Science.gov

Sample records for electronic catch recordings

  1. Keeping electronic records secure.

    PubMed

    Easton, David

    2013-10-01

    Are electronic engineering maintenance records relating to the hospital estate or a medical device as important as electronic patient records? Computer maintenance management systems (CMMS) are increasingly being used to manage all-round maintenance activities. However, the accuracy of the data held on them, and a level of security that prevents tampering with records, or other unauthorised changes to them to 'cover' poor practice, are both essential, so that, should an individual be injured or killed on hospital grounds, and a law suit follow, the estates team can be confident that it has accurate data to prove it has fulfilled its duty of care. Here David Easton MSc CEng FIHEEM MIET, director of Zener Engineering Services, and chair of IHEEM's Medical Devices Advisory Group, discusses the issues around maintenance databases, and the security and integrity of maintenance data.

  2. Adopting electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan; Singer, Alex; Kim, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand the key challenges to adoption of advanced features of electronic medical records (EMRs) in office practice, and to better understand these challenges in a Canadian context. Design Mixed-methods study. Setting Manitoba. Participants Health care providers and staff in 5 primary care offices. Methods Level of EMR adoption was assessed, and field notes from interviews and discussion groups were qualitatively analyzed for common challenges and themes across all sites. Main findings Fifty-seven interviews and 4 discussion groups were conducted from November 2011 to January 2012. Electronic medical record adoption scores ranged from 2.3 to 3.0 (out of a theoretical maximum of 5). Practices often scored lower than expected on use of decision support, providing patients with access to their own data, and use of practice-reporting tools. Qualitative analysis showed there were ceiling effects to EMR adoption owing to how the EMR was implemented, the supporting eHealth infrastructure, lack of awareness or availability of EMR functionality, and poor EMR data quality. Conclusion Many practitioners used their EMRs as “electronic paper records” and were not using advanced features of their EMRs that could further enhance practice. Data-quality issues within the EMRs could affect future attempts at using these features. Education and quality improvement activities to support data quality and EMR optimization are likely needed to support practices in maximizing their use of EMRs. PMID:23851560

  3. Catching a Wave in the Internet Surf: Electronic Extemporaneous Speaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voth, Ben

    1997-01-01

    Elaborates results of using electronic extemporaneous speaking in debate tournaments. Provides analysis around four points: preparation, event operation, participant reaction, and postevent analysis by forensic staff. (PA)

  4. Electronic Transfer of School Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeagley, Raymond

    2001-01-01

    Describes the electronic transfer of student records, notably the use of a Web-server named CHARLOTTE sponsored by the National Forum on Education Statistics and an Electronic Data Exchange system named SPEEDE/ExPRESS. (PKP)

  5. Electronic Health Records

    MedlinePlus

    ... or misfiled or somehow damaged. For example, paper medical records for thousands of patients were destroyed by ... A federal law called the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act ( ...

  6. Popular media records reveal multi-decadal trends in recreational fishing catch rates.

    PubMed

    Thurstan, Ruth H; Game, Edward; Pandolfi, John M

    2017-01-01

    Despite threats to human wellbeing from ecological degradation, public engagement with this issue remains at low levels. However, studies have shown that crafting messages to resonate with people's personal experiences can enhance engagement. Recreational fishing is one of the principal ways in which people interact with aquatic environments, but long-term data from this perspective are considered rare. We uncovered 852 popular media records of recreational fishing for an Australian estuary across a 140-year period. Using information contained in these articles we analysed the species composition of recreational catches over time and constructed two distinct time series of catch and effort (n fish fisher-1 trip-1; kg fish fisher-1 trip-1) for recreational fishing trips and fishing club competitions (mean n and kg fish caught across all competitors, and n and kg fish caught by the competition winner). Reported species composition remained similar over time. Catch rates reported from recreational fishing trips (1900-1998) displayed a significant decline, averaging 32.5 fish fisher-1 trip-1 prior to 1960, and 18.8 fish fisher-1 trip-1 post-1960. Mean n fish fisher-1 competition-1 (1913-1983) also significantly declined, but best n fish fisher-1 competition-1 (1925-1980) displayed no significant change, averaging 31.2 fish fisher-1 competition-1 over the time series. Mean and best kg fish fisher-1 competition-1 trends also displayed no significant change, averaging 4.2 and 9.9 kg fisher-1 competition-1, respectively. These variable trends suggest that while some fishers experienced diminishing returns in this region over the last few decades, the most skilled inshore fishers were able to maintain their catch rates, highlighting the difficulties inherent in crafting conservation messages that will resonate with all sections of a community. Despite these challenges, this research demonstrates that popular media sources can provide multiple long-term trends at spatial

  7. Popular media records reveal multi-decadal trends in recreational fishing catch rates

    PubMed Central

    Game, Edward; Pandolfi, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite threats to human wellbeing from ecological degradation, public engagement with this issue remains at low levels. However, studies have shown that crafting messages to resonate with people’s personal experiences can enhance engagement. Recreational fishing is one of the principal ways in which people interact with aquatic environments, but long-term data from this perspective are considered rare. We uncovered 852 popular media records of recreational fishing for an Australian estuary across a 140-year period. Using information contained in these articles we analysed the species composition of recreational catches over time and constructed two distinct time series of catch and effort (n fish fisher-1 trip-1; kg fish fisher-1 trip-1) for recreational fishing trips and fishing club competitions (mean n and kg fish caught across all competitors, and n and kg fish caught by the competition winner). Reported species composition remained similar over time. Catch rates reported from recreational fishing trips (1900–1998) displayed a significant decline, averaging 32.5 fish fisher-1 trip-1 prior to 1960, and 18.8 fish fisher-1 trip-1 post-1960. Mean n fish fisher-1 competition-1 (1913–1983) also significantly declined, but best n fish fisher-1 competition-1 (1925–1980) displayed no significant change, averaging 31.2 fish fisher-1 competition-1 over the time series. Mean and best kg fish fisher-1 competition-1 trends also displayed no significant change, averaging 4.2 and 9.9 kg fisher-1 competition-1, respectively. These variable trends suggest that while some fishers experienced diminishing returns in this region over the last few decades, the most skilled inshore fishers were able to maintain their catch rates, highlighting the difficulties inherent in crafting conservation messages that will resonate with all sections of a community. Despite these challenges, this research demonstrates that popular media sources can provide multiple long-term trends at

  8. Electronic Health Records

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does your doc scribble notes onto sheets of paper and then slide them into an ever-expanding ... for errors. Security. There's always the chance that paper records can get lost or misfiled or somehow ...

  9. Managing electronic records: A guideline

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.

    1995-07-01

    A committee at Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES) has drafted a guideline to assist offices in the management of electronic records. This paper will address the activities surrounding its creating. The guideline is for use by creators, users, and custodians of any type of electronic information. The guideline supports and supplements requirements from DOE and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), other internal processes such as system reviews, and the comprehensive records management program. While an in-house publication, it could prove useful to other organizations implementing an electronic records management program.

  10. Managing electronic records: A guideline

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.G.

    1994-10-25

    A committee at Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES) has drafted a guideline to assist offices in the management of electronic records. This paper will address the activities surrounding its creating. The guideline is for use by creators, users, and custodians of any type of electronic information. The guideline supports and supplements requirements from DOE and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), other internal processes such as system reviews, and the comprehensive records management program. While an in-house publication, it could prove useful to other organizations implementing an electronic records management program.

  11. Electronic health records and personal health records.

    PubMed

    Caligtan, Christine A; Dykes, Patricia C

    2011-08-01

    To provide an overview of electronic personal health information technology. Peer reviewed research studies, review articles, and web resources. As technology develops and electronic health records become more common, patients and clinicians are working toward a safer, more personal form of health care delivery. Improving access and input to personal health information is still in its infancy, but with government funding, development of patient health records will continue to grow. Patients are the consumers of health care and are witness to the paradigm shift of access to health information and changes in information communication technology (ICT). For the oncology nurse, the transformation of health care and ICT will require nurses to educate patients and family members on available online resources for self management and health promotion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Problems in the Preservation of Electronic Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lim Siew; Ramaiah, Chennupati K.; Wal, Pitt Kuan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses issues related to the preservation of electronic records. Highlights include differences between physical and electronic records; volume of electronic records; physical media; authenticity; migration of electronic records; metadata; legal issues; improved storage media; and projects for preservation of electronic records. (LRW)

  13. Electronic Ambient-Temperature Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Larry; Barrows, William

    1995-01-01

    Electronic temperature-recording unit stores data in internal memory for later readout. Records temperatures from minus 40 degrees to plus 60 degrees C at intervals ranging from 1.875 to 15 minutes. With all four data channels operating at 1.875-minute intervals, recorder stores at least 10 days' data. For only one channel at 15-minute intervals, capacity extends to up to 342 days' data. Developed for recording temperatures of instruments and life-science experiments on satellites, space shuttle, and high-altitude aircraft. Adaptable to such terrestrial uses as recording temperatures of perishable goods during transportation and of other systems or processes over long times. Can be placed directly in environment to monitor.

  14. 32 CFR 701.21 - Electronic record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electronic record. 701.21 Section 701.21... THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC FOIA Definitions and Terms § 701.21 Electronic record. Records (including e-mail) which are created, stored, and retrieved by electronic means. ...

  15. 32 CFR 701.21 - Electronic record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electronic record. 701.21 Section 701.21... THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC FOIA Definitions and Terms § 701.21 Electronic record. Records (including e-mail) which are created, stored, and retrieved by electronic means. ...

  16. Electronic health records lifecycle cost.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    We have overestimated the ability of electronic health records (EHR) systems to enhance efficiency by eliminating transcription and the need to physically pull charts. Hospital managers typically underestimate the costs of upgrade fees and support. To avoid this problem, hospitals must develop a full total cost of ownership (TCO) analysis to independently forecast total lifecycle costs for EHR information technology. Vendor information must be checked for validity and a milestone payment schedule must be devised to pay for results (outcomes) not promises. Vendors vary widely in their capacity to set up a fully functional inpatient-outpatient EHR system. Documentation programming will help to control hospital costs while enhancing service quality and staff morale. This study presents cost analysis from 62 hospitals in 16 cities during the period 2012-2013.

  17. Universal electronic health record MUDR.

    PubMed

    Hanzlicek, Petr; Spidlen, Josef; Nagy, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    One of the important research tasks of the European Centre for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology - Cardio (EuroMISE Centre - Cardio) is the applied research in the field of electronic health record design including electronic medical guidelines and intelligent systems for data mining and decision support. The research in the field of data storage and data acquisition was inspired by several European projects and standards, mostly by the I4C and TripleC projects. Based on experience gathered during cooperation in the TripleC project we have proposed a description of a flexible information storage model. The motivation for this effort was the large variability of the set of collected features in different departments - including temporal variability. Therefore, a dynamically extensible and modifiable structure of items is needed. In our model we use two basic structures called the knowledge base and data files. The main function of the knowledge base is to express the hierarchy of collectable features - medical concepts, their characteristics and relations among them. The data files structure is used to store the patient's data itself. These two structures can be described using graph theory expressions. Based on this model, a three-layer system architecture named "Multimedia Distributed Record" (MUDR) has been proposed and implemented. During the implementation, modern technologies such as Web Services, SOAP and XML were used. For the practical usage of EHR MUDR, an intelligent application called MUDRc (MUDR Client) was created. It enables physicians to use EHR MUDR in a flexible way. During the development process, maximum emphasis was placed on user-friendliness and comfortable usage of this application. Several methods of data entry can be used: pre-defined forms, direct entry into the tree data structure of the EHR MUDR, or automatic unstructured free-text report parsing and data retrieval. The system enables fast and simple importing and

  18. PACS and electronic health records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Simona; Gilboa, Flora; Shani, Uri

    2002-05-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) is a major component of the health informatics domain. An important part of the EHR is the medical images obtained over a patient's lifetime and stored in diverse PACS. The vision presented in this paper is that future medical information systems will convert data from various medical sources -- including diverse modalities, PACS, HIS, CIS, RIS, and proprietary systems -- to HL7 standard XML documents. Then, the various documents are indexed and compiled to EHRs, upon which complex queries can be posed. We describe the conversion of data retrieved from PACS systems through DICOM to HL7 standard XML documents. This enables the EHR system to answer queries such as 'Get all chest images of patients at the age of 20-30, that have blood type 'A' and are allergic to pine trees', which a single PACS cannot answer. The integration of data from multiple sources makes our approach capable of delivering such answers. It enables the correlation of medical, demographic, clinical, and even genetic information. In addition, by fully indexing all the tagged data in DICOM objects, it becomes possible to offer access to huge amounts of valuable data, which can be better exploited in the specific radiology domain.

  19. Biometrics for electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Flores Zuniga, Alejandro Enrique; Win, Khin Than; Susilo, Willy

    2010-10-01

    Securing electronic health records, in scenarios in which the provision of care services is share among multiple actors, could become a complex and costly activity. Correct identification of patients and physician, protection of privacy and confidentiality, assignment of access permissions for healthcare providers and resolutions of conflicts rise as main points of concern in the development of interconnected health information networks. Biometric technologies have been proposed as a possible technological solution for these issues due to its ability to provide a mechanism for unique verification of an individual identity. This paper presents an analysis of the benefit as well as disadvantages offered by biometric technology. A comparison between this technology and more traditional identification methods is used to determine the key benefits and flaws of the use biometric in health information systems. The comparison as been made considering the viability of the technologies for medical environments, global security needs, the contemplation of a share care environment and the costs involved in the implementation and maintenance of such technologies. This paper also discusses alternative uses for biometrics technologies in health care environments. The outcome of this analysis lays in the fact that even when biometric technologies offer several advantages over traditional method of identification, they are still in the early stages of providing a suitable solution for a health care environment.

  20. 5 CFR 850.301 - Electronic records; other acceptable records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... records. 850.301 Section 850.301 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... Repository, the eIRR records storage database, or other OPM database. (2) Electronic Official Personnel... continue to be acceptable records for processing by the retirement and insurance processing system....

  1. Adoption of Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Grabenbauer, L; Fraser, R.; McClay, J.; Woelfl, N.; Thompson, C.B.; Cambell, J.; Windle, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Less than 20% of hospitals in the US have an electronic health record (EHR). In this qualitative study, we examine the perspectives of both academic and private physicians and administrators as stakeholders, and their alignment, to explore their perspectives on the use of technology in the clinical environment. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 74 participants who were asked a series of open-ended questions. Grounded theory was used to analyze the transcribed data and build convergent themes. The relevance and importance of themes was constructed by examining frequency, convergence, and intensity. A model was proposed that represents the interactions between themes. Results Six major themes emerged, which include the impact of EHR systems on workflow, patient care, communication, research/outcomes/billing, education/learning, and institutional culture. Academic and private physicians were confident of the future benefits of EHR systems, yet cautious about the current implementations of EHR, and its impact on interactions with other members of the healthcare team and with patients, and the amount of time necessary to use EHR’s. Private physicians differed on education and were uneasy about the steep learning curve necessary for use of new systems. In contrast to physicians, university and hospital administrators are optimistic, and value the availability of data for use in reporting. Conclusion The results of our study indicate that both private and academic physicians concur on the need for features that maintain and enhance the relationship with the patient and the healthcare team. Resistance to adoption is related to insufficient functionality and its potential negative impact on patient care. Integration of data collection into clinical workflows must consider the unexpected costs of data acquisition. PMID:23616868

  2. Electronic health records to facilitate clinical research.

    PubMed

    Cowie, Martin R; Blomster, Juuso I; Curtis, Lesley H; Duclaux, Sylvie; Ford, Ian; Fritz, Fleur; Goldman, Samantha; Janmohamed, Salim; Kreuzer, Jörg; Leenay, Mark; Michel, Alexander; Ong, Seleen; Pell, Jill P; Southworth, Mary Ross; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Thoenes, Martin; Zannad, Faiez; Zalewski, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) provide opportunities to enhance patient care, embed performance measures in clinical practice, and facilitate clinical research. Concerns have been raised about the increasing recruitment challenges in trials, burdensome and obtrusive data collection, and uncertain generalizability of the results. Leveraging electronic health records to counterbalance these trends is an area of intense interest. The initial applications of electronic health records, as the primary data source is envisioned for observational studies, embedded pragmatic or post-marketing registry-based randomized studies, or comparative effectiveness studies. Advancing this approach to randomized clinical trials, electronic health records may potentially be used to assess study feasibility, to facilitate patient recruitment, and streamline data collection at baseline and follow-up. Ensuring data security and privacy, overcoming the challenges associated with linking diverse systems and maintaining infrastructure for repeat use of high quality data, are some of the challenges associated with using electronic health records in clinical research. Collaboration between academia, industry, regulatory bodies, policy makers, patients, and electronic health record vendors is critical for the greater use of electronic health records in clinical research. This manuscript identifies the key steps required to advance the role of electronic health records in cardiovascular clinical research.

  3. Quality of Nursing Documentation: Paper-Based Health Records versus Electronic-Based Health Records.

    PubMed

    Akhu-Zaheya, Laila; Al-Maaitah, Rowaida; Bany Hani, Salam Hasan

    2017-10-05

    To assess and compare the quality of paper-based and electronic-based health records. The comparison examined three criteria: content, documentation process, and structure. Nursing documentation is a significant indicator of the quality of patient care delivery. It can be either paper-based or organized within the system known as the Electronic Health Records (EHRs). Nursing documentation must be completed at the highest standards, in order to ensure the safety and quality of health care services. However, the evidence is not clear on which one of the two forms of documentation (paper-based versus EHRs) is more qualified. A retrospective, descriptive, comparative design was utilized to address the study's purposes. A convenient number of patients' records, from two public hospitals, were audited using the Cat-ch-Ing Audit Instrument. The sample size consisted of 434 records for both paper-based health records and EHRs from medical and surgical wards. EHRs were better than paper-based health records in terms of process and structure. In terms of quantity and quality content, paper-based records were better than EHRs. The study affirmed the poor quality of nursing documentation and lack of nurses' knowledge and skills in the nursing process and its application in both paper-based and electronic-based systems. Both forms of documentation revealed drawbacks in terms of content, process, and structure. This study provided important information, which can guide policymakers and administrators in identifying effective strategies aimed at enhancing the quality of nursing documentation. Policies and actions to ensure quality nursing documentation at the national level should focus on improving nursing knowledge, competencies, practice in nursing process, enhancing the work environment and nursing workload, as well as strengthening the capacity building of nurses practice to improve the quality of nursing care and patients' outcomes. This article is protected by copyright

  4. Privacy, confidentiality, and electronic medical records.

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, R C; Clayton, P D

    1996-01-01

    The enhanced availability of health information in an electronic format is strategic for industry-wide efforts to improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care, yet it brings a concomitant concern of greater risk for loss of privacy among health care participants. The authors review the conflicting goals of accessibility and security for electronic medical records and discuss nontechnical and technical aspects that constitute a reasonable security solution. It is argued that with guiding policy and current technology, an electronic medical record may offer better security than a traditional paper record. PMID:8653450

  5. The last frontier: catch records of white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) in the Northwest Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Heather M; Lin, Victor; Tanaka, Sho; Velikanov, Anatoly; Mollet, Henry F; Wintner, Sabine P; Fordham, Sonja V; Fisk, Aaron T; Hussey, Nigel E

    2014-01-01

    White sharks are highly migratory apex predators, globally distributed in temperate, sub-tropical, and tropical waters. Knowledge of white shark biology and ecology has increased recently based on research at known aggregation sites in the Indian, Atlantic, and Northeast Pacific Oceans; however, few data are available for the Northwest Pacific Ocean. This study provides a meta-analysis of 240 observations of white sharks from the Northwest Pacific Ocean between 1951 and 2012. Records comprise reports of bycatch in commercial fisheries, media accounts, personal communications, and documentation of shark-human interactions from Russia (n = 8), Republic of Korea (22), Japan (129), China (32), Taiwan (45), Philippines (1) and Vietnam (3). Observations occurred in all months, excluding October-January in the north (Russia and Republic of Korea) and July-August in the south (China, Taiwan, Philippines, and Vietnam). Population trend analysis indicated that the relative abundance of white sharks in the region has remained relatively stable, but parameterization of a 75% increase in observer effort found evidence of a minor decline since 2002. Reliably measured sharks ranged from 126-602 cm total length (TL) and 16-2530 kg total weight. The largest shark in this study (602 cm TL) represents the largest measured shark on record worldwide. For all countries combined the sex ratio was non-significantly biased towards females (1∶1.1; n = 113). Of 60 females examined, 11 were confirmed pregnant ranging from the beginning stages of pregnancy (egg cases) to near term (140 cm TL embryos). On average, 6.0±2.2 embryos were found per litter (maximum of 10) and gestation period was estimated to be 20 months. These observations confirm that white sharks are present in the Northwest Pacific Ocean year-round. While acknowledging the difficulties of studying little known populations of a naturally low abundance species, these results highlight the need for dedicated research to

  6. The Last Frontier: Catch Records of White Sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) in the Northwest Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Heather M.; Lin, Victor; Tanaka, Sho; Velikanov, Anatoly; Mollet, Henry F.; Wintner, Sabine P.; Fordham, Sonja V.; Fisk, Aaron T.; Hussey, Nigel E.

    2014-01-01

    White sharks are highly migratory apex predators, globally distributed in temperate, sub-tropical, and tropical waters. Knowledge of white shark biology and ecology has increased recently based on research at known aggregation sites in the Indian, Atlantic, and Northeast Pacific Oceans; however, few data are available for the Northwest Pacific Ocean. This study provides a meta-analysis of 240 observations of white sharks from the Northwest Pacific Ocean between 1951 and 2012. Records comprise reports of bycatch in commercial fisheries, media accounts, personal communications, and documentation of shark-human interactions from Russia (n = 8), Republic of Korea (22), Japan (129), China (32), Taiwan (45), Philippines (1) and Vietnam (3). Observations occurred in all months, excluding October-January in the north (Russia and Republic of Korea) and July-August in the south (China, Taiwan, Philippines, and Vietnam). Population trend analysis indicated that the relative abundance of white sharks in the region has remained relatively stable, but parameterization of a 75% increase in observer effort found evidence of a minor decline since 2002. Reliably measured sharks ranged from 126–602 cm total length (TL) and 16–2530 kg total weight. The largest shark in this study (602 cm TL) represents the largest measured shark on record worldwide. For all countries combined the sex ratio was non-significantly biased towards females (1∶1.1; n = 113). Of 60 females examined, 11 were confirmed pregnant ranging from the beginning stages of pregnancy (egg cases) to near term (140 cm TL embryos). On average, 6.0±2.2 embryos were found per litter (maximum of 10) and gestation period was estimated to be 20 months. These observations confirm that white sharks are present in the Northwest Pacific Ocean year-round. While acknowledging the difficulties of studying little known populations of a naturally low abundance species, these results highlight the need for dedicated

  7. The Future Is Coming: Electronic Health Records

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bethesda, Maryland. Titled Personal Electronic Health Records: From Biomedical Research to People's Health , the conference will bring together some of the world's most creative minds in research, government, and health care. The goal? ...

  8. Selecting an academic electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Gloe, Donna

    2010-01-01

    It is critical to keep students up-to-date on technology being used in healthcare systems. One such system is the electronic health record; however, selecting the academic electronic health record (AEHR) system and integrating it into the curriculum are complex. This author presents a plan for researching, reviewing, and choosing an AEHR. This plan can be adapted to any school interested in choosing an AEHR.

  9. 22 CFR 503.9 - Electronic records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to view such records in hard copy or to access the Internet via the BBG's computer, please contact... copying, both electronically via the Internet and in hard copy, those records that have been previously... hard copy a “Guide” on how to make an FOIA request, and an Index of all Agency information systems...

  10. Electronic health records: current and future use.

    PubMed

    Peters, Steve G; Khan, Munawwar A

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current state of the electronic medical record, including benefits and shortcomings, and presents key factors likely to drive development in the next decade and beyond. The current electronic medical record to a large extent represents a digital version of the traditional paper legal record, owned and maintained by the practitioner. The future electronic health record is expected to be a shared tool, engaging patients in decision making, wellness and disease management and providing data for individual decision support, population management and analytics. Many drivers will determine this path, including payment model reform, proliferation of mobile platforms, telemedicine, genomics and individualized medicine and advances in 'big data' technologies.

  11. A First Standardized Swiss Electronic Maternity Record.

    PubMed

    Murbach, Michel; Martin, Sabine; Denecke, Kerstin; Nüssli, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    During the nine months of pregnancy, women have to regularly visit several physicians for continuous monitoring of the health and development of the fetus and mother. Comprehensive examination results of different types are generated in this process; documentation and data transmission standards are still unavailable or not in use. Relevant information is collected in a paper-based maternity record carried by the pregnant women. To improve availability and transmission of data, we aim at developing a first prototype for an electronic maternity record for Switzerland. By analyzing the documentation workflow during pregnancy, we determined a maternity record data set. Further, we collected requirements towards a digital maternity record. As data exchange format, the Swiss specific exchange format SMEEX (swiss medical data exchange) was exploited. Feedback from 27 potential users was collected to identify further improvements. The relevant data is extracted from the primary care information system as SMEEX file, stored in a database and made available in a web and a mobile application, developed as prototypes of an electronic maternity record. The user confirmed the usefulness of the system and provided multiple suggestions for an extension. An electronical maternity record as developed in this work could be in future linked to the electronic patient record.

  12. Readiness Assessment of Electronic Health Records Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Ketabi, Saeedeh; Isfahani, Sakineh Saghaeiannejad; Heidari, Asieh

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: During the past 20 years, with huge advances in information technology and particularly, in the areas of health, various forms of electronic records have been discussed, designed or implemented. Although making health records automatically has many advantages but unfortunately in some cases, creation of an Electronic Health Record (EHR) system seems to be complicated. E-health (Electronic health) readiness assessment, as a part of the assessment before implementation is considered essential and prior to implementation. Readiness assessment aims to evaluate preparedness of each organizational component. This process can lead to the correct decision making. Therefore, identifying areas and requirements for such an assessment is so essential. Using the results of this assessment can identify deficiencies in the existing electronic health records to plan their strategies. The aim of this study was first; to show the situation of readiness assessment in EHR implementation roadmap, second, to recognize requirements associated with electronic readiness assessment and main areas of EHR readiness assessment. Results and discussion: This study reviewed the literature on EHR readiness assessment with the help of library and also searches engines available at Google. For our searches, we employed the following keywords and their combinations: readiness, assessment, implementation, Electronic Health Record (EHR), Information Technology, road map in the searching areas of title, keywords, abstract, and full text. In this study, more than 100 articles and reports were collected and 45 of them were selected based on their relevancy. PMID:23407861

  13. Patient information: confidentiality and the electronic record.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    The rise of the electronic record now allows nurses to access a large archive of patient information that was more difficult to obtain when records consisted of manually held paper files. There have been several instances where curiosity and, occasionally, more malicious motivations have led nurses to access these records and read the notes of a celebrity or a person they know. In this article, Richard Griffith considers whether nurses' accessing and reading of the record of someone who is not in their care is in breach of their duty of confidentiality.

  14. 63 FR 2268 - Electronic Records Work Group; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-01-14

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Electronic Records Work Group; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: National Archives and... Electronic Records Work Group on January 29, 1998, to obtain further comments on issues relating to NARA's General Records Schedule (GRS) 20 for Electronic Records. The Electronic Records Work Group, with...

  15. Security Techniques for the Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; Smith, Brenna; Vanderlinden, Hannah; Nealand, Alexandra

    2017-08-01

    The privacy of patients and the security of their information is the most imperative barrier to entry when considering the adoption of electronic health records in the healthcare industry. Considering current legal regulations, this review seeks to analyze and discuss prominent security techniques for healthcare organizations seeking to adopt a secure electronic health records system. Additionally, the researchers sought to establish a foundation for further research for security in the healthcare industry. The researchers utilized the Texas State University Library to gain access to three online databases: PubMed (MEDLINE), CINAHL, and ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health Source. These sources were used to conduct searches on literature concerning security of electronic health records containing several inclusion and exclusion criteria. Researchers collected and analyzed 25 journals and reviews discussing security of electronic health records, 20 of which mentioned specific security methods and techniques. The most frequently mentioned security measures and techniques are categorized into three themes: administrative, physical, and technical safeguards. The sensitive nature of the information contained within electronic health records has prompted the need for advanced security techniques that are able to put these worries at ease. It is imperative for security techniques to cover the vast threats that are present across the three pillars of healthcare.

  16. Preserving electronic records: Not the easiest task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Fynnette

    1993-01-01

    The National Archives and Records Administration has had a program for accessioning, describing, preserving and providing reference service to the electronic records (machine-readable records) created by Federal agencies for more than twenty years. Although there have been many changes in the name of the office, its basic mission has remained the same: to preserve and make available those records created by Federal agencies that the National Archives has determined to have value beyond the short-term need of the originating agency. A phrase that was once coined for a preservation conference still applies: the National Archives, when it decides to accept the transfer of records into its custody, is committing itself to preserving these records for perpetuity.

  17. Towards lifetime electronic health record implementation.

    PubMed

    Gand, Kai; Richter, Peggy; Esswein, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Integrated care concepts can help to diminish demographic challenges. Hereof, the use of eHealth, esp. overarching electronic health records, is recognized as an efficient approach. The article aims at rigorously defining the concept of lifetime electronic health records (LEHRs) and the identification of core factors that need to be fulfilled in order to implement such. A literature review was conducted. Existing definitions were identified and relevant factors were categorized. The derived assessment categories are demonstrated by a case study on Germany. Seven dimensions to differentiate types of electronic health records were found. The analysis revealed, that culture, regulation, informational self-determination, incentives, compliance, ICT infrastructure and standards are important preconditions to successfully implement LEHRs. The article paves the way for LEHR implementation and therewith for integrated care. Besides the expected benefits of LEHRs, there are a number of ethical, legal and social concerns, which need to be balanced.

  18. Principal Challenges Facing Electronic Records Management in Federal Agencies Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Giovanna; Sprehe, J. Timothy

    2002-01-01

    Discusses electronic records management in the federal government. Highlights include managing electronic mail; information technology planning, systems design, and architecture; updating conventional records management; integrating electronic records management with other information technology systems; challenges of end-user training; business…

  19. Principal Challenges Facing Electronic Records Management in Federal Agencies Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Giovanna; Sprehe, J. Timothy

    2002-01-01

    Discusses electronic records management in the federal government. Highlights include managing electronic mail; information technology planning, systems design, and architecture; updating conventional records management; integrating electronic records management with other information technology systems; challenges of end-user training; business…

  20. Electronic medical records in clinical teaching.

    PubMed

    Warboys, Ina; Mok, Wai Yin; Frith, Karen H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to provide students with experiences to develop their technology competency and examine student perceptions about an academic electronic medical record (EMR) as a learning tool. Nurse educators need to integrate EMRs into their curricula to give students practice in the use of electronic documentation and retrieval of clinical information. The findings of this study indicated that students' use of EMRs at least 5 times resulted in the development of positive perceptions about their EMR experience.

  1. Nurses' Perceptions of the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawley, Rocquel Devonne

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of electronic health records (EHR) by health care organizations has been limited. Despite the broad consensus on the potential benefits of EHRs, health care organizations have been slow to adopt the technology. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore licensed practical and registered nurses'…

  2. Barriers to implement Electronic Health Records (EHRs)

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Arab-Chadegani, Razieh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: During the past 20 years, with huge advances in information technology and particularly in the areas of health, various forms of electronic records have been studied, analyzed, designed or implemented. An Electronic Health Records (EHRs) is defined as digitally stored healthcare information throughout an individual’s lifetime with the purpose of supporting continuity of care, education, and research. The EHRs may include such things as observations, laboratory tests, medical images, treatments, therapies; drugs administered, patient identifying information, legal permissions, and so on. Despite of the potential benefits of electronic health records, implement of this project facing with barriers and restriction ,that the most of these limitations are cost constraints, technical limitations, standardization limits, attitudinal constraints–behavior of individuals and organizational constraints. Aim: The aim of this study was to express the main barriers to implement EHRs. Methods: This study was unsystematic-review study. The literature was searched on main barriers to implement EHRs with the help of library, books, conference proceedings, data bank, and also searches engines available at Google, Google scholar. For our searches, we employed the following keywords and their combinations: Electronic health record, implement, obstacle, and information technology in the searching areas of title, keywords, abstract, and full text. Results and discussion: In this study, more than 43 articles and reports were collected and 32 of them were selected based on their relevancy. Many studies indicate that the most important factor than other limitations to implement the EHR are resistance to change. PMID:24167440

  3. Patient Perceptions of Electronic Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulejian, Armine

    2011-01-01

    Research objective. Electronic Health Records (EHR) are expected to transform the way medicine is delivered with patients/consumers being the intended beneficiaries. However, little is known regarding patient knowledge and attitudes about EHRs. This study examined patient perceptions about EHR. Study design. Surveys were administered following…

  4. Nurses' Perceptions of the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawley, Rocquel Devonne

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of electronic health records (EHR) by health care organizations has been limited. Despite the broad consensus on the potential benefits of EHRs, health care organizations have been slow to adopt the technology. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore licensed practical and registered nurses'…

  5. Patient Perceptions of Electronic Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulejian, Armine

    2011-01-01

    Research objective. Electronic Health Records (EHR) are expected to transform the way medicine is delivered with patients/consumers being the intended beneficiaries. However, little is known regarding patient knowledge and attitudes about EHRs. This study examined patient perceptions about EHR. Study design. Surveys were administered following…

  6. 22 CFR 503.9 - Electronic records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Electronic records. 503.9 Section 503.9 Foreign... agency opinions and policy statements (available for public inspection and copying) will be available... matter of a current exigency to the American public, where delay in response would compromise...

  7. 22 CFR 503.9 - Electronic records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Electronic records. 503.9 Section 503.9 Foreign... agency opinions and policy statements (available for public inspection and copying) will be available... matter of a current exigency to the American public, where delay in response would compromise...

  8. 22 CFR 503.9 - Electronic records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic records. 503.9 Section 503.9 Foreign... agency opinions and policy statements (available for public inspection and copying) will be available... matter of a current exigency to the American public, where delay in response would compromise...

  9. Catching Sunlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Alan

    Everyone knows that astronomy is done in the dark. Astronomers are creatures of the night, like vampires, sleeping during the day and working all night long to catch the faint light of their elusive prey.

  10. [Nurse's coworking to electronic medical record].

    PubMed

    Maresca, M; Gavaciuto, D; Cappelli, G

    2007-01-01

    Nephrologists need to register and look at a great number of clinical data. The use of electronic medical records may improve efficiency and reduce errors. Aim of our work is to report the experience of Villa Scassi Hospital in Genoa, where a "patient file" has been performed to improve nephrology practice management. The file contains all clinical records, laboratory and radiology data, therapy, dialysis clinics, in addition to reports of out-patients department. This system allowed a better efficiency in diagnosis and treatment of the patient. Moreover experience of nurses in employing electronic medical records is reported. A reduced number of errors was found in therapy administering, because of a only one data source for physicians and nurses.

  11. Catching the electron in action in real space inside a Ge-Si core-shell nanowire transistor.

    PubMed

    Jaishi, Meghnath; Pati, Ranjit

    2017-09-21

    Catching the electron in action in real space inside a semiconductor Ge-Si core-shell nanowire field effect transistor (FET), which has been demonstrated (J. Xiang, W. Lu, Y. Hu, Y. Wu, H. Yan and C. M. Lieber, Nature, 2006, 441, 489) to outperform the state-of-the-art metal oxide semiconductor FET, is central to gaining unfathomable access into the origin of its functionality. Here, using a quantum transport approach that does not make any assumptions on electronic structure, charge, and potential profile of the device, we unravel the most probable tunneling pathway for electrons in a Ge-Si core-shell nanowire FET with orbital level spatial resolution, which demonstrates gate bias induced decoupling of electron transport between the core and the shell region. Our calculation yields excellent transistor characteristics as noticed in the experiment. Upon increasing the gate bias beyond a threshold value, we observe a rapid drop in drain current resulting in a gate bias driven negative differential resistance behavior and switching in the sign of trans-conductance. We attribute this anomalous behavior in drain current to the gate bias induced modification of the carrier transport pathway from the Ge core to the Si shell region of the nanowire channel. A new experiment involving a four probe junction is proposed to confirm our prediction on gate bias induced decoupling.

  12. Electronic health records access during a disaster.

    PubMed

    Morchel, Herman; Raheem, Murad; Stevens, Lee

    2014-01-01

    As has been demonstrated previously, medical care providers that employ an electronic health records (EHR) system provide more appropriate, cost effective care. Those providers are also better positioned than those who rely on paper records to recover if their facility is damaged as a result of severe storms, fires, or other events. The events surrounding Superstorm Sandy in 2012 made it apparent that, with relatively little additional effort and investment, health care providers with EHR systems may be able to use those systems for patient care purposes even during disasters that result in damage to buildings and facilities, widespread power outages, or both.

  13. Electronic Health Records Access During a Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Morchel, Herman; Raheem, Murad; Stevens, Lee

    2014-01-01

    As has been demonstrated previously, medical care providers that employ an electronic health records (EHR) system provide more appropriate, cost effective care. Those providers are also better positioned than those who rely on paper records to recover if their facility is damaged as a result of severe storms, fires, or other events. The events surrounding Superstorm Sandy in 2012 made it apparent that, with relatively little additional effort and investment, health care providers with EHR systems may be able to use those systems for patient care purposes even during disasters that result in damage to buildings and facilities, widespread power outages, or both. PMID:24683443

  14. Electronic Health Record Meets Digital Library

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Betsy L.

    2000-01-01

    Linking the electronic health record to the digital library is a Web-era reformulation of the long-standing informatics goal of seamless integration of automated clinical data and relevant knowledge-based information to support informed decisions. The spread of the Internet, the development of the World Wide Web, and converging format standards for electronic health data and digital publications make effective linking increasingly feasible. Some existing systems link electronic health data and knowledge-based information in limited settings or limited ways. Yet many challenging informatics research problems remain to be solved before flexible and seamless linking becomes a reality and before systems become capable of delivering the specific piece of information needed at the time and place a decision must be made. Connecting the electronic health record to the digital library also requires positive resolution of important policy issues, including health data privacy, government envouragement of high-speed communications, electronic intellectual property rights, and standards for health data and for digital libraries. Both the research problems and the policy issues should be important priorities for the field of medical informatics. PMID:10984463

  15. Personal health records as portal to the electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Jennifer E; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2014-03-01

    This topic review discusses the evolving clinical challenges associated with the implementation of electronic personal health records (PHR) that are fully integrated with electronic medical records (EMR). The benefits of facilitating patient access to the EMR through web-based, PHR-portals may be substantial; foremost is the potential to enhance the flow of information between patient and healthcare practitioner. The benefits of improved communication and transparency of care are presumed to be a reduction in clinical errors, increased quality of care, better patient-management of disease, and better disease and symptom comprehension. Yet PHR databases allow patients open access to newly-acquired clinical data without the benefit of concurrent expert clinical interpretation, and therefore may create the potential for greater patient distress and uncertainty. With specific attention to neuro-oncology patients, this review focuses on the developing conflicts and consequences associated with the use of a PHR that parallels data acquisition of the EMR in real-time. We conclude with a discussion of recommendations for implementing fully-integrated PHR for neuro-oncology patients.

  16. National electronic health record interoperability chronology.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, Stephen P

    2009-05-01

    The federal initiative for electronic health record (EHR) interoperability began in 2000 and set the stage for the establishment of the 2004 Executive Order for EHR interoperability by 2014. This article discusses the chronology from the 2001 e-Government Consolidated Health Informatics (CHI) initiative through the current congressional mandates for an aligned, interoperable, and agile DoD AHLTA and VA VistA.

  17. Confidentiality, electronic health records, and the clinician.

    PubMed

    Graves, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The advent of electronic health records (EHRs) to improve access and enable research in the everyday clinical world has simultaneously made medical information much more vulnerable to illicit, non-beneficent uses. This wealth of identified, aggregated data has and will attract attacks by domestic governments for surveillance and protection, foreign governments for espionage and sabotage, organized crime for illegal profits, and large corporations for "legal" profits. Against these powers with almost unlimited resources no security scheme is likely to prevail, so the design of such systems should include appropriate security measures. Unlike paper records, where the person maintaining and controlling the existence of the records also controls access to them, these two functions can be separated for EHRs. By giving physical control over access to individual records to their individual owners, the aggregate is dismantled, thereby protecting the nation's identified health information from large-scale data mining or tampering. Control over the existence and integrity of all the records--yet without the ability to examine their contents--would be left with larger institutions. This article discusses the implications of all of the above for the role of the clinician in assuring confidentiality (a cornerstone of clinical practice), for research and everyday practice, and for current security designs.

  18. 63 FR 25098 - Electronic Records Work Group; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-05-06

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Electronic Records Work Group; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: National Archives and... Electronic Records Work Group on May 18, 1998, to present an update of the Work Group's progress in... to obtain public comments and questions. Additional information about the Electronic Records...

  19. Problems with the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Hans-Peter; Liaschenko, Joan; Angus, Jan

    2016-01-01

    One of the most significant changes in modern healthcare delivery has been the evolution of the paper record to the electronic health record (EHR). In this paper we argue that the primary change has been a shift in the focus of documentation from monitoring individual patient progress to recording data pertinent to Institutional Priorities (IPs). The specific IPs to which we refer include: finance/reimbursement; risk management/legal considerations; quality improvement/safety initiatives; meeting regulatory and accreditation standards; and patient care delivery/evidence based practice. Following a brief history of the transition from the paper record to the EHR, the authors discuss unintended or contested consequences resulting from this change. These changes primarily reflect changes in the organization and amount of clinician work and clinician-patient relationships. The paper is not a research report but was informed by an institutional ethnography the aim of which was to understand how the EHR impacted clinicians and administrators in a large, urban hospital in the United States. The paper was also informed by other sources, including the philosophies of Jacques Ellul, Don Idhe, and Langdon Winner. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Clean catch urine sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... specimen; Urine collection - clean catch; UTI - clean catch; Urinary tract infection - clean catch; Cystitis - clean catch ... LE, Norrby SR. Approach to the patient with urinary tract infection. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  1. Electronic Health Records and the Disappearing Patient.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Linda M; Bell, Hannah S; Baker, Allison M; Howard, Heather A

    2017-09-01

    With rapid consolidation of American medicine into large-scale corporations, corporate strategies are coming to the forefront in health care delivery, requiring a dramatic increase in the amount and detail of documentation, implemented through use of electronic health records (EHRs). EHRs are structured to prioritize the interests of a myriad of political and corporate stakeholders, resulting in a complex, multi-layered, and cumbersome health records system, largely not directly relevant to clinical care. Drawing on observations conducted in outpatient specialty clinics, we consider how EHRs prioritize institutional needs manifested as a long list of requisites that must be documented with each consultation. We argue that the EHR enforces the centrality of market principles in clinical medicine, redefining the clinician's role to be less of a medical expert and more of an administrative bureaucrat, and transforming the patient into a digital entity with standardized conditions, treatments, and goals, without a personal narrative. © 2017 by the American Anthropological Association.

  2. Immunization Data Exchange With Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Melissa S; Natarajan, Karthik; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Holleran, Stephen; Forney, Kristen; Aponte, Angel; Vawdrey, David K

    2016-06-01

    To assess the impact of exchange of immunization information between an immunization information system (IIS) and an electronic health record on up-to-date rates, overimmunization, and immunization record completeness for low-income, urban children and adolescents. The New York City Department of Health maintains a population-based IIS, the Citywide Immunization Registry (CIR). Five community clinics in New York City implemented direct linkage of immunization data from the CIR to their local electronic health record. We compared immunization status and overimmunization in children and adolescents 19 to 35 month, 7 to 10 year, and 13 to 17 year-olds with provider visits in the 6-month period before data exchange implementation (2009; n = 6452) versus 6-months post-implementation (2010; n = 6124). We also assessed immunization record completeness with and without addition of CIR data for 8548 children and adolescents with visits in 2012-2013. Up-to-date status increased from before to after implementation from 75.0% to 81.6% (absolute difference, 6.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2% to 8.1%) and was significant for all age groups. The percentage overimmunized decreased from 8.8% to 4.7% (absolute difference, -4.1%; 95% CI, -7.8% to -0.3%) and was significant for adolescents (16.4% vs 1.2%; absolute difference, -15.2%; 95% CI, -26.7 to -3.6). Up-to-date status for those seen in 2012 to 2013 was higher when IIS data were added (74.6% vs 59.5%). This study demonstrates that data exchange can improve child and adolescent immunization status. Development of the technology to support such exchange and continued focus on local, state, and federal policies to support such exchanges are needed. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Intelligent consumer-centric electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Thomas, Selena B; Tang, Chunqiang

    2009-01-01

    Web-based, consumer-centric electronic medical records (CEMRs) are currently undergoing widespread deployment. Existing CEMRs, however, have limited intelligence and cannot satisfy users' many needs. This paper proposes the concept of intelligent CEMR. We introduce and extend expert system and web search technology into the CEMR domain. The resulting intelligent CEMRs can automatically provide users with personalized healthcare information to facilitate their daily activities. We use automatic home medical product recommendation as a concrete application to demonstrate the benefits offered by intelligent CEMRs.

  4. Recent perspectives of electronic medical record systems

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAO-YING; ZHANG, PEIYING

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems within developing contexts as part of efforts to monitor and facilitate the attainment of health-related aims has been on the increase. However, these efforts have been concentrated on urban hospitals. Recent findings showed that development processes of EMR systems are associated with various discrepancies between protocols and work practices. These discrepancies were mainly caused by factors including high workload, lack of medical resources, misunderstanding of the protocols by health workers, and client/patient practices. The present review focused on the effects of EMRs on patient care work, and on appropriate EMR designs principles and strategies to ameliorate these systems. PMID:27284289

  5. Big data and the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Peters, Steve G; Buntrock, James D

    2014-01-01

    The electronic medical record has evolved from a digital representation of individual patient results and documents to information of large scale and complexity. Big Data refers to new technologies providing management and processing capabilities, targeting massive and disparate data sets. For an individual patient, techniques such as Natural Language Processing allow the integration and analysis of textual reports with structured results. For groups of patients, Big Data offers the promise of large-scale analysis of outcomes, patterns, temporal trends, and correlations. The evolution of Big Data analytics moves us from description and reporting to forecasting, predictive modeling, and decision optimization.

  6. Recent perspectives of electronic medical record systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Peiying

    2016-06-01

    Implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems within developing contexts as part of efforts to monitor and facilitate the attainment of health-related aims has been on the increase. However, these efforts have been concentrated on urban hospitals. Recent findings showed that development processes of EMR systems are associated with various discrepancies between protocols and work practices. These discrepancies were mainly caused by factors including high workload, lack of medical resources, misunderstanding of the protocols by health workers, and client/patient practices. The present review focused on the effects of EMRs on patient care work, and on appropriate EMR designs principles and strategies to ameliorate these systems.

  7. Architecture for networked electronic patient record systems.

    PubMed

    Takeda, H; Matsumura, Y; Kuwata, S; Nakano, H; Sakamoto, N; Yamamoto, R

    2000-11-01

    There have been two major approaches to the development of networked electronic patient record (EPR) architecture. One uses object-oriented methodologies for constructing the model, which include the GEHR project, Synapses, HL7 RIM and so on. The second approach uses document-oriented methodologies, as applied in examples of HL7 PRA. It is practically beneficial to take the advantages of both approaches and to add solution technologies for network security such as PKI. In recognition of the similarity with electronic commerce, a certificate authority as a trusted third party will be organised for establishing networked EPR system. This paper describes a Japanese functional model that has been developed, and proposes a document-object-oriented architecture, which is-compared with other existing models.

  8. Quality and Certification of Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Hoerbst, A.; Ammenwerth, E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous projects, initiatives, and programs are dedicated to the development of Electronic Health Records (EHR) worldwide. Increasingly more of these plans have recently been brought from a scientific environment to real life applications. In this context, quality is a crucial factor with regard to the acceptance and utility of Electronic Health Records. However, the dissemination of the existing quality approaches is often rather limited. Objectives The present paper aims at the description and comparison of the current major quality certification approaches to EHRs. Methods A literature analysis was carried out in order to identify the relevant publications with regard to EHR quality certification. PubMed, ACM Digital Library, IEEExplore, CiteSeer, and Google (Scholar) were used to collect relevant sources. The documents that were obtained were analyzed using techniques of qualitative content analysis. Results The analysis discusses and compares the quality approaches of CCHIT, EuroRec, IHE, openEHR, and EN13606. These approaches differ with regard to their focus, support of service-oriented EHRs, process of (re-)certification and testing, number of systems certified and tested, supporting organizations, and regional relevance. Discussion The analyzed approaches show differences with regard to their structure and processes. System vendors can exploit these approaches in order to improve and certify their information systems. Health care organizations can use these approaches to support selection processes or to assess the quality of their own information systems. PMID:23616834

  9. Aspects of privacy for electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Haas, Sebastian; Wohlgemuth, Sven; Echizen, Isao; Sonehara, Noboru; Müller, Günter

    2011-02-01

    Patients' medical data have been originally generated and maintained by health professionals in several independent electronic health records (EHRs). Centralized electronic health records accumulate medical data of patients to improve their availability and completeness; EHRs are not tied to a single medical institution anymore. Nowadays enterprises with the capacity and knowledge to maintain this kind of databases offer the services of maintaining EHRs and adding personal health data by the patients. These enterprises get access on the patients' medical data and act as a main point for collecting and disclosing personal data to third parties, e.g. among others doctors, healthcare service providers and drug stores. Existing systems like Microsoft HealthVault and Google Health comply with data protection acts by letting the patients decide on the usage and disclosure of their data. But they fail in satisfying essential requirements to privacy. We propose a privacy-protecting information system for controlled disclosure of personal data to third parties. Firstly, patients should be able to express and enforce obligations regarding a disclosure of health data to third parties. Secondly, an organization providing EHRs should neither be able to gain access to these health data nor establish a profile about patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Disassociation for electronic health record privacy.

    PubMed

    Loukides, Grigorios; Liagouris, John; Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris; Terrovitis, Manolis

    2014-08-01

    The dissemination of Electronic Health Record (EHR) data, beyond the originating healthcare institutions, can enable large-scale, low-cost medical studies that have the potential to improve public health. Thus, funding bodies, such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the U.S., encourage or require the dissemination of EHR data, and a growing number of innovative medical investigations are being performed using such data. However, simply disseminating EHR data, after removing identifying information, may risk privacy, as patients can still be linked with their record, based on diagnosis codes. This paper proposes the first approach that prevents this type of data linkage using disassociation, an operation that transforms records by splitting them into carefully selected subsets. Our approach preserves privacy with significantly lower data utility loss than existing methods and does not require data owners to specify diagnosis codes that may lead to identity disclosure, as these methods do. Consequently, it can be employed when data need to be shared broadly and be used in studies, beyond the intended ones. Through extensive experiments using EHR data, we demonstrate that our method can construct data that are highly useful for supporting various types of clinical case count studies and general medical analysis tasks.

  11. The Use of Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Makoul, Gregory; Curry, Raymond H.; Tang, Paul C.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess physician–patient communication patterns associated with use of an electronic medical record (EMR) system in an outpatient setting and provide an empirical foundation for larger studies. Design: An exploratory, observational study involving analysis of videotaped physician–patient encounters, questionnaires, and medical-record reviews. Setting: General internal medicine practice at an academic medical center. Participants: Three physicians who used an EMR system (EMR physicians) and three who used solely a paper record (control physicians). A total of 204 patient visits were included in the analysis (mean, 34 for each physician). Main Outcome Measures: Content analysis of whether physicians accomplished communication tasks during encounters; qualitative analysis of how EMR physicians used the EMR and how control physicians used the paper chart. Results: Compared with the control physicians, EMR physicians adopted a more active role in clarifying information, encouraging questions, and ensuring completeness at the end of a visit. A trend suggested that EMR physicians might be less active than control physicians in three somewhat more patient-centered areas (outlining the patient's agenda, exploring psychosocial/ emotional issues, discussing how health problems affect a patient's life). Physicians in both groups tended to direct their attention to the patient record during the initial portion of the encounter. The relatively fixed position of the computer limited the extent to which EMR physicians could physically orient themselves toward the patient. Although there was no statistically significant difference between the EMR and control physicians in terms of mean time across all visits, a difference did emerge for initial visits: Initial visits with EMR physicians took an average of 37.5 percent longer than those with control physicians. Summary: An EMR system may enhance the ability of physicians to complete informationintensive tasks but

  12. Electronic Health Records Place 1st at Indy 500

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues EHR Electronic Health Records Place 1st at Indy 500 Past ... last May's Indy 500 had thousands of personal Electronic Health Records on hand for those attending—and ...

  13. Macro influencers of electronic health records adoption.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Vijay V; Chinta, Ravi; Zhirkin, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    While adoption rates for electronic health records (EHRs) have improved, the reasons for significant geographical differences in EHR adoption within the USA have remained unclear. To understand the reasons for these variations across states, we have compiled from secondary sources a profile of different states within the USA, based on macroeconomic and macro health-environment factors. Regression analyses were performed using these indicator factors on EHR adoption. The results showed that internet usage and literacy are significantly associated with certain measures of EHR adoption. Income level was not significantly associated with EHR adoption. Per capita patient days (a proxy for healthcare need intensity within a state) is negatively correlated with EHR adoption rate. Health insurance coverage is positively correlated with EHR adoption rate. Older physicians (>60 years) tend to adopt EHR systems less than their younger counterparts. These findings have policy implications on formulating regionally focused incentive programs.

  14. Mining Electronic Health Records using Linked Data.

    PubMed

    Odgers, David J; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Meaningful Use guidelines have pushed the United States Healthcare System to adopt electronic health record systems (EHRs) at an unprecedented rate. Hospitals and medical centers are providing access to clinical data via clinical data warehouses such as i2b2, or Stanford's STRIDE database. In order to realize the potential of using these data for translational research, clinical data warehouses must be interoperable with standardized health terminologies, biomedical ontologies, and growing networks of Linked Open Data such as Bio2RDF. Applying the principles of Linked Data, we transformed a de-identified version of the STRIDE into a semantic clinical data warehouse containing visits, labs, diagnoses, prescriptions, and annotated clinical notes. We demonstrate the utility of this system though basic cohort selection, phenotypic profiling, and identification of disease genes. This work is significant in that it demonstrates the feasibility of using semantic web technologies to directly exploit existing biomedical ontologies and Linked Open Data.

  15. Data Quality in Electronic Health Records Research.

    PubMed

    Feder, Shelli L

    2017-01-01

    The proliferation of the electronic health record (EHR) has led to increasing interest and opportunities for nurse scientists to use EHR data in a variety of research designs. However, methodological problems pertaining to data quality may arise when EHR data are used for nonclinical purposes. Therefore, this article describes common domains of data quality and approaches for quality appraisal in EHR research. Common data quality domains include data accuracy, completeness, consistency, credibility, and timeliness. Approaches for quality appraisal include data validation with data rules, evaluation and verification of data abstraction methods with statistical measures, data comparisons with manual chart review, management of missing data using statistical methods, and data triangulation between multiple EHR databases. Quality data enhance the validity and reliability of research findings, form the basis for conclusions derived from the data, and are, thus, an integral component in EHR-based study design and implementation.

  16. Change management with the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Schmucker, DeeAnn

    2009-01-01

    Many medical organizations have already changed to, are implementing, or are contemplating implementing an electronic health record (EHR) system. As in all change, some people accept the switch from paper to EHRs much easier and with more enthuiasm than others. It is common for organizations to overlook the importance of including change management properties as they create the overall plan for the change from paper to paperless. Often the result of this is anger, frustration, and lack of cooperation or even sabotage from physicians and office staff who are the recipients of the training on the EHR system. This article examines the steps for, opportunities for, and positive results from incorporating change management principles from the very beginning, and the benefits accrued by understanding and utilizing the concepts of good choices, relationships, planning, and feedback.

  17. Electronic medical records and the gastroenterologist.

    PubMed

    Kosinski, Lawrence R

    2012-01-01

    This is an age of disruptive innovation in health care in which the business model is changing. Fee-for-service, volume-based systems are being replaced by fixed-fee, value-based systems. One of the major facilitating forces behind this change has been the development of the electronic health record, which is providing the medical community with the ability to have real-time quality metrics that will drive the development of web-based clinical decision support tools that will transform the current peer-review-based rules of practice with an eclectic fluid environment of continuous quality measurement and improvement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. ICU nurses' acceptance of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Cartmill, Randi; Blosky, Mary Ann; Brown, Roger; Hackenberg, Matthew; Hoonakker, Peter; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Norfolk, Evan; Wetterneck, Tosha B; Walker, James M

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess intensive care unit (ICU) nurses' acceptance of electronic health records (EHR) technology and examine the relationship between EHR design, implementation factors, and nurse acceptance. Design The authors analyzed data from two cross-sectional survey questionnaires distributed to nurses working in four ICUs at a northeastern US regional medical center, 3 months and 12 months after EHR implementation. Measurements Survey items were drawn from established instruments used to measure EHR acceptance and usability, and the usefulness of three EHR functionalities, specifically computerized provider order entry (CPOE), the electronic medication administration record (eMAR), and a nursing documentation flowsheet. Results On average, ICU nurses were more accepting of the EHR at 12 months as compared to 3 months. They also perceived the EHR as being more usable and both CPOE and eMAR as being more useful. Multivariate hierarchical modeling indicated that EHR usability and CPOE usefulness predicted EHR acceptance at both 3 and 12 months. At 3 months postimplementation, eMAR usefulness predicted EHR acceptance, but its effect disappeared at 12 months. Nursing flowsheet usefulness predicted EHR acceptance but only at 12 months. Conclusion As the push toward implementation of EHR technology continues, more hospitals will face issues related to acceptance of EHR technology by staff caring for critically ill patients. This research suggests that factors related to technology design have strong effects on acceptance, even 1 year following the EHR implementation. PMID:21697291

  19. Parameterizing time in electronic health record studies.

    PubMed

    Hripcsak, George; Albers, David J; Perotte, Adler

    2015-07-01

    Fields like nonlinear physics offer methods for analyzing time series, but many methods require that the time series be stationary-no change in properties over time.Objective Medicine is far from stationary, but the challenge may be able to be ameliorated by reparameterizing time because clinicians tend to measure patients more frequently when they are ill and are more likely to vary. We compared time parameterizations, measuring variability of rate of change and magnitude of change, and looking for homogeneity of bins of temporal separation between pairs of time points. We studied four common laboratory tests drawn from 25 years of electronic health records on 4 million patients. We found that sequence time-that is, simply counting the number of measurements from some start-produced more stationary time series, better explained the variation in values, and had more homogeneous bins than either traditional clock time or a recently proposed intermediate parameterization. Sequence time produced more accurate predictions in a single Gaussian process model experiment. Of the three parameterizations, sequence time appeared to produce the most stationary series, possibly because clinicians adjust their sampling to the acuity of the patient. Parameterizing by sequence time may be applicable to association and clustering experiments on electronic health record data. A limitation of this study is that laboratory data were derived from only one institution. Sequence time appears to be an important potential parameterization. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reproduction and distribution of the work, in any medium, provided the original work is not altered or transformed in any way, and

  20. Nurses readiness and electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Habibi-Koolaee, Mahdi; Safdari, Reza; Bouraghi, Hamid

    2015-04-01

    The importance of the electronic health records in health care well known to everybody, as well as, the role of nurses to provide clinical care; they have a valuable role in successful implementation of electronic systems. The aim of this paper is to assess the nurses' readiness for EHR implementation. This was a descriptive cross sectional study, conducted in 2013. Using cluster sampling, 310 nurses selected from teaching hospitals at Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). A self-structured questionnaire was used for gathering data. Data management and analysis was performed using SPSS for windows by using descriptive statistics. 85.9% of nurses, participated in the study. The Microsoft Word (58.8%) was the higher level of skill according to ICDL. The mean of computer skills, knowledge and attitude of nurses towards EHR was 43.4%, 51.2% and 65.2%, respectively. In overall, the mean of readiness of nurses was 57.2%. Establish proper communication among providers and prevent duplications was the most positive attitude and complexity of service delivery was the most negative attitude toward EHR. The most obvious finding to emerge from this study is that it should be considered in the education, training and participation of nurses, it should be ensured the level of knowledge and attitude toward EHR and finally, some related courses in Health Information Systems suggested including the curriculum of nursing.

  1. Validating Laboratory Results in Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Perrotta, Peter L.; Karcher, Donald S.

    2017-01-01

    Context Laboratories must ensure that the test results and pathology reports they transmit to a patient’s electronic health record (EHR) are accurate, complete, and presented in a useable format. Objective To determine the accuracy, completeness, and formatting of laboratory test results and pathology reports transmitted from the laboratory to the EHR. Design Participants from 45 institutions retrospectively reviewed results from 16 different laboratory tests, including clinical and anatomic pathology results, within the EHR used by their providers to view laboratory results. Results were evaluated for accuracy, presence of required elements, and usability. Both normal and abnormal results were reviewed for tests, some of which were performed in-house and others at a reference laboratory. Results Overall accuracy for test results transmitted to the EHR was greater than 99.3% (1052 of 1059). There was lower compliance for completeness of test results, with 69.6% (732 of 1051) of the test results containing all essential reporting elements. Institutions that had fewer than half of their orders entered electronically had lower test result completeness rates. The rate of appropriate formatting of results was 90.9% (98 of 1010). Conclusions The great majority of test results are accurately transmitted from the laboratory to the EHR; however, lower percentages are transmitted completely and in a useable format. Laboratories should verify the accuracy, completeness, and format of test results at the time of test implementation, after test changes, and periodically. PMID:27575266

  2. Physician Use of Outpatient Electronic Health Records to Improve Care

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Adam; Bowes, Watson A.; Thornton, Sidney N.; Narus, Scott P.

    2008-01-01

    We applied a model of usage categories of electronic health records for outpatient physicians to a large population of physicians, using an established electronic health record. This model categorizes physician users according to how extensively they adopt the various capabilities of electronic health records. We identified representative indicators from usage statistics for outpatient physician use of the HELP-2 outpatient electronic medical record, in use at Intermountain Healthcare. Using these indicators, we calculated the relative proportion of users in each category. These proportions are useful for predicting the expected benefits of electronic health record adoption. PMID:18999307

  3. Breaches of health information: are electronic records different from paper records?

    PubMed

    Sade, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    Breaches of electronic medical records constitute a type of healthcare error, but should be considered separately from other types of errors because the national focus on the security of electronic data justifies special treatment of medical information breaches. Guidelines for protecting electronic medical records should be applied equally to paper medical records.

  4. Access control for electronic patient records.

    PubMed

    Glagola, M J

    1998-01-01

    The transition from hardcopy records to electronic records is in the forefront for healthcare today. For healthcare facilities, a major issue is determining who can access patients' medical information and how access to this information can be controlled. There are three components to access control: identification, authentication and authorization. Checking proof of identity is a means of authenticating someone--through a driver's license, passport or their fingerprints. Similar processes are needed in a computer environment, through the use of passwords, one-time passwords or smartcards, encryption and kerberos, and call-back procedures. New in the area of access control are biometric devices, which are hardware/software combinations that digitize a physical characteristic and compare the sample with previously stored samples. Fingerprints, voiceprints and facial features are examples. Their cost is currently prohibitive, but in time, they may become more common. Digital certificates and certification authorities are other means used to authenticate identify. When a system challenges a user's identity at log on, the user provides a certification that tells the system to go to the issuing certification authority and find proof the user's claim is valid. Low-level certifications offer little value for sensitive data, but high-level certification is now being introduced. It requires more specific, detailed information on the applicant. Authorization, the final component of access control, establishes what a specific user can and cannot access. To have effective access control, transaction logging and system monitoring are needed to ensure the various techniques are being used and performing properly.

  5. 5 CFR 850.301 - Electronic records; other acceptable records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and insurance processing system include— (1) Electronic employee data submitted by an agency or other entity through EHRI and stored within the new retirement and insurance processing system; (2) Electronic Official Personnel Folder (e-OPF) data; and (3) Documents, including hardcopy versions of the Individual...

  6. 5 CFR 850.301 - Electronic records; other acceptable records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and insurance processing system include— (1) Electronic employee data submitted by an agency or other entity through EHRI and stored within the new retirement and insurance processing system; (2) Electronic Official Personnel Folder (e-OPF) data; and (3) Documents, including hardcopy versions of the Individual...

  7. Anonymization of Longitudinal Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Tamersoy, Acar; Loukides, Grigorios; Nergiz, Mehmet Ercan; Saygin, Yucel; Malin, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) systems have enabled healthcare providers to collect detailed patient information from the primary care domain. At the same time, longitudinal data from EMRs are increasingly combined with biorepositories to generate personalized clinical decision support protocols. Emerging policies encourage investigators to disseminate such data in a deidentified form for reuse and collaboration, but organizations are hesitant to do so because they fear such actions will jeopardize patient privacy. In particular, there are concerns that residual demographic and clinical features could be exploited for reidentification purposes. Various approaches have been developed to anonymize clinical data, but they neglect temporal information and are, thus, insufficient for emerging biomedical research paradigms. This paper proposes a novel approach to share patient-specific longitudinal data that offers robust privacy guarantees, while preserving data utility for many biomedical investigations. Our approach aggregates temporal and diagnostic information using heuristics inspired from sequence alignment and clustering methods. We demonstrate that the proposed approach can generate anonymized data that permit effective biomedical analysis using several patient cohorts derived from the EMR system of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. PMID:22287248

  8. "Big data" and the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Ross, M K; Wei, W; Ohno-Machado, L

    2014-08-15

    Implementation of Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems continues to expand. The massive number of patient encounters results in high amounts of stored data. Transforming clinical data into knowledge to improve patient care has been the goal of biomedical informatics professionals for many decades, and this work is now increasingly recognized outside our field. In reviewing the literature for the past three years, we focus on "big data" in the context of EHR systems and we report on some examples of how secondary use of data has been put into practice. We searched PubMed database for articles from January 1, 2011 to November 1, 2013. We initiated the search with keywords related to "big data" and EHR. We identified relevant articles and additional keywords from the retrieved articles were added. Based on the new keywords, more articles were retrieved and we manually narrowed down the set utilizing predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Our final review includes articles categorized into the themes of data mining (pharmacovigilance, phenotyping, natural language processing), data application and integration (clinical decision support, personal monitoring, social media), and privacy and security. The increasing adoption of EHR systems worldwide makes it possible to capture large amounts of clinical data. There is an increasing number of articles addressing the theme of "big data", and the concepts associated with these articles vary. The next step is to transform healthcare big data into actionable knowledge.

  9. 63 FR 14141 - Electronic Records Work Group; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-03-24

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Electronic Records Work Group; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: National Archives and... Electronic Records Work Group with its external consultants on April 7, 1998, to discuss the preliminary..., the Work Group will accept questions and comments from observers at the end of the day. The...

  10. 63 FR 44292 - Electronic Records Work Group; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-08-18

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Electronic Records Work Group; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: National Archives and... Electronic Records Work Group with its external consultants on August 26, 1998, to discuss the comments received from the public and Federal agencies on the Work Group's proposed recommendations for...

  11. 62 FR 65737 - Electronic Records Work Group; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-12-15

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Electronic Records Work Group; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: National Archives and... the Electronic Records Work Group on December 19, 1997, to discuss issues related to the operation of the Work Group. The public is invited to observe the meeting; however, seating is limited....

  12. 49 CFR 228.205 - Access to electronic records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to electronic records. 228.205 Section 228... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HOURS OF SERVICE OF RAILROAD EMPLOYEES Electronic Recordkeeping § 228.205 Access to electronic records. (a) FRA inspectors and State inspectors participating under 49...

  13. 49 CFR 228.205 - Access to electronic records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to electronic records. 228.205 Section 228... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HOURS OF SERVICE OF RAILROAD EMPLOYEES Electronic Recordkeeping § 228.205 Access to electronic records. (a) FRA inspectors and State inspectors participating under 49...

  14. Collaborative search in electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Qiaozhu; Hanauer, David A

    2011-01-01

    Objective A full-text search engine can be a useful tool for augmenting the reuse value of unstructured narrative data stored in electronic health records (EHR). A prominent barrier to the effective utilization of such tools originates from users' lack of search expertise and/or medical-domain knowledge. To mitigate the issue, the authors experimented with a ‘collaborative search’ feature through a homegrown EHR search engine that allows users to preserve their search knowledge and share it with others. This feature was inspired by the success of many social information-foraging techniques used on the web that leverage users' collective wisdom to improve the quality and efficiency of information retrieval. Design The authors conducted an empirical evaluation study over a 4-year period. The user sample consisted of 451 academic researchers, medical practitioners, and hospital administrators. The data were analyzed using a social-network analysis to delineate the structure of the user collaboration networks that mediated the diffusion of knowledge of search. Results The users embraced the concept with considerable enthusiasm. About half of the EHR searches processed by the system (0.44 million) were based on stored search knowledge; 0.16 million utilized shared knowledge made available by other users. The social-network analysis results also suggest that the user-collaboration networks engendered by the collaborative search feature played an instrumental role in enabling the transfer of search knowledge across people and domains. Conclusion Applying collaborative search, a social information-foraging technique popularly used on the web, may provide the potential to improve the quality and efficiency of information retrieval in healthcare. PMID:21486887

  15. Using electronic health records to save money

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Dayan, Yosefa; Saed, Halil; Boaz, Mona; Misch, Yehudith; Shahar, Talia; Husiascky, Ilan; Blumenfeld, Oren

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Health information technology, especially electronic health records (EHRs), can be used to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare providers. This study assessed the cost-savings of incorporating a list of preferred specialty care providers into the EHRs used by all primary care physicians (PCPs), accompanied by a comprehensive implementation plan. Methods On January 1, 2005, all specialty clinic providers at the Israeli Defense Forces were divided into one of four financial classes based on their charges, class 1, the least expensive, being the most preferred, followed by classes 2–4. This list was incorporated into the EHRs used by all PCPs in primary care clinics. PCPs received comprehensive training. Target referral goals were determined for each class and measured for 4 years, together with the total cost of all specialist visits in the first year compared to the following years. Quality assessment (QA) scores were used as a measure of the program's effect on the quality of patient care. Results During 2005–2008, a marginally significant decline in referrals to class 1 was observed (r=−0.254, p=0.078), however a significant increase in referral rates to class 2 was observed (r=0.957, p=0.042), concurrent with a decrease in referral rates to classes 3 and 4 (r=−0.312, p=0.024). An inverse correlation was observed between year and total costs for all visits to specialists (2008 prices; r=−0.96, p=0.04), and between the mean cost of one specialist visit over the 4 years, indicating a significant reduction in real costs (2008 prices; r=−0.995, p=0.005). QA was not affected by these changes (r=0.94, p=0.016). Conclusions From a policy perspective, our data suggest that EHR can facilitate effective utilization of healthcare providers and decrease costs. PMID:23462876

  16. Underdiagnosis of hypertension using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, D.; Chung, S.; Wong, E. C.; Wang, E. J.; Stafford, R. S.; Palaniappan, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension is highly prevalent and contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Appropriate identification of hypertension is fundamental for its management. The rates of appropriate hypertension diagnosis in outpatient settings using an electronic health record (EHR) have not been well studied. We sought to identify prevalent and incident hypertension cases in a large outpatient healthcare system, examine the diagnosis rates of prevalent and incident hypertension, and identify clinical and demographic factors associated with appropriate hypertension diagnosis. METHODS We analyzed a three-year, cross-sectional sample of 251,590 patients aged ≥18 years using patient EHRs. Underlying hypertension was defined as two or more abnormal blood pressure (ABP) readings ≥140/90 mmHg and/or pharmaceutical treatment. Appropriate hypertension diagnosis was defined by the reporting of ICD-9 codes (401.0 – 401.9). Factors associated with hypertension diagnosis were assessed through multivariate analyses of patient clinical and demographic characteristics. RESULTS The prevalence of hypertension was 28.7%, and the diagnosis rate was 62.9%. The incidence of hypertension was 13.3%, with a diagnosis rate of 19.9%. Predictors of diagnosis for prevalent hypertension included older age, Asian, African American, higher BMI, and increased number of ABP readings. Predictors for incident hypertension diagnosis were similar. Patients with underlying hypertension were more likely to be treated when they had a hypertension diagnosis in the EHR (92.6%) than if they did not (15.8%, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Outpatient EHR diagnosis rates are suboptimal, yet EHR diagnosis of hypertension is strongly associated with treatment. Targeted efforts to improve diagnosis should be a priority. PMID:22031453

  17. Electronic Health Records and Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Yanamadala, Swati; Morrison, Doug; Curtin, Catherine; McDonald, Kathryn; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Electronic health records (EHRs) were implemented to improve quality of care and patient outcomes. This study assessed the relationship between EHR-adoption and patient outcomes. We performed an observational study using State Inpatient Databases linked to American Hospital Association survey, 2011. Surgical and medical patients from 6 large, diverse states were included. We performed univariate analyses and developed hierarchical regression models relating level of EHR utilization and mortality, readmission rates, and complications. We evaluated the effect of EHR adoption on outcomes in a difference-in-differences analysis, 2008 to 2011. Medical and surgical patients sought care at hospitals reporting no EHR (3.5%), partial EHR (55.2%), and full EHR systems (41.3%). In univariate analyses, patients at hospitals with full EHR had the lowest rates of inpatient mortality, readmissions, and Patient Safety Indicators followed by patients at hospitals with partial EHR and then patients at hospitals with no EHR (P < 0.05). However, these associations were not robust when accounting for other patient and hospital factors, and adoption of an EHR system was not associated with improved patient outcomes (P > 0.05). These results indicate that patients receiving medical and surgical care at hospitals with no EHR system have similar outcomes compared to patients seeking care at hospitals with a full EHR system, after controlling for important confounders. To date, we have not yet seen the promised benefits of EHR systems on patient outcomes in the inpatient setting. EHRs may play a smaller role than expected in patient outcomes and overall quality of care. PMID:27175631

  18. Using electronic health records to save money.

    PubMed

    Bar-Dayan, Yosefa; Saed, Halil; Boaz, Mona; Misch, Yehudith; Shahar, Talia; Husiascky, Ilan; Blumenfeld, Oren

    2013-06-01

    Health information technology, especially electronic health records (EHRs), can be used to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare providers. This study assessed the cost-savings of incorporating a list of preferred specialty care providers into the EHRs used by all primary care physicians (PCPs), accompanied by a comprehensive implementation plan. On January 1, 2005, all specialty clinic providers at the Israeli Defense Forces were divided into one of four financial classes based on their charges, class 1, the least expensive, being the most preferred, followed by classes 2-4. This list was incorporated into the EHRs used by all PCPs in primary care clinics. PCPs received comprehensive training. Target referral goals were determined for each class and measured for 4 years, together with the total cost of all specialist visits in the first year compared to the following years. Quality assessment (QA) scores were used as a measure of the program's effect on the quality of patient care. During 2005-2008, a marginally significant decline in referrals to class 1 was observed (r=-0.254, p=0.078), however a significant increase in referral rates to class 2 was observed (r=0.957, p=0.042), concurrent with a decrease in referral rates to classes 3 and 4 (r=-0.312, p=0.024). An inverse correlation was observed between year and total costs for all visits to specialists (2008 prices; r=-0.96, p=0.04), and between the mean cost of one specialist visit over the 4 years, indicating a significant reduction in real costs (2008 prices; r=-0.995, p=0.005). QA was not affected by these changes (r=0.94, p=0.016). From a policy perspective, our data suggest that EHR can facilitate effective utilization of healthcare providers and decrease costs.

  19. Integration of clinical research documentation in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Broach, Debra

    2015-04-01

    Clinical trials of investigational drugs and devices are often conducted within healthcare facilities concurrently with clinical care. With implementation of electronic health records, new communication methods are required to notify nonresearch clinicians of research participation. This article reviews clinical research source documentation, the electronic health record and the medical record, areas in which the research record and electronic health record overlap, and implications for the research nurse coordinator in documentation of the care of the patient/subject. Incorporation of clinical research documentation in the electronic health record will lead to a more complete patient/subject medical record in compliance with both research and medical records regulations. A literature search provided little information about the inclusion of clinical research documentation within the electronic health record. Although regulations and guidelines define both source documentation and the medical record, integration of research documentation in the electronic health record is not clearly defined. At minimum, the signed informed consent(s), investigational drug or device usage, and research team contact information should be documented within the electronic health record. Institutional policies should define a standardized process for this integration in the absence federal guidance. Nurses coordinating clinical trials are in an ideal position to define this integration.

  20. Clinical genomics in the world of the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Marsolo, Keith; Spooner, S Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The widespread adoption of electronic health records presents a number of benefits to the field of clinical genomics. They include the ability to return results to the practitioner, to use genetic findings in clinical decision support, and to have data collected in the electronic health record that serve as a source of phenotypic information for analysis purposes. Not all electronic health records are created equal, however. They differ in their features, capabilities, and ease of use. Therefore, to understand the potential of the electronic health record, it is first necessary to understand its capabilities and the impact that implementation strategy has on usability. Specifically, we focus on the following areas: (i) how the electronic health record is used to capture data in clinical practice settings; (ii) how the implementation and configuration of the electronic health record affect the quality and availability of data; (iii) the management of clinical genetic test results and the feasibility of electronic health record integration; and (iv) the challenges of implementing an electronic health record in a research-intensive environment. This is followed by a discussion of the minimum functional requirements that an electronic health record must meet to enable the satisfactory integration of genomic results as well as the open issues that remain.

  1. Implementation of Electronic Health Records in US Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Bjarnadottir, Ragnhildur I; Herzig, Carolyn T A; Travers, Jasmine L; Castle, Nicholas G; Stone, Patricia W

    2017-08-01

    While electronic health records have emerged as promising tools to help improve quality of care, nursing homes have lagged behind in implementation. This study assessed electronic health records implementation, associated facility characteristics, and potential impact on quality indicators in nursing homes. Using national Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and survey data for nursing homes, a cross-sectional analysis was conducted to identify variations between nursing homes that had and had not implemented electronic health records. A difference-in-differences analysis was used to estimate the longitudinal effect of electronic health records on commonly used quality indicators. Data from 927 nursing homes were examined, 49.1% of which had implemented electronic health records. Nursing homes with electronic health records were more likely to be nonprofit/government owned (P = .04) and had a lower percentage of Medicaid residents (P = .02) and higher certified nursing assistant and registered nurse staffing levels (P = .002 and .02, respectively). Difference-in-differences analysis showed greater quality improvements after implementation for five long-stay and two short-stay quality measures (P = .001 and .01, respectively) compared with those who did not implement electronic health records. Implementation rates in nursing homes are low compared with other settings, and better-resourced facilities are more likely to have implemented electronic health records. Consistent with other settings, electronic health records implementation improves quality in nursing homes, but further research is needed to better understand the mechanism for improvement and how it can best be supported.

  2. Permanent record. Electronic records aid in the aftermath of Joplin tornado.

    PubMed

    Russell, Matthew

    2011-09-01

    When a tornado struck St. John's Regional Medical Center in May 2011, its patient records were stored in a newly launched electronic health record system, helping prevent a bad situation from being worse.

  3. Towards Educational Electronic Health Records (EHRs): A Design Process for Integrating EHRs, Simulation, and Video Tutorials.

    PubMed

    Shachak, Aviv; Elamrousy, Samer; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Domb, Sharon; Kushniruk, Andre W

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are becoming ubiquitous in healthcare practice. However, their use in medical education has been slower to catch on and a new category of EHRs is beginning to emerge known as eduEHRs. These systems allow learners to explore and experiment with EHRs in the context of medical education. However, current eduEHRs have limitations, such as a lack of dynamic interaction built-in that would mimic real-world use of these tools. To overcome this, the integration of eduEHRs with software and tools such as video simulations and tutorials has considerable promise. In this paper we describe a new design process for integrating EHRs, simulations, and video tutorials.

  4. GSFC specification electronic data processing magnetic recording tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinari, D. F.; Perry, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The design requirements are given for magnetic oxide coated, electronic data processing tape, wound on reels. Magnetic recording tape types covered by this specification are intended for use on digital tape transports using the Non-Return-to-Zero-change-on-ones (NRZI) recording method for recording densities up to and including 800 characters per inch (cpi) and the Phase-Encoding (PE) recording method for a recording density of 1600 cpi.

  5. A review of US EPA and FDA requirements for electronic records, electronic signatures, and electronic submissions.

    PubMed

    Keatley, K L

    1999-01-01

    Both the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have issued regulatory documents that address the issues and requirements concerning electronic reporting to the Agencies. EPA has published two comprehensive and useful electronic data interchange (EDI) guidelines: 1) the EPA Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) Implementation Guideline, Draft of September 23, 1994 and October 18, 1994 that is available at the following EPA web site address: www.epa.gov/oppeedi1/guidelines/general.pdf and 2) the Interim Final Notice, Filing of Electronic Reports via Electronic Data Interchange, September 4, 1996, Federal Register Notice [FRL-5601-4, Volume 61, Number 172, page 46684], also available at: www.epa.gov/oppeedi1/edipoli.htm. The FDA has published a guidance document titled, "Guidance for Industry, Computerized Systems Used in Clinical Trials, April 1999" that is available at FDA's web site: www.fda.gov/ora/compliance_ref/bimo/ffinalcct.++ +htm. FDA's guidance document addresses a number of issues for electronic records that are applicable to all areas of GLP compliance. Another FDA document presently under development is titled, "Electronic Standards for the Transmission of Regulatory Information (ESTRI) Gateway." The ESTRI document defines strategic plans for electronic submissions to FDA. FDA has published a guidance document in this area titled, "Guidance for Industry: Providing Regulatory Submissions in Electronic Format--General Considerations, January 1999." This guidance document is available at: www.fda.gov/cder/guidance/index.htm. FDA has also published an important final rule applicable to all electronic records and signatures that is part of the U.S. Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 11, titled, "FDA's Final Rule, Electronic Records; Electronic Signatures, effective August 20, 1997." This FDA ruling is discussed below and is available at: www.fda.gov/cder/esig/index.htm.

  6. Teaching Electronic Records Management in the Archival Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Electronic records management has been incorporated into the archival curriculum in North America since the 1990s. This study reported in this paper provides a systematic analysis of the content of electronic records management (ERM) courses currently taught in archival education programs. Through the analysis of course combinations and their…

  7. 42 CFR 425.506 - Electronic health records technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic health records technology. 425.506 Section 425.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Standards and Reporting § 425.506 Electronic health records technology. (a) ACOs, ACO participants, and...

  8. 42 CFR 425.506 - Electronic health records technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic health records technology. 425.506 Section 425.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Standards and Reporting § 425.506 Electronic health records technology. (a) ACOs, ACO participants, and...

  9. 42 CFR 425.506 - Electronic health records technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic health records technology. 425.506 Section 425.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Standards and Reporting § 425.506 Electronic health records technology. (a) ACOs, ACO participants, and...

  10. Mandatory Use of Electronic Health Records: Overcoming Physician Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Viseeta K.

    2012-01-01

    Literature supports the idea that electronic health records hold tremendous value for the healthcare system in that it increases patient safety, improves the quality of care and provides greater efficiency. The move toward mandatory implementation of electronic health records is a growing concern in the United States health care industry. The…

  11. Mandatory Use of Electronic Health Records: Overcoming Physician Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Viseeta K.

    2012-01-01

    Literature supports the idea that electronic health records hold tremendous value for the healthcare system in that it increases patient safety, improves the quality of care and provides greater efficiency. The move toward mandatory implementation of electronic health records is a growing concern in the United States health care industry. The…

  12. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  13. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  14. The electronic patient records of the Hannover Medical School.

    PubMed

    Porth, A J; Niehoff, C; Matthies, H K

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, the successful introduction of a commercially available electronic patient record archiving system at the Hannover Medical School is described. Since 1996, more than 11 million document sheets of 130,000 patient records have been stored electronically. Currently, 100,000 sheets are stored each week.

  15. Teaching Electronic Records Management in the Archival Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Electronic records management has been incorporated into the archival curriculum in North America since the 1990s. This study reported in this paper provides a systematic analysis of the content of electronic records management (ERM) courses currently taught in archival education programs. Through the analysis of course combinations and their…

  16. Electronic versus paper records: documentation of pressure ulcer data.

    PubMed

    Tubaishat, Ahmad; Tawalbeh, Loai I; AlAzzam, Manar; AlBashtawy, Mohammed; Batiha, Abdul-Monim

    The documentation of patient data on health records is a vital component of the care process. Accurate and complete recording of this data is a necessary practice. The adoption of electronic health records to improve the quality of nursing documentation is on the rise. This study compares the accuracy and completeness of pressure ulcer data documentation between electronic and paper records. A descriptive, comparative design with a retrospective review of patient records. Settings and sample: Two hospitals were chosen purposefully, one using electronic recording of patient data and the other using paper records. In the first phase, all hospitalised patients aged 18 years and over were inspected for pressure ulcers. In the second phase, the files of patients with pressure ulcers were audited. Of the 52 patients with ulcers found in the hospital that used an electronic system, 43 of their records documented the pressure ulcers (83%). Of the 55 patients with pressure ulcers in the hospital using paper records, 39 files had corresponding documentation of the presence of a pressure ulcer (71%). In terms of accuracy and completeness, more comprehensive documentation practice was found on the electronic health records compared with paper records. However, both types of systems have shortcomings in the practice of pressure ulcer data documentation.

  17. 63 FR 39186 - Electronic Records Work Group Draft Report; Introductory Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-07-21

    ... and Records Administration Electronic Records Work Group Draft Report; Introductory Information... 21, 1998 / Notices#0;#0; ] NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Electronic Records Work Group... products developed by the Electronic Records Work Group relating to the disposition of Federal...

  18. Electronically Generated Records and Twentieth Century History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zweig, Ronald W.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that the electronic generation of documents in modern offices will transform the nature of archives and, therefore, the techniques of historical research. Discusses advantages and disadvantages for historical researchers. Urges historians to express their concerns about these issues to the wider scholarly community. (CFR)

  19. Operating Room Delays: Meaningful Use in Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Van Winkle, Rachelle A; Champagne, Mary T; Gilman-Mays, Meri; Aucoin, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Perioperative areas are the most costly to operate and account for more than 40% of expenses. The high costs prompted one organization to analyze surgical delays through a retrospective review of their new electronic health record. Electronic health records have made it easier to access and aggregate clinical data; 2123 operating room cases were analyzed. Implementing a new electronic health record system is complex; inaccurate data and poor implementation can introduce new problems. Validating the electronic health record development processes determines the ease of use and the user interface, specifically related to user compliance with the intent of the electronic health record development. The revalidation process after implementation determines if the intent of the design was fulfilled and data can be meaningfully used. In this organization, the data fields completed through automation provided quantifiable, meaningful data. However, data fields completed by staff that required subjective decision making resulted in incomplete data nearly 24% of the time. The ease of use was further complicated by 490 permutations (combinations of delay types and reasons) that were built into the electronic health record. Operating room delay themes emerged notwithstanding the significant complexity of the electronic health record build; however, improved accuracy could improve meaningful data collection and a more accurate root cause analysis of operating room delays. Accurate and meaningful use of data affords a more reliable approach in quality, safety, and cost-effective initiatives.

  20. [A practicable model of a secure electronic medical record system].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan-zhong; Zhong, Le-Haiz

    2006-09-01

    In this article, a new application model has been given for digital signing technology used in the Electronic Medical Record system, which uses digital signature to implement authentication mechanism and doctor signing, and uses a notarial digital signature server to implement the third party's digital signature for notarial mechanism. It can prevent the others from modifying the doctor's record and prevent the doctor himself from modifying the record as well. Case history database preserves signed data to ensure the authenticity and validity, in law, of the Electronic Medical Record.

  1. Electronic document imaging can improve land records management

    SciTech Connect

    Cisco, S.L. )

    1995-02-13

    Electronic document imaging can streamline land records management, giving oil companies faster, more accurate, and more reliable access to millions of records. These imaging systems can preserve deteriorating files and facilitate recovery from disasters like flooding or fire. Other benefits include the elimination of unnecessary records, easier duplication of necessary records, and reduced storage costs. Land records are a large volume of a company's overall collection of documents, and storing paper records takes up much of a company's premises or requires off-site storage at commercial facilities. Cisco and Associates surveyed 15 upstream petroleum companies to investigate how they manage active and inactive land records. The companies surveyed are either considering or in the process of redesigning their land administration departments. This paper discusses advantages and disadvantages of electronic imaging systems and results from the survey.

  2. The effects of an electronic medical record on the completeness of documentation in the anesthesia record.

    PubMed

    Jang, Junghwa; Yu, Seung Hum; Kim, Chun-Bae; Moon, Youngkyu; Kim, Sukil

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the completeness of anesthesia recording before and after the introduction of an electronic anesthesia record. The study was conducted in a Korean teaching hospital where the EMR was implemented in October 2008. One hundred paper anesthesia records from July to September 2008 and 150 electronic anesthesia records during the same period in 2009 were randomly sampled. Thirty-four essential items were selected out of all the anesthesia items and grouped into automatically transferred items and manual entry items. 1, .5 and 0 points were given for each item of complete entry, incomplete entry and no entry respectively. The completeness of documentation was defined as the sum of the scores. The influencing factors on the completeness of documentation were evaluated in total and by the groups. The average completeness score of the electronic anesthesia records was 3.15% higher than that of the paper records. A multiple regression model showed the type of the anesthesia record was a significant factor on the completeness of anesthesia records in all items (β=.98, p<.05) and automatically transferred items (β=.56, p<.01). The type of the anesthesia records had no influence on the completeness in manual entry items. The completeness of an anesthesia record was improved after the implementation of the electronic anesthesia record. The reuse of the data from the EMR was the main contributor to the improved completeness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. From planning to realisation of an electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Krämer, T; Rapp, R; Krämer, K-L

    1999-03-01

    The high complex requirements on information and information flow in todays hospitals can only be accomplished by the use of modern Information Systems (IS). In order to achieve this, the Stiftung Orthopädische Universitätsklinik has carried out first the Project "Strategic Informations System Planning" in 1993. Then realizing the neccessary infrastructure (network; client-server) from 1993 to 1997, and finally started the introduction of modern IS (SAP R/3 and IXOS-Archive) in the clinical area. One of the approved goal was the replacement of the paper medical record by an up-to-date electronical medical record. In this article the following three topics will be discussed: the difference between the up-to-date electronical medical record and the electronically archived finished cases, steps performed by our clinic to realize the up-to-date electronical medical record and the problems occured during this process.

  4. Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities

    MedlinePlus

    ... and use varied by facility characteristics. Figure 1. Percentages of residential care communities using electronic health records, by selected community characteristics: United States, 2010 NOTES: For all characteristics, differences were significant at p < 0.05. Figure excludes ...

  5. Platform links clinical data with electronic health records

    Cancer.gov

    To make data gathered from patients in clinical trials available for use in standard care, NCI has created a new computer tool to support interoperability between clinical research and electronic health record systems. This new software represents an inno

  6. Longevity of Electronic/Digital Records: An Annotated Bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Deken, J

    2004-03-02

    Current resources, publications, web sites and projects on the longevity and preservation of electronic/digital records are provided, along with brief comments about sites and publications of particular relevance and interest.

  7. Electronic circuit breaker for recording and stimulation from same electrode.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, A Z; Fernández-Guardiola, A; Solís, H

    1978-08-01

    An electronic circuit breaker is described which allows stimulation and recording through the same electrode and automatically shifts modes with a minimal delay. This circuit has been used efficiently in the experimental study of convulsive activity (Kindling).

  8. 76 FR 52991 - Renewal of Advisory Committee on Electronic Records Archives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Renewal of Advisory Committee on Electronic Records Archives AGENCY: National... Administration's (NARA) Advisory Committee on Electronic Records Archives. In accordance with Office of... Electronic Records Archives in NARA's ceiling of discretionary advisory committees. FOR FURTHER...

  9. Are electronic health records ready for genomic medicine?

    PubMed

    Scheuner, Maren T; de Vries, Han; Kim, Benjamin; Meili, Robin C; Olmstead, Sarah H; Teleki, Stephanie

    2009-07-01

    The goal of this project was to assess genetic/genomic content in electronic health records. Semistructured interviews were conducted with key informants. Questions addressed documentation, organization, display, decision support and security of family history and genetic test information, and challenges and opportunities relating to integrating genetic/genomics content in electronic health records. There were 56 participants: 10 electronic health record specialists, 18 primary care clinicians, 16 medical geneticists, and 12 genetic counselors. Few clinicians felt their electronic record met their current genetic/genomic medicine needs. Barriers to integration were mostly related to problems with family history data collection, documentation, and organization. Lack of demand for genetics content and privacy concerns were also mentioned as challenges. Data elements and functionality requirements that clinicians see include: pedigree drawing; clinical decision support for familial risk assessment and genetic testing indications; a patient portal for patient-entered data; and standards for data elements, terminology, structure, interoperability, and clinical decision support rules. Although most said that there is little impact of genetics/genomics on electronic records today, many stated genetics/genomics would be a driver of content in the next 5-10 years. Electronic health records have the potential to enable clinical integration of genetic/genomic medicine and improve delivery of personalized health care; however, structured and standardized data elements and functionality requirements are needed.

  10. Text mining electronic health records to identify hospital adverse events.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Hardahl, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Manual reviews of health records to identify possible adverse events are time consuming. We are developing a method based on natural language processing to quickly search electronic health records for common triggers and adverse events. Our results agree fairly well with those obtained using manual reviews, and we therefore believe that it is possible to develop automatic tools for monitoring aspects of patient safety.

  11. Physician Interaction with Electronic Medical Records: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noteboom, Cherie Bakker

    2010-01-01

    The integration of EHR (Electronic Health Records) in IT infrastructures supporting organizations enable improved access to and recording of patient data, enhanced ability to make better and more-timely decisions, and improved quality and reduced errors. Despite these benefits, there are mixed results as to the use of EHR. The literature suggests…

  12. Physician Interaction with Electronic Medical Records: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noteboom, Cherie Bakker

    2010-01-01

    The integration of EHR (Electronic Health Records) in IT infrastructures supporting organizations enable improved access to and recording of patient data, enhanced ability to make better and more-timely decisions, and improved quality and reduced errors. Despite these benefits, there are mixed results as to the use of EHR. The literature suggests…

  13. Next-generation phenotyping of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Hripcsak, George; Albers, David J

    2013-01-01

    The national adoption of electronic health records (EHR) promises to make an unprecedented amount of data available for clinical research, but the data are complex, inaccurate, and frequently missing, and the record reflects complex processes aside from the patient's physiological state. We believe that the path forward requires studying the EHR as an object of interest in itself, and that new models, learning from data, and collaboration will lead to efficient use of the valuable information currently locked in health records.

  14. Next-generation phenotyping of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Hripcsak, George; Albers, David J

    2013-01-01

    The national adoption of electronic health records (EHR) promises to make an unprecedented amount of data available for clinical research, but the data are complex, inaccurate, and frequently missing, and the record reflects complex processes aside from the patient's physiological state. We believe that the path forward requires studying the EHR as an object of interest in itself, and that new models, learning from data, and collaboration will lead to efficient use of the valuable information currently locked in health records. PMID:22955496

  15. Electronic health records within integrated care in Germany.

    PubMed

    Jähn, Karl; Gärtig-Daugs, Anja; Nagel, Eckhard

    2005-04-01

    The planned introduction of an electronic health card is seen as a milestone in the dissemination of extended electronic health records in Germany. This paper deals with the main issues likely to result from the use of the electronic health insurance card. The role of the patient in the health care process and the patients enhanced access to his or her personal medical record are reflected. A high level of acceptance of the electronic health insurance card and extended electronic documentation procedures can be expected if ethical, legal, and technological concerns of the public are addressed and appropriate incentives are established. Finally, the electronic health insurance card can serve as a useful aid to support the ongoing implementation of disease management programs for the most important chronic conditions in Germany.

  16. Health information technology and electronic health records in neurologic practice.

    PubMed

    Esper, Gregory J; Drogan, Oksana; Henderson, William S; Becker, Amanda; Avitzur, Orly; Hier, Daniel B

    2010-05-01

    The tipping point for electronic health records (EHR) has been reached and universal adoption in the United States is now inevitable. Neurologists will want to choose their electronic health record prudently. Careful selection, contracting, planning, and training are essential to successful implementation. Neurologists need to examine their workflow carefully and make adjustments to ensure that efficiency is increased. Neurologists will want to achieve a significant return on investment and qualify for all applicable financial incentives from payers, including CMS. EHRs are not just record-keeping tools but play an important role in quality improvement, evidence-based medicine, pay for performance, patient education, bio-surveillance, data warehousing, and data exchange.

  17. Solving incompatibilities between electronic records for orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Magni, Antonio; de Oliveira Albuquerque, Robson; de Sousa, Rafael Timóteo; Hans, Mark G; Magni, Franco G

    2007-07-01

    Today, orthodontists should not need to burden their work load with tasks such as figuring out how to send patient information to colleagues or how to share the same patient record across different software programs. In a long-term attempt to lighten these tasks, we are developing a standard for electronic orthodontic patient records to enable a seamless interchange of data between software programs. This article describes a practical proposal that integrates 2 existing standards, HL7 and DICOM, to create a standard for electronic orthodontic patient records.

  18. Embedding an electronic health record within a health visiting service.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Mandy; Dobbs, Janice; Monkhouse, Aileen

    2012-09-01

    County Durham and Darlington's implementation of an electronic health record across community health services provided an ideal opportunity for health visitors to take the lead in enhancing the system to reflect their paper clinical record. Practitioners' concerns, fears and anxieties in relation to confidentiality and professional accountability resulted in the project being further developed to include the employment of three full-time clinical IT facilitators. These were experienced health visitors and 'IT champions' with a sound knowledge of information governance with a specific remit to provide clinical support and supervision to health visitors in electronic clinical record keeping. These practitioners were instrumental in developing the system and proved the key to the project's success and ensuring that the electronic record was embedded into health visiting practice to improve the quality of patient care.

  19. Where is nursing in the electronic health care record?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Beverly; Petrovskaya, Olga; McIntyre, Marjorie; Frisch, Noreen

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore the possibilities for documenting professional nursing practice in an electronic health record. Recognizing that there are a variety of approaches to electronic documentation, the intent of this discussion is to generate a general rather than a particular approach to this issue. Nurses themselves must determine the ways in which professional nursing care will be captured in the electronic systems used in their facilities. Questions that arise from nursing include: How can nurses balance generalized care and protocol management with the need for documentation of each individual's nursing needs and particular experiences? How can the goals of nursing care be incorporated into the record? How can nursing actions/interventions be clearly communicated to all members of the health care team? In what ways can an electronic record document collaboration with the client to determine individualized outcomes of care and treatment? In considering these questions a number of issues arise: the selection of standardized languages to be used in the records, the title of the record, the tension between coding and text, the accessibility and transferability of the record, the ability to retrieve data on nursing outcomes through data mining techniques, ownership of the record, and privacy/security of the information stored. Although the paper will make no attempt to answer these questions it will draw on relevant journal articles to provide a context for this pivotal change in that way we account for health care practice.

  20. Electronic Healthcare Records: an essential part of Health Telematics Applications.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, R; Hildebrand, C; Moser, W

    2000-01-01

    A healthcare record should ideally be a repository of data, describing a person's health and how it is being supported; and not, as it is now, describing a person's diseases and treatment only. The healthcare record is the basis for monitoring and decisions. Therefore it should be open and available to all authorized health professionals and to the patient. To make this easier is one of the major advantages of electronic healthcare records (EHCR). The computer-based patient record could make major contributions to improving the healthcare system. This is the motivation to initiatives, projects and routine implementations of electronic patient records. The European Union and national initiatives have put major efforts into the support of this main field of medical information processing.

  1. Are In-Bed Electronic Weights Recorded in the Medical Record Accurate?

    PubMed

    Gerl, Heather; Miko, Alexandra; Nelson, Mandy; Godaire, Lori

    2016-01-01

    This study found large discrepancies between in-bed weights recorded in the medical record and carefully obtained standing weights with a calibrated, electronic bedside scale. This discrepancy appears to be related to inadequate bed calibration before patient admission and having excessive linen, clothing, and/or equipment on the bed during weighing by caregivers.

  2. The psychiatric medical record, HIPAA, and the use of electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Houston, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the practical and legal issues related to the psychiatric medical record, with an emphasis on the issues related to confidentiality. Implications of HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) legislation for the practice of child and adolescent psychiatry are addressed. The advantages and disadvantages of electronic medical records are reviewed, with guidelines for selecting software for solo and group practices.

  3. The 'catch' mechanism in molluscan muscle: an electron microscopy study of freeze-substituted anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, P M; Elliott, A

    1989-08-01

    A method for quick-freezing muscles while observing their mechanical properties until the moment of freezing is described. This method was used to freeze the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis. Intact muscle in the presence of sucrose as a cryoprotectant was freeze-substituted in acetone, fixed and embedded for electron microscopy. ABRM was frozen in a number of mechanical states including 'catch', the state of high passive tension particularly associated with some molluscan muscles. Transverse sections were examined to determine the distribution of filaments in the muscle cells. In the relaxed muscle thick and thin filaments are fairly randomly distributed. Groups of thin filaments and of thick filaments are often seen, and there is no obvious association between the two types of filaments. In contrast, in rigor muscles, both glycerol-extracted and intact, most of the thin filaments were found to lie in rings or rosettes around the thick filaments. In some places bridges between thick and thin filaments could be distinguished. In actively contracting muscle (phasic contraction) the appearance is intermediate between that of the relaxed and rigor muscles. Many thick filaments are surrounded by rosettes of thin filaments but many of the thin filaments are grouped and have no connections with thick filaments. The 'catch' state, left after a period of tonic contraction, is similar in its distribution of thick and thin filaments to the active state, many of the thin filaments lying between the thick. Frequently thick and thin filaments seem to be closer together than in other states of the muscle where a pronounced exclusion zone is present around the thick filaments. There is no evidence for association between the thick filaments. The different distribution of thin filaments in the different states is consistent with the previously described X-ray diffraction data if it is assumed that most of the contribution to the equatorial reflection at 12

  4. 36 CFR 1236.10 - What records management controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information systems? 1236.10 Section 1236.10... Implementing Electronic Information Systems § 1236.10 What records management controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information systems? The following types of records management controls...

  5. 36 CFR 1236.10 - What records management controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information systems? 1236.10 Section 1236.10... Implementing Electronic Information Systems § 1236.10 What records management controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information systems? The following types of records management controls...

  6. 36 CFR 1236.10 - What records management controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information systems? 1236.10 Section 1236.10... Implementing Electronic Information Systems § 1236.10 What records management controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information systems? The following types of records management controls...

  7. 36 CFR 1236.10 - What records management controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information systems? 1236.10 Section 1236.10... Implementing Electronic Information Systems § 1236.10 What records management controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information systems? The following types of records management controls...

  8. 36 CFR 1236.10 - What records management controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Implementing Electronic Information Systems § 1236.10 What records management controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information systems? The following types of records management controls are... controls must agencies establish for records in electronic information systems? 1236.10 Section...

  9. Moving electronic medical records upstream: incorporating social determinants of health.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Laura M; Tirozzi, Karen J; Manchanda, Rishi; Burns, Abby R; Sandel, Megan T

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of the biological pathways and mechanisms connecting social factors with health has increased exponentially over the past 25 years, yet in most clinical settings, screening and intervention around social determinants of health are not part of standard clinical care. Electronic medical records provide new opportunities for assessing and managing social needs in clinical settings, particularly those serving vulnerable populations. To illustrate the feasibility of capturing information and promoting interventions related to social determinants of health in electronic medical records. Three case studies were examined in which electronic medical records have been used to collect data and address social determinants of health in clinical settings. From these case studies, we identified multiple functions that electronic medical records can perform to facilitate the integration of social determinants of health into clinical systems, including screening, triaging, referring, tracking, and data sharing. If barriers related to incentives, training, and privacy can be overcome, electronic medical record systems can improve the integration of social determinants of health into healthcare delivery systems. More evidence is needed to evaluate the impact of such integration on health care outcomes before widespread adoption can be recommended. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The use of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Marca, Guillem; Perez, Angel; Blanco-Garcia, Martin German; Miravalles, Elena; Soley, Pere; Ortiga, Berta

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the level of adoption of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals and to identify potential barriers and facilitators to this process. We used an observational cross-sectional design. The survey was conducted between September and December 2011, using an electronic questionnaire distributed through email. We obtained a 30% response rate from the 214 hospitals contacted, all belonging to the Spanish National Health Service. The level of adoption of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals was found to be high: 39.1% of hospitals surveyed had a comprehensive EHR system while a basic system was functioning in 32.8% of the cases. However, in 2011 one third of the hospitals did not have a basic electronic health record system, although some have since implemented electronic functionalities, particularly those related to clinical documentation and patient administration. Respondents cited the acquisition and implementation costs as the main barriers to implementation. Facilitators for EHR implementation were: the possibility to hire technical support, both during and post implementation; security certification warranty; and objective third-party evaluations of EHR products. In conclusion, the number of hospitals that have electronic health records is in general high, being relatively higher in medium-sized hospitals.

  11. Development of a knowledge-based electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Safran, C; Rind, D M; Sands, D Z; Davis, R B; Wald, J; Slack, W V

    1996-01-01

    To help clinicians care for patients with HIV infection, we developed an interactive knowledge-based electronic patient record that integrates rule-based decision support and full-text information retrieval with an online patient record. This highly interactive clinical workstation now allows the clinicians at a large primary care practice (30,000 ambulatory visits per year) to use online information resources and fully electronic patient records during all patient encounters. The resulting practice database is continually updated with outcome data on a cohort of 700 patients with HIV infection. As a byproduct of this integrated system, we have developed improved statistical methods to measure the effects of electronic alerts and reminders.

  12. Implementation of standardized nomenclature in the electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Klehr, Joan; Hafner, Jennifer; Spelz, Leah Mylrea; Steen, Sara; Weaver, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    To describe a customized electronic medical record documentation system which provides an electronic health record, Epic, which was implemented in December 2006 using standardized taxonomies for nursing documentation. Descriptive data is provided regarding the development, implementation, and evaluation processes for the electronic medical record system. Nurses used standardized nursing nomenclature including NANDA-I diagnoses, Nursing Interventions Classification, and Nursing Outcomes Classification in a measurable and user-friendly format using the care plan activity. Key factors in the success of the project included close collaboration among staff nurses and information technology staff, ongoing support and encouragement from the vice president/chief nursing officer, the ready availability of expert resources, and nursing ownership of the project. Use of this evidence-based documentation enhanced institutional leadership in clinical documentation.

  13. Publication bias in clinical trials of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Vawdrey, David K; Hripcsak, George

    2013-02-01

    To measure the rate of non-publication and assess possible publication bias in clinical trials of electronic health records. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov to identify registered clinical trials of electronic health records and searched the biomedical literature and contacted trial investigators to determine whether the results of the trials were published. Publications were judged as positive, negative, or neutral according to the primary outcome. Seventy-six percent of trials had publications describing trial results; of these, 74% were positive, 21% were neutral, and 4% were negative (harmful). Of unpublished studies for which the investigator responded, 43% were positive, 57% were neutral, and none were negative; the lower rate of positive results was significant (p<0.001). The rate of non-publication in electronic health record studies is similar to that in other biomedical studies. There appears to be a bias toward publication of positive trials in this domain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Using Electronic Health Records to Help Coordinate Care

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Lynda C; Anderson, Gerard F; Kues, Irvin W

    2004-01-01

    The use of electronic health records that can securely transmit patient data among physicians will help coordinate the care of 60 million Americans with multiple chronic conditions. This article summarizes the different organizations in the United States that are developing this technology. It discusses some of the problems encountered and the current initiatives to resolve them. The article concludes with three recommendations for enhancing care coordination: (1) a common health record, such as the Continuity of Care Record, to facilitate the exchange of clinical information among health providers; (2) regional governance structures to encourage the exchange of clinical data; and (3) payment by purchasers of care, both public and private, to physicians for using electronic health records. PMID:15330973

  15. Electronic health records and community health surveillance of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Flood, Tracy L; Zhao, Ying-Qi; Tomayko, Emily J; Tandias, Aman; Carrel, Aaron L; Hanrahan, Lawrence P

    2015-02-01

    Childhood obesity remains a public health concern, and tracking local progress may require local surveillance systems. Electronic health record data may provide a cost-effective solution. To demonstrate the feasibility of estimating childhood obesity rates using de-identified electronic health records for the purpose of public health surveillance and health promotion. Data were extracted from the Public Health Information Exchange (PHINEX) database. PHINEX contains de-identified electronic health records from patients primarily in south central Wisconsin. Data on children and adolescents (aged 2-19 years, 2011-2012, n=93,130) were transformed in a two-step procedure that adjusted for missing data and weighted for a national population distribution. Weighted and adjusted obesity rates were compared to the 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Data were analyzed in 2014. The weighted and adjusted obesity rate was 16.1% (95% CI=15.8, 16.4). Non-Hispanic white children and adolescents (11.8%, 95% CI=11.5, 12.1) had lower obesity rates compared to non-Hispanic black (22.0%, 95% CI=20.7, 23.2) and Hispanic (23.8%, 95% CI=22.4, 25.1) patients. Overall, electronic health record-derived point estimates were comparable to NHANES, revealing disparities from preschool onward. Electronic health records that are weighted and adjusted to account for intrinsic bias may create an opportunity for comparing regional disparities with precision. In PHINEX patients, childhood obesity disparities were measurable from a young age, highlighting the need for early intervention for at-risk children. The electronic health record is a cost-effective, promising tool for local obesity prevention efforts. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Thomas G; Gunser, John M; Saviello, George M

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the design and use of Epic Systems software for documentation of perfusion activities as part of the patient electronic medical record. The University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics adapted the Anesthesia software module and developed an integrated perfusion/anesthesia record for the documentation of cardiac and non-cardiac surgical procedures. This project involved multiple committees, approvals, and training to successfully implement. This article will describe our documentation options, concepts, design, challenges, training, and implementation during our initial experience.

  17. National electronic medical records integration on cloud computing system.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Hebah; El-Masri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Few Healthcare providers have an advanced level of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) adoption. Others have a low level and most have no EMR at all. Cloud computing technology is a new emerging technology that has been used in other industry and showed a great success. Despite the great features of Cloud computing, they haven't been utilized fairly yet in healthcare industry. This study presents an innovative Healthcare Cloud Computing system for Integrating Electronic Health Record (EHR). The proposed Cloud system applies the Cloud Computing technology on EHR system, to present a comprehensive EHR integrated environment.

  18. Electron beam tomography of magnetic recording head fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, R. P.; Liu, Y.; Martin, J. L.; Arnoldussen, T. C.

    1995-09-01

    The quantitative evaluation of the 3D form of the magnetic field from a thin film recording head has been achieved by electron beam tomography. The data sets for tomographic reconstruction were obtained using the differential phase contrast mode of Lorentz electron microscopy applied in a 200 kV (scanning) transmission instrument. The high accelerating voltage and a novel method of mounting the head in the microscope offer advantages over previous experiments. The two reconstruction algorithms, which have been used previously, have been implemented and the results of their application are compared for theoretical data derived from a model head field and for data obtained experimentally from a production recording head.

  19. An electronic patient record implementation using clinical document architecture.

    PubMed

    Poulymenopoulou, M; Vassilacopoulos, G

    2004-01-01

    Electronic patient records (EPRs) provide the means for integrated access to patient information that may be scattered across dispersed healthcare organizations that, in general, use heterogeneous systems in order to support their internal functions. XML language and Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) provides a mechanism for defining, structuring, manipulating and visualizing patient medical data using the same semantics through web. In this paper, a prototype implementation of a web-based electronic patient record (EPR) system using XML for data format and CDA for defining and structuring patient clinical documents is presented.

  20. Electronic health records: eliciting behavioral health providers' beliefs.

    PubMed

    Shank, Nancy; Willborn, Elizabeth; Pytlikzillig, Lisa; Noel, Harmonijoie

    2012-04-01

    Interviews with 32 community behavioral health providers elicited perceived benefits and barriers of using electronic health records. Themes identified were (a) quality of care, (b) privacy and security, and (c) delivery of services. Benefits to quality of care were mentioned by 100% of the providers, and barriers by 59% of providers. Barriers involving privacy and security concerns were mentioned by 100% of providers, and benefits by 22%. Barriers to delivery of services were mentioned by 97% of providers, and benefits by 66%. Most providers (81%) expressed overall positive support for electronic behavioral health records.

  1. Template and Model Driven Development of Standardized Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Kropf, Stefan; Chalopin, Claire; Denecke, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Digital patient modeling targets the integration of distributed patient data into one overarching model. For this integration process, both a theoretical standard-based model and information structures combined with concrete instructions in form of a lightweight development process of single standardized Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are needed. In this paper, we introduce such a process along side a standard-based architecture. It allows the modeling and implementation of EHRs in a lightweight Electronic Health Record System (EHRS) core. The approach is demonstrated and tested by a prototype implementation. The results show that the suggested approach is useful and facilitates the development of standardized EHRSs.

  2. Integrated Electronic Health Record Database Management System: A Proposal.

    PubMed

    Schiza, Eirini C; Panos, George; David, Christiana; Petkov, Nicolai; Schizas, Christos N

    2015-01-01

    eHealth has attained significant importance as a new mechanism for health management and medical practice. However, the technological growth of eHealth is still limited by technical expertise needed to develop appropriate products. Researchers are constantly in a process of developing and testing new software for building and handling Clinical Medical Records, being renamed to Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems; EHRs take full advantage of the technological developments and at the same time provide increased diagnostic and treatment capabilities to doctors. A step to be considered for facilitating this aim is to involve more actively the doctor in building the fundamental steps for creating the EHR system and database. A global clinical patient record database management system can be electronically created by simulating real life medical practice health record taking and utilizing, analyzing the recorded parameters. This proposed approach demonstrates the effective implementation of a universal classic medical record in electronic form, a procedure by which, clinicians are led to utilize algorithms and intelligent systems for their differential diagnosis, final diagnosis and treatment strategies.

  3. The ImmProve Project: Leveraging electronic health record data to promote immunization delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bundy, David G.; Persing, Nichole M.; Solomon, Barry S.; King, Tracy M.; Murakami, Peter; Thompson, Richard E.; Engineer, Lilly D.; Lehmann, Christoph U.; Miller, Marlene R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Though an essential pediatric preventive service, immunizations are challenging to deliver reliably. Our objective was to measure the impact on pediatric immunization rates of providing clinicians with electronic health record-derived immunization prompting. Methods Operating in a large, urban, hospital-based pediatric primary care clinic, we evaluated 2 interventions to improve immunization delivery to children ages 2, 6, and 13 years: point-of-care, patient-specific electronic clinical decision support (CDS) when children overdue for immunizations presented for care and provider-specific bulletins listing children overdue for immunizations. Results Overall, the proportion of children up-to-date for a composite of recommended immunizations at ages 2, 6, and 13 years was not different in the intervention (CDS active) and historical control (CDS not active) periods; historical immunization rates were high. The proportion of children receiving 2 doses of hepatitis A immunization prior to their second birthday was significantly improved during the intervention period. Human papilloma virus (HPV) immunization delivery was low during both control and intervention periods and was unchanged for 13-year-olds. For 14-year-olds, however, 4 of the 5 highest quarterly rates of complete HPV immunization occurred in the final year of the intervention. Provider-specific bulletins listing children overdue for immunizations increased the likelihood of identified children receiving catch-up hepatitis A immunizations (hazard ratio: 1.32 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12–1.56]); results for HPV and the composite of recommended immunizations were of a similar magnitude but not statistically significant. Conclusions In our patient population, with high baseline uptake of recommended immunizations, electronic health record-derived immunization prompting had a limited effect on immunization delivery. Benefit was more clearly demonstrated for newer immunizations with lower

  4. Improving immunization delivery using an electronic health record: the ImmProve project.

    PubMed

    Bundy, David G; Persing, Nichole M; Solomon, Barry S; King, Tracy M; Murakami, Peter N; Thompson, Richard E; Engineer, Lilly D; Lehmann, Christoph U; Miller, Marlene R

    2013-01-01

    Though an essential pediatric preventive service, immunizations are challenging to deliver reliably. Our objective was to measure the impact on pediatric immunization rates of providing clinicians with electronic health record-derived immunization prompting. Operating in a large, urban, hospital-based pediatric primary care clinic, we evaluated 2 interventions to improve immunization delivery to children ages 2, 6, and 13 years: point-of-care, patient-specific electronic clinical decision support (CDS) when children overdue for immunizations presented for care, and provider-specific bulletins listing children overdue for immunizations. Overall, the proportion of children up to date for a composite of recommended immunizations at ages 2, 6, and 13 years was not different in the intervention (CDS active) and historical control (CDS not active) periods; historical immunization rates were high. The proportion of children receiving 2 doses of hepatitis A immunization before their second birthday was significantly improved during the intervention period. Human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization delivery was low during both control and intervention periods and was unchanged for 13-year-olds. For 14-year-olds, however, 4 of the 5 highest quarterly rates of complete HPV immunization occurred in the final year of the intervention. Provider-specific bulletins listing children overdue for immunizations increased the likelihood of identified children receiving catch-up hepatitis A immunizations (hazard ratio 1.32; 95% confidence interval 1.12-1.56); results for HPV and the composite of recommended immunizations were of a similar magnitude but not statistically significant. In our patient population, with high baseline uptake of recommended immunizations, electronic health record-derived immunization prompting had a limited effect on immunization delivery. Benefit was more clearly demonstrated for newer immunizations with lower baseline uptake. Copyright © 2013 Academic

  5. Dynamic optometer. [for electronic recording of human lens anterior surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    A dynamic optometer that electronically records the position of the anterior surface of the human lens is described. The geometrical optics of the eye and optometer, and the scattering of light from the lens, are closely examined to determine the optimum conditions for adjustment of the instrument. The light detector and associated electronics are also considered, and the operating conditions for obtaining the best signal-to-noise ratio are determined.

  6. Electronic health records: what does your signature signify?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Electronic health records serve multiple purposes, including clinical communication, legal documentation, financial transaction capture, research and analytics. Electronic signatures attached to entries in EHRs have different logical and legal meanings for different users. Some of these are vestiges from historic paper formats that require reconsideration. Traditionally accepted functions of signatures, such as identity verification, attestation, consent, authorization and non-repudiation can become ambiguous in the context of computer-assisted workflow processes that incorporate functions like logins, auto-fill and audit trails. This article exposes the incompatibility of expectations among typical users of electronically signed information. PMID:22888846

  7. Interoperability of electronic health records and personal health records: key interoperability issues associated with information exchange.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Simone; Lippitt, Alex

    2009-01-01

    As patients receive medical care, their clinical history may be tracked and recorded by multiple electronic systems developed by independent vendors. Medical providers might use electronic health record (EHR) software tailored to the needs of trained medical personnel, whereas patients may interact with personal health records (PHR). The purpose of this essay is to identify the key interoperability issues associated with the information exchange between these two types of systems and offer an approach for enhancing interoperability. This article is part of a series of unpublished essays titled A Community View on How Personal Health Records Can Improve Patient Care and Outcomes in Many Healthcare Settings, a collaborative project of Northern Illinois Physicians For Connectivity and the Coalition for Quality and Patient Safety of Chicagoland. For further information on how you can obtain copies of the complete work, contact the principle Dr. Stasia Kahn at Stash5@sbcglobal.net.

  8. Quality and Electronic Health Records in Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesh, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Adoption and use of health information technology, the electronic health record (EHR) in particular, has the potential to help improve the quality of care, increase patient safety, and reduce health care costs. Unfortunately, adoption and use of health information technology has been slow, especially when compared to the adoption and use of…

  9. Quality and Electronic Health Records in Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesh, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Adoption and use of health information technology, the electronic health record (EHR) in particular, has the potential to help improve the quality of care, increase patient safety, and reduce health care costs. Unfortunately, adoption and use of health information technology has been slow, especially when compared to the adoption and use of…

  10. School Nurse Role in Electronic School Health Records. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiltz, Cynthia; Johnson, Katie; Lechtenberg, Julia Rae; Maughan, Erin; Trefry, Sharonlee

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are essential for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) to provide efficient and effective care in the school and monitor the health of the entire student population. It is also the position of…

  11. Information Management: Challenges in Managing and Preserving Electronic Records

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    GAO United States General Accounting OfficeReport to Congressional RequestersJune 2002 INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Challenges in Managing and... INFORMATION MANAGEMENT : Challenges in Managing and Preserving Electronic Records Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s...archiving system, which will be based on new technologies that are still the subject of research. June 2002 INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Challenges in Managing

  12. Physician Sensemaking and Readiness for Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riesenmy, Kelly Rouse

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore physician sensemaking and readiness to implement electronic medical records (EMR) as a first step to finding strategies that enhance EMR adoption behaviors. Design/methodology/approach: The case study approach provides a detailed analysis of individuals within an organizational unit. Using a…

  13. Notification: Audit of Certain EPA Electronic Records Management Practices

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OA-FY13-0113, December 13, 2012. This memorandum is to notify you that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Inspector General, plans to begin an audit of certain EPA electronic records management practices.

  14. The electronic disability record: purpose, parameters, and model use case.

    PubMed

    Tulu, Bengisu; Horan, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    The active engagement of consumers is an important factor in achieving widespread success of health information systems. The disability community represents a major segment of the healthcare arena, with more than 50 million Americans experiencing some form of disability. In keeping with the "consumer-driven" approach to e-health systems, this paper considers the distinctive aspects of electronic and personal health record use by this segment of society. Drawing upon the information shared during two national policy forums on this topic, the authors present the concept of Electronic Disability Records (EDR). The authors outline the purpose and parameters of such records, with specific attention to its ability to organize health and financial data in a manner that can be used to expedite the disability determination process. In doing so, the authors discuss its interaction with Electronic Health Records (EHR) and Personal Health Records (PHR). The authors then draw upon these general parameters to outline a model use case for disability determination and discuss related implications for disability health management. The paper further reports on the subsequent considerations of these and related deliberations by the American Health Information Community (AHIC).

  15. The Electronic Disability Record: Purpose, Parameters, and Model Use Case

    PubMed Central

    Tulu, Bengisu; Horan, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    The active engagement of consumers is an important factor in achieving widespread success of health information systems. The disability community represents a major segment of the healthcare arena, with more than 50 million Americans experiencing some form of disability. In keeping with the “consumer-driven” approach to e-health systems, this paper considers the distinctive aspects of electronic and personal health record use by this segment of society. Drawing upon the information shared during two national policy forums on this topic, the authors present the concept of Electronic Disability Records (EDR). The authors outline the purpose and parameters of such records, with specific attention to its ability to organize health and financial data in a manner that can be used to expedite the disability determination process. In doing so, the authors discuss its interaction with Electronic Health Records (EHR) and Personal Health Records (PHR). The authors then draw upon these general parameters to outline a model use case for disability determination and discuss related implications for disability health management. The paper further reports on the subsequent considerations of these and related deliberations by the American Health Information Community (AHIC). PMID:18952950

  16. The electronic patient record: a strategic planning framework.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D B; Marafioti, S; Carter, M; Kunov, H; Dolan, A

    1995-01-01

    Sunnybrook Health Science Center (Sunnybrook) is a multifacility academic teaching center. In May 1994, Sunnybrook struck an electronic patient record taskforce to develop a strategic plan for the implementation of a comprehensive, facility wide electronic patient record (EPR). The taskforce sought to create a conceptual framework which provides context and integrates decision-making related to the comprehensive electronic patient record. The EPR is very much broader in scope than the traditional paper-based record. It is not restricted to simply reporting individual patient data. By the Institute of Medicine's definition, the electronic patient record resides in a system specifically designed to support users through availability of complete and accurate data, practitioner reminders and alerts, clinical decision support systems, links to bodies of medical knowledge, and other aids [1]. It is a comprehensive resource for patient care. The taskforce proposed a three domain model for determining how the EPR affects Sunnybrook. The EPR enables Sunnybrook to have a high performance team structure (domain 1), to function as an integrated organization (domain 2), and to reach out and develop new relationships with external organizations to become an extended enterprise (domain 3) [2]. Domain 1: Sunnybrook's high performance teams or patient service units' (PSUs) are decentralized, autonomous operating units that provide care to patients grouped by 'like' diagnosis and resource needs. The EPR must provide functions and applications which promote patient focused care, such as cross functional charting and care maps, group scheduling, clinical email, and a range of enabling technologies for multiskilled workers. Domain 2: In the integrated organization domain, the EPR should facilitate closer linkages between the arrangement of PSUs into clinical teams and with other facilities within the center in order to provide a longitudinal record that covers a continuum of care

  17. Access Control Model for Sharing Composite Electronic Health Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jing; Ahn, Gail-Joon; Covington, Michael J.; Zhang, Xinwen

    The adoption of electronically formatted medical records, so called Electronic Health Records (EHRs), has become extremely important in healthcare systems to enable the exchange of medical information among stakeholders. An EHR generally consists of data with different types and sensitivity degrees which must be selectively shared based on the need-to-know principle. Security mechanisms are required to guarantee that only authorized users have access to specific portions of such critical record for legitimate purposes. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for modelling access control scheme for composite EHRs. Our model formulates the semantics and structural composition of an EHR document, from which we introduce a notion of authorized zones of the composite EHR at different granularity levels, taking into consideration of several important criteria such as data types, intended purposes and information sensitivities.

  18. Pragmatic objects modeling environment for Electronic Health Records Systems.

    PubMed

    Ruelland, Alan; Jaulent, Marie-Christine; Ota, Mario; Frandji, Bruno; Degoulet, Patrice

    2003-01-01

    Customizable shared Electronic Health Care Records require new mechanisms to dynamically generate user defined objects. An object model based on a semantic network of concepts has been implemented (pragmatic database model). This model offers an easier way to represent "archetypes" of user objects including the concepts, their relationships and the specific organization and representation of the associated knowledge that are necessary to model the context of production of record elements. The aim of this paper is the presentation of this framework and its implementation in an online electronic health record system using Java Web Services technologies. A web-based registry on tobacco was implemented according to this framework and is today daily used in 150 tobacco addiction centers.

  19. Catching Conical Intersections in the Act; Monitoring Transient Electronic Coherences by Attosecond Stimulated X-Ray Raman Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Kochise; Kowalewski, Markus; Dorfman, Konstantin; Mukamel, Shaul

    Conical intersections (CIs) dominate the pathways and outcomes of virtually all photochemical molecular processes. Despite extensive experimental and theoretical effort, CIs have not been directly observed yet and the experimental evidence is inferred from fast reaction rates and vibrational signatures. We show that short X-ray pulses can directly detect the passage through a CI with the adequate temporal and spectral sensitivity. The non-adiabatic coupling that exists in the region of a CI redistributes electronic population but also generates electronic coherence. This coherent oscillation can then be detected via a coherent Raman process that employs a composite femtosecond/attosecond X-ray pulse. This technique, dubbed Transient Redistribution of Ultrafast Electronic Coherences (TRUECARS) is reminiscent of Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) in that a coherent oscillation is set in motion and then monitored, but differs in that the dynamics is electronic (CARS generally observes nuclear dynamics) and the coherence is generated internally by passage through a region of non-adiabatic coupling rather than by an externally applied laser. Support provided by U.S. Department of Energy through Award No. DE-FG02-04ER15571, the National Science Foundation (Grant No CHE-1361516), and the Alexander von Humboldt foundation through the Feodor Lynen program.

  20. Nurses' expectations and perceptions of a redesigned Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Zulma; Recondo, Francisco; Sommer, Janine; Schachner, Bibiana; Garcia, Gabriela; Luna, Daniel; Benítez, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    When a new Electronic Health Record is implemented or modifications are made, the full acceptance by end users depends on their expectations and perceptions about the possible benefits and the potential impacts on care quality. The redesign of an electronic nurse chart should consider the inherent characteristics of nurses' practice and the variables that may influence the implementation and use of the new chart. In this study, a qualitative method evaluated nurses' expectations and perceptions about the implementation impacts of a redesigned nurse chart in an electronic health record at Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires. Seventy-four nurses participated in three operative groups. Following ground theory, three analytic dimensions were found: impact at work, communication and chart quality. In addition, time was a recurrent topic. Nurses found it difficult to think positively if reduction in time of documentation was not assured.

  1. Privacy preserving index for encrypted electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chi; Horng, Gwoboa; Lin, Yi-Jheng; Chen, Kuo-Chang

    2013-12-01

    With the development of electronic systems, privacy has become an important security issue in real-life. In medical systems, privacy of patients' electronic medical records (EMRs) must be fully protected. However, to combine the efficiency and privacy, privacy preserving index is introduced to preserve the privacy, where the EMR can be efficiently accessed by this patient or specific doctor. In the literature, Goh first proposed a secure index scheme with keyword search over encrypted data based on a well-known primitive, Bloom filter. In this paper, we propose a new privacy preserving index scheme, called position index (P-index), with keyword search over the encrypted data. The proposed index scheme is semantically secure against the adaptive chosen keyword attack, and it also provides flexible space, lower false positive rate, and search privacy. Moreover, it does not rely on pairing, a complicate computation, and thus can search over encrypted electronic medical records from the cloud server efficiently.

  2. Future of electronic health records: implications for decision support.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Brian; Leonard, Joan C; Vigoda, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    The potential benefits of the electronic health record over traditional paper are many, including cost containment, reductions in errors, and improved compliance by utilizing real-time data. The highest functional level of the electronic health record (EHR) is clinical decision support (CDS) and process automation, which are expected to enhance patient health and healthcare. The authors provide an overview of the progress in using patient data more efficiently and effectively through clinical decision support to improve health care delivery, how decision support impacts anesthesia practice, and how some are leading the way using these systems to solve need-specific issues. Clinical decision support uses passive or active decision support to modify clinician behavior through recommendations of specific actions. Recommendations may reduce medication errors, which would result in considerable savings by avoiding adverse drug events. In selected studies, clinical decision support has been shown to decrease the time to follow-up actions, and prediction has proved useful in forecasting patient outcomes, avoiding costs, and correctly prompting treatment plan modifications by clinicians before engaging in decision-making. Clinical documentation accuracy and completeness is improved by an electronic health record and greater relevance of care data is delivered. Clinical decision support may increase clinician adherence to clinical guidelines, but educational workshops may be equally effective. Unintentional consequences of clinical decision support, such as alert desensitization, can decrease the effectiveness of a system. Current anesthesia clinical decision support use includes antibiotic administration timing, improved documentation, more timely billing, and postoperative nausea and vomiting prophylaxis. Electronic health record implementation offers data-mining opportunities to improve operational, financial, and clinical processes. Using electronic health record data

  3. Exploring faculty perceptions towards electronic health records for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Kowitlawakul, Y; Chan, S W C; Wang, L; Wang, W

    2014-12-01

    The use of electronic health records in nursing education is rapidly increasing worldwide. The successful implementation of electronic health records for nursing education software program relies on students as well as nursing faculty members. This study aimed to explore the experiences and perceptions of nursing faculty members using electronic health records for nursing education software program, and to identify the influential factors for successful implementation of this technology. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted using in-depth individual interviews at a university in Singapore. Seven faculty members participated in the study. The data were gathered and analysed at the end of the semester in the 2012/2013 academic year. The participants' perceptions of the software program were organized into three main categories: innovation, transition and integration. The participants perceived this technology as innovative, with both values and challenges for the users. In addition, using the new software program was perceived as transitional process. The integration of this technology required time from faculty members and students, as well as support from administrators. The software program had only been implemented for 2-3 months at the time of the interviews. Consequently, the participants might have lacked the necessary skill and competence and confidence to implement it successfully. In addition, the unequal exposure to the software program might have had an impact on participants' perceptions. The findings show that the integration of electronic health records into nursing education curricula is dependent on the faculty members' experiences with the new technology, as well as their perceptions of it. Hence, cultivating a positive attitude towards the use of new technologies is important. Electronic health records are significant applications of health information technology. Health informatics competency should be included as a required competency

  4. Electronic health records and online medical records: an asset or a liability under current conditions?

    PubMed

    Allen-Graham, Judith; Mitchell, Lauren; Heriot, Natalie; Armani, Roksana; Langton, David; Levinson, Michele; Young, Alan; Smith, Julian A; Kotsimbos, Tom; Wilson, John W

    2017-01-20

    Objective The aim of the present study was to audit the current use of medical records to determine completeness and concordance with other sources of medical information.Methods Medical records for 40 patients from each of five Melbourne major metropolitan hospitals were randomly selected (n=200). A quantitative audit was performed for detailed patient information and medical record keeping, as well as data collection, storage and utilisation. Using each hospital's current online clinical database, scanned files and paperwork available for each patient audited, the reviewers sourced as much relevant information as possible within a 30-min time allocation from both the record and the discharge summary.Results Of all medical records audited, 82% contained medical and surgical history, allergy information and patient demographics. All audited discharge summaries lacked at least one of the following: demographics, medication allergies, medical and surgical history, medications and adverse drug event information. Only 49% of records audited showed evidence the discharge summary was sent outside the institution.Conclusions The quality of medical data captured and information management is variable across hospitals. It is recommended that medical history documentation guidelines and standardised discharge summaries be implemented in Australian healthcare services.What is known about this topic? Australia has a complex health system, the government has approved funding to develop a universal online electronic medical record system and is currently trialling this in an opt-out style in the Napean Blue Mountains (NSW) and in Northern Queensland. The system was originally named the personally controlled electronic health record but has since been changed to MyHealth Record (2016). In Victoria, there exists a wide range of electronic health records used to varying degrees, with some hospitals still relying on paper-based records and many using scanned medical records. This

  5. 36 CFR 1225.24 - When can an agency apply previously approved schedules to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... agency believes the electronic records do not warrant permanent retention. (b) Temporary still pictures, sound recordings, motion picture film, and video recordings. The agency must apply the previously...

  6. Language, Structure, and Reuse in the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Angus

    2017-03-01

    Medical language is at the heart of the electronic health record (EHR), with up to 70 percent of the information in that record being recorded in the natural language, free-text portion. In moving from paper medical records to EHRs, we have opened up opportunities for the reuse of this clinical information through automated search and analysis. Natural language, however, is challenging for computational methods. This paper examines the tension between the nuanced, qualitative nature of medical language and the logical, structured nature of computation as well as the way in which these have interacted with each other through the medium of the EHR. The paper also examines the potential for the computational analysis of natural language to overcome this tension. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  7. The electronic medical record system: health care marvel or morass?

    PubMed

    Silverman, D C

    1998-01-01

    The author considers the potential advantages and disadvantages, as well as possible unintended consequences, of introducing electronic medical record systems in health care organizations. Special consideration is given to the issues such information systems raise concerning privacy, confidentiality, and quality of care from both patient and provider perspectives. The potential gains from computerizing medical records include the benefit of instantaneous availability of patients' medical history, treatment regimes, and current health status in routine and emergency clinical situations. Ease of access to this information should reduce adverse outcomes. The added value of a complete and up-to-date medical record immediately available to medical caregivers seems undeniable. The potential disadvantages include issues around patient confidentiality and unauthorized access to records, the enormous capital investment for computer hardware, and system maintenance.

  8. Electron-beam recording of patterns in chalcogenide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, S. A.; Iovu, M. S.; Iaseniuc, O. V.

    2015-02-01

    Thin films of chalcogenide glasses (ChG) of different composition have been used for e-beam recording of diffraction grating structures. The dependencies of diffraction efficiency of gratings on radiation dose were studied. The influence of ChG film composition on diffraction properties of gratings was shown. It was established that the refractive index gratings formed in As2S3 films exhibit high stability during their dark storage. The diffraction efficiency enhancement caused by uniform light irradiation was observed for gratings recorded in As4S3Se3 thin films, doped with Sn. With use of computer-controlled positioning of electron beam both the raster scan and vector patterns were recorded in As2S3 films. In the former case the images from BMP-files were patterned. In the latter case the mosaic of diffraction gratings, producing the multi-beam light diffraction was recorded.

  9. Ethical questions must be considered for electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Merle; Arnold, Michael V; Pearce, Christopher M; Fry, Craig

    2012-09-01

    National electronic health record initiatives are in progress in many countries around the world but the debate about the ethical issues and how they are to be addressed remains overshadowed by other issues. The discourse to which all others are answerable is a technical discourse, even where matters of privacy and consent are concerned. Yet a focus on technical issues and a failure to think about ethics are cited as factors in the failure of the UK health record system. In this paper, while the prime concern is the Australian Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR), the discussion is relevant to and informed by the international context. The authors draw attention to ethical and conceptual issues that have implications for the success or failure of electronic health records systems. Important ethical issues to consider as Australia moves towards a PCEHR system include: issues of equity that arise in the context of personal control, who benefits and who should pay, what are the legitimate uses of PCEHRs, and how we should implement privacy. The authors identify specific questions that need addressing.

  10. PAMFOnline: integrating EHealth with an electronic medical record system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Paul C; Black, William; Buchanan, Jenny; Young, Charles Y; Hooper, David; Lane, Steven R; Love, Barbara; Mitchell, Charlotte; Smith, Nancy; Turnbull, Jenifer R

    2003-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine stressed the need for continuous healing relationships, yet the delivery of health care has traditionally been confined to the physician office or hospital. We implemented an eHealth application tightly integrated with our electronic medical record system that provides patients with a convenient, continuously available communication channel to their physician's office. Patients can view summary data from their medical record, including the results of diagnostic tests, and request medical advice, prescription renewals, appointments, or updates to their demographic information. We have found that patients embrace this new communication channel and are using the service appropriately. Patients especially value electronic messaging with their physicians and timely access to their test results. While initially concerned about an increase in work, physicians have found that use of electronic messaging can be an efficient method for handling non-urgent communication with their patients. Online tools for patients, when integrated with an electronic medical record, can provide patients with better access to health information, improve patient satisfaction, and improve operational efficiency.

  11. [Electronic patient record as the tool for better patient safety].

    PubMed

    Schneider, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate again that there is a deficit in the use of electronic health records (EHR) in German hospitals. Despite good arguments in favour of their use, such as the rapid availability of data, German hospitals shy away from a wider implementation. The reason is the high cost of installing and maintaining the EHRs, for the benefit is difficult to evaluate in monetary terms for the hospital. Even if a benefit can be shown it is not necessarily evident within the hospital, but manifests itself only in the health system outside. Many hospitals only manage to partly implement EHR resulting in increased documentation requirements which reverse their positive effect.In the United States, electronic medical records are also viewed in light of their positive impact on patient safety. In particular, electronic medication systems prove the benefits they can provide in the context of patient safety. As a result, financing systems have been created to promote the digitalisation of hospitals in the United States. This has led to a large increase in the use of IT systems in the United States in recent years. The Universitätsklinikum Eppendorf (UKE) introduced electronic patient records in 2009. The benefits, in particular as regards patient safety, are numerous and there are many examples to illustrate this position. These positive results are intended to demonstrate the important role EHR play in hospitals. A financing system of the ailing IT landscape based on the American model is urgently needed to benefit-especially in terms of patient safety-from electronic medical records in the hospital.

  12. [Electronic medical record--interface specifications with medical informatics systems].

    PubMed

    Mocanu, Carmen; Mocanu, Mihai

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the initial efforts of description and implementation for a new scheme of electronic patients recording, based on distributed database for chronic ophthalmologic diseases. Structural specifications derived from principal system's goals are the implementation of an efficient and flexible way of patients' data administration, using actual Web technologies, permitting future extensions, without reducing in performances and without exponential cost increasing. A very important aspect, that must be take into consideration is their interfacing with other medical programs and systems, as the systems for recording clinical data, monitoring systems (Patient Administrations Systems - PAS) for demographical data, systems for monitoring of treatment (Hippocrates program), web systems, including wireless.

  13. Interfacing with the brain using organic electronics (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malliaras, George G.

    2015-10-01

    Implantable electrodes are being used for diagnostic purposes, for brain-machine interfaces, and for delivering electrical stimulation to alleviate the symptoms of diseases such as Parkinson's. The field of organic electronics made available devices with a unique combination of attractive properties, including mixed ionic/electronic conduction, mechanical flexibility, enhanced biocompatibility, and capability for drug delivery. I will present examples of organic electrodes, transistors and other devices for recording and stimulation of brain activity and discuss how they can improve our understanding of brain physiology and pathology, and how they can be used to deliver new therapies.

  14. The challenges in making electronic health records accessible to patients

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Leslie; Schein, Rebecca; Morra, Dante; Wilson, Kumanan

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that there is a tension between growing consumer demands for access to information and a healthcare system that may not be prepared to meet these demands. Designing an effective solution for this problem will require a thorough understanding of the barriers that now stand in the way of giving patients electronic access to their health data. This paper reviews the following challenges related to the sharing of electronic health records: cost and security concerns, problems in assigning responsibilities and rights among the various players, liability issues and tensions between flexible access to data and flexible access to physicians. PMID:22120207

  15. 29 CFR 4000.53 - May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record retention requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record... Electronic Means of Record Retention § 4000.53 May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record retention requirements? General requirements. You may use electronic media to satisfy the record maintenance and...

  16. 29 CFR 4000.53 - May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record retention requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record... Electronic Means of Record Retention § 4000.53 May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record retention requirements? General requirements. You may use electronic media to satisfy the record maintenance and...

  17. 29 CFR 4000.53 - May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record retention requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record... Electronic Means of Record Retention § 4000.53 May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record retention requirements? General requirements. You may use electronic media to satisfy the record maintenance and...

  18. 29 CFR 4000.53 - May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record retention requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record... Electronic Means of Record Retention § 4000.53 May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record retention requirements? General requirements. You may use electronic media to satisfy the record maintenance and...

  19. 29 CFR 4000.53 - May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record retention requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record... Electronic Means of Record Retention § 4000.53 May I use electronic media to satisfy PBGC's record retention requirements? General requirements. You may use electronic media to satisfy the record maintenance and...

  20. 36 CFR 1235.48 - What documentation must agencies transfer with electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... identify, service, and interpret the permanent electronic records This documentation must include completed... records; and (v) Web content records. (2) Guidance on the documentation for electronic records in these formats are available on the NARA Electronic Records Management Initiative Web page at http://www.archives...

  1. 36 CFR 1236.6 - What are agency responsibilities for electronic records management?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... responsibilities for electronic records management? 1236.6 Section 1236.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT General § 1236.6 What are agency responsibilities for electronic records management? Agencies must:...

  2. 36 CFR 1236.6 - What are agency responsibilities for electronic records management?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... responsibilities for electronic records management? 1236.6 Section 1236.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT General § 1236.6 What are agency responsibilities for electronic records management? Agencies must:...

  3. Efficient medical information retrieval in encrypted Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Pruski, Cédric; Wisniewski, François

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of eHealth platforms across the world, whose main objective is to centralize patient's healthcare information to ensure the best continuity of care, requires the development of advanced tools and techniques for supporting health professionals in retrieving relevant information in this vast quantity of data. However, for preserving patient's privacy, some countries decided to de-identify and encrypt data contained in the shared Electronic Health Records, which reinforces the complexity of proposing efficient medical information retrieval approach. In this paper, we describe an original approach exploiting standards metadata as well as knowledge organizing systems to overcome the barriers of data encryption for improving the results of medical information retrieval in centralized and encrypted Electronic Health Records. This is done through the exploitation of semantic properties provided by knowledge organizing systems, which enable query expansion. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the approach together with illustrating examples and a discussion on the advantages and limitations of the provided framework.

  4. Organ Procurement Organizations and the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Howard, R J; Cochran, L D; Cornell, D L

    2015-10-01

    The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) has adversely affected the ability of organ procurement organizations (OPOs) to perform their federally mandated function of honoring the donation decisions of families and donors who have signed the registry. The difficulties gaining access to potential donor medical record has meant that assessment, evaluation, and management of brain dead organ donors has become much more difficult. Delays can occur that can lead to potential recipients not receiving life-saving organs. For over 40 years, OPO personnel have had ready access to paper medical records. But the widespread adoption of EHRs has greatly limited the ability of OPO coordinators to readily gain access to patient medical records and to manage brain dead donors. Proposed solutions include the following: (1) hospitals could provide limited access to OPO personnel so that they could see only the potential donor's medical record; (2) OPOs could join with other transplant organizations to inform regulators of the problem; and (3) hospital organizations could be approached to work with Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to revise the Hospital Conditions of Participation to require OPOs be given access to donor medical records.

  5. Report Central: quality reporting tool in an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunice; Li, Qi; Mangalampalli, Anil; Greim, Julie; Eskin, Michael S; Housman, Dan; Isikoff, Jeremy; Abend, Aaron H; Middleton, Blackford; Einbinder, Jonathan S

    2006-01-01

    Quality reporting tools, integrated with ambulatory electronic health records, can help clinicians and administrators understand performance, manage populations, and improve quality. Report Central is a secure web report delivery tool built on Crystal Reports XItrade mark and ASP.NET technologies. Pilot evaluation of Report Central indicates that clinicians prefer a quality reporting tool that is integrated with our home-grown EHR to support clinical workflow.

  6. Report Central: Quality Reporting Tool in an Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eunice; Li, Qi; Mangalampalli, Anil; Greim, Julie; Eskin, Michael S.; Housman, Dan; Isikoff, Jeremy; Abend, Aaron H.; Middleton, Blackford; Einbinder, Jonathan S.

    2006-01-01

    Quality reporting tools, integrated with ambulatory electronic health records, can help clinicians and administrators understand performance, manage populations, and improve quality. Report Central is a secure web report delivery tool built on Crystal Reports XI™ and ASP.NET technologies. Pilot evaluation of Report Central indicates that clinicians prefer a quality reporting tool that is integrated with our home-grown EHR to support clinical workflow. PMID:17238590

  7. Training providers: beyond the basics of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Training is a critical part of health information technology implementations, but little emphasis is placed on post-implementation training to support day-to-day activities. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of post-implementation training on key electronic health record activities. Methods Based on feedback from providers and requests for technical support, we developed two classes designed to improve providers’ effectiveness with the electronic health record. Training took place at Kaiser Permanente, Mid-Atlantic States. The classes focused on managing patient-level information using problem lists and medication lists, as well as efficient documentation and chart review. Both classes used the blended learning method, integrating concrete scenarios, hands-on exercises and take-home materials to reinforce class concepts. To evaluate training effectiveness, we used a case–control study with a 1:4 match on pre-training performance. We measured the usage rate of two key electronic health record functions (problem list and medication list management) for six months before and after training. Change scores were compared using the Wilcoxon sign rank test. Results 36 participants and 144 non-participants were included in the training evaluation. Training participants were more likely to manage both medication lists and problem lists after training. Class material is now being incorporated into an enterprise-wide multi-modal training program available to all providers at Kaiser Permanente in the Mid-Atlantic States. Conclusions Ongoing information technology training is well-received by healthcare providers, who expressed a clear preference for additional training. Training improved use of two important electronic health record features that are included as part of the Meaningful Use criteria. PMID:24295150

  8. Standards and the integrated electronic health care record.

    PubMed

    Bell, P D

    2000-09-01

    The goal of creating an integrated electronic health care record is within our reach. It will depend chiefly on the creation and adoption of standards for health care data. This article explains why standards development is important, gives examples of the different types of standards relevant to health care, offers examples of data sets used in health care, and, finally, presents examples of standards development organizations that health care supervisors should be familiar with.

  9. Developing an electronic health record for intractable diseases in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Eizen; Kobayashi, Shinji; Kanatani, Yasuhiro; Ishihara, Ken; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Takahashi, Ryousuke; Chiba, Tsutomu; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Because intractable diseases result from unidentifiable causes and are very difficult to treat, they require a lifelong epidemiology database. Japan does not use global unique identifiers, such as social security numbers, so we conducted a feasibility study regarding an electronic health record (EHR). An EHR can be used as a lifelong database and reduce conventional administrative work. However, it will be necessary to develop additional tools to overcome issues specific to Japan before an EHR can be implemented.

  10. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bartocci, Alessio; Cappelletti, David; Pirani, Fernando; Belpassi, Leonardo; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2015-05-14

    The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the noble-gas (Ng) atoms with CCl{sub 4} and CF{sub 4}. Their investigation was motivated by the widespread current interest for the intermolecular halogen bonding (XB), a structural motif recognized to play a role in fields ranging from elementary processes to biochemistry. The simulation of the static and dynamic behaviors of complex systems featuring XB requires the formulation of reliable and accurate model potentials, whose development relies on the detailed characterization of strength and nature of the interactions occurring in simple exemplary halogenated systems. We thus selected the prototypical Ng-CCl{sub 4} and Ng-CF{sub 4} and performed high-resolution molecular beam scattering experiments to measure the absolute scale of their intermolecular potentials, with high sensitivity. In general, we expected to probe typical van der Waals interactions, consisting of a combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. For the He/Ne-CF{sub 4}, the analysis of the glory quantum interference pattern, observable in the velocity dependence of the integral cross section, confirmed indeed this expectation. On the other hand, for the He/Ne/Ar-CCl{sub 4}, the scattering data unravelled much deeper potential wells, particularly for certain configurations of the interacting partners. The experimental data can be properly reproduced only including a shifting of the repulsive wall at shorter distances, accompanied by an increased role of the dispersion attraction, and an additional short-range stabilization component. To put these findings on a firmer ground, we performed, for selected geometries of the interacting complexes, accurate theoretical calculations aimed to evaluate the intermolecular interaction and the effects of the complex formation on the electron charge density of the constituting moieties. It was thus ascertained that the adjustments of the potential

  11. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Bartocci, Alessio; Belpassi, Leonardo; Cappelletti, David; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-05-14

    The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the noble-gas (Ng) atoms with CCl4 and CF4. Their investigation was motivated by the widespread current interest for the intermolecular halogen bonding (XB), a structural motif recognized to play a role in fields ranging from elementary processes to biochemistry. The simulation of the static and dynamic behaviors of complex systems featuring XB requires the formulation of reliable and accurate model potentials, whose development relies on the detailed characterization of strength and nature of the interactions occurring in simple exemplary halogenated systems. We thus selected the prototypical Ng-CCl4 and Ng-CF4 and performed high-resolution molecular beam scattering experiments to measure the absolute scale of their intermolecular potentials, with high sensitivity. In general, we expected to probe typical van der Waals interactions, consisting of a combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. For the He/Ne-CF4, the analysis of the glory quantum interference pattern, observable in the velocity dependence of the integral cross section, confirmed indeed this expectation. On the other hand, for the He/Ne/Ar-CCl4, the scattering data unravelled much deeper potential wells, particularly for certain configurations of the interacting partners. The experimental data can be properly reproduced only including a shifting of the repulsive wall at shorter distances, accompanied by an increased role of the dispersion attraction, and an additional short-range stabilization component. To put these findings on a firmer ground, we performed, for selected geometries of the interacting complexes, accurate theoretical calculations aimed to evaluate the intermolecular interaction and the effects of the complex formation on the electron charge density of the constituting moieties. It was thus ascertained that the adjustments of the potential suggested by the analysis of the

  12. Learning from heterogeneous temporal data in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Papapetrou, Panagiotis; Asker, Lars; Boström, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health records contain large amounts of longitudinal data that are valuable for biomedical informatics research. The application of machine learning is a promising alternative to manual analysis of such data. However, the complex structure of the data, which includes clinical events that are unevenly distributed over time, poses a challenge for standard learning algorithms. Some approaches to modeling temporal data rely on extracting single values from time series; however, this leads to the loss of potentially valuable sequential information. How to better account for the temporality of clinical data, hence, remains an important research question. In this study, novel representations of temporal data in electronic health records are explored. These representations retain the sequential information, and are directly compatible with standard machine learning algorithms. The explored methods are based on symbolic sequence representations of time series data, which are utilized in a number of different ways. An empirical investigation, using 19 datasets comprising clinical measurements observed over time from a real database of electronic health records, shows that using a distance measure to random subsequences leads to substantial improvements in predictive performance compared to using the original sequences or clustering the sequences. Evidence is moreover provided on the quality of the symbolic sequence representation by comparing it to sequences that are generated using domain knowledge by clinical experts. The proposed method creates representations that better account for the temporality of clinical events, which is often key to prediction tasks in the biomedical domain.

  13. Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Ellen K; Skipenes, Eva; Hausken, Marie F; Skeie, Svein; Østbye, Truls; Iversen, Marjolein M

    2017-05-01

    Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

  14. Data-driven approach for creating synthetic electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Buczak, Anna L; Babin, Steven; Moniz, Linda

    2010-10-14

    New algorithms for disease outbreak detection are being developed to take advantage of full electronic medical records (EMRs) that contain a wealth of patient information. However, due to privacy concerns, even anonymized EMRs cannot be shared among researchers, resulting in great difficulty in comparing the effectiveness of these algorithms. To bridge the gap between novel bio-surveillance algorithms operating on full EMRs and the lack of non-identifiable EMR data, a method for generating complete and synthetic EMRs was developed. This paper describes a novel methodology for generating complete synthetic EMRs both for an outbreak illness of interest (tularemia) and for background records. The method developed has three major steps: 1) synthetic patient identity and basic information generation; 2) identification of care patterns that the synthetic patients would receive based on the information present in real EMR data for similar health problems; 3) adaptation of these care patterns to the synthetic patient population. We generated EMRs, including visit records, clinical activity, laboratory orders/results and radiology orders/results for 203 synthetic tularemia outbreak patients. Validation of the records by a medical expert revealed problems in 19% of the records; these were subsequently corrected. We also generated background EMRs for over 3000 patients in the 4-11 yr age group. Validation of those records by a medical expert revealed problems in fewer than 3% of these background patient EMRs and the errors were subsequently rectified. A data-driven method was developed for generating fully synthetic EMRs. The method is general and can be applied to any data set that has similar data elements (such as laboratory and radiology orders and results, clinical activity, prescription orders). The pilot synthetic outbreak records were for tularemia but our approach may be adapted to other infectious diseases. The pilot synthetic background records were in the 4

  15. From medical record to patient record through electronic data interchange (EDI).

    PubMed

    Kinkhorst, O M; Lalleman, A W; Hasman, A

    1996-07-01

    In this contribution the role of Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) for patient records is discussed. It is our opinion that unlimited access to patient records of different care provides is not a wise thing to do and may even not be acceptable legally. The exchange of EDI messages may be a solution in that the relevant information is exchanged on a need to know basis under the responsibility of the care provider that generated the information. The state of the art with respect to the availability of EDI messages in Europe is presented.

  16. Catch a Star!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education are launching today the 2007 edition of 'Catch a Star!', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its fifth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. Students are invited to 'become astronomers' and embark on a journey to explore the Universe. ESO PR Photo 42/06 The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star!' also includes an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. "'Catch a Star!' offers a unique opportunity for students to learn more about astronomy and about the methods scientists use to discover new things about the Universe", said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. In teams, students choose an astronomical topic to study and produce an in-depth report. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes or a telescope of the future can contribute to their investigations of the subject. As well as the top prize - a trip to one of ESO's observatory sites in Chile - visits to observatories in Germany, Austria and Spain, and many other prizes are also available to be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners chosen with the help of a public online vote. The first editions of 'Catch a Star!' have attracted several hundred entries from more than 25 countries worldwide. Previous winning entries have included "Star clusters and the structure of the Milky Way" (Budapest, Hungary), "Vega" (Acqui Terme, Italy) and "Venus

  17. A survey of user acceptance of electronic patient anesthesia records

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyun Seung; Lee, Suk Young; Jeong, Hui Yeon; Choi, Soo Joo; Lee, Hye Won

    2012-01-01

    Background An anesthesia information management system (AIMS), although not widely used in Korea, will eventually replace handwritten records. This hospital began using AIMS in April 2010. The purpose of this study was to evaluate users' attitudes concerning AIMS and to compare them with manual documentation in the operating room (OR). Methods A structured questionnaire focused on satisfaction with electronic anesthetic records and comparison with handwritten anesthesia records was administered to anesthesiologists, trainees, and nurses during February 2011 and the responses were collected anonymously during March 2011. Results A total of 28 anesthesiologists, 27 trainees, and 47 nurses responded to this survey. Most participants involved in this survey were satisfied with AIMS (96.3%, 82.2%, and 89.3% of trainees, anesthesiologists, and nurses, respectively) and preferred AIMS over handwritten anesthesia records in 96.3%, 71.4%, and 97.9% of trainees, anesthesiologists, and nurses, respectively. However, there were also criticisms of AIMS related to user-discomfort during short, simple or emergency surgeries, doubtful legal status, and inconvenient placement of the system. Conclusions Overall, most of the anesthetic practitioners in this hospital quickly accepted and prefer AIMS over the handwritten anesthetic records in the OR. PMID:22558502

  18. Patient experiences with electronic medical records: Lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Dale; Richter, Louiseann T; Kapustin, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the lived experience of patients communicating with their nurse practitioners and physicians while using paper health records (PHRs) and electronic health records (EHRs) in the examination rooms. The significance of the study lies in the salience of communication between the patient and provider in promoting optimal clinical outcomes and the highest level of patient satisfaction. Data sources The study used a qualitative, phenomenological design. Audio-taped focus group interviews were conducted with 21 patients from a diabetes clinic in Baltimore, Maryland. Patients had visits with the provider before and after implementation of EHRs in the clinic. Conclusions The four themes that emerged from the three focus groups included communication issues, patient preferences for electronic records, safety and security concerns, and transition problems with implementation of EHRs. Implications for practice Potential benefits for nurse practitioners implementing the recommendations in this study include enhanced communication between patients and providers while using EHRs, increased patient satisfaction, higher levels of nurse practitioner and physician satisfaction, and avoidance of communication issues during implementation of EHR systems. PMID:25234112

  19. Catch a Star 2008!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-10-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education have just launched the 2008 edition of 'Catch a Star', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its sixth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. CAS logo The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. In teams, students investigate an astronomical topic of their choice and write a report about it. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes such as the Very Large Telescope (VLT) or future telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) could contribute to investigations of the topic. Students may also include practical activities such as observations or experiments. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star' also offers an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. Last year, hundreds of students from across Europe and beyond took part in 'Catch a Star', submitting astronomical projects and artwork. "'Catch a Star' gets students thinking about the wonders of the Universe and the science of astronomy, with a chance of winning great prizes. It's easy to take part, whether by writing about astronomy or creating astronomically inspired artwork," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. As well as the top prize - a trip to ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile - visits to observatories in Austria and Spain, and many other prizes, can also be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners

  20. 78 FR 22345 - Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA) AGENCY: National... (NARA) announces a meeting of the Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA). The..., and service issues related to the Electronic Records Archives (ERA). This includes, but is not...

  1. 76 FR 56503 - Agency Information Collection Activity (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activity (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB... INFORMATION: Title: VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records, VA Form 10- 0400. OMB Control Number: 2900... recorded in VHA electronic health records system. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not...

  2. 63 FR 39187 - Electronic Records Work Group Draft Report; Appendix C

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-07-21

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Electronic Records Work Group Draft Report; Appendix C AGENCY: National Archives... Electronic Records Work Group's proposed strategy for Federal agencies to implement the Work Group's proposed..., comments may be mailed to Electronic Records Work Group (NPOL), Room 4100, 8601 Adelphi Rd., College...

  3. 76 FR 19147 - Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA) AGENCY: National... Administration (NARA) announces an agenda change for the Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives... to attend must be submitted to the Electronic Records Archives Program at era.program@nara.gov . This...

  4. Detecting Inappropriate Access to Electronic Health Records Using Collaborative Filtering.

    PubMed

    Menon, Aditya Krishna; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Kim, Jihoon; Vaidya, Jaideep; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2014-04-01

    Many healthcare facilities enforce security on their electronic health records (EHRs) through a corrective mechanism: some staff nominally have almost unrestricted access to the records, but there is a strict ex post facto audit process for inappropriate accesses, i.e., accesses that violate the facility's security and privacy policies. This process is inefficient, as each suspicious access has to be reviewed by a security expert, and is purely retrospective, as it occurs after damage may have been incurred. This motivates automated approaches based on machine learning using historical data. Previous attempts at such a system have successfully applied supervised learning models to this end, such as SVMs and logistic regression. While providing benefits over manual auditing, these approaches ignore the identity of the users and patients involved in a record access. Therefore, they cannot exploit the fact that a patient whose record was previously involved in a violation has an increased risk of being involved in a future violation. Motivated by this, in this paper, we propose a collaborative filtering inspired approach to predicting inappropriate accesses. Our solution integrates both explicit and latent features for staff and patients, the latter acting as a personalized "finger-print" based on historical access patterns. The proposed method, when applied to real EHR access data from two tertiary hospitals and a file-access dataset from Amazon, shows not only significantly improved performance compared to existing methods, but also provides insights as to what indicates an inappropriate access.

  5. Detecting Inappropriate Access to Electronic Health Records Using Collaborative Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Aditya Krishna; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Kim, Jihoon; Vaidya, Jaideep; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2013-01-01

    Many healthcare facilities enforce security on their electronic health records (EHRs) through a corrective mechanism: some staff nominally have almost unrestricted access to the records, but there is a strict ex post facto audit process for inappropriate accesses, i.e., accesses that violate the facility’s security and privacy policies. This process is inefficient, as each suspicious access has to be reviewed by a security expert, and is purely retrospective, as it occurs after damage may have been incurred. This motivates automated approaches based on machine learning using historical data. Previous attempts at such a system have successfully applied supervised learning models to this end, such as SVMs and logistic regression. While providing benefits over manual auditing, these approaches ignore the identity of the users and patients involved in a record access. Therefore, they cannot exploit the fact that a patient whose record was previously involved in a violation has an increased risk of being involved in a future violation. Motivated by this, in this paper, we propose a collaborative filtering inspired approach to predicting inappropriate accesses. Our solution integrates both explicit and latent features for staff and patients, the latter acting as a personalized “finger-print” based on historical access patterns. The proposed method, when applied to real EHR access data from two tertiary hospitals and a file-access dataset from Amazon, shows not only significantly improved performance compared to existing methods, but also provides insights as to what indicates an inappropriate access. PMID:24683293

  6. Patient experiences at primary care practices using electronic health records.

    PubMed

    De Leon, Samantha F; Silfen, Sheryl L; Wang, Jason J; Kamara, Taafoi S; Wu, Winfred Y; Shih, Sarah C

    2012-01-01

    We assessed patient experiences before and one year after electronic health record (EHR) implementation among primary care practices in New York City. These practices represented an ethnically diverse population in lower-income, urban communities. Surveys, available in English, Spanish, and Chinese languages, were administered at 10 sites. Generally, patients reported positive responses during both periods. After EHR implementation, patients were more likely to want e-mail communication with their doctors' office. The 70% of patients with Internet access were generally more satisfied with their experience and more likely to recognize benefits of EHRs. However, older patients and those with lower education levels or chronic diseases were significantly less likely than their counterparts to use the Internet. Therefore, disparities in Internet access could potentially lead to unequal access and use of healthcare if not addressed. Practices should routinely record patient communication preferences within the EHR, to tailor communications and improve patient experiences.

  7. Query log analysis of an electronic health record search engine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Mei, Qiaozhu; Zheng, Kai; Hanauer, David A

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed a longitudinal collection of query logs of a full-text search engine designed to facilitate information retrieval in electronic health records (EHR). The collection, 202,905 queries and 35,928 user sessions recorded over a course of 4 years, represents the information-seeking behavior of 533 medical professionals, including frontline practitioners, coding personnel, patient safety officers, and biomedical researchers for patient data stored in EHR systems. In this paper, we present descriptive statistics of the queries, a categorization of information needs manifested through the queries, as well as temporal patterns of the users' information-seeking behavior. The results suggest that information needs in medical domain are substantially more sophisticated than those that general-purpose web search engines need to accommodate. Therefore, we envision there exists a significant challenge, along with significant opportunities, to provide intelligent query recommendations to facilitate information retrieval in EHR.

  8. Using Organizational Development for Electronic Medical Record Transformation.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Joan M

    With mandates requiring the transition from paper medical records to the use of electronic medical records, organizations are embarking on a change process. To engender this process, organizational development models and interventions based predominantly on the theories of Chris Argyris, Warren Bennis, and the team of Paul Lawrence and Jay Lorsch are explored. Interventions are subdivided into behavioral and structural as organizations benefit by recognizing a need for change and, perhaps, a cultural shift in addition to refocusing their mission. To support these interventions, a champion or super user is recommended to maintain the momentum of the transformation and enculturation. With so many changes in the internal and external environments, organizations must respond systematically for, in health care, lives depend on it.

  9. Query Log Analysis of an Electronic Health Record Search Engine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Mei, Qiaozhu; Zheng, Kai; Hanauer, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed a longitudinal collection of query logs of a full-text search engine designed to facilitate information retrieval in electronic health records (EHR). The collection, 202,905 queries and 35,928 user sessions recorded over a course of 4 years, represents the information-seeking behavior of 533 medical professionals, including frontline practitioners, coding personnel, patient safety officers, and biomedical researchers for patient data stored in EHR systems. In this paper, we present descriptive statistics of the queries, a categorization of information needs manifested through the queries, as well as temporal patterns of the users’ information-seeking behavior. The results suggest that information needs in medical domain are substantially more sophisticated than those that general-purpose web search engines need to accommodate. Therefore, we envision there exists a significant challenge, along with significant opportunities, to provide intelligent query recommendations to facilitate information retrieval in EHR. PMID:22195150

  10. Shared responsibility for electronic records: governance in perinatal data entry.

    PubMed

    Craswell, Alison; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents research undertaken as part of a larger research project to examine the factors that influence midwives when entering perinatal data. A grounded theory methodology was used to undertake qualitative interviews with 15 participants from 12 different hospitals across Queensland, Australia using three different systems for perinatal data collection. The findings surrounding accountability are presented revealing that a shift in governance relating to responsibility and accountability is not occurring in midwifery units across Queensland. Without assignation of responsibility for entries and accountability for mistakes or omissions, perinatal data records can be left incomplete or inaccurate. Increasing use of electronic health records and creation of digital hospitals indicates these issues are highly relevant in planning for these services.

  11. Experience with an electronic health record for a homeless population.

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, D. R.; Barnett, G. O.; Chueh, H. C.

    1999-01-01

    A computerized electronic medical record (EMR) system using client-server architecture was designed and implemented by the Laboratory of Computer Science for use by the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) to meet the unique medical record needs of the homeless. For the past three years, this EMR has been used to assist providers in the delivery of health care to the homeless population of Boston. As the BHCHP has grown and technology improved, it is important to review what features of the EMR work, and to investigate what improvements can be made for the better delivery of care to the homeless, especially as we approach the next century. PMID:10566405

  12. Construction and Validation of Synthetic Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, Linda; Buczak, Anna L.; Hung, Lang; Babin, Steven; Dorko, Michael; Lombardo, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    There is a current and pressing need for a test bed of electronic medical records (EMRs) to insure consistent development, validation and verification of public health related algorithms that operate on EMRs. However, access to full EMRs is limited and not generally available to the academic algorithm developers who support the public health community. This paper describes a set of algorithms that produce synthetic EMRs using real EMRs as a model. The algorithms were used to generate a pilot set of over 3000 synthetic EMRs that are currently available on CDC’s Public Health grid. The properties of the synthetic EMRs were validated, both in the entire aggregate data set and for individual (synthetic) patients. We describe how the algorithms can be extended to produce records beyond the initial pilot data set. PMID:23569572

  13. Use of electronic health records to support smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Raymond; Solberg, Leif; Fiore, Michael

    2014-12-30

    Health information systems such as electronic health records (EHR), computerized decision support systems, and electronic prescribing are potentially valuable components to improve the quality and efficiency of clinical interventions for tobacco use. To assess the effectiveness of electronic health record-facilitated interventions on smoking cessation support actions by clinicians, clinics, and healthcare delivery systems and on patient smoking cessation outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and reference lists and bibliographies of included studies. We searched for studies published between January 1990 and July 2014. We included both randomized studies and non-randomized studies that reported interventions targeting tobacco use through an EHR in healthcare settings. The intervention could include any use of an EHR to improve smoking status documentation or cessation assistance for patients who use tobacco, either by direct action or by feedback of clinical performance measures. Characteristics and content of the interventions, participants, outcomes and methods of the included studies were extracted by one author and checked by a second. Because of wide variation in measurement of outcomes, we were not able to conduct a meta-analysis. We included six group randomized trials, one patient randomized study, and nine non-randomized observational studies of fair to good quality that tested the use of an existing EHR to improve documentation and/or treatment of tobacco use. None of the studies included a direct assessment of patient quit rates. Overall, these studies found only modest improvements in some of the recommended clinician actions on tobacco use. Documentation of tobacco status and referral to cessation counselling appears to increase following EHR modifications designed to prompt the recording and treating of tobacco use at healthcare visits. There is a need for

  14. 36 CFR 1236.22 - What are the additional requirements for managing electronic mail records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for managing electronic mail records? 1236.22 Section 1236.22 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.22 What are the additional requirements for managing electronic mail... requirements for electronic mail records: (1) The names of sender and all addressee(s) and date the message...

  15. 36 CFR 1236.22 - What are the additional requirements for managing electronic mail records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for managing electronic mail records? 1236.22 Section 1236.22 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.22 What are the additional requirements for managing electronic mail... requirements for electronic mail records: (1) The names of sender and all addressee(s) and date the message...

  16. 36 CFR 1236.22 - What are the additional requirements for managing electronic mail records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for managing electronic mail records? 1236.22 Section 1236.22 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.22 What are the additional requirements for managing electronic mail... requirements for electronic mail records: (1) The names of sender and all addressee(s) and date the message...

  17. Integrating Electronic Health Record Competencies into Undergraduate Health Informatics Education.

    PubMed

    Borycki, Elizabeth M; Griffith, Janessa; Kushniruk, Andre W

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on our findings arising from a qualitative, interview study of students' experiences in an undergraduate health informatics program. Our findings suggest that electronic health record competencies need to be integrated into an undergraduate curriculum. Participants suggested that there is a need to educate students about the use of the EHR, followed by best practices around interface design, workflow, and implementation with this work culminating in students spearheading the design of the technology as part of their educational program of study.

  18. A review of security of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Than

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to answer the research question, "Are current information security technologies adequate for electronic health records (EHRs)?" In order to achieve this, the following matters have been addressed in this article: (i) What is information security in the context of EHRs? (ii) Why is information security important for EHRs? and (iii) What are the current technologies for information security available to EHRs? It is concluded that current EHR security technologies are inadequate and urgently require improvement. Further study regarding information security of EHRs is indicated.

  19. Application of an Electronic Medical Record in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, Patrick J.

    2000-01-01

    Electronic Medical Records (EMR) have been emerging over the past decade. Today, they are replacing the paper chart in clinics throughout the nation. Approximately three years ago, the NASA-JSC Flight Medicine Clinic initiated an assessment of the EMRs available on the market. This assessment included comparing these products with the particular scope of practice at JSC. In 1998, the Logician EMR from Medicalogic was selected for the JSC Flight Medicine Clinic. This presentation reviews the process of selection and implementation of the EMR into the unique practice of aerospace medicine at JSC.

  20. Taming the EHR (Electronic Health Record) - There is Hope.

    PubMed

    DiAngi, Y T; Longhurst, C A; Payne, T H

    2016-01-01

    With increasing diffusion of EHR technology over the last half decade, clinician burnout is rising. As healthcare is a complex and highly regulated field, the rapid and mass adoption of EHR technology has created disruption for highly skilled workers such as clinicians. Although, much has been written about dissatisfaction with the EHR (electronic health record), a paucity of immediate solutions exists in the literature. This article suggests three actionable steps health systems and clinicians can make to expedite gains from and mitigate the effect of the EHR on clinical practice.

  1. Financial analysis projects clear returns from electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Karl F; Wofford, David A

    2002-01-01

    Implementing an electronic medical record (EMR) is a major initiative that should be undertaken only after a thoughtful analysis of the costs and benefits involved. Unfortunately, demonstrating financial returns on an EMR often is regarded as an inexact science at best, which has caused many healthcare executives to avoid adopting this technology. With the right approach, however, it is possible to demonstrate convincingly that the financial benefits will far outweigh the costs. To do this, it is necessary to involve representatives from operational areas throughout the organization, because they are best able to identify the potential for cost savings and additional revenue opportunities.

  2. Electronic Health Record in Italy and Personal Data Protection.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Silvio; Bellavista, Alessandro; Corso, Pietro Paolo; Zangara, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with the Italian Electronic Health Record (hereinafter EHR), recently introduced by Act 221/2012, with a specific focus on personal data protection. Privacy issues--e.g., informed consent, data processing, patients' rights and minors' will--are discussed within the framework of recent e-Health legislation, national Data Protection Code, the related Data Protection Authority pronouncements and EU law. The paper is aimed at discussing the problems arising from a complex, fragmentary and sometimes uncertain legal framework on e-Health.

  3. Ethics and the electronic health record in dental school clinics.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, Robert A; Valenza, John A

    2012-05-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are a major development in the practice of dentistry, and dental schools and dental curricula have benefitted from this technology. Patient data entry, storage, retrieval, transmission, and archiving have been streamlined, and the potential for teledentistry and improvement in epidemiological research is beginning to be realized. However, maintaining patient health information in an electronic form has also changed the environment in dental education, setting up potential ethical dilemmas for students and faculty members. The purpose of this article is to explore some of the ethical issues related to EHRs, the advantages and concerns related to the use of computers in the dental operatory, the impact of the EHR on the doctor-patient relationship, the introduction of web-based EHRs, the link between technology and ethics, and potential solutions for the management of ethical concerns related to EHRs in dental schools.

  4. Integration services to enable regional shared electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ilídio C; Cunha, João P S

    2011-01-01

    eHealth is expected to integrate a comprehensive set of patient data sources into a coherent continuum, but implementations vary and Portugal is still lacking on electronic patient data sharing. In this work, we present a clinical information hub to aggregate multi-institution patient data and bridge the information silos. This integration platform enables a coherent object model, services-oriented applications development and a trust framework. It has been instantiated in the Rede Telemática de Saúde (www.RTSaude.org) to support a regional Electronic Health Record approach, fed dynamically from production systems at eight partner institutions, providing access to more than 11,000,000 care episodes, relating to over 350,000 citizens. The network has obtained the necessary clearance from the Portuguese data protection agency.

  5. Assessment of the impact on time to complete medical record using an electronic medical record versus a paper record on emergency department patients: a study.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jeffrey J; Sutherland, Jane; Symington, Cheryl; Dorland, Katie; Mansour, Marlene; Stiell, Ian G

    2014-12-01

    Electronic medical records are becoming an integral part of healthcare delivery. The goal of this study was to compare paper documentation versus electronic medical record for non-traumatic chest pain to determine differences in time for physicians to complete medical records using paper versus electronic mediums. We also assessed physician satisfaction with the electronic format. We conducted this before-after study in a single large tertiary care academic emergency department. In the 'Before Period', stopwatches determined the time for paper medical recording. In the 'After Period', a template-based electronic medical record was introduced and the time for electronic recording was measured. The time to record in the before and after periods were compared using a two-sided t test. We surveyed physicians to assess satisfaction. We enrolled 100 non-traumatic patients with chest pain in the before period and 73 in the after period. The documentation time was longer using electronic charting, (9.6±5.9 min vs 6.1±2.5 min; p<0.001). 18 of 20 physicians participating in the after period completed surveys. Physicians were not satisfied with the electronic patient recording for non-traumatic chest pain. This is the first study that we are aware of which compared paper versus electronic medical records in the emergency department. Electronic recording took longer than paper records. Physicians were not satisfied using this electronic record. Given the time pressures on emergency physicians, a solution to minimise the charting time using electronic medical records must be found before widespread uptake of electronic charting will be possible. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. 36 CFR 1225.24 - When can an agency apply previously approved schedules to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... records when the electronic records system replaces a single series of hard copy permanent records or the electronic records consist of information drawn from multiple previously scheduled permanent series. Agencies... Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, phone number 301-837-1738, in writing of series of records that...

  7. 36 CFR 1225.24 - When can an agency apply previously approved schedules to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... records when the electronic records system replaces a single series of hard copy permanent records or the electronic records consist of information drawn from multiple previously scheduled permanent series. Agencies... Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, phone number 301-837-1738, in writing of series of records that...

  8. 63 FR 39196 - Electronic Records Work Group Draft Report; Appendix E

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-07-21

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Electronic Records Work Group Draft Report; Appendix E AGENCY: National Archives... Electronic Records Work Group's proposed general records schedule (GRS) to cover information technology records common to many or all Federal agencies. The proposed GRS would implement the Work Group's...

  9. Data-driven approach for creating synthetic electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background New algorithms for disease outbreak detection are being developed to take advantage of full electronic medical records (EMRs) that contain a wealth of patient information. However, due to privacy concerns, even anonymized EMRs cannot be shared among researchers, resulting in great difficulty in comparing the effectiveness of these algorithms. To bridge the gap between novel bio-surveillance algorithms operating on full EMRs and the lack of non-identifiable EMR data, a method for generating complete and synthetic EMRs was developed. Methods This paper describes a novel methodology for generating complete synthetic EMRs both for an outbreak illness of interest (tularemia) and for background records. The method developed has three major steps: 1) synthetic patient identity and basic information generation; 2) identification of care patterns that the synthetic patients would receive based on the information present in real EMR data for similar health problems; 3) adaptation of these care patterns to the synthetic patient population. Results We generated EMRs, including visit records, clinical activity, laboratory orders/results and radiology orders/results for 203 synthetic tularemia outbreak patients. Validation of the records by a medical expert revealed problems in 19% of the records; these were subsequently corrected. We also generated background EMRs for over 3000 patients in the 4-11 yr age group. Validation of those records by a medical expert revealed problems in fewer than 3% of these background patient EMRs and the errors were subsequently rectified. Conclusions A data-driven method was developed for generating fully synthetic EMRs. The method is general and can be applied to any data set that has similar data elements (such as laboratory and radiology orders and results, clinical activity, prescription orders). The pilot synthetic outbreak records were for tularemia but our approach may be adapted to other infectious diseases. The pilot synthetic

  10. Relevance of the electronic computer to hospital medical records*

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J. H.

    1969-01-01

    During the past 30 years an “information explosion” has completely changed patterns of illness. Unit files of individual patients have become so large that they are increasingly difficult both to store physically and to assimilate mentally. We have reached a communications barriers which poses a major threat to the efficient practice of clinical medicine. At the same time a new kind of machine, the electronic digital computer, which was invented only 26 years ago, has already come to dominate large areas of military, scientific, commercial, and industrial activity. Its supremacy rests on its ability to perform any data procedure automatically and incredibly quickly. Computers are being employed in clinical medicine in hospitals for various purposes. They can act as arithmetic calculators, they can process and analyse output from recording devices, and they can make possible the automation of various machine systems. However, in the field of case records their role is much less well defined, for here the organization of data as a preliminary to computer input is the real stumbling-block. Data banks of retrospective selected clinical information have been in operation in some centres for a number of years. Attempts are now being made to design computerized “total information systems” to replace conventional paper records, and the possibility of automated diagnosis is being seriously discussed. In my view, however, the medical profession is in danger of being dazzled by optimistic claims about the usefulness of computers in case record processing. The solution to the present problems of record storage and handling is very simple, and does not involve computerization. PMID:4898564

  11. High-resolution electronic imaging system for schlieren recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honour, Joseph

    2001-04-01

    High speed Schlieren photography is a reliable means of visualizing small changes of refractive index resulting from density differences within a transparent media. Schlieren techniques are frequently used for investigating the aerodynamics of high velocity projectiles to confirm the formation of shock waves on leading edge surfaces so that optimum design performance can be achieved. Traditionally this type of investigation would have been undertaken using film cameras, however, improvements in image quality provided by the rapid development of intensified silicon based sensors and associated electronics has offered a reliable alternative, without the inherent difficulties in quantitative data extraction. The development of a high resolution sixteen image electronic camera system provides the researcher with versatile recording system that can be used to capture detailed image sequences at framing rates up to two hundred million pictures per second. The number of information points is maintained, irrespective of framing rate, making it ideal for recording the complexity of detail available from these sensitive Schlieren techniques. The high resolution images, which are displayed within twenty seconds of capture, flexibility of operation, and comprehensive analysis software provide fast reliable access to experimental data.

  12. Electronic health records: new opportunities for clinical research.

    PubMed

    Coorevits, P; Sundgren, M; Klein, G O; Bahr, A; Claerhout, B; Daniel, C; Dugas, M; Dupont, D; Schmidt, A; Singleton, P; De Moor, G; Kalra, D

    2013-12-01

    Clinical research is on the threshold of a new era in which electronic health records (EHRs) are gaining an important novel supporting role. Whilst EHRs used for routine clinical care have some limitations at present, as discussed in this review, new improved systems and emerging research infrastructures are being developed to ensure that EHRs can be used for secondary purposes such as clinical research, including the design and execution of clinical trials for new medicines. EHR systems should be able to exchange information through the use of recently published international standards for their interoperability and clinically validated information structures (such as archetypes and international health terminologies), to ensure consistent and more complete recording and sharing of data for various patient groups. Such systems will counteract the obstacles of differing clinical languages and styles of documentation as well as the recognized incompleteness of routine records. Here, we discuss some of the legal and ethical concerns of clinical research data reuse and technical security measures that can enable such research while protecting privacy. In the emerging research landscape, cooperation infrastructures are being built where research projects can utilize the availability of patient data from federated EHR systems from many different sites, as well as in international multilingual settings. Amongst several initiatives described, the EHR4CR project offers a promising method for clinical research. One of the first achievements of this project was the development of a protocol feasibility prototype which is used for finding patients eligible for clinical trials from multiple sources.

  13. A personally controlled electronic health record for Australia

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Christopher; Bainbridge, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective On July 1, 2012 Australia launched a personally controlled electronic health record (PCEHR) designed around the needs of consumers. Using a distributed model and leveraging key component national eHealth infrastructure, the PCEHR is designed to enable sharing of any health information about a patient with them and any other health practitioner involved in their care to whom the patient allows access. This paper discusses the consumer-facing part of the program. Method Design of the system was through stakeholder consultation and the development of detailed requirements, followed by clinical design assurance. Results Patients are able to access any posted information through a web-accessible ‘consumer portal.’ Within the portal they are able to assert access controls on all or part of their record. The portal includes areas for consumers to record their own personal information. Discussion The PCEHR has the potential to transform the ability of patients to actively engage in their own healthcare, and to enable the emerging partnership model of health and healthcare in medicine. The ability to access health information traditionally kept within the closed walls of institutions also raises challenges for the profession, both in the language clinicians choose and the ethical issues raised by the changed roles and responsibilities. Conclusions The PCEHR is aimed at connecting all participants and their interventions, and is intended to become a system-wide activity. PMID:24650635

  14. Electronic Health Records: Then, Now, and in the Future.

    PubMed

    Evans, R S

    2016-05-20

    Describe the state of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) in 1992 and their evolution by 2015 and where EHRs are expected to be in 25 years. Further to discuss the expectations for EHRs in 1992 and explore which of them were realized and what events accelerated or disrupted/derailed how EHRs evolved. Literature search based on "Electronic Health Record", "Medical Record", and "Medical Chart" using Medline, Google, Wikipedia Medical, and Cochrane Libraries resulted in an initial review of 2,356 abstracts and other information in papers and books. Additional papers and books were identified through the review of references cited in the initial review. By 1992, hardware had become more affordable, powerful, and compact and the use of personal computers, local area networks, and the Internet provided faster and easier access to medical information. EHRs were initially developed and used at academic medical facilities but since most have been replaced by large vendor EHRs. While EHR use has increased and clinicians are being prepared to practice in an EHR-mediated world, technical issues have been overshadowed by procedural, professional, social, political, and especially ethical issues as well as the need for compliance with standards and information security. There have been enormous advancements that have taken place, but many of the early expectations for EHRs have not been realized and current EHRs still do not meet the needs of today's rapidly changing healthcare environment. The current use of EHRs initiated by new technology would have been hard to foresee. Current and new EHR technology will help to provide international standards for interoperable applications that use health, social, economic, behavioral, and environmental data to communicate, interpret, and act intelligently upon complex healthcare information to foster precision medicine and a learning health system.

  15. Electronic health records. A systematic review on quality requirements.

    PubMed

    Hoerbst, A; Ammenwerth, E

    2010-01-01

    Since the first concepts for electronic health records (EHRs) in the 1990s, the content, structure, and technology of such records were frequently changed and adapted. The basic idea to support and enhance health care stayed the same over time. To reach these goals, it is crucial that EHRs themselves adhere to rigid quality requirements. The present review aims at describing the currently available, mainly non-functional, quality requirements with regard to electronic health records. A combined approach - systematic literature analysis and expert interviews - was used. The literature analysis as well as the expert interviews included sources/experts from different domains such as standards and norms, scientific literature and guidelines, and best practice. The expert interviews were performed by using problem-centric qualitative computer-assisted telephone interviews (CATIs) or face-to-face interviews. All of the data that was obtained was analyzed using qualitative content analysis techniques. In total, more than 1200 requirements were identified of which 203 requirements were also mentioned during the expert interviews. The requirements are organized according to the ISO 9126 and the eEurope 2002 criteria. Categories with the highest number of requirements found include global requirements, (general) functional requirements and data security. The number of non-functional requirements found is by contrast lower. The manuscript gives comprehensive insight into the currently available, primarily non-functional, EHR requirements. To our knowledge, there are no other publications that have holistically reported on this topic. The requirements identified can be used in different ways, e.g. the conceptual design, the development of EHR systems, as a starting point for further refinement or as a basis for the development of specific sets of requirements.

  16. Relational machine learning for electronic health record-driven phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Peissig, Peggy L; Santos Costa, Vitor; Caldwell, Michael D; Rottscheit, Carla; Berg, Richard L; Mendonca, Eneida A; Page, David

    2014-12-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) offer medical and pharmacogenomics research unprecedented opportunities to identify and classify patients at risk. EHRs are collections of highly inter-dependent records that include biological, anatomical, physiological, and behavioral observations. They comprise a patient's clinical phenome, where each patient has thousands of date-stamped records distributed across many relational tables. Development of EHR computer-based phenotyping algorithms require time and medical insight from clinical experts, who most often can only review a small patient subset representative of the total EHR records, to identify phenotype features. In this research we evaluate whether relational machine learning (ML) using inductive logic programming (ILP) can contribute to addressing these issues as a viable approach for EHR-based phenotyping. Two relational learning ILP approaches and three well-known WEKA (Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis) implementations of non-relational approaches (PART, J48, and JRIP) were used to develop models for nine phenotypes. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) coded EHR data were used to select training cohorts for the development of each phenotypic model. Accuracy, precision, recall, F-Measure, and Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (AUROC) curve statistics were measured for each phenotypic model based on independent manually verified test cohorts. A two-sided binomial distribution test (sign test) compared the five ML approaches across phenotypes for statistical significance. We developed an approach to automatically label training examples using ICD-9 diagnosis codes for the ML approaches being evaluated. Nine phenotypic models for each ML approach were evaluated, resulting in better overall model performance in AUROC using ILP when compared to PART (p=0.039), J48 (p=0.003) and JRIP (p=0.003). ILP has the potential to improve phenotyping by independently delivering

  17. Relational Machine Learning for Electronic Health Record-Driven Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Peissig, Peggy L.; Costa, Vitor Santos; Caldwell, Michael D.; Rottscheit, Carla; Berg, Richard L.; Mendonca, Eneida A.; Page, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electronic health records (EHR) offer medical and pharmacogenomics research unprecedented opportunities to identify and classify patients at risk. EHRs are collections of highly inter-dependent records that include biological, anatomical, physiological, and behavioral observations. They comprise a patient’s clinical phenome, where each patient has thousands of date-stamped records distributed across many relational tables. Development of EHR computer-based phenotyping algorithms require time and medical insight from clinical experts, who most often can only review a small patient subset representative of the total EHR records, to identify phenotype features. In this research we evaluate whether relational machine learning (ML) using Inductive Logic Programming (ILP) can contribute to addressing these issues as a viable approach for EHR-based phenotyping. Methods Two relational learning ILP approaches and three well-known WEKA (Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis) implementations of non-relational approaches (PART, J48, and JRIP) were used to develop models for nine phenotypes. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) coded EHR data were used to select training cohorts for the development of each phenotypic model. Accuracy, precision, recall, F-Measure, and Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (AUROC) curve statistics were measured for each phenotypic model based on independent manually verified test cohorts. A two-sided binomial distribution test (sign test) compared the five ML approaches across phenotypes for statistical significance. Results We developed an approach to automatically label training examples using ICD-9 diagnosis codes for the ML approaches being evaluated. Nine phenotypic models for each MLapproach were evaluated, resulting in better overall model performance in AUROC using ILP when compared to PART (p=0.039), J48 (p=0.003) and JRIP (p=0.003). Discussion ILP has the potential to improve

  18. Consultation of medical narratives in the electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Tange, H J

    1999-12-01

    This article presents an overview of a research project concerning the consultation of medical narratives in the electronic medical record (EMR). It describes an analysis of user needs, the design and implementation of a prototype EMR system, and the evaluation of the ease of consultation of medical narratives when using this system. In a questionnaire survey, 85 hospital physicians judged the quality of their paper-based medical record with respect to data entry, information retrieval and some other aspects. Participants were more positive about the paper medical record than the literature suggests. They wished to maintain the flexibility of data entry but indicated the need to improve the retrieval of information. A prototype EMR system was developed to facilitate the consultation of medical narratives. These parts were divided into labeled segments that could be arranged source-oriented and problem-oriented. This system was used to evaluate the ease of information retrieval of 24 internists and 12 residents at a teaching hospital when using free-text medical narratives divided at different levels of detail. They solved, without time pressure, some predefined problems concerning three voluminous, inpatient case records. The participants were randomly allocated to a sequence that was balanced by patient case and learning effect. The division of medical narratives affected speed, but not completeness of information retrieval. Progress notes divided into problem-related segments could be consulted 22% faster than when undivided. Medical history and physical examination divided into segments at organ-system level could be consulted 13% faster than when divided into separate questions and observations. These differences were statistically significant. The fastest divisions were also appreciated as the best combination of easy searching and best insight in the patient case. The results of our evaluation study suggest a trade-off between searching and reading: too much

  19. Personal, Electronic, Secure National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records Conference

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues EHR Personal, Electronic, Secure: National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records ... One suggestion for saving money is to implement electronic personal health records. With this in mind, the ...

  20. Electronic patient record and archive of records in Cardio.net system for telecardiology.

    PubMed

    Sierdziński, Janusz; Karpiński, Grzegorz

    2003-01-01

    In modern medicine the well structured patient data set, fast access to it and reporting capability become an important question. With the dynamic development of information technology (IT) such question is solved via building electronic patient record (EPR) archives. We then obtain fast access to patient data, diagnostic and treatment protocols etc. It results in more efficient, better and cheaper treatment. The aim of the work was to design a uniform Electronic Patient Record, implemented in cardio.net system for telecardiology allowing the co-operation among regional hospitals and reference centers. It includes questionnaires for demographic data and questionnaires supporting doctor's work (initial diagnosis, final diagnosis, history and physical, ECG at the discharge, applied treatment, additional tests, drugs, daily and periodical reports). The browser is implemented in EPR archive to facilitate data retrieval. Several tools for creating EPR and EPR archive were used such as: XML, PHP, Java Script and MySQL. The separate question is the security of data on WWW server. The security is ensured via Security Socket Layer (SSL) protocols and other tools. EPR in Cardio.net system is a module enabling the co-work of many physicians and the communication among different medical centers.

  1. Adverse-drug-event surveillance using narrative nursing records in electronic nursing records.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hee-Jung; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of adverse drug events can be extracted by analyzing narrative nursing statements documented in standardized terminology-based electronic nursing records. For this study, we reviewed the narrative nursing documentations of 487 admissions of 355 cancer patients who were treated with cisplatin at a tertiary-care hospital in Korea. Narrative nursing statements with the terms "adverse drug reaction," "allergy," "hypersensitivity," and other adverse drug events listed in the safety information were analyzed. In addition, nausea, one of the most frequent adverse drug events, was further examined. Narrative statements documenting the presence or absence of an "adverse drug reaction," "allergy," and "hypersensitivity" were found in 162 admissions (33.3%). The presence or absence of adverse drug events due to cisplatin was documented in 476 admissions (97.7%). At least one adverse drug event was noted in 258 admissions (53.0%). The presence of nausea was documented in 214 admissions (43.9%), and the mean duration of nausea was 5.2 days. The results of this study suggest that adverse drug events can be monitored using narrative nursing statements documented in standardized terminology-based electronic nursing records.

  2. Documentation and Treatment of Intraoperative Hypotension: Electronic Anesthesia Records versus Paper Anesthesia Records.

    PubMed

    Shear, Torin D; Deshur, Mark; Lapin, Brittany; Greenberg, Steven B; Murphy, Glenn S; Szokol, Joseph; Ujiki, Michael; Newmark, Rebecca; Benson, Jessica; Koress, Cody; Dwyer, Connor; Vender, Jeffery

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we examined anesthetic records before and after the implementation of an electronic anesthetic record documentation (AIMS) in a single surgical population. The purpose of this study was to identify any inconsistencies in anesthetic care based on handwritten documentation (paper) or AIMS. We hypothesized that the type of anesthetic record (paper or AIMS) would lead to differences in the documentation and management of hypotension. Consecutive patients who underwent esophageal surgery between 2009 and 2014 by a single surgeon were eligible for the study. Patients were grouped in to 'paper' or 'AIMS' based on the type of anesthetic record identified in the chart. Pertinent patient identifiers were removed and data collated after collection. Predetermined preoperative and intraoperative data variables were reviewed. Consecutive esophageal surgery patients (N = 189) between 2009 and 2014 were evaluated. 92 patients had an anesthetic record documented on paper and 97 using AIMS. The median number of unique blood pressure recordings was lower in the AIMS group (median (Q1,Q3) AIMS 30.0 (24.0, 39.0) vs. Paper 35.0 (28.5, 43.5), p < 0.01). However, the median number of hypotensive events (HTEs) was higher in the AIMS group (median (Q1,Q3) 8.0 (4.0, 18.0) vs. 4.0 (1.0, 10.5), p < 0.001), and the percentage of HTEs per blood pressure recording was higher in the AIMS group (30.4 ((Q1, Q3) (9.5, 60.9)% vs. 12.5 (2.4, 27.5)%), p < 0.01). Multivariable regression analysis identified independent predictors of HTEs. The incidence of HTEs was found to increase with AIMS (IRR = 1.88, p < 0.01). Preoperative systolic blood pressure, increased blood loss, and phenylephrine. A phenylephrine infusion was negatively associated with hypotensive events (IRR = 0.99, p = 0.03). We noted an increased incidence of HTEs associated with the institution of an AIMS. Despite this increase, no change in medical therapy for hypotension was seen. AIMS did not appear to

  3. 77 FR 64755 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program-Stage 2; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program--Stage 2; Corrections AGENCY... Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program--Stage 2'' which appeared in the September 4... Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program--Stage 2'' there were a number of technical errors and...

  4. Forward secure digital signature for electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao-Chang; Huang, To-Yeh; Hou, Ting-Wei

    2012-04-01

    The Technology Safeguard in Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Title II has addressed a way to maintain the integrity and non-repudiation of Electronic Medical Record (EMR). One of the important cryptographic technologies is mentioned in the ACT is digital signature; however, the ordinary digital signature (e.g. DSA, RSA, GQ...) has an inherent weakness: if the key (certificate) is updated, than all signatures, even the ones generated before the update, are no longer trustworthy. Unfortunately, the current most frequently used digital signature schemes are categorized into the ordinary digital signature scheme; therefore, the objective of this paper is to analyze the shortcoming of using ordinary digital signatures in EMR and to propose a method to use forward secure digital signature to sign EMR to ensure that the past EMR signatures remain trustworthy while the key (certificate) is updated.

  5. Care Coordination and Electronic Health Records: Connecting Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Graetz, Ilana; Reed, Mary; Rundall, Thomas; Bellows, Jim; Brand, Richard; Hsu, John

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between use of electronic health records (EHR) and care coordination. Study Design: Two surveys, in 2005 and again in 2006, of primary care clinicians working in a prepaid integrated delivery system during the staggered implementation of an EHR system. Using multivariate logistic regression to adjust for clinician characteristics, we examined the association between EHR use and clinicians’ perceptions of three dimensions of care coordination: timely access to complete information; treatment goal agreement; and role/responsibility agreement. Results: Compared to clinicians without EHR, clinicians with 6+ months of EHR use more frequently reported timely access to complete information, and being in agreement on treatment goals with other involved clinicians. There was no significant association between EHR use and being in agreement on roles and responsibilities with other clinicians. Conclusions: EHR use is associated with aspects of care coordination involving information transfer and communication of treatment goals. PMID:20351851

  6. Change Management – Recommendations for Successful Electronic Medical Records Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Shoolin, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Change is difficult and managing change even more so. With the advent of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) and the difficulty of its acceptance, understanding physician’s attitudes and the psychology of change management is imperative. While many authors describe change management theories, one comes nearest to describing this particularly difficult transition. In 1969, Elizabeth Kübler-Ross wrote her seminal treatise, On Death and Dying, detailing the psychological changes terminally ill patients undergo. Her grieving model is a template to examine the impact of change. By following a physician through the EMR maze, understanding the difficulties he/she perceives and developing a plan other change agents are able to use, the paper gives practical recommendations to EMR change management. PMID:23616842

  7. Archetype Development Process of Electronic Health Record of Minas Gerais.

    PubMed

    Abreu Maia, Thais; Fernandes De Muylder, Cristiana; Mendonça Queiroga, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    The Electronic Health Record (EHR) supports health systems and aims to reduce fragmentation, which will enable continuity of patient care. The paper's main objective is to define the steps, roles and artifacts for an archetype development process (ADP) for the EHR at the Brazilian National Health System (SUS) in the State of Minas Gerais (MG). This study was conducted using qualitative analysis based upon an applied case. It had an exploratory purpose metodologically defined in four stages: literature review; descriptive comparison; proposition of an archetype development process and proof of concept. The proof of concept showed that the proposed ADP ensures the archetype quality and supports the semantic interoperability in SUS to improve clinical safety and the continuity of patient care.

  8. Enhancing electronic health records to support clinical research.

    PubMed

    Vawdrey, David K; Weng, Chunhua; Herion, David; Cimino, James J

    2014-01-01

    The "Learning Health System" has been described as an environment that drives research and innovation as a natural outgrowth of patient care. Electronic health records (EHRs) are necessary to enable the Learning Health System; however, a source of frustration is that current systems fail to adequately support research needs. We propose a model for enhancing EHRs to collect structured and standards-based clinical research data during clinical encounters that promotes efficiency and computational reuse of quality data for both care and research. The model integrates Common Data Elements (CDEs) for clinical research into existing clinical documentation workflows, leveraging executable documentation guidance within the EHR to support coordinated, standardized data collection for both patient care and clinical research.

  9. The University of Washington electronic medical record experience*

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Nanette J

    2010-01-01

    The Health Sciences Library at the University of Washington initiated and continues to develop a role in the electronic medical record, starting with the development of the first integrated web-based interface, called MINDscape. An Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) grant in 1992 began the process, which also led to the development of a clinical medical librarian position. Over the years, the librarian's role in the clinical environment became more established, and with the advent of clinical online resources, it offered further opportunities for librarians to provide the expertise needed to incorporate the appropriate resources. The collaborative journey continues as librarians, now able to directly access the EMRs, provide information about what resources to use and where best to place them and design how best to provide notes or feedback to clinicians. PMID:20648254

  10. Barriers to comparing the usability of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Ratwani, Raj M; Hettinger, A Zachary; Fairbanks, Rollin J

    2016-08-29

    Despite the widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs), usability of many EHRs continues to be suboptimal, with some vendors failing to meet usability standards, resulting in clinician frustration and patient safety hazards. In an effort to increase EHR vendor competition on usability, recommendations have been made and legislation drafted to develop comparison tools that would allow purchasers to better understand the usability of EHR products prior to purchase. Usability comparison can be based on EHR vendor design and development processes, vendor usability testing as part of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology certification program, and usability of implemented products. Barriers exist within the current certified health technology program that prevent effective comparison of usability during each of these stages. We describe the importance of providing purchasers with improved information about EHR usability, barriers to making usability comparisons, and solutions to overcome these barriers.

  11. Change management - recommendations for successful electronic medical records implementation.

    PubMed

    Shoolin, J S

    2010-01-01

    Change is difficult and managing change even more so. With the advent of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) and the difficulty of its acceptance, understanding physician's attitudes and the psychology of change management is imperative. While many authors describe change management theories, one comes nearest to describing this particularly difficult transition. In 1969, Elizabeth Kübler-Ross wrote her seminal treatise, On Death and Dying, detailing the psychological changes terminally ill patients undergo. Her grieving model is a template to examine the impact of change. By following a physician through the EMR maze, understanding the difficulties he/she perceives and developing a plan other change agents are able to use, the paper gives practical recommendations to EMR change management.

  12. Open source cardiology electronic health record development for DIGICARDIAC implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugarte, Nelson; Medina, Rubén.; Huiracocha, Lourdes; Rojas, Rubén.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development of a Cardiology Electronic Health Record (CEHR) system. Software consists of a structured algorithm designed under Health Level-7 (HL7) international standards. Novelty of the system is the integration of high resolution ECG (HRECG) signal acquisition and processing tools, patient information management tools and telecardiology tools. Acquisition tools are for management and control of the DIGICARDIAC electrocardiograph functions. Processing tools allow management of HRECG signal analysis searching for indicative patterns of cardiovascular pathologies. Telecardiology tools incorporation allows system communication with other health care centers decreasing access time to the patient information. CEHR system was completely developed using open source software. Preliminary results of process validation showed the system efficiency.

  13. Ethical issues in electronic health records: A general overview

    PubMed Central

    Ozair, Fouzia F.; Jamshed, Nayer; Sharma, Amit; Aggarwal, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) is increasingly being implemented in many developing countries. It is the need of the hour because it improves the quality of health care and is also cost-effective. Technologies can introduce some hazards hence safety of information in the system is a real challenge. Recent news of security breaches has put a question mark on this system. Despite its increased usefulness, and increasing enthusiasm in its adoption, not much attention is being paid to the ethical issues that might arise. Securing EHR with an encrypted password is a probable option. The purpose of this article is to discuss the various ethical issues arising in the use of the EHRs and their possible solutions. PMID:25878950

  14. Leveraging the cloud for electronic health record access.

    PubMed

    Coats, Brian; Acharya, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers are under increasing pressure to enable widespread access to their electronic health record (EHR) systems for the patients they serve; the meaningful use incentive programs are perhaps the most significant driver encouraging this access. Elsewhere, the cloud has become extremely efficient and successful at establishing digital identities for individuals and making them interoperable across heterogeneous systems. As the healthcare industry contemplates providing patients access to their EHRs, the solution should leverage existing cloud investment, not duplicate it. Through an analysis of industry standards and similar work being performed in other industries, a trust framework has been derived for exchanging identity information. This research lays out a comprehensive structure that healthcare providers can easily use to integrate their EHRs with the cloud for identity validation, while meeting compliance guidelines for security and privacy. Further, this research has been implemented at a large regional hospital, yielding immediate and tangible improvements.

  15. Factors Influencing Acceptance of Electronic Health Records in Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Melinda A

    2009-01-01

    The study's aim was to examine factors that may influence health information managers in the adoption of electronic health records. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) served as theoretical foundation for this quantitative study. Hospital health information managers in Arkansas were queried as to the constructs of perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and behavior intention. The study population comprised 94 health information managers with a return rate of 74.5 percent. One manager was identified to represent each hospital. In each of the construct areas, the results showed a difference between health information managers that had adopted components of EHRs versus those that had not. This study may serve to guide the educational process of both health information managers that have yet to implement EHRs as well as the EHR vendor community. PMID:20169018

  16. The Cradle Coast personally controlled electronic health record evaluation research.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Elizabeth; Cheek, Colleen; Van Der Ploeg, Winifred; Orpin, Peter; Behrens, Heidi; Condon, Sharon; Jaffray, Linda; Ellis, Isabelle; Ringeisen Arnold, Barbara; Brogan, Robyn; Skinner, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    In 2010 the Federal Government announced funding over two years to create a Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR) for Australians. One of the wave 2 implementation sites is the Cradle Coast in Tasmania. A PCEHR Program Benefits and Evaluation Partner (BEP) has been appointed to undertake evaluation activities with the e-health lead implementation sites. In addition to this implementation a comprehensive research plan has been developed and commenced through the Rural Clinical School at the University of Tasmania. The overarching aim of the research agenda is to evaluate the outcomes of various elements of the 4C project as it evolves and is implemented, from multiple perspectives. The research agenda is important as it expands upon the NEHTA mandated evaluation and provides an holistic overview of the PCEHR implementation process and outcomes for clinicians, patients and family members. This paper will detail the planned evaluation and its progress to date.

  17. Electronic health record functionality needed to better support primary care

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H; Beasley, John W; Crosson, Jesse C; Kibbe, David C; Klinkman, Michael S; Lehmann, Christoph U; Fox, Chester H; Mitchell, Jason M; Mold, James W; Pace, Wilson D; Peterson, Kevin A; Phillips, Robert L; Post, Robert; Puro, Jon; Raddock, Michael; Simkus, Ray; Waldren, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) must support primary care clinicians and patients, yet many clinicians remain dissatisfied with their system. This article presents a consensus statement about gaps in current EHR functionality and needed enhancements to support primary care. The Institute of Medicine primary care attributes were used to define needs and meaningful use (MU) objectives to define EHR functionality. Current objectives remain focused on disease rather than the whole person, ignoring factors such as personal risks, behaviors, family structure, and occupational and environmental influences. Primary care needs EHRs to move beyond documentation to interpreting and tracking information over time, as well as patient-partnering activities, support for team-based care, population-management tools that deliver care, and reduced documentation burden. While stage 3 MU's focus on outcomes is laudable, enhanced functionality is still needed, including EHR modifications, expanded use of patient portals, seamless integration with external applications, and advancement of national infrastructure and policies. PMID:24431335

  18. Rational use of electronic health records for diabetes population management.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Emma M; Klompas, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Population management is increasingly invoked as an approach to improve the quality and value of diabetes care. Recent emphasis is driven by increased focus on both costs and measures of care as the US moves from fee for service to payment models in which providers are responsible for costs incurred, and outcomes achieved, for their entire patient population. The capacity of electronic health records (EHRs) to create patient registries, apply analytic tools, and facilitate provider- and patient-level interventions has allowed rapid evolution in the scope of population management initiatives. However, findings on the efficacy of these efforts for diabetes are mixed, and work remains to achieve the full potential of an-EHR based population approach. Here we seek to clarify definitions and key domains, provide an overview of evidence for EHR-based diabetes population management, and recommend future directions for applying the considerable power of EHRs to diabetes care and prevention.

  19. Electronic Health Records in Long-Term Care: Staff Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Rebecca

    2015-10-12

    As long-term post-acute care (LTPAC) settings continue to increase their adoption of electronic health records (EHRs), it is important to learn from end users currently working with the technology to identify clinical implications and opportunities to improve systems and surrounding processes. This study utilized one-on-one interviews of direct care nurses (n = 20) in a Midwest United States LTPAC setting to describe patterns of use, and areas to improve. The majority of respondents evaluated the EHR as easy to use, with a positive impact on quality of care, through efficiencies gained in communication with the care team. Staff responses outline desired modifications to the software, including fixes to data fields for more accurate medication administration and accurate reports on bowel protocol follow-up. Recommendations for LTPAC organizations are made regarding improved staff training on the EHR, and modifications to the EHR and related processes to improve quality of care and staff retention.

  20. Characterizing Physicians Practice Phenotype from Unstructured Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sanjoy; Wang, Yajuan; Byrd, Roy J.; Ng, Kenney; Steinhubl, Steven R.; deFilippi, Christopher; Stewart, Walter F.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical practice varies among physicians in ways that could lead to variation in what is documented in a patient’s electronic health records (EHR) and act as a source of bias to predictive model performance that is independent of patient health status. We used EHR encounter note data on 5,187primary care patients 50 to 85 years of age selected for a separate case-control study covering 144 unique primary care physicians (PCPs). A validated text extractor tool was used to identify mentions of Framingham heartfailure signs and symptoms (FHFSS) from the notes. Hierarchical clustering analyses were performed on the encounter note data for finding subgroups of PCPs with distinct FHFSS documentation behaviors. Three distinct PCP groups were identified that differed in the rate of documenting assertions and denials of mentions. Physician subgroup differences were not explained by patient disease burden, medication use, or other factors related to health. PMID:28269847

  1. [Security specifications for electronic medical records on the Internet].

    PubMed

    Mocanu, Mihai; Mocanu, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    The extension for the Web applications of the Electronic Medical Record seems both interesting and promising. Correlated with the expansion of Internet in our country, it allows the interconnection of physicians of different specialties and their collaboration for better treatment of patients. In this respect, the ophthalmologic medical applications consider the increased possibilities for monitoring chronic ocular diseases and for the identification of some elements for early diagnosis and risk factors supervision. We emphasize in this survey some possible solutions to the problems of interconnecting medical information systems to the Internet: the achievement of interoperability within medical organizations through the use of open standards, the automated input and processing for ocular imaging, the use of data reduction techniques in order to increase the speed of image retrieval in large databases, and, last but not least, the resolution of security and confidentiality problems in medical databases.

  2. Electronic Health Record Use a Bitter Pill for Many Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Meigs, Stephen L.; Solomon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) adoption among office-based physician practices in the United States has increased significantly in the past decade. However, the challenges of using EHRs have resulted in growing dissatisfaction with the systems among many of these physicians. The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to increase understanding of physician perceptions regarding the value of using EHR technology. Important findings included the belief among physicians that EHR systems need to be more user-friendly and adaptable to individual clinic workflow preferences, physician beliefs that lack of interoperability among EHRs is a major barrier to meaningful use of the systems, and physician beliefs that EHR use does not improve the quality of care provided to patients. These findings suggest that although government initiatives to encourage EHR adoption among office-based physician practices have produced positive results, additional support may be required in the future to maintain this momentum. PMID:26903782

  3. Meaningful Use of the Indian Health Service Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Gina R; Hays, Howard; Orav, E John; Palan, Martha; Sequist, Thomas D

    2017-08-01

    To understand the use of electronic health record (EHR) functionalities by physicians practicing in an underserved setting. A total of 333 Indian Health Service physicians (55 percent response rate) in August 2012. Cross-sectional. The survey assessed routine use of EHR functionalities, perceived usefulness, and barriers to adoption. Physicians routinely used a median 7 of 10 EHR functionalities targeted by the Meaningful Use program, but only 5 percent used all 10. Most (63 percent) felt the EHR improved quality of care. Many (76 percent) reported increased documentation time and poorer quality patient-physician interactions (45 percent). Primary care specialty and time using the EHR were positively associated with use of EHR functionalities, while perceived productivity loss was negatively associated. Significant opportunities exist to increase use of EHR functionalities and preserve physician-patient interactions and productivity in a resource-limited environment. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  4. Electronic health records: postadoption physician satisfaction and continued use.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward; Marvel, Jon

    2012-01-01

    One goal of public-policy makers in general and health care managers in particular is the adoption and efficient utilization of electronic health record (EHR) systems throughout the health care industry. Consequently, this investigation focused on the effects of known antecedents of technology adoption on physician satisfaction with EHR technology and the continued use of such systems. The American Academy of Family Physicians provided support in the survey of 453 physicians regarding their satisfaction with their EHR use experience. A conceptual model merging technology adoption and computer user satisfaction models was tested using structural equation modeling. Results indicate that effort expectancy (ease of use) has the most substantive effect on physician satisfaction and the continued use of EHR systems. As such, health care managers should be especially sensitive to the user and computer interface of prospective EHR systems to avoid costly and disruptive system selection mistakes.

  5. Leveraging the Cloud for Electronic Health Record Access

    PubMed Central

    Coats, Brian; Acharya, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers are under increasing pressure to enable widespread access to their electronic health record (EHR) systems for the patients they serve; the meaningful use incentive programs are perhaps the most significant driver encouraging this access. Elsewhere, the cloud has become extremely efficient and successful at establishing digital identities for individuals and making them interoperable across heterogeneous systems. As the healthcare industry contemplates providing patients access to their EHRs, the solution should leverage existing cloud investment, not duplicate it. Through an analysis of industry standards and similar work being performed in other industries, a trust framework has been derived for exchanging identity information. This research lays out a comprehensive structure that healthcare providers can easily use to integrate their EHRs with the cloud for identity validation, while meeting compliance guidelines for security and privacy. Further, this research has been implemented at a large regional hospital, yielding immediate and tangible improvements. PMID:24808814

  6. Electronic health records and support for primary care teamwork

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Kevin; Gourevitch, Rebecca; Cross, Dori A.; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-01-01

    Objective Consensus that enhanced teamwork is necessary for efficient and effective primary care delivery is growing. We sought to identify how electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate and pose challenges to primary care teams as well as how practices are overcoming these challenges. Methods Practices in this qualitative study were selected from those recognized as patient-centered medical homes via the National Committee for Quality Assurance 2011 tool, which included a section on practice teamwork. We interviewed 63 respondents, ranging from physicians to front-desk staff, from 27 primary care practices ranging in size, type, geography, and population size. Results EHRs were found to facilitate communication and task delegation in primary care teams through instant messaging, task management software, and the ability to create evidence-based templates for symptom-specific data collection from patients by medical assistants and nurses (which can offload work from physicians). Areas where respondents felt that electronic medical record EHR functionalities were weakest and posed challenges to teamwork included the lack of integrated care manager software and care plans in EHRs, poor practice registry functionality and interoperability, and inadequate ease of tracking patient data in the EHR over time. Discussion Practices developed solutions for some of the challenges they faced when attempting to use EHRs to support teamwork but wanted more permanent vendor and policy solutions for other challenges. Conclusions EHR vendors in the United States need to work alongside practicing primary care teams to create more clinically useful EHRs that support dynamic care plans, integrated care management software, more functional and interoperable practice registries, and greater ease of data tracking over time. PMID:25627278

  7. A Pharmacy Blueprint for Electronic Medical Record Implementation Success

    PubMed Central

    Bach, David S.; Risko, Kenneth R.; Farber, Margo S.; Polk, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Implementation of an integrated, electronic medical record (EMR) has been promoted as a means of improving patient safety and quality. While there are a few reports of such processes that incorporate computerized prescriber order entry, pharmacy verification, an electronic medication administration record (eMAR), point-of-care barcode scanning, and clinical decision support, there are no published reports on how a pharmacy department can best participate in implementing such a process across a multihospital health care system. Method: This article relates the experience of the design, build, deployment, and maintenance of an integrated EMR solution from the pharmacy perspective. It describes a 9-month planning and build phase and the subsequent rollout at 8 hospitals over the following 13 months. Results: Key components to success are identified, as well as a set of guiding principles that proved invaluable in decision making and dispute resolution. Labor/personnel requirements for the various stages of the process are discussed, as are issues involving medication workflow analysis, drug database considerations, the development of clinical order sets, and incorporation of bar-code scanning of medications. Recommended implementation and maintenance strategies are presented, and the impact of EMR implementation on the pharmacy practice model and revenue analysis are examined. Conclusion: Adherence to the principles and practices outlined in this article can assist pharmacy administrators and clinicians during all medication-related phases of the development, implementation, and maintenance of an EMR solution. Furthermore, review and incorporation of some or all of practices presented may help ease the process and ensure its success. PMID:26405340

  8. Electronic health records and support for primary care teamwork.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ann S; Draper, Kevin; Gourevitch, Rebecca; Cross, Dori A; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-03-01

    Consensus that enhanced teamwork is necessary for efficient and effective primary care delivery is growing. We sought to identify how electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate and pose challenges to primary care teams as well as how practices are overcoming these challenges. Practices in this qualitative study were selected from those recognized as patient-centered medical homes via the National Committee for Quality Assurance 2011 tool, which included a section on practice teamwork. We interviewed 63 respondents, ranging from physicians to front-desk staff, from 27 primary care practices ranging in size, type, geography, and population size. EHRs were found to facilitate communication and task delegation in primary care teams through instant messaging, task management software, and the ability to create evidence-based templates for symptom-specific data collection from patients by medical assistants and nurses (which can offload work from physicians). Areas where respondents felt that electronic medical record EHR functionalities were weakest and posed challenges to teamwork included the lack of integrated care manager software and care plans in EHRs, poor practice registry functionality and interoperability, and inadequate ease of tracking patient data in the EHR over time. Practices developed solutions for some of the challenges they faced when attempting to use EHRs to support teamwork but wanted more permanent vendor and policy solutions for other challenges. EHR vendors in the United States need to work alongside practicing primary care teams to create more clinically useful EHRs that support dynamic care plans, integrated care management software, more functional and interoperable practice registries, and greater ease of data tracking over time. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  9. Progress in electronic medical record adoption in Canada.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    To determine the rate of adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) by physicians across Canada, provincial incentives, and perceived benefits of and barriers to EMR adoption. Data on EMR adoption in Canada were collected from CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Health Council of Canada, Canada Health Infoway, government websites, regional EMR associations, and health professional association websites. After removal of duplicate articles, 236 documents were found matching the original search. After using the filter Canada, 12 documents remained. Additional documents were obtained from each province's EMR website and from the Canada Health Infoway website. Since 2006, Canadian EMR adoption rates have increased from about 20% of practitioners to an estimated 62% of practitioners in 2013, with substantial regional disparities ranging from roughly 40% of physicians in New Brunswick and Quebec to more than 75% of physicians in Alberta. Provincial incentives vary widely but appear to have only a weak relationship with the rate of adoption. Many adopters use only a fraction of their software's available functions. User-cited benefits to adoption include time savings, improved record keeping, heightened patient safety, and confidence in retrieved data when EMRs are used efficiently. Barriers to adoption include financial and time constraints, lack of knowledgeable support personnel, and lack of interoperability with hospital and pharmacy systems. Canadian physicians remain at the stage of EMR adoption. Progression in EMR use requires experienced, knowledgeable technical support during implementation, and financial support for the transcription of patient data from paper to electronic media. The interoperability of EMR offerings for hospitals, pharmacies, and clinics is the rate-limiting factor in achieving a unified EMR solution for Canada.

  10. Hospital financial position and the adoption of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Ginn, Gregory O; Shen, Jay J; Moseley, Charles B

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between financial position and adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) in 2442 acute care hospitals. The study was cross-sectional and utilized a general linear mixed model with the multinomial distribution specification for data analysis. We verified the results by also running a multinomial logistic regression model. To measure our variables, we used data from (1) the 2007 American Hospital Association (AHA) electronic health record implementation survey, (2) the 2006 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Cost Reports, and (3) the 2006 AHA Annual Survey containing organizational and operational data. Our dependent variable was an ordinal variable with three levels used to indicate the extent of EHR adoption by hospitals. Our independent variables were five financial ratios: (1) net days revenue in accounts receivable, (2) total margin, (3) the equity multiplier, (4) total asset turnover, and (5) the ratio of total payroll to total expenses. For control variables, we used (1) bed size, (2) ownership type, (3) teaching affiliation, (4) system membership, (5) network participation, (6) fulltime equivalent nurses per adjusted average daily census, (7) average daily census per staffed bed, (8) Medicare patients percentage, (9) Medicaid patients percentage, (10) capitation-based reimbursement, and (11) nonconcentrated market. Only liquidity was significant and positively associated with EHR adoption. Asset turnover ratio was significant but, unexpectedly, was negatively associated with EHR adoption. However, many control variables, most notably bed size, showed significant positive associations with EHR adoption. Thus, it seems that hospitals adopt EHRs as a strategic move to better align themselves with their environment.

  11. Progress in electronic medical record adoption in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng; Gupta, Nishi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the rate of adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) by physicians across Canada, provincial incentives, and perceived benefits of and barriers to EMR adoption. Data sources Data on EMR adoption in Canada were collected from CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Health Council of Canada, Canada Health Infoway, government websites, regional EMR associations, and health professional association websites. Study selection After removal of duplicate articles, 236 documents were found matching the original search. After using the filter Canada, 12 documents remained. Additional documents were obtained from each province’s EMR website and from the Canada Health Infoway website. Synthesis Since 2006, Canadian EMR adoption rates have increased from about 20% of practitioners to an estimated 62% of practitioners in 2013, with substantial regional disparities ranging from roughly 40% of physicians in New Brunswick and Quebec to more than 75% of physicians in Alberta. Provincial incentives vary widely but appear to have only a weak relationship with the rate of adoption. Many adopters use only a fraction of their software’s available functions. User-cited benefits to adoption include time savings, improved record keeping, heightened patient safety, and confidence in retrieved data when EMRs are used efficiently. Barriers to adoption include financial and time constraints, lack of knowledgeable support personnel, and lack of interoperability with hospital and pharmacy systems. Conclusion Canadian physicians remain at the stage of EMR adoption. Progression in EMR use requires experienced, knowledgeable technical support during implementation, and financial support for the transcription of patient data from paper to electronic media. The interoperability of EMR offerings for hospitals, pharmacies, and clinics is the rate-limiting factor in achieving a unified EMR solution for Canada. PMID:27035020

  12. The electronic health record audit file: the patient is waiting.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Annemarie G; Jones, J B; Lerch, Virginia R; Tang, Xiaoqin; Berger, Andrea; Clark, Deserae N; Stewart, Walter F

    2017-04-01

    We describe how electronic health record (EHR) audit files can be used to understand how time is spent in primary care (PC). We used audit file data from the Geisinger Clinic to quantify elements of the clinical workflow and to determine how these times vary by patient and encounter factors. We randomly selected audit file records representing 36 437 PC encounters across 26 clinic locations. Audit file data were used to estimate duration and variance of: (1) time in the waiting room, (2) nurse time with the patient, (3) time in the exam room without a nurse or physician, and (4) physician time with the patient. Multivariate modeling was used to test for differences by patient and by encounter features. On average, a PC encounter took 54.6 minutes, with 5 minutes of nurse time, 15.5 minutes of physician time, and the remaining 62% of the time spent waiting to see a clinician or check out. Older age, female sex, and chronic disease were associated with longer wait times and longer time with clinicians. Level of service and numbers of medications, procedures, and lab orders were associated with longer time with clinicians. Late check-in and same-day visits were associated with shorter wait time and clinician time. This study provides insights on uses of audit file data for workflow analysis during PC encounters. Scalable ways to quantify clinical encounter workflow elements may provide the means to develop more efficient approaches to care and improve the patient experience.

  13. Open source electronic health records and chronic disease management

    PubMed Central

    Goldwater, Jason C; Kwon, Nancy J; Nathanson, Ashley; Muckle, Alison E; Brown, Alexa; Cornejo, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study and report on the use of open source electronic health records (EHR) to assist with chronic care management within safety net medical settings, such as community health centers (CHC). Methods and Materials The study was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago from April to September 2010. The NORC team undertook a comprehensive environmental scan, including a literature review, a dozen key informant interviews using a semistructured protocol, and a series of site visits to CHC that currently use an open source EHR. Results Two of the sites chosen by NORC were actively using an open source EHR to assist in the redesign of their care delivery system to support more effective chronic disease management. This included incorporating the chronic care model into an CHC and using the EHR to help facilitate its elements, such as care teams for patients, in addition to maintaining health records on indigent populations, such as tuberculosis status on homeless patients. Discussion The ability to modify the open-source EHR to adapt to the CHC environment and leverage the ecosystem of providers and users to assist in this process provided significant advantages in chronic care management. Improvements in diabetes management, controlled hypertension and increases in tuberculosis vaccinations were assisted through the use of these open source systems. Conclusions The flexibility and adaptability of open source EHR demonstrated its utility and viability in the provision of necessary and needed chronic disease care among populations served by CHC. PMID:23813566

  14. Open source electronic health records and chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Goldwater, Jason C; Kwon, Nancy J; Nathanson, Ashley; Muckle, Alison E; Brown, Alexa; Cornejo, Kerri

    2014-02-01

    To study and report on the use of open source electronic health records (EHR) to assist with chronic care management within safety net medical settings, such as community health centers (CHC). The study was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago from April to September 2010. The NORC team undertook a comprehensive environmental scan, including a literature review, a dozen key informant interviews using a semistructured protocol, and a series of site visits to CHC that currently use an open source EHR. Two of the sites chosen by NORC were actively using an open source EHR to assist in the redesign of their care delivery system to support more effective chronic disease management. This included incorporating the chronic care model into an CHC and using the EHR to help facilitate its elements, such as care teams for patients, in addition to maintaining health records on indigent populations, such as tuberculosis status on homeless patients. The ability to modify the open-source EHR to adapt to the CHC environment and leverage the ecosystem of providers and users to assist in this process provided significant advantages in chronic care management. Improvements in diabetes management, controlled hypertension and increases in tuberculosis vaccinations were assisted through the use of these open source systems. The flexibility and adaptability of open source EHR demonstrated its utility and viability in the provision of necessary and needed chronic disease care among populations served by CHC.

  15. Diffusion of Electronic Medical Record Based Public Hospital Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoung Won; Kim, Seong Min; An, Chang-Ho; Chae, Young Moon

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the adoption behavior of a newly developed Electronic Medical Record (EMR)-based information system (IS) at three public hospitals in Korea with a focus on doctors and nurses. User satisfaction scores from four performance layers were analyzed before and two times after the newly develop system was introduced to evaluate the adoption process of the IS with Rogers' diffusion theory. The 'intention to use' scores, the most important indicator for determining whether or not to adopt the IS in Rogers' confirmation stage for doctors, were very high in the third survey (4.21). In addition, the scores for 'reduced medication errors', which is the key indicator for evaluating the success of the IS, increased in the third survey for both doctors and nurses. The factors influencing 'intention to use' with a high odds ratio (>1.5) were the 'frequency of attendance of user training sessions', 'mandatory use of system', 'reduced medication errors', and 'reduced medical record documentation time' for both doctors and nurses. These findings show that the new EMR-based IS was well accepted by doctors. Both doctors and nurses also positively considered the effects of the new IS on their clinical environments.

  16. Learning Relational Policies from Electronic Health Record Access Logs

    PubMed Central

    Malin, Bradley; Nyemba, Steve; Paulett, John

    2011-01-01

    Modern healthcare organizations (HCOs) are composed of complex dynamic teams to ensure clinical operations are executed in a quick and competent manner. At the same time, the fluid nature of such environments hinders administrators' efforts to define access control policies that appropriately balance patient privacy and healthcare functions. Manual efforts to define these policies are labor-intensive and error-prone, often resulting in systems that endow certain care providers with overly broad access to patients' medical records while restricting other providers from legitimate and timely use. In this work, we propose an alternative method to generate these policies by automatically mining usage patterns from electronic health record (EHR) systems. EHR systems are increasingly being integrated into clinical environments and our approach is designed to be generalizable across HCOs, thus assisting in the design and evaluation of local access control policies. Our technique, which is grounded in data mining and social network analysis theory, extracts a statistical model of the organization from the access logs of its EHRs. In doing so, our approach enables the review of predefined policies, as well as the discovery of unknown behaviors. We evaluate our approach with five months of access logs from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center and confirm the existence of stable social structures and intuitive business operations. Additionally, we demonstrate that there is significant turnover in the interactions between users in the HCO and that policies learned at the department level afford greater stability over time. PMID:21277996

  17. Automated methods for the summarization of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Pivovarov, Rimma; Elhadad, Noémie

    2015-09-01

    This review examines work on automated summarization of electronic health record (EHR) data and in particular, individual patient record summarization. We organize the published research and highlight methodological challenges in the area of EHR summarization implementation. The target audience for this review includes researchers, designers, and informaticians who are concerned about the problem of information overload in the clinical setting as well as both users and developers of clinical summarization systems. Automated summarization has been a long-studied subject in the fields of natural language processing and human-computer interaction, but the translation of summarization and visualization methods to the complexity of the clinical workflow is slow moving. We assess work in aggregating and visualizing patient information with a particular focus on methods for detecting and removing redundancy, describing temporality, determining salience, accounting for missing data, and taking advantage of encoded clinical knowledge. We identify and discuss open challenges critical to the implementation and use of robust EHR summarization systems. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved.

  18. Representing nursing judgements in the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Moen, A; Henry, S B; Warren, J J

    1999-10-01

    The naming of nursing phenomena and representing the phenomena in a standardized manner suitable for encoding in computer-based systems is a challenge for the nursing profession at the national and the international level. Considerable progress has been made in the development of classification systems for nursing practice. The focus of this article is on language systems developed to represent nursing judgements in computer-based systems, in particular the electronic health record. A review of two current systems and their proposed revisions (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, NANDA, Taxonomies I and II, and the International Classification for Nursing Practice, ICNP, Alpha and Beta versions), according to the features suggested by the Computer-based Patient Record Institute (CPRI) for classification systems appropriate for implementation in computer-based systems, suggests that the evolving versions extend the current versions in terms of sufficient granularity (depth and level of detail) and atomic and compositional character. However, it is not clear from the literature available to date whether the characteristics that are most closely related to definition of a formal terminology (i.e. clear and non-redundant representation of concepts, syntax and grammar for logical constructions of compositional terms, synonyms and language independence) will be part of the evolving vocabularies. Formal terminology models and related tools have the potential to complement, extend, and refine existing nursing classification systems.

  19. Clinical decisions support malfunctions in a commercial electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Kassakian, Steven Z; Yackel, Thomas R; Gorman, Paul N; Dorr, David A

    2017-09-06

    Determine if clinical decision support (CDS) malfunctions occur in a commercial electronic health record (EHR) system, characterize their pathways and describe methods of detection. We retrospectively examined the firing rate for 226 alert type CDS rules for detection of anomalies using both expert visualization and statistical process control (SPC) methods over a five year period. Candidate anomalies were investigated and validated. Twenty-one candidate CDS anomalies were identified from 8,300 alert-months. Of these candidate anomalies, four were confirmed as CDS malfunctions, eight as false-positives, and nine could not be classified. The four CDS malfunctions were a result of errors in knowledge management: 1) inadvertent addition and removal of a medication code to the electronic formulary list; 2) a seasonal alert which was not activated; 3) a change in the base data structures; and 4) direct editing of an alert related to its medications. 154 CDS rules (68%) were amenable to SPC methods and the test characteristics were calculated as a sensitivity of 95%, positive predictive value of 29% and F-measure 0.44. CDS malfunctions were found to occur in our EHR. All of the pathways for these malfunctions can be described as knowledge management errors. Expert visualization is a robust method of detection, but is resource intensive. SPC-based methods, when applicable, perform reasonably well retrospectively. CDS anomalies were found to occur in a commercial EHR and visual detection along with SPC analysis represents promising methods of malfunction detection.

  20. Physician Specialty and Variations in Adoption of Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Grinspan, Z. M.; Banerjee, S.; Kaushal, R.; Kern, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Efforts to promote adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) have focused on primary care physicians, who are now expected to exchange data electronically with other providers, including specialists. However, the variation of EHR adoption among specialists is underexplored. Methods We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study to determine the association between physician specialty and the prevalence of EHR adoption, and a retrospective serial cross-sectional study to determine the association of physician specialty and the rate of EHR adoption over time. We used the 2005–2009 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. We considered fourteen specialties, and four definitions of EHR adoption (any EHR, basic EHR, full EHR, and a novel definition of EHR sophistication). We used multivariable logistic regression, and adjusted for several covariates (geography, practice characteristics, revenue characteristics, physician degree). Results Physician specialty was significantly associated with EHR adoption, regardless of the EHR definition, after adjusting for covariates. Psychiatrists, dermatologists, pediatricians, ophthalmologists, and general surgeons were significantly less likely to adopt EHRs, compared to the reference group of family medicine / general practitioners. After adjustment for covariates, these specialties were 44 – 94% less likely to adopt EHRs than the reference group. EHR adoption increased in all specialties, by approximately 40% per year. The rate of EHR adoption over time did not significantly vary by specialty. Conclusions Although EHR adoption is increasing in all specialties, adoption varies widely by specialty. In order to insure each individual’s network of providers can electronically share data, widespread adoption of EHRs is needed across all specialties. PMID:23874360

  1. Nitrogen catch crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High costs of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and the potential for N losses to ground and surface water have resulted in increased interest in using catch crops to recover this N. Research on potatoes has shown that the amount of N lost to leaching can be as much as the amount of N removed from the field ...

  2. Electronic health record systems in ophthalmology: impact on clinical documentation.

    PubMed

    Sanders, David S; Lattin, Daniel J; Read-Brown, Sarah; Tu, Daniel C; Wilson, David J; Hwang, Thomas S; Morrison, John C; Yackel, Thomas R; Chiang, Michael F

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate quantitative and qualitative differences in documentation of the ophthalmic examination between paper and electronic health record (EHR) systems. Comparative case series. One hundred fifty consecutive pairs of matched paper and EHR notes, documented by 3 attending ophthalmologist providers. An academic ophthalmology department implemented an EHR system in 2006. Database queries were performed to identify cases in which the same problems were documented by the same provider on different dates, using paper versus EHR methods. This was done for 50 consecutive pairs of examinations in 3 different diseases: age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, and pigmented choroidal lesions (PCLs). Quantitative measures were used to compare completeness of documenting the complete ophthalmologic examination, as well as disease-specific critical findings using paper versus an EHR system. Qualitative differences in paper versus EHR documentation were illustrated by selecting representative paired examples. (1) Documentation score, defined as the number of examination elements recorded for the slit-lamp examination, fundus examination, and complete ophthalmologic examination and for critical clinical findings for each disease. (2) Paired comparison of qualitative differences in paper versus EHR documentation. For all 3 diseases (AMD, glaucoma, PCL), the number of complete examination findings recorded was significantly lower with paper than the EHR system (P ≤ 0.004). Among the 3 individual examination sections (general, slit lamp, fundus) for the 3 diseases, 5 of the 9 possible combinations had significantly lower mean documentation scores with paper than EHR notes. For 2 of the 3 diseases, the number of critical clinical findings recorded was significantly lower using paper versus EHR notes (P ≤ 0.022). All (150/150) paper notes relied on graphical representations using annotated hand-drawn sketches, whereas no (0/150) EHR notes contained drawings. Instead

  3. The Relationship Between Magnet Designation, Electronic Health Record Adoption, and Medicare Meaningful Use Payments.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, Christine; Foronda, Cynthia; Zdanowicz, Martin; McCabe, Brian E; Ambrosia, Todd

    2017-03-02

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between nursing excellence and electronic health record adoption. Of 6582 US hospitals, 4939 were eligible for the Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program, and 6419 were eligible for evaluation on the HIMSS Analytics Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model. Of 399 Magnet hospitals, 330 were eligible for the Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program, and 393 were eligible for evaluation in the HIMSS Analytics Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model. Meaningful use attestation was defined as receipt of a Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program payment. The adoption electronic health record was defined as Level 6 and/or 7 on the HIMSS Analytics Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model. Logistic regression showed that Magnet-designated hospitals were more likely attest to Meaningful Use than non-Magnet hospitals (odds ratio = 3.58, P < .001) and were more likely to adopt electronic health records than non-Magnet hospitals (Level 6 only: odds ratio = 3.68, P < .001; Level 6 or 7: odds ratio = 4.02, P < .001). This study suggested a positive relationship between Magnet status and electronic health record use, which involves earning financial incentives for successful adoption. Continued investigation is needed to examine the relationships between the quality of nursing care, electronic health record usage, financial implications, and patient outcomes.

  4. [The electronic health record: computerised provider order entry and the electronic instruction document as new functionalities].

    PubMed

    Derikx, Joep P M; Erdkamp, Frans L G; Hoofwijk, A G M

    2013-01-01

    An electronic health record (EHR) should provide 4 key functionalities: (a) documenting patient data; (b) facilitating computerised provider order entry; (c) displaying the results of diagnostic research; and (d) providing support for healthcare providers in the clinical decision-making process.- Computerised provider order entry into the EHR enables the electronic receipt and transfer of orders to ancillary departments, which can take the place of handwritten orders.- By classifying the computer provider order entries according to disorders, digital care pathways can be created. Such care pathways could result in faster and improved diagnostics.- Communicating by means of an electronic instruction document that is linked to a computerised provider order entry facilitates the provision of healthcare in a safer, more efficient and auditable manner.- The implementation of a full-scale EHR has been delayed as a result of economic, technical and legal barriers, as well as some resistance by physicians.

  5. Computer-assisted expert case definition in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alexander M; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Weiss, Lisa S; Shen, Rongjun; Sobel, Rachel E; Bate, Andrew; Reynolds, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    To describe how computer-assisted presentation of case data can lead experts to infer machine-implementable rules for case definition in electronic health records. As an illustration the technique has been applied to obtain a definition of acute liver dysfunction (ALD) in persons with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The technique consists of repeatedly sampling new batches of case candidates from an enriched pool of persons meeting presumed minimal inclusion criteria, classifying the candidates by a machine-implementable candidate rule and by a human expert, and then updating the rule so that it captures new distinctions introduced by the expert. Iteration continues until an update results in an acceptably small number of changes to form a final case definition. The technique was applied to structured data and terms derived by natural language processing from text records in 29,336 adults with IBD. Over three rounds the technique led to rules with increasing predictive value, as the experts identified exceptions, and increasing sensitivity, as the experts identified missing inclusion criteria. In the final rule inclusion and exclusion terms were often keyed to an ALD onset date. When compared against clinical review in an independent test round, the derived final case definition had a sensitivity of 92% and a positive predictive value of 79%. An iterative technique of machine-supported expert review can yield a case definition that accommodates available data, incorporates pre-existing medical knowledge, is transparent and is open to continuous improvement. The expert updates to rules may be informative in themselves. In this limited setting, the final case definition for ALD performed better than previous, published attempts using expert definitions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploring Dental Providers’ Workflow in an Electronic Dental Record Environment

    PubMed Central

    Schwei, Kelsey M; Cooper, Ryan; Mahnke, Andrea N.; Ye, Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background A workflow is defined as a predefined set of work steps and partial ordering of these steps in any environment to achieve the expected outcome. Few studies have investigated the workflow of providers in a dental office. It is important to understand the interaction of dental providers with the existing technologies at point of care to assess breakdown in the workflow which could contribute to better technology designs. Objective The study objective was to assess electronic dental record (EDR) workflows using time and motion methodology in order to identify breakdowns and opportunities for process improvement. Methods A time and motion methodology was used to study the human-computer interaction and workflow of dental providers with an EDR in four dental centers at a large healthcare organization. A data collection tool was developed to capture the workflow of dental providers and staff while they interacted with an EDR during initial, planned, and emergency patient visits, and at the front desk. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was conducted on the observational data. Results Breakdowns in workflow were identified while posting charges, viewing radiographs, e-prescribing, and interacting with patient scheduler. EDR interaction time was significantly different between dentists and dental assistants (6:20 min vs. 10:57 min, p = 0.013) and between dentists and dental hygienists (6:20 min vs. 9:36 min, p = 0.003). Conclusions On average, a dentist spent far less time than dental assistants and dental hygienists in data recording within the EDR. PMID:27437058

  7. Electronic medical record use in pediatric primary care

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrini, Evaline A; Forrest, Christopher B; Khan, Saira; Localio, A Russell; Gerber, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To characterize patterns of electronic medical record (EMR) use at pediatric primary care acute visits. Design Direct observational study of 529 acute visits with 27 experienced pediatric clinician users. Measurements For each 20 s interval and at each stage of the visit according to the Davis Observation Code, we recorded whether the physician was communicating with the family only, using the computer while communicating, or using the computer without communication. Regression models assessed the impact of clinician, patient and visit characteristics on overall visit length, time spent interacting with families, and time spent using the computer while interacting. Results The mean overall visit length was 11:30 (min:sec) with 9:06 spent in the exam room. Clinicians used the EMR during 27% of exam room time and at all stages of the visit (interacting, chatting, and building rapport; history taking; formulation of the diagnosis and treatment plan; and discussing prevention) except the physical exam. Communication with the family accompanied 70% of EMR use. In regression models, computer documentation outside the exam room was associated with visits that were 11% longer (p=0.001), and female clinicians spent more time using the computer while communicating (p=0.003). Limitations The 12 study practices shared one EMR. Conclusions Among pediatric clinicians with EMR experience, conversation accompanies most EMR use. Our results suggest that efforts to improve EMR usability and clinician EMR training should focus on use in the context of doctor–patient communication. Further study of the impact of documentation inside versus outside the exam room on productivity is warranted. PMID:21134975

  8. Detecting Unplanned Care From Clinician Notes in Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Tamang, Suzanne; Patel, Manali I.; Blayney, Douglas W.; Kuznetsov, Julie; Finlayson, Samuel G.; Vetteth, Yohan; Shah, Nigam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Reduction in unplanned episodes of care, such as emergency department visits and unplanned hospitalizations, are important quality outcome measures. However, many events are only documented in free-text clinician notes and are labor intensive to detect by manual medical record review. Methods: We studied 308,096 free-text machine-readable documents linked to individual entries in our electronic health records, representing care for patients with breast, GI, or thoracic cancer, whose treatment was initiated at one academic medical center, Stanford Health Care (SHC). Using a clinical text-mining tool, we detected unplanned episodes documented in clinician notes (for non-SHC visits) or in coded encounter data for SHC-delivered care and the most frequent symptoms documented in emergency department (ED) notes. Results: Combined reporting increased the identification of patients with one or more unplanned care visits by 32% (15% using coded data; 20% using all the data) among patients with 3 months of follow-up and by 21% (23% using coded data; 28% using all the data) among those with 1 year of follow-up. Based on the textual analysis of SHC ED notes, pain (75%), followed by nausea (54%), vomiting (47%), infection (36%), fever (28%), and anemia (27%), were the most frequent symptoms mentioned. Pain, nausea, and vomiting co-occur in 35% of all ED encounter notes. Conclusion: The text-mining methods we describe can be applied to automatically review free-text clinician notes to detect unplanned episodes of care mentioned in these notes. These methods have broad application for quality improvement efforts in which events of interest occur outside of a network that allows for patient data sharing. PMID:25980019

  9. Adoption Factors of the Electronic Health Record: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) was a significant piece of legislation in America that served as a catalyst for the adoption of health information technology. Following implementation of the HITECH Act, Health Information Technology (HIT) experienced broad adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHR), despite skepticism exhibited by many providers for the transition to an electronic system. A thorough review of EHR adoption facilitator and barriers provides ongoing support for the continuation of EHR implementation across various health care structures, possibly leading to a reduction in associated economic expenditures. Objective The purpose of this review is to compile a current and comprehensive list of facilitators and barriers to the adoption of the EHR in the United States. Methods Authors searched Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and MEDLINE, 01/01/2012–09/01/2015, core clinical/academic journals, MEDLINE full text, and evaluated only articles germane to our research objective. Team members selected a final list of articles through consensus meetings (n=31). Multiple research team members thoroughly read each article to confirm applicability and study conclusions, thereby increasing validity. Results Group members identified common facilitators and barriers associated with the EHR adoption process. In total, 25 adoption facilitators were identified in the literature occurring 109 times; the majority of which were efficiency, hospital size, quality, access to data, perceived value, and ability to transfer information. A total of 23 barriers to adoption were identified in the literature, appearing 95 times; the majority of which were cost, time consuming, perception of uselessness, transition of data, facility location, and implementation issues. Conclusions The 25 facilitators and 23 barriers to the adoption of the EHR continue to reveal a preoccupation on cost, despite

  10. Consumers' Perceptions of Patient-Accessible Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. Objective The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers’ response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. Methods This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Results Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor’s visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Conclusions Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually

  11. Consumers' perceptions of patient-accessible electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Zarcadoolas, Christina; Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-08-26

    Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers' response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor's visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually engaging, and have user-friendly navigation.

  12. Key success factors behind electronic medical record adoption in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Narattharaksa, Kanida; Speece, Mark; Newton, Charles; Bulyalert, Damrongsak

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the elements that health care personnel in Thailand believe are necessary for successful adoption of electronic medical record (EMR) systems. Design/methodology/approach Initial qualitative in-depth interviews with physicians to adapt key elements from the literature to the Thai context. The 12 elements identified included things related to managing the implementation and to IT expertise. The nationwide survey was supported by the Ministry of Public Health and returned 1,069 usable questionnaires (response rate 42 percent) from a range of medical personnel. Findings The key elements clearly separated into a managerial dimension and an IT dimension. All were considered fairly important, but managerial expertise was more critical. In particular, there should be clear EMR project goals and scope, adequate budget allocation, clinical staff must be involved in implementation, and the IT should facilitate good electronic communication. Research limitations/implications Thailand is representative of middle-income developing countries, but there is no guarantee findings can be generalized. National policies differ, as do economic structures of health care industries. The focus is on management at the organizational level, but future research must also examine macro-level issues, as well as gain more depth into thinking of individual health care personnel. Practical implications Technical issues of EMR implementation are certainly important. However, it is clear actual adoption and use of the system also depends very heavily on managerial issues. Originality/value Most research on EMR implementation has been in developed countries, and has often focussed more on technical issues rather than examining managerial issues closely. Health IT is also critical in developing economies, and management of health IT implementation must be well understood.

  13. Electronic health records and quality of diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Cebul, Randall D; Love, Thomas E; Jain, Anil K; Hebert, Christopher J

    2011-09-01

    Available studies have shown few quality-related advantages of electronic health records (EHRs) over traditional paper records. We compared achievement of and improvement in quality standards for diabetes at practices using EHRs with those at practices using paper records. All practices, including many safety-net primary care practices, belonged to a regional quality collaborative and publicly reported performance. We used generalized estimating equations to calculate the percentage-point difference between EHR-based and paper-based practices with respect to achievement of composite standards for diabetes care (including four component standards) and outcomes (five standards), after adjusting for covariates and accounting for clustering. In addition to insurance type (Medicare, commercial, Medicaid, or uninsured), patient-level covariates included race or ethnic group (white, black, Hispanic, or other), age, sex, estimated household income, and level of education. Analyses were conducted separately for the overall sample and for safety-net practices. From July 2009 through June 2010, data were reported for 27,207 adults with diabetes seen at 46 practices; safety-net practices accounted for 38% of patients. After adjustment for covariates, achievement of composite standards for diabetes care was 35.1 percentage points higher at EHR sites than at paper-based sites (P<0.001), and achievement of composite standards for outcomes was 15.2 percentage points higher (P=0.005). EHR sites were associated with higher achievement on eight of nine component standards. Such sites were also associated with greater improvement in care (a difference of 10.2 percentage points in annual improvement, P<0.001) and outcomes (a difference of 4.1 percentage points in annual improvement, P=0.02). Across all insurance types, EHR sites were associated with significantly higher achievement of care and outcome standards and greater improvement in diabetes care. Results confined to safety

  14. Seniors' views on the use of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Morin, Diane; Tourigny, Andre; Pelletier, Daniel; Robichaud, Line; Mathieu, Luc; Vézina, Aline; Bonin, Lucie; Buteau, Martin

    2005-01-01

    In the Mauricie and Centre-du-Québec region of the province of Quebec, Canada, an integrated services network has been implemented for frail seniors. It combines three of the best practices in the field of integrated services, namely: single-entry point, case management and personalized care plan. A shared interdisciplinary electronic health record (EHR) system was set up in 1998. A consensus on the relevance of using EHRs is growing in Quebec, in Canada and around the world. However, technology has out-paced interest in the notions of confidentiality, informed consent and the impact perceived by the clientele. This study specifically examines how frail seniors perceive these issues related to an EHR. The conceptual framework is inspired by the DeLone and McLean model whose main attributes are: system quality, information quality, utilisation modes and the impact on organisations and individuals. This last attribute is the focus of this study, which is a descriptive with quantitative and qualitative component. Thirty seniors were surveyed. Positive information they provided falls under three headings: (i) being better informed; (ii) trust and consideration for professionals; and (iii) appreciation of innovation. The opinions of the seniors are generally favourable regarding the use of computers and the EHR in their presence. Improvements in EHR systems for seniors can be encouraged.

  15. Clinical Research Informatics and Electronic Health Record Data

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, M. M.; Rusincovitch, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The goal of this survey is to discuss the impact of the growing availability of electronic health record (EHR) data on the evolving field of Clinical Research Informatics (CRI), which is the union of biomedical research and informatics. Results Major challenges for the use of EHR-derived data for research include the lack of standard methods for ensuring that data quality, completeness, and provenance are sufficient to assess the appropriateness of its use for research. Areas that need continued emphasis include methods for integrating data from heterogeneous sources, guidelines (including explicit phenotype definitions) for using these data in both pragmatic clinical trials and observational investigations, strong data governance to better understand and control quality of enterprise data, and promotion of national standards for representing and using clinical data. Conclusions The use of EHR data has become a priority in CRI. Awareness of underlying clinical data collection processes will be essential in order to leverage these data for clinical research and patient care, and will require multi-disciplinary teams representing clinical research, informatics, and healthcare operations. Considerations for the use of EHR data provide a starting point for practical applications and a CRI research agenda, which will be facilitated by CRI’s key role in the infrastructure of a learning healthcare system. PMID:25123746

  16. First steps towards semantic descriptions of electronic laboratory notebook records

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In order to exploit the vast body of currently inaccessible chemical information held in Electronic Laboratory Notebooks (ELNs) it is necessary not only to make it available but also to develop protocols for discovery, access and ultimately automatic processing. An aim of the Dial-a-Molecule Grand Challenge Network is to be able to draw on the body of accumulated chemical knowledge in order to predict or optimize the outcome of reactions. Accordingly the Network drew up a working group comprising informaticians, software developers and stakeholders from industry and academia to develop protocols and mechanisms to access and process ELN records. The work presented here constitutes the first stage of this process by proposing a tiered metadata system of knowledge, information and processing where each in turn addresses a) discovery, indexing and citation b) context and access to additional information and c) content access and manipulation. A compact set of metadata terms, called the elnItemManifest, has been derived and caters for the knowledge layer of this model. The elnItemManifest has been encoded as an XML schema and some use cases are presented to demonstrate the potential of this approach. PMID:24360292

  17. Characterization of Statin Dose-response within Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei-Qi; Feng, Qiping; Jiang, Lan; Waitara, Magarya S.; Iwuchukwu, Otito F.; Roden, Dan M.; Jiang, Min; Xu, Hua; Krauss, Ronald M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Davis, Robert L.; Berg, Richard L.; Peissig, Peggy L.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Wilke, Russell A.; Denny, Joshua C.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to define the genetic architecture underlying variable statin response have met with limited success possibly because previous studies were limited to effect based on one-single-dose. We leveraged electronic medical records (EMRs) to extract potency (ED50) and efficacy (Emax) of statin dose-response curves and tested them for association with 144 pre-selected variants. Two large biobanks were used to construct dose-response curves for 2,026 (simvastatin) and 2,252 subjects (atorvastatin). Atorvastatin was more efficacious, more potent, and demonstrated less inter-individual variability than simvastatin. A pharmacodynamic variant emerging from randomized trials (PRDM16) was associated with Emax for both. For atorvastatin, Emax was 51.7 mg/dl in homozygous for the minor allele versus 75.0 mg/dl for those homozygous for the major allele. We also identified several loci associated with ED50. The extraction of rigorously defined traits from EMRs for pharmacogenetic studies represents a promising approach to further understand of genetic factors contributing to drug response. PMID:24096969

  18. Exploring the persistence of paper with the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Jason J; Russ, Alissa L; Justice, Connie F; Hagg, Heather; Ebright, Patricia R; Woodbridge, Peter A; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2009-09-01

    Healthcare organizations are increasingly implementing electronic health records (EHRs) and other related health information technology (IT). Even in institutions which have long adopted these computerized systems, employees continue to rely on paper to complete their work. The objective of this study was to explore and understand human-technology integration factors that may be causing employees to rely on paper alternatives to the EHR. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 20 key-informants in a large Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC), with a fully implemented EHR, to understand the use of paper-based alternatives. Participants included clinicians, administrators, and IT specialists across several service areas in the medical center. We found 11 distinct categories of paper-based workarounds to the use of the EHR. Paper use related to the following: (1) efficiency; (2) knowledge/skill/ease of use; (3) memory; (4) sensorimotor preferences; (5) awareness; (6) task specificity; (7) task complexity; (8) data organization; (9) longitudinal data processes; (10) trust; and (11) security. We define each of these and provide examples that demonstrate how these categories promoted paper use in spite of a fully implemented EHR. In several cases, paper served as an important tool and assisted healthcare employees in their work. In other cases, paper use circumvented the intended EHR design, introduced potential gaps in documentation, and generated possible paths to medical error. We discuss implications of these findings for EHR design and implementation.

  19. Authorisation and access control for electronic health record systems.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Bernd

    2004-03-31

    Enabling the shared care paradigm, centralised or even decentralised electronic health record (EHR) systems increasingly become core applications in hospital information systems and health networks. For realising multipurpose use and reuse as well as inter-operability at knowledge level, EHR have to meet special architectural requirements. The component-oriented and model-based architecture should meet international standards. Especially in extended health networks realising inter-organisational communication and co-operation, authorisation cannot be organised at user level anymore. Therefore, models, methods and tools must be established to allow formal and structured policy definition, policy agreements, role definition, authorisation and access control. Based on the author's international engagement in EHR architecture and security standards referring to the revision of CEN ENV 13606, the GEHR/open EHR approach, HL7 and CORBA, models for health-specific and EHR-related roles, for authorisation management and access control have been developed. The basic concept is the separation of structural roles defining organisational entity-to-entity relationships and enabling specific acts on the one hand, and functional roles bound to specific activities and realising rights and duties on the other hand. Aggregation of organisational, functional, informational and technological components follows specific rules. Using UML and XML, the principles as well as some examples for analysis, design, implementation and maintenance of policy and authorisation management as well as access control have been practically implemented.

  20. A critical pathway for electronic medical record selection.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, A; Keshavjee, K; Langton, K; Troyan, S; Millar, S; Olantunji, S; Pray, M; Tytus, R; Ford, P T

    2001-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly becoming a necessary tool in health care. Given their potential to influence every aspect of health care, there has been surprisingly little rigorous research applied to this important piece of emerging health technology. An initial phase of the COMPETE study, which is examining the impact of EMRs on efficiency, quality of care and privacy concerns, involved a rigorous "critical pathway" approach to EMR selection for the study. A multidisciplinary team with clinical, technical and research expertise led an 8-stage evaluation process with direct input from user physicians at each stage. An iterative sequence of review of EMR specifications and features, live product demonstrations, site visits, and negotiations with vendors led to a progressive narrowing of the field of eligible EMR systems. Final scoring was based on 3 main themes of clinical usability, data quality and support/vendor issues. We believe that a rigorous, multidisciplinary process such as this is required to maximize success of any EMR implementation project.

  1. A critical pathway for electronic medical record selection.

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, A.; Keshavjee, K.; Langton, K.; Troyan, S.; Millar, S.; Olantunji, S.; Pray, M.; Tytus, R.; Ford, P. T.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly becoming a necessary tool in health care. Given their potential to influence every aspect of health care, there has been surprisingly little rigorous research applied to this important piece of emerging health technology. An initial phase of the COMPETE study, which is examining the impact of EMRs on efficiency, quality of care and privacy concerns, involved a rigorous "critical pathway" approach to EMR selection for the study. A multidisciplinary team with clinical, technical and research expertise led an 8-stage evaluation process with direct input from user physicians at each stage. An iterative sequence of review of EMR specifications and features, live product demonstrations, site visits, and negotiations with vendors led to a progressive narrowing of the field of eligible EMR systems. Final scoring was based on 3 main themes of clinical usability, data quality and support/vendor issues. We believe that a rigorous, multidisciplinary process such as this is required to maximize success of any EMR implementation project. PMID:11825192

  2. “Big Data” and the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Ross, M. K.; Wei, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Implementation of Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems continues to expand. The massive number of patient encounters results in high amounts of stored data. Transforming clinical data into knowledge to improve patient care has been the goal of biomedical informatics professionals for many decades, and this work is now increasingly recognized outside our field. In reviewing the literature for the past three years, we focus on “big data” in the context of EHR systems and we report on some examples of how secondary use of data has been put into practice. Methods We searched PubMed database for articles from January 1, 2011 to November 1, 2013. We initiated the search with keywords related to “big data” and EHR. We identified relevant articles and additional keywords from the retrieved articles were added. Based on the new keywords, more articles were retrieved and we manually narrowed down the set utilizing predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results Our final review includes articles categorized into the themes of data mining (pharmacovigilance, phenotyping, natural language processing), data application and integration (clinical decision support, personal monitoring, social media), and privacy and security. Conclusion The increasing adoption of EHR systems worldwide makes it possible to capture large amounts of clinical data. There is an increasing number of articles addressing the theme of “big data”, and the concepts associated with these articles vary. The next step is to transform healthcare big data into actionable knowledge. PMID:25123728

  3. Electronic Health Record Innovations for Healthier Patients and Happier Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H.

    2015-01-01

    This special issue explores a range of health information technology (HIT) issues that can help primary care practices and patients. Findings address the design of HIT systems, primarily electronic health records (EHRs), the utility of various functionalities, and implementation strategies that ensure the greatest value. The articles also remind us that, while HIT can support the delivery of care, it is not a panacea. To be effective, functionality needs to be relevant and timely for both the clinician and patient. Prompts and better documentation can improve care, and “prompt fatigue” is not inevitable. Information presented within EHRs needs to be actionable. There is an ongoing tension between information overload and the right—and helpful—information. Even the order of presentation of information can make a difference in the outcome. Whether supported by HIT or not, basic tenants of care, such as including the whole care team in trainings, communicating with other providers, and engaging patients, remain essential. The studies in this issue will prove useful for informatics developers, practices and health systems making HIT decisions, and care teams refining HIT to support the needs of their patients. PMID:25957359

  4. The impact of electronic health record use on physician productivity.

    PubMed

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; Huckman, Robert S

    2013-11-01

    To examine the impact of the degree of electronic health record (EHR) use and delegation of EHR tasks on clinician productivity in ambulatory settings. We examined EHR use in primary care practices that implemented a web-based EHR from athenahealth (n = 42) over 3 years (695 practice-month observations). Practices were predominantly small and spread throughout the country. Data came from athenahealth practice management system and EHR task logs. We developed monthly measures of EHR use and delegation to support staff from task logs. Productivity was measured using work relative value units (RVUs). Using fixed effects models, we assessed the independent impacts on productivity of EHR use and delegation. We then explored the interaction between these 2 strategies and the role of practice size. Greater EHR use and greater delegation were independently associated with higher levels of productivity. An increase in EHR use of 1 standard deviation resulted in a 5.3% increase in RVUs per clinician workday; an increase in delegation of EHR tasks of 1 standard deviation resulted in an 11.0% increase in RVUs per clinician workday (P <.05 for both). Further, EHR use and delegation had a positive joint impact on productivity in large practices (coefficient, 0.058; P <.05), but a negative joint impact on productivity in small practices (coefficient, -0.142; P <.01). Clinicians in practices that increased EHR use and delegated EHR tasks were more productive, but practice size determined whether the 2 strategies were complements or substitutes.

  5. Development of Mobile Platform Integrated with Existing Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Kim, YoungAh; Kang, Simon; Kim, Kyungduk; Kim, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes a mobile Electronic Medical Record (EMR) platform designed to manage and utilize the existing EMR and mobile application with optimized resources. Methods We structured the mEMR to reuse services of retrieval and storage in mobile app environments that have already proven to have no problem working with EMRs. A new mobile architecture-based mobile solution was developed in four steps: the construction of a server and its architecture; screen layout and storyboard making; screen user interface design and development; and a pilot test and step-by-step deployment. This mobile architecture consists of two parts, the server-side area and the client-side area. In the server-side area, it performs the roles of service management for EMR and documents and for information exchange. Furthermore, it performs menu allocation depending on user permission and automatic clinical document architecture document conversion. Results Currently, Severance Hospital operates an iOS-compatible mobile solution based on this mobile architecture and provides stable service without additional resources, dealing with dynamic changes of EMR templates. Conclusions The proposed mobile solution should go hand in hand with the existing EMR system, and it can be a cost-effective solution if a quality EMR system is operated steadily with this solution. Thus, we expect this example to be shared with hospitals that currently plan to deploy mobile solutions. PMID:25152837

  6. Lead User Design: Medication Management in Electronic Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan; Weber, Jens H; Davies, Iryna; Bellwood, Paule

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in medication management may lead to a reduction of preventable errors. Usability and user experience issues are common and related to achieving benefits of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs). This paper reports on a novel study that combines the lead user method with a safety engineering review to discover an innovative design for the medication management module in EMRs in primary care. Eight lead users were recruited that represented prescribers and clinical pharmacists with expertise in EMR design, evidence-based medicine, medication safety and medication research. Eight separate medication management module designs were prototyped and validated, one with each lead user. A parallel safety review of medicaiton management was completed. The findings were synthesized into a single common set of goals, activities and one interactive, visual prototype. The lead user method with safety review proved to be an effective way to elicit diverse user goals and synthesize them into a common design. The resulting design ideas focus on meeting the goals of quality, efficiency, safety, reducing the cognitive load on the user, and improving communication wih the patient and the care team. Design ideas are being adapted to an existing EMR product, providing areas for further work.

  7. First steps towards semantic descriptions of electronic laboratory notebook records.

    PubMed

    Coles, Simon J; Frey, Jeremy G; Bird, Colin L; Whitby, Richard J; Day, Aileen E

    2013-12-20

    In order to exploit the vast body of currently inaccessible chemical information held in Electronic Laboratory Notebooks (ELNs) it is necessary not only to make it available but also to develop protocols for discovery, access and ultimately automatic processing. An aim of the Dial-a-Molecule Grand Challenge Network is to be able to draw on the body of accumulated chemical knowledge in order to predict or optimize the outcome of reactions. Accordingly the Network drew up a working group comprising informaticians, software developers and stakeholders from industry and academia to develop protocols and mechanisms to access and process ELN records. The work presented here constitutes the first stage of this process by proposing a tiered metadata system of knowledge, information and processing where each in turn addresses a) discovery, indexing and citation b) context and access to additional information and c) content access and manipulation. A compact set of metadata terms, called the elnItemManifest, has been derived and caters for the knowledge layer of this model. The elnItemManifest has been encoded as an XML schema and some use cases are presented to demonstrate the potential of this approach.

  8. Implementation of electronic medical records: theory-informed qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Greiver, Michelle; Barnsley, Jan; Glazier, Richard H; Moineddin, Rahim; Harvey, Bart J

    2011-10-01

    To apply the diffusion-of-innovations theory to the examination of factors that are perceived by family physicians as influencing the implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs). Qualitative study with 2 focus groups 18 months after EMR implementation; participants also took part in a concurrent quantitative study examining EMR implementation and preventive services. Toronto, Ont. Twelve community-based family physicians. We employed a semistructured interview guide. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim; 2 researchers independently categorized and coded the transcripts and then met to compare and contrast their findings, category mapping, and interpretations. Findings were then mapped to an existing theoretical framework. Multiple barriers to EMR implementation were described. These included lack of relative advantage for many processes, high complexity of the system, low compatibility with physician needs and past experiences, difficulty with adaptation of the EMR to the organization and adaptation of the organization to the EMR, and lack of organizational slack. Positive factors were the presence of a champion and relative advantages for some processes. Early EMR implementation experience is consistent with theoretical concepts associated with implementation of innovations. A problematic implementation process helps to explain, at least in part, the lack of improvement in preventive services in our quantitative results.

  9. Adoption of Electronic Health Records: A Roadmap for India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the study was to create a roadmap for the adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) in India based an analysis of the strategies of other countries and national scenarios of ICT use in India. Methods The strategies for adoption of EHR in other countries were analyzed to find the crucial steps taken. Apart from reports collected from stakeholders in the country, the study relied on the experience of the author in handling several e-health projects. Results It was found that there are four major areas where the countries considered have made substantial efforts: ICT infrastructure, Policy & regulations, Standards & interoperability, and Research, development & education. A set of crucial activities were identified in each area. Based on the analysis, a roadmap is suggested. It includes the creation of a secure health network; health information exchange; and the use of open-source software, a national health policy, privacy laws, an agency for health IT standards, R&D, human resource development, etc. Conclusions Although some steps have been initiated, several new steps need to be taken up for the successful adoption of EHR. It requires a coordinated effort from all the stakeholders. PMID:27895957

  10. Strategies for referent tracking in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Ceusters, Werner; Smith, Barry

    2006-06-01

    The goal of referent tracking is to create an ever-growing pool of data relating to the entities existing in concrete spatiotemporal reality. In the context of Electronic Healthcare Records (EHRs) the relevant concrete entities are not only particular patients but also their parts, diseases, therapies, lesions, and so forth, insofar as these are salient to diagnosis and treatment. Within a referent tracking system, all such entities are referred to directly and explicitly, something which cannot be achieved when familiar concept-based systems are used in what is called "clinical coding." In this paper, we describe the components of a referent tracking system in an informal way and we outline the procedures that would have to be followed by healthcare personnel in using such a system. We argue that the referent tracking paradigm can be introduced with only minor--though nevertheless ontologically important--technical changes to existing EHR infrastructures, but that it will require a radically different mindset on the part of those involved in clinical coding and terminology development from that which has prevailed hitherto.

  11. Barriers to Electronic Health Record Adoption: a Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; Kristof, Caitlin; Jones, Beau; Mitchell, Erica; Martinez, Angelica

    2016-12-01

    Federal efforts and local initiatives to increase adoption and use of electronic health records (EHRs) continue, particularly since the enactment of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. Roughly one in four hospitals not adopted even a basic EHR system. A review of the barriers may help in understanding the factors deterring certain healthcare organizations from implementation. We wanted to assemble an updated and comprehensive list of adoption barriers of EHR systems in the United States. Authors searched CINAHL, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, and accepted only articles relevant to our primary objective. Reviewers independently assessed the works highlighted by our search and selected several for review. Through multiple consensus meetings, authors tapered articles to a final selection most germane to the topic (n = 27). Each article was thoroughly examined by multiple authors in order to achieve greater validity. Authors identified 39 barriers to EHR adoption within the literature selected for the review. These barriers appeared 125 times in the literature; the most frequently mentioned barriers were regarding cost, technical concerns, technical support, and resistance to change. Despite federal and local incentives, the initial cost of adopting an EHR is a common existing barrier. The other most commonly mentioned barriers include technical support, technical concerns, and maintenance/ongoing costs. Policy makers should consider incentives that continue to reduce implementation cost, possibly aimed more directly at organizations that are known to have lower adoption rates, such as small hospitals in rural areas.

  12. An Electronic Health Record Investigation of Lenticulostriate Vasculopathy Features.

    PubMed

    Frankovich, Jennifer; Egan, Maximillian; Mahony, Talia; Benitz, William; Shaw, Gary

    2017-02-01

    Objective Lenticulostriate vasculopathy (LSV) is characterized by linear hyperechogenicities in the basal ganglia found on the head ultrasounds of infants. We reviewed electronic health records of infants with and without LSV to investigate whether physician dictations indicated symptoms which could reflect subtle basal ganglia injury. Study Design In a case-control study, we analyzed data from 46 infants with LSV and 127 controls. Infants were stratified between term and preterm birth. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for tone abnormalities, apnea, feeding difficulties, seizures, and movement abnormalities in the presence of LSV. Results Both term and preterm infants with LSV showed elevated risks for tone abnormalities (OR: 3.6 and 2.9, respectively). Term infants with LSV showed elevated risks for hypotonia (OR: 4.3), apnea (OR: 2.9), and feeding difficulties (OR: 4.1). Preterm infants with LSV showed elevated risks for truncal hypotonia (OR: 3.9) and hyperreflexia (OR: 3.9). Conclusion Our findings provide some evidence that LSV is associated with an increased risk of early signs of abnormal development, possibly relating to signs of subtle basal ganglia injury. Historically LSV has been considered incidental. The associations identified here suggest that LSV findings are worthy of further study.

  13. Security evaluation and assurance of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Weber-Jahnke, Jens H

    2009-01-01

    Electronic Health Records (EHRs) maintain information of sensitive nature. Security requirements in this context are typically multilateral, encompassing the viewpoints of multiple stakeholders. Two main research questions arise from a security assurance point of view, namely how to demonstrate the internal correctness of EHRs and how to demonstrate their conformance in relation to multilateral security regulations. The above notions of correctness and conformance directly relate to the general concept of system verification, which asks the question "are we building the system right?" This should not be confused with the concept of system validation, which asks the question "are we building the right system?" Much of the research in the medical informatics community has been concerned with the latter aspect (validation). However, trustworthy security requires assurances that standards are followed and specifications are met. The objective of this paper is to contribute to filling this gap. We give an introduction to fundamentals of security assurance, summarize current assurance standards, and report on experiences with using security assurance methodology applied to the EHR domain, specifically focusing on case studies in the Canadian context.

  14. Evaluation of a BCMA’s Electronic Medication Administration Record

    PubMed Central

    Staggers, Nancy; Iribarren, Sarah; Guo, Jia-Wen; Weir, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Barcode medication administration (BCMA) systems can reduce medication errors, but sociotechnical issues are quite common. Although crucial to nurses’ work, few usability evaluations are available for electronic medication administration record screens (eMARs). The purpose of this research was to identify current usability problems in the VA’s eMAR/BCMA system and explore how these might impact nurses’ situation awareness. Three expert evaluators used 10 tasks/elements, heuristic evaluation techniques and explored potential impacts using a situation awareness perspective. The results yielded 99 usability problems categorized into 440 heuristic violations with the largest volume in the category of Match with the Real World. Fifteen usability issues were rated as catastrophic with the Administer/Chart medications task having the most. Situational awareness was impacted at all levels, especially at Level 2, Comprehension. Usability problems point to important areas for improvement because these issues have the potential to impact nurses’ situation awareness, “at a glance” information, nurse productivity and patient safety. PMID:25601936

  15. Secure scalable disaster electronic medical record and tracking system.

    PubMed

    Demers, Gerard; Kahn, Christopher; Johansson, Per; Buono, Colleen; Chipara, Octav; Griswold, William; Chan, Theodore

    2013-10-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are considered superior in documentation of care for medical practice. Current disaster medical response involves paper tracking systems and radio communication for mass-casualty incidents (MCIs). These systems are prone to errors, may be compromised by local conditions, and are labor intensive. Communication infrastructure may be impacted, overwhelmed by call volume, or destroyed by the disaster, making self-contained and secure EMR response a critical capability. Report As the prehospital disaster EMR allows for more robust content including protected health information (PHI), security measures must be instituted to safeguard these data. The Wireless Internet Information System for medicAl Response in Disasters (WIISARD) Research Group developed a handheld, linked, wireless EMR system utilizing current technology platforms. Smart phones connected to radio frequency identification (RFID) readers may be utilized to efficiently track casualties resulting from the incident. Medical information may be transmitted on an encrypted network to fellow prehospital team members, medical dispatch, and receiving medical centers. This system has been field tested in a number of exercises with excellent results, and future iterations will incorporate robust security measures. A secure prehospital triage EMR improves documentation quality during disaster drills.

  16. Development of mobile platform integrated with existing electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Kim, YoungAh; Kim, Sung Soo; Kang, Simon; Kim, Kyungduk; Kim, Jun

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a mobile Electronic Medical Record (EMR) platform designed to manage and utilize the existing EMR and mobile application with optimized resources. We structured the mEMR to reuse services of retrieval and storage in mobile app environments that have already proven to have no problem working with EMRs. A new mobile architecture-based mobile solution was developed in four steps: the construction of a server and its architecture; screen layout and storyboard making; screen user interface design and development; and a pilot test and step-by-step deployment. This mobile architecture consists of two parts, the server-side area and the client-side area. In the server-side area, it performs the roles of service management for EMR and documents and for information exchange. Furthermore, it performs menu allocation depending on user permission and automatic clinical document architecture document conversion. Currently, Severance Hospital operates an iOS-compatible mobile solution based on this mobile architecture and provides stable service without additional resources, dealing with dynamic changes of EMR templates. The proposed mobile solution should go hand in hand with the existing EMR system, and it can be a cost-effective solution if a quality EMR system is operated steadily with this solution. Thus, we expect this example to be shared with hospitals that currently plan to deploy mobile solutions.

  17. Market factors and electronic medical record adoption in medical practices.

    PubMed

    Menachemi, Nir; Mazurenko, Olena; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Diana, Mark L; Ford, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies identified individual or practice factors that influence practice-based physicians' electronic medical record (EMR) adoption. Less is known about the market factors that influence physicians' EMR adoption. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between environmental market characteristics and physicians' EMR adoption. The Health Tracking Physician Survey 2008 and Area Resource File (2008) were combined and analyzed. Binary logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between three dimensions of the market environment (munificence, dynamism, and complexity) and EMR adoption controlling for several physician and practice characteristics. In a nationally representative sample of 4,720 physicians, measures of market dynamism including increases in unemployment, odds ratio (OR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.91, 0.99], or poverty rates, OR = 0.93, 95% CI [0.89, 0.96], were negatively associated with EMR adoption. Health maintenance organization penetration, OR = 3.01, 95% CI [1.49, 6.05], another measure of dynamism, was positively associated with EMR adoption. Physicians practicing in areas with a malpractice crisis, OR = 0.82, 95% CI [0.71, 0.94], representing environmental complexity, had lower EMR adoption rates. Understanding how market factors relate to practice-based physicians' EMR adoption can assist policymakers to better target limited resources as they work to realize the national goal of universal EMR adoption and meaningful use.

  18. Special requirements for electronic health record systems in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Michael F; Boland, Michael V; Brewer, Allen; Epley, K David; Horton, Mark B; Lim, Michele C; McCannel, Colin A; Patel, Sayjal J; Silverstone, David E; Wedemeyer, Linda; Lum, Flora

    2011-08-01

    The field of ophthalmology has a number of unique features compared with other medical and surgical specialties regarding clinical workflow and data management. This has important implications for the design of electronic health record (EHR) systems that can be used intuitively and efficiently by ophthalmologists and that can promote improved quality of care. Ophthalmologists often lament the absence of these specialty-specific features in EHRs, particularly in systems that were developed originally for primary care physicians or other medical specialists. The purpose of this article is to summarize the special requirements of EHRs that are important for ophthalmology. The hope is that this will help ophthalmologists to identify important features when searching for EHR systems, to stimulate vendors to recognize and incorporate these functions into systems, and to assist federal agencies to develop future guidelines regarding meaningful use of EHRs. More broadly, the American Academy of Ophthalmology believes that these functions are elements of good system design that will improve access to relevant information at the point of care between the ophthalmologist and the patient, will enhance timely communications between primary care providers and ophthalmologists, will mitigate risk, and ultimately will improve the ability of physicians to deliver the highest-quality medical care. Proprietary or commercial interest disclosure may be found after the references. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Predefined headings in a multiprofessional electronic health record system

    PubMed Central

    Lindstedt, Helena; Sonnander, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Background Applying multiprofessional electronic health records (EHRs) is expected to improve the quality of patient care and patient safety. Both EHR systems and system users depend on semantic interoperability to function efficiently. A shared clinical terminology comprising unambiguous terms is required for semantic interoperability. Empirical studies of clinical terminology, such as predefined headings, in EHR systems are scarce and limited to one profession or one clinical specialty. Objective To study predefined headings applied by users in a Swedish multiprofessional EHR system. Materials and methods This was a descriptive study of predefined headings (n=3596) applied by 5509 users in a Swedish multiprofessional EHR system. The predefined headings were classified into four term and word categories. Results Less than half of the predefined headings were shared by two or more professional groups. All eight professionals groups shared 1.7% of the predefined headings. The distribution of predefined headings across categories yielded two-thirds “terms for special purposes” and “specialist terms” and one-third “common words” and “unclassified headings”. Discussion The indicated presence of profession-specific predefined headings and the conflict between ambiguity and comprehension of terms and words used as headings are discussed. Conclusions The predefined headings in the multiprofessional EHR system studied did not constitute a joint language for specific purposes. The improvement of the quality and usability of multiprofessional EHR systems requires attention. PMID:22744962

  20. Information Discovery on Electronic Health Records Using Authority Flow Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As the use of electronic health records (EHRs) becomes more widespread, so does the need to search and provide effective information discovery within them. Querying by keyword has emerged as one of the most effective paradigms for searching. Most work in this area is based on traditional Information Retrieval (IR) techniques, where each document is compared individually against the query. We compare the effectiveness of two fundamentally different techniques for keyword search of EHRs. Methods We built two ranking systems. The traditional BM25 system exploits the EHRs' content without regard to association among entities within. The Clinical ObjectRank (CO) system exploits the entities' associations in EHRs using an authority-flow algorithm to discover the most relevant entities. BM25 and CO were deployed on an EHR dataset of the cardiovascular division of Miami Children's Hospital. Using sequences of keywords as queries, sensitivity and specificity were measured by two physicians for a set of 11 queries related to congenital cardiac disease. Results Our pilot evaluation showed that CO outperforms BM25 in terms of sensitivity (65% vs. 38%) by 71% on average, while maintaining the specificity (64% vs. 61%). The evaluation was done by two physicians. Conclusions Authority-flow techniques can greatly improve the detection of relevant information in EHRs and hence deserve further study. PMID:20969780

  1. An electronic health record-enabled obesity database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of weight loss therapies is commonly measured using body mass index and other obesity-related variables. Although these data are often stored in electronic health records (EHRs) and potentially very accessible, few studies on obesity and weight loss have used data derived from EHRs. We developed processes for obtaining data from the EHR in order to construct a database on patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. Methods Clinical data obtained as part of standard of care in a bariatric surgery program at an integrated health delivery system were extracted from the EHR and deposited into a data warehouse. Data files were extracted, cleaned, and stored in research datasets. To illustrate the utility of the data, Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate length of post-operative follow-up. Results Demographic, laboratory, medication, co-morbidity, and survey data were obtained from 2028 patients who had undergone RYGB at the same institution since 2004. Pre-and post-operative diagnostic and prescribing information were available on all patients, while survey laboratory data were available on a majority of patients. The number of patients with post-operative laboratory test results varied by test. Based on Kaplan-Meier estimates, over 74% of patients had post-operative weight data available at 4 years. Conclusion A variety of EHR-derived data related to obesity can be efficiently obtained and used to study important outcomes following RYGB. PMID:22640398

  2. Medical guidelines presentation and comparing with Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Veselý, Arnost; Zvárová, Jana; Peleska, Jan; Buchtela, David; Anger, Zdenek

    2006-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are now being developed in many places. More advanced systems provide also reminder facilities, usually based on if-then rules. In this paper we propose a method how to build the reminder facility directly upon the guideline interchange format (GLIF) model of medical guidelines. The method compares data items on the input of EHR system with medical guidelines GLIF model and is able to reveal if the input data item, that represents patient diagnosis or proposed patient treatment, contradicts with medical guidelines or not. The reminder facility can be part of EHR system itself or it can be realized by a stand-alone reminder system (SRS). The possible architecture of stand-alone reminder system is described in this paper and the advantages of stand-alone solution are discussed. The part of the EHR system could be also a browser that would present graphical GLIF model in easy to understand manner on the user screen. This browser can be data driven and focus attention of user to the relevant part of medical guidelines GLIF model.

  3. New Unintended Adverse Consequences of Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Sittig, D F; Wright, A; Ash, J; Singh, H

    2016-11-10

    Although the health information technology industry has made considerable progress in the design, development, implementation, and use of electronic health records (EHRs), the lofty expectations of the early pioneers have not been met. In 2006, the Provider Order Entry Team at Oregon Health & Science University described a set of unintended adverse consequences (UACs), or unpredictable, emergent problems associated with computer-based provider order entry implementation, use, and maintenance. Many of these originally identified UACs have not been completely addressed or alleviated, some have evolved over time, and some new ones have emerged as EHRs became more widely available. The rapid increase in the adoption of EHRs, coupled with the changes in the types and attitudes of clinical users, has led to several new UACs, specifically: complete clinical information unavailable at the point of care; lack of innovations to improve system usability leading to frustrating user experiences; inadvertent disclosure of large amounts of patient-specific information; increased focus on computer-based quality measurement negatively affecting clinical workflows and patient-provider interactions; information overload from marginally useful computer-generated data; and a decline in the development and use of internally-developed EHRs. While each of these new UACs poses significant challenges to EHR developers and users alike, they also offer many opportunities. The challenge for clinical informatics researchers is to continue to refine our current systems while exploring new methods of overcoming these challenges and developing innovations to improve EHR interoperability, usability, security, functionality, clinical quality measurement, and information summarization and display.

  4. Clinical Benefits of Electronic Health Record Use: National Findings

    PubMed Central

    King, Jennifer; Patel, Vaishali; Jamoom, Eric W; Furukawa, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess whether physicians’ reported electronic health record (EHR) use provides clinical benefits and whether benefits depend on using an EHR meeting Meaningful Use criteria or length of EHR experience. Data Source The 2011 Physician Workflow study, representative of U.S. office-based physicians. Study Design Cross-sectional data were used to examine the association of EHR use with enhanced patient care overall and nine specific clinical benefits. Principal Findings Most physicians with EHRs reported EHR use enhanced patient care overall (78 percent), helped them access a patient’s chart remotely (81 percent), and alerted them to a potential medication error (65 percent) and critical lab values (62 percent). Between 30 and 50 percent of physicians reported that EHR use was associated with clinical benefits related to providing recommended care, ordering appropriate tests, and facilitating patient communication. Using EHRs that met Meaningful Use criteria and having 2 or more years of EHR experience were independently associated with reported benefits. Physicians with EHRs meeting Meaningful Use criteria and longer EHR experience were most likely to report benefits across all 10 measures. Conclusions Physicians reported EHR use enhanced patient care overall. Clinical benefits were most likely to be reported by physicians using EHRs meeting Meaningful Use criteria and longer EHR experience. PMID:24359580

  5. Measuring Nursing Value from the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    We report the findings of a big data nursing value expert group made up of 14 members of the nursing informatics, leadership, academic and research communities within the United States tasked with 1. Defining nursing value, 2. Developing a common data model and metrics for nursing care value, and 3. Developing nursing business intelligence tools using the nursing value data set. This work is a component of the Big Data and Nursing Knowledge Development conference series sponsored by the University Of Minnesota School Of Nursing. The panel met by conference calls for fourteen 1.5 hour sessions for a total of 21 total hours of interaction from August 2014 through May 2015. Primary deliverables from the bit data expert group were: development and publication of definitions and metrics for nursing value; construction of a common data model to extract key data from electronic health records; and measures of nursing costs and finance to provide a basis for developing nursing business intelligence and analysis systems.

  6. CADe System Integrated within the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Vállez, Noelia; Déniz, Óscar; Fernández, María del Milagro; Pastor, Carlos; Rienda, Miguel Ángel; Esteve, Pablo; Arias, María

    2013-01-01

    The latest technological advances and information support systems for clinics and hospitals produce a wide range of possibilities in the storage and retrieval of an ever-growing amount of clinical information as well as in detection and diagnosis. In this work, an Electronic Health Record (EHR) combined with a Computer Aided Detection (CADe) system for breast cancer diagnosis has been implemented. Our objective is to provide to radiologists a comprehensive working environment that facilitates the integration, the image visualization, and the use of aided tools within the EHR. For this reason, a development methodology based on hardware and software system features in addition to system requirements must be present during the whole development process. This will lead to a complete environment for displaying, editing, and reporting results not only for the patient information but also for their medical images in standardised formats such as DICOM and DICOM-SR. As a result, we obtain a CADe system which helps in detecting breast cancer using mammograms and is completely integrated into an EHR. PMID:24151586

  7. The implications of electronic health record for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Shabo, Amnon

    2005-12-01

    The emerging concept of an electronic health record (EHR) targeted at a patient centric, cross-institutional and longitudinal information entity (possibly spanning the individuals lifetime) has great promise for personalized medicine. In fact, it is probably the only vehicle through which we may truly realize the personalization of medicine beyond population-based genetic profiles that are expected to become part of medication and treatment indications in the near future. The new EHR standards include mechanisms that integrate clinical data with genomic testing results obtained through applying research-type procedures, such as full DNA sequencing, to an individual patient. Although the most optimal process for the utilization of integrated clinical-genomic data in the EHR framework is still unclear, the new Health Level Seven (HL7) Clinical Genomics Draft Standard for Trial Use suggests using the 'encapsulate & bubble-up' approach, which includes two main phases: the encapsulation of raw genomic data and bubbling-up the most clinically significant portions of that data, while associating it with clinical phenotypes residing in the individual's EHR.

  8. Predictive Modeling for Comfortable Death Outcome Using Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Lodhi, Muhammad Kamran; Ansari, Rashid; Yao, Yingwei; Keenan, Gail M.; Wilkie, Diana J.; Khokhar, Ashfaq A.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) systems are used in healthcare industry to observe the progress of patients. With fast growth of the data, EHR data analysis has become a big data problem. Most EHRs are sparse and multi-dimensional datasets and mining them is a challenging task due to a number of reasons. In this paper, we have used a nursing EHR system to build predictive models to determine what factors impact death anxiety, a significant problem for the dying patients. Different existing modeling techniques have been used to develop coarse-grained as well as fine-grained models to predict patient outcomes. The coarse-grained models help in predicting the outcome at the end of each hospitalization, whereas fine-grained models help in predicting the outcome at the end of each shift, therefore providing a trajectory of predicted outcomes. Based on different modeling techniques, our results show significantly accurate predictions, due to relatively noise-free data. These models can help in determining effective treatments, lowering healthcare costs, and improving the quality of end-of-life (EOL) care. PMID:27500278

  9. Comparing electronic recording with a diagrammatic template versus traditional handwritten recording of tympanomastoid procedures: third audit cycle of 95 cases.

    PubMed

    Fang, S; Habeeb, A; Gluckman, P; Kanegoankar, R

    2017-05-01

    The middle ear and mastoid are complex three-dimensional structures and therefore tympanomastoid procedures require detailed documentation. Traditional written accounts can be inaccurate and difficult to interpret. This audit of 95 patients compares the completion of essential operative details using: an all-electronic version of a standardised proforma with a diagrammatic template, a non-electronic version with a diagrammatic template, and a traditional handwritten template. The electronic template resulted in 81 per cent of essential operative items being recorded, compared to 78 per cent (p = 0.3) with a previous non-electronic template and 50 per cent (p = 0.0004) when using simple handwritten recording. An electronic proforma with a diagrammatic template improves the documentation and interpretation of tympanomastoid procedures compared to traditional handwritten records.

  10. Experiments in robotic catching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hove, Barbara; Slotine, Jean-Jacques E.

    1991-01-01

    Real-time coordination of visual information with high-speed manipulator control is studied in the context of three-dimensional robotic catching. All path planning for the catch occurs in real-time during the half-second that the targeted object is airborne. A trajectory-matching algorithm is used that combines an observer with a varying-strength filter, an error estimator, and an initial motion algorithm. The results are demonstrated experimentally using a real-time vision system and a four-degree-of-freedom, cable-driven arm with a workspace of 4.2 m3 and speed capabilities of up to 2.0 m/s.

  11. 63 FR 39195 - Electronic Records Work Group Draft Report; Appendix D

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-07-21

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Electronic Records Work Group Draft Report; Appendix D AGENCY: National Archives... Electronic Records Work Group's proposed Appendix D. Appendix D addresses the second Work Group..., the Work Group believes that this notice will serve as the Federal Register notice required by 44...

  12. The Electronic Health Record Objective Structured Clinical Examination: Assessing Student Competency in Patient Interactions While Using the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Biagioli, Frances E.; Elliot, Diane L.; Palmer, Ryan T.; Graichen, Carla C.; Rdesinski, Rebecca E.; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Galper, Ari B.; Tysinger, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Problem Because many medical students do not have access to electronic health records (EHRs) in the clinical environment, simulated EHR training is necessary. Explicitly training medical students to use EHRs appropriately during patient encounters equips them to engage patients while also attending to the accuracy of the record and contributing to a culture of information safety. Approach Faculty developed and successfully implemented an EHR objective structured clinical examination (EHR-OSCE) for clerkship students at two institutions. The EHR-OSCE objectives include assessing EHR-related communication and data management skills. Outcomes The authors collected performance data for students (n = 71) at the first institution during academic years 2011–2013 and for students (n = 211) at the second institution during academic year 2013–2014. EHR-OSCE assessment checklist scores showed that students performed well in EHR-related communication tasks, such as maintaining eye contact and stopping all computer work when the patient expresses worry. Findings indicated student EHR skill deficiencies in the areas of EHR data management including medical history review, medication reconciliation, and allergy reconciliation. Most students’ EHR skills failed to improve as the year progressed, suggesting that they did not gain the EHR training and experience they need in clinics and hospitals. Next Steps Cross-institutional data comparisons will help determine whether differences in curricula affect students’ EHR skills. National and institutional policies and faculty development are needed to ensure that students receive adequate EHR education, including hands-on experience in the clinic as well as simulated EHR practice. PMID:27332870

  13. Modeling Disease Severity in Multiple Sclerosis Using Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zongqi; Secor, Elizabeth; Chibnik, Lori B.; Bove, Riley M.; Cheng, Suchun; Chitnis, Tanuja; Cagan, Andrew; Gainer, Vivian S.; Chen, Pei J.; Liao, Katherine P.; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Szolovits, Peter; Weiner, Howard L.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Murphy, Shawn N.; Savova, Guergana K.; Cai, Tianxi; Churchill, Susanne E.; Plenge, Robert M.; Kohane, Isaac S.; De Jager, Philip L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To optimally leverage the scalability and unique features of the electronic health records (EHR) for research that would ultimately improve patient care, we need to accurately identify patients and extract clinically meaningful measures. Using multiple sclerosis (MS) as a proof of principle, we showcased how to leverage routinely collected EHR data to identify patients with a complex neurological disorder and derive an important surrogate measure of disease severity heretofore only available in research settings. Methods In a cross-sectional observational study, 5,495 MS patients were identified from the EHR systems of two major referral hospitals using an algorithm that includes codified and narrative information extracted using natural language processing. In the subset of patients who receive neurological care at a MS Center where disease measures have been collected, we used routinely collected EHR data to extract two aggregate indicators of MS severity of clinical relevance multiple sclerosis severity score (MSSS) and brain parenchymal fraction (BPF, a measure of whole brain volume). Results The EHR algorithm that identifies MS patients has an area under the curve of 0.958, 83% sensitivity, 92% positive predictive value, and 89% negative predictive value when a 95% specificity threshold is used. The correlation between EHR-derived and true MSSS has a mean R2 = 0.38±0.05, and that between EHR-derived and true BPF has a mean R2 = 0.22±0.08. To illustrate its clinical relevance, derived MSSS captures the expected difference in disease severity between relapsing-remitting and progressive MS patients after adjusting for sex, age of symptom onset and disease duration (p = 1.56×10−12). Conclusion Incorporation of sophisticated codified and narrative EHR data accurately identifies MS patients and provides estimation of a well-accepted indicator of MS severity that is widely used in research settings but not part of the routine medical

  14. Electronic health record usability: analysis of the user-centered design processes of eleven electronic health record vendors.

    PubMed

    Ratwani, Raj M; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Hettinger, A Zachary; Benda, Natalie C

    2015-11-01

    The usability of electronic health records (EHRs) continues to be a point of dissatisfaction for providers, despite certification requirements from the Office of the National Coordinator that require EHR vendors to employ a user-centered design (UCD) process. To better understand factors that contribute to poor usability, a research team visited 11 different EHR vendors in order to analyze their UCD processes and discover the specific challenges that vendors faced as they sought to integrate UCD with their EHR development. Our analysis demonstrates a diverse range of vendors' UCD practices that fall into 3 categories: well-developed UCD, basic UCD, and misconceptions of UCD. Specific challenges to practicing UCD include conducting contextually rich studies of clinical workflow, recruiting participants for usability studies, and having support from leadership within the vendor organization. The results of the study provide novel insights for how to improve usability practices of EHR vendors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Measuring the success of electronic medical record implementation using electronic and survey data.

    PubMed Central

    Keshavjee, K.; Troyan, S.; Holbrook, A. M.; VanderMolen, D.

    2001-01-01

    Computerization of physician practices is increasing. Stakeholders are demanding demonstrated value for their Electronic Medical Record (EMR) implementations. We developed survey tools to measure medical office processes, including administrative and physician tasks pre- and post-EMR implementation. We included variables that were expected to improve with EMR implementation and those that were not expected to improve, as controls. We measured the same processes pre-EMR, at six months and 18 months post-EMR. Time required for most administrative tasks decreased within six months of EMR implementation. Staff time spent on charting increased with time, in keeping with our anecdotal observations that nurses were given more responsibility for charting in many offices. Physician time to chart increased initially by 50%, but went down to original levels by 18 months. However, this may be due to the drop-out of those physicians who had a difficult time charting electronically. PMID:11825201

  16. Measuring the success of electronic medical record implementation using electronic and survey data.

    PubMed

    Keshavjee, K; Troyan, S; Holbrook, A M; VanderMolen, D

    2001-01-01

    Computerization of physician practices is increasing. Stakeholders are demanding demonstrated value for their Electronic Medical Record (EMR) implementations. We developed survey tools to measure medical office processes, including administrative and physician tasks pre- and post-EMR implementation. We included variables that were expected to improve with EMR implementation and those that were not expected to improve, as controls. We measured the same processes pre-EMR, at six months and 18 months post-EMR. Time required for most administrative tasks decreased within six months of EMR implementation. Staff time spent on charting increased with time, in keeping with our anecdotal observations that nurses were given more responsibility for charting in many offices. Physician time to chart increased initially by 50%, but went down to original levels by 18 months. However, this may be due to the drop-out of those physicians who had a difficult time charting electronically.

  17. Empirical advances with text mining of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Delespierre, T; Denormandie, P; Bar-Hen, A; Josseran, L

    2017-08-22

    Korian is a private group specializing in medical accommodations for elderly and dependent people. A professional data warehouse (DWH) established in 2010 hosts all of the residents' data. Inside this information system (IS), clinical narratives (CNs) were used only by medical staff as a residents' care linking tool. The objective of this study was to show that, through qualitative and quantitative textual analysis of a relatively small physiotherapy and well-defined CN sample, it was possible to build a physiotherapy corpus and, through this process, generate a new body of knowledge by adding relevant information to describe the residents' care and lives. Meaningful words were extracted through Standard Query Language (SQL) with the LIKE function and wildcards to perform pattern matching, followed by text mining and a word cloud using R® packages. Another step involved principal components and multiple correspondence analyses, plus clustering on the same residents' sample as well as on other health data using a health model measuring the residents' care level needs. By combining these techniques, physiotherapy treatments could be characterized by a list of constructed keywords, and the residents' health characteristics were built. Feeding defects or health outlier groups could be detected, physiotherapy residents' data and their health data were matched, and differences in health situations showed qualitative and quantitative differences in physiotherapy narratives. This textual experiment using a textual process in two stages showed that text mining and data mining techniques provide convenient tools to improve residents' health and quality of care by adding new, simple, useable data to the electronic health record (EHR). When used with a normalized physiotherapy problem list, text mining through information extraction (IE), named entity recognition (NER) and data mining (DM) can provide a real advantage to describe health care, adding new medical material and

  18. Acupuncture and chiropractic care: utilization and electronic medical record capture.

    PubMed

    Elder, Charles; DeBar, Lynn; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Vollmer, William; Deyo, Richard A; Dickerson, John; Kindler, Lindsay

    2015-07-01

    To describe acupuncture and chiropractic use among patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) at a health maintenance organization, and explore issues of benefit design and electronic medical record (EMR) capture. Cross-sectional survey. Kaiser Permanente members meeting EMR diagnostic criteria for CMP were invited to participate. The survey included questions about self-identified presence of CMP, use of acupuncture and chiropractic care, use of ancillary self-care modalities, and communication with conventional medicine practitioners. Analysis of survey data was supplemented with a retrospective review of EMR utilization data. Of 6068 survey respondents, 32% reported acupuncture use, 47% reported chiropractic use, 21% used both, and 42% used neither. For 25% of patients using acupuncture and 43% of those using chiropractic care, utilization was undetected by the EMR. Thirty-five percent of acupuncture users and 42% of chiropractic users did not discuss this care with their health maintenance organization (HMO) clinicians. Among chiropractic users, those accessing care out of plan were older (P < .01), were more likely to use long-term opioids (P = .03), and had more pain diagnoses (P = .01) than those accessing care via clinician referral or self-referral. For acupuncture, those using the clinician referral mechanism exhibited these same characteristics. A majority of participants had used acupuncture, chiropractic care, or both. While benefit structure may materially influence utilization patterns, many patients with CMP use acupuncture and chiropractic care without regard to their insurance coverage. A substantial percentage of acupuncture and chiropractic use thus occurs beyond detection of EMR systems, and many patients do not report such care to their HMO clinicians.

  19. An Electronic Health Record Based on Structured Narrative

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stephen B.; Bakken, Suzanne; Dine, Daniel; Hyun, Sookyung; Mendonça, Eneida; Morrison, Frances; Bright, Tiffani; Van Vleck, Tielman; Wrenn, Jesse; Stetson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Objective To develop an electronic health record that facilitates rapid capture of detailed narrative observations from clinicians, with partial structuring of narrative information for integration and reuse. Design We propose a design in which unstructured text and coded data are fused into a single model called structured narrative. Each major clinical event (e.g., encounter or procedure) is represented as a document that is marked up to identify gross structure (sections, fields, paragraphs, lists) as well as fine structure within sentences (concepts, modifiers, relationships). Marked up items are associated with standardized codes that enable linkage to other events, as well as efficient reuse of information, which can speed up data entry by clinicians. Natural language processing is used to identify fine structure, which can reduce the need for form-based entry. Validation The model is validated through an example of use by a clinician, with discussion of relevant aspects of the user interface, data structures and processing rules. Discussion The proposed model represents all patient information as documents with standardized gross structure (templates). Clinicians enter their data as free text, which is coded by natural language processing in real time making it immediately usable for other computation, such as alerts or critiques. In addition, the narrative data annotates and augments structured data with temporal relations, severity and degree modifiers, causal connections, clinical explanations and rationale. Conclusion Structured narrative has potential to facilitate capture of data directly from clinicians by allowing freedom of expression, giving immediate feedback, supporting reuse of clinical information and structuring data for subsequent processing, such as quality assurance and clinical research. PMID:17947628

  20. Identifying discrepancies in electronic medical records through pharmacist medication reconciliation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Autumn L; Lynch, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    To describe the types and causes of medication discrepancies in the electronic medical record identified by pharmacist medication reconciliation during outpatient medical visits and to identify patient characteristics associated with the presence of discrepancies. Observational case series study. Indigent primary care clinic in Pittsburgh, PA, from April 2009 to May 2010. 219 adults presenting for follow-up medical visits and self-reporting medication use. Medication reconciliation as part of patient interview and concurrent chart review. Frequency, types, and reasons for medication discrepancies and demographic variables, patient knowledge, and adherence. Of 219 patients interviewed, 162 (74%) had at least one discrepancy. The most common type of discrepancy was an incorrect medication documented on the chart. The most common reasons included over-the-counter (OTC) use of medications and patients not reporting use of medications. The presence of one or more medication discrepancies was associated with the use of three or more medications. Patient factors such as gender, age, and race were not associated with discrepancies. Patients able to recall the strength for more than 75% of their medications had fewer discrepancies, while knowledge of the medication name, indication, or regimen had no association with discrepancies. Pharmacists play a critical role in identifying discrepancies between charted medication lists and self-reported medication use, independent of adherence. Inaccuracies in charted medications are frequent and often are related to use of OTC therapies and lack of communication and documentation during physician office visits. Knowledge of patient-related variables and other reasons for discrepancies may be useful in identifying patients at greatest risk for discrepancies and interventions to prevent and resolve them.

  1. Osteoporosis guideline implementation in family medicine using electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Janet; Karampatos, Sarah; Ioannidis, George; Adachi, Jonathan; Thabane, Lehana; Nash, Lynn; Mehan, Upe; Kozak, Joseph; Feldman, Sid; Hirsch, Steve; Jovaisas, Algis V.; Cheung, Angela; Lohfeld, Lynne; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify family physicians’ learning needs related to osteoporosis care; determine family physicians’ preferred modes of learning; and identify barriers to using electronic medical records (EMRs) to implement osteoporosis guidelines in practice. Design Web-based survey. Setting Ontario. Participants Family physicians. Main outcome measures Quantitative and qualitative data about learning needs related to osteoporosis diagnosis and management; preferred mode of learning about guidelines; and barriers to using EMRs to implement guidelines. Results Of the 12 332 family physicians invited to participate in the survey, 8.5% and 7.0% provided partial or fully completed surveys, respectively. More than 80% of respondents agreed that the priority areas for education were as follows: selecting laboratory tests for secondary osteoporosis and interpreting the test results; interpreting bone mineral density results; determining appropriate circumstances for ordering anterior-posterior lumbar spine x-ray scans; and understanding duration, types, and adverse effects of pharmacotherapy. Qualitative analysis revealed that managing moderate-risk patients was a learning need. Continuing medical education was the preferred mode of learning. Approximately 80% of respondents agreed that the scarcity of EMR tools to aid in guideline implementation was a barrier to using guidelines, and 50% of respondents agreed that if EMR-embedded tools were available, time would limit their ability to use them. Conclusion This survey identified key diagnostic- and treatment-related topics in osteoporosis care that should be the focus of future continuing professional development for family physicians. Developers of EMR tools, physicians, and researchers aiming to implement guidelines to improve osteoporosis care should consider the potential barriers indicated in this study.

  2. Chapter 13: Mining Electronic Health Records in the Genomics Era

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Joshua C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The combination of improved genomic analysis methods, decreasing genotyping costs, and increasing computing resources has led to an explosion of clinical genomic knowledge in the last decade. Similarly, healthcare systems are increasingly adopting robust electronic health record (EHR) systems that not only can improve health care, but also contain a vast repository of disease and treatment data that could be mined for genomic research. Indeed, institutions are creating EHR-linked DNA biobanks to enable genomic and pharmacogenomic research, using EHR data for phenotypic information. However, EHRs are designed primarily for clinical care, not research, so reuse of clinical EHR data for research purposes can be challenging. Difficulties in use of EHR data include: data availability, missing data, incorrect data, and vast quantities of unstructured narrative text data. Structured information includes billing codes, most laboratory reports, and other variables such as physiologic measurements and demographic information. Significant information, however, remains locked within EHR narrative text documents, including clinical notes and certain categories of test results, such as pathology and radiology reports. For relatively rare observations, combinations of simple free-text searches and billing codes may prove adequate when followed by manual chart review. However, to extract the large cohorts necessary for genome-wide association studies, natural language processing methods to process narrative text data may be needed. Combinations of structured and unstructured textual data can be mined to generate high-validity collections of cases and controls for a given condition. Once high-quality cases and controls are identified, EHR-derived cases can be used for genomic discovery and validation. Since EHR data includes a broad sampling of clinically-relevant phenotypic information, it may enable multiple genomic investigations upon a single set of genotyped

  3. Identifying Axial Spondyloarthritis in Electronic Medical Records of US Veterans.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jessica A; Shao, Yijun; Leng, Jianwei; He, Tao; Teng, Chia-Chen; Redd, Doug; Treitler Zeng, Qing; Burningham, Zachary; Clegg, Daniel O; Sauer, Brian C

    2017-09-01

    Large database research in axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) is limited by a lack of methods for identifying most types of axial SpA. Our objective was to develop methods for identifying axial SpA concepts in the free text of documents from electronic medical records. Veterans with documents in the national Veterans Health Administration Corporate Data Warehouse between January 1, 2005 and June 30, 2015 were included. Methods were developed for exploring, selecting, and extracting meaningful terms that were likely to represent axial SpA concepts. With annotation, clinical experts reviewed sections of text containing the meaningful terms (snippets) and classified the snippets according to whether or not they represented the intended axial SpA concept. With natural language processing (NLP) tools, computers were trained to replicate the clinical experts' snippet classifications. Three axial SpA concepts were selected by clinical experts, including sacroiliitis, terms including the prefix spond*, and HLA-B27 positivity (HLA-B27+). With supervised machine learning on annotated snippets, NLP models were developed with accuracies of 91.1% for sacroiliitis, 93.5% for spond*, and 97.2% for HLA-B27+. With independent validation, the accuracies were 92.0% for sacroiliitis, 91.0% for spond*, and 99.0% for HLA-B27+. We developed feasible and accurate methods for identifying axial SpA concepts in the free text of clinical notes. Additional research is required to determine combinations of concepts that will accurately identify axial SpA phenotypes. These novel methods will facilitate previously impractical observational research in axial SpA and may be applied to research with other diseases. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Anonymization of DICOM electronic medical records for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne; Jones, Timothy; Swerdloff, Stuart; Newhauser, Warren; Cilia, Mark; Carver, Robert; Halloran, Andy; Zhang, Rui

    2014-10-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) and treatment plans are used in research on patient outcomes and radiation effects. In many situations researchers must remove protected health information (PHI) from EMRs. The literature contains several studies describing the anonymization of generic Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) files and DICOM image sets but no publications were found that discuss the anonymization of DICOM radiation therapy plans, a key component of an EMR in a cancer clinic. In addition to this we were unable to find a commercial software tool that met the minimum requirements for anonymization and preservation of data integrity for radiation therapy research. The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype software code to meet the requirements for the anonymization of radiation therapy treatment plans and to develop a way to validate that code and demonstrate that it properly anonymized treatment plans and preserved data integrity. We extended an open-source code to process all relevant PHI and to allow for the automatic anonymization of multiple EMRs. The prototype code successfully anonymized multiple treatment plans in less than 1min/patient. We also tested commercial optical character recognition (OCR) algorithms for the detection of burned-in text on the images, but they were unable to reliably recognize text. In addition, we developed and tested an image filtering algorithm that allowed us to isolate and redact alpha-numeric text from a test radiograph. Validation tests verified that PHI was anonymized and data integrity, such as the relationship between DICOM unique identifiers (UID) was preserved.

  5. Making electronic health records support quality management: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Triantafillou, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Since the 1990s many hospitals in the OECD countries have introduced electronic health record (EHR) systems. A number of studies have examined the factors impinging on EHR implementation. Others have studied the clinical efficacy of EHR. However, only few studies have explored the (intermediary) factors that make EHR systems conducive to quality management (QM). Undertake a narrative review of existing studies in order to identify and discuss the factors conducive to making EHR support three dimensions of QM: clinical outcomes, managerial monitoring and cost-effectiveness. A narrative review of Web of Science, Cochrane, EBSCO, ProQuest, Scopus and three Nordic research databases. most studies do not specify the type of EHR examined. 39 studies were identified for analysis. 10 factors were found to be conducive to make EHR support QM. However, the contribution of EHR to the three specific dimensions of QM varied substantially. Most studies (29) included clinical outcomes. However, only half of these reported EHR to have a positive impact. Almost all the studies (36) dealt with the ability of EHR to enhance managerial monitoring of clinical activities, the far majority of which showed a positive relationship. Finally, only five dealt with cost-effectiveness of which two found positive effects. The findings resonates well with previous reviews, though two factors making EHR support QM seem new, namely: political goals and strategies, and integration of guidelines for clinical conduct. Lacking EHR type specification and diversity in study method imply that there is a strong need for further research on the factors that may make EHR may support QM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Physicians, Patients, and the Electronic Health Record: An Ethnographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ventres, William; Kooienga, Sarah; Vuckovic, Nancy; Marlin, Ryan; Nygren, Peggy; Stewart, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Little is known about the effects of the electronic health record (EHR) on physician-patient encounters. The objectives of this study were to identify the factors that influence the manner by which physicians use the EHR with patients. METHODS This ethnographic study included 4 qualitative components: 80 hours of participant observation in 4 primary care offices in the Pacific Northwest; individual interviews with 52 patients, 12 office staff members, 23 physicians, and 1 nurse-practitioner; videotaped reviews of 29 clinical encounters; and 5 focus-group interviews with physicians and computer advocates. The main outcome measures were factors that influence how physicians use the EHR. Researchers qualitatively derived these factors through serial reviews of data. RESULTS This study identified 14 factors that influence how EHRs are used and perceived in medical practice today. These factors were categorized into 4 thematic domains: (1) spatial—effect of the physical presence and location of EHRs on interactions between physicians and patients; (2) relational—perceptions of physicians and patients about the EHR and how those perceptions affected its use; (3) educational—issues of developing physicians’ proficiency with and improving patients’ understandings about EHR use; and (4) structural—institutional and technological forces that influence how physicians perceived their use of EHR. CONCLUSIONS This study found that the introduction of EHRs into practice influences multiple cognitive and social dimensions of the clinical encounter. It brings into focus important questions that through further inquiry can determine how to make best use of the EHR to enhance therapeutic relationships. PMID:16569715

  7. Hospital electronic medical record enterprise application strategies: do they matter?

    PubMed

    Fareed, Naleef; Ozcan, Yasar A; DeShazo, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    Successful implementations and the ability to reap the benefits of electronic medical record (EMR) systems may be correlated with the type of enterprise application strategy that an administrator chooses when acquiring an EMR system. Moreover, identifying the most optimal enterprise application strategy is a task that may have important linkages with hospital performance. This study explored whether hospitals that have adopted differential EMR enterprise application strategies concomitantly differ in their overall efficiency. Specifically, the study examined whether hospitals with a single-vendor strategy had a higher likelihood of being efficient than those with a best-of-breed strategy and whether hospitals with a best-of-suite strategy had a higher probability of being efficient than those with best-of-breed or single-vendor strategies. A conceptual framework was used to formulate testable hypotheses. A retrospective cross-sectional approach using data envelopment analysis was used to obtain efficiency scores of hospitals by EMR enterprise application strategy. A Tobit regression analysis was then used to determine the probability of a hospital being inefficient as related to its EMR enterprise application strategy, while moderating for the hospital's EMR "implementation status" and controlling for hospital and market characteristics. The data envelopment analysis of hospitals suggested that only 32 hospitals were efficient in the study's sample of 2,171 hospitals. The results from the post hoc analysis showed partial support for the hypothesis that hospitals with a best-of-suite strategy were more likely to be efficient than those with a single-vendor strategy. This study underscores the importance of understanding the differences between the three strategies discussed in this article. On the basis of the findings, hospital administrators should consider the efficiency associations that a specific strategy may have compared with another prior to moving toward

  8. 36 CFR 1236.20 - What are appropriate recordkeeping systems for electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT Additional... systems, depending on their business needs, for managing their records. Transitory e-mail may be managed... retrievable and usable for as long as needed to conduct agency business and to meet NARA-approved...

  9. 76 FR 65218 - Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA) AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. Appendix 2), the National Archives and Records...

  10. 77 FR 65416 - Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA) AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. Appendix 2), the National Archives and Records...

  11. 75 FR 63208 - Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA) AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. Appendix 2), the National Archives and Records...

  12. 75 FR 12573 - Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA) AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. Appendix 2), the National Archives and Records...

  13. 36 CFR 1225.24 - When can an agency apply previously approved schedules to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authority reference; and (v) Format of the records (e.g., database, scanned images, digital photographs, etc... Records Schedule items that exclude electronic master files and databases) or an agency-specific...

  14. The Lean Acquisition Strategy Behind the DOD’s 2015 Electronic Health Record System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    ACQUISITION STRATEGY BEHIND THE DOD’S 2015 ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD SYSTEM by Stanley C. Wong September 2016 Thesis Co-Advisors: Mark Nissen...AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE THE LEAN ACQUISITION STRATEGY BEHIND THE DOD’S 2015 ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD SYSTEM 5...in its previous attempt to acquire an enterprise electronic health record (EHR) system. The earlier program was plagued with schedule delays and cost

  15. Electronic Personal Health Record Use Among Nurses in the Nursing Informatics Community.

    PubMed

    Gartrell, Kyungsook; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Wilson, Marisa L

    2015-07-01

    An electronic personal health record is a patient-centric tool that enables patients to securely access, manage, and share their health information with healthcare providers. It is presumed the nursing informatics community would be early adopters of electronic personal health record, yet no studies have been identified that examine the personal adoption of electronic personal health record's for their own healthcare. For this study, we sampled nurse members of the American Medical Informatics Association and the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society with 183 responding. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify those factors associated with electronic personal health record use. Overall, 72% were electronic personal health record users. Users tended to be older (aged >50 years), be more highly educated (72% master's or doctoral degrees), and hold positions as clinical informatics specialists or chief nursing informatics officers. Those whose healthcare providers used electronic health records were significantly more likely to use electronic personal health records (odds ratio, 5.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-25.61). Electronic personal health record users were significantly less concerned about privacy of health information online than nonusers (odds ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.70) adjusted for ethnicity, race, and practice region. Informatics nurses, with their patient-centered view of technology, are in prime position to influence development of electronic personal health records. Our findings can inform policy efforts to encourage informatics and other professional nursing groups to become leaders and users of electronic personal health record; such use could help them endorse and engage patients to use electronic personal health records. Having champions with expertise in and enthusiasm for the new technology can promote the adoptionof electronic personal health records among healthcare providers as well as

  16. Procedures for Electronic Management of Rulemaking and Other Docketed Records in the Federal Docket Management System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This procedure identifies the specific requirements, processes and supporting documents EPA uses to electronically manage rulemaking and other docketed records in the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS).

  17. 36 CFR 1236.6 - What are agency responsibilities for electronic records management?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-1235 of this subchapter; (b) Integrate records management and preservation considerations into the design, development, enhancement, and implementation of electronic information systems in accordance...

  18. Recording of hospitalizations for acute exacerbations of COPD in UK electronic health care records

    PubMed Central

    Rothnie, Kieran J; Müllerová, Hana; Thomas, Sara L; Chandan, Joht S; Smeeth, Liam; Hurst, John R; Davis, Kourtney; Quint, Jennifer K

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate identification of hospitalizations for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) within electronic health care records is important for research, public health, and to inform health care utilization and service provision. We aimed to develop a strategy to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in secondary care data and to investigate the validity of strategies to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in primary care data. Methods We identified patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) with linked Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) data. We used discharge summaries for recent hospitalizations for AECOPD to develop a strategy to identify the recording of hospitalizations for AECOPD in HES. We then used the HES strategy as a reference standard to investigate the positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of strategies for identifying AECOPD using general practice CPRD data. We tested two strategies: 1) codes for hospitalization for AECOPD and 2) a code for AECOPD other than hospitalization on the same day as a code for hospitalization due to unspecified reason. Results In total, 27,182 patients with COPD were included. Our strategy to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in HES had a sensitivity of 87.5%. When compared with HES, using a code suggesting hospitalization for AECOPD in CPRD resulted in a PPV of 50.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 48.5%–51.8%) and a sensitivity of 4.1% (95% CI 3.9%–4.3%). Using a code for AECOPD and a code for hospitalization due to unspecified reason resulted in a PPV of 43.3% (95% CI 42.3%–44.2%) and a sensitivity of 5.4% (95% CI 5.1%–5.7%). Conclusion Hospitalization for AECOPD can be identified with high sensitivity in the HES database. The PPV and sensitivity of strategies to identify hospitalizations for AECOPD in primary care data alone are very poor. Primary care data alone should not be used to identify

  19. Evaluating increased resource use in fibromyalgia using electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Jay M; Masters, Elizabeth T; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Smith, David M; Faulkner, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The management of fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic musculoskeletal disease, remains challenging, and patients with FM are often characterized by high health care resource utilization. This study sought to explore potential drivers of all-cause health care resource utilization and other factors associated with high resource use, using a large electronic health records (EHR) database to explore data from patients diagnosed with FM. This was a retrospective analysis of de-identified EHR data from the Humedica database. Adults (≥18 years) with FM were identified based on ≥2 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for FM (729.1) ≥30 days apart between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012 and were required to have evidence of ≥12 months continuous care pre- and post-index; first FM diagnosis was the index event; 12-month pre- and post-index reporting periods. Multivariable analysis evaluated relationships between variables and resource utilization. Patients were predominantly female (81.4%), Caucasian (87.7%), with a mean (standard deviation) age of 54.4 (14.8) years. The highest health care resource utilization was observed for the categories of "medication orders" and "physician office visits," with 12-month post-index means of 21.2 (21.5) drug orders/patient and 15.1 (18.1) office visits/patient; the latter accounted for 73.3% of all health care visits. Opioids were the most common prescription medication, 44.3% of all patients. The chance of high resource use was significantly increased (P<0.001) 26% among African-Americans vs Caucasians and for patients with specific comorbid conditions ranging from 6% (musculoskeletal pain or depression/bipolar disorder) to 21% (congestive heart failure). Factors significantly associated with increased medications ordered included being female (P<0.001) and specific comorbid conditions (P<0.05). Physician office visits and pharmacotherapy orders were key drivers of all-cause health care utilization, with

  20. Evaluating increased resource use in fibromyalgia using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Jay M; Masters, Elizabeth T; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Smith, David M; Faulkner, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Objective The management of fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic musculoskeletal disease, remains challenging, and patients with FM are often characterized by high health care resource utilization. This study sought to explore potential drivers of all-cause health care resource utilization and other factors associated with high resource use, using a large electronic health records (EHR) database to explore data from patients diagnosed with FM. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of de-identified EHR data from the Humedica database. Adults (≥18 years) with FM were identified based on ≥2 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for FM (729.1) ≥30 days apart between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012 and were required to have evidence of ≥12 months continuous care pre- and post-index; first FM diagnosis was the index event; 12-month pre- and post-index reporting periods. Multivariable analysis evaluated relationships between variables and resource utilization. Results Patients were predominantly female (81.4%), Caucasian (87.7%), with a mean (standard deviation) age of 54.4 (14.8) years. The highest health care resource utilization was observed for the categories of “medication orders” and “physician office visits,” with 12-month post-index means of 21.2 (21.5) drug orders/patient and 15.1 (18.1) office visits/patient; the latter accounted for 73.3% of all health care visits. Opioids were the most common prescription medication, 44.3% of all patients. The chance of high resource use was significantly increased (P<0.001) 26% among African-Americans vs Caucasians and for patients with specific comorbid conditions ranging from 6% (musculoskeletal pain or depression/bipolar disorder) to 21% (congestive heart failure). Factors significantly associated with increased medications ordered included being female (P<0.001) and specific comorbid conditions (P<0.05). Conclusion Physician office visits and pharmacotherapy orders were key

  1. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jeffrey B; Justison, George A

    2015-12-01

    The authors comment on Steffens and Gunser's article describing the University of Wisconsin adoption of the Epic anesthesia record to include perfusion information from the cardiopulmonary bypass patient experience. We highlight the current-day lessons and the valuable quality and safety principles the Wisconsin-Epic model anesthesia-perfusion record provides.

  2. The development and deployment of electronic personal health records records: a strategic positioning perspective.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mark; Baxter, Ryan; Pouder, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of strategic position on the ability of an entrepreneurial firm to successfully develop and deploy electronic personal health records technology within the US healthcare industry. This study uses an in-depth longitudinal case study methodology. The study contributes by juxtaposing a longitudinal view of how the focal firm proposed and acted on different strategic positions in an attempt to achieve development and deployment success. In doing so, the study also elaborates on Porter's recognition that firms need to make trade-offs when choosing a strategic position, as the purposeful limitation of service offerings can protect against the degradation of existing value creating activities. The authors' study highlights the enormous challenge of facilitating the adoption and diffusion of technology enabled interventions in the US healthcare ecosystem. Future research that combines both interdisciplinary and multi-level investigation and analysis is sorely needed to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the phenomenon and to encourage the development and deployment of useful technology enabled interventions within the US healthcare industry. While the fragmented nature of the healthcare industry provides opportunities for entrepreneurial firms, such complexity within the ecosystem should not be underestimated as a reason for concern for small firms. Total economic burden due to chronic diseases and other healthcare-related expenses is massive for the USA. Consequently, prevention and early detection of future disease states has become a core component of the current healthcare reform debate. EPHRs are considered one core component of a broader healthcare strategy to improve health outcomes and lower costs. By deepening our understanding of how best to develop and deploy such interventions, society will surely benefit. The longitudinal nature of the authors' study provides a unique opportunity to understand the

  3. Are low income patients receiving the benefits of electronic health records? A statewide survey.

    PubMed

    Butler, Matthew J; Harootunian, Gevork; Johnson, William G

    2013-06-01

    There are concerns that physicians serving low-income, Medicaid patients, in the United States are less likely to adopt electronic health records and, if so, that Medicaid patients will be denied the benefits from electronic health record use. This study seeks to determine whether physicians treating Medicaid patients were less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Physician surveys completed during physicians' license renewal process in Arizona were merged with the physician licensing data and Medicaid administrative claims data. Survey responses were received from 50.7 percent (6,780 out of 13,380) of all physicians practicing in Arizona. Physician survey responses were used to identify whether the physician used electronic health records and the degree to which the physician exchanged electronic health records with other health-care providers. Medicaid claims data were used to identify which physicians provided health care to Medicaid beneficiaries. The primary outcome of interest was whether Medicaid providers were more or less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate average marginal effects. In multivariate analysis, physicians with 20 or more Medicaid patients during the survey cycle were 4.1 percent more likely to use an electronic health record and 5.2 percent more likely to be able to transmit electronic health records to at least one health-care provider outside of their practice. These effects increase in magnitude when the analysis is restricted to solo practice physicians This is the first study to find a pro-Medicaid gap in electronic health record adoption suggesting that the low income patients served by Arizona's Health Care Cost Containment System are not at a disadvantage with regard to electronic health record access and that Arizona's model of promoting electronic health record adoption merits further study.

  4. A national survey assessing the number of records allowed open in electronic health records at hospitals and ambulatory sites.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Jason S; Berger, Matthew A; Rai, Amisha; Galanter, William L; Lambert, Bruce L; Schiff, Gordon D; Vawdrey, David K; Green, Robert A; Salmasian, Hojjat; Koppel, Ross; Schechter, Clyde B; Applebaum, Jo R; Southern, William N

    2017-09-01

    To reduce the risk of wrong-patient errors, safety experts recommend limiting the number of patient records providers can open at once in electronic health records (EHRs). However, it is unknown whether health care organizations follow this recommendation or what rationales drive their decisions. To address this gap, we conducted an electronic survey via 2 national listservs. Among 167 inpatient and outpatient study facilities using EHR systems designed to open multiple records at once, 44.3% were configured to allow ≥3 records open at once (unrestricted), 38.3% allowed only 1 record open (restricted), and 17.4% allowed 2 records open (hedged). Decision-making centered on efforts to balance safety and efficiency, but there was disagreement among organizations about how to achieve that balance. Results demonstrate no consensus on the number of records to be allowed open at once in EHRs. Rigorous studies are needed to determine the optimal number of records that balances safety and efficiency. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. [Information extraction methodology used in electronic medical records].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingying; Ye, Feng

    2011-01-01

    We try to use information extraction technology in some parts of the medical records and extract disease information to accumulate experience for extracting complete information from medical records. This paper attempts to use dictionary and rules to achieve the named entity recognition. Information extraction is based on shallow parsing and use pattern sentence matching method with the help of a 3 levels finite state automaton.

  6. Electronic Health Record-Related Safety Concerns: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Electronic Health Record Users

    PubMed Central

    Pajunen, Tuuli; Saranto, Kaija; Lehtonen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Background The rapid expansion in the use of electronic health records (EHR) has increased the number of medical errors originating in health information systems (HIS). The sociotechnical approach helps in understanding risks in the development, implementation, and use of EHR and health information technology (HIT) while accounting for complex interactions of technology within the health care system. Objective This study addresses two important questions: (1) “which of the common EHR error types are associated with perceived high- and extreme-risk severity ratings among EHR users?”, and (2) “which variables are associated with high- and extreme-risk severity ratings?” Methods This study was a quantitative, non-experimental, descriptive study of EHR users. We conducted a cross-sectional web-based questionnaire study at the largest hospital district in Finland. Statistical tests included the reliability of the summative scales tested with Cronbach’s alpha. Logistic regression served to assess the association of the independent variables to each of the eight risk factors examined. Results A total of 2864 eligible respondents provided the final data. Almost half of the respondents reported a high level of risk related to the error type “extended EHR unavailability”. The lowest overall risk level was associated with “selecting incorrectly from a list of items”. In multivariate analyses, profession and clinical unit proved to be the strongest predictors for high perceived risk. Physicians perceived risk levels to be the highest (P<.001 in six of eight error types), while emergency departments, operating rooms, and procedure units were associated with higher perceived risk levels (P<.001 in four of eight error types). Previous participation in eLearning courses on EHR-use was associated with lower risk for some of the risk factors. Conclusions Based on a large number of Finnish EHR users in hospitals, this study indicates that HIT safety hazards should

  7. Atigeo at TREC 2012 Medical Records Track: ICD-9 Code Description Injection to Enhance Electronic Medical Record Search Accuracy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    codes that represent the diagnoses and procedures described in those medical records. We have developed a suite of natural language processing (NLP...to promote the research and development of free-text search engines that can find electronic medical records (EMRs or reports) that are relevant to...test and refine the natural language processing (NLP) components we have developed to support our xPatterns Computer-Aided Coding (CAC) product

  8. Perceptions of electronic health record implementation: a statewide survey of physicians in Rhode Island.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Matthew C; Baier, Rosa R; Gardner, Rebekah L

    2014-10-01

    Although electronic health record use improves healthcare delivery, adoption into clinical practice is incomplete. We sought to identify the extent of adoption in Rhode Island and the characteristics of physicians and electronic health records associated with positive experience. We performed a cross-sectional study of data collected by the Rhode Island Department of Health for the Health Information Technology Survey 2009 to 2013. Survey questions included provider and practice demographics, health record information, and Likert-type scaled questions regarding how electronic health record use affected clinical practice. The survey response rate ranged from 50% to 65%, with 62% in 2013. Increasing numbers of physicians in Rhode Island use an electronic health record. In 2013, 81% of physicians used one, and adoption varied by clinical subspecialty. Most providers think that electronic health record use improves billing and quality improvement but has not improved job satisfaction. Physicians with longer and more sophisticated electronic health record use report positive effects of introduction on all aspects of practice examined (P < .001). Older physician age is associated with worse opinion of electronic health record introduction (P < .001). Of the 18 electronic health record vendors most frequently used in Rhode Island, 5 were associated with improved job satisfaction. We report the largest statewide study of electronic health record adoption to date. We found increasing physician use in Rhode Island, and the extent of adoption varies by subspecialty. Although older physicians are less likely to be positive about electronic health record adoption, longer and more sophisticated use are associated with more positive opinions, suggesting acceptance will grow over time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 45 CFR 170.314 - 2014 Edition electronic health record certification criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false 2014 Edition electronic health record certification criteria. 170.314 Section 170.314 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH... Health Information Technology § 170.314 2014 Edition electronic health record certification criteria. The...

  10. 29 CFR 2520.107-1 - Use of electronic media for maintenance and retention of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of electronic media for maintenance and retention of....107-1 Use of electronic media for maintenance and retention of records. (a) Scope and purpose... media for the maintenance and retention of records required to be kept under sections 107 and 209 of...

  11. 29 CFR 2520.107-1 - Use of electronic media for maintenance and retention of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of electronic media for maintenance and retention of....107-1 Use of electronic media for maintenance and retention of records. (a) Scope and purpose... media for the maintenance and retention of records required to be kept under sections 107 and 209 of...

  12. Toward Developing a Framework of Cost Elements for Preserving Authentic Electronic Records into Perpetuity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanett, Shelby

    2002-01-01

    Proposes that a cost model specific to preserving authentic electronic records be developed. Topics include financial challenges of processes involved in preserving electronic records; financial management tools to support the decision-making processes that archives and libraries use; digital resources and data types; and baseline requirements…

  13. Electronic health records in an occupational health setting-Part II. Global deployment.

    PubMed

    Bey, Jean M; de Magalhães, Josiane S; Bojórquez, Lorena; Lin, Karen

    2013-03-01

    Electronic medical record systems are being used by more multi-national corporations. This article describes one corporation's considerations and process in successfully deploying a global electronic medical record system to international facilities in Brazil, Mexico, Singapore, and Taiwan. This article summarizes feedback from the experiences of occupational health nurse superusers in these countries. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. 21 CFR 1304.06 - Records and reports for electronic prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and application service provider must retain a copy of any security incident report filed with the... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Records and reports for electronic prescriptions... AND REPORTS OF REGISTRANTS General Information § 1304.06 Records and reports for electronic...

  15. 21 CFR 1304.06 - Records and reports for electronic prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and application service provider must retain a copy of any security incident report filed with the... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Records and reports for electronic prescriptions... AND REPORTS OF REGISTRANTS General Information § 1304.06 Records and reports for electronic...

  16. 21 CFR 1304.06 - Records and reports for electronic prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and application service provider must retain a copy of any security incident report filed with the... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Records and reports for electronic prescriptions... AND REPORTS OF REGISTRANTS General Information § 1304.06 Records and reports for electronic...

  17. 21 CFR 1304.06 - Records and reports for electronic prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and application service provider must retain a copy of any security incident report filed with the... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Records and reports for electronic prescriptions... AND REPORTS OF REGISTRANTS General Information § 1304.06 Records and reports for electronic...

  18. Impact of an electronic medication administration record on medication administration efficiency and errors.

    PubMed

    McComas, Jeffery; Riingen, Michelle; Chae Kim, Son

    2014-12-01

    The study aims were to evaluate the impact of electronic medication administration record implementation on medication administration efficiency and occurrence of medication errors as well as to identify the predictors of medication administration efficiency in an acute care setting. A prospective, observational study utilizing time-and-motion technique was conducted before and after electronic medication administration record implementation in November 2011. A total of 156 cases of medication administration activities (78 pre- and 78 post-electronic medication administration record) involving 38 nurses were observed at the point of care. A separate retrospective review of the hospital Midas+ medication error database was also performed to collect the rates and origin of medication errors for 6 months before and after electronic medication administration record implementation. The mean medication administration time actually increased from 11.3 to 14.4 minutes post-electronic medication administration record (P = .039). In a multivariate analysis, electronic medication administration record was not a predictor of medication administration time, but the distractions/interruptions during medication administration process were significant predictors. The mean hospital-wide medication errors significantly decreased from 11.0 to 5.3 events per month post-electronic medication administration record (P = .034). Although no improvement in medication administration efficiency was observed, electronic medication administration record improved the quality of care with a significant decrease in medication errors.

  19. Patient-initiated electronic health record amendment requests

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David A; Preib, Rebecca; Zheng, Kai; Choi, Sung W

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Providing patients access to their medical records offers many potential benefits including identification and correction of errors. The process by which patients ask for changes to be made to their records is called an ‘amendment request’. Little is known about the nature of such amendment requests and whether they result in modifications to the chart. Methods We conducted a qualitative content analysis of all patient-initiated amendment requests that our institution received over a 7-year period. Recurring themes were identified along three analytic dimensions: (1) clinical/documentation area, (2) patient motivation for making the request, and (3) outcome of the request. Results The dataset consisted of 818 distinct requests submitted by 181 patients. The majority of these requests (n=636, 77.8%) were made to rectify incorrect information and 49.7% of all requests were ultimately approved. In 6.6% of the requests, patients wanted valid information removed from their record, 27.8% of which were approved. Among all of the patients requesting a copy of their chart, only a very small percentage (approximately 0.2%) submitted an amendment request. Conclusions The low number of amendment requests may be due to inadequate awareness by patients about how to make changes to their records. To make this approach effective, it will be important to inform patients of their right to view and amend records and about the process for doing so. Increasing patient access to medical records could encourage patient participation in improving the accuracy of medical records; however, caution should be used. PMID:24863430

  20. Developing Effective Case Scenarios for Interprofessional Electronic Health Record Research.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kristie; Courtney, Karen L; Frisch, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, there have been numerous calls for research in interprofessional communication and documentation. Some of the limitations of research in this area have been proprietary user interfaces that may not be generalizable and impact varying adoption rates of electronic documentation among different health disciplines. In order to address these concerns, researchers need to create standardized case scenarios as research instruments. This paper outlines the process for developing a case scenario instrument for use in interprofessional electronic documentation research.

  1. Ethical, legal, and social implications of incorporating genomic information into electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Hazin, Ribhi; Brothers, Kyle B.; Malin, Bradley A.; Koenig, Barbara A.; Sanderson, Saskia C.; Rothstein, Mark A.; Williams, Marc S.; Clayton, Ellen W.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of genomic data in the electronic health record raises important ethical, legal, and social issues. In this article, we highlight these challenges and discuss potential solutions. We provide a brief background on the current state of electronic health records in the context of genomic medicine, discuss the importance of equitable access to genome-enabled electronic health records, and consider the potential use of electronic health records for improving genomic literacy in patients and providers. We highlight the importance of privacy, access, and security, and of determining which genomic information is included in the electronic health record. Finally, we discuss the challenges of reporting incidental findings, storing and reinterpreting genomic data, and nondocumentation and duty to warn family members at potential genetic risk. PMID:24030434

  2. Ethical, legal, and social implications of incorporating genomic information into electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Hazin, Ribhi; Brothers, Kyle B; Malin, Bradley A; Koenig, Barbara A; Sanderson, Saskia C; Rothstein, Mark A; Williams, Marc S; Clayton, Ellen W; Kullo, Iftikhar J

    2013-10-01

    The inclusion of genomic data in the electronic health record raises important ethical, legal, and social issues. In this article, we highlight these challenges and discuss potential solutions. We provide a brief background on the current state of electronic health records in the context of genomic medicine, discuss the importance of equitable access to genome-enabled electronic health records, and consider the potential use of electronic health records for improving genomic literacy in patients and providers. We highlight the importance of privacy, access, and security, and of determining which genomic information is included in the electronic health record. Finally, we discuss the challenges of reporting incidental findings, storing and reinterpreting genomic data, and nondocumentation and duty to warn family members at potential genetic risk.

  3. 36 CFR 1236.20 - What are appropriate recordkeeping systems for electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT Additional... storage media or formats in order to avoid loss due to media decay or technology obsolescence. (7) Execute... disposition when required. (c) Backup systems. System and file backup processes and media do not provide...

  4. 36 CFR 1236.20 - What are appropriate recordkeeping systems for electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT Additional... storage media or formats in order to avoid loss due to media decay or technology obsolescence. (7) Execute... disposition when required. (c) Backup systems. System and file backup processes and media do not provide...

  5. 76 FR 15349 - Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on the Electronic Records Archives (ACERA); Meeting AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. Appendix 2), the National Archives and...

  6. 39 CFR 3004.41 - Electronic requests for records and for expedited processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... processing. 3004.41 Section 3004.41 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PUBLIC RECORDS AND FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 3004.41 Electronic requests for records and for expedited processing. (a) An...://www.prc.gov; (2) Reasonably describe the records sought; (3) Include a daytime telephone number and...

  7. 39 CFR 3004.41 - Electronic requests for records and for expedited processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... processing. 3004.41 Section 3004.41 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PUBLIC RECORDS AND FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 3004.41 Electronic requests for records and for expedited processing. (a) An...://www.prc.gov; (2) Reasonably describe the records sought; (3) Include a daytime telephone number and...

  8. 39 CFR 3004.41 - Electronic requests for records and for expedited processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... processing. 3004.41 Section 3004.41 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PUBLIC RECORDS AND FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 3004.41 Electronic requests for records and for expedited processing. (a) An...://www.prc.gov; (2) Reasonably describe the records sought; (3) Include a daytime telephone number and...

  9. Framework and Policy Recommendations for the Exchange and Preservation of Electronic Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Margaret H.; Rosen, Bruce K.

    The objectives of this project were to assist the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in developing a policy for the representation, transfer, access, and preservation of electronic records of permanent value. A lack of attention to the management, retention, and selective preservation of these machine-readable records will result…

  10. 75 FR 17207 - Electronic On-Board Recorders for Hours-of-Service Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Regulations (FMCSRs) to incorporate new performance standards for electronic on-board recorders (EOBRs... installation of EOBRs meeting the new performance standards. If FMCSA determines, based on HOS records reviewed... existing performance standards for on-board recording devices. The Motor Carrier Safety Act of 1984 (Pub. L...

  11. Nurses' Experiences of an Initial and Reimplemented Electronic Health Record Use.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Ping; Lee, Ting-Ting; Liu, Chia-Hui; Mills, Mary Etta

    2016-04-01

    The electronic health record is a key component of healthcare information systems. Currently, numerous hospitals have adopted electronic health records to replace paper-based records to document care processes and improve care quality. Integrating healthcare information system into traditional nursing daily operations requires time and effort for nurses to become familiarized with this new technology. In the stages of electronic health record implementation, smooth adoption can streamline clinical nursing activities. In order to explore the adoption process, a descriptive qualitative study design and focus group interviews were conducted 3 months after and 2 years after electronic health record system implementation (system aborted 1 year in between) in one hospital located in southern Taiwan. Content analysis was performed to analyze the interview data, and six main themes were derived, in the first stage: (1) liability, work stress, and anticipation for electronic health record; (2) slow network speed, user-unfriendly design for learning process; (3) insufficient information technology/organization support; on the second stage: (4) getting used to electronic health record and further system requirements, (5) benefits of electronic health record in time saving and documentation, (6) unrealistic information technology competence expectation and future use. It concluded that user-friendly design and support by informatics technology and manpower backup would facilitate this adoption process as well.

  12. Special requirements of electronic medical record systems in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Michael J; Diamond, Anne M; Strunk, Albert L

    2010-07-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance and potential benefit of information technology and electronic medical records in providing quality care for women. Incorporation of obstetrician-gynecologist-specific requirements by electronic medical record vendors is essential to achieve appropriate electronic medical record functionality for obstetrician-gynecologists. Obstetricians and gynecologists record and document patient care in ways that are unique to medicine. Current electronic medical record systems are often limited in their usefulness for the practice of obstetrics and gynecology because of the absence of obstetrician-gynecologist specialty-specific requirements and functions. The Certification Commission on Health Information Technology is currently the only federally recognized body for certification of electronic medical record systems. As Certification Commission on Health Information Technology expands the certification criteria for electronic medical records, the special requirements identified in this report will be used as a framework for developing obstetrician-gynecologist specialty-specific criteria to be incorporated into the Certification Commission on Health Information Technology endorsement for electronic medical records used by obstetrician-gynecologists.

  13. Electronic Record Systems and Individual Privacy. Federal Government Information Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report considers the privacy issues raised by the growth of the new technology being applied to the personal information collected, maintained, and disseminated by the Federal Government. Four major areas are addressed: (1) technological developments relevant to government record systems; (2) current and prospective Federal agency use of…

  14. Sharing electronic medical records across multiple heterogeneous and competing institutions.

    PubMed Central

    Kohane, I. S.; van Wingerde, F. J.; Fackler, J. C.; Cimino, C.; Kilbridge, P.; Murphy, S.; Chueh, H.; Rind, D.; Safran, C.; Barnett, O.; Szolovits, P.

    1996-01-01

    Most early reports of implemented World-Wide Web (W3) medical record systems describe single institution architectures. We describe W3-EMRS, a multi-institutional architecture, and its implementation. Thorny problems in data sharing underlined by the W3-EMRS project are reviewed. PMID:8947738

  15. Randomised trial comparing the recording ability of a novel, electronic emergency documentation system with the AHA paper cardiac arrest record.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Eliot; Palmer, Andrew; Grigg, Jeffrey; Oppenheimer, Peter; Wu, Tim; Roesler, Axel; Nair, Bala; Ross, Brian

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the ability of an electronic system created at the University of Washington to accurately document prerecorded VF and pulseless electrical activity (PEA) cardiac arrest scenarios compared with the American Heart Association paper cardiac arrest record. 16 anaesthesiology residents were randomly assigned to view one of two prerecorded, simulated VF and PEA scenarios and asked to document the event with either the paper or electronic system. Each subject then repeated the process with the other video and documentation method. Five types of documentation errors were defined: (1) omission, (2) specification, (3) timing, (4) commission and (5) noise. The mean difference in errors between the paper and electronic methods was analysed using a single factor repeated measures ANOVA model. Compared with paper records, the electronic system omitted 6.3 fewer events (95% CI -10.1 to -2.5, p=0.003), which represents a 28% reduction in omission errors. Users recorded 2.9 fewer noise items (95% CI -5.3 to -0.6, p=0.003) when compared with paper, representing a 36% decrease in redundant or irrelevant information. The rate of timing (Δ=-3.2, 95% CI -9.3 to 3.0, p=0.286) and commission (Δ=-4.4, 95% CI -9.4 to 0.5, p=0.075) errors were similar between the electronic system and paper, while the rate of specification errors were about a third lower for the electronic system when compared with the paper record (Δ=-3.2, 95% CI -6.3 to -0.2, p=0.037). Compared with paper documentation, documentation with the electronic system captured 24% more critical information during a simulated medical emergency without loss in data quality. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Security and confidentiality in an electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Olson, L A; Peters, S G; Stewart, J B

    1998-01-01

    The maintenance of privacy and confidentially must remain a core principle of the interaction between patients and medical staff. Traditionally, the single paper copy of the medical history has been treated with systematic handling, careful tracking, and respect for the integrity and confidentiality of the contents. The widespread availability of computerized information requires that these principles be maintained in the electronic environment. Security measures should protect sensitive data without hindering medical practice. At Mayo, we have established data security policies and standards for the handling of all electronic information. Dissemination and communication of these standards and guidelines are an ongoing challenge. Technical maneuvers can be employed to protect data integrity, identify users, and monitor compliance. Personnel policies must be updated to reflect the responsibilities and liabilities of the electronic environment. Practice efficiencies and access to clinical data must be balanced by individual responsibility and accountability for privileged patient information.

  17. "Catching" Social Bias.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Allison L; Meltzoff, Andrew N; Olson, Kristina R

    2017-02-01

    Identifying the origins of social bias is critical to devising strategies to overcome prejudice. In two experiments, we tested the hypothesis that young children can catch novel social biases from brief exposure to biased nonverbal signals demonstrated by adults. Our results are consistent with this hypothesis. In Experiment 1, we found that children who were exposed to a brief video depicting nonverbal bias in favor of one individual over another subsequently explicitly preferred, and were more prone to behave prosocially toward, the target of positive nonverbal signals. Moreover, in Experiment 2, preschoolers generalized such bias to other individuals. The spread of bias observed in these experiments lays a critical foundation for understanding the way that social biases may develop and spread early in childhood.

  18. Validity of electronic diet recording nutrient estimates compared to dietitian analysis of diet records: A randomized controlled trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Dietary intake assessment with diet records (DR) is a standard research and practice tool in nutrition. Manual entry and analysis of DR is time-consuming and expensive. New electronic tools for diet entry by clients and research participants may reduce the cost and effort of nutrient int...

  19. Correction of electronic record for weighing bucket precipitation gauge measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electronic sensors generate valuable streams of forcing and validation data for hydrologic models, but are often subject to noise, which must be removed as part of model input and testing database development. We developed Automated Precipitation Correction Program (APCP) for weighting bucket preci...

  20. Cutaneous Recording and Stimulation of Muscles Using Organic Electronic Textiles.

    PubMed

    Papaiordanidou, Maria; Takamatsu, Seiichi; Rezaei-Mazinani, Shahab; Lonjaret, Thomas; Martin, Alain; Ismailova, Esma

    2016-08-01

    Electronic textiles are an emerging field providing novel and non-intrusive solutions for healthcare. Conducting polymer-coated textiles enable a new generation of fully organic surface electrodes for electrophysiological evaluations. Textile electrodes are able to assess high quality muscular monitoring and to perform transcutaneous electrical stimulation.

  1. Record High Power Terahertz Radiation from Relativistic Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    G.L. Carr; Michael C. Martin; Wayne R. McKinney; Kevin Jordan; George R. Neil; Gwyn P. Williams

    2002-03-01

    Calculations and measurements confirm the production of coherent broadband THz radiation from relativistic electrons with an average power of nearly 20 watts. The radiation has qualities closely analogous to the THz radiation produced by ultrafast laser techniques (spatially coherent, short duration pulses with transform-limited spectral content). But in contrast to conventional THz radiation, the intensity is many orders of magnitude greater due to a relativistic enhancement. The absorption and dispersive properties of materials in this spectral range provide contrast for a unique type of imaging [1,2]. The striking improvement in power reported here could revolutionize this application by allowing full-field, real-time image capture. High peak and average power THz sources are also critical in driving new non-linear phenomena with excellent signal to noise, and for pump-probe studies of dynamical properties of novel materials, both of which are central to future high-speed electronic devices [3,4]. It should also be useful for studies of molecular vibrations and rotations, low frequency protein motions, phonons, superconductor bandgaps, electronic scattering and collective electronic excitations (e.g., charge density waves).

  2. Hot electron pump: a plasmonic rectifying antenna (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanik, Ahmet A.; Hossain, Golam I.

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have been widely explored to improve absorption efficiency of conventional solar cells, either by employing them as a light scatterer, or as a source of local field enhancement. Unavoidable ohmic loss associated with the plasmonic metal nanostructures in visible spectrum, limits the efficiency improvement of photovoltaic devices by employing this local photon density of states (LDOS) engineering approach. Instead of using plasmonic structures as efficiency improving layer, recently, there has been a growing interest in exploring plasmoinc nanoparticle as the active medium for photovoltaic device. By extracting hot electrons that are created in metallic nanoparticles in a non-radiative Landau decay of surface plasmons, many novel plasmonic photovoltaic devices have been proposed. Moreover, these hot electrons in metal nanoparticles promises high efficiency with a spectral response that is not limited by the band gap of the semiconductors (active material of conventional solar cell). In this work, we will show a novel photovoltaic configuration of plasmonic nanoparticle that acts as an antenna by capturing free space ultrahigh frequency electromagnetic wave and rectify them through an ultrafast hot electron pump and eventually inject DC current in the contact of the device. We will introduce a bottom-up quantum mechanical approach model to explain fundamental physical processes involved in this hot electron pump rectifying antenna and it's ultrafast dynamics. Our model is based on non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, a robust theoretical framework to investigate transport and design nanoscale electronic devices. We will demonstrate some fundamental limitations that go the very foundations of quantum mechanics.

  3. MEDRIS: The Problem Oriented Electronic Medical Record in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Rifat, Sami F.; Robert, Shanthi; Trace, David; Prakash, Sanjeev; Naeymi-Rad, Frank; Barnett, David; Pannicia, Gregory; Hammergren, David; Carmony, Lowell; Evens, Martha

    1990-01-01

    MEDRIS (The Medical Record Interface System) is an object oriented HyperCard interface designed to help physicians enter patient information as comfortably and naturally as possible. It can function as a stand alone system producing its own reports or serve as an interface to a medical expert system (e.g., MEDAS). MEDRIS plays an important role in the clinical education of medical students at the Chicago Medical School. MEDRIS portrays an intuitive, graphically oriented system that will provide a learning environment for the problem oriented medical record (POMR) that forms the basis of the structure of the history and physical exam. The enthusiasm shown by the medical students for this project has garnered support for including MEDRIS in the curriculum of the Introduction to Clinical Medicine course this semester. MEDRIS, developed using HyperCard, can be used as a tool not only for teaching POMR and physical diagnosis, but also computer literacy.

  4. Fine-Grained Access Control for Electronic Health Record Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, Pham Thi Bach; Wohlgemuth, Sven; Echizen, Isao; Thuy, Dong Thi Bich; Thuc, Nguyen Dinh

    There needs to be a strategy for securing the privacy of patients when exchanging health records between various entities over the Internet. Despite the fact that health care providers such as Google Health and Microsoft Corp.'s Health Vault comply with the U.S Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the privacy of patients is still at risk. Several encryption schemes and access control mechanisms have been suggested to protect the disclosure of a patient's health record especially from unauthorized entities. However, by implementing these approaches, data owners are not capable of controlling and protecting the disclosure of the individual sensitive attributes of their health records. This raises the need to adopt a secure mechanism to protect personal information against unauthorized disclosure. Therefore, we propose a new Fine-grained Access Control (FGAC) mechanism that is based on subkeys, which would allow a data owner to further control the access to his data at the column-level. We also propose a new mechanism to efficiently reduce the number of keys maintained by a data owner in cases when the users have different access privileges to different columns of the data being shared.

  5. Use of the electronic medical record for trauma resuscitations: how does this impact documentation completeness?

    PubMed

    Bilyeu, Pam; Eastes, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Although many trauma centers across the country have implemented electronic medical records (EMRs) for inpatient documentation, they have avoided the use of EMR during the fast-paced trauma resuscitations. The objective of this study was to determine whether documenting electronically during trauma resuscitations has resulted in improvement or degradation of the completeness of data recorded. Forty critical data points were evaluated in 100 pre-EMR charts and 100 post-EMR charts. There was improvement in completeness of charting in 25% of the electronic records reviewed and degradation of completeness of charting in 18% of the records, for a net improvement in completeness of charting of 7% in the electronic records reviewed.

  6. The introduction of electronic records into the community public health workforce.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Sara

    2013-07-01

    The UK government is committed to the introduction of electronic health records and has announced an intention for a 'paper-free' NHS by 2018. This has particular implications for the specialist community public health nurse (SCPHN) workforce, mainly due to staff members' general lack of experience with information technology (IT). There are further potential issues arising from the use of skill mix staff within teams and their role in record keeping and governance. This article advocates the use of practice teachers as change agents and educational theory to empower and support the workforce during the introduction of electronic records. Robust information governance and record-keeping policies are essential in driving the introduction of electronic records successfully. Clinical supervision is a suitable arena to support, and obtain feedback from the workforce before, during and after change, to ensure quality and governance are at the forefront of practice. To support a transition from paper to electronic health records, it is essential to view resistance as a predictable phenomenon and to learn from other areas that have already introduced electronic records successfully. It is recommended that the workforce's IT skills and learning styles are assessed before the development of training programmes for electronic records. This information can then be used to establish the appropriate educational approach.

  7. The use of focused electronic medical record forms to improve health-care outcomes.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Bryan D; Katz, Robert D; Pascarella, Eugene M

    2011-01-01

    We tested the use of specifically designed electronic medical record forms, thereby demonstrating the ability to electronically capture, report, and compare clinical data. To that end, podiatric physicians can determine what constitutes the most effective program or treatment for specific conditions by documenting their treatment outcomes. A prospective case series was initiated to determine the value of using focused electronic medical record forms to track walking programs in the practices of podiatric physicians. Three patients were observed for 48 weeks using focused electronic medical record forms to input data (body mass index, cholesterol level, hemoglobin A(1c) level, blood pressure, and other vital information). Patients were given pedometers so that they could log their mileage and their podiatric physicians could enter it into the medical record. Information was collected using an electronic medical record system with the ability to link multiple templates together and assign logic to create flexible entry completion requirements. The clinical data generated are captured in a common database, where the data offer future opportunity to compare statistics among a multitude of practices in various demographic regions. Focused electronic medical record forms were effectively used to track improvements and overall health benefits in a walking program supervised by podiatric physicians. Valuable information can be ascertained with focused electronic medical record forms to help determine treatment effectiveness. This information can later be compared with practices across many different demographics to ascertain the best evidence-based practice.

  8. Electronic health records and cardiac implantable electronic devices: new paradigms and efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Slotwiner, David J

    2016-10-01

    The anticipated advantages of electronic health records (EHRs)-improved efficiency and the ability to share information across the healthcare enterprise-have so far failed to materialize. There is growing recognition that interoperability holds the key to unlocking the greatest value of EHRs. Health information technology (HIT) systems including EHRs must be able to share data and be able to interpret the shared data. This requires a controlled vocabulary with explicit definitions (data elements) as well as protocols to communicate the context in which each data element is being used (syntactic structure). Cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) provide a clear example of the challenges faced by clinicians when data is not interoperable. The proprietary data formats created by each CIED manufacturer, as well as the multiple sources of data generated by CIEDs (hospital, office, remote monitoring, acute care setting), make it challenging to aggregate even a single patient's data into an EHR. The Heart Rhythm Society and CIED manufacturers have collaborated to develop and implement international standard-based specifications for interoperability that provide an end-to-end solution, enabling structured data to be communicated from CIED to a report generation system, EHR, research database, referring physician, registry, patient portal, and beyond. EHR and other health information technology vendors have been slow to implement these tools, in large part, because there have been no financial incentives for them to do so. It is incumbent upon us, as clinicians, to insist that the tools of interoperability be a prerequisite for the purchase of any and all health information technology systems.

  9. Record Low NEP in the Hot-Electron Titanium Nanobolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; Olaya, David; Wei, Jian; Pereverzev, Sergey; Gershenson, Michael E.; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; McGrath, William R.; Sergeev, Andrei V.

    2006-01-01

    We are developing hot-electron superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) capable of counting THz photons and operating at T = 0.3K. We fabricated superconducting Ti nanosensors with Nb contacts with a volume of approx. 3x10(exp -3) cu microns on planar Si substrate and have measured the thermal conductance due to the weak electron-phonon coupling in the material G = 4x10(exp -14) W/K at 0.3 K. The corresponding phonon-noise NEP = 3x10(exp -19) W/Hz(sup 1/2). Detection of single optical photons (1550nm and 670nm wavelength) has been demonstrated for larger devices and yielded the thermal time constants of 30 microsec at 145 mK and of 25 microsec at 190 mK. This Hot-Electron Direct Detector (HEDD) is expected to have a sufficient energy resolution for detecting individual photons with (nu) > 1 THz where NEP approx. 3x10(exp -20) W/Hz(sup 1/2) is needed for spectroscopy in space.

  10. "Catch a Star !"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    ESO and EAAE Launch Web-based Educational Programme for Europe's Schools Catch a star!... and discover all its secrets! This is the full title of an innovative educational project, launched today by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). It welcomes all students in Europe's schools to an exciting web-based programme with a competition. It takes place within the context of the EC-sponsored European Week of Science and Technology (EWST) - 2002 . This unique project revolves around a web-based competition and is centred on astronomy. It is specifically conceived to stimulate the interest of young people in various aspects of this well-known field of science, but will also be of interest to the broad public. What is "Catch a Star!" about? [Go to Catch a Star Website] The programme features useful components from the world of research, but it is specifically tailored to (high-)school students. Younger participants are also welcome. Groups of up to four persons (e.g., three students and one teacher) have to select an astronomical object - a bright star, a distant galaxy, a beautiful comet, a planet or a moon in the solar system, or some other celestial body. Like detectives, they must then endeavour to find as much information as possible about "their" object. This information may be about the position and visibility in the sky, the physical and chemical characteristics, particular historical aspects, related mythology and sky lore, etc. They can use any source available, the web, books, newspaper and magazine articles, CDs etc. for this work. The group members must prepare a (short) summarising report about this investigation and "their" object, with their own ideas and conclusions, and send it to ESO (email address: eduinfo@eso.org). A jury, consisting of specialists from ESO and the EAAE, will carefully evaluate these reports. All projects that are found to fulfill the stipulated requirements, including a

  11. Interactions between finfish aquaculture and lobster catches in a sheltered bay.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Ronald H; Smith, Ruth E; Fisher, E Brian

    2014-11-15

    Interactions between open-net pen finfish aquaculture and lobster catches in a sheltered bay in Nova Scotia, Canada, were investigated using fishermen's participatory research in annual lobster trap surveys over seven years. Fishermen recorded lobster catches during the last two weeks of May from 2007 to 2013. Catches for each trap haul were recorded separately for ovigerous and market-sized lobsters. Catch trends within the bay were compared to regional trends. Results of correlation analyses indicated that ovigerous catch trends were strongly affected by the fish farm's feeding/fallow periods. There was no significant correlation between trends for bay and LFA lobster landings. Patterns of lobster catch per unit effort extending over considerable distance in Port Mouton Bay appear to be influenced by proximity to the fish farm regardless of year-to-year variation in water temperatures and weather conditions. Odours and habitat changes surrounding open-net pen finfish operations are potential factors affecting lobster displacement.

  12. Electronic Surveillance of Testicular Cancer: Understanding Patient Perspectives on Access to Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Groll, Ryan J.; Leonard, Kevin J.; Eakin, Joan; Warde, Padraig; Bender, Jackie; Jewett, Michael A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To understand patient perceptions and attitudes regarding online access to testicular cancer surveillance test results, and to identify factors that may be important in maximizing referencing of electronic medical records (EMRs) by patients for these results. Methods: In this qualitative study, seven focus groups were conducted with a total of 22 patients undergoing surveillance for testicular cancer. Transcript data were analyzed iteratively using combined manual and computerized coding by two independent coders to generate a theoretic framework grounded in the data. Results: Practicality, meaning of information, patient-physician relationship, risk of recurrence, and role of technology were identified as interrelated factors that frame how patients regard potential surveillance technology. The influence of each factor hinged on its relationship with reassurance—the central predominant factor. Additionally, time since start of surveillance seemed to affect the relative importance of all other factors. Conclusion: Prevailing models of technology acceptance understate the complexity of the situation of the patient user and the implications of online access to health information. Surveillance for testicular cancer seems to be a suitable context for patient access to EMR information if patient perspectives are to be understood and considered. Reassurance is the overriding element influencing attitudes. PMID:20856632

  13. Bilateral sound propagation characteristics in electronic TMJ sound recording.

    PubMed

    Yang, K P; Koh, K H; Williams, W J; Widmalm, S E; Djurdjanovic, D

    1999-01-01

    Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) sounds, clicking and crepitation, are important signs of possible TM disorder or dysfunction (TMD). The sound are usually recorded and observed by stethoscope auscultation or palpation. Sound from one TMJ may propagate through head tissues and be recorded on the contra lateral side misleading the examiner to classify both joints as non-silent. Errors in localization of sound source may lead to an erroneous diagnosis. Widmalm et al. (1997) suggested a mathematical model for estimation of the sound propagation characteristics through the head tissues. A modified model applying the auto-spectral density and cross-spectral density of the signal was used to estimate the bilateral sound propagation characteristics of temporomandibular joint sounds from two subjects. The result indicates that the head tissues act as a bandpass filter causing strong attenuation in some frequency areas with little attenuation in others. The phase response of the transfer function provides a good mean to estimate the latency in time between sounds.

  14. Inference of Soil Hydrologic Parameters from Electronic Soil Moisture Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, David G.; Seyfried, Mark S.; McNamara, James P.; Hwang, Kyotaek

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture is an important control on hydrologic function, as it governs vertical fluxes from and to the atmosphere, groundwater recharge and lateral fluxes through the soil. Historically, the traditional model parameters of saturation, field capacity and permanent wilting point have been determined by laboratory methods. This approach is challenged by issues of scale, boundary conditions and soil disturbance. We develop and compare four methods to determine values of field saturation, field capacity, plant extraction limit and initiation of plant water stress from long term in-situ monitoring records of TDR-measured volumetric water content (Q). The monitoring sites represent a range of soil textures, soil depths, effective precipitation and plant cover types in a semi-arid climate. The Q records exhibit attractors (high frequency values) that correspond to field capacity and the plant extraction limit at both annual and longer time scales, but the field saturation values vary by year depending on seasonal wetness in the semi-arid setting. The analysis for five sites in two watersheds is supported by comparison to values determined by a common pedotransfer function and measured soil characteristic curves. Frozen soil is identified as a complicating factor for the analysis and users are cautioned to filter data by temperature, especially for near surface soils.

  15. Two-dimensional material electronics and photonics (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenjuan

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials has attracted intense interest in research in recent years. As compared to their bulk counterparts, these 2D materials have many unique properties due to their reduced dimensionality and symmetry. A key difference is the band structures, which lead to distinct electronic and photonic properties. The 2D nature of the materials also plays an important role in defining their exceptional properties of mechanical strength, surface sensitivity, thermal conductivity, tunable band-gap and interaction with light. These unique properties of 2D materials open up broad territories of applications in computing, communication, energy, and medicine. In this talk, I will present our work on understanding the electrical properties of graphene and MoS2, in particular current transport and band-gap engineering in graphene, interface between gate dielectrics and graphene, and gap states in MoS2. I will also present our work on the nano-scale electronic devices (RF and logic devices) and photonic devices (plasmonic devices and photo-detectors) based on graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides.

  16. Electronic Medical Record and Quality Ratings of Long Term Care Facilities Long-Term Care Facility Characteristics and Reasons and Barriers for Adoption of Electronic Medical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Cheryl Andrea

    2013-01-01

    With the growing elderly population, compounded by the retirement of the babyboomers, the need for long-term care (LTC) facilities is expected to grow. An area of great concern for those that are seeking a home for their family member is the quality of care provided by the nursing home to the residents. Electronic medical records (EMR) are often…

  17. Electronic Medical Record and Quality Ratings of Long Term Care Facilities Long-Term Care Facility Characteristics and Reasons and Barriers for Adoption of Electronic Medical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Cheryl Andrea

    2013-01-01

    With the growing elderly population, compounded by the retirement of the babyboomers, the need for long-term care (LTC) facilities is expected to grow. An area of great concern for those that are seeking a home for their family member is the quality of care provided by the nursing home to the residents. Electronic medical records (EMR) are often…

  18. Electronic personal maternity records: Both web and smartphone services.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Wei; Ma, Tien-Yan; Choi, Mei-San; Hsu, Yu-Yun; Tsai, Yi-Jing; Hou, Ting-Wei

    2015-08-01

    This study develops an antenatal care information system to assist women during pregnancy. We designed and implemented the system as both a web-based service and a multi-platform application for smartphones and tablets. The proposed system has three novel features: (1) web-based maternity records, which contains concise explanations of various antenatal screening and diagnostic tests; (2) self-care journals, which allow pregnant women to keep track of their gestational weight gains, blood pressure, fetal movements, and contractions; and (3) health education, which automatically presents detailed information on antenatal care and other pregnancy-related knowledge according to the women's gestational age. A survey was conducted among pregnant women to evaluate the usability and acceptance of the proposed system. In order to prove that the antenatal care was effective, clinical outcomes should be provided and the results are focused on a usability evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 36 CFR 1235.44 - What general transfer requirements apply to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Electronic/Special Media Records Services Division (NWME), 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740, phone... Services Division (NWCS) for digital photographs, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740, phone...

  20. 36 CFR 1235.44 - What general transfer requirements apply to electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Electronic/Special Media Records Services Division (NWME), 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740, phone... Services Division (NWCS) for digital photographs, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740, phone...

  1. Requirements for prototyping an educational electronic health record: experiences and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth; Kuo, Mu-Hsing; Parapini, Eric; Wang, Shu Lin; Ho, Kendall

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health records and related technologies are being increasingly deployed throughout the world. It is expected that upon graduation health professionals will be able to use these technologies in effective and efficient ways. However, educating health professional students about such technologies has lagged behind. There is a need for software that will allow medical, nursing and health informatics students access to this important software to learn how it works and how to use it effectively. Furthermore, electronic health record educational software that is accessed should provide a range of functions including allowing instructors to build patient cases. Such software should also allow for simulation of a course of a patient's stay and the ability to allow instructors to monitor student use of electronic health records. In this paper we describe our work in developing the requirements for an educational electronic health record to support education about this important technology. We also describe a prototype system being developed based on the requirements gathered.

  2. 29 CFR 2520.107-1 - Use of electronic media for maintenance and retention of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... program evidenced by regular evaluations of the electronic recordkeeping system including periodic checks... duplicate or substitute record under the terms of the plan and applicable federal or state law. ...

  3. 29 CFR 2520.107-1 - Use of electronic media for maintenance and retention of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... program evidenced by regular evaluations of the electronic recordkeeping system including periodic checks... duplicate or substitute record under the terms of the plan and applicable federal or state law. ...

  4. 29 CFR 2520.107-1 - Use of electronic media for maintenance and retention of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... program evidenced by regular evaluations of the electronic recordkeeping system including periodic checks... duplicate or substitute record under the terms of the plan and applicable federal or state law. ...

  5. Electronic health records: Is it a risk worth taking in healthcare delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Vera Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    The electronic health record represents a major change in healthcare delivery, either for health professionals and health institutions, either for patients. In this essay we will mainly focus on its consequences regarding patient safety and medical liability. In this particular domain the electronic health record has dual effects: on one side prevents medical errors and, in this sense, promotes patient safety and protects the doctor from lawsuits; but, on the other side, when not used properly, it may also generate other kind of errors, potentially threatening patient safety and, therefore, increasing the risk of juridical liability for the physician. This paper intends to underline the main human errors, technologic mistakes and medical faults that may occur while using the electronic health record and the ways to overcome them, also explaining how the electronic health record may be used in court during a judicial proceeding. PMID:26693253

  6. An Enterprise Architecture Perspective to Electronic Health Record Based Care Governance.

    PubMed

    Motoc, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an Enterprise Architecture viewpoint of Electronic Health Record (EHR) based care governance. The improvements expected are derived from the collaboration framework and the clinical health model proposed as foundation for the concept of EHR.

  7. Positive beliefs and privacy concerns shape the future for the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Lehnbom, E C; Douglas, H E; Makeham, M A B

    2016-01-01

    The uptake of the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR) has been slowly building momentum in Australia. The purpose of the PCEHR is to collect clinically important information from multiple healthcare providers to provide a secure electronic record to patients and their authorised healthcare providers that will ultimately enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare delivery. Reasons for the slow uptake of the PCEHR and future directions to improve its usefulness is discussed later.

  8. Electronic health record project initiation and early planning in a community health center.

    PubMed

    Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall; Noblin, Alice; Martin, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Community health centers exist to help their constituents become proactive in addressing their own health care needs and to improve the overall well-being of the community. However, they pose a different set of challenges when implementing an electronic health record system. This article applies 2 project management principles, initiation and early planning, to the electronic health record implementation in a community health center. Issues such as planning, financial considerations, and quality improvement are discussed.

  9. Estimating historical eastern North Pacific blue whale catches using spatial calling patterns.

    PubMed

    Monnahan, Cole C; Branch, Trevor A; Stafford, Kathleen M; Ivashchenko, Yulia V; Oleson, Erin M

    2014-01-01

    Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were exploited extensively around the world and remain endangered. In the North Pacific their population structure is unclear and current status unknown, with the exception of a well-studied eastern North Pacific (ENP) population. Despite existing abundance estimates for the ENP population, it is difficult to estimate pre-exploitation abundance levels and gauge their recovery because historical catches of the ENP population are difficult to separate from catches of other populations in the North Pacific. We collated previously unreported Soviet catches and combined these with known catches to form the most current estimates of North Pacific blue whale catches. We split these conflated catches using recorded acoustic calls from throughout the North Pacific, the knowledge that the ENP population produces a different call than blue whales in the western North Pacific (WNP). The catches were split by estimating spatiotemporal occurrence of blue whales with generalized additive models fitted to acoustic call patterns, which predict the probability a catch belonged to the ENP population based on the proportion of calls of each population recorded by latitude, longitude, and month. When applied to the conflated historical catches, which totaled 9,773, we estimate that ENP blue whale catches totaled 3,411 (95% range 2,593 to 4,114) from 1905-1971, and amounted to 35% (95% range 27% to 42%) of all catches in the North Pacific. Thus most catches in the North Pacific were for WNP blue whales, totaling 6,362 (95% range 5,659 to 7,180). The uncertainty in the acoustic data influence the results substantially more than uncertainty in catch locations and dates, but the results are fairly insensitive to the ecological assumptions made in the analysis. The results of this study provide information for future studies investigating the recovery of these populations and the impact of continuing and future sources of anthropogenic mortality.

  10. Estimating Historical Eastern North Pacific Blue Whale Catches Using Spatial Calling Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Monnahan, Cole C.; Branch, Trevor A.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Ivashchenko, Yulia V.; Oleson, Erin M.

    2014-01-01

    Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were exploited extensively around the world and remain endangered. In the North Pacific their population structure is unclear and current status unknown, with the exception of a well-studied eastern North Pacific (ENP) population. Despite existing abundance estimates for the ENP population, it is difficult to estimate pre-exploitation abundance levels and gauge their recovery because historical catches of the ENP population are difficult to separate from catches of other populations in the North Pacific. We collated previously unreported Soviet catches and combined these with known catches to form the most current estimates of North Pacific blue whale catches. We split these conflated catches using recorded acoustic calls from throughout the North Pacific, the knowledge that the ENP population produces a different call than blue whales in the western North Pacific (WNP). The catches were split by estimating spatiotemporal occurrence of blue whales with generalized additive models fitted to acoustic call patterns, which predict the probability a catch belonged to the ENP population based on the proportion of calls of each population recorded by latitude, longitude, and month. When applied to the conflated historical catches, which totaled 9,773, we estimate that ENP blue whale catches totaled 3,411 (95% range 2,593 to 4,114) from 1905–1971, and amounted to 35% (95% range 27% to 42%) of all catches in the North Pacific. Thus most catches in the North Pacific were for WNP blue whales, totaling 6,362 (95% range 5,659 to 7,180). The uncertainty in the acoustic data influence the results substantially more than uncertainty in catch locations and dates, but the results are fairly insensitive to the ecological assumptions made in the analysis. The results of this study provide information for future studies investigating the recovery of these populations and the impact of continuing and future sources of anthropogenic mortality. PMID

  11. Where should electronic records for patients be stored?

    PubMed

    Lapsia, Vijay; Lamb, Kenneth; Yasnoff, William A

    2012-12-01

    The importance of a nationwide health information infrastructure (NHII) is widely recognized. Patient data may be stored where it happens to be created (the distributed or institution-centric model) or in one place for a given patient (the centralized or patient-centric model). Minimal data is available regarding the performance implications of these alternative architectural choices. To help identify the architecture best suited for efficient and complete nationwide health information exchange based on the large-scale operational characteristics of these architectures. We used simulation to study the impact of health care record (data) fragmentation and probability of encounter on transaction volume and data retrieval failure rate as markers of performance for each of the above architectures. Data fragmentation and the probability of encounter directly correlate with transaction volume and are significantly higher for the distributed model when the number of data nodes >4 (p<0.0001). The number of data retrieval failures increases in proportion to fragmentation and is significantly higher for the distributed model when the number of data nodes ≥2 (p<0.0059). In simulation studies, the distributed model scaled poorly in terms of data availability and integrity with a higher failure rate when compared to the centralized model of data storage. Choice of architecture may have implications on the efficiency, usability, and effectiveness of the NHII at the point of care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of electronic laboratory reports, administrative claims, and electronic health record data for acute viral hepatitis surveillance.

    PubMed

    Allen-Dicker, Joshua; Klompas, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Public health surveillance systems for acute hepatitis are limited: clinician reporting is insensitive and electronic laboratory reporting is nonspecific. Insurance claims and electronic health records are potential alternative sources. To compare the utility of laboratory data, diagnosis codes, and electronic health record combination data (current and prior viral hepatitis studies, liver function tests, and diagnosis codes) for acute hepatitis A and B surveillance. Retrospective chart review. Massachusetts ambulatory practice serving 350 000 patients per year. All patients seen between 1990 and 2008. Sensitivity and positive predictive value of immunoglobulin M (IgM), International Classification of Disease-Ninth Revision (ICD-9) diagnosis codes, and combination electronic health record data for acute hepatitis A and B. During the study period, there were 111 patients with positive hepatitis A IgMs, 154 with acute hepatitis A ICD-9 codes, and 77 with positive IgM and elevated liver function tests. On review, 79 cases were confirmed. Sensitivity and positive predictive value were 100% and 71% (95% confidence interval, 62%-79%) for IgM, 94% (92%-100%) and 48% (40%-56%) for ICD-9 codes and 97% (92%-100%) and 100% (96%-100%) for combination electronic health record data. There were 14 patients with positive hepatitis B core IgMs, 2564 with acute hepatitis B ICD-9 codes, and 125 with suggestive combinations of electronic health record data. Acute hepatitis B was confirmed in 122 patients. Sensitivity and positive predictive value were 9.4% (5.2%-16%) and 86% (60%-98%) for hepatitis B core IgM, 73% (65%-80%) and 3.6% (2.9%-4.4%) for ICD-9 codes, and 96% (91%-99%) and 98% (94%-99%) for electronic health record data. Laboratory surveillance using IgM tests overestimates the burden of acute hepatitis A and underestimates the burden of acute hepatitis B. Claims data are subject to many false positives. Electronic health record data are both sensitive and predictive

  13. Use of Electronic Health Records by Nurses for Symptom Management in Inpatient Settings: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ozkaynak, Mustafa; Reeder, Blaine; Hoffecker, Lilian; Makic, Mary Beth; Sousa, Karen

    2017-09-01

    Symptom management is one of the essential functions of nurses in inpatient settings; yet, little is understood about the manner in which nurses use electronic health records for symptom documentation. Therefore, the purpose of this systematic review is to characterize nurses' use of electronic health records for documentation of symptom assessment and management in inpatient settings, to inform design studies that better support electronic health records for patient symptom management by nurses. We searched the Ovid Medline (1946-current), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (EBSCO, 1981-current), and Excerpta Medica Database (Embase.com, 1974-current) databases from inception through May 2015 using multiple subject headings and "free text" key words, representing the concepts of electronic medical records, symptom documentation, and inpatient setting. One thousand nine hundred eighty-two articles were returned from the search. Eighteen publications from the years 2003 to 2014 were included after abstract and full text review. Studies heavily focused on a pain as symptom. Nurses face challenges when using electronic health records that can threaten quality and safety of care. Clinical, design, and administrative recommendations were identified to overcome the challenges of nurses' electronic health record use. A call for interdisciplinary, comprehensive, systematic interventions and user-centered design of information systems is needed.

  14. Stakeholder engagement: a key component of integrating genomic information into electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Hartzler, Andrea; McCarty, Catherine A.; Rasmussen, Luke V.; Williams, Marc S.; Brilliant, Murray; Bowton, Erica A.; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Faucett, William A.; Ferryman, Kadija; Field, Julie R.; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Horowitz, Carol R.; Koenig, Barbara A.; McCormick, Jennifer B.; Ralston, James D.; Sanderson, Saskia C.; Smith, Maureen E.; Trinidad, Susan Brown

    2014-01-01

    Integrating genomic information into clinical care and the electronic health record can facilitate personalized medicine through genetically guided clinical decision support. Stakeholder involvement is critical to the success of these implementation efforts. Prior work on implementation of clinical information systems provides broad guidance to inform effective engagement strategies. We add to this evidence-based recommendations that are specific to issues at the intersection of genomics and the electronic health record. We describe stakeholder engagement strategies employed by the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network, a national consortium of US research institutions funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute to develop, disseminate, and apply approaches that combine genomic and electronic health record data. Through select examples drawn from sites of the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network, we illustrate a continuum of engagement strategies to inform genomic integration into commercial and homegrown electronic health records across a range of health-care settings. We frame engagement as activities to consult, involve, and partner with key stakeholder groups throughout specific phases of health information technology implementation. Our aim is to provide insights into engagement strategies to guide genomic integration based on our unique network experiences and lessons learned within the broader context of implementation research in biomedical informatics. On the basis of our collective experience, we describe key stakeholder practices, challenges, and considerations for successful genomic integration to support personalized medicine. PMID:24030437

  15. Nurse's use of power to standardise nursing terminology in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Ali, Samira; Sieloff, Christina L

    2017-07-01

    To describe nurses' use of power to influence the incorporation of standardised nursing terminology within electronic health records. Little is known about nurses' potential use of power to influence the incorporation of standardised nursing terminology within electronic health records. The theory of group power within organisations informed the design of the descriptive, cross-sectional study used a survey method to assess nurses' use of power to influence the incorporation of standardised nursing terminology within electronic health records. The Sieloff-King Assessment of Group Power within Organizations(©) and Nursing Power Scale was used. A total of 232 nurses responded to the survey. The mean power capability score was moderately high at 134.22 (SD 18.49), suggesting that nurses could use power to achieve the incorporation of standardised nursing terminology within electronic health records. The nurses' power capacity was significantly correlated with their power capability (r = 0.96, P < 0.001). Nurses may use power to achieve their goals, such as the incorporation of standardised nursing terminology within electronic health records. Nurse administrators may use their power to influence the incorporation of standardised nursing terminology within electronic health records. If nurses lack power, this could decrease nurses' ability to achieve their goals and contribute to the achievement of effective patient outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Selecting Information in Electronic Health Records for Knowledge Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Chase, Herbert; Markatou, Marianthi; Hripcsak, George; Friedman, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge acquisition of relations between biomedical entities is critical for many automated biomedical applications, including pharmacovigilance and decision support. Automated acquisition of statistical associations from biomedical and clinical documents has shown some promise. However, acquisition of clinically meaningful relations (i.e. specific associations) remains challenging because textual information is noisy and co-occurrence does not typically determine specific relations. In this work, we focus on acquisition of two types of relations from clinical reports: disease-manifestation related symptom (MRS) and drug-adverse drug event (ADE), and explore the use of filtering by sections of the report to improve performance. Evaluation indicated that applying the filters improved recall (disease-MRS: from 0.85 to 0.90; drug-ADE: from 0.43 to 0.75) and precision (disease-MRS: from 0.82 to 0.92; drug-ADE: from 0.16 to 0.31). This preliminary study demonstrates that selecting information in narrative electronic reports based on the section improves the detection of disease-MRS and drug-ADE types of relations. Further investigation of complementary methods, such as more sophisticated statistical methods, more complex temporal models and use of information from other knowledge sources, is needed. PMID:20362071

  17. Prevalence of Sharing Access Credentials in Electronic Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Hassidim, Ayal; Korach, Tzfania; Shreberk-Hassidim, Rony; Thomaidou, Elena; Uzefovsky, Florina; Ayal, Shahar; Ariely, Dan

    2017-07-01

    Confidentiality of health information is an important aspect of the physician patient relationship. The use of digital medical records has made data much more accessible. To prevent data leakage, many countries have created regulations regarding medical data accessibility. These regulations require a unique user ID for each medical staff member, and this must be protected by a password, which should be kept undisclosed by all means. We performed a four-question Google Forms-based survey of medical staff. In the survey, each participant was asked if he/she ever obtained the password of another medical staff member. Then, we asked how many times such an episode occurred and the reason for it. A total of 299 surveys were gathered. The responses showed that 220 (73.6%) participants reported that they had obtained the password of another medical staff member. Only 171 (57.2%) estimated how many time it happened, with an average estimation of 4.75 episodes. All the residents that took part in the study (45, 15%) had obtained the password of another medical staff member, while only 57.5% (38/66) of the nurses reported this. The use of unique user IDs and passwords to defend the privacy of medical data is a common requirement in medical organizations. Unfortunately, the use of passwords is doomed because medical staff members share their passwords with one another. Strict regulations requiring each staff member to have it's a unique user ID might lead to password sharing and to a decrease in data safety.

  18. A new vision for maternity records in Scotland: the Scottish Woman-Held Maternity Record (SWHMR) project and the electronic Scottish Woman-Held Maternity Record (eSWHMR) project.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Helen; Chalmers, Jim

    2003-06-01

    This article outlines current developments in maternity records in Scotland. It describes the impetus for a unified woman-held paper maternity record and a complementary electronic record. Details of both these ongoing projects are provided.

  19. Urban Alabama Physicians and the Electronic Medical Record: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiggle, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The electronic medical record (EMR) is an information technology tool supporting the examination, treatment, and care of a patient. The EMR allows physicians to view a patient's record showing current medications, a history of visits from health care providers with notes from those visits, a problem list, a functional status assessment, a schedule…

  20. 49 CFR 395.16 - Electronic on-board recording devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 395.16 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR... to use. This section applies to electronic on-board recording devices (EOBRs) used to record the driver's hours of service as specified by part 395. Motor carriers subject to a remedial directive...

  1. New Optical Card for Sneaker’s Network in Place of Electronic Clinical Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kenya; Satsukawa, Takatoshi; Chiba, Seisho; Ohmori, Takaaki

    2006-02-01

    In order to solve problems in electronic medical records, a new optical card of the digital versatile disk (DVD) type with higher capacity and lower cost than conventional compact disc recording (CD-R)-type cards has been developed, which is thinner, stronger and wearable like a credit card.

  2. Urban Alabama Physicians and the Electronic Medical Record: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiggle, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The electronic medical record (EMR) is an information technology tool supporting the examination, treatment, and care of a patient. The EMR allows physicians to view a patient's record showing current medications, a history of visits from health care providers with notes from those visits, a problem list, a functional status assessment, a schedule…

  3. Nurses' Perceptions of Nursing Care Documentation in the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Tracey A.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) will soon become the standard for documenting nursing care. The EHR holds the promise of rapid access to complete records of a patient's encounter with the healthcare system. It is the expectation that healthcare providers input essential data that communicates important patient information to support quality…

  4. Nurses' Perceptions of Nursing Care Documentation in the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Tracey A.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) will soon become the standard for documenting nursing care. The EHR holds the promise of rapid access to complete records of a patient's encounter with the healthcare system. It is the expectation that healthcare providers input essential data that communicates important patient information to support quality…

  5. The Centers For Medicare And Medicaid Services Electronic Health Records for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Brett

    2012-06-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Electronic Health Records (EHR) incentive program for hospitals is described with respect to the requirements to receive the incentive payments, how to calculate the amount, and the pertinent time frames. Comparisons between the CMS EHR and Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) are presented. The hallmarks of successful computerized health records are reviewed.

  6. Doctors' use of electronic medical records systems in hospitals: cross sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Lærum, Hallvard; Ellingsen, Gunnar; Faxvaag, Arild

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To compare the use of three electronic medical records systems by doctors in Norwegian hospitals for general clinical tasks. Design Cross sectional questionnaire survey. Semistructured telephone interviews with key staff in information technology in each hospital for details of local implementation of the systems. Setting 32 hospital units in 19 Norwegian hospitals with electronic medical records systems. Participants 227 (72%) of 314 hospital doctors responded, equally distributed between the three electronic medical records systems. Main outcome measures Proportion of respondents who used the electronic system, calculated for each of 23 tasks; difference in proportions of users of different systems when functionality of systems was similar. Results Most tasks listed in the questionnaire (15/23) were generally covered with implemented functions in the electronic medical records systems. However, the systems were used for only 2-7 of the tasks, mainly associated with reading patient data. Respondents showed significant differences in frequency of use of the different systems for four tasks for which the systems offered equivalent functionality. The respondents scored highly in computer literacy (72.2/100), and computer use showed no correlation with respondents' age, sex, or work position. User satisfaction scores were generally positive (67.2/100), with some difference between the systems. Conclusions Doctors used electronic medical records systems for far fewer tasks than the systems supported. What is already known on this topicElectronic information systems in health care have not undergone systematic evaluation, and few comparisons between electronic medical records systems have been madeGiven the information intensive nature of clinical work, electronic medical records systems should be of help to doctors for most clinical tasksWhat this study addsDoctors in Norwegian hospitals reported a low level of use of all electronic medical records systems

  7. Simulated electronic heterodyne recording and processing of pulsed-laser holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The electronic recording of pulsed-laser holograms is proposed. The polarization sensitivity of each resolution element of the detector is controlled independently to add an arbitrary phase to the image waves. This method which can be used to simulate heterodyne recording and to process three-dimensional optical images, is based on a similar method for heterodyne recording and processing of continuous-wave holograms.

  8. Validity of electronic diet recording nutrient estimates compared to dietitian analysis of diet records: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Raatz, Susan K; Scheett, Angela J; Johnson, LuAnn K; Jahns, Lisa

    2015-01-20

    Dietary intake assessment with diet records (DR) is a standard research and practice tool in nutrition. Manual entry and analysis of DR is time-consuming and expensive. New electronic tools for diet entry by clients and research participants may reduce the cost and effort of nutrient intake estimation. To determine the validity of electronic diet recording, we compared responses to 3-day DR kept by Tap & Track software for the Apple iPod Touch and records kept on the Nutrihand website to DR coded and analyzed by a research dietitian into a customized US Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient analysis program, entitled GRAND (Grand Forks Research Analysis of Nutrient Data). Adult participants (n=19) enrolled in a crossover-designed clinical trial. During each of two washout periods, participants kept a written 3-day DR. In addition, they were randomly assigned to enter their DR in a Web-based dietary analysis program (Nutrihand) or a handheld electronic device (Tap & Track). They completed an additional 3-day DR and the alternate electronic diet recording methods during the second washout. Entries resulted in 228 daily diet records or 12 for each of 19 participants. Means of nutrient intake were calculated for each method. Concordance of the intake estimates were determined by Bland-Altman plots. Coefficients of determination (R(2)) were calculated for each comparison to assess the strength of the linear relationship between methods. No significant differences were observed between the mean nutrient values for energy, carbohydrate, protein, fat, saturated fatty acids, total fiber, or sodium between the recorded DR analyzed in GRAND and either Nutrihand or Tap & Track, or for total sugars comparing GRAND and Tap & Track. Reported values for total sugars were significantly reduced (P<.05) comparing Nutrihand to GRAND. Coefficients of determination (R(2)) for Nutrihand and Tap & Track compared to DR entries into GRAND, respectively, were energy .56, .01

  9. Validity of Electronic Diet Recording Nutrient Estimates Compared to Dietitian Analysis of Diet Records: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Scheett, Angela J; Johnson, LuAnn K; Jahns, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Dietary intake assessment with diet records (DR) is a standard research and practice tool in nutrition. Manual entry and analysis of DR is time-consuming and expensive. New electronic tools for diet entry by clients and research participants may reduce the cost and effort of nutrient intake estimation. Objective To determine the validity of electronic diet recording, we compared responses to 3-day DR kept by Tap & Track software for the Apple iPod Touch and records kept on the Nutrihand website to DR coded and analyzed by a research dietitian into a customized US Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient analysis program, entitled GRAND (Grand Forks Research Analysis of Nutrient Data). Methods Adult participants (n=19) enrolled in a crossover-designed clinical trial. During each of two washout periods, participants kept a written 3-day DR. In addition, they were randomly assigned to enter their DR in a Web-based dietary analysis program (Nutrihand) or a handheld electronic device (Tap & Track). They completed an additional 3-day DR and the alternate electronic diet recording methods during the second washout. Entries resulted in 228 daily diet records or 12 for each of 19 participants. Means of nutrient intake were calculated for each method. Concordance of the intake estimates were determined by Bland-Altman plots. Coefficients of determination (R 2) were calculated for each comparison to assess the strength of the linear relationship between methods. Results No significant differences were observed between the mean nutrient values for energy, carbohydrate, protein, fat, saturated fatty acids, total fiber, or sodium between the recorded DR analyzed in GRAND and either Nutrihand or Tap & Track, or for total sugars comparing GRAND and Tap & Track. Reported values for total sugars were significantly reduced (P<.05) comparing Nutrihand to GRAND. Coefficients of determination (R 2) for Nutrihand and Tap & Track compared to DR entries into GRAND, respectively

  10. Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Jean E; Israelsson, Johan; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Göran I; Bath, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC™ Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety.

  11. The Past and Future of the Electronic Dental Record from the Practitioners' View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neiburger, E. J.; Diehl, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    Future dental practice is seen to include not only the electronic dental record (EDR) but a fully electronic clinical dental documentation package, computer-assisted diagnostic support, and digital imaging. The EDR's development since the 1970s is reviewed. Specific suggestions are made concerning hardware, software, administration, and practical…

  12. Records for Electronic Databases in the Online Catalog at Middle Tennessee State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geckle, Beverly J.; Pozzebon, Mary Ellen; Williams, Jo

    2008-01-01

    This article recounts a project at the Middle Tennessee State University library to include records for electronic databases in the online catalog. Although electronic databases are accessible via the library's Databases A-Z list and related subject guides, cataloging these resources also provides access via the online catalog, allowing more of…

  13. The Past and Future of the Electronic Dental Record from the Practitioners' View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neiburger, E. J.; Diehl, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    Future dental practice is seen to include not only the electronic dental record (EDR) but a fully electronic clinical dental documentation package, computer-assisted diagnostic support, and digital imaging. The EDR's development since the 1970s is reviewed. Specific suggestions are made concerning hardware, software, administration, and practical…

  14. Electronic Systems and Records Management in the Information Age: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Richard J.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a statement of requirements developed by the University of Pittsburgh School of Information Science ensuring the preservation of evidence in electronic form. Although specifically addressing electronic record-keeping systems, the requirements are also applicable to manual or hybrid systems. (PEN)

  15. 77 FR 7562 - Electronic On-Board Recorders and Hours of Service Supporting Documents

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 385, 390, and 395 RIN 2126-AB20 Electronic On... the Electronic On-Board Recorders and Hours of Service Supporting Documents rulemaking (EOBR 2) by... developing material to support this ] rulemaking, including technical specifications for EOBRs and...

  16. Records for Electronic Databases in the Online Catalog at Middle Tennessee State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geckle, Beverly J.; Pozzebon, Mary Ellen; Williams, Jo

    2008-01-01

    This article recounts a project at the Middle Tennessee State University library to include records for electronic databases in the online catalog. Although electronic databases are accessible via the library's Databases A-Z list and related subject guides, cataloging these resources also provides access via the online catalog, allowing more of…

  17. 76 FR 13121 - Electronic On-Board Recorders and Hours of Service Supporting Documents

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 385, 390, and 395 RIN 2126-AB20 Electronic On... requested that FMCSA extend the comment period for the Electronic On-Board Recorder and Hours of Service...

  18. 42 CFR 495.370 - Appeals process for a Medicaid provider receiving electronic health record incentive payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... electronic health record incentive payments. 495.370 Section 495.370 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific to the Medicaid Program § 495.370 Appeals process for a Medicaid provider receiving electronic health record...

  19. Opportunities and challenges in integrating electronic health records into undergraduate medical education: a national survey of clerkship directors.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Maya M; Margo, Katherine; Christner, Jennifer G; Fisher, Jonathan; Fischer, Shira H; Pangaro, Louis N

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have reported on the utilization and the effect of electronic health records on the education of medical students. The purpose of this study was to describe the current use of electronic health records by medical students in the United States and explore the opportunities and challenges of integrating electronic health records into daily teaching of medical students. A survey with 24 questions regarding the use of electronic health records by medical students was developed by the Alliance for Clinical Educators and sent to clerkship directors across the United States. Both quantitative and qualitative responses were collected and analyzed to determine current access to and use of electronic health records by medical students. This study found that an estimated 64% of programs currently allow student use of electronic health records, of which only two thirds allowed students to write notes within the electronic record. Overall, clerkship directors' opinions on the effects of electronic health records on medical student education were neutral, and despite acknowledging many advantages to electronic health records, there were many concerns raised regarding their use in education. Medical students are using electronic health records at higher rates than physicians in practice. Although this is overall reassuring, educators have to be cautious about the limitations being placed on student's documentation in electronic health records as this can potentially have consequences on their training, and they need to explore ways to maximize the benefits of electronic health records in medical education.

  20. Electronic health record tools' support of nurses' clinical judgment and team communication.

    PubMed

    Kossman, Susan P; Bonney, Leigh Ann; Kim, Myoung Jin

    2013-11-01

    Nurses need to quickly process information to form clinical judgments, communicate with the healthcare team, and guide optimal patient care. Electronic health records not only offer potential for enhanced care but also introduce unintended consequences through changes in workflow, clinical judgment, and communication. We investigated nurses' use of improvised (self-made) and electronic health record-generated cognitive artifacts on clinical judgment and team communication. Tanner's Clinical Judgment Model provided a framework and basis for questions in an online survey and focus group interviews. Findings indicated that (1) nurses rated self-made work lists and medication administration records highest for both clinical judgment and communication, (2) tools aided different dimensions of clinical judgment, and (3) interdisciplinary tools enhance team communication. Implications are that electronic health record tool redesign could better support nursing work.

  1. Use of electronic health records can improve the health care industry's environmental footprint.

    PubMed

    Turley, Marianne; Porter, Catherine; Garrido, Terhilda; Gerwig, Kathy; Young, Scott; Radler, Linda; Shaber, Ruth

    2011-05-01

    Electronic health records have the potential to improve the environmental footprint of the health care industry. We estimate that Kaiser Permanente's electronic health record system, which covers 8.7 million beneficiaries, eliminated 1,000 tons of paper records and 68 tons of x-ray film, and that it has lowered gasoline consumption among patients who otherwise would have made trips to the doctor by at least three million gallons per year. However, the use of personal computers resulted in higher energy consumption and generated an additional 250 tons of waste. We conclude that electronic health records have a positive net effect on the environment, and that our model for evaluating their impact can be used to determine whether their use can improve communities' health.

  2. 29 CFR 4000.54 - May I dispose of original paper records if I keep electronic copies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I dispose of original paper records if I keep... of Record Retention § 4000.54 May I dispose of original paper records if I keep electronic copies? You may dispose of original paper records any time after they are transferred to an electronic...

  3. Openness of patients' reporting with use of electronic records: psychiatric clinicians' views

    PubMed Central

    Blackford, Jennifer Urbano; Rosenbloom, S Trent; Seidel, Sandra; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Dilts, David M; Finder, Stuart G

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Improvements in electronic health record (EHR) system development will require an understanding of psychiatric clinicians' views on EHR system acceptability, including effects on psychotherapy communications, data-recording behaviors, data accessibility versus security and privacy, data quality and clarity, communications with medical colleagues, and stigma. Design Multidisciplinary development of a survey instrument targeting psychiatric clinicians who recently switched to EHR system use, focus group testing, data analysis, and data reliability testing. Measurements Survey of 120 university-based, outpatient mental health clinicians, with 56 (47%) responding, conducted 18 months after transition from a paper to an EHR system. Results Factor analysis gave nine item groupings that overlapped strongly with five a priori domains. Respondents both praised and criticized the EHR system. A strong majority (81%) felt that open therapeutic communications were preserved. Regarding data quality, content, and privacy, clinicians (63%) were less willing to record highly confidential information and disagreed (83%) with including their own psychiatric records among routinely accessed EHR systems. Limitations single time point; single academic medical center clinic setting; modest sample size; lack of prior instrument validation; survey conducted in 2005. Conclusions In an academic medical center clinic, the presence of electronic records was not seen as a dramatic impediment to therapeutic communications. Concerns regarding privacy and data security were significant, and may contribute to reluctances to adopt electronic records in other settings. Further study of clinicians' views and use patterns may be helpful in guiding development and deployment of electronic records systems. PMID:20064802

  4. Is patient confidentiality compromised with the electronic health record?: a position paper.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ilse M

    2015-02-01

    In order for electronic health records to fulfill their expected benefits, protection of privacy of patient information is key. Lack of trust in confidentiality can lead to reluctance in disclosing all relevant information, which could have grave consequences. This position paper contemplates whether patient confidentiality is compromised by electronic health records. The position that confidentiality is compromised was supported by the four bioethical principles and argued that despite laws and various safeguards to protect patients' confidentiality, numerous data breaches have occurred. The position that confidentiality is not compromised was supported by virtue ethics and a utilitarian viewpoint and argued that safeguards keep information confidential and the public feels relatively safe with the electronic health record. The article concludes with an ethically superior position that confidentiality is compromised with the electronic health record. Although organizational and governmental ways of enhancing the confidentiality of patient information within the electronic health record facilitate confidentiality, the ultimate responsibility of maintaining confidentiality rests with the individual end-users and their ethical code of conduct. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for nurses calls for nurses to be watchful with data security in electronic communications.

  5. [Electronic patient records and teleophthalmology : part 1: introduction to the various systems and standards].

    PubMed

    Schargus, M; Michelson, G; Grehn, F

    2011-05-01

    Electronic storage of patient-related data will replace paper-based patient records in the near future. Some steps in medical practice can even now not be achieved without electronic data processing. Both systems, conventional paper-based and electronic-based records, have advantages and disadvantages which have to be taken into consideration. The advantages of electronic-based records are e.g. good availability of data, structured storage of data, scientific analysis of long-term data and possible data exchange with colleagues in the context of teleconsultation systems. Problems have to be solved in the field of data security, initial high investment costs and time consumption in learning to use the system as well as in incompatibility of existing IT systems.

  6. A patient-controlled journal for an electronic medical record: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wald, Jonathan S; Middleton, Blackford; Bloom, Amy; Walmsley, Dan; Gleason, Mary; Nelson, Elizabeth; Li, Qi; Epstein, Marianna; Volk, Lynn; Bates, David W

    2004-01-01

    Partners Healthcare System, Boston, MA, has developed a patient Web portal that features a patient-controlled electronic "journal" to allow patients to interact with their physician's electronic medical record. Patients can view and respond to health reminders, critique electronic chart information maintained by their doctor's office, enter additional clinical information, and prepare information summaries before an office visit. Creating shared information resources to support a collaborative care model required analysis of the business, architectural, and workflow requirements of the patient-controlled clinical portal and the physician-controlled electronic medical record system. In this paper we describe the challenges in aligning the two systems and serving the different user groups. Coupling the Patient Gateway system, serving over 8700 patients of 90 physicians as of September, 2003, with the Longitudinal Medical Record system, serving over 4000 physicians, has required a clear definition of user goals and workflow, well-defined interfaces, and careful consideration of system assumptions to succeed.

  7. Beneficial Effects of Two Types of Personal Health Record Services Connected With Electronic Medical Records Within the Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jisan; Kim, James G Boram; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Kiwhan; Kim, Byungjun; Kim, Sukwha; Kim, Jeongeun

    2017-05-26

    Healthcare consumers must be able to make decisions based on accurate health information. To assist with this, we designed and developed an integrated system connected with electronic medical records in hospitals to ensure delivery of accurate health information. The system-called the Consumer-centered Open Personal Health Record platform-is composed of two services: a portal for users with any disease and a mobile application for users with cleft lip/palate. To assess the benefits of these services, we used a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design, assigning participants to the portal (n = 50) and application (n = 52) groups. Both groups showed significantly increased knowledge, both objective (actual knowledge of health information) and subjective (perceived knowledge of health information), after the intervention. Furthermore, while both groups showed higher information needs satisfaction after the intervention, the application group was significantly more satisfied. Knowledge changes were more affected by participant characteristics in the application group. Our results may be due to the application's provision of specific disease information and a personalized treatment plan based on the participant and other users' data. We recommend that services connected with electronic medical records target specific diseases to provide personalized health management to patients in a hospital setting.

  8. Electronic medical records as tools for quality improvement in ambulatory practice: theory and a case study.

    PubMed

    Ornstein, S M; Jenkins, R G; MacFarlane, L; Glaser, A; Snyder, K; Gundrum, T

    1998-11-01

    Information management is critical in today's health care environment. Traditional paper-based medical records are inadequate information management tools. Electronic medical records (EMRs) overcome many problems with paper records and are ideally suited to help physicians increase productivity and improve the quality of care they provide. The Department of Family Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina uses the Practice Partner Patient Record EMR system. Department members have developed a quality improvement model based on this EMR system. The model has been used to improve care for acute bronchitis, diabetes mellitus, tobacco abuse, asthma, and postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  9. The Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR): a device for sampling naturalistic daily activities and conversations.

    PubMed

    Mehl, M R; Pennebaker, J W; Crow, D M; Dabbs, J; Price, J H

    2001-11-01

    A recording device called the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) is described. The EAR taperecords for 30 sec once every 12 min for 2-4 days. It is lightweight and portable, and it can be worn comfortably by participants in their natural environment. The acoustic data samples provide a nonobtrusive record of the language used and settings entered by the participant. Preliminary psychometric findings suggest that the EAR data accurately reflect individuals' natural social, linguistic, and psychological lives. The data presented in this article were collected with a first-generation EAR system based on analog tape recording technology, but a second generation digital EAR is now available.

  10. Electronic Documentation Support Tools and Text Duplication in the Electronic Medical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrenn, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    In order to ease the burden of electronic note entry on physicians, electronic documentation support tools have been developed to assist in note authoring. There is little evidence of the effects of these tools on attributes of clinical documentation, including document quality. Furthermore, the resultant abundance of duplicated text and…

  11. Defining and incorporating basic nursing care actions into the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Englebright, Jane; Aldrich, Kelly; Taylor, Cathy R

    2014-01-01

    To develop a definition of basic nursing care for the hospitalized adult patient and drive uptake of that definition through the implementation of an electronic health record. A team of direct care nurses, assisted by subject matter experts, analyzed nursing theory and regulatory requirements related to basic nursing care. The resulting list of activities was coded using the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) system and incorporated into the electronic health record system of a 170-bed community hospital. Nine basic nursing care activities were identified as a result of analyzing nursing theory and regulatory requirements in the framework of a hypothetical "well" patient. One additional basic nursing care activity was identified following the pilot implementation in the electronic health record. The pilot hospital has successfully passed a post-implementation regulatory review with no recommendations related to the documentation of basic patient care. This project demonstrated that it is possible to define the concept of basic nursing care and to distinguish it from the interdisciplinary, problem-focused plan of care. The use of the electronic health record can help clarify, document, and communicate basic care elements and improve uptake among nurses. This project to define basic nursing care activities and incorporate into the electronic health record represents a first step in capturing meaningful data elements. When fully implemented, these data could be translated into knowledge for improving care outcomes and collaborative processes. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  12. The informatics nurse specialist role in electronic health record usability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Crystal L; Seckman, Charlotte A

    2014-05-01

    Health information technology is revolutionizing the way we interact with health-related data. One example of this can be seen in the rising adoption rates of electronic health records by healthcare providers. Nursing plays a vital role in electronic health record adoption, not only because of their numbers but also their intimate understanding of workflow. The success of an electronic health record also relies on how usable the software is for clinicians, and a thorough usability evaluation is needed before implementing a system within an organization. Not all nurses have the knowledge and skills to perform extensive usability testing; therefore, the informatics nurse specialist plays a critical role in the process. This article will discuss core usability principles, provide a framework for applying these concepts, and explore the role of the informatics nurse specialist in electronic health record evaluation. Health information technology is fundamentally changing the clinical practice environment, and many nurses are seeking leadership positions in the field of informatics. As technology and software become more sophisticated, usability principles must be used under theguidance of the informatics nurse specialist to provide a relevant, robust, and well-designed electronic health record to address the needs of the busy clinician.

  13. Electronic health records in rheumatology: emphasis on automated scoring and additional use.

    PubMed

    Richter, Jutta G; Chehab, Gamal; Schneider, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records are increasingly used and frequently required from various regulatory authorities. Apart from their day-to-day use by health care professionals for routine clinical practice and/or the improvement of quality of care processes, patients with chronic inflammatory disease may become increasingly involved in the data retrieval process by self-monitoring and providing patient-reported (outcome) data. Among key features of electronic health records are automated scoring, visualisation of validated measures, and long-term systematic patient-centered data collection in a structured and standardised manner. Data derived from electronic health records are increasingly incorporated into patient-centered research, registries, and other secondary uses. Thus, electronic health records offer opportunities to improve knowledge and to create new process flows in rheumatology health care. The article summarises some of these opportunities in patient care, as well as an overview of secondary use scenarios. In addition, the article focuses on patients' active involvement in the disease management process via health information applications, reports on patients' perspectives, as well as some legal and regulatory matters concerning electronic health records.

  14. Feasibility of utilizing a commercial eye tracker to assess electronic health record use during patient simulation.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jeffrey Allen; Stephenson, Laurel E; Gorsuch, Adriel; Parthasarathy, Keshav; Mohan, Vishnu

    2016-09-01

    Numerous reports describe unintended consequences of electronic health record implementation. Having previously described physicians' failures to recognize patient safety issues within our electronic health record simulation environment, we now report on our use of eye and screen-tracking technology to understand factors associated with poor error recognition during an intensive care unit-based electronic health record simulation. We linked performance on the simulation to standard eye and screen-tracking readouts including number of fixations, saccades, mouse clicks and screens visited. In addition, we developed an overall Composite Eye Tracking score which measured when, where and how often each safety item was viewed. For 39 participants, the Composite Eye Tracking score correlated with performance on the simulation (p = 0.004). Overall, the improved performance was associated with a pattern of rapid scanning of data manifested by increased number of screens visited (p = 0.001), mouse clicks (p = 0.03) and saccades (p = 0.004). Eye tracking can be successfully integrated into electronic health record-based simulation and provides a surrogate measure of cognitive decision making and electronic health record usability.

  15. 50 CFR 660.17 - Catch monitors and catch monitor service providers. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West Coast Groundfish Fisheries § 660.17 Catch monitors and catch monitor service providers. ...

  16. Mitigating by-catch of diamondback terrapins in crab pots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Kristen M.; Crowder, Larry B.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic by-catch of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) pots is a concern for terrapin conservation along the United States Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Despite the availability of by-catch reduction devices (BRDs) for crab pots, adoption of BRDs has not been mandated and by-catch of terrapins continues. We conducted experimental fishing studies in North Carolina's year-round blue crab fishery from 2000 to 2004 to evaluate the ability of various BRDs to reduce terrapin by-catch without a concomitant reduction in the catch of blue crabs. In 4,822 crab pot days fished, we recorded only 21 terrapin captures. Estimated capture rates were 0.003 terrapins/pot per day in hard crab experimental fishing and 0.008 terrapins/pot per day in peeler experimental fishing. All terrapin captures occurred from April to mid-May within 321.4 m of the shoreline. Longer soak times produced more dead terrapins, with 4 live and 4 dead during hard crab experimental fishing and 11 live and 2 dead during peeler experimental fishing. The 4.0-cm BRDs in fall and 4.5-cm and 5.0-cm BRDs in spring reduced the catch of legal-sized male hard crabs by 26.6%, 21.2%, and 5.7%, respectively. Only the 5.0-cm BRDs did not significantly affect the catch of legal-sized hard male crabs. However, BRDs had no measurable effect on catch of target crabs in the peeler crab fishery. Our results identify 3 complementary and economically feasible tools for blue crab fishery managers to exclude terrapins from commercially fished crab pots in North Carolina: 1) gear modifications (e.g., BRDs); 2) distance-to-shore restrictions; and 3) time-of-year regulations. These measures combined could provide a reduction in terrapin by-catch of up to 95% without a significant reduction in target crab catch.

  17. To Catch a Cheat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Brian A.; Levitt, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the results of a three-year investigation into cheating by school personnel. The goals of this research were to measure the prevalence of cheating by teachers and administrators and to analyze the factors that predict cheating. Using data on test scores and student records from the Chicago Public Schools, the authors…

  18. The role of frontline RNs in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner.

    PubMed

    Wilhoit, Kathryn; Mustain, Jane; King, Marjorie

    2006-01-01

    Frontline RNs knowledgeable in the strategic objectives of their organization made a difference in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner for a large, complex healthcare system. Their impact was significant because of the chief nurse executive's personal articulation of the organization's strategic goals and of her investment in their education. These factors provided the frontline RNs with a foundational base of knowledge about a variety of electronic medical record systems. The preparation and exposure enabled the frontline RNs to make a valuable contribution to the selection of an electronic medical record business partner. The RNs were a major force in affecting philosophical change from the organization's original pursuit of "best-of-breed" interfaced systems to a fully integrated, "best-of-class" vendor business partner. The learning experiences of the frontline RNs are explored to answer the following question: Why must frontline RNs play a key role in this process?

  19. Using the Electronic Health Record in Nursing Research: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Joanne G; McGrath, Robert J; Fetzer, Susan J; Mittal, Prashant; Bourgoine, Derek

    2015-10-01

    Changes in the patient record from the paper to the electronic health record format present challenges and opportunities for the nurse researcher. Current use of data from the electronic health record is in a state of flux. Novel data analytic techniques and massive data sets provide new opportunities for nursing science. Realization of a strong electronic data output future relies on meeting challenges of system use and operability, data presentation, and privacy. Nurse researchers need to rethink aspects of proposal development. Joining ongoing national efforts aimed at creating usable data output is encouraged as a means to affect system design. Working to address challenges and embrace opportunities will help grow the science in a way that answers important patient care questions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Abstracting ICU Nursing Care Quality Data From the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Jennifer B; Evans, Anna C; Sciulli, Andrea M; Barnato, Amber E; Sereika, Susan M; Happ, Mary Beth

    2017-09-01

    The electronic health record is a potentially rich source of data for clinical research in the intensive care unit setting. We describe the iterative, multi-step process used to develop and test a data abstraction tool, used for collection of nursing care quality indicators from the electronic health record, for a pragmatic trial. We computed Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ) to assess interrater agreement or reliability of data abstracted using preliminary and finalized tools. In assessing the reliability of study data ( n = 1,440 cases) using the finalized tool, 108 randomly selected cases (10% of first half sample; 5% of last half sample) were independently abstracted by a second rater. We demonstrated mean κ values ranging from 0.61 to 0.99 for all indicators. Nursing care quality data can be accurately and reliably abstracted from the electronic health records of intensive care unit patients using a well-developed data collection tool and detailed training.