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Sample records for electron-neutrino scattering neutrino

  1. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, J.

    2015-12-31

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter for electron neutrino appearance oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically begin with the muon neutrino cross section and apply theoretical corrections to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section. However, at present no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments exists. We present the cross sections for a CCQE-like process determined using the MINERvA detector, which are the first measurements of any exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^{2}$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^{2}$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between these measurements and the predictions of the GENIE generator. We furthermore report on a photon-like background unpredicted by the generator which we interpret as neutral-coherent diffractive scattering from hydrogen.

  2. Measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon at $$\\langle E_{\

    DOE PAGES

    Wolcott, J.

    2016-02-25

    The first direct measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region of incident neutrino energy has been carried out using the MINERvA detector in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The flux-integrated differential cross sections in the electron production angle, electron energy, and Q2 are presented. The ratio of the quasielastic, flux-integrated differential cross section in Q2 for νe with that of similarly selected νμ-induced events from the same exposure is used to probe assumptions that underpin conventional treatments of charged-current νe interactions used by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. Furthermore, the data are found tomore » be consistent with lepton universality and are well described by the predictions of the neutrino event generator GENIE.« less

  3. Electron-neutrino scattering off nuclei from two different theoretical perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, M.; Jachowicz, N.; Ericson, M.; Pandey, V.; Van Cuyck, T.; Van Dessel, N.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze charged-current electron-neutrino cross sections on carbon. We consider two different theoretical approaches, on one hand the continuum random phase approximation (CRPA) which allows a description of giant resonances and quasielastic excitations, on the other hand the RPA-based calculations which are able to describe multinucleon emission and coherent and incoherent pion production as well as quasielastic excitations. We compare the two approaches in the genuine quasielastic channel, and find a satisfactory agreement between them at large energies while at low energies the collective giant resonances show up only in the CRPA approach. We also compare electron-neutrino cross sections with the corresponding muon-neutrino ones in order to investigate the impact of the different charged-lepton masses. Finally, restricting to the RPA-based approach, we compare the sum of quasielastic, multinucleon emission, coherent, and incoherent one-pion production cross sections (folded with the electron-neutrino T2K flux) with the charged-current inclusive electron-neutrino differential cross sections on carbon measured by T2K. We find a good agreement with the data. The multinucleon component is needed in order to reproduce the T2K electron-neutrino inclusive cross sections.

  4. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2015-10-28

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter to appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically work from the muon neutrino cross section and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section, but to date there has been no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments. We present the first measurement of an exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions, namely, the cross section for a CCQE-like process, made using the MINERvA detector. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^2$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^2$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between this measurement and the predictions of the GENIE generator.

  5. Measurement of Electron Neutrino Quasielastic and Quasielasticlike Scattering on Hydrocarbon at ⟨Eν⟩=3.6 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Muhlbeier, T.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Salazar, G.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zegarra, A.; Zhang, D.; Ziemer, B. P.; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    The first direct measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region of incident neutrino energy has been carried out using the MINERvA detector in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The flux-integrated differential cross sections in the electron production angle, electron energy, and Q2 are presented. The ratio of the quasielastic, flux-integrated differential cross section in Q2 for νe with that of similarly selected νμ-induced events from the same exposure is used to probe assumptions that underpin conventional treatments of charged-current νe interactions used by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The data are found to be consistent with lepton universality and are well described by the predictions of the neutrino event generator GENIE.

  6. Measurement of Electron Neutrino Quasielastic and Quasielasticlike Scattering on Hydrocarbon at ⟨E_{ν}⟩=3.6  GeV.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, J; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bellantoni, L; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Ghosh, A; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Muhlbeier, T; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Osta, J; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Salazar, G; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Solano Salinas, C J; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zegarra, A; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2016-02-26

    The first direct measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region of incident neutrino energy has been carried out using the MINERvA detector in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The flux-integrated differential cross sections in the electron production angle, electron energy, and Q^{2} are presented. The ratio of the quasielastic, flux-integrated differential cross section in Q^{2} for ν_{e} with that of similarly selected ν_{μ}-induced events from the same exposure is used to probe assumptions that underpin conventional treatments of charged-current ν_{e} interactions used by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The data are found to be consistent with lepton universality and are well described by the predictions of the neutrino event generator GENIE.

  7. Measurement of Electron Neutrino Quasielastic and Quasielasticlike Scattering on Hydrocarbon at ⟨E_{ν}⟩=3.6  GeV.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, J; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bellantoni, L; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Ghosh, A; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Muhlbeier, T; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Osta, J; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Salazar, G; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Solano Salinas, C J; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zegarra, A; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2016-02-26

    The first direct measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region of incident neutrino energy has been carried out using the MINERvA detector in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The flux-integrated differential cross sections in the electron production angle, electron energy, and Q^{2} are presented. The ratio of the quasielastic, flux-integrated differential cross section in Q^{2} for ν_{e} with that of similarly selected ν_{μ}-induced events from the same exposure is used to probe assumptions that underpin conventional treatments of charged-current ν_{e} interactions used by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The data are found to be consistent with lepton universality and are well described by the predictions of the neutrino event generator GENIE. PMID:26967410

  8. Interaction of electron neutrino with LSD detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Semenov, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    The interaction of electron neutrino flux, originating in the rotational collapse mechanism on the first stage of Supernova burst, with the LSD detector components, such as 56Fe (a large amount of this metal is included in as shielding material) and liquid scintillator barNnH2n+2, is being investigated. Both charged and neutral channels of neutrino reaction with 12barN and 56Fe are considered. Experimental data, giving the possibility to extract information for nuclear matrix elements calculation are used. The number of signals, produced in LSD by the neutrino pulse of Supernova 1987A is determined. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Reines-Cowan team discovery of the electron neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Herald W.

    2011-12-01

    Personal perspective and recollections by the author discuss the Reines-Cowan team discovery of the electron neutrino at a Savannah River reactor in 1956. First presented at the Neutrino Santa Fe 2006 Conference.

  10. Observation of electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Adam, J; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S W; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bertram, I; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F D M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Floetotto, L; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Gaudin, A; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kumaratunga, S; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Lamont, I; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lee, K P; Licciardi, C; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Macaire, M; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Marzec, J; Mathie, E L; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Monfregola, L; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nagasaki, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakai, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Naples, D; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Pearce, G F; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L J; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Retiere, F; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smith, R J; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Szeglowski, T; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Ueno, K; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Zmuda, J

    2014-02-14

    The T2K experiment has observed electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam produced 295 km from the Super-Kamiokande detector with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV. A total of 28 electron neutrino events were detected with an energy distribution consistent with an appearance signal, corresponding to a significance of 7.3σ when compared to 4.92±0.55 expected background events. In the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing model, the electron neutrino appearance signal depends on several parameters including three mixing angles θ12, θ23, θ13, a mass difference Δm(32)(2) and a CP violating phase δ(CP). In this neutrino oscillation scenario, assuming |Δm(32)(2)|=2.4×10(-3)  eV(2), sin(2)θ(23)=0.5, and Δm322>0 (Δm(32)(2)<0), a best-fit value of sin(2)2θ(13)=0.140(-0.032)(+0.038) (0.170(-0.037)(+0.045)) is obtained at δ(CP)=0. When combining the result with the current best knowledge of oscillation parameters including the world average value of θ(13) from reactor experiments, some values of δ(CP) are disfavored at the 90% C.L. PMID:24580687

  11. Observation of electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Adam, J; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S W; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bertram, I; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F D M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Floetotto, L; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Gaudin, A; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kumaratunga, S; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Lamont, I; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lee, K P; Licciardi, C; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Macaire, M; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Marzec, J; Mathie, E L; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Monfregola, L; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nagasaki, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakai, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Naples, D; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Pearce, G F; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L J; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Retiere, F; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smith, R J; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Szeglowski, T; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Ueno, K; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Zmuda, J

    2014-02-14

    The T2K experiment has observed electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam produced 295 km from the Super-Kamiokande detector with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV. A total of 28 electron neutrino events were detected with an energy distribution consistent with an appearance signal, corresponding to a significance of 7.3σ when compared to 4.92±0.55 expected background events. In the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing model, the electron neutrino appearance signal depends on several parameters including three mixing angles θ12, θ23, θ13, a mass difference Δm(32)(2) and a CP violating phase δ(CP). In this neutrino oscillation scenario, assuming |Δm(32)(2)|=2.4×10(-3)  eV(2), sin(2)θ(23)=0.5, and Δm322>0 (Δm(32)(2)<0), a best-fit value of sin(2)2θ(13)=0.140(-0.032)(+0.038) (0.170(-0.037)(+0.045)) is obtained at δ(CP)=0. When combining the result with the current best knowledge of oscillation parameters including the world average value of θ(13) from reactor experiments, some values of δ(CP) are disfavored at the 90% C.L.

  12. Observation of Electron Neutrino Appearance in a Muon Neutrino Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Floetotto, L.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Gaudin, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Lamont, I.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Licciardi, C.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Naples, D.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Pearce, G. F.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L. J.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    The T2K experiment has observed electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam produced 295 km from the Super-Kamiokande detector with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV. A total of 28 electron neutrino events were detected with an energy distribution consistent with an appearance signal, corresponding to a significance of 7.3σ when compared to 4.92±0.55 expected background events. In the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing model, the electron neutrino appearance signal depends on several parameters including three mixing angles θ12, θ23, θ13, a mass difference Δm322 and a CP violating phase δCP. In this neutrino oscillation scenario, assuming |Δm322|=2.4×10-3 eV2, sin2θ23=0.5, and Δm322>0 (Δm322<0), a best-fit value of sin22θ13=0.140-0.032+0.038 (0.170-0.037+0.045) is obtained at δCP=0. When combining the result with the current best knowledge of oscillation parameters including the world average value of θ13 from reactor experiments, some values of δCP are disfavored at the 90% C.L.

  13. Evidence of electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abgrall, N.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Albert, J. B.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Beznosko, D.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Boyd, S.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Brook-Roberge, D. G.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Curioni, A.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dobson, J.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziomba, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Frank, E.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A.; Galymov, V.; Gaudin, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Jung, C. K.; Kaboth, A.; Kaji, H.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khanam, F.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, J.; Kim, S. B.; Kirby, B.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Kogan, G.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kowalik, K.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Laing, A.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Licciardi, C.; Lim, I. T.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, G. D.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marchionni, A.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Masliah, P.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; McLachlan, T.; Messina, M.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Naples, D.; Nicholls, T. C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Obayashi, Y.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Otani, M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Pac, M. Y.; Palladino, V.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Pearce, G. F.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Scully, D. I.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Szeptycka, M.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, I. J.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Zalewska, A.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.

    2013-08-01

    The T2K Collaboration reports evidence for electron neutrino appearance at the atmospheric mass splitting, |Δm322|≈2.4×10-3eV2. An excess of electron neutrino interactions over background is observed from a muon neutrino beam with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV at the Super-Kamiokande (SK) detector 295 km from the beam’s origin. Signal and background predictions are constrained by data from near detectors located 280 m from the neutrino production target. We observe 11 electron neutrino candidate events at the SK detector when a background of 3.3±0.4(syst) events is expected. The background-only hypothesis is rejected with a p value of 0.0009 (3.1σ), and a fit assuming νμ→νe oscillations with sin⁡22θ23=1, δCP=0 and |Δm322|=2.4×10-3eV2 yields sin⁡22θ13=0.088-0.039+0.049(stat+syst).

  14. Experimental bound on the charge radius of the electron neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.; Hausamann, R.; Lee, W.P.; Lu, X.; Mahler, H.J.; Potter, M.E.; Wang, K.C. ); Bowles, T.J.; Burman, R.L.; Carlini, R.D.; Cochran, D.R.F.; Frank, J.S.; Piasetzky, E.; Sandberg, V.D. ); Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L. )

    1991-01-01

    A limit on the electron-neutrino charge radius {vert bar}{ital r}{vert bar} is derived from a measurement of the weak-neutral-current vector coupling constant {ital g}{sub {ital V}} obtained in electron-neutrino electron elastic scattering. The 90%-confidence interval for {ital g}{sub {ital V}} is {minus}0.177{lt}{ital g}{sub {ital V}}{lt}0.187, which for sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub {ital W}}=0.227 implies that the {nu}{sub {ital e}} mean-square charge radius is in the range {minus}2.74{times}10{sup {minus}32}{lt}{l angle}{ital r}{sup 2}{r angle}{lt}4.88{times}10{sup {minus}32} cm{sup 2}, or simply {vert bar}{ital r}{vert bar}{lt}2.2{times}10{sup {minus}16} cm. This is the first experimental bound on the {nu}{sub {ital e}} charge radius, and is the same order of magnitude as bounds for {nu}{sub {mu}} structure.

  15. Next discoveries in neutrino mixing: Electron neutrino appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duyang, Hongyue

    The discovery of neutrino oscillation is a clear evidence of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Measurements of electron neutrino (nu e) and electron anti-neutrino (nu e) appearances are the most important channels to complete the neutrino mixing matrix. In a nue/ nue appearance experiment, a near detector (ND) is used to constrain the neutrino flux and measure the backgrounds to the signal. Backgrounds to the nue appearance comes from Neutral Current Muon Neutrino Interactions (numu-NC), Charged Current Muon Neutrino Interactions (numu-CC), beam nu e events and outside backgrounds. The background components are then extrapolated to the far detector (FD). By looking for excess of signal nu e/nue-like events in FD, we measure the neutrino mixing angle, neutrino's mass hierarchy and the elusive CP-violation in the lepton sector. This dissertation focuses on the signals and backgrounds in nu e/nue appearance measurements. The first part of the dissertation presents an analysis of nue appearance in a large Water Cherenkov detector such as the one proposed by the LBNE collaboration. The analysis, including scanning thousands of events, aims to distinguish nu e signals from the NC backgrounds. The second part of the dissertation presents measurements of Resonance Neutrino Interactions using the NOMAD data. This process plays a critical role in not only neutrino-nuclear cross section but also in the precision analysis of the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments such as NOnuA and LBNE. The last part of the dissertation discusses the method of using low-nu fit method to measure relative neutrino flux and constrain beam nue background.

  16. Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillation in NOnuA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Kanika

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment optimized for electron neutrino (nue) appearance in the NuMI beam, a muon neutrino (numu) source at Fermilab. It consists of two functionally identical, nearly fully-active liquid-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector (ND) at Fermilab is used to study the neutrino beam spectrum and composition before oscillation, and measure background rate to the nu e appearance search. The far detector, 810 km away in Northern Minnesota, observes the oscillated beam and is used to extract oscillation parameters from the data. NOnuA's long baseline, combined with the ability of the NuMI beam to operate in the anti-neutrino mode, makes NOnuA sensitive to the last unmeasured parameters in neutrino oscillations- mass hierarchy, CP violation and the octant of mixing angle theta23. This thesis presents the search for nue appearance in the first data collected by the NOnuA detectors from October 2013 till May 2015. Studies of the NuMI neutrino data collected in the NOnuA near detector are also presented, which show large discrepancies between the ND simulation and data. Muon-removed electron (MRE) events, constructed by replacing the muon in numu charged current interactions by a simulated electron, are used to correct the far detector nue appearance prediction for these discrepancies. In the analysis of the first data, a total of 6 nue candidate events are observed in the far detector on a background of 1, a 3.46 sigma excess, which is interpreted as strong evidence for nue appearance. The results are consistent with our expectation, based on constraints from other neutrino oscillation experiments. The result presented here differs from the officially published nu e appearance result from the NOnuA experiment where the systematic error is assumed to cover the MRE correction.

  17. Measurement of the Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Cross-Section for Electron Neutrinos on a Hydrocarbon Target

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments, which observe the transition from muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos, promise to help answer some of the fundamental questions surrounding physics in the post-Standard-Model era. Because they wish to observe the interactions of electron neutrinos in their detectors, and because the power of current results is typically limited by their systematic uncertainties, these experiments require precise estimates of the cross-section for electron neutrino interactions. Of particular interest is the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) process, which gures signi cantly in the composition of the reactions observed at the far detector. However, no experimental measurements of this crosssection currently exist for electron neutrinos; instead, current experiments typically work from the abundance of muon neutrino CCQE cross-section data and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for electron neutrinos. Veri cation of these predictions is challenging due to the di culty of constructing an electron neutrino beam, but the advent of modern high-intensity muon neutrino beams|together with the percent-level electron neutrino impurity inherent in these beams| nally presents the opportunity to make such a measurement. We report herein the rst-ever measurement of a cross-section for an exclusive state in electron neutrino scattering, which was made using the MINER A detector in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We present the electron neutrino CCQE di erential cross-sections, which are averaged over neutrinos of energies 1-10 GeV (with mean energy of about 3 GeV), in terms of various kinematic variables: nal-state electron angle, nal-state electron energy, and the square of the fourmomentum transferred to the nucleus by the neutrino , Q2. We also provide a total cross-section vs. neutrino energy. While our measurement of this process is found to be in agreement with the predictions of the GENIE

  18. Search for Electron Neutrino Appearance in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Orchanian, Mhair; /Caltech

    2011-09-01

    The MINOS Collaboration continues its search for {nu}{sub e} appearance in the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) beam at Fermilab. Neutrinos in the beam interact in the Near Detector, located 1 km from the beam source, allowing us to characterize the backgrounds present in our analysis. In particular, we can estimate the number of {nu}{sub e} candidate events we expect to see in the Far Detector (735 km away, in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota) in the presence or absence of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillation. Recent efforts to improve the sensitivity of the analysis, including upgrades to the event identification algorithm and fitting procedure, are discussed, and the latest results from the search are presented.

  19. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Orchanian, Mhair-armen Hagop

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes a search for ve appearance in the two-detector long-baseline MINOS neutrino experiment at Fermilab, based on a data set representing an exposure of 8.2×1020 protons on the NuMI target. The analysis detailed herein represents an increase in sensitivity to the θ13 mixing angle of approximately 25% over previous analyses, due to improvements in the event discriminant and fitting technique. Based on our observation, we constrain the value of θ13 further, finding 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13< 0.12(0.20) at the 90% confidence level for δCP = 0 and the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy. The best-fit value is 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13 = 0.041+0.047 -0.031(0.079+0.071 -0.053) under the same assumptions. We exclude the θ 13 = 0 hypothesis at the 89% confidence level.

  20. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Holin, Anna Maria

    2010-02-01

    The MINOS experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment which sends a high intensity muon neutrino beam through two functionally identical detectors, a Near detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, 1km from the beam source, and a Far detector, 734km away, in the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. MINOS may be able to measure the neutrino mixing angle parameter sin213 for the rst time. Detector granularity, however, makes it very hard to distinguish any e appearance signal events characteristic of a non-zero value of θ 13 from background neutral current (NC) and short-track vμ charged current (CC) events. Also, uncertainties in the hadronic shower modeling in the kinematic region characteristic of this analysis are relatively large. A new data-driven background decomposition method designed to address those issues is developed and its results presented. By removing the long muon tracks from vμ-CC events, the Muon Removed Charge Current (MRCC) method creates independent pseudo-NC samples that can be used to correct the MINOS Monte Carlo to agree with the high-statistics Near detector data and to decompose the latter into components so as to predict the expected Far detector background. The MRCC method also provides an important cross-check in the Far detector to test the background in the signal selected region. MINOS finds a 1.0-1.5 σ ve-CC excess above background in the Far detector data, depending on method used, for a total exposure of 3.14 x 1020 protons-on-target. Interpreting this excess as signal, MINOS can set limits on sin213. Using the MRCC method, MINOS sets a limit of sin2 2 θ 13 < 0.265 at the 90% confidence limit for a CP-violating phase δ = 0.

  1. New results for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Justin; Whitehead, Lisa; /Brookhaven

    2010-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment situated along Fermilab's high-intensity NuMI neutrino beam. MINOS has completed an updated search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino transitions, observation of which would indicate a non-zero value for the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. The present 7 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target data set represents more than double the exposure used in the previous analysis. The new result and its implications are presented.

  2. Detecting electron neutrinos from solar dark matter annihilation by JUNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wan-Lei

    2016-01-01

    We explore the electron neutrino signals from light dark matter (DM) annihilation in the Sun for the large liquid scintillator detector JUNO. In terms of the spectrum features of three typical DM annihilation channels χχ → νbar nu, τ+τ-, bbar b, we take two sets of selection conditions to calculate the expected signals and atmospheric neutrino backgrounds based on the Monte Carlo simulation data. Then the JUNO sensitivities to the spin independent DM-nucleon and spin dependent DM-proton cross sections are presented. It is found that the JUNO projected sensitivities are much better than the current spin dependent direct detection experimental limits for the νbar nu and τ+τ- channels. In the spin independent case, the JUNO will give the better sensitivity to the DM-nucleon cross section than the LUX and CDMSlite limits for the νbar nu channel with the DM mass lighter than 6.5 GeV . If the νbar nu or τ+τ- channel is dominant, the future JUNO results are very helpful for us to understand the tension between the DAMA annual modulation signal and other direct detection exclusions.

  3. Detecting electron neutrinos from solar dark matter annihilation by JUNO

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wan-Lei

    2016-01-01

    We explore the electron neutrino signals from light dark matter (DM) annihilation in the Sun for the large liquid scintillator detector JUNO. In terms of the spectrum features of three typical DM annihilation channels χχ → νν-bar , τ{sup +}τ{sup −}, b b-bar , we take two sets of selection conditions to calculate the expected signals and atmospheric neutrino backgrounds based on the Monte Carlo simulation data. Then the JUNO sensitivities to the spin independent DM-nucleon and spin dependent DM-proton cross sections are presented. It is found that the JUNO projected sensitivities are much better than the current spin dependent direct detection experimental limits for the νν-bar and τ{sup +}τ{sup −} channels. In the spin independent case, the JUNO will give the better sensitivity to the DM-nucleon cross section than the LUX and CDMSlite limits for the νν-bar channel with the DM mass lighter than 6.5 GeV . If the νν-bar or τ{sup +}τ{sup −} channel is dominant, the future JUNO results are very helpful for us to understand the tension between the DAMA annual modulation signal and other direct detection exclusions.

  4. Measurement of the intrinsic electron neutrino component in the T2K neutrino beam with the ND280 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Floetotto, L.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iwai, E.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Naples, D.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    The T2K experiment has reported the first observation of the appearance of electron neutrinos in a muon neutrino beam. The main and irreducible background to the appearance signal comes from the presence in the neutrino beam of a small intrinsic component of electron neutrinos originating from muon and kaon decays. In T2K, this component is expected to represent 1.2% of the total neutrino flux. A measurement of this component using the near detector (ND280), located 280 m from the target, is presented. The charged current interactions of electron neutrinos are selected by combining the particle identification capabilities of both the time projection chambers and electromagnetic calorimeters of ND280. The measured ratio between the observed electron neutrino beam component and the prediction is 1.01±0.10 providing a direct confirmation of the neutrino fluxes and neutrino cross section modeling used for T2K neutrino oscillation analyses. Electron neutrinos coming from muons and kaons decay are also separately measured, resulting in a ratio with respect to the prediction of 0.68±0.30 and 1.10±0.14, respectively.

  5. Observing Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the NOνA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations offers an insight on new physics beyond the Standard Model. The three mixing angles (θ12, θ13 and θ23) and the two mass splittings (Δm2 and Αm2 ) have been measured by different neutrino oscillation experiments. Some other parameters including the mass ordering of different neutrino mass eigenstates and the CP violation phase are still unknown. NOνA is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment, using neutrinos from the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The experiment is equipped with two functionally identical detectors about 810 kilometers apart and 14 mrad off the beam axis. In this configuration, the muon neutrinos from the NuMI beam reach the disappearance maximum in the far detector and a small fraction of that oscillates into electron neutrinos. The sensitivity to the mass ordering and CP viola- tion phase determination is greately enhanced. This thesis presents the νeappearance analysis using the neutrino data collected with the NOνA experiment between February 2014 and May 2015, which corresponds to 3.45 ×1020 protons-on-target (POT). The νe appearance analysis is performed by comparing the observed νe CC-like events to the estimated background at the far detector. The total background is predicted to be 0.95 events with 0.89 originated from beam events and 0.06 from cosmic ray events. The beam background is obtained by extrapolating near detector data through different oscillation channels, while the cosmic ray background is calculated based on out-of-time NuMI trigger data. A total of 6 electron neutrino candidates are observed in the end at the far detector which represents 3.3 σ excess over the predicted background. The NOνA result disfavors inverted mass hierarchy for δcp ϵ [0, 0.6π] at 90% C.L.

  6. Evidence for electron neutrino flavor change through measurement of the (8)B solar neutrino flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Mark Stephen

    2001-11-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water Cerenkov detector designed to study solar neutrinos. Using 1 kiloton of heavy water as the target and detection medium, SNO is able to separately determine the flux of electron neutrinos (νe) and the flux of all active neutrinos from the Sun by measuring the rate of charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) interactions with deuterons. A comparison of these interaction rates allows for direct observation of solar neutrino oscillations. SNO can also search for oscillations by comparing the rate of CC and neutrino- electron elastic scattering (ES) events, since ES has both charged current and neutral current sensitivity. In this thesis, we present measurement of the 8B solar ν e flux of 1.78+0.13-0.14 (stat+syst) × 106cm-2s -1 (35% BP2000 SSM) through measurement of the CC rate over 169.3 days of livetime. We have also measured the 8B flux from the ES reaction to be 2.56+0.48-0.45 (stat+syst), consistent with measurements by previous water Cerenkov experiments. A flavor analysis comparing the CC measured flux with that determined through ES by SuperKamiokande yields a non- νe active neutrino flux from 8B of 3.62+1.06-1.08 × 106cm-2s-1 , providing evidence for νe --> ν μ,τ oscillations as a solution to the solar neutrino problem. This result excludes pure solar νe --> ν s oscillations at greater than the 99.7% C.I. The total active 8B neutrino flux has been measured to be 5.39+1.07-1.09 × 106cm-2s-1 , consistent with BP2000 SSM predictions. First analyses of the CC (NHit) spectrum and hep flux in SNO are presented. The CC spectrum is found to be a good fit to expectations from an undistorted 8B spectrum, and global best fit vacuum oscillation solutions are disfavored over the other solutions by the data. Through observations near the 8B endpoint with consideration of energy systematics, hep flux limits of 4.1 (90% C.I.) and 6.9 (99% C.I.) times SSM expectations are obtained. A statistical fit for the

  7. A search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoa Ricoux, Juan Pedro

    2009-01-01

    We perform a search for vμ → ve oscillations, a process which would manifest a nonzero value of the θ13 mixing angle, in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The analysis consists of searching for an excess of ve charged-current candidate events over the predicted backgrounds, made mostly of neutral-current events with high electromagnetic content. A novel technique to select electron neutrino events is developed, which achieves an improved separation between the signal and the backgrounds, and which consequently yields a better reach in θ13. The backgrounds are predicted in the Far Detector from Near Detector measurements. An excess is observed in the Far Detector data over the predicted backgrounds, which is consistent with the background-only hypothesis at 1.2 standard deviations.

  8. Measuring $\\theta_{13}$ via Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Ruth B.

    2011-01-01

    One of the primary goals in neutrino physics at the present moment is to make a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameter $\\theta_{13}$. This parameter, in addition to being unknown, could potentially allow for the introduction of CP violation into the lepton sector. The MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment has the ability to make a measurement of this parameter, by looking for the oscillation of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos between a Near and Far Detector over a distance of 735 km. This thesis discusses the development of an analysis framework to search for this oscillation mode. Two major improvements to pre-existing analysis techniques have been implemented by the author. First, a novel particle ID technique based on strip topology, known as the Library Event Matching (LEM) method, is optimized for use in MINOS. Second, a multiple bin likelihood method is developed to fit the data. These two improvements, when combined, increase MINOS' sensitivity to $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})$ by 27\\% over previous analyses. This thesis sees a small excess over background in the Far Detector. A Frequentist interpretation of the data rules out $\\theta_{13}=0$ at 91\\%. A Bayesian interpretation of the data is also presented, placing the most stringent upper boundary on the oscillation parameter to date, at $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})<0.09(0.015)$ for the Normal (Inverted) Hierarchy and $\\delta_{CP}=0$.

  9. A study of muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tingjun

    2009-03-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillations (neutrino changing from one flavor to another) has provided compelling evidence that the neutrinos have non-zero masses and that leptons mix, which is not part of the original Standard Model of particle physics. The theoretical framework that describes neutrino oscillation involves two mass scales (Δmatm2 and Δmsol2), three mixing angles (θ12, θ23, and θ13) and one CP violating phase (δCP). Both mass scales and two of the mixing angles (θ12 and θ23) have been measured by many neutrino experiments. The mixing angle θ13, which is believed to be very small, remains unknown. The current best limit on θ13 comes from the CHOOZ experiment: θ13 < 11° at 90% C.L. at the atmospheric mass scale. δCP is also unknown today. MINOS, the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long baseline neutrino experiment based at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment uses a muon neutrino beam, which is measured 1 km downstream from its origin in the Near Detector at Fermilab and then 735 km later in the Far Detector at the Soudan mine. By comparing these two measurements, MINOS can obtain parameters in the atmospheric sector of neutrino oscillations. MINOS has published results on the precise measurement of Δmatm2 and θ23 through the disappearance of muon neutrinos in the Far Detector and on a search for sterile neutrinos by looking for a deficit in the number of neutral current interactions seen in the Far Detector. MINOS also has the potential to improve the limit on the neutrino mixing angle θ13 or make the first measurement of its value by searching for an electron neutrino appearance signal in the Far Detector. This is the focus of the study presented in this thesis. We developed a neural network based algorithm to

  10. Atmospheric electron neutrinos in the MINOS far detector

    SciTech Connect

    Speakman, Benjamin Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Neutrinos produced as a result of cosmic-ray interactions in the earth's atmosphere offer a powerful probe into the nature of this three-membered family of low-mass, weakly-interacting particles. Ten years ago, the Super-Kamiokande Experiment has confirmed earlier indications that neutrinos undergo lepton-flavor oscillations during propagation, proving that they are massive contrary to the previous Standard Model assumptions. The Soudan Underground Laboratory, located in northern Minnesota, was host to the Soudan2 Experiment, which has made important contributions to atmospheric neutrino research. This same lab has more recently been host to the MINOS far detector, a neutrino detector which serves as the downstream element of an accelerator-based long-baseline neutrino-oscillation experiment. This thesis has examined 418.5 live days of atmospheric neutrino data (fiducial exposure of 4.18 kton-years) collected in the MINOS far detector prior to the activation of the NuMI neutrino beam, with a specific emphasis on the investigation of electron-type neutrino interactions. Atmospheric neutrino interaction candidates have been selected and separated into showering or track-like events. The showering sample consists of 89 observed events, while the track-like sample consists of 112 observed events. Based on the Bartol atmospheric neutrino flux model of Barr et al. plus a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of interactions in the MINOS detector, the expected yields of showering and track-like events in the absence of neutrino oscillations are 88.0 ± 1.0 and 149.1 ± 1.0 respectively (where the uncertainties reflect only the limited MC statistics). Major systematic uncertainties, especially those associated with the flux model, are cancelled by forming a double ratio of these observed and expected yields: R$data\\atop{trk/shw}$/R$MC\\atop{trk/shw}$ = 0.74$+0.12\\atop{-1.0}$(stat.) ± 0.04 (syst.) This double ratio should be equal to unity in the absence of oscillations, and the

  11. Measurement of electron neutrino appearance with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Joshua Adam Alpern

    2009-05-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. By measuring the neutrino interactions in a detector near the neutrino source and again 735 km away from the production site, it is possible to probe the parameters governing neutrino oscillation. The majority of the vμ oscillate to vτ but a small fraction may oscillate instead to ve. This thesis presents a measurement of the ve appearance rate in the MINOS far detector using the first two years of exposure. Methods for constraining the far detector backgrounds using the near detector measurements is discussed and a technique for estimating the uncertainty on the background and signal selection are developed. A 1.6σ excess over the expected background rate is found providing a hint of ve appearance.

  12. Electron Neutrino and Antineutrino Appearance in the MINOS Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Schreckenberger, Adam Paul

    2013-04-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline neutrino experiment that utilizes a particle beam and two steel-scintillator calorimeters designed to determine the parameters associated with muon neutrino disappearance. Analysis methods developed by the MINOS νe group have facilitated the placement of limits upon the mixing angle associated with νμ → νe oscillations. Since the polarity of the focusing horns can be switched, we can perform a similar analysis with an antineutrino-enriched beam to select electron antineutrino appearance candidates. Using 3.34e20 POT (protons on target) in the antineutrino mode, we exclude θ13 = 0 at the 80% C.L. A joint fit of the 3.34e20 POT antineutrino and 10.6e20 POT neutrino samples excluded θ13 = 0 at the 96% C.L. In addition, the combined data were used to produce exclusions regarding the CP-violating phase.

  13. Short-baseline electron neutrino oscillation length after the Troitsk experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunti, C.; Laveder, M.; Li, Y. F.; Long, H. W.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the implications for short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance in the 3+1 mixing scheme of the recent Troitsk bounds on the mixing of a neutrino with mass between 2 and 100 eV. Considering the Troitsk data in combination with the results of short-baseline νe and ν¯e disappearance experiments, which include the reactor and Gallium anomalies, we derive a 2σ allowed range for the effective neutrino squared-mass difference between 0.85 and 43eV2. The upper bound implies that it is likely that oscillations in distance and/or energy can be observed in radioactive source experiments. It is also favorable for the ICARUS@CERN experiment, in which it is likely that oscillations are not washed out in the near detector. We discuss also the implications for neutrinoless double-β decay.

  14. Observation of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the NuMI Beam with the NOvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Niner, Evan David

    2015-01-01

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment that uses two functionally identical detectors separated by 810 kilometers at locations 14 milliradians off-axis from the NuMI muon neutrino beam at Fermilab. At these locations the beam energy peaks at 2 GeV. This baseline is the longest in the world for an accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment, which enhances the sensitivity to the neutrino mass ordering. The experiment studies oscillations of the muon neutrino and anti-neutrino beam that is produced. Both detectors completed commissioning in the summer of 2014 and continue to collect data. One of the primary physics goals of the experiment is the measurement of electron neutrino appearance in the muon neutrino beam which yields measurements of the oscillation parameters sin213, δ , and the neutrino mass ordering within the standard model of neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents the analysis of data collected between February 2014 and May 2015, corresponding to 3.52 X 1020 protons-on-target. In this first analysis NOvA recorded 6 electron neutrino candidates, which is a 3.3σ observation of electron neutrino appearance. The T2K experiment performs the same measurement on a baseline of 295 kilometers and has a 1 σ preference for the normal mass ordering over the inverted ordering over the phase space of the CP violating parameter δ, which is also weakly seen in the NOvA result. By the summer of 2016 NOvA will triple its statistics due to increased beam power and a completed detector. If electron neutrinos continue to be observed at the current rate NOvA will be able to establish a mass ordering preference at a similar confidence level to T2K.

  15. New Prospects for Real-Time Spectroscopy of Low Energy Electron Neutrinos from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, R. S.

    1997-05-01

    Flavor-specific real-time spectroscopy of solar electron neutrinos \\(νe\\) from the p+p, 7Be+e-, and CNO reactions in the Sun may become practical for the first time via a newly discovered class of νe reactions. Highly specific signatures of νe capture by the targets 176Yb, 160Gd, or 82Se can discriminate against a background ~107 times larger than the νe signals. A high-quality liquid scintillator containing up to ~15 wt % Yb has been developed for observing these νe reactions. Experiments based on the new approach can, in principle, resolve basic puzzles set by current solar neutrino results and the underlying question of νe-flavor conversion.

  16. A combined muon-neutrino and electron-neutrino oscillation search at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, Jocelyn Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    MiniBooNE seeks to corroborate or refute the unconfirmed oscillation result from the LSND experiment. If correct, the result implies that a new kind of massive neutrino, with no weak interactions, participates in neutrino oscillations. MiniBooNE searches for vμ → ve oscillations with the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 8 GeV beam line, which produces a vμ beam with an average energy of ~ 0.8 GeV and an intrinsic ve content of 0.4%. The neutrino detector is a 6.1 m radius sphere filled with CH2, viewed by 1540 photo-multiplier tubes, and located 541 m downstream from the source. This work focuses on the estimation of systematic errors associated with the neutrino flux and neutrino interaction cross section predictions, and in particular, on constraining these uncertainties using in-situ MiniBooNE vμ charged current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering data. A data set with ~ 100,000 events is identified, with 91% CCQE purity. This data set is used to measure several parameters of the CCQE cross section: the axial mass, the Fermi momentum, the binding energy, and the functional dependence of the axial form factor on four-momentum transfer squared. Constraints on the vμ and ve fluxes are derived using the vμ CCQE data set. A Monte Carlo study of a combined vμ disappearance and ve appearance oscillation fit is presented, which improves the vμ → ve oscillation sensitivity of MiniBooNE with respect to a ve appearance-only fit by 1.2-1.5σ, depending on the value of Δm2.

  17. Measurement of the inclusive electron neutrino charged current cross section on carbon with the T2K near detector.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Adam, J; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2014-12-12

    The T2K off-axis near detector ND280 is used to make the first differential cross-section measurements of electron neutrino charged current interactions at energies ∼1  GeV as a function of electron momentum, electron scattering angle, and four-momentum transfer of the interaction. The total flux-averaged ν(e) charged current cross section on carbon is measured to be ⟨σ⟩(ϕ)=1.11±0.10(stat)±0.18(syst)×10⁻³⁸ cm²/nucleon. The differential and total cross-section measurements agree with the predictions of two leading neutrino interaction generators, NEUT and GENIE. The NEUT prediction is 1.23×10⁻³⁸ cm²/nucleon and the GENIE prediction is 1.08×10⁻³⁸ cm²/nucleon. The total ν(e) charged current cross-section result is also in agreement with data from the Gargamelle experiment. PMID:25541766

  18. Experimental evidence of electron neutrino oscillations and validation of MSW-LMA model with Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzini, M. Buizza

    2011-04-01

    We report the real time measurements of 7Be and 8B solar neutrino fluxes performed with the Borexino experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The achievement of these measurements was possible thanks to the excellent levels of the radiopurity reached. The measurement of the 7Be in real time is the first direct measurements of the survival probability for solar electron neutrinos in the vacuum region. For 8B we reached a threshold energy of 3MeV which is the lowest achieved so far in real time. For the first time, the same apparatus can measure two different oscillation regions (vacuum-driven and matter-enhanced) predicted by the MSW-LMA model. Borexino also quotes the ratio between the survival probabilities, corresponding to 1.93 ± 0.75, and validates the presence of the transition region between the two oscillation regimes, according to the MSW-LMA solution.In addition, a preliminary result on the Day-Night Asymmetry (ADN) for the 7Be neutrino flux is presented and corresponds to 0.007 ± 0.073. This measurement makes Borexino able to give once more an independent confirmation of the MSW-LMA solution.

  19. Improved search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in MINOS

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.

    2011-10-27

    The authors report the results of a search for νe appearance in νμ beam in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino experiment. With an improved analysis and an increased exposure of 8.2 x 1020 protons on the NuMI target at Fermilab, they find that 2 sin2 (θ23 sin2 (θ13) < 0.12 (0.20) at 90% confidence level for δ = 0 and the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy, with a best fit of 2 sin2θ23) sin 2 (2θ13) = 0.041-0.031 +0.047 (0.079-0.053 +0.071). The θ13= 0 hypothesis is disfavored by the MINOS data at the 89% confidence level.

  20. Improved search for Muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in MINOS.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Auty, D J; Ayres, D S; Backhouse, C; Barr, G; Betancourt, M; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Cavanaugh, S; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Danko, I Z; de Jong, J K; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Huang, X; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Lefeuvre, G; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mathis, M; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mitchell, J; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Orchanian, M; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Pearce, G F; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Qiu, X; Ratchford, J; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Shanahan, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Walding, J J; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Wojcicki, S G; Yang, T; Zwaska, R

    2011-10-28

    We report the results of a search for ν(e) appearance in a ν(μ) beam in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino experiment. With an improved analysis and an increased exposure of 8.2 × 10(20) protons on the NuMI target at Fermilab, we find that 2 sin(2) (θ(23))sin(2)(2θ(13))<0.12(0.20) at 90% confidence level for δ = 0 and the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy, with a best-fit of 2sin(2) (θ(23))sin(2)(2θ(13)) = 0.041(-0.031)(+0.047) (0.079(-0.053) (+0.071)). The θ(13) = 0 hypothesis is disfavored by the MINOS data at the 89% confidence level.

  1. Interaction of Electron Neutrinos with {sup 56}Fe in the LSD for E{sub {nu}{sub e}} {<=} 50 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gaponov, Yu.V.; Ryazhskaya, O.G.; Semenov, S.V.

    2004-11-01

    The neutrino pulses detected by the LSD (Liquid Scintillator Detector) on February 23, 1987, are analyzed on the basis of a two-stage model of supernova explosion. The number of events due to the electron-neutrino interaction with {sup 56}Fe in the LSD is calculated. The obtained number of signals is in agreement with experimental data.

  2. Improved search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.

    2011-10-27

    The authors report the results of a search for νe appearance in νμ beam in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino experiment. With an improved analysis and an increased exposure of 8.2 x 1020 protons on the NuMI target at Fermilab, they find that 2 sin223 sin213) < 0.12 (0.20) at 90% confidence level for δ = 0 and the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy, with a best fit of 2 sin2θ23) sin 2 (2θ13) = 0.041-0.031 +0.047 (0.079-0.053 +0.071). The θ13= 0 hypothesis is disfavored by the MINOS data at the 89% confidence level.

  3. New constraints on muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino transitions in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Auty, D.J.; Ayres, D.S.; Backhouse, C.; Barr, G.; Bernstein, R.H.; Betancourt, M.; Bhattarai, P.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; /Cambridge U. /Fermilab

    2010-06-01

    This letter reports results from a search for {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {mu}} transitions by the MINOS experiment based on a 7 x 1020 protons-on-target exposure. Our observation of 54 candidate e events in the Far Detector with a background of 49.1 {+-} 7.0(stat.) {+-} 2.7(syst.) events predicted by the measurements in the Near Detector requires 2 sin2(2{theta}13) sin2{theta}23 < 0.12 (0.20) at the 90% C.L. for the normal (inverted) mass hierarchy at {delta}CP = 0. The experiment sets the tightest limits to date on the value of {theta}13 for nearly all values of {delta}CP for the normal neutrino mass hierarchy and maximal sin2(2{theta}23).

  4. Indication of electron neutrino appearance from an accelerator-produced off-axis muon neutrino beam.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Abgrall, N; Ajima, Y; Aihara, H; Albert, J B; Andreopoulos, C; Andrieu, B; Aoki, S; Araoka, O; Argyriades, J; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Badertscher, A; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Bertram, I; Besnier, M; Beucher, J; Beznosko, D; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S B; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Brook-Roberge, D G; Buchanan, N; Budd, H; Calvet, D; Cartwright, S L; Carver, A; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cazes, A; Cervera, A; Chavez, C; Choi, S; Christodoulou, G; Coleman, J; Coleman, W; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Curioni, A; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davies, G S; Davis, S; Day, M; De Rosa, G; de André, J P A M; de Perio, P; Delbart, A; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Dinh Tran, P; Dobson, J; Dore, U; Drapier, O; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Dziomba, M; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Esposito, L S; Fechner, M; Ferrero, A; Finch, A J; Frank, E; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Galymov, V; Gannaway, F C; Gaudin, A; Gendotti, A; George, M A; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Golan, T; Goldhaber, M; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Grant, A; Gumplinger, P; Guzowski, P; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamano, K; Hansen, C; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Harrison, P F; Hartfiel, B; Hartz, M; Haruyama, T; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hastings, S; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hayashi, K; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Henderson, R; Higashi, N; Hignight, J; Hirose, E; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Hyndman, A; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Iida, M; Ikeda, M; Ilic, J; Imber, J; Ishida, T; Ishihara, C; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iwasaki, M; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Joo, K K; Jover-Manas, G V; Jung, C K; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Karlen, D; Kasami, K; Kato, I; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khanam, F; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kim, J; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kimura, N; Kirby, B; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Kogan, G; Koike, S; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kouzuma, Y; Kowalik, K; Kravtsov, V; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kulkarni, N; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Laveder, M; Lee, K P; Le, P T; Levy, J M; Licciardi, C; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Litchfield, R P; Litos, M; Longhin, A; Lopez, G D; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Lux, T; Macaire, M; Mahn, K; Makida, Y; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marchionni, A; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Maryon, T; Marzec, J; Masliah, P; Mathie, E L; Matsumura, C; Matsuoka, K; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; McLachlan, T; Messina, M; Metcalf, W; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A D; Mituka, G; Miura, M; Mizouchi, K; Monfregola, L; Moreau, F; Morgan, B; Moriyama, S; Muir, A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakai, T; Nakajima, K; Nakamoto, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Naples, D; Navin, M L; Nelson, B; Nicholls, T C; Nishikawa, K; Nishino, H; Nowak, J A; Noy, M; Obayashi, Y; Ogitsu, T; Ohhata, H; Okamura, T; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oser, S M; Otani, M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Ozaki, T; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Paul, P; Payne, D; Pearce, G F; Perkin, J D; Pettinacci, V; Pierre, F; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Qian, W; Raaf, J L; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Raufer, T M; Ravonel, M; Raymond, M; Retiere, F; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rondio, E; Roney, J M; Rossi, B; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sabouri, S; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sarrat, A; Sasaki, K; Scholberg, K; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Scully, D I; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Shibata, M; Shimizu, Y; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Siyad, M; Smith, R J; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Stahl, A; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Stone, J; Strabel, C; Sulak, L R; Sulej, R; Sutcliffe, P; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, Y; Szeglowski, T; Szeptycka, M; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, M M; Tanimoto, N; Tashiro, K; Taylor, I; Terashima, A; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Toki, W; Tomaru, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Ueno, K; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Walding, J J; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wanderer, P J; Wang, J; Ward, M A; Ward, G P; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; West, N; Whitehead, L H; Wikström, G; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, S; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamanoi, Y; Yamaoka, H; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2011-07-22

    The T2K experiment observes indications of ν(μ) → ν(e) appearance in data accumulated with 1.43×10(20) protons on target. Six events pass all selection criteria at the far detector. In a three-flavor neutrino oscillation scenario with |Δm(23)(2)| = 2.4×10(-3)  eV(2), sin(2)2θ(23) = 1 and sin(2)2θ(13) = 0, the expected number of such events is 1.5±0.3(syst). Under this hypothesis, the probability to observe six or more candidate events is 7×10(-3), equivalent to 2.5σ significance. At 90% C.L., the data are consistent with 0.03(0.04) < sin(2)2θ(13) < 0.28(0.34) for δ(CP) = 0 and a normal (inverted) hierarchy.

  5. Indication of Electron Neutrino Appearance from an Accelerator-Produced Off-Axis Muon Neutrino Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abgrall, N.; Ajima, Y.; Aihara, H.; Albert, J. B.; Andreopoulos, C.; Andrieu, B.; Aoki, S.; Araoka, O.; Argyriades, J.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Badertscher, A.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Bertram, I.; Besnier, M.; Beucher, J.; Beznosko, D.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. D. M. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S. B.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Brook-Roberge, D. G.; Buchanan, N.; Budd, H.; Calvet, D.; Cartwright, S. L.; Carver, A.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cazes, A.; Cervera, A.; Chavez, C.; Choi, S.; Christodoulou, G.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, W.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Curioni, A.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, S.; Day, M.; de Rosa, G.; de André, J. P. A. M.; de Perio, P.; Delbart, A.; Densham, C.; di Lodovico, F.; di Luise, S.; Dinh Tran, P.; Dobson, J.; Dore, U.; Drapier, O.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziomba, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Esposito, L. S.; Fechner, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finch, A. J.; Frank, E.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Galymov, V.; Gannaway, F. C.; Gaudin, A.; Gendotti, A.; George, M. A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Golan, T.; Goldhaber, M.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Grant, A.; Gumplinger, P.; Guzowski, P.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamano, K.; Hansen, C.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartfiel, B.; Hartz, M.; Haruyama, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hastings, S.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Hayashi, K.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Henderson, R.; Higashi, N.; Hignight, J.; Hirose, E.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Hyndman, A.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Iida, M.; Ikeda, M.; Ilic, J.; Imber, J.; Ishida, T.; Ishihara, C.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iwasaki, M.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Joo, K. K.; Jover-Manas, G. V.; Jung, C. K.; Kaji, H.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kaneyuki, K.; Karlen, D.; Kasami, K.; Kato, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khanam, F.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kim, J.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, S. B.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, B.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Kogan, G.; Koike, S.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kouzuma, Y.; Kowalik, K.; Kravtsov, V.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kulkarni, N.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Laveder, M.; Lee, K. P.; Le, P. T.; Levy, J. M.; Licciardi, C.; Lim, I. T.; Lindner, T.; Litchfield, R. P.; Litos, M.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, G. D.; Loverre, P. F.; Ludovici, L.; Lux, T.; Macaire, M.; Mahn, K.; Makida, Y.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marchionni, A.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Maryon, T.; Marzec, J.; Masliah, P.; Mathie, E. L.; Matsumura, C.; Matsuoka, K.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; McLachlan, T.; Messina, M.; Metcalf, W.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A. D.; Mituka, G.; Miura, M.; Mizouchi, K.; Monfregola, L.; Moreau, F.; Morgan, B.; Moriyama, S.; Muir, A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamoto, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Naples, D.; Navin, M. L.; Nelson, B.; Nicholls, T. C.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishino, H.; Nowak, J. A.; Noy, M.; Obayashi, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Ohhata, H.; Okamura, T.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oser, S. M.; Otani, M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Ozaki, T.; Pac, M. Y.; Palladino, V.; Paolone, V.; Paul, P.; Payne, D.; Pearce, G. F.; Perkin, J. D.; Pettinacci, V.; Pierre, F.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Qian, W.; Raaf, J. L.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Raufer, T. M.; Ravonel, M.; Raymond, M.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rondio, E.; Roney, J. M.; Rossi, B.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sabouri, S.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sarrat, A.; Sasaki, K.; Scholberg, K.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Scully, D. I.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Shibata, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Siyad, M.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Stahl, A.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Stone, J.; Strabel, C.; Sulak, L. R.; Sulej, R.; Sutcliffe, P.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Szeptycka, M.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takenaga, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, M. M.; Tanimoto, N.; Tashiro, K.; Taylor, I.; Terashima, A.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Toki, W.; Tomaru, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Walding, J. J.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wanderer, P. J.; Wang, J.; Ward, M. A.; Ward, G. P.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; West, N.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wikström, G.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, S.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamanoi, Y.; Yamaoka, H.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.

    2011-07-01

    The T2K experiment observes indications of νμ→νe appearance in data accumulated with 1.43×1020 protons on target. Six events pass all selection criteria at the far detector. In a three-flavor neutrino oscillation scenario with |Δm232|=2.4×10-3eV2, sin⁡22θ23=1 and sin⁡22θ13=0, the expected number of such events is 1.5±0.3(syst). Under this hypothesis, the probability to observe six or more candidate events is 7×10-3, equivalent to 2.5σ significance. At 90% C.L., the data are consistent with 0.03(0.04)

  6. Neutrino mass hierarchy and electron neutrino oscillation parameters with one hundred thousand reactor events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzi, F.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proposed medium-baseline reactor neutrino experiments offer unprecedented opportunities to probe, at the same time, the mass-mixing parameters which govern νe oscillations both at long wavelength (δm2 and θ12) and at short wavelength (Δm2 and θ13), as well as their tiny interference effects related to the mass hierarchy (i.e., the relative sign of Δm2 and δm2). In order to take full advantage of these opportunities, precision calculations and refined statistical analyses of event spectra are required. In such a context, we revisit several input ingredients, including nucleon recoil in inverse beta decay and its impact on energy reconstruction and resolution, hierarchy and matter effects in the oscillation probability, spread of reactor distances, irreducible backgrounds from geoneutrinos and from far reactors, and degeneracies between energy scale and spectrum shape uncertainties. We also introduce a continuous parameter α, which interpolates smoothly between normal hierarchy (α =+1) and inverted hierarchy (α =-1). The determination of the hierarchy is then transformed from a test of hypothesis to a parameter estimation, with a sensitivity given by the distance of the true case (either α=+1 or α =-1) from the "undecidable" case (α=0). Numerical experiments are performed for the specific setup envisaged for the JUNO project, assuming a realistic sample of O(105) reactor events. We find a typical sensitivity of ˜2σ to the hierarchy in JUNO, which, however, can be challenged by energy scale and spectrum shape systematics, whose possible conspiracy effects are investigated. The prospective accuracy reachable for the other mass-mixing parameters is also discussed.

  7. Coherent scattering of cosmic neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opher, R.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that cosmic neutrino scattering can be non-negligible when coherence effects previously neglected are taken into account. The coherent neutrino scattering cross section is derived and the neutrino index of refraction evaluated. As an example of coherent neutrino scattering, a detector using critical reflection is described which in principle can detect the low energy cosmic neutrino background allowed by the measured cosmological red shift.

  8. Energy Estimation for the NOvA Electron Neutrino Appearance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psihas, Fernanda

    2016-03-01

    The NOvA experiment measures long baseline νμ -->νe oscillations in Fermilab's NuMI beam. Measurement of this oscillation probability enables determination of the neutrino mass ordering and opens a window to observation of charge-parity violation in the neutrino sector. NOvA started taking data in 2014 and has already observed νe appearance at the 3.3 σ level with the first 7 % of the total projected dataset last year. Future analyses will exploit the expected energy dependence of oscillation to improve sensitivity. A new method to estimate energy for νe events and its impact on the next analysis will be discussed.

  9. A Measurement of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment After Four Years of Data

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanaugh, Steven

    2010-05-01

    This work attempts to measure or set a limit on sin2(2θ13), the parameter which describes vμ → ve oscillations. The MINOS detectors at Fermilab are used to perform a search for the oscillations utilizing a beam of vμ neutrinos created in the NuMI beamline by the collisions of 120 GeV protons with a carbon target. These collisions create π± and K± which are focused with magnetic horns, are allowed to decay, and result in a beam of vμ in the energy range of 1 to 30 GeV. Two functionally identical steel-scintillator calorimetric detectors are utilized to measure the interactions of the generated neutrinos. A detector close to the NuMI beam, located 104 m underground and 1040 m from the target, is used to measure the properties of the neutrino beam, including the flux, composition, and energy spectrum. This information is used in part to generate a predicted spectrum of neutrinos in absence of vμ → ve oscillations in the detector located far from the target, at a distance of 705 m underground and 735.5 km from the target. An excess of predicted ve charged current events in this far detector will be interpreted as vμ → ve oscillations, and a measurement of sin2(2θ13) will be made using a Feldman-Cousins analysis. The measurement of vμ → ve requires the separation of ve candidates from background events. New reconstruction software was developed with a focus on identifying ve candidate events in order to reduce systematic errors. The event parameters measured by this software were used as an input to an artificial neutral network event discriminator. The details of this reconstruction software and the other steps of the analysis necessary to making the measurement will be discussed. This work builds on a previous measurement made with this

  10. Six observations consistent with the electron neutrino being a m2 = - 0.11 ± 0.02eV2 tachyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Six observations involving cosmology, particle physics and cosmic rays are consistent with the hypothesis that the electron neutrino is a mν,e2 = - 0.11 ± 0.02eV2 tachyon. The observations consist of interpretations of published primary data and fits to those data, and in each case it is possible to compute a value for mν,e2. It is found that the six values are remarkably consistent with the above cited νe mass (χ2 = 2.73) .

  11. A Search for electron neutrino appearance at the Delta m**2 ~ 1- eV**2 scale

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; Djurcic, Z.; /Columbia U. /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The MiniBooNE Collaboration reports first results of a search for {upsilon}{sub e} appearance in a {upsilon}{sub {mu}} beam. With two largely independent analyses, we observe no significant excess of events above background for reconstructed neutrino energies above 475 MeV. The data are consistent with no oscillations within a two neutrino appearance-only oscillation model.

  12. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precise measurements of two delta m**2 in electron-neutrino and muon-neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.; Parke, Stephen J.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-09-01

    In this talk, the authors discuss the possibility of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the two effective atmospheric neutrino mass squared differences measured, respectively, in electron, and in muon neutrino disappearance oscillation experiments. if the former, is larger (smaller) than the latter, the mass hierarchy is of normal (inverted) type. They consider two very high precision (a few per mil) measurements of such mass squared differences by the phase II of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) experiment and by the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic errors of both measurements, they determine the region of sensitivities where the mass hierarchy can be distinguished. Due to the tight space limitation, they present only the general idea and show a few most important plots.

  13. Search for Electron Neutrino Appearance at the {delta}m{sup 2}{approx}1 eV{sup 2} Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Bugel, L.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Djurcic, Z.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Monroe, J.; Schmitz, D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sorel, M.; Zeller, G. P.; Bazarko, A. O.; Laird, E. M.; Meyers, P. D.; Patterson, R. B.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Tanaka, H. A.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Finley, D. A.

    2007-06-08

    The MiniBooNE Collaboration reports first results of a search for {nu}{sub e} appearance in a {nu}{sub {mu}} beam. With two largely independent analyses, we observe no significant excess of events above the background for reconstructed neutrino energies above 475 MeV. The data are consistent with no oscillations within a two-neutrino appearance-only oscillation model.

  14. A measurement of hadron production cross sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in the Δm2 about equals 1-eV2 region

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, David W.

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of hadron production cross-sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the Δm2 ~ 1 eV2} region. This dissertation presents measurements from two different high energy physics experiments with a very strong connection: the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment located at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, and the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (Mini-BooNE) located at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois.

  15. SciNOvA: A Measurement of Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering in a Narrow-Band Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Paley, J.; Djurcic, Z.; Harris, D.; Tesarek, R.; Feldman, G.; Corwin, L.; Messier, M.D.; Mayer, N.; Musser, J.; Paley, J.; Tayloe, R.; /Indiana U. /Iowa State U. /Minnesota U. /South Carolina U. /Wichita State U. /William-Mary Coll.

    2010-10-15

    We propose to construct and deploy a fine-grained detector in the Fermilab NOvA 2 GeV narrow-band neutrino beam. In this beam, the detector can make unique contributions to the measurement of quasi-elastic scattering, neutral-current elastic scattering, neutral-current {pi}{sup 0} production, and enhance the NOvA measurements of electron neutrino appearance. To minimize cost and risks, the proposed detector is a copy of the SciBar detector originally built for the K2K long baseline experiment and used recently in the SciBooNE experiment.

  16. Search for a new charged heavy vector boson decaying to an electron-neutrino pair in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jieun

    2005-06-01

    We present results on a search for a heavy charged vector boson, W', decaying to an electron-neutrino pair in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 205 pb{sup -1}. We found no evidence of this decay channel, and set 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section times branching fraction assuming the light neutrino. We also set the limit on the W' boson mass at M{sub W'} > 788 GeV/c{sup 2}, assuming the standard model strength couplings.

  17. Neutrino Scattering and Flavor Transformation in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, John F.; Carlson, J.; Friedland, Alexander; Fuller, George M.; Vlasenko, Alexey

    2012-06-01

    We argue that the small fraction of neutrinos that undergo direction-changing scattering outside of the neutrinosphere could have significant influence on neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernova environments. We show that the standard treatment for collective neutrino flavor transformation is adequate at late times but could be inadequate in early epochs of core-collapse supernovae, where the potentials that govern neutrino flavor evolution are affected by the scattered neutrinos. Taking account of this effect, and the way it couples to entropy and composition, will require a new approach in neutrino flavor transformation modeling.

  18. Generalized mass ordering degeneracy in neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma, Pilar; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We consider the impact of neutral-current (NC) nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSI) on the determination of the neutrino mass ordering. We show that in the presence of NSI there is an exact degeneracy which makes it impossible to determine the neutrino mass ordering and the octant of the solar mixing angle θ12 at oscillation experiments. The degeneracy holds at the probability level and for arbitrary matter density profiles, and hence solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrino experiments are affected simultaneously. The degeneracy requires order-1 corrections from NSI to the NC electron neutrino-quark interaction and can be tested in electron neutrino NC scattering experiments.

  19. A search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations at Δm2 > 0.1 eV2

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Ryan Benton

    2007-11-01

    The evidence is compelling that neutrinos undergo flavor change as they propagate. In recent years, experiments have observed this phenomenon of neutrino oscillations using disparate neutrino sources: the sun, fission reactors, accelerators, and secondary cosmic rays. The standard model of particle physics needs only simple extensions - neutrino masses and mixing - to accommodate all neutrino oscillation results to date, save one. The 3.8σ-significant $\\bar{v}$e excess reported by the LSND collaboration is consistent with $\\bar{v}$μ →$\\bar{v}$e oscillations with a mass-squared splitting of Δm2 ~ 1 eV2. This signal, which has not been independently verified, is inconsistent with other oscillation evidence unless more daring standard model extensions (e.g. sterile neutrinos) are considered.

  20. Measurement of interference between W and Z exchange in electron-neutrino electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.; Hausammann, R.; Lee, W.P.; Mahler, H.J.; Potter, M.E.; Lu, X.Q.; Wang, K.C. ); Bowles, T.J.; Burman, R.L.; Carlini, R.D.; Cochran, D.R.F.; Frank, J.S.; Piasetzky, E.; Sandberg, V.D. ); Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L. )

    1990-03-19

    A measurement of the reaction {nu}{sub {ital e}}+{ital e}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{nu}{sub {ital e}}+{ital e}{sup {minus}} was performed using a beam-stop source of {nu}{sub {ital e}}. Based upon 234{plus minus}35 events, we obtain a cross section of {sigma}({nu}{sub {ital ee}})=(9.9{plus minus}1.5(stat){plus minus}1.0(syst)){times}10{sup {minus}42} cm{sup 2} {times}({ital E}{sub {nu}} (GeV)). This reaction is mediated by the exchange of {ital W} and {ital Z} bosons and is thus sensitive to the interference between them. This interference is measured to be {minus}1.07{plus minus}0.17(stat){plus minus}0.11(syst), consistent with the destructive interference ({minus}1.08) predicted by the standard model.

  1. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Miner ν A Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ˜10 % due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We have isolated a sample of 135 ±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  2. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; et al

    2016-06-10

    In muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ~10% due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We also isolated a sample of 135±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux frommore » 9% to 6%. Finally, our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.« less

  3. Search for W-prime boson decaying to electron-neutrino pairs in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-11-01

    The authors present the results of a search for W{prime} boson decaying to electron-neutrino pairs in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using a data sample corresponding to 205 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab. They observe no evidence for this decay mode and set limits on the production cross section times branching fraction, assuming the neutrinos from W{prime} boson decays to be light. If they assume the manifest left-right symmetric model, they exclude a W{prime} boson with mass less than 788 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level.

  4. Neutrino-nucleus scattering off 136Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ydrefors, E.; Suhonen, J.; Zhao, Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Theoretical estimates of the cross sections for the neutrino-nucleus scattering off relevant nuclei for supernova neutrinos are essential for many applications in neutrino physics and astrophysics. The double-β -decaying nucleus 136Xe nucleus is used by the EXO Collaboration in the search for neutrinoless double-β decay. A ton-scale experiment based on 136Xe could also be used for studies of supernova neutrinos and/or solar neutrinos. Purpose: The purpose of the present work is, thus, to perform a study of the charged-current and neutral-current nuclear responses to supernova neutrinos for 136Xe . Method: The cross sections are computed by using the well-established framework for studies of semileptonic processes in nuclei introduced by O'Connell, Donnelly, and Walecka [Phys. Rev. C 6, 719 (1972), 10.1103/PhysRevC.6.719]. The nuclear wave functions of the initial and the final nuclear states for the neutral-current neutrino-nucleus scattering in 136Xe are computed by using the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Similarly, the pnQRPA is adopted to construct the initial and final nuclear states which are relevant for the charged-current reactions. The nuclear responses to supernova neutrinos are subsequently computed by folding the cross sections with appropriate energy spectra for the incoming neutrinos. Results: We present results for the cross sections of the charged-current and neutral-current neutrino and antineutrino scatterings off 136Xe . Nuclear responses to supernova neutrinos are also given. For the considered scenario for the neutrino mixing we have found that neutrino interactions with matter and so-called collective neutrino oscillations enhance significantly the neutrino and antineutrino flux-averaged cross sections. Conclusions: We have found that for the charged-current and neutral-current neutrino scatterings off 136Xe transitions mediated by the 1+ multipole are the most important ones. However, for the charged

  5. Measurement of W-Z interference from neutrino-electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, R.L.; Bowles, T.J.; Carlini, R.D.; Cochran, D.R.F.; Doe, P.J.; Frank, J.S.; Potter, M.E.; Sandberg, V.D.; Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L. |; Allen, R.C.; Chen, H.H.; Hausammann, R.; Lee, W.P.; Lu, X.Q.; Mahler, H.J.; Wang, K.C.; Piasetzky, E.

    1993-04-01

    Neutrino-electron elastic scattering was observed at LAMPF with a 15-ton fine-grained tracking calorimeter exposed to electron-neutrinos from muon decay at rest. The measured {nu}{sub e}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub e}e{sup {minus}} elastic scattering cross section, 10.0 {plus_minus} 1.5(stat) {plus_minus} 0.9(syst) {times} 10{sup {minus}45} cm{sup 2} {times} (E{sub {nu}}(MeV)), gives a model independent measurement of the strength of the destructive interference between the charged and neutral currents, I = {minus}1.07 {plus_minus} 0.21, that agrees well with the standard model (SM) prediction I = {minus}1.08. The agreement between the measured electroweak parameters and SM expectations is used to place limits on neutrino properties, such as neutrino flavor-changing neutral currents and neutrino electromagnetic moments, and on the masses of hypothetical new bosons that would interact with leptons.

  6. Neutrino-induced Reactions and Neutrino Scattering with Nuclear Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Yang, Ghil-Seok; Kim, Kyungsik; Kajino, T.

    2016-02-01

    We reviewed present status regarding experimental data and theoretical approaches for neutrino-induced reactions and neutrino scattering. With a short introduction of relevant data, our recent calculations by distorted-wave Born approximation for quasielastic region are presented for MiniBooNE data. For much higher energy neutrino data, such as NOMAD data, elementary process approach was shown to be useful instead of using complicated nuclear models. But, in the low energy region, detailed nuclear structure model, such as QRPA and shell model, turn out to be inescapable to explain the reaction data. Finally, we discussed that one step-process in the reaction is comparable to the two-step process, which has been usually used in the neutrino-nucleosynthesis.

  7. Coherency in neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerman, S.; Sharma, V.; Deniz, M.; Wong, H. T.; Chen, J.-W.; Li, H. B.; Lin, S. T.; Liu, C.-P.; Yue, Q.; Texono Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering provides a unique laboratory to study the quantum mechanical coherency effects in electroweak interactions, towards which several experimental programs are being actively pursued. We report results of our quantitative studies on the transitions towards decoherency. A parameter (α ) is identified to describe the degree of coherency, and its variations with incoming neutrino energy, detector threshold, and target nucleus are studied. The ranges of α that can be probed with realistic neutrino experiments are derived, indicating complementarity between projects with different sources and targets. Uncertainties in nuclear physics and in α would constrain sensitivities in probing physics beyond the standard model. The maximum neutrino energies corresponding to α >0.95 are derived.

  8. Neutrino-proton and anti-neutrino-proton elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fuess, Stuart Charles

    1981-01-01

    An experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron observed the elastic scattering of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos from a nuclear target. The neutral current anti-neutrino to neutral current neutrino ratio is: sigma(anti ..nu..p ..-->.. anti ..nu..p)/sigma(..nu..p ..-->.. ..nu..p) = 0.45 +- 0.18 for 0.33 less than or equal to Q/sup 2/ less than or equal to 1.0 (GeV/c)/sup 2/, where Q/sup 2/ is the square of the momentum transfer to the nucleon. The neutrino neutral current to charged current ratio is: sigma(..nu..p ..-->.. ..nu..p)/sigma(..nu..n ..-->.. ..mu../sup -/p) = 0.13 +- 0.04 for 0.25 less than or equal to Q/sup 2/ less than or equal to 1.0 (GeV/c)/sup 2/. The ratios are consistent with a value of the Weinberg angle of sin/sup 2/theta/sub w/ = 0.26 +- 0.08.

  9. Neutrino-Electron Scattering in MINERvA for Constraining the NuMI Neutrino Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaewon

    2013-01-01

    Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is used as a reference process to constrain the neutrino flux at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam observed by the MINERvA experiment. Prediction of the neutrino flux at accelerator experiments from other methods has a large uncertainty, and this uncertainty degrades measurements of neutrino oscillations and neutrino cross-sections. Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is a rare process, but its cross-section is precisely known. With a sample corresponding to $3.5\\times10^{20}$ protons on target in the NuMI low-energy neutrino beam, a sample of $120$ $\

  10. Can neutrino-electron scattering tell us whether neutrinos are Dirac or Majorana particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, B.

    1988-04-01

    There has recently been interest in the possibility that neutrino-electron scattering experiments could determine whether neutrinos are Dirac or Majorana particles by providing information on their electromagnetic structure. We try to explain why studies of neutrino electromagnetic structure actually cannot distinguish between Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. 9 refs.

  11. Neutrino-induced reactions and neutrino scattering with nuclei in low and high neutrino energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Yang, Ghil-Seok; Kim, K. S.; Kajino, T.

    2016-06-01

    We reviewed present status regarding theoretical approaches for neutrino-induced reactions and neutrino scattering. With a short introduction of relevant data, our recent calculations by distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) for quasielastic region are presented for MiniBooNE data. We also discussed that one step-process estimated by the DWBA is comparable to the two-step process, which has been usually used in the neutrino-nucleosynthesis. For much higher energy neutrino data, such as NOMAD data, elementary process approach was shown to be useful instead of using complicated nuclear models. But, in the low energy region, detailed nuclear structure model, such as QRPA and shell model, turn out to be inescapable to explain the reaction data.

  12. Neutrino-electron scattering. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    We present here a progress report on an experiment to measure the cross section for nu/sub ..mu../e scattering at the Brookhaven AGS. A wide band focussing horn is used with a neutrino beam energy centered at 1.5 GeV. We have in hand measurements with nu/sub ..mu../ and anti nu/sub ..mu../ beams but we present preliminary data on the nu/sub ..mu../ beam running only. We also measure the reactions: nu/sub ..mu../ + n ..-->.. ..mu../sup -/ + p and nu/sub e/ + n ..-->.. e/sup -/ + p which will be used in normalization and in background estimation.

  13. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions and the MINERvA Neutrino Nucleus Scattering Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfín, Jorge G.

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering have been studied in the frame-work of a χ2 analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs)1. A set of iron PDFs have been extracted which are then used to compute xBj-dependent and Q2-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. Upon comparing our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for l±-iron scattering we find that, except for very high xBj, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering. The MINERvA neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab, will systematically study neutrino nuclear effects off of He, C, Fe and Pb for a more thorough A-dependent study of nuclear PDFs and these correction factors.

  14. Measurement of Nuclear Dependence in Inclusive Charged Current Neutrino Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tice, Brian George

    2014-01-01

    Neutrino experiments use heavy nuclei (C, Fe, Pb) to achieve necessary statistics. However, the use of heavy nuclei exposes these experiments to the nuclear dependence of neutrino-nucleus cross sections, which are poorly known and difficult to model. This dissertation presents an analysis of the nuclear dependence of inclusive chargedcurrent neutrino scattering using events in carbon, iron, lead, and scintillator targets of the MINERvA detector. MINERvA (Main INjector ExpeRiment for -A) is a few-GeV neutrinonucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab.

  15. Scattering of low-energy neutrinos on atomic shells

    SciTech Connect

    Babič, Andrej; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-28

    We present a derivation of the total cross section for inelastic scattering of low-energy solar neutrinos and reactor antineutrinos on bound electrons, resulting in a transition of the electron to an excited state. The atomic-shell structure of various chemical elements is treated in terms of a nonrelativistic approximation. We estimate the interaction rates for modern neutrino detectors, in particular the Borexino and GEMMA experiments. We establish that in these experiments the effect can be safely neglected, but it could be accessible to future large-volume neutrino detectors with low energy threshold.

  16. The neutrino signal at HALO: learning about the primary supernova neutrino fluxes and neutrino properties

    SciTech Connect

    Väänänen, Daavid; Volpe, Cristina E-mail: volpe@ipno.in2p3.fr

    2011-10-01

    Core-collapse supernova neutrinos undergo a variety of phenomena when they travel from the high neutrino density region and large matter densities to the Earth. We perform analytical calculations of the supernova neutrino fluxes including collective effects due to the neutrino-neutrino interactions, the Mikheev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect due to the neutrino interactions with the background matter and decoherence of the wave packets as they propagate in space. We predict the numbers of one- and two-neutron charged and neutral-current electron-neutrino scattering on lead events. We show that, due to the energy thresholds, the ratios of one- to two-neutron events are sensitive to the pinching parameters of neutrino fluxes at the neutrinosphere, almost independently of the presently unknown neutrino properties. Besides, such events have an interesting sensitivity to the spectral split features that depend upon the presence/absence of energy equipartition among neutrino flavors. Our calculations show that a lead-based observatory like the Helium And Lead Observatory (HALO) has the potential to pin down important characteristics of the neutrino fluxes at the neutrinosphere, and provide us with information on the neutrino transport in the supernova core.

  17. Azimuthal asymmetry of recoil electrons in neutrino-electron elastic scattering as signature of neutrino nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobków, W.; Błaut, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the theoretically possible scenario beyond the standard model in order to show how the presence of the exotic scalar, tensor, {V}+{A} weak interactions in addition to the standard vector-axial ({V}-{A}) ones may help to distinguish the Dirac from Majorana neutrinos in the elastic scattering of an (anti)neutrino beam off the unpolarized electrons in the relativistic limit. We assume that the incoming (anti)neutrino beam comes from the polarized muon decay at rest and is the left-right chiral superposition with assigned direction of the transversal spin polarization with respect to the production plane. Our analysis is carried out for the flavour (current) neutrino eigenstates. It means that the transverse neutrino polarization estimates are the same both for the Dirac and Majorana cases. We display that the azimuthal asymmetry in the angular distribution of recoil electrons is generated by the interference terms between the standard and exotic couplings, which are proportional to the transversal (anti)neutrino spin polarization and independent of the neutrino mass. This asymmetry for the Majorana neutrinos is larger than for the Dirac ones. We also indicate the possibility of utilizing the azimuthal asymmetry measurements to search for the new CP-violating phases. Our study is based on the assumption that the possible detector (running for 1 year) has the shape of a flat circular ring, while the intense neutrino source is located in the centre of the ring and polarized perpendicularly to the ring. In addition, the large low-threshold, real-time detector is able to measure with a high resolution both the polar angle and the azimuthal angle of outgoing electron momentum. Our analysis is model-independent and consistent with the current upper limits on the non-standard couplings.

  18. Evidence for neutrino oscillations in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, Alysia Diane

    2004-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a large-volume heavy water Cerenkov detector designed to resolve the solar neutrino problem. SNO observes charged-current interactions with electron neutrinos, neutral-current interactions with all active neutrinos, and elastic-scattering interactions primarily with electron neutrinos with some sensitivity to other flavors. This dissertation presents an analysis of the solar neutrino flux observed in SNO in the second phase of operation, while ~2 tonnes of salt (NaCl) were dissolved in the heavy water. The dataset here represents 391 live days of data. Only the events above a visible energy threshold of 5.5 MeV and inside a fiducial volume within 550 cm of the center of the detector are studied. The neutrino flux observed via the charged-current interaction is [1.71 ± 0.065(stat.)±$0.065\\atop{0.068}$(sys.)±0.02(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, via the elastic-scattering interaction is [2.21±0.22(stat.)±$0.12\\atop{0.11}$(sys.)±0.01(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, and via the neutral-current interaction is [5.05±0.23(stat.)±$0.31\\atop{0.37}$(sys.)±0.06(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1. The electron-only flux seen via the charged-current interaction is more than 7σ below the total active flux seen via the neutral-current interaction, providing strong evidence that neutrinos are undergoing flavor transformation as they travel from the core of the Sun to the Earth. The most likely origin of the flavor transformation is matter-induced flavor oscillation.

  19. Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung from nucleon-nucleon scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yi; Liou, M. K.; Schreiber, W. M.; Gibson, B. F.

    2015-07-22

    Background: Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung processes from nucleon-nucleon scattering ΝΝνν¯ (nnvv¯, ppvv¯, and npvv¯) have recently attracted attention in studies of neutrino emission in neutron stars, because of the implications for the neutron star cooling. The calculated ΝΝνν¯ emissivities within the neutron star environment are relatively insensitive to the two-nucleon dynamical model used in the calculations, but differ significantly from those obtained using an OPE model. Purpose: To investigate the free ΝΝνν¯ cross sections using a realistic nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude, comparing the relative sizes of the cross sections for the three processes nnvv¯, ppvv¯, and npvv¯.

  20. Neutrino Scattering on Atomic Electrons in Searches for the Neutrino Magnetic Moment

    SciTech Connect

    Voloshin, M. B.

    2010-11-12

    The scattering of a neutrino on atomic electrons is considered in the situation where the energy transferred to the electrons is comparable to the characteristic atomic energies, as relevant to the current experimental search for the neutrino magnetic moment. The process is induced by the standard electroweak interaction as well as by the possible neutrino magnetic moment. Quantum-mechanical sum rules are derived for the inclusive cross section at a fixed energy deposited in the atomic system, and it is shown that the differential over the energy transfer cross section is given, modulo very small corrections, by the same expression as for free electrons, once all possible final states of the electronic system are taken into account. Thus, the atomic effects effectively cancel in the inclusive process.

  1. Sensitivity to Z -prime and nonstandard neutrino interactions from ultralow threshold neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Mahapatra, Rupak; Strigari, Louis E.; Walker, Joel W.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss prospects for probing Z -prime and nonstandard neutrino interactions using neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering with ultralow energy (˜10 eV ) threshold Si and Ge detectors. The analysis is performed in the context of a specific and contemporary reactor-based experimental proposal, developed in cooperation with the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University, and referencing available technology based upon economical and scalable detector arrays. For expected exposures, we show that sensitivity to the Z -prime mass is on the order of several TeV and is complementary to the LHC search with low-mass detectors in the near term. This technology is also shown to provide sensitivity to the neutrino magnetic moment, at a level that surpasses terrestrial limits, and is competitive with more stringent astrophysical bounds. We demonstrate the benefits of combining silicon and germanium detectors for distinguishing between classes of models of new physics and for suppressing correlated systematic uncertainties.

  2. Theory and phenomenology of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Gail

    2015-07-15

    We review the theory and phenomenology of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEνNS). After a brief introduction, we summarize the places where CEνNS is already in use and then turn to future physics opportunities from CEνNS. CEνNS has been proposed as a way to limit or discover beyond the standard model physics, measure the nuclear-neutron radius and constrain the Weinberg angle.

  3. Resonant Production of Sterile Neutrinos in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Lauren; Grohs, Evan; Fuller, George M.

    2016-06-01

    This study examines the cosmological impacts of a light resonantly produced sterile neutrino in the early universe. Such a neutrino could be produced through lepton number-driven Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) conversion of active neutrinos around big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), resulting in a non-thermal spectrum of both sterile and electron neutrinos. During BBN, the neutron-proton ratio depends sensitively on the electron neutrino flux. If electron neutrinos are being converted to sterile neutrinos, this makes the n/p ratio a probe of possible new physics. We use observations of primordial Yp and D/H to place limits on this process.

  4. Atmospheric neutrinos and discovery of neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through studies of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. They are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith-angle and energy dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. Neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. Neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have small but non-zero masses. The small neutrino masses have profound implications to our understanding of elementary particle physics and the Universe. This article discusses the experimental discovery of neutrino oscillations.

  5. Atmospheric neutrinos and discovery of neutrino oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through studies of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. They are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith-angle and energy dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. Neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. Neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have small but non-zero masses. The small neutrino masses have profound implications to our understanding of elementary particle physics and the Universe. This article discusses the experimental discovery of neutrino oscillations. PMID:20431258

  6. Exact expressions and improved approximations for interaction rates of neutrinos with free nucleons in a high-temperature, high-density gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schinder, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    The exact expressions needed in the neutrino transport equations for scattering of all three flavors of neutrinos and antineutrinos off free protons and neutrons, and for electron neutrino absorption on neutrons and electron antineutrino absorption on protons, are derived under the assumption that nucleons are noninteracting particles. The standard approximations even with corrections for degeneracy, are found to be poor fits to the exact results. Improved approximations are constructed which are adequate for nondegenerate nucleons for neutrino energies from 1 to 160 MeV and temperatures from 1 to 50 MeV.

  7. Measurement of elastic muon-neutrino scattering off protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faissner, H.; Frenzel, E.; Hansl, T.; Hoffmann, D.; Radermacher, E.; Reithler, H.; Samm, U.; de Witt, H.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Bobisut, F.; Huzita, H.; Loreti, M.; Puglierin, G.

    1980-02-01

    Single recoil protons have been detected in a multiplate Al spark chamber exposed to the 2-GeV wide-band neutrino beam from the CERN proton synchrotron. Neutron-induced protons were suppressed by suitable geometrical and kinematical cuts. After correction for remaining neutron background (110+/-15 events) and single-pion contribution (45+/-6 events), the final sample contains 62+/-19 genuine neutrino-induced single protons. This yields an effective ratio of neutral-current (NC) to charged-current (CC) events of RN=(15+/-5)%, in the range 0.2<-q2<1.0 (GeV/c)2. This number is due to a mixture of elastic neutrino scatterings off protons and neutrons. From the probability fnp for a recoil neutron to give an accepted proton, one derives a model-independent combination of the NC/CC ratios Rp+fnpRn, with fnp=0.31+/-0.04. This favors axial-vector-isovector-dominant NC coupling constants and is consistent with the Weinberg-Salam model with 2θW=0.29+0.21-0.11. In terms of this model, this corresponds to Rp=(10+/-3)% and Rn=(15+3-5)%.

  8. Two-Phase Emission Detector for Measuring Coherent Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, A; Hagmann, C A

    2003-11-26

    Coherent scattering is a flavor-blind, high-rate, as yet undetected neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model. We propose to use a compact (kg-scale), two-phase (liquid-gas) argon ionization detector to measure coherent neutrino scattering off nuclei. In our approach, neutrino-induced nuclear recoils in the liquid produce a weak ionization signal, which is transported into a gas under the influence of an electric field, amplified via electroluminescence, and detected by phototubes or avalanche diodes. This paper describes the features of the detector, and estimates signal and background rates for a reactor neutrino source. Relatively compact detectors of this type, capable of detecting coherent scattering, offer a new approach to flavor-blind detection of man-made and astronomical neutrinos, and may allow development of compact neutrino detectors capable of nonintrusive real-time monitoring of fissile material in reactors.

  9. Neutrinos: Theory and Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen

    2013-10-22

    The theory and phenomenology of neutrinos will be addressed, especially that relating to the observation of neutrino flavor transformations. The current status and implications for future experiments will be discussed with special emphasis on the experiments that will determine the neutrino mass ordering, the dominant flavor content of the neutrino mass eigenstate with the smallest electron neutrino content and the size of CP violation in the neutrino sector. Beyond the neutrino Standard Model, the evidence for and a possible definitive experiment to confirm or refute the existence of light sterile neutrinos will be briefly discussed.

  10. A proposed measurement of Δ s via neutrino-nucleon neutral-current elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayloe, Rex

    2004-10-01

    The neutral-current neutrino-nucleon scattering process is uniquely sensitiveto the axial form factor of the nucleon. If strange quarks carry a significant fraction of the nucleon spin, they would contribute to this form factor and would be observable via a sufficiently precise measurement of this process. FINeSSE is a neutrino scattering experiment to be located at a near location (≈ 100m from neutrino production target) on an intense neutrino beamline. A novel detector using liquid scintillator and wavelength-shifting fibers will be employed. The motivation and methods of this experiment will be presented.

  11. Collaborative Research: Neutrinos & Nucleosynthesis in Hot Dense Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Sanjay

    2013-09-06

    It is now firmly established that neutrinos, which are copiously produced in the hot and dense core of the supernova, play a role in the supernova explosion mechanism and in the synthesis of heavy elements through a phenomena known as r-process nucleosynthesis. They are also detectable in terrestrial neutrino experiments, and serve as a probe of the extreme environment and complex dynamics encountered in the supernova. The major goal of the UW research activity relevant to this project was to calculate the neutrino interaction rates in hot and dense matter of relevance to core collapse supernova. These serve as key input physics in large scale computer simulations of the supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis being pursued at national laboratories here in the United States and by other groups in Europe and Japan. Our calculations show that neutrino production and scattering rate are altered by the nuclear interactions and that these modifications have important implications for nucleosynthesis and terrestrial neutrino detection. The calculation of neutrino rates in dense matter are difficult because nucleons in the dense matter are strongly coupled. A neutrino interacts with several nucleons and the quantum interference between scattering off different nucleons depends on the nature of correlations between them in dense matter. To describe these correlations we used analytic methods based on mean field theory and hydrodynamics, and computational methods such as Quantum Monte Carlo. We found that due to nuclear effects neutrino production rates at relevant temperatures are enhanced, and that electron neutrinos are more easily absorbed than anti-electron neutrinos in dense matter. The latter, was shown to favor synthesis of heavy neutron-rich elements in the supernova.

  12. Probing neutrino nature at Borexino detector with chromium neutrino source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobków, W.; Błaut, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we indicate a possibility of utilizing the intense chromium source (˜ 370 PBq) in probing the neutrino nature in low energy neutrino experiments with the ultra-low threshold and background real-time Borexino detector located near the source (˜ 8 m). We analyse the elastic scattering of electron neutrinos (Dirac or Majorana, respectively) on the unpolarised electrons in the relativistic neutrino limit. We assume that the incoming neutrino beam is the superposition of left-right chiral states produced by the chromium source. Left chiral neutrinos may be detected by the standard V - A and non-standard scalar S_L, pseudoscalar P_L, tensor T_L interactions, while right chiral ones partake only in the exotic V + A and S_R, P_R, T_R interactions. Our model-independent study is carried out for the flavour (current) neutrino eigenstates. We compute the expected event number for the standard V-A interaction of the left chiral neutrinos using the current experimental values of standard couplings and in the case of left-right chiral superposition. We show that the significant decrement in the event number due to the interference terms between the standard and exotic interactions for the Majorana neutrinos may appear. We also demonstrate how the presence of the exotic couplings affects the energy spectrum of outgoing electrons, both for the Dirac and Majorana cases. The 90~% C.L. sensitivity contours in the planes of corresponding exotic couplings are found. The presence of interferences in the Majorana case gives the stronger constraints than for the Dirac neutrinos, even if the neutrino source is placed outside the detector.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Neutrino Scattering in Heterogeneous High Dense Media

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, O. L.

    2008-03-13

    The dynamics of core-collapse supernovae is sensitive to neutrino scattering. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we calculated ion static structure factors and neutrino mean free paths. We simulated the stellar medium as composed in one case by single ion specie, and in the other by a mixture of ions. For the heterogeneous plasma we used two different models and systematically found the neutrino mean free path is shorter for an ion mixture.

  14. A letter of intent for a neutrino scattering experiment on the booster neutrino meanline: FINeSSE

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, B.T.; Tayloe, R.; /Indiana U. /Yale U.

    2005-03-01

    The experiment described in this Letter of Intent provides a decisive measurement of {Delta}s, the spin of the nucleon carried by strange quarks. This is crucial as, after more than thirty years of study, the spin contribution of strange quarks to the nucleon is still not understood. The interpretation of {Delta}s measurements from inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) experiments using charged leptons suffers from two questionable techniques; an assumption of SU(3)-flavor symmetry, and an extrapolation into unmeasured kinematic regions, both of which provide ample room for uncertain theoretical errors in the results. The results of recent semi-inclusive DIS data from HERMES paint a somewhat different picture of the contribution of strange quarks to the nucleon spin than do the inclusive results, but since HERMES does not make use of either of the above-mentioned techniques, then the results are somewhat incomparable. What is required is a measurement directly probing the spin contribution of the strange quarks in the nucleon. Neutrino experiments provide a theoretically clean and robust method of determining {Delta}s by comparing the neutral current interaction, which is isoscalar plus isovector, to the charged current interaction, which is strictly isovector. A past experiment, E734, performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, has pioneered this effort. Building on what they have learned, we present an experiment which achieves a measurement to {+-} 0.025 using neutrino scattering, and {+-} 0.04 using anti-neutrino scattering, significantly better than past measurements. The combination of the neutrino and anti-neutrino data, when combined with the results of the parity-violating electron-nucleon scattering data, will produce the most significant result for {Delta}s. This experiment can also measure neutrino cross sections in the energy range required for accelerator-based precision oscillation measurements. Accurate measurements of cross sections have been

  15. The MINERvA Neutrino Scattering Experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, David W.

    2011-11-23

    The MINER{nu}A experiment at Fermilab is aimed at precision measurements of neutrino interactions in nuclei for energies up to a few GeV. MINER{nu}A makes use of a fine-grained, fully active detector design and a range of nuclear target materials. The experiment began taking data in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab in late 2009 and will collect data in both the neutrino and antineutrino configurations of the beamline.

  16. Effects of the rest mass of the neutrino (antineutrino) on the scattering of /gamma/ (/sup /approx///gamma/) by /sub 6/C/sup 12/

    SciTech Connect

    Samsonenko, N.V.; Katkhat, C.L.; El-Gavkhari, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    Expressions are obtained for the differential cross sections of the processes /gamma/ + /sub 6/C/sup 12/ /yields/ /sub 7/N/sup 12/ + e/sup /minus// and /sup /approx///gamma/ + /sub 6/C/sup 12/ /yields/ /sub 5/B/sup 12/ + e/sup +/ for the shell model of the nucleus and the harmonic oscillator model. The authors analyze the effect of the rest mass of the neutrino (antineutrino) on the degree of longitudinal polarization of the electrons (positrons), the angular electron-neutrino (positron-antineutrino) correlation coefficient, and the charge symmetry.

  17. Anti-Neutrino Charged Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering in MINER$\

    SciTech Connect

    Chvojka, Jesse John

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of neutrino oscillation is becoming increasingly understood with results from accelerator-based and reactor-based experiments, but unanswered questions remain. The proper ordering of the neutrino mass eigenstates that compose the neutrino avor eigenstates is not completely known. We have yet to detect CP violation in neutrino mixing, which if present could help explain the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter in the universe. We also have not resolved whether sterile neutrinos, which do not interact in any Standard Model interaction, exist. Accelerator-based experiments appear to be the most promising candidates for resolving these questions; however, the ability of present and future experiments to provide answers is likely to be limited by systematic errors. A significant source of this systematic error comes from limitations in our knowledge of neutrino-nucleus interactions. Errors on cross-sections for such interactions are large, existing data is sometimes contradictory, and knowledge of nuclear effects is incomplete. One type of neutrino interaction of particular interest is charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) scattering, which yields a final state consisting of a charged lepton and nucleon. This process, which is the dominant interaction near energies of 1 GeV, is of great utility to neutrino oscillation experiments since the incoming neutrino energy and the square of the momentum transferred to the final state nucleon, Q2, can be reconstructed using the final state lepton kinematics. To address the uncertainty in our knowledge of neutrino interactions, many experiments have begun making dedicated measurements. In particular, the MINER A experiment is studying neutrino-nucleus interactions in the few GeV region. MINERvA is a fine-grained, high precision, high statistics neutrino scattering experiment that will greatly improve our understanding of neutrino cross-sections and nuclear effects that affect the final state particles

  18. Electron events from the scattering with solar neutrinos in the search of keV scale sterile neutrino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wei; Wu, Xiao-Hong; Zhou, Hang

    2014-05-01

    In a previous work, we showed that it is possible to detect keV scale sterile neutrino dark matter νs in a β decay experiment using radioactive sources such as T3 or Ru106. The signals of this dark matter candidate are monoenergetic electrons produced in the neutrino capture process νs+ N'→N+e-. These electrons have energy greater than the maximum energy of the electrons produced in the associated decay process N'→N+e-+ν ¯e. Hence, signal electron events are well beyond the end point of the β decay spectrum and are not polluted by the β decay process. Another possible background, which is a potential threat to the detection of νs dark matter, is the electron event produced by the scattering of solar neutrinos with electrons in target matter. In this article, we study in detail this possible background and discuss its implications for the detection of keV scale sterile neutrino dark matter. In particular, bound state features of electrons in Ru atoms are considered with care in the scattering process when the kinetic energy of the final electron is the same order of magnitude of the binding energy.

  19. Nucleon-nucleon scattering in a strong external magnetic field and the neutrino emissivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bavarsad, E.; Mohammadi, R.; Haghighat, M.

    2010-11-15

    The nucleon-nucleon scattering in a large magnetic background is considered to find its potential to change the neutrino emissivity of the neutron stars. For this purpose, we consider the one-pion-exchange approximation to find the nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross section in a background field as large as 10{sup 15}-10{sup 18} G. We show that the NN cross section in neutron stars with temperatures in the range 0.1-5 MeV can be changed up to the 1 order of magnitude with respect to the one in the absence of the magnetic field. In the limit of the soft neutrino emission, the neutrino emissivity can be written in terms of the NN-scattering amplitude; therefore, the large magnetic fields can dramatically change the neutrino emissivity of the neutron stars as well.

  20. First Measurement of Electron Neutrino Appearance in NOvA.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Ader, C; Andrews, M; Anfimov, N; Anghel, I; Arms, K; Arrieta-Diaz, E; Aurisano, A; Ayres, D S; Backhouse, C; Baird, M; Bambah, B A; Bays, K; Bernstein, R; Betancourt, M; Bhatnagar, V; Bhuyan, B; Bian, J; Biery, K; Blackburn, T; Bocean, V; Bogert, D; Bolshakova, A; Bowden, M; Bower, C; Broemmelsiek, D; Bromberg, C; Brunetti, G; Bu, X; Butkevich, A; Capista, D; Catano-Mur, E; Chase, T R; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Chowdhury, B; Coan, T E; Coelho, J A B; Colo, M; Cooper, J; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Cunningham, A; Davies, G S; Davies, J P; Del Tutto, M; Derwent, P F; Deepthi, K N; Demuth, D; Desai, S; Deuerling, G; Devan, A; Dey, J; Dharmapalan, R; Ding, P; Dixon, S; Djurcic, Z; Dukes, E C; Duyang, H; Ehrlich, R; Feldman, G J; Felt, N; Fenyves, E J; Flumerfelt, E; Foulkes, S; Frank, M J; Freeman, W; Gabrielyan, M; Gallagher, H R; Gebhard, M; Ghosh, T; Gilbert, W; Giri, A; Goadhouse, S; Gomes, R A; Goodenough, L; Goodman, M C; Grichine, V; Grossman, N; Group, R; Grudzinski, J; Guarino, V; Guo, B; Habig, A; Handler, T; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Hatzikoutelis, A; Heller, K; Howcroft, C; Huang, J; Huang, X; Hylen, J; Ishitsuka, M; Jediny, F; Jensen, C; Jensen, D; Johnson, C; Jostlein, H; Kafka, G K; Kamyshkov, Y; Kasahara, S M S; Kasetti, S; Kephart, K; Koizumi, G; Kotelnikov, S; Kourbanis, I; Krahn, Z; Kravtsov, V; Kreymer, A; Kulenberg, Ch; Kumar, A; Kutnink, T; Kwarciancy, R; Kwong, J; Lang, K; Lee, A; Lee, W M; Lee, K; Lein, S; Liu, J; Lokajicek, M; Lozier, J; Lu, Q; Lucas, P; Luchuk, S; Lukens, P; Lukhanin, G; Magill, S; Maan, K; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Martens, M; Martincik, J; Mason, P; Matera, K; Mathis, M; Matveev, V; Mayer, N; McCluskey, E; Mehdiyev, R; Merritt, H; Messier, M D; Meyer, H; Miao, T; Michael, D; Mikheyev, S P; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mohanta, R; Moren, A; Mualem, L; Muether, M; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Newman, H B; Nelson, J K; Niner, E; Norman, A; Nowak, J; Oksuzian, Y; Olshevskiy, A; Oliver, J; Olson, T; Paley, J; Pandey, P; Para, A; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Pearson, N; Perevalov, D; Pershey, D; Peterson, E; Petti, R; Phan-Budd, S; Piccoli, L; Pla-Dalmau, A; Plunkett, R K; Poling, R; Potukuchi, B; Psihas, F; Pushka, D; Qiu, X; Raddatz, N; Radovic, A; Rameika, R A; Ray, R; Rebel, B; Rechenmacher, R; Reed, B; Reilly, R; Rocco, D; Rodkin, D; Ruddick, K; Rusack, R; Ryabov, V; Sachdev, K; Sahijpal, S; Sahoo, H; Samoylov, O; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schlabach, P; Schneps, J; Schroeter, R; Sepulveda-Quiroz, J; Shanahan, P; Sherwood, B; Sheshukov, A; Singh, J; Singh, V; Smith, A; Smith, D; Smolik, J; Solomey, N; Sotnikov, A; Sousa, A; Soustruznik, K; Stenkin, Y; Strait, M; Suter, L; Talaga, R L; Tamsett, M C; Tariq, S; Tas, P; Tesarek, R J; Thayyullathil, R B; Thomsen, K; Tian, X; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Trevor, J; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Valerio, L; Vinton, L; Vrba, T; Waldron, A V; Wang, B; Wang, Z; Weber, A; Wehmann, A; Whittington, D; Wilcer, N; Wildberger, R; Wildman, D; Williams, K; Wojcicki, S G; Wood, K; Xiao, M; Xin, T; Yadav, N; Yang, S; Zadorozhnyy, S; Zalesak, J; Zamorano, B; Zhao, A; Zirnstein, J; Zwaska, R

    2016-04-15

    We report results from the first search for ν_{μ}→ν_{e} transitions by the NOvA experiment. In an exposure equivalent to 2.74×10^{20} protons on target in the upgraded NuMI beam at Fermilab, we observe 6 events in the Far Detector, compared to a background expectation of 0.99±0.11(syst) events based on the Near Detector measurement. A secondary analysis observes 11 events with a background of 1.07±0.14(syst). The 3.3σ excess of events observed in the primary analysis disfavors 0.1π<δ_{CP}<0.5π in the inverted mass hierarchy at the 90% C.L. PMID:27127961

  1. First Measurement of Electron Neutrino Appearance in NOvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Ader, C.; Andrews, M.; Anfimov, N.; Anghel, I.; Arms, K.; Arrieta-Diaz, E.; Aurisano, A.; Ayres, D. S.; Backhouse, C.; Baird, M.; Bambah, B. A.; Bays, K.; Bernstein, R.; Betancourt, M.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bian, J.; Biery, K.; Blackburn, T.; Bocean, V.; Bogert, D.; Bolshakova, A.; Bowden, M.; Bower, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bromberg, C.; Brunetti, G.; Bu, X.; Butkevich, A.; Capista, D.; Catano-Mur, E.; Chase, T. R.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Chowdhury, B.; Coan, T. E.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Colo, M.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Cunningham, A.; Davies, G. S.; Davies, J. P.; Del Tutto, M.; Derwent, P. F.; Deepthi, K. N.; Demuth, D.; Desai, S.; Deuerling, G.; Devan, A.; Dey, J.; Dharmapalan, R.; Ding, P.; Dixon, S.; Djurcic, Z.; Dukes, E. C.; Duyang, H.; Ehrlich, R.; Feldman, G. J.; Felt, N.; Fenyves, E. J.; Flumerfelt, E.; Foulkes, S.; Frank, M. J.; Freeman, W.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Gebhard, M.; Ghosh, T.; Gilbert, W.; Giri, A.; Goadhouse, S.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodenough, L.; Goodman, M. C.; Grichine, V.; Grossman, N.; Group, R.; Grudzinski, J.; Guarino, V.; Guo, B.; Habig, A.; Handler, T.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Heller, K.; Howcroft, C.; Huang, J.; Huang, X.; Hylen, J.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jediny, F.; Jensen, C.; Jensen, D.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kafka, G. K.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Kasetti, S.; Kephart, K.; Koizumi, G.; Kotelnikov, S.; Kourbanis, I.; Krahn, Z.; Kravtsov, V.; Kreymer, A.; Kulenberg, Ch.; Kumar, A.; Kutnink, T.; Kwarciancy, R.; Kwong, J.; Lang, K.; Lee, A.; Lee, W. M.; Lee, K.; Lein, S.; Liu, J.; Lokajicek, M.; Lozier, J.; Lu, Q.; Lucas, P.; Luchuk, S.; Lukens, P.; Lukhanin, G.; Magill, S.; Maan, K.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Martens, M.; Martincik, J.; Mason, P.; Matera, K.; Mathis, M.; Matveev, V.; Mayer, N.; McCluskey, E.; Mehdiyev, R.; Merritt, H.; Messier, M. D.; Meyer, H.; Miao, T.; Michael, D.; Mikheyev, S. P.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Mohanta, R.; Moren, A.; Mualem, L.; Muether, M.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Newman, H. B.; Nelson, J. K.; Niner, E.; Norman, A.; Nowak, J.; Oksuzian, Y.; Olshevskiy, A.; Oliver, J.; Olson, T.; Paley, J.; Pandey, P.; Para, A.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Pearson, N.; Perevalov, D.; Pershey, D.; Peterson, E.; Petti, R.; Phan-Budd, S.; Piccoli, L.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poling, R.; Potukuchi, B.; Psihas, F.; Pushka, D.; Qiu, X.; Raddatz, N.; Radovic, A.; Rameika, R. A.; Ray, R.; Rebel, B.; Rechenmacher, R.; Reed, B.; Reilly, R.; Rocco, D.; Rodkin, D.; Ruddick, K.; Rusack, R.; Ryabov, V.; Sachdev, K.; Sahijpal, S.; Sahoo, H.; Samoylov, O.; Sanchez, M. C.; Saoulidou, N.; Schlabach, P.; Schneps, J.; Schroeter, R.; Sepulveda-Quiroz, J.; Shanahan, P.; Sherwood, B.; Sheshukov, A.; Singh, J.; Singh, V.; Smith, A.; Smith, D.; Smolik, J.; Solomey, N.; Sotnikov, A.; Sousa, A.; Soustruznik, K.; Stenkin, Y.; Strait, M.; Suter, L.; Talaga, R. L.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tariq, S.; Tas, P.; Tesarek, R. J.; Thayyullathil, R. B.; Thomsen, K.; Tian, X.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Trevor, J.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Valerio, L.; Vinton, L.; Vrba, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Wang, B.; Wang, Z.; Weber, A.; Wehmann, A.; Whittington, D.; Wilcer, N.; Wildberger, R.; Wildman, D.; Williams, K.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wood, K.; Xiao, M.; Xin, T.; Yadav, N.; Yang, S.; Zadorozhnyy, S.; Zalesak, J.; Zamorano, B.; Zhao, A.; Zirnstein, J.; Zwaska, R.; NOvA Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We report results from the first search for νμ→νe transitions by the NOvA experiment. In an exposure equivalent to 2.74 ×1020 protons on target in the upgraded NuMI beam at Fermilab, we observe 6 events in the Far Detector, compared to a background expectation of 0.99 ±0.11 (syst) events based on the Near Detector measurement. A secondary analysis observes 11 events with a background of 1.07 ±0.14 (syst) . The 3.3 σ excess of events observed in the primary analysis disfavors 0.1 π <δC P<0.5 π in the inverted mass hierarchy at the 90% C.L.

  2. First Measurement of Electron Neutrino Appearance in NOvA.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Ader, C; Andrews, M; Anfimov, N; Anghel, I; Arms, K; Arrieta-Diaz, E; Aurisano, A; Ayres, D S; Backhouse, C; Baird, M; Bambah, B A; Bays, K; Bernstein, R; Betancourt, M; Bhatnagar, V; Bhuyan, B; Bian, J; Biery, K; Blackburn, T; Bocean, V; Bogert, D; Bolshakova, A; Bowden, M; Bower, C; Broemmelsiek, D; Bromberg, C; Brunetti, G; Bu, X; Butkevich, A; Capista, D; Catano-Mur, E; Chase, T R; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Chowdhury, B; Coan, T E; Coelho, J A B; Colo, M; Cooper, J; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Cunningham, A; Davies, G S; Davies, J P; Del Tutto, M; Derwent, P F; Deepthi, K N; Demuth, D; Desai, S; Deuerling, G; Devan, A; Dey, J; Dharmapalan, R; Ding, P; Dixon, S; Djurcic, Z; Dukes, E C; Duyang, H; Ehrlich, R; Feldman, G J; Felt, N; Fenyves, E J; Flumerfelt, E; Foulkes, S; Frank, M J; Freeman, W; Gabrielyan, M; Gallagher, H R; Gebhard, M; Ghosh, T; Gilbert, W; Giri, A; Goadhouse, S; Gomes, R A; Goodenough, L; Goodman, M C; Grichine, V; Grossman, N; Group, R; Grudzinski, J; Guarino, V; Guo, B; Habig, A; Handler, T; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Hatzikoutelis, A; Heller, K; Howcroft, C; Huang, J; Huang, X; Hylen, J; Ishitsuka, M; Jediny, F; Jensen, C; Jensen, D; Johnson, C; Jostlein, H; Kafka, G K; Kamyshkov, Y; Kasahara, S M S; Kasetti, S; Kephart, K; Koizumi, G; Kotelnikov, S; Kourbanis, I; Krahn, Z; Kravtsov, V; Kreymer, A; Kulenberg, Ch; Kumar, A; Kutnink, T; Kwarciancy, R; Kwong, J; Lang, K; Lee, A; Lee, W M; Lee, K; Lein, S; Liu, J; Lokajicek, M; Lozier, J; Lu, Q; Lucas, P; Luchuk, S; Lukens, P; Lukhanin, G; Magill, S; Maan, K; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Martens, M; Martincik, J; Mason, P; Matera, K; Mathis, M; Matveev, V; Mayer, N; McCluskey, E; Mehdiyev, R; Merritt, H; Messier, M D; Meyer, H; Miao, T; Michael, D; Mikheyev, S P; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mohanta, R; Moren, A; Mualem, L; Muether, M; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Newman, H B; Nelson, J K; Niner, E; Norman, A; Nowak, J; Oksuzian, Y; Olshevskiy, A; Oliver, J; Olson, T; Paley, J; Pandey, P; Para, A; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Pearson, N; Perevalov, D; Pershey, D; Peterson, E; Petti, R; Phan-Budd, S; Piccoli, L; Pla-Dalmau, A; Plunkett, R K; Poling, R; Potukuchi, B; Psihas, F; Pushka, D; Qiu, X; Raddatz, N; Radovic, A; Rameika, R A; Ray, R; Rebel, B; Rechenmacher, R; Reed, B; Reilly, R; Rocco, D; Rodkin, D; Ruddick, K; Rusack, R; Ryabov, V; Sachdev, K; Sahijpal, S; Sahoo, H; Samoylov, O; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schlabach, P; Schneps, J; Schroeter, R; Sepulveda-Quiroz, J; Shanahan, P; Sherwood, B; Sheshukov, A; Singh, J; Singh, V; Smith, A; Smith, D; Smolik, J; Solomey, N; Sotnikov, A; Sousa, A; Soustruznik, K; Stenkin, Y; Strait, M; Suter, L; Talaga, R L; Tamsett, M C; Tariq, S; Tas, P; Tesarek, R J; Thayyullathil, R B; Thomsen, K; Tian, X; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Trevor, J; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Valerio, L; Vinton, L; Vrba, T; Waldron, A V; Wang, B; Wang, Z; Weber, A; Wehmann, A; Whittington, D; Wilcer, N; Wildberger, R; Wildman, D; Williams, K; Wojcicki, S G; Wood, K; Xiao, M; Xin, T; Yadav, N; Yang, S; Zadorozhnyy, S; Zalesak, J; Zamorano, B; Zhao, A; Zirnstein, J; Zwaska, R

    2016-04-15

    We report results from the first search for ν_{μ}→ν_{e} transitions by the NOvA experiment. In an exposure equivalent to 2.74×10^{20} protons on target in the upgraded NuMI beam at Fermilab, we observe 6 events in the Far Detector, compared to a background expectation of 0.99±0.11(syst) events based on the Near Detector measurement. A secondary analysis observes 11 events with a background of 1.07±0.14(syst). The 3.3σ excess of events observed in the primary analysis disfavors 0.1π<δ_{CP}<0.5π in the inverted mass hierarchy at the 90% C.L.

  3. Neutrino-nucleus scattering of {sup 95,97}Mo and {sup 116}Cd

    SciTech Connect

    Ydrefors, E.; Almosly, W.; Suhonen, J.

    2013-12-30

    Accurate knowledge about the nuclear responses to supernova neutrinos for relevant nuclear targets is important both for neutrino detection and for astrophysical applications. In this paper we discuss the cross sections for the charged-current neutrino-nucleus scatterings off {sup 95,97}Mo and {sup 116}Cd. The microscopic quasiparticle-phonon model is adopted for the odd-even nuclei {sup 95,97}Mo. In the case of {sup 116}Cd we present cross sections both for the Bonn one-boson-exchange potential and self-consistent calculations based on modern Skyrme interactions.

  4. Nonadiabatic three-neutrino oscillations in matter

    SciTech Connect

    DOlivo, J.C.; Oteo, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Oscillations of three neutrinos in matter are analyzed by using the Magnus expansion for the time-evolution operator. We derive a simple expression for the electron-neutrino survival probability which is applied to the examination of the effect of a third neutrino on the nonadiabatic flavor transformations. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasielastic Scattering on Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Bugel, L.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Djurcic, Z.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Monroe, J.; Schmitz, D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sorel, M.; Zeller, G. P.; Bazarko, A. O.; Laird, E. M.; Meyers, P. D.; Patterson, R. B.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Tanaka, H. A.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Finley, D. A.

    2008-01-25

    The observation of neutrino oscillations is clear evidence for physics beyond the standard model. To make precise measurements of this phenomenon, neutrino oscillation experiments, including MiniBooNE, require an accurate description of neutrino charged current quasielastic (CCQE) cross sections to predict signal samples. Using a high-statistics sample of {nu}{sub {mu}} CCQE events, MiniBooNE finds that a simple Fermi gas model, with appropriate adjustments, accurately characterizes the CCQE events observed in a carbon-based detector. The extracted parameters include an effective axial mass, M{sub A}{sup eff}=1.23{+-}0.20 GeV, that describes the four-momentum dependence of the axial-vector form factor of the nucleon, and a Pauli-suppression parameter, {kappa}=1.019{+-}0.011. Such a modified Fermi gas model may also be used by future accelerator-based experiments measuring neutrino oscillations on nuclear targets.

  6. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    DOE PAGES

    Mousseau, J.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5–50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy.more » However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x < 0.1. This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.« less

  7. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Minerν A Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5-50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy. However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x <0.1 . This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice et al. (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.

  8. Why black hole production in scattering of cosmic ray neutrinos is generically suppressed.

    PubMed

    Stojkovic, Dejan; Starkman, Glenn D; Dai, De-Chang

    2006-02-01

    It has been argued that neutrinos originating from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays can produce black holes deep in the atmosphere in models with TeV-scale quantum gravity. Such black-hole events could be observed at the Auger Observatory. However, any phenomenologically viable model with a low scale of quantum gravity must explain how to preserve protons from rapid decay. We argue that the suppression of proton decay will also suppress lepton-nucleon scattering and hence black-hole production by scattering of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray neutrinos in the atmosphere. We discuss explicitly the split fermion solution to the problem of fast proton decay.

  9. Measurement of muon neutrino quasi-elastic scattering on carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; Djurcic, Z.; /Alabama U. /Bucknell U. /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Columbia U. /Embry-Riddle Aeronautical U. /Fermilab /Indiana U. /Los Alamos /Louisiana State U. /Michigan U.

    2007-06-01

    Low energy (200 < E{sub v} < 2000 MeV) neutrino oscillation experiments, including MiniBooNE, require a model of charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino interactions to predict signal samples. Using a high-statistics sample of muon neutrino CCQE events, MiniBooNE finds that a simple Fermi gas model, with appropriate adjustments, accurately characterizes the CCQE events observed in a carbon-based detector. The extracted parameters include an effective axial mass, M{sub A} = 1.23 {+-} 0.20 GeV, used to describe the four-momentum dependence of the axial-vector form factor of the nucleon; and a Pauli-suppression parameter, {kappa} = 1.019 {+-} 0.011.

  10. A method for measuring coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering at a far off-axis high-energy neutrino beam target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brice, S. J.; Cooper, R. L.; DeJongh, F.; Empl, A.; Garrison, L. M.; Hime, A.; Hungerford, E.; Kobilarcik, T.; Loer, B.; Mariani, C.; Mocko, M.; Muhrer, G.; Pattie, R.; Pavlovic, Z.; Ramberg, E.; Scholberg, K.; Tayloe, R.; Thornton, R. T.; Yoo, J.; Young, A.

    2014-04-01

    We present an experimental method for measuring the process of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS). This method uses a detector situated transverse to a high-energy neutrino beam production target. This detector would be sensitive to the low-energy neutrinos arising from decay-at-rest pions in the target. We discuss the physics motivation for making this measurement and outline the predicted backgrounds and sensitivities using this approach. We report a measurement of neutron backgrounds as found in an off-axis surface location of the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) target. The results indicate that the Fermilab BNB target is a favorable location for a CENNS experiment.

  11. A dedicated torsion balance to detect neutrinos by coherent scattering on high Debye temperature monocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruceru, I.; Nicolescu, G.; Duliu, O. G.

    2008-11-01

    Coherent scattering of neutrinos on high Debye temperature monocrystals represent an alternative to detect solar as well as other high flux neutrino sources such as nuclear reactors or nuclear tests. Therefore, the possibility of detecting neutrinos by using sapphire monocrystals is presented and analyzed. Preliminary evaluations showed that 1 MeV neutrinos with a fluency density of 1012 cm-1 s-1 could interact with a 100 g sapphire monocrystal with a force of about 10-6 dyne, value measurable with a high sensitivity torsion balance. For this reason a torsion balance provided with 1 m length molybdenum or tungsten wire and an optical autocollimator able to measure small rotation angles of about 0.1 seconds of arc was designed, constructed and now is under preliminary tests. Both theoretical and practical implications of such kind of detector are presented and discussed.

  12. Terascale Physics Opportunities at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment:. NuSOnG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, T.; Batra, P.; Bugel, L.; Camilleri, L.; Conrad, J. M.; de Gouvêa, A.; Fisher, P. H.; Formaggio, J. A.; Jenkins, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kobilarcik, T. R.; Kopp, S.; Kyle, G.; Loinaz, W. A.; Mason, D. A.; Milner, R.; Moore, R.; Morfín, J. G.; Nakamura, M.; Naples, D.; Nienaber, P.; Olness, F. I.; Owens, J. F.; Pate, S. F.; Pronin, A.; Seligman, W. G.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Schellman, H.; Schienbein, I.; Syphers, M. J.; Tait, T. M. P.; Takeuchi, T.; Tan, C. Y.; van de Water, R. G.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yu, J. Y.

    This paper presents the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering on Glass). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain over an order of magnitude higher statistics than presently available for the purely weak processes νμ + e- → νμ + e- and νμ + e- → νe + μ-. A sample of Deep Inelastic Scattering events which is over two orders of magnitude larger than past samples will also be obtained. As a result, NuSOnG will be unique among present and planned experiments for its ability to probe neutrino couplings to Beyond the Standard Model physics. Many Beyond Standard Model theories physics predict a rich hierarchy of TeV-scale new states that can correct neutrino cross-sections, through modifications of Zνν couplings, tree-level exchanges of new particles such as Z‧'s, or through loop-level oblique corrections to gauge boson propagators. These corrections are generic in theories of extra dimensions, extended gauge symmetries, supersymmetry, and more. The sensitivity of NuSOnG to this new physics extends beyond 5 TeV mass scales. This paper reviews these physics opportunities.

  13. Search for Elastic Coherent Neutrino Scattering off Atomic Nuclei at the Kalinin Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, D. Yu.; Belov, V. A.; Bolozdynya, A. I.; Burenkov, A. A.; Efremenko, Yu. V.; Etenko, A. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Khromov, A. V.; Konovalov, A. M.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Kumpan, A. V.; Melikyan, Yu. A.; Rudik, D. G.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.

    We propose to detect and study neutrino neutral elastic coherent scattering off atomic nuclei with two-phase emission detector with liquid xenon as a target medium. One of the possible experimental site is a Kalinin Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) situated in the Russian Federation. In this paper we discuss the design of the detector and expected signals and background for this site.

  14. Neutrino Oscillations and the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, David

    2001-04-01

    When the existence of the neutrino was almost apologetically first proposed by Wolfgang Pauli it was intended to explain the mysterious apparent absence of energy and momentum in beta decay. 70 years later the neutrino has indeed solved that mystery, but it has generated still more of its own. Are neutrinos massive? Is it possible to create a neutrino with its spin in the same direction as its momentum? What fraction of the mass of the Universe is made up of neutrinos? Are the flavour labels which we put on neutrinos, like electron and muon, really fixed or can they change? Why does no experiment see the predicted flux of neutrinos from the Sun? Why do there appear to be roughly equal numbers of muon and electron neutrinos created in our atmosphere, rather than the 2:1 ratio we would expect? Many of these questions were coupled when Bruno Pontecorvo first suggested that the shortfall in solar neutrino measurements were caused by neutrino oscillations - neutrinos spontaneously changing flavour as they travel from the Sun. 30 years later we still await definitive proof of that conjecture, and providing that proof is the reason for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The talk will discuss the current state of neutrino oscillations studies, and show how the unique capabilities of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory can provide definitive proof of whether neutrino oscillations are the long-sought answer to the solar neutrino problem.

  15. Neutrino oscillations in the presence of super-light sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divari, Paraskevi; Vergados, John

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of conversion of super-light sterile neutrino (SLSN) to electron neutrino in matter like that of the Earth. In the Sun the resonance conversion between SLSN and electron neutrino via the neutral current is suppressed due to the smallness of neutron number. On the other hand, neutron number density can play an important role in the Earth, making the scenario of SLSN quite interesting. The effect of CP-violating phases on active-SLSN oscillations is also discussed. Reactor neutrino experiments with medium or short baseline may probe the scenario of SLSN.

  16. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  17. Cross section measurements for quasi-elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering with the MINOS near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dorman, Mark Edward

    2008-04-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Chicago, Illinois. MINOS measures neutrino interactions in two large iron-scintillator tracking/sampling calorimeters; the Near Detector on-site at FNAL and the Far Detector located in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The Near Detector has recorded a large number of neutrino interactions and this high statistics dataset can be used to make precision measurements of neutrino interaction cross sections. The cross section for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering has been measured by a number of previous experiments and these measurements disagree by up to 30%. A method to select a quasi-elastic enriched sample of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector is presented and a procedure to fit the kinematic distributions of this sample and extract the quasi-elastic cross section is introduced. The accuracy and robustness of the fitting procedure is studied using mock data and finally results from fits to the MINOS Near Detector data are presented.

  18. Superscaling in electron-nucleus scattering and its link to CC and NC QE neutrino-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro, M. B.; Amaro, J. E.; Caballero, J. A.; González-Jiménez, R.; Donnelly, T. W.; Ivanov, M.; Udías, J. M.

    2015-05-15

    The superscaling approach (SuSA) to neutrino-nucleus scattering, based on the assumed universality of the scaling function for electromagnetic and weak interactions, is reviewed. The predictions of the SuSA model for bot CC and NC differential and total cross sections are presented and compared with the MiniBooNE data. The role of scaling violations, in particular the contribution of meson exchange currents in the two-particle two-hole sector, is explored.

  19. A phenomenological study of photon production in low energy neutrino nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, James P; Goldman, Terry J

    2009-01-01

    Low energy photon production is an important background to many current and future precision neutrino experiments. We present a phenomenological study of t-channel radiative corrections to neutral current neutrino nucleus scattering. After introducing the relevant processes and phenomenological coupling constants, we will explore the derived energy and angular distributions as well as total cross-section predictions along with their estimated uncertainties. This is supplemented throughout with comments on possible experimental signatures and implications. We conclude with a general discussion of the analysis in the context of complimentary methodologies. This is based on a talk presented at the DPF 2009 meeting in Detroit MI.

  20. Enhanced sensitivity to dark matter self-annihilations in the Sun using neutrino spectral information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rott, C.; Tanaka, T.; Itow, Y.

    2011-09-01

    Self-annihilating dark matter gravitationally captured by the Sun could yield observable neutrino signals at current and next generation neutrino detectors. By exploiting such signals, neutrino detectors can probe the spin-dependent scattering of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with nucleons in the Sun. We describe a method how to convert constraints on neutrino fluxes to a limit on the WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section. In this method all neutrino flavors can be treated in a very similar way. We study the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes for Solar WIMP signals using vertex contained events and find that this detection channel is of particular importance in the search for low mass WIMPs. We obtain highly competitive sensitivities with all neutrino flavor channels for a Megaton sized detector through the application of basic spectral selection criteria. Best results are obtained with the electron neutrino channel. We discuss associated uncertainties and provide a procedure how to treat them for analyses in a consistent way.

  1. CAPTAIN-Minerνa. Neutrino-Argon Scattering in a Medium-Energy Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mauger, Christopher M.

    2015-10-29

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab is currently providing an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the NOνA, MINERνA and MINOS+ experiments. By installing the 5-ton CAPTAIN liquid argon TPC in front of the MINERνA detector in the NuMI beamline and combining the data from the CAPTAIN, MINERνA and MINOS+ detectors, a broad program of few-GeV neutrino cross section measurements on argon can be pursued. These measurements will be extremely helpful for future oscillation experiments. By directly comparing the cross sections on argon to MINERνA’s scintillator (CH) target, a new level of precision can be achieved in the measurements of the effects of the nucleus on neutrino interactions. These effects are of interest to not only the particle physics but also the nuclear physics community. This document describes in detail the physics goals of the CAPTAIN-MINERνA experiment, in addition to a first estimate of the technical resources required to install, commission and operate the CAPTAIN detector in front of the MINERVA detector.

  2. Neutrinos

    PubMed Central

    Besson, Dave; Cowen, Doug; Selen, Mats; Wiebusch, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Neutrinos represent a new “window” to the Universe, spanning a large range of energy. We discuss the science of neutrino astrophysics and focus on two energy regimes. At “lower” energies (≈1 MeV), studies of neutrinos born inside the sun, or produced in interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere, have allowed the first incontrovertible evidence that neutrinos have mass. At energies typically one thousand to one million times higher, sources further than the sun (both within the Milky Way and beyond) are expected to produce a flux of particles that can be detected only through neutrinos. PMID:10588680

  3. RED-100 detector for the first observation of the elastic coherent neutrino scattering off xenon nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, D. Yu; Berdnikova, A. K.; Belov, V. A.; Bolozdynya, A. I.; Burenkov, A. A.; Efremenko, Yu V.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Etenko, A. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Khromov, A. V.; Konovalov, A. M.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Kozlova, E. S.; Kumpan, A. V.; Krakhmalova, T. D.; Melikyan, Yu A.; Naumov, P. P.; Rudik, D. G.; Shafigullin, R. R.; Shakirov, A. V.; Simakov, G. E.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Stekhanov, V. N.; Tobolkin, A. A.; Tolstukhin, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    The RED-100 (Russian Emission Detector) is being constructed for the experiment to search for elastic coherent neutrino scattering off atomic nuclei. This fundamental process was predicted several decades ago by the Standard Model of electroweak interactions but has not been discovered yet. The RED-100 is a two-phase emission xenon detector containing ∼200 kg of the liquid Xe (∼ 100 kg of that is in a fiducial volume). One of the possible sites to carry out the experiment is the SNS (Spallation Neutron Source) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA. SNS is the world's most intense pulsed source of neutrinos and unique place to study neutrino properties. The energy spectrum of neutrinos produced at the SNS extends up to ∼ 50 MeV and satisfies coherence condition. These neutrinos give kinetic energies of Xe recoils up to a few tens of keV where the response of nuclear recoils is well-known from neutron calibrations of dark matter detectors. The detector will be deployed in the basement under the experimental hall at a distance of ∼30 meters from the SNS target. The expected signal and background (neutron and gamma) are estimated for this specific location. The detector details, current status and future plans are provided.

  4. Superscaling Predictions for Neutral Current Quasielastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M. C.; Udias, J. M.; Caballero, J. A.; Donnelly, T. W.

    2008-02-08

    The application of superscaling ideas to predict neutral-current (NC) quasielastic (QE) neutrino cross sections is investigated. The relativistic impulse approximation (RIA) using the same relativistic mean field potential (RMF) for both initial and final nucleons -- a model that reproduces the experimental (e,e{sup '}) scaling function -- is used to illustrate our findings. While NC reactions are apparently not well suited for scaling analyses, to a large extent, the RIA-RMF predictions do exhibit superscaling. Independence of the scaled response on the nuclear species is very well fulfilled. The RIA-RMF NC superscaling function is in good agreement with the experimental (e,e{sup '}) one. The idea that electroweak processes can be described with a universal scaling function, provided that mild restrictions on the kinematics are assumed, is shown to be valid.

  5. Model independent extraction of the axial mass parameter in CCQE anti neutrino-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebe, Heather

    2013-10-01

    Neutrino oscillation studies depend on a consistent value for the axial mass. For this reason, a model-independent extraction of this parameter from quasielastic (anti)neutrino-nucleon scattering data is vital. While most studies employ a model-dependent extraction using the dipole model of the axial form factor, we present a model-independent description using the z expansion of the axial form factor. Quasielastic antineutrino scattering data on C-12 from the MiniBooNE experiment are analyzed using this model-independent description. The value found, mA = 0 .85-0 . 06 + 0 . 13 +/- 0 . 13 GeV, differs significantly from the value utilized by the MiniBooNE Collaboration, mA = 1 . 35 GeV. Advisor: Dr. Gil Paz Wayne State Univerity.

  6. Neutrino-induced reactions on nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallmeister, K.; Mosel, U.; Weil, J.

    2016-09-01

    Background: Long-baseline experiments such as the planned deep underground neutrino experiment (DUNE) require theoretical descriptions of the complete event in a neutrino-nucleus reaction. Since nuclear targets are used this requires a good understanding of neutrino-nucleus interactions. Purpose: Develop a consistent theory and code framework for the description of lepton-nucleus interactions that can be used to describe not only inclusive cross sections, but also the complete final state of the reaction. Methods: The Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) implementation of quantum-kinetic transport theory is used, with improvements in its treatment of the nuclear ground state and of 2p2h interactions. For the latter an empirical structure function from electron scattering data is used as a basis. Results: Results for electron-induced inclusive cross sections are given as a necessary check for the overall quality of this approach. The calculated neutrino-induced inclusive double-differential cross sections show good agreement data from neutrino and antineutrino reactions for different neutrino flavors at MiniBooNE and T2K. Inclusive double-differential cross sections for MicroBooNE, NOvA, MINERvA, and LBNF/DUNE are given. Conclusions: Based on the GiBUU model of lepton-nucleus interactions a good theoretical description of inclusive electron-, neutrino-, and antineutrino-nucleus data over a wide range of energies, different neutrino flavors, and different experiments is now possible. Since no tuning is involved this theory and code should be reliable also for new energy regimes and target masses.

  7. NOνA Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jediny, Filip

    2015-06-01

    The NOνA experiment is a long-baseline accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment. It uses the upgraded NuMI beam from Fermilab and measures electron-neutrino appearance and muon-neutrino disappearance at its far detector in Ash River, Minnesota. Goals of the experiment include measurements of θ13, mass hierarchy and the CP violating phase. NOνA has begun to take neutrino data and first neutrino candidates are observed in its detectors. This document provides an overview of the scientific reach of the experiment, the status of detector operation and physics analysis, as well as the first data.

  8. Limit on flavor-changing neutral currents from a measurement of neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L. University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 ); Allen, R.C.; Chen, H.H.; Hausammann, R.; Lee, W.P.; Lu, X.; Mahler, H.J.; Wang, K.C. ); Bowles, T.J.; Burman, R.L.; Carlini, R.D.; Cochran, D.R.F.; Doe, P.J.; Frank, J.S.; Potter, M.E.; Sandberg, V.D. ); Piasetzky, E. )

    1992-02-01

    From a measurement of the absolute cross section in {nu}{sub {ital e}e}{sup {minus}} elastic scattering we have set a limit on flavor-changing neutral currents in the neutrino sector. We find that an off-diagonal, flavor-changing coupling is limited to 1{minus}{ital f}{sub {ital e}{ital e}}{lt}0.35 (90% C.L.).

  9. Searching for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos with liquid scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, J.; Sandick, P.

    2015-06-22

    We consider searches for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos in the core of the Sun. We find that liquid scintillation neutrino detectors have enhanced sensitivity to this class of dark matter models, due to the energy and angular resolution possible for electron neutrinos and antineutrinos that scatter via charged-current interactions. In particular we find that KamLAND, utilizing existing data, could provide better sensitivity to such models than any current direct detection experiment for m{sub X}≲15 Gev. KamLAND’s sensitivity is signal-limited, and future liquid scintillation or liquid argon detectors with similar energy and angular resolution, but with larger exposure, will provide significantly better sensitivity. These detectors may be particularly powerful probes of dark matter with mass O(10) GeV.

  10. Searching for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos with liquid scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, J.; Sandick, P. E-mail: sandick@physics.utah.edu

    2015-06-01

    We consider searches for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos in the core of the Sun. We find that liquid scintillation neutrino detectors have enhanced sensitivity to this class of dark matter models, due to the energy and angular resolution possible for electron neutrinos and antineutrinos that scatter via charged-current interactions. In particular we find that KamLAND, utilizing existing data, could provide better sensitivity to such models than any current direct detection experiment for m{sub X} ∼< 15 Gev. KamLAND's sensitivity is signal-limited, and future liquid scintillation or liquid argon detectors with similar energy and angular resolution, but with larger exposure, will provide significantly better sensitivity. These detectors may be particularly powerful probes of dark matter with mass O(10) GeV.

  11. Recent Advances and Open Questions in Neutrino-induced Quasi-elastic Scattering and Single Photon Production

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, G. T.; Harris, D. A.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tayloe, R.; Zeller, G. P.

    2015-06-15

    The study of neutrino–nucleus interactions has recently seen rapid development with a new generation of accelerator-based neutrino experiments employing medium and heavy nuclear targets for the study of neutrino oscillations. A few unexpected results in the study of quasi-elastic scattering and single photon production have spurred a revisiting of the underlying nuclear physics and connections to electron–nucleus scattering. A thorough understanding and resolution of these issues is essential for future progress in the study of neutrino oscillations.

  12. Effect of strangeness for neutrino (antineutrino) scattering in the quasi-elastic region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. S.; Yu, Byung Geel; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    2008-05-15

    We present the neutral- and charged-current reactions by incident neutrino (antineutrino) scattering on the nucleon and on the {sup 12}C target in the quasi-elastic region within the framework of a relativistic single-particle model. The incident energies at 500 MeV and 1 GeV are used for the scattering. Effects of strangeness are studied thoroughly on the cross sections, the ratios between the neutral- and charged-current reactions, and the asymmetries by incident neutrino and antineutrino. We find that there exists some cancellation of the strange quark contributions between the knocked-out protons and neutrons in the neutrino (antineutrino)-nucleus scattering. The effect of strangeness is exhibited more strongly on the asymmetry than on the ratio or cross section. On a difference of the asymmetry, the effect of strangeness appears strongly, but on a summation of the asymmetry, the effect almost disappears in the low and middle kinetic energies of the knocked-out nucleon.

  13. Possible explanation of the solar-neutrino puzzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bethe, H. A.

    1986-01-01

    A new derivation of the Mikheyev and Smirnov (1985) mechanism for the conversion of electron neutrinos into mu neutrinos when traversing the sun is presented, and various hypotheses set forth. It is assumed that this process is responsible for the detection of fewer solar neutrinos than expected, with neutrinos below a minimum energy, E(m), being undetectable. E(m) is found to be about 6 MeV, and the difference of the squares of the respective neutrino masses is calculated to be 6 X 10 to the - 5th sq eV. A restriction on the neutrino mixing angle is assumed such that the change of density near the crossing point is adiabatic. It is predicted that no resonance conversion of neutrinos will occur in the dense core of supernovae, but conversion of electron neutrinos to mu neutrinos will occur as they escape outward through a density region around 100.

  14. Influence of short-range correlations in neutrino-nucleus scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cuyck, T.; Jachowicz, N.; González-Jiménez, R.; Martini, M.; Pandey, V.; Ryckebusch, J.; Van Dessel, N.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Nuclear short-range correlations (SRCs) are corrections to mean-field wave functions connected with the short-distance behavior of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. These SRCs provide corrections to lepton-nucleus cross sections as computed in the impulse approximation (IA). Purpose: We want to investigate the influence of SRCs on the one-nucleon (1 N ) and two-nucleon (2 N ) knockout channels for muon-neutrino induced processes on a 12 target at energies relevant for contemporary measurements. Method: The model adopted in this work corrects the impulse approximation for SRCs by shifting the complexity induced by the SRCs from the wave functions to the operators. Due to the local character of the SRCs, it is argued that the expansion of these operators can be truncated at a low order. Results: The model is compared with electron-scattering data, and two-particle two-hole responses are presented for neutrino scattering. The contributions from the vector and axial-vector parts of the nuclear current as well as the central, tensor, and spin-isospin parts of the SRCs are studied. Conclusions: Nuclear SRCs affect the 1 N knockout channel and give rise to 2 N knockout. The exclusive neutrino-induced 2 N knockout cross section of SRC pairs is shown and the 2 N knockout contribution to the QE signal is calculated. The strength occurs as a broad background which extends into the dip region.

  15. Neutrino-Nucleus Coherent NC({pi}{sup 0}) Scattering in the MINOS Near Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cherdack, Daniel

    2011-11-23

    Neutrino reactions recorded by the MINOS Near Detector in exposures totalling 2.8x10{sup 20} protons-on-target were searched for single, highly-forward {pi}{sup 0} mesons produced by coherent neutral current interactions {nu}{sub {mu}}+A{yields}{nu}{sub {mu}}+A+{pi}{sup 0}. Events having topologies consistent with single electromagnetic showers were isolated. Contributions from neutrino-induced backgrounds are determined using a data-driven fit of Monte Carlo distributions over sideband regions. The fit is used to project the background levels into signal regions. An excess of events above the best-fit background is observed for shower topologies of few GeV energies and at very forward angles. The partial cross section for NC({pi}{sup 0}) coherent scattering yielding E{sub vis}({pi}{sup 0})>1.0 GeV averaged over incident neutrino energies 2.4{<=}E{sub {nu}{<=}9}.0 GeV is (31.6{+-}10.5)x10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleus. Total cross sections for coherent scattering from nuclei of average nucleon number A{sub eff} = 48 and for iron (A = 56) nuclei are estimated for } = 4.9 GeV.

  16. Evidence of coherent $$K^{+}$$ meson production in neutrino-nucleus scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Z.

    2016-08-05

    Neutrino-induced charged-current coherent kaon production νμA→μ-K+A is a rare, inelastic electroweak process that brings a K+ on shell and leaves the target nucleus intact in its ground state. This process is significantly lower in rate than the neutrino-induced charged-current coherent pion production because of Cabibbo suppression and a kinematic suppression due to the larger kaon mass. We search for such events in the scintillator tracker of MINERvA by observing the final state K+, μ-, and no other detector activity, and by using the kinematics of the final state particles to reconstruct the small momentum transfer to the nucleus, which ismore » a model-independent characteristic of coherent scattering. Furthermore, we find the first experimental evidence for the process at 3σ significance.« less

  17. Background Neutron Studies for Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering Measurements at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoff, Diane; Coherent Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The COHERENT collaboration has proposed to measure coherent, elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CE νNS) cross sections on several nuclear targets using neutrinos produced at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The largest background of concern arises from beam-induced, fast neutrons that can mimic a nuclear recoil signal event in the detector. Multiple technologies of neutron detection have been employed at prospective experiment sites at the SNS. Analysis of these data have produced a consistent picture of the backgrounds expected for a CE νNS measurement. These background studies show that at suitable locations, the fast neutrons of concern arrive mainly in the prompt 1.3 μs window and the neutrons in the delayed window are primarily of lower energies that are relatively easier to shield.

  18. Evidence of Coherent K+ Meson Production in Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Marshall, C. M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Endress, E.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Simon, C.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    Neutrino-induced charged-current coherent kaon production νμA →μ-K+A is a rare, inelastic electroweak process that brings a K+ on shell and leaves the target nucleus intact in its ground state. This process is significantly lower in rate than the neutrino-induced charged-current coherent pion production because of Cabibbo suppression and a kinematic suppression due to the larger kaon mass. We search for such events in the scintillator tracker of MINERvA by observing the final state K+, μ-, and no other detector activity, and by using the kinematics of the final state particles to reconstruct the small momentum transfer to the nucleus, which is a model-independent characteristic of coherent scattering. We find the first experimental evidence for the process at 3 σ significance.

  19. Evidence of Coherent K^{+} Meson Production in Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Marshall, C M; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bellantoni, L; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; da Motta, H; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Endress, E; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Ghosh, A; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Nuruzzaman; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ramirez, M A; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Simon, C; Solano Salinas, C J; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zhang, D

    2016-08-01

    Neutrino-induced charged-current coherent kaon production ν_{μ}A→μ^{-}K^{+}A is a rare, inelastic electroweak process that brings a K^{+} on shell and leaves the target nucleus intact in its ground state. This process is significantly lower in rate than the neutrino-induced charged-current coherent pion production because of Cabibbo suppression and a kinematic suppression due to the larger kaon mass. We search for such events in the scintillator tracker of MINERvA by observing the final state K^{+}, μ^{-}, and no other detector activity, and by using the kinematics of the final state particles to reconstruct the small momentum transfer to the nucleus, which is a model-independent characteristic of coherent scattering. We find the first experimental evidence for the process at 3σ significance. PMID:27541459

  20. Evidence of Coherent K^{+} Meson Production in Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Marshall, C M; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bellantoni, L; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; da Motta, H; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Endress, E; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Ghosh, A; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Nuruzzaman; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ramirez, M A; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Simon, C; Solano Salinas, C J; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zhang, D

    2016-08-01

    Neutrino-induced charged-current coherent kaon production ν_{μ}A→μ^{-}K^{+}A is a rare, inelastic electroweak process that brings a K^{+} on shell and leaves the target nucleus intact in its ground state. This process is significantly lower in rate than the neutrino-induced charged-current coherent pion production because of Cabibbo suppression and a kinematic suppression due to the larger kaon mass. We search for such events in the scintillator tracker of MINERvA by observing the final state K^{+}, μ^{-}, and no other detector activity, and by using the kinematics of the final state particles to reconstruct the small momentum transfer to the nucleus, which is a model-independent characteristic of coherent scattering. We find the first experimental evidence for the process at 3σ significance.

  1. Neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The field of neutrino physics has expanded greatly in recent years with the discovery that neutrinos change flavor and therefore have mass. Although there are many neutrino physics results since the last DIS workshop, these proceedings concentrate on recent neutrino physics results that either add to or depend on the understanding of Deep Inelastic Scattering. They also describe the short and longer term future of neutrino DIS experiments.

  2. Proposal to perform a high - statisics neutrino scattering experiment using a fine - grained detector in the NuMI Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Morfin, J.G.; McFarland, K.; /Rochester U.

    2003-12-01

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab will provide an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the MINOS neutrino-oscillation experiment. The spacious and fully-outfitted MINOS near detector hall will be the ideal venue for a high-statistics, high-resolution {nu} and {bar {nu}}-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiment. The experiment described here will measure neutrino cross-sections and probe nuclear effects essential to present and future neutrino-oscillation experiments. Moreover, with the high NuMI beam intensity, the experiment will either initially address or significantly improve our knowledge of a wide variety of neutrino physics topics of interest and importance to the elementary-particle and nuclear-physics communities.

  3. Investigation of quasielastic muon-neutrino scattering on nuclei at E{sub v} < 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Agababyan, N. M.; Ammosov, V. V.; Atayan, M.; Grigoryan, N.; Gulkanyan, H.; Ivanilov, A. A. Karamyan, Zh.; Korotkov, B. A.

    2007-10-15

    Quasielastic muon-neutrino scattering on nuclei of propane-Freon mixture at energies in the range E{sub v} < 1 GeV is studied. The multiplicity, momentum, and emission-angle distributions of final protons are measured along with the dependence of the mean values for these distributions on the neutrino energy in the range 0.2 < E{sub v} < 1 GeV.

  4. Charge Coupled Devices for detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez Moroni, Guillermo; Estrada, Juan; Paolini, Eduardo E.; Cancelo, Gustavo; Tiffenberg, Javier; Molina, Jorge

    2015-04-03

    In this article the feasibility of using charge coupled devices (CCD) to detect low-energy neutrinos through their coherent scattering with nuclei is analyzed. The detection of neutrinos through this standard model process has been elusive because of the small energy deposited in such interaction. Typical particle detectors have thresholds of a few keV, and most of the energy deposition expected from coherent scattering is well below this level. The CCD detectors discussed in this paper can operate at a threshold of approximately 30 eV, making them ideal for observing this signal. On a CCD array of 500 g located next to a power nuclear reactor the number of coherent scattering events expected is about 3000 events/year. Our results shows that a detection with a confidence level of 99% can be reached within 16 days of continuous operation; with the current 52 g detector prototype this time lapse extends to five months.

  5. Inclusive charged-current neutrino-nucleus scattering in the quasielastic region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    2011-03-15

    We study inclusive charged-current reaction through total cross sections of neutrino-nucleus scattering within the framework of a relativistic single-particle model in the quasielastic region. To describe the final-state interaction between knocked-out nucleons and the residual nucleus, a real potential of final nucleons, which is generated by a relativistic mean field, is used with the assumption of no loss of flux, which leads to current conservation and gauge invariance. We calculate ({nu}{sub {mu},{mu}}{sup -}) and ({nu}-bar{sub {mu},{mu}}{sup +}) reactions. In these calculations, {sup 12}C, {sup 40}Ca, and {sup 208}Pb are used as target nuclei and the incident neutrino (antineutrino) energies are exploited up to 4 GeV. We find that the effect of the final-state interaction by the real potential of the knocked-out nucleons reduces cross sections by about 15%, similar to the effect of electron scattering. Furthermore, the effect of the Coulomb distortion for the outgoing leptons is shown to be different from the electron scattering. Finally, our total cross sections by scaling number of participated nucleons are presented to compare with experimental data.

  6. Limits on dark matter proton scattering from neutrino telescopes using micrOMEGAs

    SciTech Connect

    Bélanger, G.; Silva, J. Da; Perrillat-Bottonet, T.; Pukhov, A.

    2015-12-17

    Limits on dark matter spin dependent elastic scattering cross section on protons derived from IceCube data are obtained for different dark matter annihilation channels using micrOMEGAs. The uncertainty on the derived limits, estimated by using different neutrino spectra, can reach a factor two. For all dark matter annihilation channels except for quarks, the limits on the spin dependent cross section are more stringent than those obtained in direct detection experiments. The new functions that allow to derive those limits are described.

  7. QCD Precision Measurements and Structure Function Extraction at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.; Batra, P.; Bugel, Leonard G.; Camilleri, Leslie Loris; Conrad, Janet Marie; de Gouvea, A.; Fisher, Peter H.; Formaggio, Joseph Angelo; Jenkins, J.; Karagiorgi, Georgia S.; Kobilarcik, T.R.; /Fermilab /Texas U.

    2009-06-01

    We extend the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering On Glass) to address a variety of issues including precision QCD measurements, extraction of structure functions, and the derived Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain a sample of Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) events which is over two orders of magnitude larger than past samples. We outline an innovative method for fitting the structure functions using a parameterized energy shift which yields reduced systematic uncertainties. High statistics measurements, in combination with improved systematics, will enable NuSOnG to perform discerning tests of fundamental Standard Model parameters as we search for deviations which may hint of 'Beyond the Standard Model' physics.

  8. QCD Precision Measurements and Structure Function Extraction at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment:. NuSOnG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, T.; Batra, P.; Bugel, L.; Camilleri, L.; Conrad, J. M.; de Gouvêa, A.; Fisher, P. H.; Formaggio, J. A.; Jenkins, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kobilarcik, T. R.; Kopp, S.; Kyle, G.; Loinaz, W. A.; Mason, D. A.; Milner, R.; Moore, R.; Morfín, J. G.; Nakamura, M.; Naples, D.; Nienaber, P.; Olness, F. I.; Owens, J. F.; Pate, S. F.; Pronin, A.; Seligman, W. G.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Schellman, H.; Schienbein, I.; Syphers, M. J.; Tait, T. M. P.; Takeuchi, T.; Tan, C. Y.; van de Water, R. G.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yu, J. Y.

    We extend the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering On Glass) to address a variety of issues including precision QCD measurements, extraction of structure functions, and the derived Parton Distribution Functions (PDF's). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain a sample of Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) events which is over two orders of magnitude larger than past samples. We outline an innovative method for fitting the structure functions using a parametrized energy shift which yields reduced systematic uncertainties. High statistics measurements, in combination with improved systematics, will enable NuSOnG to perform discerning tests of fundamental Standard Model parameters as we search for deviations which may hint of "Beyond the Standard Model" physics.

  9. Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, K.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Neutrinos are electrically neutral ELEMENTARY PARTICLES which experience only the weak nuclear force and gravity. Their existence was introduced as a hypothesis by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930 to explain the apparent violation of energy conservation in radioactive beta decay. Chadwick had discovered in 1914 that the energy spectrum of electrons emitted in beta decay was not monoenergetic but continuous...

  10. Observability of the neutrino flux from the inner region of the galactic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberberg, R.; Shapiro, M. M.; Stecker, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    The observability of galactic neutrinos in a detector of 10 billion tons of water with an observing time of a few years is explored. Although the atmospheric flux exceeds the galactic flux considerably at energies greater than or equal to 1 TeV, the latter may still provide a marginally observable signal owing to its directionality. Galactic muon neutrinos with energy greater than or equal to 1 TeV will produce a signal approximately 2 sigma above the atmospheric background over a four year period. If electron neutrinos can also be studied with the deep underwater muon and neutrino detector, then galactic electron neutrinos above 1 TeV would give an approximate 4 to 5 sigma signal above the electron neutrino background over a four year integration time.

  11. Final state interaction and Coulomb effect for neutrino-nucleus scattering in the quasielastic region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, M. K.

    2009-11-25

    We study the effect of final state interaction between outgoing nucleons and residual nuclei through total cross sections of neutrino-nucleus scattering within the framework of a relativistic single-particle model in the quasielastic region. To investigate the effect of the FSI, a relativistic phenomenological optical potential and a real potential for final nucleons are used. The real potential refers to no loss of flux while the optical potential indicates an absorption. We calculate both neutral-current reaction such as (v, v') and charged-current reactions like (v{sub e}, e{sup -}) and (v{sub {mu}}, {mu}{sup -}). In these calculations, {sup 12}C is used as a target nucleus and the incident neutrino (antineutrino) energies are exploited up to 2 GeV. We find that the effect of the FSI by the optical potential reduces cross sections about 50% and about 15% for the real potential. Furthermore, in the case of the charged-current reaction, we also calculate the Coulomb distortion of the outgoing leptons for {sup 12}C, {sup 40}Ca, and {sup 208}Pb. As a consequence, the effect of the Coulomb distortion is about a half by comparing with the case of electron scattering.

  12. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellerive, A.; Klein, J. R.; McDonald, A. B.; Noble, A. J.; Poon, A. W. P.

    2016-07-01

    This review paper provides a summary of the published results of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment that was carried out by an international scientific collaboration with data collected during the period from 1999 to 2006. By using heavy water as a detection medium, the SNO experiment demonstrated clearly that solar electron neutrinos from 8B decay in the solar core change into other active neutrino flavors in transit to Earth. The reaction on deuterium that has equal sensitivity to all active neutrino flavors also provides a very accurate measure of the initial solar flux for comparison with solar models. This review summarizes the results from three phases of solar neutrino detection as well as other physics results obtained from analyses of the SNO data.

  13. Solar Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Esch, E.-I.; Fowler, M.M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hime, A.; McGirt, F.; Miller, G.G.; Thornewell, P.M.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Wouters, J.M.

    1999-07-15

    With its heavy water target, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) offers the unique opportunity to measure both the 8B flux of electron neutrinos from the Sun and, independently, the flux of all active neutrino species reaching the Earth. A model-independent test of the hypothesis that neutrino oscillations are responsible for the observed solar neutrino deficit can be made by comparing the charged-current (CC) and neutral-current (NC) rates. This LDRD proposal supported the research and development necessary for an assessment of backgrounds and performance of the SNO detector and the ability to extract the NC/CC-Ratio. Particular emphasis is put upon the criteria for deployment and signal extraction from a discrete NC detector array based upon ultra-low background 3He proportional counters.

  14. First measurement of the flux of solar neutrinos from the sun at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittich, Peter

    2000-12-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation solar neutrino detector. SNO is the first experiment that is able to measure both the electron neutrino flux and a flavor-blind flux of all active neutrino types, allowing a model-independent determination if the deficit of solar neutrinos known as the solar neutrino problem is due to neutrino oscillation. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory started taking production data in November, 1999. A measurement of the charged current rate will be the first indication if SNO too sees a suppression of the solar neutrino signal relative to the theoretical predictions. Such a confirmation is the first step in SNO's ambitious science program. In this thesis, we present evidence that SNO is seeing solar neutrinos and a preliminary ratio of the measured vs predicted rate of electrons as induced by 8B neutrinos in the νe, + d --> p + p + e charged-current (CC) reaction.

  15. Twist-four effects in deep inelastic neutrino scattering and sinStheta/sub w/

    SciTech Connect

    Fajfer, S.; Oakes, R.J.

    1985-07-01

    In addition to the standard perturbative QCD corrections to deep inelastic scattering, there are nonperturbative twist-four corrections which behave like 1/QS relative to the lnQS leading log corrections. We have calculated the twist-four, spin-one and spin-two corrections to sigma/sub NC/, sigma/sub CC/, R/sub nu/ and R/sub anti nu/ using the following procedure: The bilocal product of the weak currents is expanded into local operators using the Wilson operator product expansion. The coefficient functions obey the renormalization group equations and, neglecting the anomalous dimensions of the operators, were calculated using perturbative techniques. The nucleon matrix elements of the local operators can then be evaluated assuming some quark confinement model. We found that twist-four, spin-two corrections to the neutral current neutrino scattering decreases sinStheta/sub w/ by about 1%. Taking into account the twist-four, spin-two corrections for the charged current cross section, we found that they give a dominant contribution to the ratio R/sub nu/ and increased sinStheta/sub w/ by about 0.5%. We also have studied the model dependence of our results, and we have found that the twist-four, spin-two corrections to sinStheta/sub w/ are quite model dependent. The twist-four, spin-one corrections to the neutrino scattering were also calculated. These corrections come from two-quark, one-gluon operators and even at low QS their contribution was found to be considerably smaller than the twist-four, spin-two corrections.

  16. Search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino transitions in MINOS.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Andreopoulos, C; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Ayres, D S; Backhouse, C; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bernstein, R H; Betancourt, M; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehm, J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Bower, C; Cavanaugh, S; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Coelho, J A B; Coleman, S J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Culling, A J; Danko, I Z; de Jong, J K; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Godley, A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Howcroft, C; Huang, X; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Krahn, Z; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Ma, J; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Metelko, C J; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mitchell, J; Moore, C D; Morfín, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Para, A; Patterson, R B; Patzak, T; Pavlović, Z; Pawloski, G; Pearce, G F; Petyt, D A; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahaman, A; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Rodrigues, P A; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ryabov, V A; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Strait, M; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Toner, R; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; West, N; White, C; Whitehead, L; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Yang, T; Zhang, K; Zheng, H; Zois, M; Zwaska, R

    2009-12-31

    This Letter reports on a search for nu(mu) --> nu(e) transitions by the MINOS experiment based on a 3.14x10(20) protons-on-target exposure in the Fermilab NuMI beam. We observe 35 events in the Far Detector with a background of 27+/-5(stat)+/-2(syst) events predicted by the measurements in the Near Detector. If interpreted in terms of nu(mu) --> nu(e) oscillations, this 1.5sigma excess of events is consistent with sin2(2theta(13)) comparable to the CHOOZ limit when |Delta m2|=2.43x10(-3) eV2 and sin2(2theta(23))=1.0 are assumed. PMID:20366304

  17. Search for Muon-Neutrino to Electron-Neutrino Transitions in MINOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D. J.; Ayres, D. S.; Backhouse, C.; Barnes, P. D., Jr.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W. L.; Becker, B. R.; Belias, A.; Bernstein, R. H.; Betancourt, M.; Bhattacharya, D.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G. J.; Boehm, J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Bower, C.; Cavanaugh, S.; Chapman, J. D.; Cherdack, D.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Cobb, J. H.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Coleman, S. J.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Culling, A. J.; Danko, I. Z.; de Jong, J. K.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Dorman, M.; Erwin, A. R.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Frohne, M. V.; Gallagher, H. R.; Godley, A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Gran, R.; Grashorn, E. W.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Harris, D.; Harris, P. G.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Heller, K.; Himmel, A.; Holin, A.; Howcroft, C.; Huang, X.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kopp, S.; Kordosky, M.; Koskinen, D. J.; Krahn, Z.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Loiacono, L.; Lucas, P.; Ma, J.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Marshall, J. S.; Mayer, N.; McGowan, A. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Metelko, C. J.; Michael, D. G.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Mitchell, J.; Moore, C. D.; Morfín, J.; Mualem, L.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nicholls, T. C.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oliver, W. P.; Ospanov, R.; Paley, J.; Para, A.; Patterson, R. B.; Patzak, T.; Pavlović, Ž.; Pawloski, G.; Pearce, G. F.; Petyt, D. A.; Pittam, R.; Plunkett, R. K.; Rahaman, A.; Rameika, R. A.; Raufer, T. M.; Rebel, B.; Reichenbacher, J.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Ryabov, V. A.; Sanchez, M. C.; Saoulidou, N.; Schneps, J.; Schreiner, P.; Shanahan, P.; Smart, W.; Smith, C.; Sousa, A.; Speakman, B.; Stamoulis, P.; Strait, M.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Thron, J. L.; Tinti, G.; Toner, R.; Tsarev, V. A.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viren, B.; Ward, D. R.; Watabe, M.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; West, N.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wright, D. M.; Yang, T.; Zhang, K.; Zheng, H.; Zois, M.; Zwaska, R.

    2009-12-01

    This Letter reports on a search for νμ→νe transitions by the MINOS experiment based on a 3.14×1020 protons-on-target exposure in the Fermilab NuMI beam. We observe 35 events in the Far Detector with a background of 27±5(stat)±2(syst) events predicted by the measurements in the Near Detector. If interpreted in terms of νμ→νe oscillations, this 1.5σ excess of events is consistent with sin⁡2(2θ13) comparable to the CHOOZ limit when |Δm2|=2.43×10-3eV2 and sin⁡2(2θ23)=1.0 are assumed.

  18. Search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino transitions in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K.E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D.J.; Ayres, D.S.; Backhouse, C.; Barnes, P.D., Jr.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W.L.; Becker, B.R.; /Minnesota U. /Rutherford

    2009-09-01

    This letter reports on a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} transitions by the MINOS experiment based on a 3.14 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target exposure in the Fermilab NuMI beam. We observe 35 events in the Far Detector with a background of 27 {+-} 5(stat.) {+-} 2(syst.) events predicted by the measurements in the Near Detector. If interpreted in terms of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, this 1.5 {sigma} excess of events is consistent with sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) comparable to the CHOOZ limit when |{Delta}m{sup 2}| = 2.43 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} (2{theta}{sub 23}) = 1.0 are assumed.

  19. Search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino transitions in MINOS.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Andreopoulos, C; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Ayres, D S; Backhouse, C; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bernstein, R H; Betancourt, M; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehm, J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Bower, C; Cavanaugh, S; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Coelho, J A B; Coleman, S J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Culling, A J; Danko, I Z; de Jong, J K; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Godley, A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Howcroft, C; Huang, X; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Krahn, Z; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Ma, J; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Metelko, C J; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mitchell, J; Moore, C D; Morfín, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Para, A; Patterson, R B; Patzak, T; Pavlović, Z; Pawloski, G; Pearce, G F; Petyt, D A; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahaman, A; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Rodrigues, P A; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ryabov, V A; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Strait, M; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Toner, R; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; West, N; White, C; Whitehead, L; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Yang, T; Zhang, K; Zheng, H; Zois, M; Zwaska, R

    2009-12-31

    This Letter reports on a search for nu(mu) --> nu(e) transitions by the MINOS experiment based on a 3.14x10(20) protons-on-target exposure in the Fermilab NuMI beam. We observe 35 events in the Far Detector with a background of 27+/-5(stat)+/-2(syst) events predicted by the measurements in the Near Detector. If interpreted in terms of nu(mu) --> nu(e) oscillations, this 1.5sigma excess of events is consistent with sin2(2theta(13)) comparable to the CHOOZ limit when |Delta m2|=2.43x10(-3) eV2 and sin2(2theta(23))=1.0 are assumed.

  20. Solar Neutrinos, SNO and SNOLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, A. B.

    2007-06-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has completed operation in its third phase with an array of neutron detectors in 1000 tonnes of heavy water and Cherenkov light detection 2 km underground in INCO's Creighton mine near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. Data from the third phase is now being analyzed. In the first two phases of the project reported previously, the neutral current reaction on deuterium was used to determine the total flux of active neutrinos and the charged current reaction on deuterium provided a measure of the flux and energy spectrum of solar electron neutrinos. The flux of electron neutrinos was found to be only about one third of the total flux, providing clear evidence of neutrino flavour change. The total flux of active neutrinos was found to be in agreement with solar model calculations. The underground laboratory is being expanded to create an international facility known as SNOLAB that will be completed at the end of 2007. Proposed future experiments for the detection of lower energy solar neutrinos, geo-neutrinos, dark matter and double beta decay are described.

  1. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewan, G. T.

    1992-04-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) detector is a 1000 ton heavy water (D2O) Cherenkov detector designed to study neutrinos from the sun and other astrophysical sources. The use of heavy water allows both electron neutrinos and all other types of neutrinos to be observed by three complementary reactions. The detector will be sensitive to the electron neutrino flux and energy spectrum shape and to the total neutrino flux irrespective of neutrino type. These measurements will provide information on both vacuum neutrino oscillations and matter-enhanced oscillations, the MSW effect. In the event of a supernova it will be very sensitive to muon and tau neutrinos as well as the electron neutrinos emitted in the initial burst, enabling sensitive mass measurements as well as providing details of the physics of stellar collapse. On behalf of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Collaboration : H.C . Evans, G.T . Ewan, H.W. Lee, J .R . Leslie, J .D. MacArthur, H .-B . Mak, A.B . McDonald, W. McLatchie, B.C . Robertson, B. Sur, P. Skensved (Queen's University) ; C.K . Hargrove, H. Mes, W.F. Davidson, D. Sinclair, 1 . Blevis, M. Shatkay (Centre for Research in Particle Physics) ; E.D. Earle, G.M. Milton, E. Bonvin, (Chalk River Laboratories); J .J . Simpson, P. Jagam, J . Law, J .-X . Wang (University of Guelph); E.D . Hallman, R.U. Haq (Laurentian University); A.L. Carter, D. Kessler, B.R . Hollebone (Carleton University); R. Schubank . C.E . Waltha m (University of British Columbia); R.T. Kouzes, M.M. Lowry, R.M. Key (Princeton University); E.W. Beier, W. Frati, M. Newcomer, R. Van Berg (University of Penn-sylvania), T.J . Bowles, P.J . Doe, S.R . Elliott, M.M. Fowler, R.G.H. Robertson, D.J . Vieira, J .B . Wilhelmy, J .F. Wilker-son, J .M. Wouters (Los Alamos National Laboratory) ; E. Norman, K. Lesko, A. Smith, R. Fulton, R. Stokstad (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), N.W. Tanner, N. JCIILY, P. Trent, J . Barton, D.L . Wark (University of Oxford).

  2. Inclusive neutrino scattering off deuteron from threshold to GeV energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gang Shen, Laura E. Marcucci, Joseph Carlson, Stefano Gandolfi, Rocco Schiavilla

    2012-09-01

    Cross sections for inclusive neutrino scattering off deuteron induced by neutral and charge-changing weak currents are calculated from threshold up to GeV energies, using the Argonne v{sub 18} potential and consistent nuclear electroweak currents with one- and two-body terms. Two-body contributions are found to be small, and increase the cross sections obtained with one-body currents by less than 10% over the whole range of energies. Total cross sections obtained by describing the final two-nucleon states with plane waves differ negligibly, for neutrino energies {approx}> 500 MeV, from those in which interaction effects in these states are fully accounted for. The sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to different models for the two-nucleon potential and/or two-body terms in the weak current is found to be weak. In order to illustrate nuclear structure effects, the cross sections are compared to those obtained in a naive model in which the deuteron is taken to consist of a free proton and neutron at rest.

  3. Consistent analysis of neutral- and charged-current (anti)neutrino scattering off carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ankowski, Artur M.

    2015-05-15

    Good understanding of the cross sections for (anti)neutrino scattering off nuclear targets in the few-GeV energy region is a prerequisite for the correct interpretation of results of ongoing and planned oscillation experiments. To clarify a possible source of disagreement between recent measurements of the cross sections on carbon, we analyze the available data within an approach based on the realistic spectral function of carbon, treating neutral-current elastic (NCE) and charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) processes on equal footing. We show that the axial mass from the shape analysis of the MiniBooNE data is in good agreement with the results reported by the BNL E734 and NOMAD Collaborations. However, the combined analysis of the NCE and CCQE data does not seem to support the contribution of multinucleon final states being large enough to explain the normalization of the MiniBooNE-reported cross sections.

  4. Consistent analysis of neutral- and charged-current (anti)neutrino scattering off carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankowski, Artur M.

    2015-05-01

    Good understanding of the cross sections for (anti)neutrino scattering off nuclear targets in the few-GeV energy region is a prerequisite for the correct interpretation of results of ongoing and planned oscillation experiments. To clarify a possible source of disagreement between recent measurements of the cross sections on carbon, we analyze the available data within an approach based on the realistic spectral function of carbon, treating neutral-current elastic (NCE) and charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) processes on equal footing. We show that the axial mass from the shape analysis of the MiniBooNE data is in good agreement with the results reported by the BNL E734 and NOMAD Collaborations. However, the combined analysis of the NCE and CCQE data does not seem to support the contribution of multinucleon final states being large enough to explain the normalization of the MiniBooNE-reported cross sections.

  5. A proposal for a precision test of the standard model by neutrino-electron scattering (Large /hacek C/erenkov Detector Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Lu, X-Q.; Gollwitzer, K.; Igo, G.J.; Gulmez, E.; Whitten, C.; VanDalen, G.; Layter, J.; Fung, Sun Yui; Shen, B.C.

    1988-04-01

    A precision measurement of neutrino-electron elastic scattering from a beam stop neutrino source at LAMPF is proposed. The total error in sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/ is estimated to be +-0.89/percent/. The experiment also will be sensitive to neutrino oscillations and supernova-neutrino bursts, and should set improved limits on the neutrino-charge radius and magnetic-dipole moment. The detector consists of a 2.5-million-gallon tank of water with approximately 14,000 photomultiplier tubes lining the surfaces of the tank. Neutrino-electron scattering events will be observed from the /hacek C/erenkov radiation emitted by the electrons in the water. 19 refs.

  6. Measurement of Neutrino-Nucleon Neutral-Current Elastic Scattering Cross-section at SciBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Takei, Hideyuki

    2009-02-01

    In this thesis, results of neutrino-nucleon neutral current (NC) elastic scattering analysis are presented. Neutrinos interact with other particles only with weak force. Measurement of cross-section for neutrino-nucleon reactions at various neutrino energy are important for the study of nucleon structure. It also provides data to be used for beam flux monitor in neutrino oscillation experiments. The cross-section for neutrino-nucleon NC elastic scattering contains the axial vector form factor GA(Q2) as well as electromagnetic form factors unlike electromagnetic interaction. GA is propotional to strange part of nucleon spin (Δs) in Q2 → 0 limit. Measurement of NC elastic cross-section with smaller Q2 enables us to access Δs. NC elastic cross-sections of neutrino-nucleon and antineutrino-nucleon were measured earlier by E734 experiment at Brookheaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 1987. In this experiment, cross-sections were measured in Q2 > 0.4 GeV2 region. Result from this experiment was the only published data for NC elastic scattering cross-section published before our experiment. SciBooNE is an experiment for the measurement of neutrino-nucleon scattering cross-secitons using Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at FNAL. BNB has energy peak at 0.7 GeV. In this energy region, NC elastic scattering, charged current elastic scattering, charged current pion production, and neutral current pion production are the major reaction branches. SciBar, electromagnetic calorimeter, and Muon Range Detector are the detectors for SciBooNE. The SciBar consists of finely segmented scintillators and 14336 channels of PMTs. It has a capability to reconstruct particle track longer than 8 cm and separate proton from muons and pions using energy deposit information. Signal of NC elastic scattering is a single proton track. In vp → vp process, the recoil proton is detected. On the other hand, most of vn → vn is

  7. In-medium effect with muon-neutrino and anti-muon-neutrino quasi-elastic scattering from 12C nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kim, K. S.; Kim, Hungchong; So, W. Y.; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the in-medium effect by density-dependent axial and weak-vector form factors on muon-neutrino ({{ν }μ }) and anti-muon-neutrino ({{\\bar{ν }}μ }) scattering in the quasi-elastic (QE) region from nucleons (N*) bound in a nucleus or immersed in a nuclear medium via neutral current (NC) and charged current (CC). For the density-dependent form factors, we exploited a quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model. We found that the {{ν }μ }({{\\bar{ν }}μ })-{{N}*} scattering cross sections via NC in the QE region usually decrease with an increased medium density, while those using CC were increased. However, their rate of change was sensitive to the four-momentum transfer given to a bound nucleon through scattering. We compared these results obtained by the elementary process corrected by the in-medium effect to the BNL and MiniBooNE data, which measured {{ν }μ } scattering cross sections per nucleon through {{ν }μ } - 12C scattering in 12C composite targets. The incident energy range was 550 \\lt {{E}ν }\\lt 3000 MeV. We increased the energy up to 100 GeV to compare our results to the NOMAD experimental data. In order to study the density effects on a nucleon embedded in 12C, we exploited the QMC form factors evaluated at ρ =0.5{{ρ }o}, where the normal density {{ρ }o}˜ 0.15 f{{m}-3}. The strangeness contributions in NC scattering are also incorporated into the form factors for comparison with experimental data. Our numerical results show that most of the experimental data can be explained in a satisfactory manner by the density-dependent elementary process, but there are some remaining deviations resulting from the nuclear structure, particularly in the low and high momentum-transfer regions.

  8. MINERvA: A Dedicated neutrino scattering experiment at NuMI

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, Kevin S.; /Rochester U.

    2006-05-01

    MINERvA is a dedicated neutrino cross-section experiment planned for the near detector hall of the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. I summarize the detector design and physics capabilities of the experiment.

  9. Emission of neutron-proton and proton-proton pairs in neutrino scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Simo, I.; Amaro, J. E.; Barbaro, M. B.; De Pace, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Megias, G. D.; Donnelly, T. W.

    2016-11-01

    We use a recently developed model of relativistic meson-exchange currents to compute the neutron-proton and proton-proton yields in (νμ ,μ-) scattering from 12C in the 2p-2h channel. We compute the response functions and cross sections with the relativistic Fermi gas model for different kinematics from intermediate to high momentum transfers. We find a large contribution of neutron-proton configurations in the initial state, as compared to proton-proton pairs. In the case of charge-changing neutrino scattering the 2p-2h cross section of proton-proton emission (i.e., np in the initial state) is much larger than for neutron-proton emission (i.e., two neutrons in the initial state) by a (ω , q)-dependent factor. The different emission probabilities of distinct species of nucleon pairs are produced in our model only by meson-exchange currents, mainly by the Δ isobar current. We also analyze other effects including exchange contributions and the effect of the axial and vector currents.

  10. Contribution of gallium experiments to the understanding of solar physics and neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrin, V. N.

    2013-10-15

    The results of gallium measurements of solar neutrino and measurements with artificial sources of neutrinos are presented. Conclusions are drawn from these results, and the potential of the SAGE experiment for studying transitions of active neutrinos to sterile states for {Delta}m{sup 2} > 0.5 eV{sup 2} and a sensitivity of a few percent to the disappearance of electron neutrinos is examined.

  11. Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, E.W.

    1992-03-01

    This document is a technical progress report on work performed at the University of Pennsylvania during the current year on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. The motivation for the experiment is the measurement of neutrinos emitted by the sun. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation dedicated solar neutrino experiment which will extend the results of our work with the Kamiokande II detector by measuring three reactions of neutrinos rather than the single reaction measured by the Kamiokande experiment. The collaborative project includes physicists from Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Full funding for the construction of this facility was obtained in January 1990, and its construction is estimated to take five years. The motivation for the SNO experiment is to study the fundamental properties of neutrinos, in particular the mass and mixing parameters, which remain undetermined after decades of experiments in neutrino physics utilizing accelerators and reactors as sources of neutrinos. To continue the study of neutrino properties it is necessary to use the sun as a neutrino source. The long distance to the sun makes the search for neutrino mass sensitive to much smaller mass than can be studied with terrestrial sources. Furthermore, the matter density in the sun is sufficiently large to enhance the effects of small mixing between electron neutrinos and mu or tau neutrinos. This experiment, when combined with the results of the radiochemical {sup 37}Cl and {sup 71}Ga experiments and the Kamiokande II experiment, should extend our knowledge of these fundamental particles, and as a byproduct, improve our understanding of energy generation in the sun.

  12. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-27

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon.

  13. First Search for the EMC Effect and Nuclear Shadowing in Neutrino Nucleus Deep Inelastic Scattering at MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Mousseau, Joel A.

    2015-01-01

    Decades of research in electron-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS) have provided a clear picture of nuclear physics at high momentum transfer. While these effects have been clearly demonstrated by experiment, the theoretical explanation of their origin in some kinematic regions has been lacking. Particularly, the effects in the intermediate regions of Bjorken-x, anti-shadowing and the EMC effect have no universally accepted quantum mechanical explanation. In addition, these effects have not been measured systematically with neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering, due to experiments lacking multiple heavy targets.

  14. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-27

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon. PMID:27284650

  15. Ultrahigh-Energy Neutrino-Nucleon Deep-Inelastic Scattering and the Froissart Bound

    SciTech Connect

    Illarionov, Alexey Yu.; Kniehl, Bernd A.; Kotikov, Anatoly V.

    2011-06-10

    We present a simple formula for the total cross section {sigma}{sup {nu}}N of neutral- and charged-current deep-inelastic scattering of ultrahigh-energy neutrinos on isoscalar nuclear targets, which is proportional to the structure function F{sub 2}{sup {nu}}N(M{sub V}{sup 2}/s,M{sub V}{sup 2}), where M{sub V} is the intermediate-boson mass and s is the square of the center-of-mass energy. The coefficient in front of F{sub 2}{sup {nu}}N(x,Q{sup 2}) depends on the asymptotic low-x behavior of F{sub 2}{sup {nu}}N. It contains an additional lns term if F{sub 2}{sup {nu}}N scales with a power of ln(1/x). Hence, an asymptotic low-x behavior F{sub 2}{sup {nu}}N{proportional_to}ln{sup 2}(1/x), which is frequently assumed in the literature, already leads to a violation of the Froissart bound on {sigma}{sup {nu}}N.

  16. Electroweak higher-order effects and theoretical uncertainties in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, K.-P.O.; Dittmaier, S.; Hollik, W.

    2005-11-01

    A previous calculation of electroweak O({alpha}) corrections to deep-inelastic neutrino scattering, as e.g. measured by NuTeV and NOMAD, is supplemented by higher-order effects. In detail, we take into account universal two-loop effects from {delta}{alpha} and {delta}{rho} as well as higher-order final-state photon radiation off muons in the structure function approach. Moreover, we make use of the recently released O({alpha})-improved parton distributions MRST2004QED and identify the relevant QED factorization scheme, which is DIS-like. As a technical by-product, we describe slicing and subtraction techniques for an efficient calculation of a new type of real corrections that are induced by the generated photon distribution. A numerical discussion of the higher-order effects suggests that the remaining theoretical uncertainty from unknown electroweak corrections is dominated by nonuniversal two-loop effects and is of the order 0.0003 when translated into a shift in sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}=1-M{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub Z}{sup 2}. The O({alpha}) corrections implicitly included in the parton distributions lead to a shift of about 0.0004.

  17. Implications of optical properties of ocean, lake, and ice for ultrahigh-energy neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.B.

    1997-03-01

    The collecting power and imaging ability of planned ultrahigh-energy neutrino observatories depend on wavelength-dependent absorption and scattering coefficients for the detector medium. Published data are compiled for deep ice at the South Pole, for deep fresh water at Lake Baikal, and for deep seawater. The effective scattering coefficient is smallest for the clearest deep ocean sites, whereas the absorption coefficient is an order of magnitude smaller for deep ice than for the ocean and lake sites. The effective volume per detector element as a function of energy is calculated for electromagnetic cascades produced by electron neutrinos interacting at the various sites. It is largest for deep bubble-free ice, smallest for shallow bubbly ice, and intermediate for lake and seawater. The effective volume per element is calculated for detection of positrons resulting from the capture of a few megaelectron volt supernova neutrinos by protons in the medium. This volume is proportional to the absorption length and independent of the scattering length; it is larger for ice than for seawater or lake water. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  18. Supernova 1987a and the secret interactions of neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W.; Turner, M.S.

    1987-07-01

    By using SN 1987a as a 'source' of neutrinos with energy approx.10 MeV we place limits on the couplings of neutrinos with cosmic background particles. Specifically, we find that the Majoron-electron neutrino coupling must be less than about 10/sup -3/; if neutrinos couple to a massless vector particle, its dimensionless coupling must be less than about 10/sup -3/; and if neutrinos couple with strength g to a massive boson of mass M, then g/M must be less than 12 MeV/sup -1/. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Solar Neutrino flare detection in Hyperkamiokande and SK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The possible buid and near activity of a Megaton neutrino detection in HyperKamiokande and the older SK implementation by Gadolinium liqid might open to future detection of largest solar flare (pion trace at tens MeV) electron neutrino and antineutrino. The multiwave detection of X-gamma and neutrino event might offer a deep view of such solar acelleration and of neutrino flavor mix along its flight. The possoble near future discover of such events will open a third neutrino astronomy windows after rarest SN 1987A and persistent Solar nuclear signals.

  20. Atmospheric neutrinos, ν e- ν s oscillations and a novel neutrino evolution equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, Evgeny

    2016-08-01

    If a sterile neutrino ν s with an eV-scale mass and a sizeable mixing to the electron neutrino exists, as indicated by the reactor and gallium neutrino anomalies, a strong resonance enhancement of ν e -ν s oscillations of atmospheric neutrinos should occur in the TeV energy range. At these energies neutrino flavour transitions in the 3+1 scheme depend on just one neutrino mass squared difference and are fully described within a 3-flavour oscillation framework. We demonstrate that the flavour transitions of atmospheric ν e can actually be very accurately described in a 2-flavour framework, with neutrino flavour evolution governed by an inhomogeneous Schrödinger-like equation. Evolution equations of this type have not been previously considered in the theory of neutrino oscillations.

  1. An ''archaeological'' quest for galactic supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Lazauskas, Rimantas; Volpe, Cristina E-mail: Cecilia.Lunardini@asu.edu

    2009-04-15

    We explore the possibility to observe the effects of electron neutrinos from past galactic supernovae, through a geochemical measurement of the amount of Technetium 97 produced by neutrino-induced reactions in a Molybdenum ore. The calculations we present take into account the recent advances in our knowledge of neutrino interactions, of neutrino oscillations inside a supernova, of the solar neutrino flux at Earth and of possible failed supernovae. The predicted Technetium 97 abundance is of the order of 10{sup 7} atoms per 10 kilotons of ore, which is close to the current geochemical experimental sensitivity. Of this, {approx} 10-20% is from supernovae. Considering the comparable size of uncertainties, more precision in the modeling of neutrino fluxes as well as of neutrino cross sections is required for a meaningful measurement.

  2. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2014-06-24

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  3. Neutrino factory

    DOE PAGES

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; et al

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable ofmore » making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.« less

  4. Neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; Kuno, Y.; Benedetto, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoini, S.; Martini, M.; Wildner, E.; Prior, G.; Blondel, A.; Karadzhow, Y.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Jenner, L. J.; Kurup, A.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Zarrebini, A.; Poslimski, J.; Blackmore, V.; Cobb, J.; Tunnell, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bennett, J. R.J.; Brooks, S.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Edgecock, T. R.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; McFarland, A.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Booth, C.; Skoro, G.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Berg, J. S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Stratakis, D.; Souchlas, N.; Witte, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Makhov, N.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Strait, J.; Striganov, S.; Morfín, J. G.; Wands, R.; Snopok, P.; Bagacz, S. A.; Morozov, V.; Roblin, Y.; Cline, D.; Ding, X.; Bromberg, C.; Hart, T.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C. M.; Beard, K. B.; Cummings, M. A.C.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Roberts, T. J.; Yoshikawa, C. Y.; Graves, V. B.; McDonald, K. T.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  5. Neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; Kuno, Y.; Benedetto, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoini, S.; Martini, M.; Wildner, E.; Prior, G.; Blondel, A.; Karadzhow, Y.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Jenner, L. J.; Kurup, A.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Zarrebini, A.; Poslimski, J.; Blackmore, V.; Cobb, J.; Tunnell, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bennett, J. R. J.; Brooks, S.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Edgecock, T. R.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; McFarland, A.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Booth, C.; Skoro, G.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Berg, J. S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Stratakis, D.; Souchlas, N.; Witte, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Makhov, N.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Strait, J.; Striganov, S.; Morfín, J. G.; Wands, R.; Snopok, P.; Bagacz, S. A.; Morozov, V.; Roblin, Y.; Cline, D.; Ding, X.; Bromberg, C.; Hart, T.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C. M.; Beard, K. B.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Roberts, T. J.; Yoshikawa, C. Y.; Graves, V. B.; McDonald, K. T.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.

    2014-12-01

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that θ13>0 . The measured value of θ13 is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti)neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO ν Design Study consortium. EURO ν coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO ν baseline accelerator facility will provide 1 021 muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  6. Planck scale effects in neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, E. K.; Senjanovic, G.; Tao, Zhi-Jan; Berezhiani, Z. G.

    1992-08-01

    We study the phenomenology and cosmology of the Majoron (flavon) models of one inert neutrino and three active ones. We pay special attention to the possible (almost) conserved generalization of the Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud lepton charge. Using Planck scale physics effects, which provide the breaking of the lepton charge, we show how, in this picture, one can incorporate the solutions to some of the central issues in neutrino physics, such as the solar and atmospheric neutrino puzzles, dark matter, and a 17 keV neutrino. These gravitation effects induce tiny Majorana mass terms for neutrinos and considerable masses for flavons. The cosmological demand for the sufficiently fast decay of flavons implies a lower limit on the electron neutrino mass in the range of 0.1-1 eV.

  7. Planck scale effects in neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, Eugeni Kh.; Berezhiani, Zurab G.; Senjanović, Goran; Tao, Zhijian

    1993-04-01

    We study the phenomenology and cosmology of the Majoron (flavon) models of three active and one inert neutrino paying special attention to the possible (almost) conserved generalization of the Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud lepton charge. Using Planck scale physics effects which provide the breaking of the lepton charge, we show how in this picture one can incorporate the solutions to some of the central issues in neutrino physics such as the solar and atmospheric neutrino puzzles and the dark matter problem with the possible existence of a heavy (1-10 keV) neutrino. These gravitational effects induce tiny Majorana mass terms for neutrinos and considerable masses for flavons. The cosmological demand for the sufficiently fast decay of flavons implies a lower limit on the electron-neutrino mass in the range of 0.1-1 eV.

  8. One-loop correction effects on supernova neutrino fluxes: a new possible probe for Beyond Standard Models

    SciTech Connect

    Gava, J.

    2010-05-01

    We present the consequences of a large radiative correction term coming from Supersymmetry (SUSY) upon the electron neutrino fluxes streaming off a core-collapse supernova using a 3-flavour neutrino-neutrino interaction code. We explore the interplay between the neutrino-neutrino interaction and the effects of the resonance associated with the μ−τ neutrino index of refraction. We find that sizeable effects may be visible in the flux on Earth and, consequently, on the number of events upon the energy signal of electron neutrinos in a liquid argon detector. Such effects could lead to a probe for Beyond Standard Model (BSM) physics and, ideally, to constraints in the SUSY parameter space.

  9. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, H.; Garvey, G.; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  10. Study of scintillation, fluorescence and scattering in mineral oil for the MiniBooNE neutrino detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Bruce C.; Brice, Stephen; Hawker, Eric; Maza, Shannon; Meyer, Hans-Otto; Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Tayloe, Rex; Tanaka, Hirohisa A.; Toptygin, Dmitri; /Fermilab /Western Illinois U. /Indiana U. /Princeton U. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2004-11-01

    The MiniBooNE neutrino detector at Fermilab (FNAL) is filled with 250,000 gallons of pure mineral oil. The principal signal for MiniBooNE is light observed in a prompt Cherenkov cone. Scattering and fluorescence modify our detection of this light. Scintillation is also created by ionization in the oil. Studies of fluorescence of this oil have been carried out over a wide spectrum of exciting light and time resolved fluorescence with a narrower range of excitation. Polarized scattering measurements have been carried out at longer wavelengths. Time resolved and spectrally resolved scintillation has been studied with a 200 MeV Proton beam at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Results of these studies will be reported.

  11. Direct detection of relic active and sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Both active and sterile sub-eV neutrinos can form the cosmic neutrino background in the early Universe. We consider the beta-decaying (e.g., 3H) and EC-decaying (e.g., 163Ho) nuclei as the promising targets to capture relic neutrinos in the laboratory. We calculate the capture rates of relic electron neutrinos and antineutrinos against the corresponding beta decay or electron capture (EC) decay backgrounds in the (3+Ns) flavor mixing scheme, and discuss the future prospect in terms of the PTOLEMY project. We stress that such direct measurements of hot DM might not be hopeless in the long term.

  12. Precision measurement of sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/ from semileptonic neutrino scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowicz, H.; Belusevic, R.; Blondel, A.; Bluemer, H.; Boeckmann, P.; Brummel, H.D.; Buchholz, P.; Burkhardt, H.; Debu, P.; Duda, J.; Dydak, F.; Falkenburg, B.; Fiedler, M.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Grant, A.L.; Guyot, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Hepp, V.; Hughes, E.W.; Kampschulte, B.; Keilwerth, H.; Kleinknecht, K.; Knobloch, J.; Krasny, M.; Kro-acute-accentlikowski, J.; Kurz, N.; Lipniacka, A.; Merlo, J.; Mueller, E.; Para, A.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Pollman, D.; Ranjard, F.; Renk, B.; Schuller, J.; Taureg, H.; Tittel, K.; Turlay, R.; Vallage, B.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wotschack, J.

    1986-07-21

    The ratio R-italic/sub ..nu../ of the neutral- to charged-current cross sections of neutrinos in iron has been measured in an exposure of the CERN-Dortmund-Heidelberg-Saclay neutrino detector to a 160-GeV/c-italic neutrino narrow-band beam at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. The result is R-italic/sub ..nu../ = 0.3072 +- 0.0025(stat) +- 0.0020(syst), for hadronic energy greater than 10 GeV. The electroweak mixing parameter is sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/ = 0.225 +- 0.005(expt ) +- 0.003(theor)+0.013(m-italic/sub c-italic/-1. 5 GeV/c-italic/sup 2/), where m-italic/sub c-italic/ is the charm-quark mass.

  13. Limit on electron neutrino mass from observation of the beta decay of molecular tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, J.F.; Bowles, T.J.; Friar, J.L.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Stephenson, G.J. Jr.; Wark, D.L. ); Knapp, D.A. )

    1990-01-01

    We report the most sensitive upper limit set on the mass of the electron antineutrino. The upper limit of 9.4 eV (95% confidence level) was obtained from a study of the shape of the beta decay spectrum of free molecular tritium. Achieving such a level of sensitivity required precise determinations of all processes that modify the shape of the observed spectrum. This result is in clear disagreement with a reported value for the mass of 26(5) eV. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Electron neutrino and antineutrino appearance in the full MINOS data sample.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Anghel, I; Backhouse, C; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mathis, M; Mayer, N; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Moed Sher, S; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; O'Connor, J; Oliver, W P; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tinti, G; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Wojcicki, S G; Yang, T; Zwaska, R

    2013-04-26

    We report on ν(e) and ν(e) appearance in ν(μ) and ν(μ) beams using the full MINOS data sample. The comparison of these ν(e) and ν(e) appearance data at a 735 km baseline with θ13 measurements by reactor experiments probes δ, the θ23 octant degeneracy, and the mass hierarchy. This analysis is the first use of this technique and includes the first accelerator long-baseline search for ν(μ) → ν(e). Our data disfavor 31% (5%) of the three-parameter space defined by δ, the octant of the θ23, and the mass hierarchy at the 68% (90%) C.L. We measure a value of 2sin(2)(2θ13)sin(2)(θ23) that is consistent with reactor experiments.

  15. Correlated, precision measurements of θ23 and δ using only the electron neutrino appearance experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2013-06-04

    Precision measurement of the leptonic CP violating phase δ will suffer from the, then surviving, large uncertainty of sin2θ23 of 10–20% in the experimentally interesting region near maximal mixing of θ23. We advocate a new method for determination of both θ23 and δ at the same time using only the νe and ν̄e appearance channels and show that sin2θ23 can be determined automatically with much higher accuracy, approximately a factor of six, than sinδ. In this method, we identify a new degeneracy for the simultaneous determination of θ23 and δ, the θ23 intrinsic degeneracy, which must be resolved in ordermore » to achieve precision measurement of these two parameters. Spectral information around the vacuum oscillation maxima is shown to be the best way to resolve this degeneracy.« less

  16. Measurement of the total flux averaged neutrino induced neutral current elastic scattering cross section with the T2K Pi-Zero detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruterbories, Daniel

    Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) is a second generation accelerator neutrino oscillation experiment. T2K uses a high intensity proton beam produced at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) incident on a carbon target and focused with three magnetic horns to produce a high intensity and nearly pure muon neutrino beam with a peak energy of 600 MeV at a 2.5º axis angle. The muon neutrino beam travels 295 km across Japan to the Super Kamiokande (SK) water Cherenkov detector in the Kamioka mine. The neutrino beam is also sampled by a complex of near detectors 280 m downstream of the carbon target located both on and off the beam axis. These detectors measure the neutrino beam before neutrino oscillations occur to provide input constraints to oscillation searches using SK. The off-axis near detector, ND280, is a composite detector made up of a tracker section and a Pi-Zero detector (POD), all surrounded by an electromagnetic calorimeter. The entire detector is enclosed in a dipole magnet with a field of 0.2 T. The primary purpose of the tracker section is to measure neutrino induced charged current events characterized by the production of muons. The POD is primarily designed to detect electromagnetic showers and to measure interactions on water through the use of a removable water target. In addition to these measurements, the ND280 detector is also used to study the cross sections of neutrino interactions on the various materials in the detectors. Limited knowledge of the cross sections in this neutrino energy regime are an important source of systematic error in neutrino oscillation measurements. This thesis presents a measurement of one neutrino interaction channel in the POD, neutral current elastic scattering (NCE). In this process a neutrino elastically scatters off a proton or neutron in the target nucleus producing a proton or neutron with higher energy. The signature of this process is a single proton track. A particle identification algorithm (PID) was

  17. Expression of Interest for Neutrinos Scattering on Glass: NuSOnG

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.; Bugel, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Fisher, P.H.; Formaggio, J.A.; de Gouvea, A.; Loinaz, W.A.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kobilarcik, T.R.; Kopp, S.; Kyle, G.; /New Mexico State U. /Fermilab /MIT /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    We propose a 3500 ton (3000 ton fiducial volume) SiO{sub 2} neutrino detector with sampling calorimetry, charged particle tracking, and muon spectrometers to run in a Tevatron Fixed Target Program. Improvements to the Fermilab accelerator complex should allow substantial increases in the neutrino flux over the previous NuTeV quad triplet beamline. With 4 x 10{sup 19} protons on target/year, a 5 year run would achieve event statistics more than 100 times higher than NuTeV. With 100 times the statistics of previous high energy neutrino experiments, the purely weak processes {nu}{sub {mu}} + e{sup -} {yields} {nu}{sub {mu}} + e{sup -} and {nu}{sub {mu}} + e{sup -} {yields} {nu}{sub e} + {mu}{sup -} (inverse muon decay) can be measured with high accuracy for the first time. The inverse muon decay process is independent of strong interaction effects and can be used to significantly improve the flux normalization for all other processes. The high neutrino and antineutrino fluxes also make new searches for lepton flavor violation and neutral heavy leptons possible. In this document, we give a first look at the physics opportunities, detector and beam design, and calibration procedures.

  18. Dirac neutrinos and SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the cooling of SN 1987A excludes a Dirac-neutrino mass greater than theta(20 keV) for nu(sub e), nu(sub mu), or nu(sub tau). The emission of wrong-helicity, Dirac neutrinos from SN 1987A, is re-examined. It is concluded that the effect of a Dirac neutrino on the cooling of SN 1987A has been underestimated due to neutrino degeneracy and additional emission processes. The limit that follows from the cooling of SN 1987A is believed to be greater (probably much greater) than 10 keV. This result is significant in light of the recent evidence for a 17 keV mass eigenstate that mixes with the electron neutrino.

  19. Neutrino oscillations in noisy media

    SciTech Connect

    Loreti, F.N.; Balantekin, A.B.

    1994-05-27

    The authors develop the Redfield equation for delta-correlated gaussian noise and apply it to the case of two neutrino flavor or spin precession in the presence of a noisy matter density or magnetic field, respectively. The criteria under which physical fluctuations can be well approximated by the delta-correlated gaussian noise for the above cases are examined. Current limits on the possible neutrino magnetic moment and solar magnetic field suggest that a reasonably noisy solar magnetic field would not appreciably affect the solar electron neutrino flux. However, if the solar electron density has fluctuations of a few percent of the local density and a small enough correlation length, the MSW effect is suppressed for a range of parameters.

  20. Aspects of neutrino interactions (scatterings at the low Q{sup 2}-region)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoinka, T.; Paschos, E. A.; Thomas, L.

    2015-10-15

    The article begins with a description of chiral symmetry and its application to neutrino induced reactions. For small Q{sup 2} (forward direction) the process is dominated by the amplitute with helicity zero where the pion pole disappears when multiplied with the polarization vector. The remaining part of the amplitude is determined by PCAC. For E{sub ν} > 2 GeV the computed cross sections are in good agreement with data. In coherent pion production we expect equal yields for neutrinos and antineutrinos a relation which for E{sub ν} > 2 GeV is fulfilled. We discuss specific features of the data and suggest methods for improving them by presenting new estimates for the incoherent background.

  1. Tau Contribution and Precision Measurement of θ23 at a Neutrino Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indumathi, D.; Sinha, Nita

    2010-03-01

    We discuss precision measurements of the leading atmospheric parameters at a standard neutrino factory. The oscillation of the muon and electron neutrinos (anti-neutrinos) to tau neutrinos (anti-neutrinos) adds to the muon events sample (both right sign and wrong sign) via leptonic decays of the taus produced through charge current interactions in the detector. We focus on how this contribution affects a precision measurement of the atmospheric mixing parameters and the deviation of νμ↔ντmixing from maximality.

  2. Right-Handed Neutrinos and the 2 TeV $W'$ Boson

    DOE PAGES

    Coloma, Pilar; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Lopez-Pavon, Jacobo

    2015-12-30

    The CMS e+e-jj events of invariant mass near 2 TeV are consistent with a W' boson decaying into an electron and a right-handed neutrino whose TeV-scale mass is of the Dirac type. We show that the Dirac partner of the right-handed electron-neutrino can be the right-handed tau-neutrino. Furthermore, a prediction of this model is that the sum of the τ+e+jj and τ-e-jj signal cross sections equals twice that for e+e-jj. The Standard Model neutrinos acquire Majorana masses and mixings compatible with neutrino oscillation data.

  3. Towards a precision measurement of theta13 with reactor neutrinos: Initiatives in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2004-09-12

    Recent experimental results have provided unambiguous evidence that neutrinos have a small but finite mass and mix from one type into another. The phenomenon of neutrino mixing is characterized by the coupling between the neutrino flavor (nu e,mu,tau) and mass eigenstates (nu 1,2,3) and the associated mixing angles. Previous neutrino oscillation experiments have determined two of the three mixing angles in the neutrino mixing matrix, U MNSP. Using multiple neutrino detectors placed at different distances from a nuclear power plant, a future reactor neutrino experiment has the potential to discover and measure the coupling of the electron neutrino flavor to the third mass eigenstate, Ue3, the last undetermined element of the neutrino mixing matrix. In this paper we describe recent efforts in the US towards a next-generation experiment to measure theta13 with reactor neutrinos.

  4. FEASIBILITY STUDY II OF A MUON BASED NEUTRINO SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    GALLARDO,J.C.; OZAKI,S.; PALMER,R.B.; ZISMAN,M.

    2001-06-30

    The concept of using a muon storage ring to provide a well characterized beam of muon and electron neutrinos (a Neutrino Factory) has been under study for a number of years now at various laboratories throughout the world. The physics program of a Neutrino Factoryis focused on the relatively unexplored neutrino sector. In conjunction with a detector located a suitable distance from the neutrino source, the facility would make valuable contributions to the study of neutrino masses and lepton mixing. A Neutrino Factory is expected to improve the measurement accuracy of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32} and provide measurements of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) and the sign of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}. It may also be able to measure CP violation in the lepton sector.

  5. BEST sensitivity to O(1) eV sterile neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barinov, Vladislav; Gavrin, Vladimir; Gorbunov, Dmitry; Ibragimova, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    Numerous anomalous results in neutrino oscillation experiments can be attributed to the interference of an ˜1 eV sterile neutrino. The Baksan Experiment on Sterile Transitions (BEST), specially designed to fully explore the Gallium anomaly, starts next year. We investigate the sensitivity of BEST in search of a sterile neutrino mixed with an electron neutrino. Then, performing the combined analysis of all the Gallium experiments (SAGE, GALLEX, BEST), we find the region in the model parameter space (sterile neutrino mass and mixing angle) which will be excluded if BEST agrees with no sterile neutrino hypothesis. For the opposite case, if BEST observes the signal as it follows from the sterile neutrino explanation of the Gallium (SAGE and GALLEX) anomaly, we show how BEST will improve upon the present estimates of the model parameters.

  6. Towards the resolution of the solar neutrino problem

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, Alexander

    2000-08-29

    A number of experiments have accumulated over the years a large amount of solar neutrino data. The data indicate that the observed solar neutrino flux is significantly smaller than expected and, furthermore, that the electron neutrino survival probability is energy dependent. This ''solar neutrino problem'' is best solved by assuming that the electron neutrino oscillates into another neutrino species. Even though one can classify the solar neutrino deficit as strong evidence for neutrino oscillations, it is not yet considered a definitive proof. Traditional objections are that the evidence for solar neutrino oscillations relies on a combination of hard, different experiments, and that the Standard Solar Model (SSM) might not be accurate enough to precisely predict the fluxes of different solar neutrino components. Even though it seems unlikely that modifications to the SSM alone can explain the current solar neutrino data, one still cannot completely discount the possibility that a combination of unknown systematic errors in some of the experiments and certain modifications to the SSM could conspire to yield the observed data. To conclusively demonstrate that there is indeed new physics in solar neutrinos, new experiments are aiming at detecting ''smoking gun'' signatures of neutrino oscillations, such as an anomalous seasonal variation in the observed neutrino flux or a day-night variation due to the regeneration of electron neutrinos in the Earth. In this dissertation we study the sensitivity reach of two upcoming neutrino experiments, Borexino and KamLAND, to both of these effects. Results of neutrino oscillation experiments for the case of two-flavor oscillations have always been presented on the (sin{sup 2} 2{theta}, {Delta}m{sup 2}) parameter space. We point out, however, that this parameterization misses the half of the parameter space {pi}/4 < {theta} {le} {pi}/2, which is physically inequivalent to the region 0 {le} {theta} {le} {pi}/4 in the presence of

  7. Experimental Anomalies in Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamara, Ornella

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, experimental anomalies ranging in significance (2.8-3.8 σ) have been reported from a variety of experiments studying neutrinos over baselines less than 1 km. Results from the LSND and MiniBooNE short-baseline νe /νe appearance experiments show anomalies which cannot be described by oscillations between the three standard model neutrinos (the ``LSND anomaly''). In addition, a re-analysis of the anti-neutrino flux produced by nuclear power reactors has led to an apparent deficit in νe event rates in a number of reactor experiments (the ``reactor anomaly''). Similarly, calibration runs using 51Cr and 37Ar radioactive sources in the Gallium solar neutrino experiments GALLEX and SAGE have shown an unexplained deficit in the electron neutrino event rate over very short distances (the ``Gallium anomaly''). The puzzling results from these experiments, which together may suggest the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model and hint at exciting new physics, including the possibility of additional low-mass sterile neutrino states, have raised the interest in the community for new experimental efforts that could eventually solve this puzzle. Definitive evidence for sterile neutrinos would be a revolutionary discovery, with implications for particle physics as well as cosmology. Proposals to address these signals by employing accelerator, reactor and radioactive source experiments are in the planning stages or underway worldwide. In this talk some of these will be reviewed, with emphasis on the accelerator programs.

  8. Charged-current quasielastic neutrino scattering cross sections on 12C with realistic spectral and scaling functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M. V.; Antonov, A. N.; Caballero, J. A.; Megias, G. D.; Barbaro, M. B.; de Guerra, E. Moya; Udías, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Charge-current quasielastic (anti)neutrino scattering cross sections on a 12C target are analyzed using a spectral function S (p,E) that gives a scaling function in accordance with the (e ,e') scattering data. The spectral function accounts for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) correlations, it has a realistic energy dependence, and natural orbitals (NOs) from the Jastrow correlation method are used in its construction. In all calculations the standard value of the axial mass MA=1.032 GeV/c2 is used. The results are compared with those when NN correlations are not included, as in the relativistic Fermi gas model, or when harmonic-oscillator single-particle wave functions are used instead of NOs. The role of the final-state interactions (FSIs) on the theoretical spectral and scaling functions, as well as on the cross sections, is accounted for. A comparison of the results for the cases with and without FSI, as well as to results from the phenomenological scaling function obtained from the superscaling analysis, is carried out. Our calculations based on the impulse approximation underpredict the MiniBooNE data but agree with the data from the NOMAD experiment. The possible missing ingredients in the considered theoretical models are discussed.

  9. Monte Carlo neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Kneller, James P.; McLaughlin, Gail C.

    2006-03-01

    We demonstrate that the effects of matter upon neutrino propagation may be recast as the scattering of the initial neutrino wave function. Exchanging the differential, Schrodinger equation for an integral equation for the scattering matrix S permits a Monte Carlo method for the computation of S that removes many of the numerical difficulties associated with direct integration techniques.

  10. Probing Neutrino Properties with Long-Baseline Neutrino Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, Alysia

    2015-06-29

    This is nal report on an Early Career Award grant began in April 15, 2010 and concluded on April 14, 2015. Alysia Marino's research is fo- cussed on making precise measurements of neutrino properties using in- tense accelerator-generated neutrino beams. As a part of this grant, she is collaborating on the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) long-baseline neutrino exper- iment [6], currently taking data in Japan, and on the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) design e ort for a future Long-Baseline Neu- trino Facility (LBNF) in the US.1 She is also a member of the NA61/SHINE particle production experiment at CERN, but as that e ort is supported by other funds, it will not be discussed further here. T2K was designed to search for the disappearance of muon neutrinos ( ) and the appearance of electron neutrinos ( e), using a beam of muon neu- trino beam that travels 295 km across Japan towards the Super-Kamiokande detector. In 2011 T2K rst reported indications of e appearance [2], a pre- viously unobserved mode of neutrino oscillations. In the past year, T2K has published a combined analysis of disappearance and e appearance [1], and began collecting taking data with a beam of anti-neutrinos, instead of neutrinos, to search for hints of violation of the CP symmetry of the uni- verse. The proposed DUNE experiment has similar physics goals to T2K, but will be much more sensitive due to its more massive detectors and new higher-intensity neutrino beam. This e ort will be very high-priority particle physics project in the US over the next decade.

  11. Neutrino-driven Explosion of a 20 Solar-mass Star in Three Dimensions Enabled by Strange-quark Contributions to Neutrino–Nucleon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melson, Tobias; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Bollig, Robert; Hanke, Florian; Marek, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    Interactions with neutrons and protons play a crucial role for the neutrino opacity of matter in the supernova core. Their current implementation in many simulation codes, however, is rather schematic and ignores not only modifications for the correlated nuclear medium of the nascent neutron star, but also free-space corrections from nucleon recoil, weak magnetism, or strange quarks, which can easily add up to changes of several 10% for neutrino energies in the spectral peak. In the Garching supernova simulations with the Prometheus-Vertex code, such sophistications have been included for a long time except for the strange-quark contributions to the nucleon spin, which affect neutral-current neutrino scattering. We demonstrate on the basis of a 20 {M}ȯ progenitor star that a moderate strangeness-dependent contribution of {g}{{a}}{{s}}=-0.2 to the axial-vector coupling constant {g}{{a}}≈ 1.26 can turn an unsuccessful three-dimensional (3D) model into a successful explosion. Such a modification is in the direction of current experimental results and reduces the neutral-current scattering opacity of neutrons, which dominate in the medium around and above the neutrinosphere. This leads to increased luminosities and mean energies of all neutrino species and strengthens the neutrino-energy deposition in the heating layer. Higher nonradial kinetic energy in the gain layer signals enhanced buoyancy activity that enables the onset of the explosion at ˜300 ms after bounce, in contrast to the model with vanishing strangeness contributions to neutrino–nucleon scattering. Our results demonstrate the close proximity to explosion of the previously published, unsuccessful 3D models of the Garching group.

  12. The COHERENT collaboration: an effort to observe coherent, elastic, neutral-current neutrino-nucleus scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Grayson; Coherent Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The phenomenon of coherent, neutral-current scattering of neutrinos from nuclei was first proposed by D.Z. Freedman in 1974, who posited that an effort to observe this effect experimentally ``may be an act of hubris'' owing to extreme experimental difficulties. Taking advantage of technologies which have come to maturity and new experience gained in the intervening 40 years, the newly-formed COHERENT collaboration seeks to measure for the first time coherent, elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CE ν NS). Using neutrinos created by stopped pions at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, several detector systems will be deployed to limit systematic uncertainties and unambiguously observe the N2 -dependence on the cross section. The current status of the efforts of the collaboration will be addressed, focusing on detector technologies and calibration of these detectors for low-energy nuclear recoils. We will also discuss the longer-term physics goals of the collaboration, including astrophysical implications of the measurements and the use CE ν NS as a probe to search for non-standard neutrino interactions and as a way to measure the weak mixing angle.

  13. Strangeness in the Nucleon, Cold Dark Matter in the Universe, and Neutrino Scattering off Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Papavassiliou, V.

    2010-03-30

    The strangeness content of the nucleon and the contribution of strange quarks to various nucleon quantum numbers, besides being of fundamental interest, also affects calculations of cross sections of processes that are important in searches for new physics. Here we focus on direct searches for cold dark matter, in the scenario in which the lightest supersymmetric neutral particle dominates the CDM density in the universe and point out that interpretation of searches, as well as the choice of optimal materials for future experiments, are hobbled by uncertainties in the contribution of strange quarks to the nucleon spin. We show how a future low-energy neutrino experiment using a liquid-Ar TPC can make important contributions in determining this quantity with much better precision and reduced theoretical uncertainties.

  14. Single photon production induced by (anti)neutrino neutral current scattering on nucleons and nuclear targets

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Nieves, J.; Wang, E.

    2015-10-15

    We review our theoretical approach to neutral current photon emission on nucleons and nuclei in the few-GeV energy region, relevant for neutrino oscillation experiments. These reactions are dominated by the weak excitation of the Δ(1232) resonance but there are also important non-resonant contributions. We have also included terms mediated by nucleon excitations from the second resonance region. On nuclei, Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and the in-medium Δ resonance broadening have been taken into account for both incoherent and coherent reaction channels. With this model, the number and distributions of photon events at the MiniBooNE and T2K experiments have been obtained. We have also compared to the NOMAD upper limit at higher energies. The implications of our findings and future perspectives are discussed.

  15. Single photon production induced by (anti)neutrino neutral current scattering on nucleons and nuclear targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Nieves, J.; Wang, E.

    2015-10-01

    We review our theoretical approach to neutral current photon emission on nucleons and nuclei in the few-GeV energy region, relevant for neutrino oscillation experiments. These reactions are dominated by the weak excitation of the Δ(1232) resonance but there are also important non-resonant contributions. We have also included terms mediated by nucleon excitations from the second resonance region. On nuclei, Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and the in-medium Δ resonance broadening have been taken into account for both incoherent and coherent reaction channels. With this model, the number and distributions of photon events at the MiniBooNE and T2K experiments have been obtained. We have also compared to the NOMAD upper limit at higher energies. The implications of our findings and future perspectives are discussed.

  16. Neutral-current detectors for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Hime, A.; SNO Collaboration

    1997-09-01

    With its heavy water target, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has the unique opportunity to measure both the {sup 8}B flux of electron neutrinos from the Sun and the flux of all active neutrino species independently, thus offering a direct and model-independent test of a neutrino oscillation solution to the solar neutrino problem. The authors report on the physics intent and design of a discrete method of neutral-current detection in the Sudbury neutrino observatory that will utilize ultra-low background {sup 3}He proportional counters dispersed throughout the heavy water volume. Projections of background in all components of the detector are considered in an analysis of the ability to extract the neutral-current signal and the neutral-current to charged-current ratio.

  17. Neutrino beams from electron capture at high gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinec, Mark; Sato, Joe

    2007-08-01

    We investigate the potential of a flavor pure high gamma electron capture electron neutrino beam directed towards a large Water Cherenkov detector with 500 kt fiducial mass. The energy of the neutrinos is reconstructed by the position measurement within the detector and superb energy resolution capabilities could be achieved. We estimate the requirements for such a scenario to be competitive to a neutrino/anti-neutrino running at a neutrino factory with less accurate energy resolution. Although the requirements turn out to be extreme, in principle such a scenario could achieve as good abilities to resolve correlations and degeneracies in the search for sin2 2θ13 and δCP as a standard neutrino factory experiment.

  18. Neutrino and Anti-neutrino Cross Sections at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan

    2011-10-06

    The MiniBooNE experiment has reported a number of high statistics neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections -among which are the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) and neutral current elastic (NCE) neutrino scattering on mineral oil (CH{sub 2}). Recently a study of the neutrino contamination of the anti-neutrino beam has concluded and the analysis of the anti-neutrino CCQE and NCE scattering is ongoing.

  19. Tau contributions to muon/electron events at a neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Nita

    2011-10-06

    The oscillation of the muon and electron neutrinos (anti-neutrinos) to tau neutrinos (anti-neutrinos) adds to the muon and electron events sample (both right sign and wrong sign) via leptonic decays of the taus produced through charge current interactions in the detector. We focus on how this contribution affects a precision measurement of the atmospheric mixing parameters and the deviation of v{sub {mu}} {r_reversible} v{sub {tau}} mixing from maximality. We also comment on the tau contamination in the golden and platinum channels.

  20. Tau contributions to muon/electron events at a neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Nita

    2011-10-01

    The oscillation of the muon and electron neutrinos (anti-neutrinos) to tau neutrinos (anti-neutrinos) adds to the muon and electron events sample (both right sign and wrong sign) via leptonic decays of the taus produced through charge current interactions in the detector. We focus on how this contribution affects a precision measurement of the atmospheric mixing parameters and the deviation of vμ ↔ vτ mixing from maximality. We also comment on the tau contamination in the golden and platinum channels.

  1. Investigation of neutrino oscillations in the T2k long-baseline accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Izmaylov, A. O. Yershov, N. V.; Kudenko, Yu. G.; Matveev, V. A.; Mineev, O. V.; Musienko, Yu. V.; Khabibulliun, M. M.; Khotjantsev, A. N.; Shaykhiev, A. T.

    2012-02-15

    High-sensitivity searches for transitions of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos are the main task of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) second-generation long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The present article is devoted to describing basic principles of T2K, surveying experimental apparatuses that it includes, and considering in detail the muon-range detector (SMRD) designed and manufactured by a group of physicists from the Institute of Nuclear Research (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The results of the first measurements with a neutrino beam are presented, and plans for the near future are discussed.

  2. Upper bound on neutrino mass based on T2K neutrino timing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, R. A.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kopylov, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Ludovici, L.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Rychter, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoo, J.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) long-baseline neutrino experiment consists of a muon neutrino beam, produced at the J-PARC accelerator, a near detector complex and a large 295-km-distant far detector. The present work utilizes the T2K event timing measurements at the near and far detectors to study neutrino time of flight as a function of derived neutrino energy. Under the assumption of a relativistic relation between energy and time of flight, constraints on the neutrino rest mass can be derived. The sub-GeV neutrino beam in conjunction with timing precision of order tens of ns provide sensitivity to neutrino mass in the few MeV /c2 range. We study the distribution of relative arrival times of muon and electron neutrino candidate events at the T2K far detector as a function of neutrino energy. The 90% C.L. upper limit on the mixture of neutrino mass eigenstates represented in the data sample is found to be mν2<5.6 MeV2/c4 .

  3. Bolometric detection of neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, B.; Krauss, L. M.; Wilczek, F.

    1985-01-01

    Elastic neutrino scattering off electrons in crystalline silicon at 1-10 mK results in measurable temperature changes in macroscopic amounts of material, even for low-energy (less than 0.41-MeV) pp neutrinos from the sun. New detectors for bolometric measurement of low-energy neutrino interactions, including coherent nuclear elastic scattering, are proposed. A new and more sensitive search for oscillations of reactor antineutrinos is practical (about 100 kg of Si), and would lay the groundwork for a more ambitious measurement of the spectrum of pp, Be-7, and B-8 solar neutrinos, and of supernovae anywhere in the Galaxy (about 10 tons of Si).

  4. Physics of neutrino flavor transformation through matter-neutrino resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng-Ru; Duan, Huaiyu; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    In astrophysical environments such as core-collapse supernovae and neutron star-neutron star or neutron star-black hole mergers where dense neutrino media are present, matter-neutrino resonances (MNRs) can occur when the neutrino propagation potentials due to neutrino-electron and neutrino-neutrino forward scattering nearly cancel each other. We show that neutrino flavor transformation through MNRs can be explained by multiple adiabatic solutions similar to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein mechanism. We find that for the normal neutrino mass hierarchy, neutrino flavor evolution through MNRs can be sensitive to the shape of neutrino spectra and the adiabaticity of the system, but such sensitivity is absent for the inverted hierarchy.

  5. Application of Reactor Antineutrinos: Neutrinos for Peace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suekane, F.

    2013-02-01

    In nuclear reactors, 239Pu are produced along with burn-up of nuclear fuel. 239Pu is subject of safeguard controls since it is an explosive component of nuclear weapon. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is watching undeclared operation of reactors to prevent illegal production and removal of 239Pu. In operating reactors, a huge numbers of anti electron neutrinos (ν) are produced. Neutrino flux is approximately proportional to the operating power of reactor in short term and long term decrease of the neutrino flux per thermal power is proportional to the amount of 239Pu produced. Thus rector ν's carry direct and real time information useful for the safeguard purposes. Since ν can not be hidden, it could be an ideal medium to monitor the reactor operation. IAEA seeks for novel technologies which enhance their ability and reactor neutrino monitoring is listed as one of such candidates. Currently neutrino physicists are performing R&D of small reactor neutrino detectors to use specifically for the safeguard use in response to the IAEA interest. In this proceedings of the neutrino2012 conference, possibilities of such reactor neutrinos application and current world-wide R&D status are described.

  6. Single photon production {nu}{sub l}N{yields}{nu}{sub l}N{gamma} in neutrino-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Barbero, C.; Mariano, A.

    2013-05-06

    The quasielastic charged current (CCQE) {nu}{sub e}n{yields}e{sup -}p scattering is the dominant mechanism to detect appearance of a {nu}{sub e} in an almost {nu}{sub {mu}} flux at the 1 GeV scale. Actual experiments show a precision below 1% and between less known background contributions, but necessary to constraint the event excess, we have the radiative corrections. A consistent model recently developed for the simultaneous description of elastic and radiative {pi}N scattering, pion-photoproduction and single pion production processes, both for charged and neutral current neutrino-nucleon scattering, is extended for the evaluation of the radiative {nu}{sub l}N{yields}{nu}{sub l}N{gamma} cross section. Our results are similar to a previous (but inconsistent) theoretical evaluation in the low energy region, and show an increment in the upper region where the {Delta} resonance becomes relevant.

  7. Implications of results of neutrino mass experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKellar, B.H.; Garbutt, M.

    2000-10-01

    The long standing negative (mass){sup 2} anomaly encountered in attempts to measure the mass of the electron neutrino may be an indication of physics beyond the standard model. It is demonstrated that an additional charged current interaction which is not of V--A form, and which is at least an order of magnitude weaker than the standard model charged current interaction, will produce a spectrum, which, if fitted by the standard model, may give a negative value for m{sub {nu}}{sup 2}. A possible physical explanation of the time dependent effects seen by the Troitsk experiment is also provided.

  8. A Search for Neutrino Induced Coherent NC($\\pi^{0}$) Production in the MINOS Near Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cherdack, Daniel David

    2011-02-01

    The production of single, highly forward π0 mesons by NC coherent neutrino-nucleus interactions (νμ + N → νμ + N + π0) is a process which probes fundamental aspects of the weak interaction. This reaction may also pose as a limiting background for long baseline searches for νμ → νe oscillations if the neutrino mixing angle θ13 is very small. The high-statistics sample of neutrino interactions recorded by the MINOS Near Detector provides an opportunity to measure the cross section of this coherent reaction on a relatively large-A nucleus at an average Ev = 4.9 GeV. A major challenge for this measurement is the isolation of forward-going electromagnetic (EM) showers produced by the relatively rare coherent NC(π0) process amidst an abundant rate of incoherently produced EM showers. The backgrounds arise from single π0 dominated NC events and also from quasi-elastic-like CC scattering of electron neutrinos. In this Thesis the theory of coherent interactions is summarized, and previous measurements of the coherent NC(π0) cross section are reviewed. Then, methods for selecting a sample of coherent NC(π0) like events, extracting the coherent NC(π0) event rate from that sample, estimating the analysis uncertainties, and calculating a cross section, are presented. A signal for neutrino-induced NC(π0) production is observed in the relevant kinematic regime as an excess of events of three standard deviations above background. The reaction cross sections, averaged over an energy window of 2.5 ≤ Ev ≤ 9.0 GeV is determined to be (31.6±10.5) x 10-40 cm2/nucleus. The result is the first evidence obtained for neutrino-nucleus coherent NC(π0) scattering on iron, and is the first measurement on an average nuclear target above A = 30. The cross section measurement

  9. Inhomogeneous neutrino degeneracy and big bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmire, Scott E.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    2000-04-15

    We examine big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) in the case of inhomogeneous neutrino degeneracy, in the limit where the fluctuations are sufficiently small on large length scales that the present-day element abundances are homogeneous. We consider two representative cases: degeneracy of the electron neutrino alone and equal chemical potentials for all three neutrinos. We use a linear programming method to constrain an arbitrary distribution of the chemical potentials. For the current set of (highly restrictive) limits on the primordial element abundances, homogeneous neutrino degeneracy barely changes the allowed range of the baryon-to-photon ratio {eta}. Inhomogeneous degeneracy allows for little change in the lower bound on {eta}, but the upper bound in this case can be as large as {eta}=1.1x10{sup -8} (only {nu}{sub e} degeneracy) or {eta}=1.0x10{sup -9} (equal degeneracies for all three neutrinos). For the case of inhomogeneous neutrino degeneracy, we show that there is no BBN upper bound on the neutrino energy density, which is bounded in this case only by limits from structure formation and the cosmic microwave background. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  10. Neutrino properties and fundamental symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There are two components to this work. The first is a development of a new detection scheme for neutrinos. The observed deficit of neutrinos from the Sun may be due to either a lack of understanding of physical processes in the Sun or may be due to neutrinos oscillating from one type to another during their transit from the Sun to the Earth. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is designed to use a water Cerenkov detector employing one thousand tonnes of heavy water to resolve this question. The ability to distinguish muon and tau neutrinos from electron neutrinos is crucial in order to carry out a model-independent test of neutrino oscillations. We describe a developmental exploration of a novel technique to do this using {sup 3}He proportional counters. Such a method offers considerable advantages over the initially proposed method of using Cerenkov light from capture on NaCl in the SNO. The second component of this work is an exploration of optimal detector geometry for a time-reversal invariance experiment. The question of why time moves only in the forward direction is one of the most puzzling problems in modern physics. We know from particle physics measurements of the decay of kaons that there is a charge-parity symmetry that is violated in nature, implying time-reversal invariance violation. Yet, we do not understand the origin of the violation of this symmetry. To promote such an understanding, we are developing concepts and prototype apparatus for a new, highly sensitive technique to search for time-reversal-invariance violation in the beta decay of the free neutron. The optimized detector geometry is seven times more sensitive than that in previous experiments. 15 refs.

  11. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory: Observation of Flavor Change for Solar Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, A. B.

    2016-03-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) detector was developed by an international scientific collaboration (Canada, US, UK) to use 1000 tonnes of heavy water 2 km underground in ultra-clean conditions to observe flavor change for solar neutrinos from 8B decay in the sun. A clear observation of neutrino change was obtained by comparing two neutrino reactions on deuterium, one sensitive only to electron flavor neutrinos and one sensitive equally to all active neutrino types. The design and construction and the operation and data analysis for the three separate phases of the experiment will be described. The initial phase with pure heavy water provided conclusive evidence for flavor change and hence finite mass for neutrinos. Subsequent phases within added NaCl and with an array of neutron detectors provided improved accuracy for the measurements of oscillation parameters. The observed total flux of 8B solar electron neutrinos is in excellent agreement with and more accurate than solar models. Modification of the SNO detector to create SNO + and expansion of the laboratory to create a long-term international underground laboratory, SNOLAB, will be briefly described.

  12. Neutrino and Antineutrino Cross sections at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan; /Alabama U.

    2011-10-01

    The MiniBooNE experiment has reported a number of high statistics neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections -among which are the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) and neutral current elastic (NCE) neutrino scattering on mineral oil (CH2). Recently a study of the neutrino contamination of the anti-neutrino beam has concluded and the analysis of the anti-neutrino CCQE and NCE scattering is ongoing.

  13. Can electron capture tell us the mass of the neutrino?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faessler, Amand; Šimkovic, F.

    2016-04-01

    The neutrino masses are one of the most important open problems in particle physics. Presently major efforts are underway to measure the electron antineutrino-mass by the triton beta decay [1] and the effective Majorana neutrino mass by the double beta decay [2]. The best way to determine the neutrino mass by electron capture was assumed to be in {}163{Ho}. The total decay energy of the excited daughter atom has for all excitations the same upper energy limit of the Q-value minus the mass of the electron neutrino. Recently Robertson [3] claimed, that the excitation of the two-hole states makes the determination of the neutrino mass by this method practically impossible. But Faessler and Simkovic [4] showed, that the influence of the two-hole states is less than 1% near the Q-value, the area relevant for the determination of the neutrino mass. Even weaker are the contributions of the three-hole states [5]. The upper end of the calorimetric deexcitation spectrum of Dy is dominated by the highest energy one-hole resonance. With a Lorentzian profile of this resonance one has to fit after including the experimental sensitivity four parameters: (1) the neutrino mass, (2) the Q-value, (3) the width of the resonance and (4) its strength. This contribution discusses the problems of the determination of the neutrino mass by electron capture in {}163{Ho}. The conclusion of this work is, that the determination of the electron neutrino mass by electron capture in {}163{Ho} is difficult, but (probably) not impossible.

  14. Neutrino mass matrices with two equalities between the elements or cofactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, S.; Gautam, Radha Raman; Singh, Lal

    2013-04-01

    We study the implications of the existence of two equalities between the elements or cofactors of the neutrino mass matrix. There are 65 structures of this type for each case. Phenomenological implications for unknown parameters like the effective Majorana mass of the electron neutrino and CP-violating phases are examined for the viable cases. To illustrate how such forms of the neutrino mass matrices may be realized, we also present a simple A4 model for one of the classes in each case.

  15. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. II. RELATIVISTIC EXPLOSION MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M{sub Sun} progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  16. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. II. Relativistic Explosion Models of Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M ⊙ progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  17. Observation of Muon Neutrino Charged Current Events in an Off-Axis Horn-Focused Neutrino Beam Using the NOvA Prototype Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Enrique Arrieta

    2014-01-01

    The NOνA is a long base-line neutrino oscillation experiment. It will study the oscillations between muon and electron neutrinos through the Earth. NOνA consists of two detectors separated by 810 km. Each detector will measure the electron neutrino content of the neutrino (NuMI) beam. Differences between the measurements will reveal details about the oscillation channel. The NOνA collaboration built a prototype detector on the surface at Fermilab in order to develop calibration, simulation, and reconstruction tools, using real data. This 220 ton detector is 110 mrad off the NuMI beam axis. This off-axis location allows the observation of neutrino interactions with energies around 2 GeV, where neutrinos come predominantly from charged kaon decays. During the period between October 2011 and April 2012, the prototype detector collected neutrino data from 1.67 × 1020 protons on target delivered by the NuMI beam. This analysis selected a number of candidate charged current muon neutrino events from the prototype data, which is 30% lower than predicted by the NOνA Monte Carlo simulation. The analysis suggests that the discrepancy comes from an over estimation of the neutrino flux in the Monte Carlo simulation, and in particular, from neutrinos generated in charged kaon decays. The ratio of measured divided by the simulated flux of muon neutrinos coming from charged kaon decays is: 0.70+0.108 -0.094. The NOνA collaboration may use the findings of this analysis to introduce a more accurate prediction of the neutrino flux produced by the NuMI beam in future Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Charged-current weak interaction processes in hot and dense matter and its impact on the spectra of neutrinos emitted from protoneutron star cooling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pinedo, G; Fischer, T; Lohs, A; Huther, L

    2012-12-21

    We perform three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport radiation hydrodynamics simulations covering a period of 3 s after the formation of a protoneutron star in a core-collapse supernova explosion. Our results show that a treatment of charged-current neutrino interactions in hot and dense matter as suggested by Reddy et al. [Phys. Rev. D 58, 013009 (1998)] has a strong impact on the luminosities and spectra of the emitted neutrinos. When compared with simulations that neglect mean-field effects on the neutrino opacities, we find that the luminosities of all neutrino flavors are reduced while the spectral differences between electron neutrinos and antineutrinos are increased. Their magnitude depends on the equation of state and in particular on the symmetry energy at subnuclear densities. These modifications reduce the proton-to-nucleon ratio of the outflow, increasing slightly their entropy. They are expected to have a substantial impact on nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds, even though they do not result in conditions that favor an r process. Contrary to previous findings, our results show that the spectra of electron neutrinos remain substantially different from those of other (anti)neutrino flavors during the entire deleptonization phase of the protoneutron star. The obtained luminosity and spectral changes are also expected to have important consequences for neutrino flavor oscillations and neutrino detection on Earth.

  19. Charged-current weak interaction processes in hot and dense matter and its impact on the spectra of neutrinos emitted from protoneutron star cooling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pinedo, G; Fischer, T; Lohs, A; Huther, L

    2012-12-21

    We perform three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport radiation hydrodynamics simulations covering a period of 3 s after the formation of a protoneutron star in a core-collapse supernova explosion. Our results show that a treatment of charged-current neutrino interactions in hot and dense matter as suggested by Reddy et al. [Phys. Rev. D 58, 013009 (1998)] has a strong impact on the luminosities and spectra of the emitted neutrinos. When compared with simulations that neglect mean-field effects on the neutrino opacities, we find that the luminosities of all neutrino flavors are reduced while the spectral differences between electron neutrinos and antineutrinos are increased. Their magnitude depends on the equation of state and in particular on the symmetry energy at subnuclear densities. These modifications reduce the proton-to-nucleon ratio of the outflow, increasing slightly their entropy. They are expected to have a substantial impact on nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds, even though they do not result in conditions that favor an r process. Contrary to previous findings, our results show that the spectra of electron neutrinos remain substantially different from those of other (anti)neutrino flavors during the entire deleptonization phase of the protoneutron star. The obtained luminosity and spectral changes are also expected to have important consequences for neutrino flavor oscillations and neutrino detection on Earth. PMID:23368446

  20. Neutrino Observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Q. R. Ahmad, R. C. Allen, T. C. Andersen, J. D. Anglin, G. Bühler, J. C. Barton, E. W. Beier, M. Bercovitch, J. Bigu, S. Biller, R. A. Black, I. Blevis, R. J. Boardman, J. Boger, E. Bonvin, M. G. Boulay, M. G. Bowler, T. J. Bowles, S. J. Brice, M. C. Browne, T. V. Bullard, T. H. Burritt, K. Cameron, J. Cameron, Y. D. Chan, M. Chen, H. H. Chen, X. Chen, M. C. Chon, B. T. Cleveland, E. T. H. Clifford, J. H. M. Cowan, D. F. Cowen, G. A. Cox, Y. Dai, X. Dai, F. Dalnoki-Veress, W. F. Davidson, P. J. Doe, G. Doucas, M. R. Dragowsky, C. A. Duba, F. A. Duncan, J. Dunmore, E. D. Earle, S. R. Elliott, H. C. Evans, G. T. Ewan, J. Farine, H. Fergani, A. P. Ferraris, R. J. Ford, M. M. Fowler, K. Frame, E. D. Frank, W. Frati, J. V. Germani, S. Gil, A. Goldschmidt, D. R. Grant, R. L. Hahn, A. L. Hallin, E. D. Hallman, A. Hamer, A. A. Hamian, R. U. Haq, C. K. Hargrove, P. J. Harvey, R. Hazama, R. Heaton, K. M. Heeger, W. J. Heintzelman, J. Heise, R. L. Helmer, J. D. Hepburn, H. Heron, J. Hewett, A. Hime, M. Howe, J. G. Hykawy, M. C. P. Isaac, P. Jagam, N. A. Jelley, C. Jillings, G. Jonkmans, J. Karn, P. T. Keener, K. Kirch, J. R. Klein, A. B. Knox, R. J. Komar, R. Kouzes, T. Kutter, C. C. M. Kyba, J. Law, I. T. Lawson, M. Lay, H. W. Lee, K. T. Lesko, J. R. Leslie, I. Levine, W. Locke, M. M. Lowry, S. Luoma, J. Lyon, S. Majerus, H. B. Mak, A. D. Marino, N. McCauley, A. B. McDonald, D. S. McDonald, K. McFarlane, G. McGregor, W. McLatchie, R. Meijer Drees, H. Mes, C. Mifflin, G. G. Miller, G. Milton, B. A. Moffat, M. Moorhead, C. W. Nally, M. S. Neubauer, F. M. Newcomer, H. S. Ng, A. J. Noble, E. B. Norman, V. M. Novikov, M. O'Neill, C. E. Okada, R. W. Ollerhead, M. Omori, J. L. Orrell, S. M. Oser, A. W. P. Poon, T. J. Radcliffe, A. Roberge, B. C. Robertson, R. G. H. Robertson, J. K. Rowley, V. L. Rusu, E. Saettler, K. K. Schaffer, A. Schuelke, M. H. Schwendener, H. Seifert, M. Shatkay, J. J. Simpson, D. Sinclair, P. Skensved, A. R. Smith, M. W. E. Smith, N. Starinsky, T. D. Steiger, R. G. Stokstad, R. S. Storey, B. Sur, R. Tafirout, N. Tagg, N. W. Tanner, R. K. Taplin, M. Thorman, P. Thornewell, P. T. Trent, Y. I. Tserkovnyak, R. Van Berg, R. G. Van de Water, C. J. Virtue, C. E. Waltham, J.-X. Wang, D. L. Wark, N. West, J. B. Wilhelmy, J. F. Wilkerson, J. Wilson, P. Wittich, J. M. Wouters, and M. Yeh

    2001-09-24

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D{sub 2}O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar {nu}{sub e} flux and the total flux of all active neutrino species. Solar neutrinos from the decay of {sup 8}B have been detected at SNO by the charged-current (CC) interaction on the deuteron and by the elastic scattering (ES) of electrons. While the CC reaction is sensitive exclusively to {nu}{sub e}, the ES reaction also has a small sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}}. In this paper, recent solar neutrino results from the SNO experiment are presented. It is demonstrated that the solar flux from {sup 8}B decay as measured from the ES reaction rate under the no-oscillation assumption is consistent with the high precision ES measurement by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. The {nu}{sub e} flux deduced from the CC reaction rate in SNO differs from the Super-Kamiokande ES results by 3.3{sigma}. This is evidence for an active neutrino component, in additional to {nu}{sub e}, in the solar neutrino flux. These results also allow the first experimental determination of the total active {sup 8}B neutrino flux from the Sun, and is found to be in good agreement with solar model predictions.

  1. Hybrid textures of the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, S.; Gautam, Radha Raman; Singh, Lal

    2013-08-01

    We perform a systematic study of neutrino mass matrices having a vanishing cofactor and an equality between two cofactors of the mass matrix. Such texture structures of the effective neutrino mass matrix arise from the type-I seesaw mechanism when the Dirac neutrino mass matrix is diagonal with two equal elements and the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrix has hybrid textures with one equality of matrix elements and one zero matrix element. For three right-handed neutrinos there are sixty possible hybrid textures out of which only six are excluded by the present experimental data. We show that such textures can be derived using discrete symmetries. The predictions of experimentally allowed textures are examined for unknown parameters such as the effective Majorana mass of the electron neutrino and the Dirac-type CP-violating phase.

  2. Detectable MeV neutrinos from black hole neutrino-dominated accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong; Zhang, Bing; Li, Ye; Ma, Ren-Yi; Xue, Li

    2016-06-01

    Neutrino-dominated accretion flows (NDAFs) around rotating stellar-mass black holes (BHs) have been theorized as the central engine of relativistic jets launched in massive star core collapse events or compact star mergers. In this work, we calculate the electron neutrino/antineutrino spectra of NDAFs by fully taking into account the general relativistic effects, and investigate the effects of viewing angle, BH spin, and mass accretion rate on the results. We show that even though a typical NDAF has a neutrino luminosity lower than that of a typical supernova (SN), it can reach 1050- 1051 erg s-1 peaking at ˜10 MeV , making NDAFs potentially detectable with the upcoming sensitive MeV neutrino detectors if they are close enough to Earth. Based on the observed gamma-ray burst (GRB) event rate in the local universe and requiring that at least three neutrinos are detected to claim a detection, we estimate a detection rate up to ˜(0.10 - 0.25 ) per century for GRB-related NDAFs by the Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K) detector if one neglects neutrino oscillation. If one assumes that all type Ib/c SNe have an engine-driven NDAF, the Hyper-K detection rate would be ˜(1 - 3 ) per century. By considering neutrino oscillations, the detection rate may decrease by a factor of 2-3. Detecting one such event would establish the observational evidence of NDAFs in the Universe.

  3. Unparticle physics and neutrino phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco, J.; Bolanos, A.; Miranda, O. G.; Moura, C. A.; Rashba, T. I.

    2009-04-01

    We have constrained unparticle interactions with neutrinos and electrons using available data on neutrino-electron elastic scattering and the four CERN LEP experiments data on mono photon production. We have found that, for neutrino-electron elastic scattering, the MUNU experiment gives better constraints than previous reported limits in the region d>1.5. The results are compared with the current astrophysical limits, pointing out the cases where these limits may or may not apply. We also discuss the sensitivity of future experiments to unparticle physics. In particular, we show that the measurement of coherent reactor neutrino scattering off nuclei could provide a good sensitivity to the couplings of unparticle interaction with neutrinos and quarks. We also discuss the case of future neutrino-electron experiments as well as the International Linear Collider.

  4. Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2010-08-04

    Recent studies of neutrino oscillations have established the existence of finite neutrino masses and mixing between generations of neutrinos. The combined results from studies of atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, reactor antineutrinos and neutrinos produced at accelerators paint an intriguing picture that clearly requires modification of the standard model of particle physics. These results also provide clear motivation for future neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for direct neutrino mass and nuclear double-beta decay. I will discuss the program of new neutrino oscillation experiments aimed at completing our knowledge of the neutrino mixing matrix.

  5. Astrophysics and cosmology closing in on neutrino masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, Arnon

    1990-01-01

    Massive neutrinos are expected in most grand unified theories that attempt to unify the strong and electroweak interactions. So far, heroic laboratory experiments have yielded only upper bounds on the masses of the elusive neutrinos. These bounds, however, are not very restrictive and cannot even exclude the possibility that the dark matter in the universe consists of neutrinos. The astrophysical and cosmological bounds on the masses of the muon and tau neutrinos, m(nu sub mu) and m(nu sub tau), which already are much more restrictive than the laboratory bounds, and the laboratory bound on the mass of the electron neutrino, m(nu sub e) can be improved significantly by future astrophysical and cosmological observations that perhaps will pin down the neutrino masses. Indeed, the recent results from the solar neutrino experiments combined with the seesaw mechanism for generating neutrino masses suggest that m(nu sub e) of about 10 to the -8th electron volts, m(nu sub mu) of about 0.001 electron volts, and m(nu sub tau) of about 10 electron volts, which can be tested in the near future by solar neutrino and accelerator experiments.

  6. Impact of sterile neutrino dark matter on core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Mackenzie L.; Mathews, Grant J.; Meixner, Matthew; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2016-09-01

    We summarize the impact of sterile neutrino dark matter on core-collapse supernova explosions. We explore various oscillations between electron neutrinos or mixed μ ‑ τ neutrinos and right-handed sterile neutrinos that may occur within a core-collapse supernova. In particular, we consider sterile neutrino masses and mixing angles that are consistent with sterile neutrino dark matter candidates as indicated by recent X-ray flux measurements. We find that the interpretation of the observed 3.5 keV X-ray excess as due to a decaying 7 keV sterile neutrino that comprises 100% of the dark matter would have almost no observable effect on supernova explosions. However, in the more realistic case in which the decaying sterile neutrino comprises only a small fraction of the total dark matter density due to the presence of other sterile neutrino flavors, WIMPs, etc. a larger mixing angle is allowed. In this case a 7 keV sterile neutrino could have a significant impact on core-collapse supernovae. We also consider mixing between μ ‑ τ neutrinos and sterile neutrinos. We find, however, that this mixing does not significantly alter the explosion and has no observable effect on the neutrino luminosities at early times.

  7. Global analysis of the source and detector nonstandard interactions using the short baseline ν -e and ν ¯ -e scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Amir N.

    2016-05-01

    We present a global analysis of the semileptonic and purely leptonic nonuniversal and flavor-changing nonstandard neutrino interactions in all the known short-baseline neutrino—and antineutrino—electron scattering experiments. The nonstandard effects at the source and at the detector can be more transparent in these experiments because of the negligibly small ratio between the baselines and neutrino energies, which is not enough for the neutrinos to oscillate, and thus can be sensitive to the new physics at both ends. We use data from two electron-neutrino electron scattering experiments and six electron-antineutrino electron scattering experiments, combine them to find the best fits on the nonstandard parameters using the source-only, detector-only analyses, and then find the interplay between the two cases. The bounds obtained in some cases are stronger and new, in some cases comparable to the current ones, and in other cases weaker. For instance, the bound obtained from the interplay between the source and detector nonstandard physics on the nonstandard parameter ɛee u d L at the source is much stronger and is comparable with the indirect bound, but the bounds on the parameters ɛμe u d L and ɛτe u d L are weaker in this study in comparison with the indirect bounds. We also find a global fit on the standard weak mixing angle sin2θW=0.249 ±0.020 with 2% improvement in its precision in comparison with the previous studies.

  8. Measurement of the Form Factors in the Semileptonic Decay Positive D Meson Going to Neutral Antikaon Resonance Positron Electron Neutrino.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Pauline

    A measurement of the ratios of the form factors in the semileptonic decay channel D^{ +/-}to K^{0*}e^ {+/-}nu is performed using data collected by the E791 collaboration at the Tagged Photon Spectrometer at Fermilab in a hadroproduction of charm experiment. Charmed events are selected if a secondary vertex of charged tracks is found clearly separated from the primary vertex. Semileptonic events for this particular decay mode are required to have a well identified electron as well as an invariant mass for the (Kpi ) system consistent with the K^* (892) mass. The form factors are extracted by comparing the data to a Monte-Carlo-simulated sample using a continuous maximum-likelihood method to simultaneously fit to four kinematic variables characteristic of this decay mode. The measured values for the form factor ratios are R _2 = 0.32_sp{-0.27}{+0.26} +/- 0.13 and R_{V} = 2.4_sp{-0.37}{+0.39}+/- 0.27..

  9. Correlated, precision measurements of θ23 and δ using only the electron neutrino appearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2013-06-04

    Precision measurement of the leptonic CP violating phase δ will suffer from the, then surviving, large uncertainty of sin2θ23 of 10–20% in the experimentally interesting region near maximal mixing of θ23. We advocate a new method for determination of both θ23 and δ at the same time using only the νe and ν̄e appearance channels and show that sin2θ23 can be determined automatically with much higher accuracy, approximately a factor of six, than sinδ. In this method, we identify a new degeneracy for the simultaneous determination of θ23 and δ, the θ23 intrinsic degeneracy, which must be resolved in order to achieve precision measurement of these two parameters. Spectral information around the vacuum oscillation maxima is shown to be the best way to resolve this degeneracy.

  10. Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, L.; Hulth, P. O.; Botner, O.; Carlson, P.; Ohlsson, T.

    2006-03-01

    J. N. Bahcall (1934-2005) -- Preface -- List of participants -- Committees -- Nobel symposium on neutrino physics - program -- The history of neutrino oscillations / S. M. Bilenky -- Super-Kamiokande results on neutrino oscillations / Y. Suzuki -- Sudbury neutrino observatory results / A. B. McDonald -- Results from KamLAND reactor neutrino detection / A. Suzuki -- New opportunities for surprise / J. Conrad -- Solar models and solar neutrinos / J. N. Bahcall -- Atmospheric neutrino fluxes / T. K. Gaisser -- The MSW effect and matter effects in neutrino oscillations / A. Yu. Smirnov -- Three-flavour effects and CP- and T-violation in neutrino oscillations / E. Kh. Akhmedov -- Global analysis of neutrino data / M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia -- Future precision neutrino oscillation experiments and theoretical implications / M. Lindner -- Experimental prospects of neutrinoless double beta decay / E. Fiorini -- Theoretical prospects of neutrinoless double beta decay / S. T. Petcov -- Supernova neutrino oscillations / G. G. Raffelt -- High-energy neutrino astronomy / F. Halzen -- Neutrino astrophysics in the cold: Amanda, Baikal and IceCube / C. Spiering -- Status of radio and acoustic detection of ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos and a proposal on reporting results / D. Saltzberg -- Detection of neutrino-induced air showers / A. A. Watson -- Prospect for relic neutrino searches / G. B. Gelmini -- Leptogenesis in the early universe / T. Yanagida -- Neutrinos and big bang nucleosynthesis / G. Steigman -- Extra galactic sources of high energy neutrinos / E. Waxman -- Cosmological neutrino bounds for non-cosmologists / M. Tegmark -- Neutrino intrinsic properties: the neutrino-antineutrino relation / B. Kayser -- NuTeV and neutrino properties / M. H. Shaevitz -- Absolute masses of neutrinos - experimental results and future possibilities / C. Weinheimer -- Flavor theories and neutrino masses / P. Ramond -- Neutrino mass models and leptogenesis / S. F. King -- Neutrino mass and

  11. A Study of the Nuclear-Medium Influence on Transverse Momentum of Hadrons Produced in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Agababyan, N.M.; Ammosov, V.V.; Ivanilov, A.A.; Korotkov, V.A.; Atayan, M.; Grigoryan, N.; Gulkanyan, H.; Karamyan, Zh.

    2005-07-01

    The influence of nuclear effects on the transverse momentum (p{sub T}) of neutrino-produced hadrons is investigated using the data obtained with the SKAT propane-freon bubble chamber irradiated in the neutrino beam (with E{sub {nu}} = 3-30 GeV) at the Serpukhov accelerator. It has been observed that the nuclear effects cause an enhancement of of hadrons produced in the target fragmentation region at low invariant mass of the hadronic system (2 < W < 4 GeV) and at low energies transferred to the hadrons (2 < {nu} < 9 GeV). At higher W and {nu}, no influence of nuclear effects on is observed. Measurement results are compared with predictions of a simple model, incorporating secondary intranuclear interactions of hadrons, which qualitatively reproduces the main features of the data.

  12. Neutrinos and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, Alejandro

    2015-07-15

    Neutrinos could be key particles to unravel the nature of the dark matter of the Universe. On the one hand, sterile neutrinos in minimal extensions of the Standard Model are excellent dark matter candidates, producing potentially observable signals in the form of a line in the X-ray sky. On the other hand, the annihilation or the decay of dark matter particles produces, in many plausible dark matter scenarios, a neutrino flux that could be detected at neutrino telescopes, thus providing non-gravitational evidence for dark matter. More conservatively, the non-observation of a significant excess in the neutrino fluxes with respect to the expected astrophysical backgrounds can be used to constrain dark matter properties, such as the self-annihilation cross section, the scattering cross section with nucleons and the lifetime.

  13. Cosmic Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2008-02-01

    I recall the place of neutrinos in the electroweak theory and summarize what we know about neutrino mass and flavor change. I next review the essential characteristics expected for relic neutrinos and survey what we can say about the neutrino contribution to the dark matter of the Universe. Then I discuss the standard-model interactions of ultrahigh-energy neutrinos, paying attention to the consequences of neutrino oscillations, and illustrate a few topics of interest to neutrino observatories. I conclude with short comments on the remote possibility of detecting relic neutrinos through annihilations of ultrahigh-energy neutrinos at the Z resonance.

  14. HALO the helium and lead observatory for supernova neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duba, C. A.; Duncan, F.; Farine, J.; Habig, A.; Hime, A.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Scholberg, K.; Shantz, T.; Virtue, C. J.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Yen, S.

    2008-11-01

    The Helium and Lead Observatory (HALO) is a supernova neutrino detector under development for construction at SNOLAB. It is intended to fulfill a niche as a long term, low cost, high livetime, and low maintenance, dedicated supernova detector. It will be constructed from 80 tonnes of lead, from the decommissioning of the Deep River Cosmic Ray Station, and instrumented with approximately 384 meters of 3He neutron detectors from the final phase of the SNO experiment. Charged- and Neutral-Current neutrino interactions in lead expel neutrons from the lead nuclei making a burst of detected neutrons the signature for the detection of a supernova. Existing neutrino detectors are mostly of the water Cerenkov and liquid scintillator types, which are primarily sensitive to electron anti-neutrinos via charged-current interactions on the hydrogen nuclei in these materials. By contrast, the large neutron excess of a heavy nucleus like Pb acts to Pauli-block pranglen transitions induced by electron anti-neutrinos, making HALO primarily sensitive to electron neutrinos. While any supernova neutrino data would provide an invaluable window into supernova dynamics, the electron neutrino CC channel has interesting sensitivity to particle physics through flavour-swapping and spectral splitting due to MSW-like collective neutrino-neutrino interactions in the core of the supernova, the only place in the universe where there is a sufficient density of neutrinos for this to occur. Such data could provide a test for θ13 ≠ 0 and an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. In addition, the ratio of 1-neutron to 2-neutron events would be a measure of the temperature of the cooling neutron star. For the 80 tonne detector, a supernova at 10 kpc is estimated to produce 43 detected neutrons in the absence of collective ν-ν interactions, and many more in their presence. The high neutrino cross-section and low neutron absorption cross-section of lead, along with the modest cost of lead, makes this

  15. Yet another possible explanation of the solar-neutrino puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W.; Turner, M.S.; Walker, T.P.

    1986-04-01

    Mikheyev and Smirnov have shown that the interactions of neutrinos with matter can result in the conversion of electron neutrinos produced in the center of the sun to muon neutrinos. Bethe has exploited this and has pointed out that the solar-neutrino puzzle can be resolved if the mass difference squared of the two neutrinos is m/sub 2//sup 2/ - m /sub 1//sup 2/ approx. = 6 x 10/sup -5/ eV/sup 2/, and the mixing angle satisfies sin theta/sub v/ > 0.0065. We discuss a qualitatively different solution to the solar-neutrino puzzle which requires 1.0 x 10/sup -8/ < (m/sub 2//sup 2/ - m/sub 1//sup 2/) (sin/sup 2/ 2theta/sub v//cos 2theta/sub v/) < 6.1 x 10/sup -8/ eV/sup 2/. Our solutions result in a much smaller flux of neutrinos from the p - p process than predicted by standard solar models, while Bethe's solution results in a flux of neutrinos from the p - process that is about the same as standard solar models.

  16. Right-Handed Neutrinos and the 2 TeV $W'$ Boson

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma, Pilar; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Lopez-Pavon, Jacobo

    2015-12-30

    The CMS e+e-jj events of invariant mass near 2 TeV are consistent with a W' boson decaying into an electron and a right-handed neutrino whose TeV-scale mass is of the Dirac type. We show that the Dirac partner of the right-handed electron-neutrino can be the right-handed tau-neutrino. Furthermore, a prediction of this model is that the sum of the τ+e+jj and τ-e-jj signal cross sections equals twice that for e+e-jj. The Standard Model neutrinos acquire Majorana masses and mixings compatible with neutrino oscillation data.

  17. Upper limit on the cross section for elastic neutralino-nucleon scattering in a neutrino experiment at the Baksan Underground Scintillator Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Suvorova, O. V. Boliev, M. M. Demidov, S. V. Mikheyev, S. P.

    2013-11-15

    The results of a neutrino experiment that involved 24.12 yr of live time of observation of muons from the lower Earth's hemisphere with the aid of the Baksan Underground Scintillator Telescope are presented. In the problem of searches for a signal from the annihilation of dark matter in the Sun, an upper limit on the cross section for the elastic scattering of a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) on a nucleon was obtained at a 90% confidence level from an analysis of data accumulated within 21.15 yr of live time of observation. A neutralino in a nonminimal supersymmetric theory was considered for a WIMP. The best limit at the Baksan Underground Scintillator Telescope on the cross section for spin-dependent neutralino interactionwith a proton corresponds to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} pb for the neutralino mass of 210 GeV/c{sup 2}. This limit is three orders of magnitude more stringent than similar limits obtained in experiments that detected directly WIMP scattering on target nuclei.

  18. Opportunities for Neutrino Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Efremenko, Yuri; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss opportunities for a neutrino program at the Spallation Neutrons Source (SNS) being commissioning at ORNL. Possible investigations can include study of neutrino-nuclear cross sections in the energy rage important for supernova dynamics and neutrino nucleosynthesis, search for neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering, and various tests of the standard model of electro-weak interactions.

  19. Detectors for Neutrino Physics at the First Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.A.; McFarland, K.S.

    1998-04-01

    We consider possible detector designs for short-baseline neutrino experiments using neutrino beams produced at the First Muon Collider complex. The high fluxes available at the muon collider make possible high statistics deep-inelastic scattering neutrino experiments with a low-mass target. A design of a low-energy neutrino oscillation experiment on the ``tabletop`` scale is also discussed.

  20. A Sterile-Neutrino Search with the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The MINOS experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in the the NuMI beamline at Fermilab, USA. Using a near detector at 1 km distance from the neutrino production target, and a far detector at 735 km from the target, it is designed primarily to measure the disappearance of muon neutrinos. This thesis presents an analysis using MINOS data of the possibility of oscil- lation of the neutrinos in the NuMI beam to a hypothetical sterile flavour, which would have no Standard Model couplings. Such oscillations would result in a deficit in the neutral current interaction rate in the MINOS far detector relative to the expectation derived from the near detector data. The method used to identify neutral current and charged current events in the MINOS detectors is described and a new method of predicting and fitting the far detector spectrum presented, along with the effects of systematic uncertainties on the sterile neutrino oscillation analysis. Using this analysis, the fraction fs of the disappearing neutrinos that go to steriles is constrained to be below 0.15 at the 90% confidence level in the absence of electron neutrino appearance in the NuMI beam. With electron appearance at the CHOOZ limit, fs < 0.41 at 90% C.L.

  1. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasielastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at Eν~3.5 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Fiorentini, G. A.; Schmitz, D. W.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Baldin, B.; Baumbaugh, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Boyd, S.; et al

    2013-07-11

    We report a study of νμ charged-current quasielastic events in the segmented scintillator inner tracker of the MINERvA experiment running in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. The events were selected by requiring a μ⁻ and low calorimetric recoil energy separated from the interaction vertex. We measure the flux-averaged differential cross section, dσ/dQ², and study the low energy particle content of the final state. Deviations are found between the measured dσ/dQ² and the expectations of a model of independent nucleons in a relativistic Fermi gas. We also observe an excess of energy near the vertex consistent with multiple protons inmore » the final state.« less

  2. Neutrino Physics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lederman, L. M.

    1963-01-09

    The prediction and verification of the neutrino are reviewed, together with the V A theory for its interactions (particularly the difficulties with the apparent existence of two neutrinos and the high energy cross section). The Brookhaven experiment confirming the existence of two neutrinos and the cross section increase with momentum is then described, and future neutrino experiments are considered. (D.C.W.)

  3. Oscillations of very low energy atmospheric neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Orlando L. G.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-06-01

    There are several new features in the production, oscillations, and detection of the atmospheric neutrinos of low energies E < or approx. 100 MeV. The flavor ratio r of muon to electron neutrino fluxes is substantially smaller than 2 and decreases with energy, a significant part of events is due to the decay of invisible muons at rest, etc. Oscillations in a two-layer medium (atmosphere-Earth) should be taken into account. We derive analytical and semianalytical expressions for the oscillation probabilities of these 'sub-sub-GeV' neutrinos. The energy spectra of the e-like events in water Cherenkov detectors are computed, and the dependence of the spectra on the 2-3 mixing angle {theta}{sub 23}, the 1-3 mixing, and the CP-violation phase are studied. We find that variations of {theta}{sub 23} in the presently allowed region change the number of e-like events by about 15%-20% as well as lead to distortion of the energy spectrum. The 1-3 mixing and CP violation can lead to {approx}10% effects. Detailed study of the sub-sub-GeV neutrinos will be possible in future megaton-scale detectors.

  4. MINERνA neutrino detector calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, Cheryl

    2015-05-15

    MINERνA is a neutrino scattering experiment that uses Fermilab’s NuMI beamline. Its goal is to measure cross-sections for neutrino scattering from different nuclei. Precise knowledge of these cross-sections is vital for current and future neutrino oscillation experiments. In order to measure these values to a high degree of accuracy, it is essential that the detector be carefully calibrated. Here, we describe in-situ calibration and cross-checks.

  5. A study of muon neutrino disappearance in the MINOS detectors and the NuMI beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Jiajie

    2010-01-01

    There is now substantial evidence that the proper description of neutrino involves two representations related by the 3 x 3 PMNS matrix characterized by either distinct mass or flavor. The parameters of this mixing matrix, three angles and a phase, as well as the mass differences between the three mass eigenstates must be determined experimentally. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search experiment is designed to study the flavor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as it travels between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory at 1 km from the target, and the Far Detector in the Soudan iron mine in Minnesota at 735 km from the target. From the comparison of reconstructed neutrino energy spectra at the near and far location, precise measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters from muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance are expected. It is very important to know the neutrino flux coming from the source in order to achieve the main goal of the MINOS experiment: precise measurements of the atmospheric mass splitting |Δm232|, sin2 θ23. The goal of my thesis is to accurately predict the neutrino flux for the MINOS experiment and measure the neutrino mixing angle and atmospheric mass splitting.

  6. Low-energy neutrino-nucleus interactions and beta-beam neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Jachowicz, N.; Pandey, V.

    2015-05-15

    We present an overview of neutrino-nucleus scattering at low energies with cross sections obtained within a continuum random phase approximation (CRPA) formalism. We highlight potential applications of beta-beam neutrino experiments for neutrino astrophysics. Our calculations are compared with MiniBooNe data at intermediate energies.

  7. Neutrino detection with CLEAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinsey, D. N.; Coakley, K. J.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes CLEAN, an approach to the detection of low-energy solar neutrinos and neutrinos released from supernovae. The CLEAN concept is based on the detection of elastic scattering events (neutrino-electron scattering and neutrino-nuclear scattering) in liquified noble gases such as liquid helium, liquid neon, and liquid xenon, all of which scintillate brightly in the ultraviolet. Key to the CLEAN technique is the use of a thin film of wavelength-shifting fluor to convert the ultraviolet scintillation light to the visible, thereby allowing detection by conventional photomultipliers. Liquid neon is a particularly promising medium for CLEAN. Because liquid neon has a high scintillation yield, has no long-lived radioactive isotopes, and can be easily purified by use of cold traps, it is an ideal medium for the detection of rare nuclear events. In addition, neon is inexpensive, dense, and transparent to its own scintillation light, making it practical for use in a large self-shielding apparatus. The central region of a full-sized detector would be a stainless steel tank holding approximately 135 metric tons of liquid neon. Inside the tank and suspended in the liquid neon would be several thousand photomultipliers. Monte Carlo simulations of gamma ray backgrounds have been performed assuming liquid neon as both shielding and detection medium. Gamma ray events occur with high probability in the outer parts of the detector. In contrast, neutrino scattering events occur uniformly throughout the detector. We discriminate background gamma ray events from events of interest based on a spatial maximum likelihood method estimate of event location. Background estimates for CLEAN are presented, as well as an evaluation of the sensitivity of the detector for p-p neutrinos. Given these simulations, the physics potential of the CLEAN approach is evaluated.

  8. Search for the Cosmic Neutrino Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faessler, A.; Hodak, R.; Kovalenko, S.; Simkovic, F.

    2015-02-01

    One expects three Cosmic Backgrounds: (1) The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) originated 380000 years after the Big Bang (BB). (2) The Neutrino Background decoupled about one second after the BB, while (3) the Cosmic Gravitational Wave Background created by the inflationary expansion decoupled directly after the BB. Only the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) has been detected and is well studied. Its spectrum follows Planck's black body radiation formula and shows a remarkable constant temperature of T0γ ≈ 2.7 K independent of the direction. The present photon density is about 370 photons per cm3. The size of the hot spots, which deviates only in the fifth decimal of the temperature from the average value, tells us, that the universe is flat. About 380 000 years after the Big Bang at a temperature of T0γ = 3000 K already in the matter dominated era the electrons combine with the protons and 4He and the photons move freely in the neutral universe and form the CMB. So the temperature and distribution of the photons give us information of the universe 380 000 years after the Big Bang. The Cosmic Neutrino Background (CνB) decoupled from matter already one second after the BB at a temperature of about 1010 K. Today their temperature is ~ 1.95 K and the average density is 56 electron-neutrinos and the total density of all neutrinos about 336 per cm3. Measurement of these neutrinos is an extremely challenging experimental problem which can hardly be solved with the present technologies. On the other hand it represents a tempting opportunity to check one of the key elements of the Big Bang Cosmology and to probe the early stages of the universe. The search for the CνB with the induced beta decay νe+3H → 3He + e- using KATRIN (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment) is the topic of this contribution.

  9. Neutrino mass calorimetric searches in the MARE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucciotti, A.; MARE Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The international project "Microcalorimeter Arrays for a Rhenium Experiment" (MARE) aims at the direct and calorimetric measurement of the electron neutrino mass with sub-electronvolt sensitivity. Calorimetric neutrino mass experiments measure all the energy released in a beta decay except for the energy carried away by the neutrino, therefore removing the most severe systematic uncertainties which have plagued the traditional and, so far, more sensitive spectrometers. Calorimetric measurements are best realized exploiting the thermal detection technique. This approach uses thermal microcalorimeters whose absorbers contain a low transition energy Q beta decaying isotope. To date the two best options are 187Re and 163Ho. While the first beta decays, the latter decays via electron capture, but both have a Q value around 2.5 keV. The potential of using 187Re for a calorimetric neutrino mass experiment has been already demonstrated. On the contrary, no calorimetric spectrum of 163Ho has been so far measured with the precision required to set a useful limit on the neutrino mass. In this talk we present the status and the perspectives of the MARE project activities for the active isotope selection and the single channel development. We also discuss the neutrino mass statistical sensitivity achievable with both isotopes.

  10. Constraints on neutrino oscillations using 1258 days of Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino data.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, S; Fukuda, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Itow, Y; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Okada, A; Sakurai, N; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Toshito, T; Totsuka, Y; Yamada, S; Desai, S; Earl, M; Kearns, E; Messier, M D; Scholberg, K; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Goldhaber, M; Barszczak, T; Casper, D; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Liu, D W; Price, L R; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Keig, W E; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Takemori, D; Hayato, Y; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakamura, K; Obayashi, Y; Oyama, Y; Sakai, A; Sakuda, M; Kohama, M; Suzuki, A T; Inagaki, T; Nakaya, T; Nishikawa, K; Haines, T J; Blaufuss, E; Dazeley, S; Lee, K B; Svoboda, R; Goodman, J A; Guillian, G; Sullivan, G W; Turcan, D; Habig, A; Hill, J; Jung, C K; Martens, K; Malek, M; Mauger, C; McGrew, C; Sharkey, E; Viren, B; Yanagisawa, C; Mitsuda, C; Miyano, K; Saji, C; Shibata, T; Kajiyama, Y; Nagashima, Y; Nitta, K; Takita, M; Yoshida, M; Kim, H I; Kim, S B; Yoo, J; Okazawa, H; Ishizuka, T; Etoh, M; Gando, Y; Hasegawa, T; Inoue, K; Ishihara, K; Maruyama, T; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Koshiba, M; Hatakeyama, Y; Ichikawa, Y; Koike, M; Nishijima, K; Fujiyasu, H; Ishino, H; Morii, M; Watanabe, Y; Golebiewska, U; Kielczewska, D; Boyd, S C; Stachyra, A L; Wilkes, R J; Young, K K

    2001-06-18

    We report the result of a search for neutrino oscillations using precise measurements of the recoil electron energy spectrum and zenith angle variations of the solar neutrino flux from 1258 days of neutrino-electron scattering data in Super-Kamiokande. The absence of significant zenith angle variation and spectrum distortion places strong constraints on neutrino mixing and mass difference in a flux-independent way. Using the Super-Kamiokande flux measurement in addition, two allowed regions at large mixing are found.

  11. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy from electron disappearance at a low energy neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Rupak; Sinha, Nita; Raut, Sushant K.

    2014-04-01

    Recent measurements of large θ13 by the reactor experiments have opened up the possibility of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy, i.e., the sign of the mass squared splitting Δm312, the CP-violating phase δCP, and the octant of θ23. In light of this result, we study the performance of a low energy neutrino factory (LENF) for determination of the mass hierarchy. In particular, we explore the potential of the νe and ν¯e disappearance channels at LENF to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, that is free from the uncertainties arising from the unknown δCP phase and the θ23 octant. We find that using these electron neutrino (antineutrino) disappearance channels with a standard LENF, it is possible to exclude the wrong hierarchy at 5σ with only 2 years of running, with a muon beam energy above ˜3.5(5.0-10.0) GeV and baseline longer than ˜1400(1900-2400) km for an optimistic (conservative) systematic error of 2% (5%).

  12. Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate O(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This prepares the way for a Neutrino Factory (NF) in which high energy muons decay within the straight sections of a storage ring to produce a beam of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos. The NF concept was proposed in 1997 at a time when the discovery that the three known types of neutrino ({nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}) can change their flavor as they propagate through space (neutrino oscillations) was providing a first glimpse of physics beyond the Standard Model. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source: a Neutrino Factory. This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for a Neutrino Factory.

  13. Behaviour of the high-energy neutrino flux in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanov, Aleksey; Sinegovskiy, Sergey; Sinegovskaya, Tatyana; Morozova, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The processing of the IceCube experiment data obtained during 988 days (2010-2013) revealed 37 high-energy neutrino-induced events with deposited energies of 30 TeV - 2 PeV. The hypothesis of an astrophysical origin of these neutrinos is confirmed at the statistical confidence level of 5.7σ. To identify reliably the neutrino events, a thorough calculation of the atmospheric neutrino background is required. In this work we calculate the atmospheric neutrino spectra in the energy range of 100 GeV - 10 PeV with usage of several hadronic models and a few parametrizations of cosmic ray spectra supported by experimental data which take into account the knee. It is shown that rare decays of short-lived neutral ka ns K_S^0 contribute more than a third of the total ν_e +(ν)_e flux at the energies above 100 eV. The account for kaons production in pion-nucleus collisions increases the ν_e +(ν)_e flux by 5-7% in the energy range of 102-104 GeV. Calculated neutrino spectra agree on the whole with the measurement data. The neutrino flavor ratio extracted from the IceCube data possibly indicates that the conventional atmospheric electron neutrino flux obtained in the IceCube experiment contains an admixture of the astrophysical neutrinos in the range of 20-50 TeV.

  14. Primordial nucleosynthesis and neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Christel Johanna

    calculations and have made it available to the community. We have applied a fully relativistic Coulomb wave correction to the weak reactions in the full Kawano/Wagoner Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) code. We have also added the zero temperature radiative correction. We find that using this higher accuracy Coulomb correction results in good agreement with previous work, giving only a modest ˜ 0.04% increase in helium mass fraction over correction prescriptions applied previously in BBN calculations. We have calculated the effect of these corrections on other light element abundance yields in BBN and we have studied these yields as functions of electron neutrino lepton number. This has allowed insights into the role of the Coulomb correction in the setting of the neutron-to-proton ratio during the BBN epoch. We find that the lepton capture processes' contributions to this ratio are only second order in the Coulomb correction.

  15. Neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Boris; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    Thanks to compelling evidence that neutrinos can change flavor, we now know that they have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. In these lectures, we explain the physics of neutrino flavor change, both in vacuum and in matter. Then, we describe what the flavor-change data have taught us about neutrinos. Finally, we consider some of the questions raised by the discovery of neutrino mass, explaining why these questions are so interesting, and how they might be answered experimentally.

  16. Time-Dependent Collective Neutrino Oscillations in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbar, Sajad; Duan, Huaiyu

    2015-10-01

    Neutrinos can experience self-induced flavor conversion in core-collapse supernovae due to neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. Previously a stationary supernova model, the so called ``neutrino bulb model,'' was used exclusively to study collective neutrino oscillations in the core-collapse supernova. We show that even a small time-dependent perturbation in neutrino fluxes on the surface of the proto-neutron star can lead to fast varying collective oscillations at large radii. This result calls for time-dependent supernova models for the study of collective neutrino oscillations. This work was supported by DOE EPSCoR Grant DE-SC0008142 at UNM.

  17. Neutrino Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, Steve

    2010-06-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate O(1021) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source : a Neutrino Factory. This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for a Neutrino Factory.

  18. Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Feilitzsch, Franz; Lanfranchi, Jean-Côme; Wurm, Michael

    The neutrino was postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in the early 1930s, but could only be detected for the first time in the 1950s. Ever since scientists all around the world have worked on the detection and understanding of this particle which so scarcely interacts with matter. Depending on the origin and nature of the neutrino, various types of experiments have been developed and operated. In this entry, we will review neutrino detectors in terms of neutrino energy and associated detection technique as well as the scientific outcome of some selected examples. After a brief historical introduction, the detection of low-energy neutrinos originating from nuclear reactors or from the Earth is used to illustrate the principles and difficulties which are encountered in detecting neutrinos. In the context of solar neutrino spectroscopy, where the neutrino is used as a probe for astrophysics, three different types of neutrino detectors are presented - water Čerenkov, radiochemical, and liquid-scintillator detectors. Moving to higher neutrino energies, we discuss neutrinos produced by astrophysical sources and from accelerators. The entry concludes with an overview of a selection of future neutrino experiments and their scientific goals.

  19. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Balantekin, A. B.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Kusakabe, M.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Pehlivan, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-06-01

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial 7Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and 7Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like 7Li, 11B, 92Nb, 138La and 180Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ13 with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio 11B/7Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  20. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Balantekin, A. B.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Kusakabe, M.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Pehlivan, Y.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-06-24

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  1. A quantum-information theoretic analysis of three-flavor neutrino oscillations. Quantum entanglement, nonlocal and nonclassical features of neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Subhashish; Alok, Ashutosh Kumar; Srikanth, R.; Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.

    2015-10-01

    Correlations exhibited by neutrino oscillations are studied via quantum-information theoretic quantities. We show that the strongest type of entanglement, genuine multipartite entanglement, is persistent in the flavor changing states. We prove the existence of Bell-type nonlocal features, in both its absolute and genuine avatars. Finally, we show that a measure of nonclassicality, dissension, which is a generalization of quantum discord to the tripartite case, is nonzero for almost the entire range of time in the evolution of an initial electron-neutrino. Via these quantum-information theoretic quantities, capturing different aspects of quantum correlations, we elucidate the differences between the flavor types, shedding light on the quantum-information theoretic aspects of the weak force.

  2. Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Several anomalies recorded in short-baseline neutrino experiments suggest the possibility that the standard 3-flavor framework may be incomplete and point towards a manifestation of new physics. Light sterile neutrinos provide a credible solution to these puzzling results. Here, we present a concise review of the status of the neutrino oscillations within the 3+1 scheme, the minimal extension of the standard 3-flavor framework endowed with one sterile neutrino species. We emphasize the potential role of LBL experiments in the searches of CP violation related to sterile neutrinos and their complementarity with the SBL experiments.

  3. Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Annual technical progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, E.W.

    1992-03-01

    This document is a technical progress report on work performed at the University of Pennsylvania during the current year on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. The motivation for the experiment is the measurement of neutrinos emitted by the sun. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation dedicated solar neutrino experiment which will extend the results of our work with the Kamiokande II detector by measuring three reactions of neutrinos rather than the single reaction measured by the Kamiokande experiment. The collaborative project includes physicists from Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Full funding for the construction of this facility was obtained in January 1990, and its construction is estimated to take five years. The motivation for the SNO experiment is to study the fundamental properties of neutrinos, in particular the mass and mixing parameters, which remain undetermined after decades of experiments in neutrino physics utilizing accelerators and reactors as sources of neutrinos. To continue the study of neutrino properties it is necessary to use the sun as a neutrino source. The long distance to the sun makes the search for neutrino mass sensitive to much smaller mass than can be studied with terrestrial sources. Furthermore, the matter density in the sun is sufficiently large to enhance the effects of small mixing between electron neutrinos and mu or tau neutrinos. This experiment, when combined with the results of the radiochemical {sup 37}Cl and {sup 71}Ga experiments and the Kamiokande II experiment, should extend our knowledge of these fundamental particles, and as a byproduct, improve our understanding of energy generation in the sun.

  4. Neutrinos from type II supernovae - The first 100 milliseconds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myra, Eric S.; Burrows, Adam

    1990-01-01

    The collapse of a 1.17 solar mass iron core is numerically followed through infall to 100 ms past core bounce, and the emergent neutrino spectra during each phase are highlighted. It is found that, even with fairly optimistic conditions for producing a strong, sustained core-bounce shock wave, the prompt shock stalls within 9 ms of core bounce at a radius of less than 250 km. It appears that a radical change in the character of the progenitor core or in our understanding of the relevant physics of stellar collapse is needed before the direct mechanism for type II supernovae can become viable. Expanding the number of neutrino types from one to six magnifies the debilitating effect of neutrino loss on shock propagation. At shock breakout, prompt bursts of all neutrino types are observed. The luminosities of the nonelectron types show a sudden turn-on in luminosity while that of the electron neutrinos steadily increases throughout infall as a result of accelerating electron capture.

  5. A combined beta-beam and electron capture neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, José; Espinoza, Catalina; Orme, Christopher; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Pascoli, Silvia

    2009-06-01

    The next generation of long baseline neutrino experiments will aim at determining the value of the unknown mixing angle, θ13, the type of neutrino mass hierarchy and the presence of CP-violation in the lepton sector. Beta-beams and electron capture experiments have been studied as viable candidates for long baseline experiments. They use a very clean electron neutrino beam from the β-decays or electron capture decays of boosted ions. In the present article we consider an hybrid setup which combines a beta-beam with an electron capture beam by using boosted Ytterbium ions. We study the sensitivity to the CP-violating phase δ and the θ13 angle, the CP-discovery potential and the reach to determine the type of neutrino mass hierarchy for this type of long baseline experiment. The analysis is performed for different neutrino beam energies and baselines. Finally, we also discuss how the results would change if a better knowledge of some of the assumed parameters was achieved by the time this experiment could take place.

  6. The status of the study of solar CNO neutrinos in the Borexino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanchenko, G. A.; Collaboration: Borexino Collaboration

    2015-12-15

    Although less than 1% of solar energy is generated in the CNO cycle, it plays a critical role in astrophysics, since this cycle is the primary source of energy in certain more massive stars and at later stages of evolution of solar-type stars. Electron neutrinos are produced in the CNO cycle reactions. These neutrinos may be detected by terrestrial neutrino detectors. Various solar models with different abundances of elements heavier than helium predict different CNO neutrino fluxes. A direct measurement of the CNO neutrino flux could help distinguish between these models and solve several other astrophysical problems. No CNO neutrinos have been detected directly thus far, and the best upper limit on their flux was set in the Borexino experiment. The work on reducing the background in the region of energies of CNO neutrinos (up to 1.74 MeV) and developing novel data analysis methods is presently under way. These efforts may help detect the CNO neutrino flux in the Borexino experiment at the level predicted by solar models.

  7. Neutrino Oscillations With Two Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.

    2016-10-01

    This work estimates the probability of μ to e neutrino oscillation with two sterile neutrinos using a 5×5 U-matrix, an extension of the previous estimate with one sterile neutrino and a 4×4 U-matrix. The sterile neutrino-active neutrino mass differences and the mixing angles of the two sterile neutrinos with the three active neutrinos are taken from recent publications, and the oscillation probability for one sterile neutrino is compared to the previous estimate.

  8. Neutrino Oscillations With Two Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.

    2016-06-01

    This work estimates the probability of μ to e neutrino oscillation with two sterile neutrinos using a 5×5 U-matrix, an extension of the previous estimate with one sterile neutrino and a 4×4 U-matrix. The sterile neutrino-active neutrino mass differences and the mixing angles of the two sterile neutrinos with the three active neutrinos are taken from recent publications, and the oscillation probability for one sterile neutrino is compared to the previous estimate.

  9. Panofsky Prize Lecture: Evidence for Oscillation of Atmospheric Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsuka, Yoji

    2002-04-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are decay products of pions and kaons (and of their decay products muons) produced by nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with air nuclei. Though their flux is not known well, only within 20 %, physics quantities that are independent of the flux uncertainty exist. The ratio of the number of muon neutrinos to the number of electron neutrinos is estimated to be accurate within 5 %. The other quantity is the shape of the zenith-angle distribution. Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande are water Cherenkov detectors with 3,000 ton and 50,000 ton pure water, respectively. Kamiokande was operational in 1983 - 1996, and Super-K in 1996 - 2001 and 2003 - in future. We had already noted in 1988 that the observed μ/e ratio, which represented ν_mu/ν_e, was smaller by about 40 %. Later in 1994 we noted that the zenith angle distribution of muon neutrinos was strongly distorted, namely much fewer muons observed in the upward direction, while downward-going muons were what we expected. Electrons were quite normal. In 1996 Super-Kamiokande was ready. Its fiducial volume is 22.5 kton, much larger than Kamiokande's 1.04 kton. In 1998 based on 25.5 kton years of data we presented convincing results on the small μ/e ratio which was caused by fewer number of muons in the upward direction. The essential feature of the observed anomaly was that the disappearance of muon neutrinos depended strongly on their path length and on their energies. Electrons showed no anomaly within the experimental limit. These results were quantitatively and almost uniquely explained by oscillation of muon neutrinos to tau neutrinos, thus evidence for the finite but tiny mass of neutrinos.

  10. Solar Neutrinos

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Harmer, D. S.

    1964-12-01

    The prospect of studying the solar energy generation process directly by observing the solar neutrino radiation has been discussed for many years. The main difficulty with this approach is that the sun emits predominantly low energy neutrinos, and detectors for observing low fluxes of low energy neutrinos have not been developed. However, experimental techniques have been developed for observing neutrinos, and one can foresee that in the near future these techniques will be improved sufficiently in sensitivity to observe solar neutrinos. At the present several experiments are being designed and hopefully will be operating in the next year or so. We will discuss an experiment based upon a neutrino capture reaction that is the inverse of the electron-capture radioactive decay of argon-37. The method depends upon exposing a large volume of a chlorine compound, removing the radioactive argon-37 and observing the characteristic decay in a small low-level counter.

  11. Neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.

    1994-04-01

    The existence of a finite neutrino mass would have important consequences in particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. Experimental sensitivities have continued to be pushed down without any confirmed evidence for a finite neutrino mass. Yet there are several observations of discrepancies between theoretical predictions and observations which might be possible indications of a finite neutrino mass. Thus, extensive theoretical and experimental work is underway to resolve these issues.

  12. Three flavor neutrino oscillations in matter: Flavor diagonal potentials, the adiabatic basis, and the CP phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kneller, James P.; McLaughlin, Gail C.

    2009-09-01

    We discuss the three neutrino flavor evolution problem with general, flavor-diagonal, matter potentials and a fully parametrized mixing matrix that includes CP violation, and derive expressions for the eigenvalues, mixing angles, and phases. We demonstrate that, in the limit that the mu and tau potentials are equal, the eigenvalues and matter mixing angles {theta}-tilde{sub 12} and {theta}-tilde{sub 13} are independent of the CP phase, although {theta}-tilde{sub 23} does have CP dependence. Since we are interested in developing a framework that can be used for S matrix calculations of neutrino flavor transformation, it is useful to work in a basis that contains only off-diagonal entries in the Hamiltonian. We derive the 'nonadiabaticity' parameters that appear in the Hamiltonian in this basis. We then introduce the neutrino S matrix, derive its evolution equation and the integral solution. We find that this new Hamiltonian, and therefore the S matrix, in the limit that the {mu} and {tau} neutrino potentials are the same, is independent of both {theta}-tilde{sub 23} and the CP violating phase. In this limit, any CP violation in the flavor basis can only be introduced via the rotation matrices, and so effects which derive from the CP phase are then straightforward to determine. We then show explicitly that the electron neutrino and electron antineutrino survival probability is independent of the CP phase in this limit. Conversely, if the CP phase is nonzero and mu and tau matter potentials are not equal, then the electron neutrino survival probability cannot be independent of the CP phase.

  13. Muon and Tau Neutrinos Spectra from Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele; Moscato, Federica

    2003-12-01

    Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23th February 1956, September 29th 1989, 28th October and on 2nd-4th November 2003 are sources of cosmic rays, X, gamma and neutrino bursts. These flares took place both on front or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk. The 4th November event was the most powerful X event in the highest known rank category X28 just at horizons. The observed and estimated total flare energy (EFL ≃ 1031div 1033 erg) should be a source of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise by the solar charged flare particles reaching the terrestrial atmosphere. These first earliest prompt solar neutrino burst might be observed, in a few neutrino clustered events, in present or future largest neutrino underground detectors as Super-Kamiokande one, in time correlation with the X-Radio flare. The onset in time correlation has great statistical significance. Our first estimate on the neutrino number events detection at the Super-Kamiokande II Laboratory for horizontal or hidden flare is found to be few events: NeV_bar{ν}_e≃ 0.63&etae ()/(35 MeV) ()/(1031 erg); and NeV_bar{ν}μ ≃ 3.58()/(200 MeV) ()/(1031erg) η,SUB>μ, where η≃ 1, Eνμ > 113 MeV. Our first estimates of neutrino signals in largest underground detectors hint for few events in correlation with X, gamma, radio onser. Our approximated spectra for muons and taus from these rare solar eruption are shown over the most common background. The muon and tau signature is very peculiar and characteristic over electron and anti-electron neutrino fluxes. The rise of muon neutrinos will be detectable above the minimal muon threshold Eν ≃ 113 MeV energy, or above the pion and Δ ° thresholds (Eν≃ 151 and 484 MeV). Any large neutrino flare event record might also verify the expected neutrino flavour mixing leading to a few as well as a comparable

  14. Analysis Techniques to Measure Charged Current Inclusive Water Cross Section and to Constrain Neutrino Oscillation Parameters using the Near Detector (ND280) of the T2K Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rajarshi

    2014-03-01

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) Experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment located in Japan with the primary goal to precisely measure multiple neutrino flavor oscillation parameters. An off-axis muon neutrino beam with an energy that peaks at 600 MeV is generated at the JPARC facility and directed towards the kiloton Super-Kamiokande (SK) water Cherenkov detector located 295 km away. The rates of electron neutrino and muon neutrino interactions are measured at SK and compared with expected model values. This yields a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters sinq and sinq. Measurements from a Near Detector that is 280 m downstream of the neutrino beam target are used to constrain uncertainties in the beam flux prediction and neutrino interaction rates. We present a measurement of inclusive charged current neutrino interactions on water. We used several sub-detectors in the ND280 complex, including a Pi-Zero detector (P0D) that has alternating planes of plastic scintillator and water bag layers, a time projection chamber (TPC) and fine-grained detector (FGD) to detect and reconstruct muons from neutrino charged current events. Finally, we describe a ``forward-fitting'' technique that is used to constrain the beam flux and cross section as an input for the neutrino oscillation analysis and also to extract a flux-averaged inclusive charged current cross section on water.

  15. Determination of |Vub| from measurements of the electron and neutrino momenta in inclusive semileptonic B decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-09-01

    We present a determination of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub| based on the analysis of semileptonic B decays from a sample of 88 x 10(6) Gamma(4S) decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e+e- storage ring. Charmless semileptonic B decays are selected using measurements of the electron energy and the invariant mass squared of the electron-neutrino pair. We obtain |Vub| =(3.95 +/- 0.26(+0.58)(-0.42) +/- 0.25) x 10(-3), where the errors represent experimental uncertainties, heavy quark parameter uncertainties, and theoretical uncertainties, respectively.

  16. Atmospheric neutrinos observed in underground detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stanev, T.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced when the primary cosmic ray beam hits the atmosphere and initiates atmospheric cascades. Secondary mesons decay and give rise to neutrinos. The neutrino production was calculated and compared with the neutrino fluxes detected in underground detectors. Contained neutrino events are characterized by observation of an interaction within the fiducial volume of the detector when the incoming particle is not observed. Both the neutrino flux and the containment requirement restrict the energy of the neutrinos observed in contained interactions to less than several GeV. Neutrinos interact with the rock surrounding the detector but only muon neutrino interactions can be observed, as the electron energy is dissipated too fast in the rock. The direction of the neutrino is preserved in the interaction and at energies above 1 TeV the angular resolution is restricted by the scattering of the muon in the rock. The muon rate reflects the neutrino spectrum above some threshold energy, determined by the detector efficiency for muons.

  17. Neutrino telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, H.

    2012-09-15

    Neutrino astrophysics offers a new possibility to observe our Universe: high-energy neutrinos, produced by the most energetic phenomena in our Galaxy and in the Universe, carry complementary (if not exclusive) information about the cosmos: this young discipline extends in fact the conventional astronomy beyond the usual electromagnetic probe. The weak interaction of neutrinos with matter allows them to escape from the core of astrophysical objects and in this sense they represent a complementary messenger with respect to photons. However, their detection on Earth due to the small interaction cross section requires a large target mass. The aim of this article is to review the scientific motivations of the high-energy neutrino astrophysics, the detection principles together with the description of a running apparatus, the experiment ANTARES, the performance of this detector with some results, and the presentation of other neutrino telescope projects.

  18. Neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2015-07-15

    The Neutrino Factory is a facility that produces neutrino beams with a well-defined flavour content and energy spectrum from the decay of intense, high-energy, stored muon beams to establish CP violation in the neutrino sector. The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) is providing a Reference Design Report (RDR) for the facility. The present design is optimised for the recent measurements of θ{sub 13}. The accelerator facility will deliver 10{sup 21} muon decays per year from 10 GeV stored muon beams. The straight sections of the storage ring point to a 100 kton Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) at a distance of 2000-2500 km from the source. The accuracy in the value of δ{sub CP} that a Neutrino Factory can achieve and the δ{sub CP} coverage is unrivalled by other future facilities. Staging scenarios for the Neutrino Factory deliver facilities that can carry out physics at each stage. In the context of Fermilab, such a scenario would imply in the first stage the construction of a small storage ring, nuSTORM, to carry out neutrino cross-section and sterile neutrino measurements and to perform a programme of 6D muon cooling R&D. The second stage is the construction of a 5 GeV Neutrino Factory (nuMAX) pointing to the Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake and the final stage would use many of the components of this facility to construct a Muon Collider, initially as a 126 GeV CM Higgs Factory, which may be upgraded to a multi-TeV Muon Collider if required.

  19. Updating neutrino magnetic moment constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañas, B. C.; Miranda, O. G.; Parada, A.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we provide an updated analysis of the neutrino magnetic moments (NMMs), discussing both the constraints on the magnitudes of the three transition moments Λi and the role of the CP violating phases present both in the mixing matrix and in the NMM matrix. The scattering of solar neutrinos off electrons in Borexino provides the most stringent restrictions, due to its robust statistics and the low energies observed, below 1 MeV. Our new limit on the effective neutrino magnetic moment which follows from the most recent Borexino data is 3.1 ×10-11μB at 90% C.L. This corresponds to the individual transition magnetic moment constraints: |Λ1 | ≤ 5.6 ×10-11μB, |Λ2 | ≤ 4.0 ×10-11μB, and |Λ3 | ≤ 3.1 ×10-11μB (90% C.L.), irrespective of any complex phase. Indeed, the incoherent admixture of neutrino mass eigenstates present in the solar flux makes Borexino insensitive to the Majorana phases present in the NMM matrix. For this reason we also provide a global analysis including the case of reactor and accelerator neutrino sources, presenting the resulting constraints for different values of the relevant CP phases. Improved reactor and accelerator neutrino experiments will be needed in order to underpin the full profile of the neutrino electromagnetic properties.

  20. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Morfín, Jorge G.; Nieves, Juan; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  1. Recent Developments in Neutrino/Antineutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Morfín, Jorge G.; Nieves, Juan; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental results and developments in the theoretical treatment of neutrino-nucleus interactions in the energy range of 1–10 GeV are discussed. Difficulties in extracting neutrino-nucleon cross sections from neutrino-nucleus scattering data are explained and significance of understanding nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation experiments is stressed. Detailed discussions of the status of two-body current contribution in the kinematic region dominated by quasielastic scattering and specific features of partonic nuclear effects in weak DIS scattering are presented.

  2. Some uncertainties of neutrino oscillation effect in the NOνA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolupaeva, Lyudmila D.; Kuzmin, Konstantin S.; Petrova, Olga N.; Shandrov, Igor M.

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainties related to the effect of neutrino coherent forward scattering in Earth’s matter (MSW mechanism) and with the cross-sections of quasi-elastic (QE) neutrino scattering on nuclear targets of the NOνA detectors are studied. The NOνA sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy and the CP violating phase is discussed.

  3. The Fermilab main injector neutrino program

    SciTech Connect

    Morfin, Jorge G.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The NuMI Facility at Fermilab provides an extremely intense beam of neutrinos making it an ideal place for the study of neutrino oscillations as well as high statistics (anti)neutrino-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiments. The MINOS neutrino oscillation {nu}{mu} disappearance experiment is currently taking data and has published first results. The NO{nu}A {nu}e appearance experiment is planning to begin taking data at the start of the next decade. For the study of neutrino scattering, the MINER{nu}A experiment at Fermilab is a collaboration of elementary-particle and nuclear physicists planning to use a fully active fine-grained solid scintillator detector. The overall goals of the experiment are to measure absolute exclusive cross-sections, nuclear effects in {nu} - A interactions, a systematic study of the resonance-DIS transition region and the high-xBj - low Q2 DIS region.

  4. Coronal Neutrino Emission in Hypercritical Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, R.; Mineshige, S.; Kawanaka, N.

    2008-03-01

    Hypercritical accretion flows onto stellar mass black holes (BHs) are commonly believed to be as a promising model of central engines of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this model a certain fraction of the gravitational binding energy of accreting matter is deposited to the energy of relativistic jets via neutrino annihilation and/or magnetic fields. However, some recent studies have indicated that the energy deposition rate by neutrino annihilation is somewhat smaller than that needed to power a GRB. To overcome this difficulty, Ramirez-Ruiz and Socrates proposed that high-energy neutrinos from the hot corona above the accretion disk might enhance the efficiency of the energy deposition. We elucidate the disk corona model in the context of hypercritical accretion flows. From the energy balance in the disk and the corona, we can calculate the disk and coronal temperature, Td and Tc, and neutrino spectra, taking into account the neutrino cooling processes by neutrino-electron scatterings and neutrino pair productions. The calculated neutrino spectra consist of two peaks: one by the neutrino emission from the disk and the other by that from the corona. We find that the disk corona can enhance the efficiency of energy release but only by a factor of 1.5 or so, unless the height of the corona is very small, Hll r. This is because the neutrino emission is very sensitive to the temperature of the emitting region, and then the ratio Tc/Td cannot be very large.

  5. Neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mark

    2002-05-15

    The wave theory of light, and in particular the principle of interference, was formulated by Thomas Young in 1801. In the 20th century, the principle of interference was extended to the quantum mechanical wave functions describing matter. The phenomenon of quantum mechanical interference of different neutrino states, neutrino oscillations, has provided one of the most exciting developments in high energy particle physics of the last decade. Observations of the flavour oscillations of neutrinos produced by distant sources, such as from the core of the Sun, provide compelling evidence that neutrinos have mass. This article describes the main features and the most significant experimental observations of this unusual application of the principle of interference.

  6. Sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, J.; Machado, P. A. N.; Maltoni, M.; Schwetz, T.

    2016-06-01

    We characterize statistically the indications of a presence of one or more light sterile neutrinos from MiniBooNE and LSND data, together with the reactor and gallium anomalies, in the global context. The compatibility of the aforementioned signals with null results from solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator experiments is evaluated. We conclude that a severe tension is present in the global fit, and therefore the addition of eV-scale sterile neutrinos does not satisfactorily explain the anomalies.

  7. Neutrino quantum kinetic equations: The collision term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, Daniel N.; Cirigliano, Vincenzo

    2016-08-01

    We derive the collision term relevant for neutrino quantum kinetic equations in the early universe and compact astrophysical objects, displaying its full matrix structure in both flavor and spin degrees of freedom. We include in our analysis neutrino-neutrino processes, scattering and annihilation with electrons and positrons, and neutrino scattering off nucleons (the latter in the low-density limit). After presenting the general structure of the collision terms, we take two instructive limiting cases. The one-flavor limit highlights the structure in helicity space and allows for a straightforward interpretation of the off-diagonal entries in terms of the product of scattering amplitudes of the two helicity states. The isotropic limit is relevant for studies of the early universe: in this case the terms involving spin coherence vanish and the collision term can be expressed in terms of two-dimensional integrals, suitable for computational implementation.

  8. Neutrino quantum kinetic equations: The collision term

    DOE PAGES

    Blaschke, Daniel N.; Cirigliano, Vincenzo

    2016-08-25

    We derive the collision term relevant for neutrino quantum kinetic equations in the early universe and compact astrophysical objects, displaying its full matrix structure in both flavor and spin degrees of freedom. We include in our analysis neutrino-neutrino processes, scattering and annihilation with electrons and positrons, and neutrino scattering off nucleons (the latter in the low-density limit). After presenting the general structure of the collision terms, we take two instructive limiting cases. The one-flavor limit highlights the structure in helicity space and allows for a straightforward interpretation of the off-diagonal entries in terms of the product of scattering amplitudes ofmore » the two helicity states. As a result, the isotropic limit is relevant for studies of the early universe: in this case the terms involving spin coherence vanish and the collision term can be expressed in terms of two-dimensional integrals, suitable for computational implementation.« less

  9. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precision measurements in electron and muon neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.; Parke, S.J.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-07-01

    Recently a new method for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the effective values of the atmospheric {Delta}m{sup 2} measured in the electron neutrino disappearance channel, {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee), with the one measured in the muon neutrino disappearance channel, {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}), was proposed. If {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) is larger (smaller) than {Delta}m{sup 2} ({mu}{mu}) the hierarchy is of the normal (inverted) type. We re-examine this proposition in the light of two very high precision measurements: {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}) that may be accomplished by the phase II of the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) experiment, for example, and {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) that can be envisaged using the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic uncertainties of both measurements, we estimate the parameter region of ({theta}{sub 13}, {delta}) in which the mass hierarchy can be determined. If {theta}{sub 13} is relatively large, sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} {approx}> 0.05, and both of {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) and {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}) can be measured with the precision of {approx} 0.5 % it is possible to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at > 95% CL for 0.3{pi} {approx}< {delta} {approx}< 1.7 {pi} for the current best fit values of all the other oscillation parameters.

  10. Large transition magnetic moment of the neutrino from horizontal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. S.; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    1990-12-01

    The apparent anticorrelation of the solar-neutrino signal with the 11-yr sunspot cycle observed by Davis can be understood if the electron neutrino has a large magnetic moment. We discuss extensions of the standard model, where the existence of a leptonic SU(2)H-horizontal symmetry between the electron and muon generations provides a way to understand such a large magnetic moment, while keeping the neutrino mass naturally small. A global le-lμ symmetry (li=ith lepton number) is maintained even after spontaneous gauge symmetry breaking, so that the neutrino is of Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud type with m2νe-m2νμ=0. This condition automatically guarantees that the neutrino spin precession in the magnetic field of the Sun is not suppressed. Of the two extensions of the standard model that we discuss, the first one is a local SU(2)H model with the horizontal symmetry broken completely at a TeV scale. We show how a global U(1)le-lμ can be maintained although le-lμ is a subgroup of the gauged SU(2)H. The second example is the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model with R-parity-violating [but (le-lμ)-conserving] interactions. An approximate SU(2)H symmetry between the e-μ families is imposed in order to suppress the neutrino mass, but not its magnetic moment. We provide a detailed theoretical and phenomenological investigation of these two models and discuss their tests at the colliders as well as in low-energy experiments. The models generally predict mνe~=1-10 eV and the existence of charged scalar particles in the mass range of 100 GeV.

  11. Off-shell effects in the relativistic mean field model and their role in CC (anti)neutrino scattering at MiniBooNE kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M. V.; González-Jiménez, R.; Caballero, J. A.; Barbaro, M. B.; Donnelly, T. W.; Udías, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    The relativistic mean field (RMF) model is used to describe nucleons in the nucleus and thereby to evaluate the effects of having dynamically off-shell spinors. Compared with free, on-shell nucleons as employed in some other models, within the RMF nucleons are described by relativistic spinors with strongly enhanced lower components. In this work it is seen that for MiniBooNE kinematics, neutrino charged-current quasielastic cross sections show some sensitivity to these off-shell effects, while for the antineutrino-nucleus case the total cross sections are seen to be essentially independent of the enhancement of the lower components. As was found to be the case when comparing the RMF results with the neutrino-nucleus data, the present impulse approximation predictions within the RMF also fall short of the MiniBooNE antineutrino-nucleus data.

  12. Precise measurement of neutrino and anti-neutrino differential cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanov, M.; Naples, D.; Boyd, S.; McDonald, J.; Radescu, V.; Adams, T.; Alton, A.; Avvakumov, S.; deBarbaro, L.; deBarbaro, P.; Bernstein, R.H.; Bodek, A.; Bolton, T.; Brau, J.; Buchholz, D.; Budd, H.; Bugel, L.; Conrad, J.; Drucker, R.B.; Fleming, B.T.; Frey, R.; /Pittsburgh U. /Cincinnati U. /Columbia U. /Fermilab /Kansas State U. /Northwestern U. /Oregon U. /Rochester U.

    2005-09-01

    The NuTeV experiment at Fermilab has obtained a unique high statistics sample of neutrino and anti-neutrino interactions using its high-energy sign-selected beam. We present a measurement of the differential cross section for charged-current neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering from iron. Structure functions, F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and xF{sub 3}(x,Q{sup 2}), are determined by fitting the inelasticity, y, dependence of the cross sections. This measurement has significantly improved systematic precision as a consequence of more precise understanding of hadron and muon energy scales.

  13. Is a massive tau neutrino just what cold dark matter needs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Gyuk, Geza; Turner, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) scenario for structure formation in the Universe is very attractive and has many successes; however, when its spectrum of density perturbations is normalized to the COBE anisotropy measurement the level of inhomogeneity predicted on small scales is too large. This can be remedied by a tau neutrino of mass 1 MeV - 10MeV and lifetime 0.1 sec - 100 sec whose decay products include electron neutrinos because it allows the total energy density in relativistic particles to be doubled without interfering with nucleosynthesis. The anisotropies predicted on the degree scale for 'tau CDM' are larger than standard CDM. Experiments at e(sup +/-) collides may be able to probe such a mass range.

  14. Very low-energy neutrino interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2015-05-01

    Neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections are now evaluated rather accurately by shell-model (SM) or SM+RPA calculations based on recent advances in nuclear structure studies. Due to these achievements, reliable constraints on super-nova neutrino temperatures as well as neutrino oscillation parameters become possible. Supernova neutrino tempeatures are constrained from abundances of elements obtained by using new ν-nucleus reaction cross sections. A possibility of constructing supernova neutrino spectrum from beta-beam measurements is pointed out. Neutrino mass hierarchy and mixing angle θ13 can be determined from abundance ratio of 7Li/11B, which is sensitive to the MSW matter oscillation effects in supernova explosions. Inverted mass hierarchy is shown to be statistically more favored based on a recent analysis of presolar grains. Effects of neutrino-neutrino interactions are also shown to play important roles in r-process nucleosynthesis. Importance and possibilities of direct measurements of ν-induced cross sections on 40Ar and 208Pb are discussed for future supernova neutrino detections. Recent calculations of the cross sections for ν-40Ar are presented. The need for new theoretical evaluations of the cross sections for ν-208Pb is pointed out. Challenges to experiments on coherent elastic scattering are presented.

  15. Very low-energy neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2015-05-15

    Neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections are now evaluated rather accurately by shell-model (SM) or SM+RPA calculations based on recent advances in nuclear structure studies. Due to these achievements, reliable constraints on super-nova neutrino temperatures as well as neutrino oscillation parameters become possible. Supernova neutrino tempeatures are constrained from abundances of elements obtained by using new ν-nucleus reaction cross sections. A possibility of constructing supernova neutrino spectrum from beta-beam measurements is pointed out. Neutrino mass hierarchy and mixing angle θ{sub 13} can be determined from abundance ratio of {sup 7}Li/{sup 11}B, which is sensitive to the MSW matter oscillation effects in supernova explosions. Inverted mass hierarchy is shown to be statistically more favored based on a recent analysis of presolar grains. Effects of neutrino-neutrino interactions are also shown to play important roles in r-process nucleosynthesis. Importance and possibilities of direct measurements of ν-induced cross sections on {sup 40}Ar and {sup 208}Pb are discussed for future supernova neutrino detections. Recent calculations of the cross sections for ν-{sup 40}Ar are presented. The need for new theoretical evaluations of the cross sections for ν-{sup 208}Pb is pointed out. Challenges to experiments on coherent elastic scattering are presented.

  16. Neutrino masses, neutrino oscillations, and cosmological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical concepts and motivations for considering neutrinos having finite masses are discussed and the experimental situation on searches for neutrino masses and oscillations is summarized. The solar neutrino problem, reactor, deep mine and accelerator data, tri decay experiments and double beta-decay data are considered and cosmological implications and astrophysical data relating to neutrino masses are reviewed. The neutrino oscillation solution to the solar neutrino problem, the missing mass problem in galaxy halos and galaxy cluster galaxy formation and clustering, and radiative neutrino decay and the cosmic ultraviolet background radiation are examined.

  17. Solar neutrino physics with low-threshold dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billard, J.; Strigari, L. E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2015-05-01

    Dark matter detectors will soon be sensitive to Solar neutrinos via two distinct channels: coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron elastic scatterings. We establish an analysis method for extracting Solar model properties and neutrino properties from these measurements, including the possible effects of sterile neutrinos which have been hinted at by some reactor experiments and cosmological measurements. Even including sterile neutrinos, through the coherent scattering channel, a 1 ton-year exposure with a low-threshold background free Germanium detector could improve on the current measurement of the normalization of the B 8 Solar neutrino flux down to 3% or less. Combining with the neutrino-electron elastic scattering data will provide constraints on both the high- and low-energy survival probability and will improve on the uncertainty on the active-to-sterile mixing angle by a factor of 2. This sensitivity to active-to-sterile transitions is competitive and complementary to forthcoming dedicated short baseline sterile neutrino searches with nuclear decays. Finally, we show that such solar neutrino physics potentials can be reached as long as the signal-to-noise ratio is better than 0.1.

  18. Future Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillations: View from North America

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    In late 2012 the US Department of Energy gave approval for the first phase of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE), that will conduct a broad scientific program including neutrino oscillations, neutrino scattering physics, search for baryon violation, supernova burst neutrinos and other related astrophysical phenomena. The project is now being reformulated as an international facility hosted by the United States. The facility will consist of an intense neutrino beam produced at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), a highly capable set of neutrino detectors on the Fermilab campus, and a large underground liquid argon time projection chamber at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota 1300 km from Fermilab. With an intense beam and massive far detector, the experimental program at the facility will make detailed studies of neutrino oscillations, including measurements of the neutrino mass hierarchy and Charge-Parity symmetry violation, by measuring neutrino and anti-neutrino mixing separately. At the near site, the high-statistics neutrino scattering data will allow for many cross section measurements and precision tests of the Standard Model. This presentation will describe the configuration developed by the LBNE collaboration, the broad physics program, and the status of the formation of the international facility.

  19. Future long-baseline neutrino oscillations: View from North America

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2015-07-15

    In late 2012 the US Department of Energy gave approval for the first phase of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) that will conduct a broad scientific program including neutrino oscillations, neutrino scattering physics, search for baryon violation, supernova burst neutrinos and other related astrophysical phenomena. The project is now being reformulated as an international facility hosted by the United States. The facility will consist of an intense neutrino beam produced at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), a highly capable set of neutrino detectors on the Fermilab campus, and a large underground liquid argon time projection chamber at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota 1300 km from Fermilab. With an intense beam and massive far detector, the experimental program at the facility will make detailed studies of neutrino oscillations, including measurements of the neutrino mass hierarchy and Charge-Parity symmetry violation, by measuring neutrino and anti-neutrino mixing separately. At the near site, the high-statistics neutrino scattering data will allow for many cross section measurements and precision tests of the Standard Model. This presentation will describe the configuration developed by the LBNE collaboration, the broad physics program, and the status of the formation of the international facility.

  20. A new-concept calorimeter for future neutrino beams based on Kaon tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Terranova, F.

    2016-07-01

    Neutrino cross-section measurements are an essential requirement for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments and they are presently limited by uncertainties on neutrino fluxes. In [1] we propose to instrument a neutrino decay tunnel to detect large angle positrons and tag the three-body semileptonic K+ →e+π0νe decays. In such a facility the absolute electron neutrino flux could be determined with unprecedented precision (O(1%)). An e+/π+ separation capability of about 2% as well as a high e+ efficiency is required for a diffuse particle source over a length of several tens of meters. Additional constraints, due to the harsh beam environment, involve radiation hardness and fast response. For this purpose we propose a specialized shashlik calorimeter (copper-scintillator) with a compact readout based on small-area Silicon PhotoMultipliers coupled to WLS fibers. The setup would allow an effective longitudinal segmentation for electron/hadron separation, reducing the dead zones introduced by fiber bundling. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations are in progress. The construction of a small prototype and exposures to pion and electron beams are foreseen.

  1. Instability of magnetic fields in electroweak plasma driven by neutrino asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornikov, Maxim; Semikoz, Victor B. E-mail: semikoz@yandex.ru

    2014-05-01

    The magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is modified to incorporate the parity violation in the Standard Model leading to a new instability of magnetic fields in the electroweak plasma in the presence of nonzero neutrino asymmetries. The main ingredient for such a modified MHD is the antisymmetric part of the photon polarization tensor in plasma, where the parity violating neutrino interaction with charged leptons is present. We calculate this contribution to the polarization tensor connected with the Chern-Simons term in effective Lagrangian of the electromagnetic field. The general expression for such a contribution which depends on the temperature and the chemical potential of plasma as well as on the photon's momentum is derived. The instability of a magnetic field driven by the electron neutrino asymmetry for the ν-burst during the first second of a supernova explosion can amplify a seed magnetic field of a protostar, and, perhaps, can explain the generation of strongest magnetic fields in magnetars. The growth of a cosmological magnetic field driven by the neutrino asymmetry density Δn{sub ν} = n{sub ν}−n{sub ν-bar}≠0 is provided by a lower bound on |ξ{sub ν{sub e}}| = |μ{sub ν{sub e}}|/T which is consistent with the well-known Big Bang nucleosynthesis (upper) bound on neutrino asymmetries in a hot universe plasma.

  2. Using Neutrino Nucleus Interactions as a Probe of the Strong Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Morfin, Jorge G.

    2011-11-23

    Neutrino scattering experiments have been studying QCD for over 30 years. From the Gargamelle experiments in the early 70's, through the subsequent bubble chamber and electronic detector experiments in the 80's and 90's, neutrino scattering experiments have steadily accumulated increasing statistics and minimized their systematic errors. An example of the more recent studies of QCD with neutrinos is from the TeVatron neutrino beam--the NuTeV {nu}-Fe experiment. The problem the community faces in trying to study QCD with modern neutrino data is that there is no experimentally verified way to scale neutrino-nucleus (for example, Fe) results to the equivalent neutrino-nucleon values making it difficult to combine neutrino nucleus scattering data with charged-lepton nucleus and nucleon scattering data in QCD global fits to extract parton distribution functions. This is particularly crucial since there is now indications that nuclear effects in neutrino nucleus interactions are different than those measured in charged-lepton nucleus scattering. To better understand this situation, the MINER{nu}A neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab, a collaboration of elementary-particle and nuclear physicists, is systematically studying neutrino nuclear effects off of He, C, Fe and Pb for a more thorough A-dependent study of nuclear PDFs and these correction factors.

  3. Neutrino-Nucleon Interactions and Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Richard; Kronfeld, Andreas; Meyer, Aaron

    2016-03-01

    We address techniques to make the theoretical underpinning of neutrino-nucleon scattering more robust. We see this foundation as a necessary step to disentangle fundamental physics (such as neutrino oscillation parameters) from nuclear effects. We address a reanalysis of old experiments with elementary targets, model-independent parametrizations of nucleon form factors based on analyticity, and lattice QCD calculations of the form factors. speaker.

  4. "Hammer" events, neutrino energies, and nucleon-nucleon correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, L. B.; Hen, O.; Piasetzky, Eli

    2016-10-01

    Background: Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation measurements depend on observing a difference between the expected and measured rate of neutrino-nucleus interactions at different neutrino energies or different distances from the neutrino source. Neutrino-nucleus scattering cross sections are complicated and depend on the neutrino beam energy, the neutrino-nucleus interaction, and the structure of the nucleus. Knowledge of the incident neutrino energy spectrum and neutrino-detector interactions are crucial for analyzing neutrino oscillation experiments. The ArgoNeut liquid argon time projection chamber (lArTPC) observed charged-current neutrino-argon scattering events with two protons back-to-back in the final state ("hammer" events) which they associated with short-range correlated (SRC) nucleon-nucleon pairs. The large volume MicroBooNE lArTPC will measure far more of these unique events. Purpose: Determine what we can learn about the incident neutrino energy spectrum and/or the structure of SRC from hammer events that will be measured in MicroBooNE. Methods: We simulate hammer events using two models and the well-known electron-nucleon scattering cross section. In the first model the neutrino (or electron) scatters from a moving proton, ejecting a π+, and the π+ is then absorbed on a moving deuteron-like n p pair. In the second model the neutrino (or electron) scatters from a moving nucleon, exciting it to a Δ or N*, which then de-excites by interacting with a second nucleon: Δ N →p p . Results: The pion production and reabsorption process results in two back-to-back protons each with momentum of about 500 MeV/c , very similar to that of the observed ArgoNeut events. These distributions are insensitive to either the relative or center-of-mass momentum of the n p pair that absorbed the π . In this model, the incident neutrino energy can be reconstructed relatively accurately using the outgoing lepton. The Δ p →p p process results in two protons that

  5. Neutrino refraction by the cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, J. S.; Klinkhamer, F. R.

    2016-03-01

    We have determined the dispersion relation of a neutrino test particle propagating in the cosmic neutrino background. Describing the relic neutrinos and antineutrinos from the hot big bang as a dense medium, a matter potential or refractive index is obtained. The vacuum neutrino mixing angles are unchanged, but the energy of each mass state is modified. Using a matrix in the space of neutrino species, the induced potential is decomposed into a part which produces signatures in beta-decay experiments and another part which modifies neutrino oscillations. The low temperature of the relic neutrinos makes a direct detection extremely challenging. From a different point of view, the identified refractive effects of the cosmic neutrino background constitute an ultralow background for future experimental studies of nonvanishing Lorentz violation in the neutrino sector.

  6. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasielastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at Eν~3.5 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentini, G. A.; Schmitz, D. W.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Baldin, B.; Baumbaugh, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradford, R.; Brooks, W. K.; Budd, H.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Castromonte, C. M.; Christy, M. E.; Chung, H.; Chvojka, J.; Clark, M.; da Motta, H.; Damiani, D. S.; Danko, I.; Datta, M.; Day, M.; DeMaat, R.; Devan, J.; Draeger, E.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Edmondson, D. A.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Gago, A. M.; Gallagher, H.; George, C. A.; Gielata, J. A.; Gingu, C.; Gobbi, B.; Gran, R.; Grossman, N.; Hanson, J.; Harris, D. A.; Heaton, J.; Higuera, A.; Howley, I. J.; Hurtado, K.; Jerkins, M.; Kafka, T.; Kaisen, J.; Kanter, M. O.; Keppel, C. E.; Kilmer, J.; Kordosky, M.; Krajeski, A. H.; Kulagin, S. A.; Le, T.; Lee, H.; Leister, A. G.; Locke, G.; Maggi, G.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Ochoa, N.; O’Connor, C. D.; Olsen, J.; Osmanov, B.; Osta, J.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Peña, C.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rude, C.; Sassin, K. E.; Schellman, H.; Schneider, R. M.; Schulte, E. C.; Simon, C.; Snider, F. D.; Snyder, M. C.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tan, W.; Tice, B. G.; Tzanakos, G.; Velásquez, J. P.; Walding, J.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wolthuis, B. A.; Woodward, N.; Zavala, G.; Zeng, H. B.; Zhang, D.; Zhu, L. Y.; Ziemer, B. P.

    2013-07-11

    We report a study of νμ charged-current quasielastic events in the segmented scintillator inner tracker of the MINERvA experiment running in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. The events were selected by requiring a μ⁻ and low calorimetric recoil energy separated from the interaction vertex. We measure the flux-averaged differential cross section, dσ/dQ², and study the low energy particle content of the final state. Deviations are found between the measured dσ/dQ² and the expectations of a model of independent nucleons in a relativistic Fermi gas. We also observe an excess of energy near the vertex consistent with multiple protons in the final state.

  7. MicroBooNE and the Road to Large Liquid Argon Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiorgi, G.

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPC's) provide a promising technology for multi-kiloton scale detectors aiming to address-among other pressing particle physics questions-the possibility of short and long baseline electron neutrino and antineutrino appearance. MicroBooNE, a 170 ton LArTPC under construction, is the next necessary step in a phased R&D effort toward construction and stable operation of larger-scale LArTPC's. This development effort also leans heavily on the ArgoNeuT and LAr1 LArTPC R&D experiments at Fermilab. In addition to advancing the LArTPC technology, these projects also provide unique physics opportunities. For example, Micro-BooNE will be located in the Booster Neutrino Beamline at Fermilab, at ∼470 m from neutrino production. Thus, in addition to measuring a suite of low energy neutrino cross sections on argon, MicroBooNE will investigate the anomalous low energy excess seen by the MiniBooNE experiment. Furthermore, the neutrino beam energy and relatively short baseline provide MicroBooNE with sensitivity to high-∼m2 neutrino oscillations. These proceedings summarize the role of the MicroBooNE detector in the US LArTPC R&D program, present its physics reach, and briefly discuss the physics potential of a dedicated near-future neutrino oscillation program at the Booster Neutrino Beamline, as a way to maximize the physics output of the Fermilab LArTPC R&D projects.

  8. Why Are Neutrinos Light? -- An Alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Oliver, Steven J.

    2004-09-23

    We review the recent proposal that neutrinos are light because their masses are proportional to a low scale, f, of lepton flavor symmetry breaking. This mechanism is testable because the resulting pseudo-Goldstone bosons, of mass m_G, couple strongly with the neutrinos, affecting the acoustic oscillations during the eV era of the early universe that generate the peaks in the CMB radiation. Characteristic signals result over a very wide range of (f, m_G) because of a change in the total relativistic energy density and because the neutrinos scatter rather than free-stream. Thermodynamics allows a precise calculation of the signal, so that observations would not only confirm the late-time neutrino mass mechanism, but could also determine whether the neutrino spectrum is degenerate, inverted or hierarchical and whether the neutrinos are Dirac or Majorana. The flavor symmetries could also give light sterile states. If the masses of the sterile neutrinos turn on after the MeV era, the LSND oscillations can be explained without upsetting big bang nucleosynthesis, and, since the sterile states decay to lighter neutrinos and pseudo-Goldstones, without giving too much hot dark matter.

  9. Low energy neutrinos in Super-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Super-Kamiokande (SK), a 50 kton water Cherenkov detector, observes 8B solar neutrinos via neutrino-electron elastic scattering. The analysis threshold was successfully lowered to 3.5 MeV (recoil electron kinetic energy) in SK-IV. To date SK has observed solar neutrinos for 18 years. An analysis regarding possible correlations between the solar neutrino flux and the 11 year solar activity cycle is shown. With large statistics, SK searches for distortions of the solar neutrino energy spectrum caused by the MSW resonance in the core of the sun. SK also searches for a day/night solar neutrino flux asymmetry induced by the matter in the Earth. The Super-Kamiokande Gd (SK-Gd) project is the upgrade of the SK detector via the addition of water-soluble gadolinium (Gd) salt. This modification will enable it to efficiently identify low energy anti-neutrinos. SK-Gd will pursue low energy physics currently inaccessible to SK due to backgrounds. The most important will be the world’s first observation of the diffuse supernova neutrino background. The main R&D program towards SK-Gd is EG ADS: a 200 ton, fully instrumented tank built in a new cavern in the Kamioka mine.

  10. The nuclear response of molybdenum to supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Ydrefors, E.; Suhonen, J.

    2011-12-16

    Neutrino-nucleus interactions play a prominent role in many astrophysical applications. Knowledge about nuclear responses to neutrinos is therefore of paramount importance. We present cross sections for neutral-current neutrino-nucleus scattering off the stable (A = 92,94,95,96,97,98,100) molybdenum isotopes. The nuclear responses for these nuclei are additionally computed by folding the computed cross sections with a Fermi-Dirac distribution.

  11. Computation with Inverse States in a Finite Field FP: The Muon Neutrino Mass, the Unified Strong-Electroweak Coupling Constant, and the Higgs Mass

    SciTech Connect

    DAI,YANG; BORISOV,ALEXEY B.; BOYER,KEITH; RHODES,CHARLES K.

    2000-08-11

    The construction of inverse states in a finite field F{sub P{sub {alpha}}} enables the organization of the mass scale with fundamental octets in an eight-dimensional index space that identifies particle states with residue class designations. Conformance with both CPT invariance and the concept of supersymmetry follows as a direct consequence of this formulation. Based on two parameters (P{sub {alpha}} and g{sub {alpha}}) that are anchored on a concordance of physical data, this treatment leads to (1) a prospective mass for the muon neutrino of {approximately}27.68 meV, (2) a value of the unified strong-electroweak coupling constant {alpha}* = (34.26){sup {minus}1} that is physically defined by the ratio of the electron neutrino and muon neutrino masses, and (3) a see-saw congruence connecting the Higgs, the electron neutrino, and the muon neutrino masses. Specific evaluation of the masses of the corresponding supersymmetric Higgs pair reveals that both particles are superheavy (> 10{sup 18}GeV). No renormalization of the Higgs masses is introduced, since the calculational procedure yielding their magnitudes is intrinsically divergence-free. Further, the Higgs fulfills its conjectured role through the see-saw relation as the particle defining the origin of all particle masses, since the electron and muon neutrino systems, together with their supersymmetric partners, are the generators of the mass scale and establish the corresponding index space. Finally, since the computation of the Higgs masses is entirely determined by the modulus of the field P{sub {alpha}}, which is fully defined by the large-scale parameters of the universe through the value of the universal gravitational constant G and the requirement for perfect flatness ({Omega} = 1.0), the see-saw congruence fuses the concepts of mass and space and creates a new unified archetype.

  12. Measuring neutrino-nucleus interactions with MINERνA

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, P. A.

    2015-07-15

    We present results from the MINERνA experiment for neutrino-nucleus scattering in the few-GeV energy region. These measurements cover a range of processes that must be modeled correctly in neutrino oscillation experiments, and in which recent results from other experiments have suggested deficiencies in the models currently used.

  13. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  14. Neutrino decay and solar neutrino seasonal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picoreti, R.; Guzzo, M. M.; de Holanda, P. C.; Peres, O. L. G.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the possibility of solar neutrino decay as a sub-leading effect on their propagation between production and detection. Using current oscillation data, we set a new lower bound to the ν2 neutrino lifetime at τ2 /m2 ≥ 7.2 ×10-4s .eV-1 at 99% C.L. Also, we show how seasonal variations in the solar neutrino data can give interesting additional information about neutrino lifetime.

  15. Massive neutrinos in the standard model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalapillil, Arun Madhav

    differences between the Majorana and Dirac cases. It is then proved that in spite of the theoretical differences between the two cases, as far as experiments are considered, they would be virtually indistinguishable for any space-time geometry satisfying the weak field condition. We then calculate the transition gravitational form factors for the neutrino by evaluating the relevant Feynman diagrams at 1-loop and estimate a neutrino transition mass radius. The form factor is seen to depend on the momentum transfer very weakly. It is also seen that the neutrino transition mass radius is smaller than the typical neutrino charge radius by a couple of orders of magnitude. In the final part of my thesis, some of the recent neutrino observations and anomalies are revisited, in the context of sterile neutrinos. Among our aims is to understand more clearly some of the analytic implications of the current global neutrino fits from short baseline experiments. Of particular interest to us are the neutrino disappearance measurements from MINOS and the recent indications of a possibly non-vanishing angle, theta13 , from T2K, MINOS and Double-CHOOZ. Based on a general parametrization motivated in the presence of sterile neutrinos, the consistency of the MINOS disappearance data with additional sterile neutrinos is discussed. We also explore the implications of sterile neutrinos for the measurement of | Umu3| in this case. We then turn our attention to the study of |Ue3| extraction in electron neutrino disappearance and appearance measurements. In particular, we study the effects of some of the additional CP phases that appear when there are sterile neutrinos. We observe that the existence of sterile neutrinos may induce a significant modification of the theta13 angle in neutrino appearance experiments like T2K and MINOS, over and above the ambiguities and degeneracies that are already present in 3-neutrino parameter extractions. There are reactor experiments, for instance those measuring nu

  16. Neutrino in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, D.

    2010-09-01

    The relic neutrinos from the Big Bang or the Cosmic Neutrino Background (CNB) neutrinos are expected to be the most abundant particles in our universe after the relic photons of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). They carry precious information from the early epoch when our universe was only 1 sec old. Although not yet directly detected, CNB may be revealed indirectly through cosmological observations due to their important cosmological influence. I review the cosmological role of neutrinos and the present cosmological constraints on neutrino characteristics. Namely, I discuss the impact of neutrinos in the cosmic expansion, neutrino decoupling, the role of neutrinos in the primordial production of light elements, their effect on CMB anisotropies, LSS formation, the possible neutrino contribution to the Dark Matter in the universe, leptogenesis, etc. Due to the considerable cosmological influence of neutrinos, cosmological bounds on neutrino properties from observational data exist. I review the cosmological constraints on the neutrino characteristics, such as the effective number of neutrino species, neutrino mass and mixing parameters, lepton number of the universe, gravitational clustering of neutrinos, presence of sterile neutrino, etc.

  17. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Bob

    2015-06-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  18. Low-energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludhova, Livia

    2016-05-01

    There exist several kinds of sources emitting neutrinos in the MeV energy range. These low-energy neutrinos from different sources can be often detected by the same multipurpose detectors. The status-of-art of the field of solar neutrinos, geoneutrinos, and the search for sterile neutrino with artificial neutrino sources is provided here; other neutrino sources, as for example reactor or high-energy neutrinos, are described elsewhere. For each of these three fields, the present-day motivation and open questions, as well as the latest experimental results and future perspectives are discussed.

  19. Neutral current neutrino-nucleus interactions at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gay Ducati, M. B.; Machado, M. M.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2009-04-01

    We present a QCD analysis of the neutral current (NC) neutrino-nucleus interaction at the small-x region using the color dipole formalism. This phenomenological approach is quite successful in describing experimental results in deep inelastic ep scattering and charged current neutrino-nucleus interactions at high energies. We present theoretical predictions for the relevant structure functions and the corresponding implications for the total NC neutrino cross section. It is shown that at small x, the NC boson-nucleon cross section should exhibit the geometric scaling property that has important consequences for ultrahigh energy neutrino phenomenology.

  20. No 17 keV neutrino: Admixture [lt]0. 073% (95% C. L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, T.; Shirai, J.; Tsukamoto, T. ); Sugaya, Y.; Takahashi, K. ); Suzuki, T. ); Rosenfeld, C.; Wilson, S. ); Ueno, K. ); Yonezawa, Y. ); Kawakami, H.; Kato, S.; Shibata, S.; Ukai, K. )

    1993-06-01

    To solve the controversial issue concerning the possible existence of a 17 keV neutrino with a 1% admixture in nuclear [beta] decay, we searched directly for any evidence of a production-threshold effect. The [sup 63]Ni [beta] spectrum was measured with a magnetic spectrometer, with very high statistics along with a fine energy scan over a narrow energy region around the expected threshold. The obtained mixing strength was [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2]=[[minus]0.011[plus minus]0.033(stat)[plus minus]0.030(syst)]%, very consistent with zero, and decisively excluding the existence of a 17 keV neutrino admixing at the 1% level with the electron neutrino. The corresponding upper limit was set at [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2][lt]0.073% (95% C.L.). A new limit was also obtained for a wider mass range: [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2][lt]0.15% (95% C.L.) for 10.5 to 25.0 keV neutrinos.

  1. Influence of neutrinos on r-process nucleosynthesis in black hole-neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.; Duez, Matthew D.; Faber, Joshua A.; Foucart, Francois; Lombardi, James C.; Ott, Christian D.; Ponce, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    During a black hole-neutron star merger, baryonic material can be dynamically ejected. Because this ejecta is extremely neutron-rich, the r-process rapidly synthesizes heavy nuclides as the material expands and cools. This can contribute to galactic chemical evolution of the r-process elements and lead to a short-lived optical transient, called a kilonova, powered by the radioactive decay of the heavy nuclides. We use the nuclear reaction network SkyNet to model r-process nucleosynthesis under varying levels of neutrino irradiation by post-processing tracer particles in the ejecta of a full numerical relativity simulation of a black hole-neutron star merger. We find the ejected material robustly produces the second and third r-process peaks, whose abundances remain unchanged even for very high neutrino luminosities, due to the rapid velocities of the outflow. Nonetheless, we find that neutrinos can have an impact on the detailed abundance pattern by significantly enhancing the amount of material produced in the first peak around A ~ 78 . Electron neutrinos are captured by neutrons to produce protons while neutron capture is occurring. These protons rapidly form low-mass seed nuclei, a fraction of which eventually ends up in the first peak after neutron capture ceases. Partially supported by NASA and NSF under AST-1205732, AST-1313091, AST-1333520, PF3-140114, PF4-150122, and PHY-1151197.

  2. A Search for Lorentz and CPT Violation in the Neutrino Sector of the Standard Model Extension Using the Near Detectors of the Tokai to Kamioka Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, Gary Alexander

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) neutrino experiment is designed to search for electron neutrino appearance oscillations and muon neutrino disappearance oscillations. While the main physics goals of T2K fall into conventional physics, T2K may be used to search for more exotic physics. One exotic physics analysis that can be performed is a search for Lorentz and CPT symmetry violation (LV and CPTV) through short baseline neutrino oscillations. The theoretical framework which describes these phenomena is the Standard Model Extension (SME). Due to its off-axis nature, T2K has two near detectors. A search for LV and CPTV is performed in each detector. The search utilizes charged-current inclusive (CC inclusive) neutrino events to search for sidereal variations in the neutrino event rate at each detector. Two methods are developed; the first being a Fast Fourier Transform method to perform a hypothesis test of the data with a set of 10,000 toy Monte-Carlo simulations that do not have any LV signal in them. The second is a binned likelihood fit. Using three data sets, both analysis methods are consistent with no sidereal variations. One set of data is used to calculate upper limits on combinations of the SME coefficients while the other two are used to constrain the SME coefficients directly. Despite not seeing any indication of LV in the T2K near detectors, the upper limits provided are useful for the theoretical field to continue improving theories which include LV and CPTV.

  3. Study of low-energy neutrino factory at the Fermilab to DUSEL baseline

    SciTech Connect

    Kyberd, Paul; Ellis, Malcolm; Bross, Alan; Geer, Steve; Mena, Olga; Long, Ken; Pascoli, Silvia; Fernandez Martinez, Enrique; McDonald, Kirk; Huber, Patrick; /Virginia Tech.

    2009-07-01

    the straight sections of the ring. Since the decay of the muon is well understood, the systematic uncertainties associated with a neutrino beam produced in this manner are very small. Beam diagnostics in the decay ring and a specially designed near detector further reduce the systematic uncertainties of the neutrino beam produced at the Neutrino Factory. In addition since the muon (anti-muon) decays produce both muon and anti-electron neutrinos (anti-muon and electron neutrinos), many oscillation channels are accessible from a Neutrino Factory, further extending the reach in the oscillation parameter space. Over the last decade there have been a number of studies [2-5] that have explored the discovery reach of Neutrino Factories in the small mixing angle, {theta}{sub 13}, and its capability to determine the mass hierarchy and determine if CP is violated in leptons through observation of phase parameter, {delta}. The most recent study to be completed [6], the International scoping study of a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS), studied the physics capabilities of various future neutrino facilities: super-beam, {beta}-Beam and Neutrino Factory and has determined that the Neutrino Factory with an energy of {approx}25 GeV has the best discovery reach for small values of sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}, reaching an ultimate sensitivity of between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -4}. However, for larger values of sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} (> 10{sup -3}), the sensitivity of other experimental approaches is competitive to that of the 25 GeV Neutrino Factory. The wide-band neutrino beam (WBB) produced at Fermilab and directed towards DUSEL [7] is one such competitor. For the case where sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} (> 10{sup -3}) is large, initial studies have shown that a Low-Energy Neutrino Factory [8-10] with an energy of, for example, 4 GeV, may be both cost-effective and offers exquisite sensitivity. The required baseline for a Low-Energy Neutrino Factory matches

  4. Neutrino dynamics below the electroweak crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate the thermal masses and damping rates of active (m < eV) and sterile (M ~ GeV) neutrinos with thermal momenta k~ 3T at temperatures below the electroweak crossover (5 GeV < T < 160 GeV) . These quantities fix the equilibration or ``washout'' rates of Standard Model lepton number densities. Sterile neutrinos interact via direct scatterings mediated by Yukawa couplings, and via their overlap with active neutrinos. Including all leading-order reactions we find that the washout rate generally exceeds the Hubble rate for 5 GeV < T < 30 GeV . Therefore it is challenging to generate a large lepton asymmetry facilitating dark matter computations operating at T < 5 GeV, whereas the generation of a baryon asymmetry at T > 130 GeV remains an option. Our differential rates are tabulated in a form suitable for studies of specific scenarios with given neutrino Yukawa matrices.

  5. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations for Earth tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Modern proposed atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments, such as PINGU in the Antarctic ice or ORCA in Mediterranean sea water, aim for precision measurements of the oscillation parameters including the ordering of the neutrino masses. They can, however, go far beyond that: Since neutrino oscillations are affected by the coherent forward scattering with matter, neutrinos can provide a new view on the interior of the earth. We show that the proposed atmospheric oscillation experiments can measure the lower mantle density of the earth with a precision at the level of a few percent, including the uncertainties of the oscillation parameters and correlations among different density layers. While the earth's core is, in principle, accessible by the angular resolution, new technology would be required to extract degeneracy-free information.

  6. Interplay of Neutrino Opacities in Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, Bronson; Hix, William Raphael; Bruenn, S. W.

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of including, and improving, the calculation of neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations by removing, or replacing, each opacity individually, or removing opacities in groups. We find that during core collapse improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei based on the hybrid model, relative to the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for a mean nucleus, plays the most important role of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse leading to larger deleptonization of the collapsing core, without the energy downscattering via non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons required for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from NIS on electrons. For the accretion phase NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by $e^+e^-$-annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear electron capture, $e^+e^-$-annihilation pair emission, and non-isoenergetic scattering on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  7. INTERPLAY OF NEUTRINO OPACITIES IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Bruenn, Stephen W.

    2012-11-20

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of modern neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations. We test the effects of opacities by removing opacities or by undoing opacity improvements for individual opacities and groups of opacities. We find that improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei using modern nuclear structure models rather than the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for EC on a mean nucleus, plays the most important role during core collapse of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by modern nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse without the energy downscattering on electrons required to enhance neutrino escape and deleptonization for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons. For the accretion phase, NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by e {sup +} e {sup -} annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated, including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering, have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear EC, e {sup +} e {sup -}-annihilation pair emission, and NIS on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  8. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  9. Charged current quasi-elastic neutrino analysis at MINERνA

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentini, G. A.

    2015-05-15

    MINERνA (Main INjector Experiment for ν-A) is a neutrino scattering experiment in the NuMI high-intensity neutrino beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. MINERvA was designed to make precision measurements of low energy neutrino and antineutrino cross sections on a variety of different materials (plastic scintillator, C, Fe, Pb, He and H2O). We present the current status of the charged current quasi-elastic scattering in plastic scintillator.

  10. Direct extraction of nuclear effects in quasielastic scattering on carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Callum; McFarland, Kevin S.

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear effects on neutrino reactions are expected to be a significant complication in current and future neutrino oscillation experiments seeking precision measurements of neutrino flavor transitions. Calculations of these nuclear effects are hampered by a lack of experimental data comparing neutrino reactions on free nucleons to neutrino reactions on nuclei. We present results from a novel technique that compares neutrino and antineutrino charged current quasielastic scattering on hydrocarbons to extract a cross section ratio of antineutrino charged current elastic reactions on free protons to charged current quasielastic reactions on the protons bound in a carbon nucleus. This measurement of nuclear effects is compared to models.

  11. Neutrino Oscillations with Three Active and Three Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.

    2016-07-01

    This is an extension of estimates of the probability of μ to e neutrino oscillation with one sterile neutrino to three sterile neutrinos, using a 6x6 matrix. Since the mixing angle for only one sterile neutrino has been experimentally determined, we estimate the μ to e neutrino oscillation probability with different mixing angles for two of the sterile neutrinos.

  12. Atomic ionization by sterile-to-active neutrino conversion and constraints on dark matter sterile neutrinos with germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Chi, Hsin-Chang; Lin, Shin-Ted; Liu, C.-P.; Singh, Lakhwinder; Wong, Henry T.; Wu, Chih-Liang; Wu, Chih-Pan

    2016-05-01

    The transition magnetic moment of a sterile neutrino can give rise to its conversion to an active neutrino through radiative decay or nonstandard interaction (NSI) with matter. For sterile neutrinos of keV-mass as dark matter candidates, their decay signals are actively searched for in cosmic x-ray spectra. In this work, we consider the NSI that leads to atomic ionization, which can be detected by direct dark matter experiments. It is found that this inelastic scattering process for a nonrelativistic sterile neutrino has a pronounced enhancement in the differential cross section at energy transfer about half of its mass, manifesting experimentally as peaks in the measurable energy spectra. The enhancement effects gradually smear out as the sterile neutrino becomes relativistic. Using data taken with low-threshold low-background germanium detectors, constraints on sterile neutrino mass and its transition magnetic moment are derived and compared with those from astrophysical observations.

  13. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  14. Neutrino Cloud Instabilities Just above the Neutrino Sphere of a Supernova.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, R F

    2016-02-26

    Most treatments of neutrino flavor evolution, above a surface of the last scattering, take identical angular distributions on this surface for the different initial (unmixed) flavors, and for particles and antiparticles. Differences in these distributions must be present, as a result of the species-dependent scattering cross sections lower in the star. These lead to a new set of nonlinear equations, unstable even at the initial surface with respect to perturbations that break all-over spherical symmetry. There could be important consequences for explosion dynamics as well as for the neutrino pulse in the outer regions.

  15. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab

    ScienceCinema

    Saoulidou, Niki

    2016-07-12

    Neutrino oscillations provide the first evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. I will briefly overview the neutrino "hi-story", describing key discoveries over the past decades that shaped our understanding of neutrinos and their behavior. Fermilab was, is and hopefully will be at the forefront of the accelerator neutrino experiments.  NuMI, the most powerful accelerator neutrino beam in the world has ushered us into the era of precise measurements. Its further upgrades may give a chance to tackle the remaining mysteries of the neutrino mass hierarchy and possible CP violation.

  16. Neutrino Nucleosynthesis in Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Takashi; Suzuki, Toshio; Chiba, Satoshi; Kajino, Toshitaka; Yokomakura, Hidekazu; Kimura, Keiichi; Takamura, Akira; Hartmann, Dieter H.

    2009-05-04

    Neutrino nucleosynthesis is an important synthesis process for light elements in supernovae. One important physics input of neutrino nucleosynthesis is cross sections of neutrino-nucleus reactions. The cross sections of neutrino-{sup 12}C and {sup 4}He reactions are derived using new shell model Hamiltonians. With the new cross sections, light element synthesis of a supernova is investigated. The appropriate range of the neutrino temperature for supernovae is constrained to be between 4.3 MeV and 6.5 MeV from the {sup 11}B abundance in Galactic chemical evolution. Effects by neutrino oscillations are also discussed.

  17. A Combined Maximum-likelihood Analysis of the High-energy Astrophysical Neutrino Flux Measured with IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Gross, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hellwig, D.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Koob, A.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stössl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wichary, C.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    Evidence for an extraterrestrial flux of high-energy neutrinos has now been found in multiple searches with the IceCube detector. The first solid evidence was provided by a search for neutrino events with deposited energies ≳ 30 TeV and interaction vertices inside the instrumented volume. Recent analyses suggest that the extraterrestrial flux extends to lower energies and is also visible with throughgoing, νμ-induced tracks from the Northern Hemisphere. Here, we combine the results from six different IceCube searches for astrophysical neutrinos in a maximum-likelihood analysis. The combined event sample features high-statistics samples of shower-like and track-like events. The data are fit in up to three observables: energy, zenith angle, and event topology. Assuming the astrophysical neutrino flux to be isotropic and to consist of equal flavors at Earth, the all-flavor spectrum with neutrino energies between 25 TeV and 2.8 PeV is well described by an unbroken power law with best-fit spectral index -2.50 ± 0.09 and a flux at 100 TeV of ({6.7}-1.2+1.1)× {10}-18 {{GeV}}-1 {{{s}}}-1 {{sr}}-1 {{cm}}-2. Under the same assumptions, an unbroken power law with index -2 is disfavored with a significance of 3.8σ (p = 0.0066%) with respect to the best fit. This significance is reduced to 2.1σ (p = 1.7%) if instead we compare the best fit to a spectrum with index -2 that has an exponential cut-off at high energies. Allowing the electron-neutrino flux to deviate from the other two flavors, we find a νe fraction of 0.18 ± 0.11 at Earth. The sole production of electron neutrinos, which would be characteristic of neutron-decay-dominated sources, is rejected with a significance of 3.6σ (p = 0.014%).

  18. DUMAND Summer Workshop, University of California, La Jolla, Calif., July 24-September 2, 1978, Proceedings. Volume 2 - UHE interactions, neutrino astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A.

    1979-01-01

    The volume covers categories on inelastic neutrino scattering and the W-boson, and other ultra-high-energy processes, on pulsars, quasars and galactic nuclei, as well as other point sources and constants from gamma ray astronomy. Individual subjects include weak intermediate vector bosons and DUMAND, the Monte Carlo simulation of inelastic neutrino scattering in DUMAND, and Higgs boson production by very high-energy neutrinos. The observability of the neutrino flux from the inner region of the galactic disk, the diffuse fluxes of high-energy neutrinos, as well as the significance of gamma ray observations for neutrino astronomy are also among the topics covered.

  19. Sterile neutrinos and indirect dark matter searches in IceCube

    SciTech Connect

    Argüelles, Carlos A.; Kopp, Joachim E-mail: jkopp@fnal.gov

    2012-07-01

    If light sterile neutrinos exist and mix with the active neutrino flavors, this mixing will affect the propagation of high-energy neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun. In particular, new Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein resonances can occur, leading to almost complete conversion of some active neutrino flavors into sterile states. We demonstrate how this can weaken IceCube limits on neutrino capture and annihilation in the Sun and how potential future conflicts between IceCube constraints and direct detection or collider data might be resolved by invoking sterile neutrinos. We also point out that, if the dark matter-nucleon scattering cross section and the allowed annihilation channels are precisely measured in direct detection and collider experiments in the future, IceCube can be used to constrain sterile neutrino models using neutrinos from the dark matter annihilation.

  20. Neutrino-flavoured sneutrino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March-Russell, John; McCabe, Christopher; McCullough, Matthew

    2010-03-01

    A simple theory of supersymmetric dark matter (DM) naturally linked to neutrino flavour physics is studied. The DM sector comprises a spectrum of mixed lhd-rhd sneutrino states where both the sneutrino flavour structure and mass splittings are determined by the associated neutrino masses and mixings. Prospects for indirect detection from solar capture are good due to a large sneutrino-nucleon cross-section afforded by the inelastic splitting (solar capture limits exclude an explanation of DAMA/LIBRA). We find parameter regions where all heavier states will have decayed, leaving only one flavour mixture of sneutrino as the candidate DM. Such regions have a unique ‘smoking gun’ signature — sneutrino annihilation in the Sun produces a pair of neutrino mass eigenstates free from vacuum oscillations, with the potential for detection at neutrino telescopes through the observation of a hard spectrum of ν μ and ν τ (for a normal neutrino hierarchy). Next generation direct detection experiments can explore much of the parameter space through both elastic and inelastic scattering. We show in detail that the observed neutrino masses and mixings can arise as a consequence of supersymmetry breaking effects in the sneutrino DM sector, consistent with all experimental constraints.

  1. Solar Neutrino Problem

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, R. Jr.; Evans, J. C.; Cleveland, B. T.

    1978-04-28

    A summary of the results of the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment is given and discussed in relation to solar model calculations. A review is given of the merits of various new solar neutrino detectors that were proposed.

  2. Supernova neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, K.

    2015-07-15

    In this presentation I summarize the main detection channels for neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae, and describe current status of and future prospects for supernova-neutrino-sensitive detectors worldwide.

  3. Using neutrinos as a probe of the strong interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Morfin, J.G.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Neutrino scattering experiments have been studying QCD for over 30 years. From the Gargamelle experiments in the early 70's, through the subsequent bubble chamber and electronic detector experiments in the 80's and 90's, neutrino scattering experiments have steadily accumulated increasing statistics and minimized their systematic errors. While the most recent study of QCD with neutrinos is from the TeVatron neutrino beam (the NuTeV experiment with results presented by Martin Tzanov at this Workshop), near-future studies will shift to the Main Injector based NuMI facility also at Fermilab. The NuMI Facility at Fermilab provides an extremely intense beam of neutrinos making it an ideal place for high statistics (anti)neutrino-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiments. The MINERvA experiment at Fermilab is a collaboration of elementary-particle and nuclear physicists planning to use a fully active fine-grained solid scintillator detector to measure absolute exclusive cross-sections and nuclear effects in v - A interactions as well as a systematic study of the resonance-DIS transition region and DIS with an emphasis on the extraction of high-xBj parton distribution functions. Further in the future an intense proton source, the Fermilab Proton Driver, will increase neutrino interaction rates by a further factor of 5-20.

  4. Geo-neutrino Observation

    SciTech Connect

    Dye, S. T.; Alderman, M.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Mahoney, J. M.; Pakvasa, S.; Rosen, M.; Smith, S.; Varner, G.; McDonough, W. F.

    2009-12-17

    Observations of geo-neutrinos measure radiogenic heat production within the earth, providing information on the thermal history and dynamic processes of the mantle. Two detectors currently observe geo-neutrinos from underground locations. Other detection projects in various stages of development include a deep ocean observatory. This paper presents the current status of geo-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology and neutrino physics.

  5. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-06-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures. Neutrinos and photons are by far the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. Thus, if we would like to comprehend the universe, we must understand the neutrinos. Of course, studying the neutrinos is challenging, since the only known forces through which these electrically-neutral leptons interact are the weak force and gravity. Consequently, interactions of neutrinos in a detector are very rare events, so that very large detectors and intense neutrino sources are needed to make experiments feasible. Nevertheless, we have confirmed that the weak interactions of neutrinos are correctly described by the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particle physics. Moreover, in the last 14 years, we have discovered that neutrinos have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. These discoveries have been based on the observation that neutrinos can change from one 'flavor' to another - the phenomenon known as neutrino oscillation. We shall explain the physics of neutrino oscillation, deriving the probability of oscillation in a new way. We shall also provide a very brief guide to references that can be used to study some major neutrino-physics topics other than neutrino oscillation.

  6. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Inclusive Charged Current Cross Section on Iron using the MINOS Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Loiacono, Laura Jean

    2010-05-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) produces an intense muon neutrino beam used by the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS), a neutrino oscillation experiment, and the Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A, (MINERv A), a neutrino interaction experiment. Absolute neutrino cross sections are determined via σv = N vv , where the numerator is the measured number of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Detector and the denominator is the flux of incident neutrinos. Many past neutrino experiments have measured relative cross sections due to a lack of precise measurements of the incident neutrino flux, normalizing to better established reaction processes, such as quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. But recent measurements of neutrino interactions on nuclear targets have brought to light questions about our understanding of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. In this thesis the vμ inclusive charged current cross section on iron is measured using the MINOS Detector. The MINOS detector consists of alternating planes of steel and scintillator. The MINOS detector is optimized to measure muons produced in charged current vμ interactions. Along with muons, these interactions produce hadronic showers. The neutrino energy is measured from the total energy the particles deposit in the detector. The incident neutrino flux is measured using the muons produced alongside the neutrinos in meson decay. Three ionization chamber monitors located in the downstream portion of the NuMI beamline are used to measure the muon flux and thereby infer the neutrino flux by relation to the underlying pion and kaon meson flux. This thesis describes the muon flux instrumentation in the NuMI beam, its operation over the two year duration of this measurement, and the techniques used to derive the neutrino flux.

  7. Toward construction of a unified neutrino-nucleus interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamano, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A precise knowledge of the neutrino-nucleus interactions is becoming one of the crucial issues for a successful determination of the neutrino parameters from the future neutrino-oscillation experiments. It is therefore urgent to have a reliable neutrino-nucleus interactoin model that enables a quantitative description of neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections in an accuracy of 10 percent or less. However, the kinematic regions relevant to the neutrino parameter searches extend over the quasi-elastic, resonance, and deep-inelastic-scattering regions, where different theoretical treatments based on hadronic or partonic degrees of freedom are usually employed, and this makes the construction of a unified neutrino-nucleus interaction model covering those kinematic regions challenging. To tackle on such a challenging issue, we have recently developed a collaboration of experimentalists and theorists in different fields at J-PARC Branch of KEK Theory Center (http://www.nuint.kek.jp/index_e.html). In this talk, I review our efforts toward construction of the unified neutrino-nucleus interaction model at J-PARC Branch of KEK Theory Center. A precise knowledge of the neutrino-nucleus interactions is becoming one of the crucial issues for a successful determination of the neutrino parameters from the future neutrino-oscillation experiments. It is therefore urgent to have a reliable neutrino-nucleus interactoin model that enables a quantitative description of neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections in an accuracy of 10 percent or less. However, the kinematic regions relevant to the neutrino parameter searches extend over the quasi-elastic, resonance, and deep-inelastic-scattering regions, where different theoretical treatments based on hadronic or partonic degrees of freedom are usually employed, and this makes the construction of a unified neutrino-nucleus interaction model covering those kinematic regions challenging. To tackle on such a challenging issue, we have

  8. Speedy neutrinos, again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Frank

    2012-02-01

    I am writing with regard to the OPERA collaboration's recent publicizing of experimental results suggesting that neutrinos have been observed travelling faster than light (see "Superluminal neutrinos split OPERA collaboration", November 2011 pp12-13 "The brave new-media world", ibid p19; and "Speedy neutrinos", December 2011 pp20-21).

  9. Neutrinos in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, D.; Frere, J.-M.

    2012-12-01

    The neutrinos from the Big Bang or the Cosmic Neutrino Background (CNB) carry precious information from the early epoch when our universe was only 1 s old. Although not yet directly detected, CNB may be revealed indirectly through cosmological observations due to neutrino important cosmological influence. We review the cosmological role of neutrinos and the cosmological constraints on neutrino characteristics. Namely, we discuss the impact of neutrinos in the early universe: the cosmic expansion, neutrino decoupling, the role of neutrinos in the primordial production of light elements, leptogenesis, etc. We briefly discuss the role of neutrino at later stages of the universe. Due to the considerable cosmological influence of neutrinos, cosmological bounds on neutrino properties from observational data exist. We review the cosmological constraints on the effective number of neutrino species, neutrino mass and mixing parameters, lepton number of the universe, presence of sterile neutrino, etc.

  10. Possibility of measuring Adler angles in charged current single pion neutrino-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, F.

    2016-05-01

    Uncertainties in modeling neutrino-nucleus interactions are a major contribution to systematic errors in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. Accurate modeling of neutrino interactions requires additional experimental observables such as the Adler angles which carry information about the polarization of the Δ resonance and the interference with nonresonant single pion production. The Adler angles were measured with limited statistics in bubble chamber neutrino experiments as well as in electron-proton scattering experiments. We discuss the viability of measuring these angles in neutrino interactions with nuclei.

  11. Nucleosynthesis and Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, Toshitaka

    2011-05-06

    Neutrinos play the critical roles in nucleosynthesis of light-to-heavy mass nuclei in core-collapse supernovae. We study the nucleosynthesis induced by neutrino interactions and find suitable average neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta. These isotopes are predominantly synthesized by the supernova {nu}-process. We also study the neutrino oscillation effects on their abundances and propose a method to determine the unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, i.e. {theta}{sub 13} and mass hierarchy.

  12. Mass determination of neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1988-01-01

    A time-energy correlation method has been developed to determine the signature of a nonzero neutrino mass in a small sample of neutrinos detected from a distant source. The method is applied to the Kamiokande II (Hirata et al., 1987) and IMB (Bionta et al., 1987) observations of neutrino bursts from SN 1987A. Using the Kamiokande II data, the neutrino rest mass is estimated at 2.8 + 2.0, - 1.4 eV and the initial neutrino pulse is found to be less than 0.3 sec full width, followed by an emission tail lasting at least 10 sec.

  13. Neutrinos from AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The great penetrating power of neutrinos makes them ideal probe of astrophysical sites and conditions inaccessible to other forms of radiation. These are the centers of stars (collapsing or not) and the centers of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). It has been suggested that AGN presented a very promising source of high energy neutrinos, possibly detectable by underwater neutrino detectors. This paper reviews the evolution of ideas concerning the emission of neutrinos from AGN in view of the more recent developments in gamma-ray astronomy and their implications for the neutrino emission from these class of objects.

  14. Dark matter, baryogenesis and neutrino oscillations from right-handed neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canetti, Laurent; Drewes, Marco; Frossard, Tibor; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2013-05-01

    We show that, leaving aside accelerated cosmic expansion, all experimental data in high energy physics that are commonly agreed to require physics beyond the Standard Model can be explained when completing the model by three right-handed neutrinos that can be searched for using present-day experimental techniques. The model that realizes this scenario is known as the Neutrino Minimal Standard Model (νMSM). In this article we give a comprehensive summary of all known constraints in the νMSM, along with a pedagogical introduction to the model. We present the first complete quantitative study of the parameter space of the model where no physics beyond the νMSM is needed to simultaneously explain neutrino oscillations, dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe. The key new point of our analysis is leptogenesis after sphaleron freeze-out, which leads to resonant dark matter production, thus evading the constraints on sterile neutrino dark matter from structure formation and x-ray searches. This requires one to track the time evolution of left- and right-handed neutrino abundances from hot big bang initial conditions down to temperatures below the QCD scale. We find that the interplay of resonant amplifications, CP-violating flavor oscillations, scatterings, and decays leads to a number of previously unknown constraints on the sterile neutrino properties. We furthermore reanalyze bounds from past collider experiments and big bang nucleosynthesis in the face of recent evidence for a nonzero neutrino mixing angle θ13. We combine all our results with existing constraints on dark matter properties from astrophysics and cosmology. Our results provide a guideline for future experimental searches for sterile neutrinos. A summary of the constraints on sterile neutrino masses and mixings has appeared in Canetti et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 061801 (2013)PRLTAO0031-9007]. In this article we provide all details of our calculations and give constraints on other model

  15. Solar neutrino detection in a large volume double-phase liquid argon experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, D.; Giganti, C.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Bottino, B.; Canci, N.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Jollet, C.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Pocar, A.; Razeti, M.; Renshaw, A. L.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Suvorov, Y.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Wang, H.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2016-08-01

    Precision measurements of solar neutrinos emitted by specific nuclear reaction chains in the Sun are of great interest for developing an improved understanding of star formation and evolution. Given the expected neutrino fluxes and known detection reactions, such measurements require detectors capable of collecting neutrino-electron scattering data in exposures on the order of 1 ktonne-yr, with good energy resolution and extremely low background. Two-phase liquid argon time projection chambers (LAr TPCs) are under development for direct Dark Matter WIMP searches, which possess very large sensitive mass, high scintillation light yield, good energy resolution, and good spatial resolution in all three cartesian directions. While enabling Dark Matter searches with sensitivity extending to the ``neutrino floor'' (given by the rate of nuclear recoil events from solar neutrino coherent scattering), such detectors could also enable precision measurements of solar neutrino fluxes using the neutrino-electron elastic scattering events. Modeling results are presented for the cosmogenic and radiogenic backgrounds affecting solar neutrino detection in a 300 tonne (100 tonne fiducial) LAr TPC operating at LNGS depth (3,800 meters of water equivalent). The results show that such a detector could measure the CNO neutrino rate with ~15% precision, and significantly improve the precision of the 7Be and pep neutrino rates compared to the currently available results from the Borexino organic liquid scintillator detector.

  16. Measurement of Neutrino and Antineutrino Charged-Current Inclusive Cross Sections with the MINERvA Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Devan, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are a nearly massless, neutral particle in the Standard Model that only interact via the weak interaction. Experimental confirmation of neutrino oscillations, in which a neutrino created as a particular type (electron, muon or tau) can be observed as a different type after propagating some distance, earned the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics. Neutrino oscillation experiments rely on accurate measurements of neutrino interactions with matter, such as that presented here. Neutrinos also provide a unique probe of the nucleus, complementary to electron scattering experiments. This thesis presents a measurement of the charged-current inclusive cross section for muon neutrinos and antineutrinos in the energy range 2 to 50 GeV with the MINERvA detector. MINERvA is a neutrino scattering experiment in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab, near Chicago. A cross section measures the probability of an interaction occurring, measured here as a function of neutrino energy. To extract a cross section from data, the observed rate of interactions is corrected for detector efficiency and divided by the number of scattering nucleons in the target and the flux of neutrinos in the beam. The neutrino flux is determined with the low-$\

  17. Probing neutrino magnetic moments at the Spallation Neutron Source facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmas, T. S.; Miranda, O. G.; Papoulias, D. K.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2015-07-01

    Majorana neutrino electromagnetic properties are studied through neutral current coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. We focus on the potential of the recently planned COHERENT experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source to probe muon-neutrino magnetic moments. The resulting sensitivities are determined on the basis of a χ2 analysis employing realistic nuclear structure calculations in the context of the quasiparticle random phase approximation. We find that they can improve existing limits by half an order of magnitude. In addition, we show that these facilities allow for standard model precision tests in the low energy regime, with a competitive determination of the weak mixing angle. Finally, they also offer the capability to probe other electromagnetic neutrino properties, such as the neutrino charge radius. We illustrate our results for various choices of experimental setup and target material.

  18. Sensitivities to neutrino electromagnetic properties at the TEXONO experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmas, T. S.; Miranda, O. G.; Papoulias, D. K.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of measuring neutral-current coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS) at the TEXONO experiment has opened high expectations towards probing exotic neutrino properties. Focusing on low threshold Germanium-based targets with kg-scale mass, we find a remarkable efficiency not only for detecting CENNS events due to the weak interaction, but also for probing novel electromagnetic neutrino interactions. Specifically, we demonstrate that such experiments are complementary in performing precision Standard Model tests as well as in shedding light on sub-leading effects due to neutrino magnetic moment and neutrino charge radius. This work employs realistic nuclear structure calculations based on the quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) and takes into consideration the crucial quenching effect corrections. Such a treatment, in conjunction with a simple statistical analysis, shows that the attainable sensitivities are improved by one order of magnitude as compared to previous studies.

  19. Atmospheric Neutrinos: Background and Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Mocioiu, Irina

    2010-11-24

    We discuss a brief history of atmospheric neutrinos, from background to proton decay searches to proving neutrino oscillations. We then discuss how high statistics atmospheric neutrino measurements in the IceCube Deep Core Array can provide useful information about neutrino oscillation parameters and other neutrino properties.

  20. Neutrino physics with JUNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Fengpeng; An, Guangpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Buizza Avanzini, Margherita; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio; Cao, Guofu; Cao, Jun; Chang, Yun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Yixue; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Clerbaux, Barbara; Conrad, Janet; D'Angelo, Davide; De Kerret, Hervé; Deng, Zhi; Deng, Ziyan; Ding, Yayun; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dornic, Damien; Dracos, Marcos; Drapier, Olivier; Dusini, Stefano; Dye, Stephen; Enqvist, Timo; Fan, Donghua; Fang, Jian; Favart, Laurent; Ford, Richard; Göger-Neff, Marianne; Gan, Haonan; Garfagnini, Alberto; Giammarchi, Marco; Gonchar, Maxim; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Gonin, Michel; Grassi, Marco; Grewing, Christian; Guan, Mengyun; Guarino, Vic; Guo, Gang; Guo, Wanlei; Guo, Xin-Heng; Hagner, Caren; Han, Ran; He, Miao; Heng, Yuekun; Hsiung, Yee; Hu, Jun; Hu, Shouyang; Hu, Tao; Huang, Hanxiong; Huang, Xingtao; Huo, Lei; Ioannisian, Ara; Jeitler, Manfred; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Jollet, Cécile; Kang, Li; Karagounis, Michael; Kazarian, Narine; Krumshteyn, Zinovy; Kruth, Andre; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Leitner, Rupert; Li, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Weidong; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Yi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Zhi-Bing; Liang, Hao; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Tao; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Ling, Jiajie; Lippi, Ivano; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Hu; Liu, Jianglai; Liu, Jianli; Liu, Jinchang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Shulin; Lombardi, Paolo; Long, Yongbing; Lu, Haoqi; Lu, Jiashu; Lu, Jingbin; Lu, Junguang; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Luo, Shu; Lyashuk, Vladimir; Möllenberg, Randolph; Ma, Xubo; Mantovani, Fabio; Mao, Yajun; Mari, Stefano M.; McDonough, William F.; Meng, Guang; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Meroni, Emanuela; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miramonti, Lino; Mueller, Thomas; Naumov, Dmitry; Oberauer, Lothar; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Ortica, Fausto; Paoloni, Alessandro; Peng, Haiping; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Previtali, Ezio; Qi, Ming; Qian, Sen; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yongzhong; Qin, Zhonghua; Raffelt, Georg; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Ricci, Barbara; Robens, Markus; Romani, Aldo; Ruan, Xiangdong; Ruan, Xichao; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Shaevitz, Mike; Sinev, Valery; Sirignano, Chiara; Sisti, Monica; Smirnov, Oleg; Soiron, Michael; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Steinmann, Jochen; Sun, Xilei; Sun, Yongjie; Taichenachev, Dmitriy; Tang, Jian; Tkachev, Igor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw; van Waasen, Stefan; Volpe, Cristina; Vorobel, Vit; Votano, Lucia; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Wang, Guoli; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Wen, Liangjian; Wiebusch, Christopher; Wonsak, Björn; Wu, Qun; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Wurm, Michael; Xi, Yufei; Xia, Dongmei; Xie, Yuguang; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Xu, Jilei; Yan, Baojun; Yang, Changgen; Yang, Chaowen; Yang, Guang; Yang, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Yu; Yegin, Ugur; Yermia, Frédéric; You, Zhengyun; Yu, Boxiang; Yu, Chunxu; Yu, Zeyuan; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zhan, Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhenghua; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhong, Weili; Zhou, Guorong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Rong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Wenxiong; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yeling; Zhou, Yufeng; Zou, Jiaheng

    2016-03-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) as a primary physics goal. The excellent energy resolution and the large fiducial volume anticipated for the JUNO detector offer exciting opportunities for addressing many important topics in neutrino and astro-particle physics. In this document, we present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. Following an introduction summarizing the current status and open issues in neutrino physics, we discuss how the detection of antineutrinos generated by a cluster of nuclear power plants allows the determination of the neutrino MH at a 3-4σ significance with six years of running of JUNO. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum with excellent energy resolution will also lead to the precise determination of the neutrino oscillation parameters {{sin}}2{θ }12, {{Δ }}{m}212, and | {{Δ }}{m}{ee}2| to an accuracy of better than 1%, which will play a crucial role in the future unitarity test of the MNSP matrix. The JUNO detector is capable of observing not only antineutrinos from the power plants, but also neutrinos/antineutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and solar neutrinos. As a result of JUNO's large size, excellent energy resolution, and vertex reconstruction capability, interesting new data on these topics can be collected. For example, a neutrino burst from a typical core-collapse supernova at a distance of 10 kpc would lead to ˜5000 inverse-beta-decay events and ˜2000 all-flavor neutrino-proton ES events in JUNO, which are of crucial importance for understanding the mechanism of supernova explosion and for exploring novel phenomena such as collective neutrino oscillations

  1. THE ROLE OF QUANTUM MECHANICS IN NEUTRINO FACTORIES.

    SciTech Connect

    GALLARDO,J.C.; SESSLER,A.M.; WURTELE,J.

    2000-12-06

    A compilation is made of the various ways in which quantum phenomena enter into the design and operation of a neutrino factory. They include production of pions, decay of pions into muons, ionization energy loss of muons in material, scattering and energy straggling of muons in material, polarization of muons, and the decay of muons into neutrinos, and the radiation effect of neutrinos. For each process formulas are presented which cover the basic mechanism. A discussion is presented of the areas of uncertainty and of the experiments, underway and proposed, which will reduce the uncertainty to an acceptable level.

  2. MINOS Sterile Neutrino Search

    SciTech Connect

    Koskinen, David Jason

    2009-02-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment designed to measure properties of neutrino oscillation. Using a high intensity muon neutrino beam, produced by the Neutrinos at Main Injector (NuMI) complex at Fermilab, MINOS makes two measurements of neutrino interactions. The first measurement is made using the Near Detector situated at Fermilab and the second is made using the Far Detector located in the Soudan Underground laboratory in northern Minnesota. The primary goal of MINOS is to verify, and measure the properties of, neutrino oscillation between the two detectors using the v μ→ Vτ transition. A complementary measurement can be made to search for the existence of sterile neutrinos; an oft theorized, but experimentally unvalidated particle. The following thesis will show the results of a sterile neutrino search using MINOS RunI and RunII data totaling ~2.5 x 1020 protons on target. Due to the theoretical nature of sterile neutrinos, complete formalism that covers transition probabilities for the three known active states with the addition of a sterile state is also presented.

  3. Detecting Solar Neutrino Flare in Megaton and km3 detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele; di Giacomo, Paola

    2009-03-01

    To foresee a solar flare neutrino signal we infer its upper and lower bound. The upper bound was derived since a few years by general energy equipartition arguments on observed solar particle flare. The lower bound, the most compelling one for any guarantee neutrino signal, is derived by most recent records of hard Gamma bump due to solar flare on January 2005 (by neutral pion decay). Because neutral and charged pions (made by hadron scattering in the flare) are born on the same foot, their link is compelling: the observed gamma flux [Grechnev V.V. et al., arXiv:0806.4424, Solar Physics, Vol. 1, October, (2008), 252] reflects into a corresponding one for the neutrinos, almost one to one. Moreover while gamma photons might be absorbed (in deep corona) or at least reduced inside the flaring plasma, the secondaries neutrino are not. So pion neutrinos should be even more abundant than gamma ones. Tens-hundred MeV neutrinos may cross undisturbed the whole Sun, doubling at least their rate respect a unique solar-side for gamma flare. Therefore we obtain minimal bounds opening a windows for neutrino astronomy, already at the edge of present but quite within near future Megaton neutrino detectors. Such detectors are considered mostly to reveal cosmic supernova background or rare Local Group (few Mpc) Supernovas events [Matthew D. Kistler et al. 0810.1959v1]. However rarest (once a decade), brief (a few minutes) powerful solar neutrino “flare” may shine and they may overcome by two to three order of magnitude the corresponding steady atmospheric neutrino noise on the Earth, leading in largest Neutrino detector at least to one or to meaning-full few events clustered signals. The voice of such a solar anti-neutrino flare component at a few tens MeVs may induce an inverse beta decay over a vanishing anti-neutrino solar background. Megaton or even inner ten Megaton Ice Cube detector at ten GeV threshold may also reveal traces in hardest energy of solar flares. Icecube

  4. Studies of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory detector and sonoluminescence using a sonoluminescent source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Douglas Steven

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is the first heavy water Cerenkov solar neutrino detector. 1000 metric tonnes of heavy water is used as a neutrino target and detection medium. SNO is designed to measure the flux and energy spectrum of high energy solar electron neutrinos via charged current interactions of electron neutrinos with deuterons in the heavy water. SNO can also measure the total high energy solar neutrino flux of neutrinos of all flavors via neutral current interactions with deuterons. The physics of solar models and solar neutrinos is presented. The physics of SNO and the SNO detector are described in detail. Two sonoluminescence sources were developed for use in calibrations of the SNO detector. The sonoluminescence source outperformed the standard SNO optical source, a nitrogen laser with a diffuser ball, by 25% in measurements of photomultiplier tube timing accuracy. Two systematic effects with the SNO electronics were discovered. Electronic crosstalk between channels has been measured for charges greater than 5 photoelectrons. An efficient cut has been developed to minimize this systematic error with an upper limit on signal loss of 0.4% times the PMT occupancy. Electronics crosstalk will affect solar neutrino analyses as it falsely adds PMT hits to some fraction of the events. A small anticorrelation of photomultiplier charges for electronics channels in close proximity has been measured. It has been shown that this subtle effect does not affect the number of photons detected, only the photomultiplier charges. A SL source and the SNO detector were used to study three properties of sonoluminescence. An analysis of SL data with regard to back-to-back photon correlations is presented. The results are consistent with no back-to- back photon correlations with an upper limit on the strength of back-to-back photon correlations of 3.16% for unfiltered SL light, and 0.5% for filtered SL light (λ = 420 nm) at the 95% confidence level. The SL photon

  5. Physics from solar neutrinos in dark matter direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeño, David G.; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Jubb, Thomas; Machado, Pedro A. N.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Bœhm, Céline

    2016-05-01

    The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to both coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron scattering. This will enable them to explore aspects of solar physics, perform the lowest energy measurement of the weak angle sin2 θ W to date, and probe contributions from new theories with light mediators. In this article, we compute the projected nuclear and electron recoil rates expected in several dark matter direct detection experiments due to solar neutrinos, and use these estimates to quantify errors on future measurements of the neutrino fluxes, weak mixing angle and solar observables, as well as to constrain new physics in the neutrino sector. Our analysis shows that the combined rates of solar neutrino events in second generation experiments (SuperCDMS and LZ) can yield a measurement of the pp flux to 2.5% accuracy via electron recoil, and slightly improve the 8B flux determination. Assuming a low-mass argon phase, projected tonne-scale experiments like DARWIN can reduce the uncertainty on both the pp and boron-8 neutrino fluxes to below 1%. Finally, we use current results from LUX, SuperCDMS and CDMSlite to set bounds on new interactions between neutrinos and electrons or nuclei, and show that future direct detection experiments can be used to set complementary constraints on the parameter space associated with light mediators.

  6. The State of the Art of Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.

    2015-06-08

    The study of neutrino interactions has recently experienced a renaissance, motivated by the fact that neutrino oscillation experiments depend critically on an accurate models of neutrino interactions. These models have to predict not only the signal and background populations that oscillation experiments see at near and far detectors, but they must also predict how the neutrino's energy which enters a nucleus gets transferred to energies of the particles that leave the nucleus after the neutrino interacts. Over the past year there have been a number of new results on many different neutrino (and antineutrino) interaction channels using several different target nuclei. These results are often not in agreement with predictions extraolated from charged lepton scattering measurements, or even from predictions anchored to neutrino measurements on deuterium. These new measurements are starting to give the community the handles needed to improve the theoretical description of neutrino interactions, which ultimately pave the way for precision oscillation measurements. This report briefly summarizes recent results and points out where those results differ from the predictions based on current models.

  7. Charged Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachelrieß, M.

    2013-04-01

    High-energy neutrino astronomy has grown up, with IceCube as one of its main experiments having sufficient sensitivity to test "vanilla" models of astrophysical neutrinos. I review predictions of neutrino fluxes as well as the status of cosmic ray physics. I comment also briefly on an improvement of the Fermi-LAT limit for cosmogenic neutrinos and on the two neutrino events presented by IceCube first at "Neutrino 2012".

  8. Paradoxes of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-08-15

    Despite the theory of neutrino oscillations being rather old, some of its basic issues are still being debated in the literature. We discuss a number of such issues, including the relevance of the 'same energy' and 'same momentum' assumptions, the role of quantum-mechanical uncertainty relations in neutrino oscillations, the dependence of the coherence and localization conditions that ensure the observability of neutrino oscillations on neutrino energy and momentum uncertainties, the question of (in)dependence of the oscillation probabilities on the neutrino production and detection processes, and the applicability limits of the stationary-source approximation. We also develop a novel approach to calculation of the oscillation probability in the wave-packet approach, based on the summation/integration conventions different from the standard one, which allows a new insight into the 'same energy' vs. 'same momentum' problem. We also discuss a number of apparently paradoxical features of the theory of neutrino oscillations.

  9. Solar neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Miramonti, Lino

    2009-04-30

    More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

  10. Measurement of the Ratio of the nu{sub m}u Charged-Current Single-Pion Production to Quasielastic Scattering with a 0.8 GeV Neutrino Beam on Mineral Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Bugel, L.; Coney, L.; Djurcic, Z.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Monroe, J.; Schmitz, D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sorel, M.; Anderson, C. E.; Curioni, A.; Fleming, B. T.; Linden, S. K.; Soderberg, M.; Spitz, J.; Bazarko, A. O.; Laird, E. M.; Meyers, P. D.; Patterson, R. B.; Shoemaker, F. C.

    2009-08-21

    Using high statistics samples of charged-current nu{sub m}u interactions, the MiniNooNE Collaboration reports a measurement of the single-charged-pion production to quasielastic cross section ratio on mineral oil (CH{sub 2}), both with and without corrections for hadron reinteractions in the target nucleus. The result is provided as a function of neutrino energy in the range 0.4 GeVneutrino calculations.

  11. Neutrinos in Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2008-01-24

    I give an overview of the effects of neutrinos on cosmology, focussing in particular on the role played by neutrinos in the evolution of cosmological perturbations. I discuss how recent observations of the cosmic microwave background and the large-scale structure of galaxies can probe neutrino masses with greater precision than current laboratory experiments. I describe several new techniques that will be used to probe cosmology in the future.

  12. Neutrinos: Nature's Ghosts?

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-06-18

    Dr. Don Lincoln introduces one of the most fascinating inhabitants of the subatomic realm: the neutrino. Neutrinos are ghosts of the microworld, almost not interacting at all. In this video, he describes some of their properties and how they were discovered. Studies of neutrinos are expected to be performed at many laboratories across the world and to form one of the cornerstones of the Fermilab research program for the next decade or more.

  13. Neutrinos: Nature's Ghosts?

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Dr. Don Lincoln introduces one of the most fascinating inhabitants of the subatomic realm: the neutrino. Neutrinos are ghosts of the microworld, almost not interacting at all. In this video, he describes some of their properties and how they were discovered. Studies of neutrinos are expected to be performed at many laboratories across the world and to form one of the cornerstones of the Fermilab research program for the next decade or more.

  14. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Federspiel, F.; Garvey, G.; Louis, W.C.; Mills, G.B.; Tayloe, R.; Sandberg, V.; Sapp, B.; White, D.H.

    1999-07-09

    The Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND), located at the LANSCE (formerly LAMPF) linear accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory, has seen evidence for the oscillation of neutrinos, and hence neutrino mass. That discovery was the impetus for this LDRD project, begun in 1996. The goal of this project was to define the appropriate technologies to use in a follow up experiment and to set in place the requirements for such an experiment.

  15. High intensity neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, A. K.

    2015-07-15

    High-intensity proton accelerator complex enabled long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments with a precisely controlled neutrino beam. The beam power so far achieved is a few hundred kW with enourmorous efforts of accelerator physicists and engineers. However, to fully understand the lepton mixing structure, MW-class accelerators are desired. We describe the current intensity-frontier high-energy proton accelerators, their plans to go beyond and technical challenges in the neutrino beamline facilities.

  16. Deep and shallow inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Heather

    2015-05-15

    In this session we focused on the higher energy deep and shallow inelastic particle interactions, DIS and SIS. DIS interactions occur when the energy of the incident particle beam is so large that the beam is able to penetrate the nucleons inside of the target nuclei. These interactions occur at the smallest level possible, that of the quark-gluon, or parton, level. SIS interactions occur in an intermediate energy range, just below the energy required for DIS interactions. The DIS cross section formula contains structure functions that describe our understanding of the underlying parton structure of nature. The full description of DIS interactions requires three structure functions: two may be measured in charged lepton or neutrino scattering, but one can only be extracted from neutrino DIS data. There are reasons to expect that the impact of nuclear effects could be different for neutrinos engaging in the DIS interaction, vs those felt by leptons. In fact, fits by the nCTEQ collaboration have found that the neutrino-Fe structure functions appear to differ from those extracted from lepton scattering data [1]. To better understand the global picture of DIS and SIS, we chose a three-pronged attack that examined recent experimental results, data fits, and latest theory predictions. Experimental results from neutrino and lepton scattering, as well as collider experiments, were presented.

  17. Accelerator neutrino program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    The accelerator neutrino programme in the USA consists primarily of the Fermilab neutrino programme. Currently, Fermilab operates two neutrino beamlines, the Booster neutrino beamline and the NuMI neutrino beamline and is the planning stages for a third neutrino beam to send neutrinos to DUSEL. The experiments in the Booster neutrino beamline are miniBooNE, SciBooNE and in the future microBooNE, whereas in the NuMI beamline we have MINOS, ArgoNut, MINERVA and coming soon NOvA. The major experiment in the beamline to DUSEL will be LBNE.

  18. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Wen, L J; Zhang, C

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos. PMID:25913819

  19. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Wen, L J; Zhang, C

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  20. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  1. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  2. Novel Ideas for Neutrino Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peach, Ken

    2007-04-23

    Recent developments in neutrino physics, primarily the demonstration of neutrino oscillations in both atmospheric neutrinos and solar neutrinos, provide the first conclusive evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The simplest phenomenology of neutrino oscillations, for three generations of neutrino, requires six parameters - two squared mass differences, 3 mixing angles and a complex phase that could, if not 0 or {pi}, contribute to the otherwise unexplained baryon asymmetry observed in the universe. Exploring the neutrino sector will require very intense beams of neutrinos, and will need novel solutions.

  3. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos. PMID:25913819

  4. Neutrino-nucleus interactions at the LBNF near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mosel, Ulrich

    2015-10-15

    The reaction mechanisms for neutrino interactions with an {sup 40}Ar nucleus with the LBNF flux are calculated with the Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) transport-theoretical implementation of these interactions. Quasielastic scattering, many-body effects, pion production and absorption and Deep Inelastic Scattering are discussed; they all play a role at the LBNF energies and are experimentally entangled with each other. Quasielastic scattering makes up for only about 1/3 of the total cross section whereas pion production channels make up about 2/3 of the total. This underlines the need for a consistent description of the neutrino-nucleus reaction that treats all channels on an equal, consistent footing. The results discussed here can also serve as useful guideposts for the Intermediate Neutrino Program.

  5. From eV to EeV: Neutrino cross sections across energy scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formaggio, J. A.; Zeller, G. P.

    2012-07-01

    Since its original postulation by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930, the neutrino has played a prominent role in our understanding of nuclear and particle physics. In the intervening 80 years, scientists have detected and measured neutrinos from a variety of sources, both man made and natural. Underlying all of these observations, and any inferences we may have made from them, is an understanding of how neutrinos interact with matter. Knowledge of neutrino interaction cross sections is an important and necessary ingredient in any neutrino measurement. With the advent of new precision experiments, the demands on our understanding of neutrino interactions is becoming even greater. The purpose of this article is to survey our current knowledge of neutrino cross sections across all known energy scales: from the very lowest energies to the highest that we hope to observe. The article covers a wide range of neutrino interactions including coherent scattering, neutrino capture, inverse beta decay, low-energy nuclear interactions, quasielastic scattering, resonant pion production, kaon production, deep inelastic scattering, and ultrahigh energy interactions. Strong emphasis is placed on experimental data whenever such measurements are available.

  6. Neutrinos in supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1986-10-01

    The role of neutrinos in Type II supernovae is discussed. An overall view of the neutrino luminosity as expected theoretically is presented. The different weak interactions involved are assessed from the standpoint of how they exchange energy, momentum, and lepton number. Particular attention is paid to entropy generation and the path to thermal and chemical equilibration, and to the phenomenon of trapping. Various methods used to calculate the neutrino flows are considered. These include trapping and leakage schemes, distribution-averaged transfer, and multi-energy group methods. The information obtained from the neutrinos caught from Supernova 1987a is briefly evaluated. 55 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Muons and neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first generation of large and precise detectors, some initially dedicated to search for nucleon decay has accumulated significant statistics on neutrinos and high-energy muons. A second generation of even better and bigger detectors are already in operation or in advanced construction stage. The present set of experimental data on muon groups and neutrinos is qualitatively better than several years ago and the expectations for the following years are high. Composition studies with underground muon groups, neutrino detection, and expected extraterrestrial neutrino fluxes are discussed.

  8. Nonlinear growing neutrino cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaita, Youness; Baldi, Marco; Führer, Florian; Puchwein, Ewald; Wetterich, Christof

    2016-03-01

    The energy scale of dark energy, ˜2 ×10-3 eV , is a long way off compared to all known fundamental scales—except for the neutrino masses. If dark energy is dynamical and couples to neutrinos, this is no longer a coincidence. The time at which dark energy starts to behave as an effective cosmological constant can be linked to the time at which the cosmic neutrinos become nonrelativistic. This naturally places the onset of the Universe's accelerated expansion in recent cosmic history, addressing the why-now problem of dark energy. We show that these mechanisms indeed work in the growing neutrino quintessence model—even if the fully nonlinear structure formation and backreaction are taken into account, which were previously suspected of spoiling the cosmological evolution. The attractive force between neutrinos arising from their coupling to dark energy grows as large as 106 times the gravitational strength. This induces very rapid dynamics of neutrino fluctuations which are nonlinear at redshift z ≈2 . Nevertheless, a nonlinear stabilization phenomenon ensures only mildly nonlinear oscillating neutrino overdensities with a large-scale gravitational potential substantially smaller than that of cold dark matter perturbations. Depending on model parameters, the signals of large-scale neutrino lumps may render the cosmic neutrino background observable.

  9. Neutrino physics with multi-ton scale liquid xenon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baudis, L.; Ferella, A.; Kish, A.; Manalaysay, A.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Schumann, M. E-mail: alfredo.ferella@lngs.infn.it E-mail: aaronm@ucdavis.edu E-mail: marc.schumann@lhep.unibe.ch

    2014-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of large-scale xenon detectors to low-energy solar neutrinos, to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and to neutrinoless double beta decay. As a concrete example, we consider the xenon part of the proposed DARWIN (Dark Matter WIMP Search with Noble Liquids) experiment. We perform detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the expected backgrounds, considering realistic energy resolutions and thresholds in the detector. In a low-energy window of 2–30 keV, where the sensitivity to solar pp and {sup 7}Be-neutrinos is highest, an integrated pp-neutrino rate of 5900 events can be reached in a fiducial mass of 14 tons of natural xenon, after 5 years of data. The pp-neutrino flux could thus be measured with a statistical uncertainty around 1%, reaching the precision of solar model predictions. These low-energy solar neutrinos will be the limiting background to the dark matter search channel for WIMP-nucleon cross sections below ∼ 2 × 10{sup −48} cm{sup 2} and WIMP masses around 50 GeV⋅c{sup −2}, for an assumed 99.5% rejection of electronic recoils due to elastic neutrino-electron scatters. Nuclear recoils from coherent scattering of solar neutrinos will limit the sensitivity to WIMP masses below ∼ 6 GeV⋅c{sup −2} to cross sections above ∼ 4 × 10{sup −45}cm{sup 2}. DARWIN could reach a competitive half-life sensitivity of 5.6 × 10{sup 26} y to the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe after 5 years of data, using 6 tons of natural xenon in the central detector region.

  10. Extremely high energy cosmic neutrinos and relic neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2006-03-01

    I review the essentials of ultrahigh-energy neutrino interactions, show how neutral-current detection and flavor tagging can enhance the scientific potential of neutrino telescopes, and sketch new studies on neutrino encounters with dark matter relics and on gravitational lensing of neutrinos.

  11. Review of neutrino oscillations with sterile and active neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.

    2016-08-01

    Recently neutrino oscillation experiments have shown that it is very likely that there are one or two sterile neutrinos. In this review neutrino oscillations with one, two, three sterile and three active neutrinos, and parameters that are consistent with experiments, are reviewed.

  12. Cosmological neutrino mass detection: The Best probe of neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi-)massless particles as in majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way-out to explain a discrepancy {approx}< 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and Lab data.

  13. Muon and neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a new calculation of the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes and the energy spectrum of muon-neutrinos produced in individual extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by proton and gamma-ray primaries is reported. Also explained is the possibility of detecting atmospheric nu sub mu's due to gamma-rays from these sources.

  14. Dark matter astrophysical uncertainties and the neutrino floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hare, Ciaran A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) by direct detection faces an encroaching background due to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. For a given WIMP mass the cross section at which neutrinos constitute a dominant background is dependent on the uncertainty on the flux of each neutrino source, principally from the Sun, supernovae or atmospheric cosmic ray collisions. However there are also considerable uncertainties with regard to the astrophysical ingredients of the predicted WIMP signal. Uncertainties in the velocity of the Sun with respect to the Milky Way dark matter halo, the local density of WIMPs, and the shape of the local WIMP speed distribution all have an effect on the expected event rate in direct detection experiments and hence will change the region of the WIMP parameter space for which neutrinos are a significant background. In this work we extend the neutrino floor calculation to account for the uncertainty in the astrophysics dependence of the WIMP signal. We show the effect of uncertainties on projected discovery limits with an emphasis on low WIMP masses (less than 10 GeV) when solar neutrino backgrounds are most important. We find that accounting for astrophysical uncertainties changes the shape of the neutrino floor as a function of WIMP mass but also causes it to appear at cross sections up to an order of magnitude larger, extremely close to existing experimental limits, indicating that neutrino backgrounds will become an issue sooner than previously thought. We also explore how neutrinos hinder the estimation of WIMP parameters and how astrophysical uncertainties impact the discrimination of WIMPs and neutrinos with the use of their respective time dependencies.

  15. First indication of terrestrial matter effects on solar neutrino oscillation.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, A; Abe, K; Hayato, Y; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Tomura, T; Ueno, K; Yokozawa, T; Wendell, R A; Irvine, T; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Lee, K P; Nishimura, Y; Okumura, K; McLachlan, T; Labarga, L; Berkman, S; Tanaka, H A; Tobayama, S; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhabar, M; Bays, K; Carminati, G; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Akiri, T; Himmel, A; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Bronner, C; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Ieki, K; Ikeda, M; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Takahashi, S; Fukuda, Y; Choi, K; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Mijakowski, P; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Yano, T; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Martens, K; Marti, Ll; Vagins, M R; Martin, J F; de Perio, P; Konaka, A; Wilking, M J; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Wilkes, R J

    2014-03-01

    We report an indication that the elastic scattering rate of solar B8 neutrinos with electrons in the Super-Kamiokande detector is larger when the neutrinos pass through Earth during nighttime. We determine the day-night asymmetry, defined as the difference of the average day rate and average night rate divided by the average of those two rates, to be [-3.2 ± 1.1(stat) ± 0.5(syst)]%, which deviates from zero by 2.7 σ. Since the elastic scattering process is mostly sensitive to electron-flavored solar neutrinos, a nonzero day-night asymmetry implies that the flavor oscillations of solar neutrinos are affected by the presence of matter within the neutrinos' flight path. Super-Kamiokande's day-night asymmetry is consistent with neutrino oscillations for 4 × 10(-5)  eV(2) ≤ Δm 2(21) ≤ 7 × 10(-5) eV(2) and large mixing values of θ12, at the 68% C.L. PMID:24655245

  16. Supernova neutrino halo and the suppression of self-induced flavor conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikas, Srdjan; Tamborra, Irene; Raffelt, Georg; Hüdepohl, Lorenz; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Neutrinos streaming from a supernova core occasionally scatter in the envelope, producing a small “neutrino halo” with a much broader angle distribution than the primary flux originating directly from the core. Cherry et al. have recently pointed out that, during the accretion phase, the halo actually dominates neutrino-neutrino refraction at distances exceeding some 100 km. However, the multiangle matter effect (which increases if the angle distribution is broader) still appears to suppress self-induced flavor conversion during the accretion phase.

  17. Pairing effects on neutrino transport in low-density stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrello, S.; Colonna, M.; Matera, F.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the impact of pairing correlations on neutrino transport in stellar matter. Our analysis is extended to nuclear matter conditions where large density fluctuations may develop, associated with the onset of the liquid-vapor phase transition, and where clustering phenomena occur. Within a thermodynamical treatment, we show that at moderate temperatures, where pairing effects are still active, the scattering of neutrinos in the nuclear medium is significantly affected by pairing correlations, which increase the neutrino trapping, thus modifying the cooling mechanism, by neutrino emission, of protoneutron stars.

  18. Asymmetric neutrino production in magnetized proto-neutron stars in fully relativistic mean-field approach

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Hidaka, Jun; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Kuroda, Takami; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ryu, Chung-Yeol; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-02

    We calculate the neutrino production cross-section in the proto-neutron-star matter under a strong magnetic field in the relativistic mean-field approach. We introduce a new parameter-set which can reproduce the 1.96 solar mass neutron star. We find that the production process increases emitted neutrinos along the direction parallel to the magnetic field and decrease those along its opposite direction. It means that resultant asymmetry due to the neutrino absorption and scattering process in the magnetic field becomes larger by the addition of the neutrino production process.

  19. Astroparticle physics with solar neutrinos

    PubMed Central

    NAKAHATA, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Solar neutrino experiments observed fluxes smaller than the expectations from the standard solar model. This discrepancy is known as the “solar neutrino problem”. Flux measurements by Super-Kamiokande and SNO have demonstrated that the solar neutrino problem is due to neutrino oscillations. Combining the results of all solar neutrino experiments, parameters for solar neutrino oscillations are obtained. Correcting for the effect of neutrino oscillations, the observed neutrino fluxes are consistent with the prediction from the standard solar model. In this article, results of solar neutrino experiments are reviewed with detailed descriptions of what Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande have contributed to the history of astroparticle physics with solar neutrino measurements. PMID:21558758

  20. Astroparticle physics with solar neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Nakahata, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Solar neutrino experiments observed fluxes smaller than the expectations from the standard solar model. This discrepancy is known as the "solar neutrino problem". Flux measurements by Super-Kamiokande and SNO have demonstrated that the solar neutrino problem is due to neutrino oscillations. Combining the results of all solar neutrino experiments, parameters for solar neutrino oscillations are obtained. Correcting for the effect of neutrino oscillations, the observed neutrino fluxes are consistent with the prediction from the standard solar model. In this article, results of solar neutrino experiments are reviewed with detailed descriptions of what Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande have contributed to the history of astroparticle physics with solar neutrino measurements. (Communicated by Toshimitsu Yamazaki, M.J.A.).

  1. Cosmological bounds on dark-matter-neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mangano, Gianpiero; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2006-08-15

    We investigate the cosmological effects of a neutrino interaction with cold dark-matter. We postulate a neutrino that interacts with a ''neutrino-interacting dark-matter'' (NIDM) particle with an elastic-scattering cross section that either decreases with temperature as T{sup 2} or remains constant with temperature. The neutrino-dark-matter interaction results in a neutrino-dark-matter fluid with pressure, and this pressure results in diffusion-damped oscillations in the matter power spectrum, analogous to the acoustic oscillations in the baryon-photon fluid. We discuss the bounds from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey on the NIDM opacity (ratio of cross section to NIDM-particle mass) and compare with the constraint from observation of neutrinos from supernova 1987A. If only a fraction of the dark matter interacts with neutrinos, then NIDM oscillations may affect current cosmological constraints from measurements of galaxy clustering. We discuss how detection of NIDM oscillations would suggest a particle-antiparticle asymmetry in the dark-matter sector.

  2. Neutrino flavor transformation in the lepton-asymmetric universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Lucas; Mina, Mattia; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Paris, Mark W.; Fuller, George M.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate neutrino flavor transformation in the early Universe in the presence of a lepton asymmetry, focusing on a two-flavor system with 1-3 mixing parameters. We identify five distinct regimes that emerge in an approximate treatment neglecting collisions as the initial lepton asymmetry at high temperature is varied from values comparable to current constraints on the lepton number down to values at which the neutrino-neutrino forward-scattering potential is negligible. The characteristic phenomena occurring in these regimes are (1) large synchronized oscillations, (2) minimal flavor transformation, (3) asymmetric (ν - or ν ¯-only) MSW, (4) partial MSW, and (5) symmetric MSW. We examine our numerical results in the framework of adiabaticity, and we illustrate how they are modified by collisional damping. Finally, we point out the existence of matter-neutrino resonances in the early Universe and show that they suffer from nonadiabaticity.

  3. Sneutrino dark matter in gauged inverse seesaw models for neutrinos.

    PubMed

    An, Haipeng; Dev, P S Bhupal; Cai, Yi; Mohapatra, R N

    2012-02-24

    Extending the minimal supersymmetric standard model to explain small neutrino masses via the inverse seesaw mechanism can lead to a new light supersymmetric scalar partner which can play the role of inelastic dark matter (IDM). It is a linear combination of the superpartners of the neutral fermions in the theory (the light left-handed neutrino and two heavy standard model singlet neutrinos) which can be very light with mass in ~5-20 GeV range, as suggested by some current direct detection experiments. The IDM in this class of models has keV-scale mass splitting, which is intimately connected to the small Majorana masses of neutrinos. We predict the differential scattering rate and annual modulation of the IDM signal which can be testable at future germanium- and xenon-based detectors.

  4. Neutrino flavor transformation in the lepton-asymmetric universe

    DOE PAGES

    Johns, Lucas Andrew; Mina, Mattia; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Paris, Mark W.; Fuller, George M.

    2016-10-04

    We investigate neutrino flavor transformation in the early Universe in the presence of a lepton asymmetry, focusing on a two-flavor system with 1–3 mixing parameters. We identify five distinct regimes that emerge in an approximate treatment neglecting collisions as the initial lepton asymmetry at high temperature is varied from values comparable to current constraints on the lepton number down to values at which the neutrino-neutrino forward-scattering potential is negligible. The characteristic phenomena occurring in these regimes are (1) large synchronized oscillations, (2) minimal flavor transformation, (3) asymmetric (ν- or ν¯-only) MSW, (4) partial MSW, and (5) symmetric MSW. We examinemore » our numerical results in the framework of adiabaticity, and we illustrate how they are modified by collisional damping. Lastly, we point out the existence of matter-neutrino resonances in the early Universe and show that they suffer from nonadiabaticity.« less

  5. The GENIE Neutrino Monte Carlo Generator: Physics and User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Andreopoulos, Costas; Barry, Christopher; Dytman, Steve; Gallagher, Hugh; Golan, Tomasz; Hatcher, Robert; Perdue, Gabriel; Yarba, Julia

    2015-10-20

    GENIE is a suite of products for the experimental neutrino physics community. This suite includes i) a modern software framework for implementing neutrino event generators, a state-of-the-art comprehensive physics model and tools to support neutrino interaction simulation for realistic experimental setups (the Generator product), ii) extensive archives of neutrino, charged-lepton and hadron scattering data and software to produce a comprehensive set of data/MC comparisons (the Comparisons product), and iii) a generator tuning framework and fitting applications (the Tuning product). This book provides the definite guide for the GENIE Generator: It presents the software architecture and a detailed description of its physics model and official tunes. In addition, it provides a rich set of data/MC comparisons that characterise the physics performance of GENIE. Detailed step-by-step instructions on how to install and configure the Generator, run its applications and analyze its outputs are also included.

  6. Neutrino-neutrino interactions in a supernova and their effect on neutrino flavor conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Dighe, Amol

    2011-11-23

    The neutrino-neutrino interactions inside a supernova core give rise to nonlinear collective effects that significantly influence the neutrino flavor conversions inside the star. I shall describe these interactions, the new oscillation phenomena they generate, and their effect on the neutrino fluxes arriving at the earth.

  7. Deuterium target data for precision neutrino-nucleus cross sections

    DOE PAGES

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Betancourt, Minerba; Gran, Richard; Hill, Richard J.

    2016-06-23

    Amplitudes derived from scattering data on elementary targets are basic inputs to neutrino-nucleus cross section predictions. A prominent example is the isovector axial nucleon form factor, FA(q2), which controls charged current signal processes at accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments. Previous extractions of FA from neutrino-deuteron scattering data rely on a dipole shape assumption that introduces an unquantified error. A new analysis of world data for neutrino-deuteron scattering is performed using a model-independent, and systematically improvable, representation of FA. A complete error budget for the nucleon isovector axial radius leads to rA2 = 0.46(22)fm2, with a much larger uncertainty than determined inmore » the original analyses. The quasielastic neutrino-neutron cross section is determined as σ(νμn → μ-p)|Ev=1GeV = 10.1(0.9)×10-39cm2. The propagation of nucleon-level constraints and uncertainties to nuclear cross sections is illustrated using MINERvA data and the GENIE event generator. Furthermore, these techniques can be readily extended to other amplitudes and processes.« less

  8. Determining neutrino oscillation parameters from atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of IceCube DeepCore data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Brunner, J.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Clevermann, F.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Eichmann, B.; Eisch, J.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallen, P.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hellwig, D.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Jagielski, K.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jlelati, O.; Jurkovic, M.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Koob, A.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kriesten, A.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larsen, D. T.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Paul, L.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Rees, I.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallraff, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wichary, C.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    We present a measurement of neutrino oscillations via atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of data of the completed IceCube neutrino detector. DeepCore, a region of denser IceCube instrumentation, enables the detection and reconstruction of atmospheric muon neutrinos between 10 and 100 GeV, where a strong disappearance signal is expected. The IceCube detector volume surrounding DeepCore is used as a veto region to suppress the atmospheric muon background. Neutrino events are selected where the detected Cherenkov photons of the secondary particles minimally scatter, and the neutrino energy and arrival direction are reconstructed. Both variables are used to obtain the neutrino oscillation parameters from the data, with the best fit given by Δ m322=2.72-0.20+0.19×10-3 eV2 and sin2θ23=0.53-0.12+0.09 (normal mass ordering assumed). The results are compatible, and comparable in precision, to those of dedicated oscillation experiments.

  9. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  10. Active-sterile neutrino oscillations in the early Universe with full collision terms

    SciTech Connect

    Hannestad, Steen; Hansen, Rasmus Sloth; Tram, Thomas; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: rshansen@phys.au.dk E-mail: yvonne.y.wong@unsw.edu.au

    2015-08-01

    Sterile neutrinos are thermalised in the early Universe via oscillations with the active neutrinos for certain mixing parameters. The most detailed calculation of this thermalisation process involves the solution of the momentum-dependent quantum kinetic equations, which track the evolution of the neutrino phase space distributions. Until now the collision terms in the quantum kinetic equations have always been approximated using equilibrium distributions, but this approximation has never been checked numerically. In this work we revisit the sterile neutrino thermalisation calculation using the full collision term, and compare the results with various existing approximations in the literature. We find a better agreement than would naively be expected, but also identify some issues with these approximations that have not been appreciated previously. These include an unphysical production of neutrinos via scattering and the importance of redistributing momentum through scattering, as well as details of Pauli blocking. Finally, we devise a new approximation scheme, which improves upon some of the shortcomings of previous schemes.

  11. Active-sterile neutrino oscillations in the early Universe with full collision terms

    SciTech Connect

    Hannestad, Steen; Hansen, Rasmus Sloth; Tram, Thomas; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y.

    2015-08-11

    Sterile neutrinos are thermalised in the early Universe via oscillations with the active neutrinos for certain mixing parameters. The most detailed calculation of this thermalisation process involves the solution of the momentum-dependent quantum kinetic equations, which track the evolution of the neutrino phase space distributions. Until now the collision terms in the quantum kinetic equations have always been approximated using equilibrium distributions, but this approximation has never been checked numerically. In this work we revisit the sterile neutrino thermalisation calculation using the full collision term, and compare the results with various existing approximations in the literature. We find a better agreement than would naively be expected, but also identify some issues with these approximations that have not been appreciated previously. These include an unphysical production of neutrinos via scattering and the importance of redistributing momentum through scattering, as well as details of Pauli blocking. Finally, we devise a new approximation scheme, which improves upon some of the shortcomings of previous schemes.

  12. Sensitivity of low energy neutrino experiments to physics beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco, J.; Miranda, O. G.; Rashba, T. I.

    2007-10-01

    We study the sensitivity of future low energy neutrino experiments to extra neutral gauge bosons, leptoquarks, and R-parity breaking interactions. We focus on future proposals to measure coherent neutrino-nuclei scattering and neutrino-electron elastic scattering. We introduce a new comparative analysis between these experiments and show that in different types of new physics it is possible to obtain competitive bounds to those of present and future collider experiments. For the cases of leptoquarks and R-parity breaking interactions we found that the expected sensitivity for most of the future low energy experimental setups is better than the current constraints.

  13. First Measurements of Inclusive Muon Neutrino Charged Current Differential Cross Sections on Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C.; Antonello, M.; Baller, B.; Bolton, T.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; Church, E.; Edmunds, D.; Ereditato, A.; Farooq, S.; Fleming, B.; Greenlee, H.; Guenette, R.; Haug, S.; Horton-Smith, G.; James, C.; Klein, E.; Lang, K.; Laurens, P.; Linden, S.; McKee, D.; Mehdiyev, R.; Page, B.; Palamara, O.; Partyka, K.; Patch, A.; Rameika, G.; Rebel, B.; Rossi, B.; Soderberg, M.; Spitz, J.; Szelc, A. M.; Weber, M.; Yang, T.; Zeller, G.

    2012-04-01

    The ArgoNeuT Collaboration presents the first measurements of inclusive muon neutrino charged current differential cross sections on argon. Obtained in the NuMI neutrino beam line at Fermilab, the flux-integrated results are reported in terms of outgoing muon angle and momentum. The data are consistent with the Monte Carlo expectation across the full range of kinematics sampled, 0°<θμ<36° and 0neutrino detection, the measurements allow tests of low-energy neutrino scattering models important for interpreting results from long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments designed to investigate CP violation and the orientation of the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  14. First measurements of inclusive muon neutrino charged current differential cross sections on argon.

    PubMed

    Anderson, C; Antonello, M; Baller, B; Bolton, T; Bromberg, C; Cavanna, F; Church, E; Edmunds, D; Ereditato, A; Farooq, S; Fleming, B; Greenlee, H; Guenette, R; Haug, S; Horton-Smith, G; James, C; Klein, E; Lang, K; Laurens, P; Linden, S; McKee, D; Mehdiyev, R; Page, B; Palamara, O; Partyka, K; Patch, A; Rameika, G; Rebel, B; Rossi, B; Soderberg, M; Spitz, J; Szelc, A M; Weber, M; Yang, T; Zeller, G

    2012-04-20

    The ArgoNeuT Collaboration presents the first measurements of inclusive muon neutrino charged current differential cross sections on argon. Obtained in the NuMI neutrino beam line at Fermilab, the flux-integrated results are reported in terms of outgoing muon angle and momentum. The data are consistent with the Monte Carlo expectation across the full range of kinematics sampled, 0°<θ(μ)<36° and 0neutrino detection, the measurements allow tests of low-energy neutrino scattering models important for interpreting results from long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments designed to investigate CP violation and the orientation of the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  15. The solar neutrino puzzle and the vL --> vR conversion hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, R.; Fiorentini, G.

    As a possible explanation of the solar neutrino puzzle, several authors have invoked a neutrino helicity rotation (vL --> vR) in the solar magnetic field, coupled to a neutrino magnetic moment. We discuss: (i) the effect on the vL --> vR conversion probability of the different coherent interaction with matter of the two neutrino helicity states; (ii) the azimuthal asymmetry in the elastic v-e scattering of solar neutrinos, due to the interference between the weak and the electromagnetic amplitude. We also briefly comment on the theoretical problem posed by a neutrino magnetic moment as large as 10-10μB. Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, Italy.

  16. Neutrinos from neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    A calculation of the flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from galactic neutron stars is presented. The calculation is used to determine the number of point sources detectable at the sensitivity threshold of a proposed deep underwater muon and neutrino detector array. The detector array would have a point source detection threshold of about 100 eV/sq cm-sec. Analysis of neutrino luminosities and the number of detectable sources suggests that the deep underwater detector may make a few discoveries. In particular, a suspected neutron star in the Cyg X-3 source seems a promising target for the deep underwater array.

  17. Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. Don Lincoln

    2016-07-12

    The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

  18. Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Don Lincoln

    2013-07-11

    The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

  19. Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

  20. Hidden Glashow resonance in neutrino-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikhanov, I.

    2016-05-01

    Today it is widely believed that s-channel excitation of an on-shell W boson, commonly known as the Glashow resonance, can be initiated in matter only by the electron antineutrino in the process νbaree- →W- at the laboratory energy around 6.3 PeV. In this Letter we argue that the Glashow resonance within the Standard Model also occurs in neutrino-nucleus collisions. The main conclusions are as follows. 1) The Glashow resonance can be excited by both neutrinos and antineutrinos of all the three flavors scattering in the Coulomb field of a nucleus. 2) The Glashow resonance in a neutrino-nucleus reaction does not manifest itself as a Breit-Wigner-like peak in the cross section but the latter exhibits instead a slow logarithmic-law growth with the neutrino energy. The resonance turns thus out to be hidden. 3) More than 98% of W bosons produced in the sub-PeV region in neutrino-initiated reactions in water/ice will be from the Glashow resonance. 4) The vast majority of the Glashow resonance events in a neutrino detector are expected at energies from a few TeV to a few tens of TeV, being mostly initiated by the conventional atmospheric neutrinos dominant in this energy range. Calculations of the cross sections for Glashow resonance excitation on the oxygen nucleus as well as on the proton are carried out in detail. The results of this Letter can be useful for studies of neutrino interactions at large volume water/ice neutrino detectors. For example, in the IceCube detector one can expect 0.3 Glashow resonance events with shower-like topologies and the deposited energies above 300 TeV per year. It is therefore likely already to have at least one Glashow resonance event in the IceCube data set.

  1. Collaborative Research: Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Hot Dense Matter

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Gail; Schaefer, Thomas

    2015-05-31

    The major accomplishments of the research activity at NC State during the five years were: to determine the effects and signatures of turbulence in supernova, to calculate r-process and supernova nucleosynthesis, and to determine the neutrino scattering and flavor transformation that occurs in black hole accretion disks. This report goes into more detail on them.

  2. Detecting the Neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arns, Robert G.

    In 1930 Wolfgang Pauli suggested that a new particle might be required to make sense of the radioactive-disintegration mode known as beta decay. This conjecture initially seemed impossible to verify since the new particle, which became known as the neutrino, was uncharged, had zero or small mass, and interacted only insignificantly with other matter. In 1951 Frederick Reines and Clyde L. Cowan, Jr., of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory undertook the difficult task of detecting the free neutrino by observing its inverse beta-decay interaction with matter. They succeeded in 1956. The neutrino was accepted rapidly as a fundamental particle despite discrepancies in reported details of the experiments and despite the absence of independent verification of the result. This paper describes the experiments, examines the nature of the discrepancies, and discusses the circumstances of the acceptance of the neutrino's detection by the physics community.

  3. Light sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariazzo, S.; Giunti, C.; Laveder, M.; Li, Y. F.; Zavanin, E. M.

    2015-03-01

    The theory and phenomenology of light sterile neutrinos at the eV mass scale is reviewed. The reactor, gallium and Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector anomalies are briefly described and interpreted as indications of the existence of short-baseline oscillations which require the existence of light sterile neutrinos. The global fits of short-baseline oscillation data in 3 + 1 and 3 + 2 schemes are discussed, together with the implications for β-decay and neutrinoless double-β decay. The cosmological effects of light sterile neutrinos are briefly reviewed and the implications of existing cosmological data are discussed. The review concludes with a summary of future perspectives. This review is dedicated to the memory of Hai-Wei Long, our dear friend and collaborator, who passed away on 29 May 2015. He was an exceptionally kind person and an enthusiastic physicist. We deeply miss him.

  4. Light sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariazzo, S.; Giunti, C.; Laveder, M.; Li, Y. F.; Zavanin, E. M.

    2016-03-01

    The theory and phenomenology of light sterile neutrinos at the eV mass scale is reviewed. The reactor, gallium and Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector anomalies are briefly described and interpreted as indications of the existence of short-baseline oscillations which require the existence of light sterile neutrinos. The global fits of short-baseline oscillation data in 3 + 1 and 3 + 2 schemes are discussed, together with the implications for β-decay and neutrinoless double-β decay. The cosmological effects of light sterile neutrinos are briefly reviewed and the implications of existing cosmological data are discussed. The review concludes with a summary of future perspectives. This review is dedicated to the memory of Hai-Wei Long, our dear friend and collaborator, who passed away on 29 May 2015. He was an exceptionally kind person and an enthusiastic physicist. We deeply miss him.

  5. Neutrinos in Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Sacha

    2008-02-21

    Neutrinos can contribute to various episodes of the evolution of the Universe. For instance, in the seesaw model, they may generate the baryon asymmetry of the Universe via leptogenesis. This conference proceedings briefly reviews lepton flavour effects in thermal leptogenesis.

  6. ICFA neutrino panel report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, K.

    2015-07-01

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: "To promote international cooperation in the development of the accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation program and to promote international collaboration in the development of a neutrino factory as a future intense source of neutrinos for particle physics experiments." In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel's findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel's initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  7. ICFA neutrino panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.

    2015-07-15

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: <<neutrino-oscillation program and to promote international collaboration in the development of a neutrino factory as a future intense source of neutrinos for particle physics experiments. >>>In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel’s findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel’s initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  8. Ultrahigh energy neutrino interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domokos, G.; Elliot, B.; Kovesi-Domokos, S.; Mrenna, S.

    1990-03-01

    Ultrahigh energy neutrinos are valuable probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. Neutrinos of the highest energies are emitted by point sources in the sky. We review briefly the predictions of the Standard Model concerning neutrino interactions. We further argue that a number of preon models designed to overcome some difficulties of the Standard Model leads to a blurring of the distinction between leptons and quarks. As a consequence, at sufficiently high energies neutrinos acquire ``anomalous'' interactions. While this phenomenon can probably explain the observed muon excess in extensive air showers (EAS), it can be also tested by studying the absorption of the primaries on the cosmic microwave background. We discuss some observations to be performed in the search of such ``new physics'' beyond the Standard Model.

  9. WMAPping out neutrino masses

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Aaron; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-10-28

    Recent data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) place important bounds on the neutrino sector. The precise determination of the baryon number in the universe puts a strong constraint on the number of relativistic species during Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis. WMAP data, when combined with the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), also directly constrain the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. These results impinge upon a neutrino oscillation interpretation of the result from the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND).We also note that the Heidelberg-Moscow evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay is only consistent with the WMAP+2dFGRS data for the largest values of the nuclear matrix element.

  10. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Lucía; Romero, Ismael; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two- and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of these particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width.

  11. Neutrinos from GRBs cannonballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, J. R.; Ferry, S.

    We present a new estimation of the production of prompt neutrinos in the Cannonball Model of Gamma Ray Bursts proposed by Dar and De Rújula. Interactions between nucleons in the cannonballs and nucleons in the supernova shell are calculated in the rest frame of the shocked matter produced by these interactions. We explore the neutrino yield as a function of the parameters of the model.

  12. First Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Anderson, C.E.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; /Yale U. /Columbia U.

    2010-02-01

    A high-statistics sample of charged-current muon neutrino scattering events collected with the MiniBooNE experiment is analyzed to extract the first measurement of the double differential cross section (d{sup 2}{sigma}/dT{sub {mu}}d cos {theta}{sub {mu}}) for charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering on carbon. This result features minimal model dependence and provides the most complete information on this process to date. With the assumption of CCQE scattering, the absolute cross section as a function of neutrino energy ({sigma}[E{sub {nu}}]) and the single differential cross section (d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}) are extracted to facilitate comparison with previous measurements. These quantities may be used to characterize an effective axial-vector form factor of the nucleon and to improve the modeling of low-energy neutrino interactions on nuclear targets. The results are relevant for experiments searching for neutrino oscillations.

  13. First measurement of the muon neutrino charged current quasielastic double differential cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Anderson, C. E.; Curioni, A.; Fleming, B. T.; Linden, S. K.; Soderberg, M.; Spitz, J.; Bazarko, A. O.; Laird, E. M.; Meyers, P. D.; Patterson, R. B.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Tanaka, H. A.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Finley, D. A.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Kasper, P.; Kobilarcik, T.

    2010-05-01

    A high-statistics sample of charged-current muon neutrino scattering events collected with the MiniBooNE experiment is analyzed to extract the first measurement of the double differential cross section ((d{sup 2{sigma}}/dT{sub {mu}d}cos{theta}{sub {mu}})) for charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering on carbon. This result features minimal model dependence and provides the most complete information on this process to date. With the assumption of CCQE scattering, the absolute cross section as a function of neutrino energy ({sigma}[E{sub {nu}}]) and the single differential cross section ((d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2})) are extracted to facilitate comparison with previous measurements. These quantities may be used to characterize an effective axial-vector form factor of the nucleon and to improve the modeling of low-energy neutrino interactions on nuclear targets. The results are relevant for experiments searching for neutrino oscillations.

  14. Neutrino experiments: Hierarchy, CP, CPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manmohan; Randhawa, Monika; Singh, Mandip

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of our recent investigations regarding the prospects of ongoing neutrino experiments as well as future experiments in determining few of the most important unknowns in the field of neutrino physics, specifically the neutrino mass ordering and leptonic CP-violation phase. The effect of matter oscillations on the neutrino oscillation probabilities has been exploited in resolving the degeneracy between the neutrino mass ordering and the CP violation phase in the leptonic sector. Further, we estimate the extent of extrinsic CP and CPT violation in the experiments with superbeams as well as neutrino factories.

  15. Neutrino Detectors: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2011-10-06

    This paper covers possible detector options suitable at future neutrino facilities, such as Neutrino Factories, Super Beams and Beta Beams. The Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND), which is the baseline detector at a Neutrino Factory, will be described and a new analysis which improves the efficiency of this detector at low energies will be shown. Other detectors covered include the Totally Active Scintillating Detectors (TASD), particularly relevant for a low energy Neutrino Factory, emulsion detectors for tau detection, liquid argon detectors and megaton scale water Cherenkov detectors. Finally the requirements of near detectors for long-baseline neutrino experiments will be demonstrated.

  16. Electromagnetic properties of massive neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrynina, A. A. Mikheev, N. V.; Narynskaya, E. N.

    2013-10-15

    The vertex function for a virtual massive neutrino is calculated in the limit of soft real photons. A method based on employing the neutrino self-energy operator in a weak external electromagnetic field in the approximation linear in the field is developed in order to render this calculation of the vertex function convenient. It is shown that the electric charge and the electric dipole moment of the real neutrino are zero; only the magnetic moment is nonzero for massive neutrinos. A fourth-generation heavy neutrino of mass not less than half of the Z-boson mass is considered as a massive neutrino.

  17. Neutrinos beyond the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Valle, J.W.F.

    1989-08-01

    I review some basic aspects of neutrino physics beyond the Standard Model such as neutrino mixing and neutrino non-orthogonality, universality and CP violation in the lepton sector, total lepton number and lepton flavor violation, etc.. These may lead to neutrino decays and oscillations, exotic weak decay processes, neutrinoless double /beta/ decay, etc.. Particle physics models are discussed where some of these processes can be sizable even in the absence of measurable neutrino masses. These may also substantially affect the propagation properties of solar and astrophysical neutrinos. 39 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Nonthermal cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We point out that, for Dirac neutrinos, in addition to the standard thermal cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ), there could also exist a nonthermal neutrino background with comparable number density. As the right-handed components are essentially decoupled from the thermal bath of standard model particles, relic neutrinos with a nonthermal distribution may exist until today. The relic density of the nonthermal (nt) background can be constrained by the usual observational bounds on the effective number of massless degrees of freedom Neff and can be as large as nν nt≲0.5 nγ. In particular, Neff can be larger than 3.046 in the absence of any exotic states. Nonthermal relic neutrinos constitute an irreducible contribution to the detection of the C ν B and, hence, may be discovered by future experiments such as PTOLEMY. We also present a scenario of chaotic inflation in which a nonthermal background can naturally be generated by inflationary preheating. The nonthermal relic neutrinos, thus, may constitute a novel window into the very early Universe.

  19. Trapped ionic simulation of neutrino electromagnetic properties in neutrino oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. S.; Cai, Xiaoya; Pan, Hui

    2015-11-01

    We present an approach to study neutrino electromagnetic properties by simulating neutrino oscillation in both dense background matter and external electromagnetic field in terms of trapped coupling ions. We find that the neutrino and anti-neutrino productions can be simulated by using large enough diagonal matter potentials and external magnetic field. We further show that the transition probabilities of flavor neutrino have rich features and time scales corresponding to the neutrino magnetic moments and electric millicharges. Especially, such features and scales can be achieved by tuning the laser parameters. At last, we show that the millicharge and magnetic moments can be detected in terms of flavor neutrino transition probabilities in the trapped ion system. Our approach provides a useful clue to measure the neutrino electromagnetic properties for experimental realization.

  20. Tau neutrinos favored over sterile neutrinos in atmospheric muon neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, S; Fukuda, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Sakurai, N; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Toshito, T; Totsuka, Y; Yamada, S; Earl, M; Habig, A; Kearns, E; Messier, M D; Scholberg, K; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Goldhaber, M; Barszczak, T; Casper, D; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Price, L R; Smy, M; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Keig, W E; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Takemori, D

    2000-11-01

    The previously published atmospheric neutrino data did not distinguish whether muon neutrinos were oscillating into tau neutrinos or sterile neutrinos, as both hypotheses fit the data. Using data recorded in 1100 live days of the Super-Kamiokande detector, we use three complementary data samples to study the difference in zenith angle distribution due to neutral currents and matter effects. We find no evidence favoring sterile neutrinos, and reject the hypothesis at the 99% confidence level. On the other hand, we find that oscillation between muon and tau neutrinos suffices to explain all the results in hand.

  1. No-neutrino double beta decay: more than one neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Interference effects between light and heavy Majorana neutrinos in the amplitude for no-neutrino double beta decay are discussed. The effects include an upper bound on the heavy neutrino mass, and an A dependence for the effective mass extracted from double beta decay. Thus the search for the no-neutrino decay mode should be pursued in several nuclei, and particularly in Ca/sup 48/, where the effective mass may be quite large.

  2. Atmospheric neutrinos in ice and measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Giordano, Gerardo; Mocioiu, Irina; Mena, Olga

    2010-11-01

    The main goal of the IceCube Deep Core array is to search for neutrinos of astrophysical origins. Atmospheric neutrinos are commonly considered as a background for these searches. We show that the very high statistics atmospheric neutrino data can be used to obtain precise measurements of the main oscillation parameters.

  3. Secondary atmospheric tau neutrino production

    SciTech Connect

    Bulmahn, Alexander; Hall Reno, Mary

    2010-09-01

    We evaluate the flux of tau neutrinos produced from the decay of pair produced taus from incident muons using a cascade equation analysis. To solve the cascade equations, our numerical result for the tau production Z moment is given. Our results for the flux of tau neutrinos produced from incident muons are compared to the flux of tau neutrinos produced via oscillations and the direct prompt atmospheric tau neutrino flux. Results are given for both downward and upward going neutrinos fluxes and higher zenith angles are discussed. We conclude that the direct prompt atmospheric tau neutrino flux dominates these other atmospheric sources of tau neutrinos for neutrino energies larger than a few TeV for upward fluxes, and over a wider range of energy for downward fluxes.

  4. Hadronization processes in neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei; Mandalia, Shivesh

    2015-10-15

    Next generation neutrino oscillation experiments utilize details of hadronic final states to improve the precision of neutrino interaction measurements. The hadronic system was often neglected or poorly modelled in the past, but they have significant effects on high precision neutrino oscillation and cross-section measurements. Among the physics of hadronic systems in neutrino interactions, the hadronization model controls multiplicities and kinematics of final state hadrons from the primary interaction vertex. For relatively high invariant mass events, many neutrino experiments rely on the PYTHIA program. Here, we show a possible improvement of this process in neutrino event generators, by utilizing expertise from the HERMES experiment. Finally, we estimate the impact on the systematics of hadronization models for neutrino mass hierarchy analysis using atmospheric neutrinos such as the PINGU experiment.

  5. Results from Neutrino Oscillations Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis

    2010-09-10

    The interpretation of the results of early solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments in terms of neutrino oscillations has been verified by several recent experiments using both, natural and man-made sources. The observations provide compelling evidence in favor of the existence of neutrino masses and mixings. These proceedings give a general description of the results from neutrino oscillation experiments, the current status of the field, and some possible future developments.

  6. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhi-zhong

    2010-06-01

    I give a theoretical overview of some basic properties of massive neutrinos in these lectures. Particular attention is paid to the origin of neutrino masses, the pattern of lepton flavor mixing, the feature of leptonic CP violation and the electromagnetic properties of massive neutrinos. I highlight the TeV seesaw mechanisms as a possible bridge between neutrino physics and collider physics in the era characterized by the Large Hadron Collider.

  7. A Comparison of Boltzmann and Multigroup Flux-limited Diffusion Neutrino Transport during the Postbounce Shock Reheating Phase in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, O.E.; Mezzacappa, A. |; Bruenn, S.W.; Guidry, M.W. |

    1998-11-01

    We compare Newtonian three-flavor multigroup Boltzmann (MGBT) and (Bruenn`s) multigroup flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD) neutrino transport in postbounce core-collapse supernova environments. We focus our study on quantities central to the postbounce neutrino heating mechanism for reviving the stalled shock. Stationary-state three-flavor neutrino distributions are developed in thermally and hydrodynamically frozen time slices obtained from core collapse and bounce simulations that implement Lagrangian hydrodynamics and MGFLD neutrino transport. We obtain distributions for time slices at 106 and 233 ms after core bounce for the core of a 15 {ital M}{sub {circle_dot}} progenitor, and at 156 ms after core bounce for a 25 {ital M}{sub {circle_dot}} progenitor. For both transport methods, the electron neutrino and antineutrino luminosities, rms energies, and mean inverse flux factors, all of which enter the neutrino heating rates, are computed as functions of radius and compared. The net neutrino heating rates are also computed as functions of radius and compared. Notably, we find significant differences in neutrino luminosities and mean inverse flux factors between the two transport methods for both precollapse models and for all three time slices. In each case, the luminosities for each transport method begin to diverge above the neutrinospheres, where the MGBT luminosities become larger than their MGFLD counterparts, finally settling to a constant difference maintained to the edge of the core. We find that the mean inverse flux factors, which describe the degree of forward peaking in the neutrino radiation field, also differ significantly between the two transport methods, with MGBT providing more isotropic radiation fields in the gain region. Most important, for a region above the gain radius we find net heating rates for MGBT that are as much as {approximately}2 times the corresponding MGFLD rates, and we find net cooling rates below the gain radius that are

  8. Gravitational Lensing of Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; Mocioiu, Irina; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The black hole at the center of the galaxy is a powerful lens for supernova neutrinos. In the very special circumstance of a supernova near the extended line of sight from Earth to the galactic center, lensing could dramatically enhance the neutrino flux at Earth and stretch the neutrino pulse.

  9. Neutrino sea scope takes shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2016-03-01

    A consortium of European physicists building a vast neutrino detector on the floor of the Mediterranean Sea has unveiled the science it will carry out. The Cubic Kilometre Neutrino Telescope (KM3NeT) will use strings of radiation detectors arranged in a 3D network to measure the light emitted when neutrinos very occasionally interact with the surrounding sea water.

  10. Neutrino trident production: a powerful probe of new physics with neutrino beams.

    PubMed

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Gori, Stefania; Pospelov, Maxim; Yavin, Itay

    2014-08-29

    The production of a μ+ μ- pair from the scattering of a muon neutrino off the Coulomb field of a nucleus, known as neutrino trident production, is a subweak process that has been observed in only a couple of experiments. As such, we show that it constitutes an exquisitely sensitive probe in the search for new neutral currents among leptons, putting the strongest constraints on well-motivated and well-hidden extensions of the standard model gauge group, including the one coupled to the difference of the lepton number between the muon and tau flavor, Lμ-Lτ. The new gauge boson Z', increases the rate of neutrino trident production by inducing additional (μγαμ)(νγ(α)ν) interactions, which interfere constructively with the standard model contribution. Existing experimental results put significant restrictions on the parameter space of any model coupled to muon number Lμ, and disfavor a putative resolution to the muon g-2 discrepancy via the loop of Z' for any mass mZ'≳400  MeV. The reach to the models' parameter space can be widened with future searches of the trident production at high-intensity neutrino facilities such as the LBNE. PMID:25215977

  11. Stopping power of neutrinos and antineutrinos in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustgi, M. L.; Leung, P. T.; Long, S. A. T.

    1985-01-01

    The Weinberg-Salam model is applied to quantify the energy loss of antineutrinos and neutrinos encountering polymers. The scattering cross-sectional energy due to encounters with electrons is calculated, along with the probability that an antineutrino will remain the same particle. The energy loss reaches a maximum, i.e., stopping occurs, when the probability is unity. The technique is applied to study the energy losses in kapton, a solid organic insulator used for antennas on spacecraft exposed to solar neutrinos with energies ranging from 0.5-10 MeV. The energy loss is found to be negligible.

  12. A gauge model for right handed neutrinos as dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Pinto, R. J.; Pérez-Lorenzana, A.

    2008-07-01

    We suggest a simple extension of the electroweak group, SU(2)L×U(1)Y×U(1)B-L, where the breaking of U(1)B-L symmetry provides masses for right handed neutrinos, N, at an acceptable range for them to be Dark Matter (DM). We study the contributions to Mo/ller and Bhabha scattering due to B-L neutral boson to constrain its gauge coupling. We analize N decay rates to determine the number of families that should be considered as DM candidates. The decoupling temperature between active and sterile neutrinos is also calculated.

  13. Ultraviolet background radiation and the search for decaying neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The spectrum of the observed far-ultraviolet background at high galactic latitudes is studied in order to find evidence of radiation from neutrino decay. It is concluded that at latitudes above about 20 degrees, the limit on any light scattered from interstellar dust or the limit on light from any source other than stars is of order 300 photons/sq cm sec ster A. Superficial evidence for radiation from decaying neutrinos is provided by an examination of the spectrum of the observed background at the highest galactic latitudes, although the spectrum is so uncertain that conclusions are not possible.

  14. Construction and analysis of a simplified many-body neutrino model

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, Alexander; McKellar, Bruce H.J.; Okuniewicz, Ivona

    2006-05-01

    In dense neutrino systems, such as found in the early Universe, or near a supernova core, neutrino flavor evolution is affected by coherent neutrino-neutrino scattering. It has been recently suggested that many-particle quantum entanglement effects may play an essential role in these systems, potentially invalidating the traditional description in terms of a set of single-particle evolution equations. We model the neutrino system by a system of interacting spins, following an earlier work which showed that such a spin system can in some cases be solved exactly [A. Friedland and C. Lunardini, J. High Energy Phys. 10 (2003) 043.]. We extend this work by constructing an exact analytical solution to a more general spin system, including initial states with asymmetric spin distribution and, moreover, not necessarily aligned along the same axis. Our solution exhibits a rich set of behaviors, including coherent oscillations and dephasing and a transition from the classical to quantum regimes. We argue that the classical evolution of the spin system captures the entire coherent behavior of the neutrino system, while the quantum effects in the spin system capture some, but not all, of the neutrino incoherent evolution. By comparing the spin and neutrino systems, we find no evidence for the violation of the accepted one-body description, though the argument involves some subtleties not appreciated before. The analysis in this paper may apply to other two-state systems beyond the neutrino field.

  15. Biological effects of stellar collapse neutrinos

    PubMed

    Collar, J I

    1996-02-01

    Massive stars in their final stages of collapse radiate most of their binding energy in the form of MeV neutrinos. The recoil atoms that they produce in elastic scattering off nuclei in organic tissue create radiation damage which is highly effective in the production of irreparable DNA harm, leading to cellular mutation, neoplasia, and oncogenesis. Using a conventional model of the galaxy and of the collapse mechanism, the periodicity of nearby stellar collapses and the radiation dose are calculated. The possible contribution of this process to the paleontological record of mass extinctions is examined.

  16. Probing of the neutrino magnetic moment at the level of 10{sup -22} μ{sub B} with an intense tritium source of (anti)neutrino and helium target (project)

    SciTech Connect

    Martemyanov, V.P.; Aleshin, V.I.; Tarasenko, V.G.; Tsinoev, V.G.; Sabelnikov, A.A.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Popov, V.V.; Baluev, V.V.; Golubkov, A.N.; Klevtsov, V.G.; Kuryakin, A.V.; Sitdikov, D.T.; Bogdanova, L.N.

    2015-03-15

    We present research results of the preparation project for the experimental measurement of the (anti)neutrino magnetic moment at the level of 10{sup -12} μ{sub B} using an intense tritium source of antineutrinos and a liquid helium scintillation detector. The neutrino detection in the scintillation detector is based on the scattering of neutrinos by the electrons of the helium atoms that produces fast electrons able to ionize and exciting helium atoms. The detection of the atomic radiation emitted during the relaxation process of the helium atoms and the knowledge of its parameters will allow us to conclude on the neutrino properties.

  17. Probing Late Neutrino Mass Properties With SupernovaNeutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Joseph; Goldberg, Haim; Perez, Gilad; Sarcevic, Ina

    2007-08-08

    Models of late-time neutrino mass generation contain new interactions of the cosmic background neutrinos with supernova relic neutrinos (SRNs). Exchange of an on-shell light scalar may lead to significant modification of the differential SRN flux observed at earth. We consider an Abelian U(1) model for generating neutrino masses at low scales, and show that there are cases for which the changes induced in the flux allow one to distinguish the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos, as well as the type of neutrino mass hierarchy (normal or inverted or quasi-degenerate). In some region of parameter space the determination of the absolute values of the neutrino masses is also conceivable. Measurements of the presence of these effects may be possible at the next-generation water Cerenkov detectors enriched with Gadolinium, or a 100 kton liquid argon detector.

  18. Theory for Neutrino Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations, for which Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald were awarded the 2015 Nobel prize in physics, tremendous progresses have been made in measuring the mixing angles which determine the oscillation pattern. A lot of theoretical efforts have been made to understand how neutrinos mix with each other. Present data show that in the standard parameterization of the mixing matrix, θ23 is close to π/4 and the CP violating phase is close to - π/2. In this talk I report results obtained in arXiv:1505.01932 (Phys. Lett. B750(2015)620) and arXive:1404.01560 (Chin. J. Phys.53(2015)100101) and discuss some implications for theoretical model buildings for such mixing pattern. Specific examples for neutrino mixing based on A4 family symmetry are given.

  19. Theory for Neutrino Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations, for which Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald were awarded the 2015 Nobel prize in physics, tremendous progresses have been made in measuring the mixing angles which determine the oscillation pattern. A lot of theoretical efforts have been made to understand how neutrinos mix with each other. Present data show that in the standard parameterization of the mixing matrix, θ23 is close to π/4 and the CP violating phase is close to ‑ π/2. In this talk I report results obtained in arXiv:1505.01932 (Phys. Lett. B750(2015)620) and arXive:1404.01560 (Chin. J. Phys.53(2015)100101) and discuss some implications for theoretical model buildings for such mixing pattern. Specific examples for neutrino mixing based on A4 family symmetry are given.

  20. Cosmology and neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, Gary

    1982-05-01

    Constraints on cosmology and on neutrino physics are provided by the abundances of the light elements produced during the early evolution of the universe. The predictions of primordial nucleosynthesis depend on the nucleon to photon ratio ɛ and on the number of types of two component neutrinos Nν. A comparison between the big bang predictions and the observed abundances of D, 3He, 4He and 7Li shows that ɛ is constrained to a narrow range around 4×10-10 and Nν<~4. An important consequence of the derived value of ɛ is that the universal density of nucleon is small, raising the possibility that our Universe may be dominated by massive relic neutrinos. The constraint on Nn suggests that (almost) all lepton species are now known.

  1. The Neutrino Telescope ANTARES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Juan José

    Neutrinos can reveal a brand new Universe at high energies. The ANTARES collaboration [1] , formed in 1996, works towards the building and deployment of a neutrino telescope. This detector could observe and study high energy astrophysical sources such as X-ray binary systems, young supernova remnants or Active Galactic Nuclei and help to discover or set exclusion limits on some of the elementary particles and objects that have been put forward as candidates to fill the Universe (WIMPS, neutralinos, topological deffects, Q-balls, etc). A neutrino telescope will certainly open a new observational window and can shed light on the most energetic phenomena of the Universe. A review of the progress made by the ANTARES collaboration to achieve this goal is presented

  2. Neutrino physics: Summary talk

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1989-04-01

    This paper is organized as follows: First, I describe the state of neutrino phenomenology. Emphasis is placed on sin/sup 2/ /theta//sub W/, its present status and future prospects. In addition, some signatures of ''new physics'' are described. Then, kaon physics at Fermilab is briefly discussed. I concentrate on the interesting rare decay K/sub L/ /yields/ /pi//sup 0/e/sup +/e/sup /minus// which may be a clean probe direct CP violation. Neutrino mass, mixing, and electromagnetic moments are surveyed. There, I describe the present state and future direction of accelerator based experiments. Finally, I conclude with an outlook on the future. Throughout this summary, I have drawn from and incorporated ideas discussed by other speakers at this workshop. However, I have tried to combine their ideas with my own perspective on neutrino physics and where it is headed. 49 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Studying neutrino oscillations using quasi-elastic events in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaratunga, Sujeewa Terasita

    2008-02-01

    MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search), is a long baseline neutrino experiment designed to search for neutrino oscillations using two detectors at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, IL (Near Detector) and Soudan, MN (Far Detector). It will study vμ → vτ oscillations and make a measurement on the oscillation parameters, Δm$2\\atop{23}$ and sin223, via a vμ beam made at Fermilab. Charge current neutrino interactions in the MINOS detectors are of three types: quasi-elastic scattering (QEL), resonance scattering (RES) and deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Of these, quasi-elastic scattering leaves the cleanest signal with just one μ and one proton in the final state, thus rendering the reconstruction of the neutrino energy more accurate. This thesis will outline a method to separate QEL events from the others in the two detectors and perform a calculation of Δm$2\\atop{23}$ and sin223 using those events. The period under consideration was May 2005 to February 2006. The number of observed quasi-elastic events with energies below 10 GeV was 29, where the expected number was 60 ± 3. A fit to the energy distribution of these events gives Δm$2\\atop{23}$ = 2.91$+0.49\\atop{-0.53}$(stat)$+0.08\\atop{-0.09}$(sys) x 10-3 eV2 and sin223 = 0.990-0.180(stat)-0.030(sys).

  4. Atmospheric neutrinos: Status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Sandhya

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of the current status of neutrino oscillation studies at atmospheric neutrino experiments. While the current data gives some tantalising hints regarding the neutrino mass hierarchy, octant of θ23 and δCP, the hints are not statistically significant. We summarise the sensitivity to these sub-dominant three-generation effects from the next-generation proposed atmospheric neutrino experiments. We next present the prospects of new physics searches such as non-standard interactions, sterile neutrinos and CPT violation studies at these experiments.

  5. Are neutrinos their own antiparticles?

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Boris; /Fermilab

    2009-03-01

    We explain the relationship between Majorana neutrinos, which are their own antiparticles, and Majorana neutrino masses. We point out that Majorana masses would make the neutrinos very distinctive particles, and explain why many theorists strongly suspect that neutrinos do have Majorana masses. The promising approach to confirming this suspicion is to seek neutrinoless double beta decay. We introduce a toy model that illustrates why this decay requires nonzero neutrino masses, even when there are both right-handed and left-handed weak currents.

  6. Solar Neutrinos. II. Experimental

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, Raymond Jr.

    1964-01-01

    A method is described for observing solar neutrinos from the reaction Cl{sup 37}(nu,e{sup -})Ar{sup 37} in C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}. Two 5 00-gal tanks of C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4} were placed in a limestone mine (1800 m.w.e.) and the resulting Ar{sup 37} activity induced by cosmic mesons( mu ) was measured to determine the necessary conditions for solar neutrino observations. (R.E.U.)

  7. Sterile Neutrino Search with MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Devan, Alena V.

    2015-08-01

    MINOS, Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in the NuMI muon neutrino beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL. It consists of two detectors, a near detector positioned 1 km from the source of the beam and a far detector 734 km away in Minnesota. MINOS is primarily designed to observe muon neutrino disappearance resulting from three flavor oscillations. The Standard Model of Particle Physics predicts that neutrinos oscillate between three active flavors as they propagate through space. This means that a muon-type neutrino has a certain probability to later interact as a different type of neutrino. In the standard picture, the neutrino oscillation probabilities depend only on three neutrino flavors and two mass splittings, Δm2. An anomaly was observed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments that suggests the existence of a fourth, sterile neutrino flavor that does not interact through any of the known Standard Model interactions. Oscillations into a theoretical sterile flavor may be observed by a deficit in neutral current interactions in the MINOS detectors. A distortion in the charged current energy spectrum might also be visible if oscillations into the sterile flavor are driven by a large mass-squared difference, ms2 ~ 1 eV2. The results of the 2013 sterile neutrino search are presented here.

  8. Experimental data on solar neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludhova, Livia

    2016-04-01

    Neutrino physics continues to be a very active research field, full of opened fundamental questions reaching even beyond the Standard Model of elementary particles and towards a possible new physics. Solar neutrinos have played a fundamental historical role in the discovery of the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations and thus non-zero neutrino mass. Even today, the study of solar neutrinos provides an important insight both into the neutrino as well as into the stellar and solar physics. In this section we give an overview of the most important solar-neutrino measurements from the historical ones up to the most recent ones. We cover the results from the experiments using radio-chemic (Homestake, SAGE, GNO, GALLEX), water Cherenkov (Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, SNO), and the liquid-scintillator (Borexino, KamLAND) detection techniques.

  9. First Measurement of Muon Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic (CCQE) Double Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei; /MIT, LNS

    2009-09-01

    Using a high statistics sample of muon neutrino charged current quasielastic (CCQE) events, we report the first measurement of the double differential cross section (d{sup 2}{sigma}/dT{sub {mu}}d cos {theta}{sub {mu}}) for this process. The result features reduced model dependence and supplies the most complete information on neutrino CCQE scattering to date. Measurements of the absolute cross section as a function of neutrino energy ({sigma}[E{sub v}{sup QE,RFG}]) and the single differential cross section (d{sigma}/dQ{sub QE}{sup 2}) are also provided, largely to facilitate comparison with prior measurements. This data is of particular use for understanding the axial-vector form factor of the nucleon as well as improving the simulation of low energy neutrino interactions on nuclear targets, which is of particular relevance for experiments searching for neutrino oscillations.

  10. Generator of neutrino-nucleon interactions for the FLUKA based simulation code

    SciTech Connect

    Battistoni, G.; Sala, P. R.; Ferrari, A.; Lantz, M.; Smirnov, G. I.

    2009-11-25

    An event generator of neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-nucleus interactions has been developed for the general purpose Monte Carlo code FLUKA. The generator includes options for simulating quasi-elastic interactions, the neutrino-induced resonance production and deep inelastic scattering. Moreover, it shares the hadronization routines developed earlier in the framework of the FLUKA package for simulating hadron-nucleon interactions. The simulation of neutrino-nuclear interactions makes use of the well developed PEANUT event generator implemented in FLUKA for modeling of the interactions between hadrons and nuclei. The generator has been tested in the neutrino energy range from 0 to 10 TeV and it is available in the standard FLUKA distribution. Limitations related to some particular kinematical conditions are discussed. A number of upgrades is foreseen for the generator which will optimize its applications for simulating experiments in the CNGS beam.

  11. Global analyses of neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Maltoni, Michele; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We summarize the determination of some neutrino properties from the global analysis of solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrino data in the framework of three-neutrino mixing as well as in some extended scenarios such as the mixing with eV-scale sterile neutrinos invoked for the interpretation of the short baseline anomalies, and the presence of non-standard neutrino interactions.

  12. Project X and its connection to neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah; Jansson, Andreas; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Project X is a new high intensity proton source that is being planned at Fermilab to usher in a new era of high intensity physics. The high intensity frontier can provide a wealth of new measurements--the most voracious consumer of protons is the long baseline neutrino program, but with the proton source upgrades being planned there are even more protons available than current neutrino targets can withstand. Those protons can provide a rich program on their own of muon physics and neutrino scattering physics that is complimentary to the long baseline program. In this article we discuss the physics motivation for Project X that comes from these short baseline experiments, and also the status of the design of this new source and what it will take to move forward on that design.

  13. The neutrino electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P.K.; Stenflo, L.; Bingham, R.; Bethe, H.A.; Dawson, J.M.; Mendonca, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that a wake of electron plasma oscillations can be created by the nonlinear ponderomotive force of an intense neutrino flux. The electrons trapped in the plasma wakefield will be accelerated to high energies. Such processes may be important in supernovas and pulsars. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Long Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzetto, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Following the discovery of neutrino oscillations by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration, recently awarded with the Nobel Prize, two generations of long baseline experiments had been setup to further study neutrino oscillations. The first generation experiments, K2K in Japan, Minos in the States and Opera in Europe, focused in confirming the Super-Kamiokande result, improving the precision with which oscillation parameters had been measured and demonstrating the ντ appearance process. Second generation experiments, T2K in Japan and very recently NOνA in the States, went further, being optimized to look for genuine three neutrino phenomena like non-zero values of θ13 and first glimpses to leptonic CP violation (LCPV) and neutrino mass ordering (NMO). The discovery of leptonic CP violation will require third generation setups, at the moment two strong proposals are ongoing, Dune in the States and Hyper-Kamiokande in Japan. This review will focus a little more in these future initiatives.

  15. A new paradigm for modeling the neutrino-nucleus cross section?

    SciTech Connect

    Benhar, Omar

    2011-11-23

    There is increasing evidence that the scheme, or paradigm, successfully applied to explain the wealth of electron-nucleus scattering data fails to describe the measured quasi elastic neutrino-nucleus cross sections. I argue that, before advocating modifications of the nucleon properties in the nuclear medium, the available data should be analyzed within a new paradigm, allowing for a consistent treatment of the reaction mechanisms, other than single nucleon knockout, contributing to the flux averaged neutrino cross section.

  16. Development of Microwave Superconducting Microresonators for Neutrino Mass Measurement in the Holmes Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giachero, A.; Day, P. K.; Falferi, P.; Faverzani, M.; Ferri, E.; Giordano, C.; Maino, M.; Margesin, B.; Mezzena, R.; Nizzolo, R.; Nucciotti, A.; Puiu, A.; Zanetti, L.

    2016-07-01

    The European Research Council has recently funded HOLMES, a project with the aim of performing a calorimetric measurement of the electron neutrino mass measuring the energy released in the electron capture decay of 163Ho. The baseline for HOLMES are microcalorimeters coupled to transition edge sensors read-out with rf-SQUIDs, for microwave multiplexing purposes. A promising alternative solution is based on superconducting microwave resonators that have undergone rapid development in the last decade. These detectors, called Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs), are inherently multiplexed in the frequency domain and suitable for even larger-scale pixel arrays, with theoretical high energy resolution and fast response. The aim of our activity is to develop arrays of microresonator detectors for X-ray spectroscopy and suitable for the calorimetric measurement of the energy spectra of 163Ho. Superconductive multilayer films composed by a sequence of pure Titanium and stoichiometric TiN layers show many ideal properties for MKIDs, such as low loss, large sheet resistance, large kinetic inductance, and tunable critical temperature T_c. We developed Ti/TiN multilayer microresonators with T_c within the range from 70 mK to 4.5 K and with good uniformity. In this contribution, we present the design solutions adopted, the fabrication processes, and the characterization results.

  17. Pseudo-dirac neutrinos: a challenge for neutrino telescopes.

    PubMed

    Beacom, John F; Bell, Nicole F; Hooper, Dan; Learned, John G; Pakvasa, Sandip; Weiler, Thomas J

    2004-01-01

    Neutrinos may be pseudo-Dirac states, such that each generation is actually composed of two maximally mixed Majorana neutrinos separated by a tiny mass difference. The usual active neutrino oscillation phenomenology would be unaltered if the pseudo-Dirac splittings are deltam(2) less, similar 10(-12) eV(2); in addition, neutrinoless double beta decay would be highly suppressed. However, it may be possible to distinguish pseudo-Dirac from Dirac neutrinos using high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. By measuring flavor ratios as a function of L/E, mass-squared differences down to deltam(2) approximately 10(-18) eV(2) can be reached. We comment on the possibility of probing cosmological parameters with neutrinos. PMID:14753977

  18. Precision Solar Neutrino Measurements with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Oblath, Noah

    2007-10-26

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is the first experiment to measure the total flux of active, high-energy neutrinos from the sun. Results from SNO have solved the long-standing 'Solar Neutrino Problem' by demonstrating that neutrinos change flavor. SNO measured the total neutrino flux with the neutral-current interaction of solar neutrinos with 1000 tonnes of D{sub 2}O. In the first two phases of the experiment we detected the neutron from that interaction by capture on deuterium and capture on chlorine, respectively. In the third phase an array of {sup 3}He proportional counters was deployed in the detector. This allows a measurement of the neutral-current neutrons that is independent of the Cherenkov light detected by the PMT array. We are currently developing a unique, detailed simulation of the current pulses from the proportional-counter array that will be used to help distinguish signal and background pulses.

  19. Measurement of atmospheric neutrino oscillations with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; de Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Hallewell, G.; Hamal, M.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; ANTARES Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The data taken with the ANTARES neutrino telescope from 2007 to 2010, a total live time of 863 days, are used to measure the oscillation parameters of atmospheric neutrinos. Muon tracks are reconstructed with energies as low as 20 GeV. Neutrino oscillations will cause a suppression of vertical upgoing muon neutrinos of such energies crossing the Earth. The parameters determining the oscillation of atmospheric neutrinos are extracted by fitting the event rate as a function of the ratio of the estimated neutrino energy and reconstructed flight path through the Earth. Measurement contours of the oscillation parameters in a two-flavour approximation are derived. Assuming maximal mixing, a mass difference of Δ m322 = (3.1 ± 0.9) ṡ10-3eV2 is obtained, in good agreement with the world average value.

  20. Neutrino magnetic moment effects in neutrino nucleus reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Athar, M.S.

    1995-10-01

    Some low energy neutrino nucleus reactions induced by neutrinos (antineutrinos) having a magnetic moment of the order of 10{sup {minus}9}{minus}10{sup {minus}10} Bohr magneton are studied. It is found that in the case of {sup 4}He, {sup 12}C, and {sup 16}O, the detection of very low energy scalar and isoscalar elastic and inelastic reactions induced by the isoscalar vector currents can provide a better limit on the neutrino magnetic moment.