Science.gov

Sample records for electronic design automation

  1. Electronic Design Automation: Integrating the Design and Manufacturing Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachnak, Rafic; Salkowski, Charles

    1997-01-01

    As the complexity of electronic systems grows, the traditional design practice, a sequential process, is replaced by concurrent design methodologies. A major advantage of concurrent design is that the feedback from software and manufacturing engineers can be easily incorporated into the design. The implementation of concurrent engineering methodologies is greatly facilitated by employing the latest Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools. These tools offer integrated simulation of the electrical, mechanical, and manufacturing functions and support virtual prototyping, rapid prototyping, and hardware-software co-design. This report presents recommendations for enhancing the electronic design and manufacturing capabilities and procedures at JSC based on a concurrent design methodology that employs EDA tools.

  2. Using digital electronic design flow to create a Genetic Design Automation tool.

    PubMed

    Gendrault, Y; Madec, M; Wlotzko, V; Andraud, M; Lallement, C; Haiech, J

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic bio-systems become increasingly more complex and their development is lengthy and expensive. In the same way, in microelectronics, the design process of very complex circuits has benefited from many years of experience. It is now partly automated through Electronic Design Automation tools. Both areas present analogies that can be used to create a Genetic Design Automation tool inspired from EDA tools used in digital electronics. This tool would allow moving away from a totally manual design of bio-systems to assisted conception. This ambitious project is presented in this paper, with a deep focus on the tool that automatically generates models of bio-systems directly usable in electronic simulators.

  3. A Parallel Genetic Algorithm for Automated Electronic Circuit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Jason D.; Colombano, Silvano P.; Haith, Gary L.; Stassinopoulos, Dimitris

    2000-01-01

    Parallelized versions of genetic algorithms (GAs) are popular primarily for three reasons: the GA is an inherently parallel algorithm, typical GA applications are very compute intensive, and powerful computing platforms, especially Beowulf-style computing clusters, are becoming more affordable and easier to implement. In addition, the low communication bandwidth required allows the use of inexpensive networking hardware such as standard office ethernet. In this paper we describe a parallel GA and its use in automated high-level circuit design. Genetic algorithms are a type of trial-and-error search technique that are guided by principles of Darwinian evolution. Just as the genetic material of two living organisms can intermix to produce offspring that are better adapted to their environment, GAs expose genetic material, frequently strings of 1s and Os, to the forces of artificial evolution: selection, mutation, recombination, etc. GAs start with a pool of randomly-generated candidate solutions which are then tested and scored with respect to their utility. Solutions are then bred by probabilistically selecting high quality parents and recombining their genetic representations to produce offspring solutions. Offspring are typically subjected to a small amount of random mutation. After a pool of offspring is produced, this process iterates until a satisfactory solution is found or an iteration limit is reached. Genetic algorithms have been applied to a wide variety of problems in many fields, including chemistry, biology, and many engineering disciplines. There are many styles of parallelism used in implementing parallel GAs. One such method is called the master-slave or processor farm approach. In this technique, slave nodes are used solely to compute fitness evaluations (the most time consuming part). The master processor collects fitness scores from the nodes and performs the genetic operators (selection, reproduction, variation, etc.). Because of dependency

  4. A Parallel Genetic Algorithm for Automated Electronic Circuit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason D.; Colombano, Silvano P.; Haith, Gary L.; Stassinopoulos, Dimitris; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We describe a parallel genetic algorithm (GA) that automatically generates circuit designs using evolutionary search. A circuit-construction programming language is introduced and we show how evolution can generate practical analog circuit designs. Our system allows circuit size (number of devices), circuit topology, and device values to be evolved. We present experimental results as applied to analog filter and amplifier design tasks.

  5. The design of the automated control system for warehouse equipment under radio-electronic manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapulin, D. V.; Chemidov, I. V.; Kazantsev, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    In the paper, the aspects of design, development and implementation of the automated control system for warehousing under the manufacturing process of the radio-electronic enterprise JSC «Radiosvyaz» are discussed. The architecture of the automated control system for warehousing proposed in the paper consists of a server which is connected to the physically separated information networks: the network with a database server, which stores information about the orders for picking, and the network with the automated storage and retrieval system. This principle allows implementing the requirements for differentiation of access, ensuring the information safety and security requirements. Also, the efficiency of the developed automated solutions in terms of optimizing the warehouse’s logistic characteristics is researched.

  6. Automated design of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.; Mccomb, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in structural analysis of aerospace vehicles is characterized, automated design technology is discussed, and an indication is given of the future direction of research in analysis and automated design. Representative computer programs for analysis typical of those in routine use in vehicle design activities are described, and results are shown for some selected analysis problems. Recent and planned advances in analysis capability are indicated. Techniques used to automate the more routine aspects of structural design are discussed, and some recently developed automated design computer programs are described. Finally, discussion is presented of early accomplishments in interdisciplinary automated design systems, and some indication of the future thrust of research in this field is given.

  7. Automated Hardware Design via Evolutionary Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason D.; Colombano, Silvano P.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the application of evolutionary search to the process of automated engineering design. Evolutionary search techniques involve the simulation of Darwinian mechanisms by computer algorithms. In recent years, such techniques have attracted much attention because they are able to tackle a wide variety of difficult problems and frequently produce acceptable solutions. The results obtained are usually functional, often surprising, and typically "messy" because the algorithms are told to concentrate on the overriding objective and not elegance or simplicity. advantages. First, faster design cycles translate into time and, hence, cost savings. Second, automated design techniques can be made to scale well and hence better deal with increasing amounts of design complexity. Third, design quality can increase because design properties can be specified a priori. For example, size and weight specifications of a device, smaller and lighter than the best known design, might be optimized by the automated design technique. The domain of electronic circuit design is an advantageous platform in which to study automated design techniques because it is a rich design space that is well understood, permitting human-created designs to be compared to machine- generated designs. developed for circuit design was to automatically produce high-level integrated electronic circuit designs whose properties permit physical implementation in silicon. This process entailed designing an effective evolutionary algorithm and solving a difficult multiobjective optimization problem. FY 99 saw many accomplishments in this effort.

  8. Design Automation in Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Appleton, Evan; Madsen, Curtis; Roehner, Nicholas; Densmore, Douglas

    2017-04-03

    Design automation refers to a category of software tools for designing systems that work together in a workflow for designing, building, testing, and analyzing systems with a target behavior. In synthetic biology, these tools are called bio-design automation (BDA) tools. In this review, we discuss the BDA tools areas-specify, design, build, test, and learn-and introduce the existing software tools designed to solve problems in these areas. We then detail the functionality of some of these tools and show how they can be used together to create the desired behavior of two types of modern synthetic genetic regulatory networks.

  9. Automated cleaning of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.

    1994-03-01

    Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents in electronic component cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. In addition, the use of robotic and automated systems can reduce the manual handling of parts that necessitates additional cleaning. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

  10. Automated cleaning of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

    1994-07-01

    Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

  11. Automating Software Design Metrics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    declaration to be associated with it. Second, Byron tools can produce useful output from incomplete specifications. These advantages over pure Ada are...8217 implemented. Implementation independent details are included in Sec- tion 2.2. Requirements and Design information for the DARTS implemen- tation of both...The Intelligence Content (I) is an estimate of the Potential Volume. It is independent of the language used and is expected to be invariant over

  12. Automated Core Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2005-07-15

    Multistate searching methods are a subfield of distributed artificial intelligence that aims to provide both principles for construction of complex systems involving multiple states and mechanisms for coordination of independent agents' actions. This paper proposes a multistate searching algorithm with reinforcement learning for the automatic core design of a boiling water reactor. The characteristics of this algorithm are that the coupling structure and the coupling operation suitable for the assigned problem are assumed and an optimal solution is obtained by mutual interference in multistate transitions using multiagents. Calculations in an actual plant confirmed that the proposed algorithm increased the convergence ability of the optimization process.

  13. Automated Design of Quantum Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin P.; Gray, Alexander G.

    2000-01-01

    In order to design a quantum circuit that performs a desired quantum computation, it is necessary to find a decomposition of the unitary matrix that represents that computation in terms of a sequence of quantum gate operations. To date, such designs have either been found by hand or by exhaustive enumeration of all possible circuit topologies. In this paper we propose an automated approach to quantum circuit design using search heuristics based on principles abstracted from evolutionary genetics, i.e. using a genetic programming algorithm adapted specially for this problem. We demonstrate the method on the task of discovering quantum circuit designs for quantum teleportation. We show that to find a given known circuit design (one which was hand-crafted by a human), the method considers roughly an order of magnitude fewer designs than naive enumeration. In addition, the method finds novel circuit designs superior to those previously known.

  14. Automated Engineering Design (AED); An approach to automated documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, C. W.

    1970-01-01

    The automated engineering design (AED) is reviewed, consisting of a high level systems programming language, a series of modular precoded subroutines, and a set of powerful software machine tools that effectively automate the production and design of new languages. AED is used primarily for development of problem and user-oriented languages. Software production phases are diagramed, and factors which inhibit effective documentation are evaluated.

  15. Automation of Design Engineering Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrey, Glenn; Sawasky, Gerald; Courey, Karim

    2004-01-01

    A method, and a computer program that helps to implement the method, have been developed to automate and systematize the retention and retrieval of all the written records generated during the process of designing a complex engineering system. It cannot be emphasized strongly enough that all the written records as used here is meant to be taken literally: it signifies not only final drawings and final engineering calculations but also such ancillary documents as minutes of meetings, memoranda, requests for design changes, approval and review documents, and reports of tests. One important purpose served by the method is to make the records readily available to all involved users via their computer workstations from one computer archive while eliminating the need for voluminous paper files stored in different places. Another important purpose served by the method is to facilitate the work of engineers who are charged with sustaining the system and were not involved in the original design decisions. The method helps the sustaining engineers to retrieve information that enables them to retrace the reasoning that led to the original design decisions, thereby helping them to understand the system better and to make informed engineering choices pertaining to maintenance and/or modifications of the system. The software used to implement the method is written in Microsoft Access. All of the documents pertaining to the design of a given system are stored in one relational database in such a manner that they can be related to each other via a single tracking number.

  16. Automation design of cemented doublet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, Galina; Ivanova, Tatiana; Korotkova, Natalia

    2015-09-01

    Algorithm and software for cemented doublet synthesis by Slusarev's methodology are presented. Slusarev's methodology is based on lookup tables that allow calculating doublet radii by given value of third-order coma, spherical aberration and chromatic aberration by specific algorithm. This calculation is automated in this work. The input parameters for algorithm are desired values of third-order coma, spherical aberration and chromatic aberration of cemented doublet. The software looks up few pairs of optical glasses corresponding to specified value of chromatic aberration and then calculates radii of surfaces for each pair of glasses corresponding to specified third-order coma and spherical aberration. The resulted third-order aberrations and real aberrations on the edge of the pupil are calculated for obtained radiuses. Several doublets can be analyzed in result table and the chosen one can be imported into Zemax. The calculated cemented doublet parameters can be analyzed and optimized in optical system design software. The software allows to make the first step of optical system design fast and simple. It allows to design not only the system which is free of the third-order spherical aberration, coma and axial color, but obtain necessary value of aberration for compensation of aberrations in another part of optical system. Possibility to look up optical glasses automatically, what affects the chromatic aberration correction and aberration correction in general, is especially important. Examples of automatic calculation of cemented doublet and compensation of aberrations in another part of optical system are presented in the paper.

  17. Generic Automated Multi-function Finger Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarpardaz, M.; Tarkian, M.; Sirkett, D.; Ölvander, J.; Feng, X.; Elf, J.; Sjögren, R.

    2016-11-01

    Multi-function fingers that are able to handle multiple workpieces are crucial in improvement of a robot workcell. Design automation of multi-function fingers is highly demanded by robot industries to overcome the current iterative, time consuming and complex manual design process. However, the existing approaches for the multi-function finger design automation are unable to entirely meet the robot industries’ need. This paper proposes a generic approach for design automation of multi-function fingers. The proposed approach completely automates the design process and requires no expert skill. In addition, this approach executes the design process much faster than the current manual process. To validate the approach, multi-function fingers are successfully designed for two case studies. Further, the results are discussed and benchmarked with existing approaches.

  18. Automated data collection in single particle electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yong Zi; Cheng, Anchi; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Automated data collection is an integral part of modern workflows in single particle electron microscopy (EM) research. This review surveys the software packages available for automated single particle EM data collection. The degree of automation at each stage of data collection is evaluated, and the capabilities of the software packages are described. Finally, future trends in automation are discussed. PMID:26671944

  19. Automated data collection in single particle electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yong Zi; Cheng, Anchi; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget

    2016-02-01

    Automated data collection is an integral part of modern workflows in single particle electron microscopy (EM) research. This review surveys the software packages available for automated single particle EM data collection. The degree of automation at each stage of data collection is evaluated, and the capabilities of the software packages are described. Finally, future trends in automation are discussed.

  20. Automated CPX support system preliminary design phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bordeaux, T. A.; Carson, E. T.; Hepburn, C. D.; Shinnick, F. M.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the Distributed Command and Control System (DCCS) is discussed. The development of an automated C2 system stimulated the development of an automated command post exercise (CPX) support system to provide a more realistic stimulus to DCCS than could be achieved with the existing manual system. An automated CPX system to support corps-level exercise was designed. The effort comprised four tasks: (1) collecting and documenting user requirements; (2) developing a preliminary system design; (3) defining a program plan; and (4) evaluating the suitability of the TRASANA FOURCE computer model.

  1. Automated Simulation For Analysis And Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, E.; Shenk, Tim; Robinson, Peter; Upadhye, R.

    1992-01-01

    Design Assistant Workstation (DAWN) software being developed to facilitate simulation of qualitative and quantitative aspects of behavior of life-support system in spacecraft, chemical-processing plant, heating and cooling system of large building, or any of variety of systems including interacting process streams and processes. Used to analyze alternative design scenarios or specific designs of such systems. Expert system will automate part of design analysis: reason independently by simulating design scenarios and return to designer with overall evaluations and recommendations.

  2. Design considerations for automated packaging operations

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrenholtz, J.; Jones, J.; Kincy, M.

    1993-12-31

    The paper is based on work performed at Sandia National Laboratories to automate DOE packaging operations. It is a general summary of work from several projects which may be applicable to other packaging operations. Examples are provided of robotic operations which have been demonstrated as well as operations that are currently being developed. General design considerations for packages and for automated handling systems are described.

  3. An Automated Approach to Instructional Design Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, J. Michael; And Others

    This paper describes the Guided Approach to Instructional Design Advising (GAIDA), an automated instructional design tool that incorporates techniques of artificial intelligence. GAIDA was developed by the U.S. Air Force Armstrong Laboratory to facilitate the planning and production of interactive courseware and computer-based training materials.…

  4. ASTROS: A multidisciplinary automated structural design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neill, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    ASTROS (Automated Structural Optimization System) is a finite-element-based multidisciplinary structural optimization procedure developed under Air Force sponsorship to perform automated preliminary structural design. The design task is the determination of the structural sizes that provide an optimal structure while satisfying numerous constraints from many disciplines. In addition to its automated design features, ASTROS provides a general transient and frequency response capability, as well as a special feature to perform a transient analysis of a vehicle subjected to a nuclear blast. The motivation for the development of a single multidisciplinary design tool is that such a tool can provide improved structural designs in less time than is currently needed. The role of such a tool is even more apparent as modern materials come into widespread use. Balancing conflicting requirements for the structure's strength and stiffness while exploiting the benefits of material anisotropy is perhaps an impossible task without assistance from an automated design tool. Finally, the use of a single tool can bring the design task into better focus among design team members, thereby improving their insight into the overall task.

  5. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  6. Automated fully-stressed design with NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallerstein, D. V.; Haggenmacher, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    An automated strength sizing capability is described. The technique determines the distribution of material among the elements of a structural model. The sizing is based on either a fully stressed design or a scaled feasible fully stressed design. Results obtained from the application of the strength sizing to the structural sizing of a composite material wing box using material strength allowables are presented. These results demonstrate the rapid convergence of the structural sizes to a usable design.

  7. Automated ILA design for synchronous sequential circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, M. N.; Liu, K. Z.; Maki, G. K.; Whitaker, S. R.

    1991-01-01

    An iterative logic array (ILA) architecture for synchronous sequential circuits is presented. This technique utilizes linear algebra to produce the design equations. The ILA realization of synchronous sequential logic can be fully automated with a computer program. A programmable design procedure is proposed to fullfill the design task and layout generation. A software algorithm in the C language has been developed and tested to generate 1 micron CMOS layouts using the Hewlett-Packard FUNGEN module generator shell.

  8. CMOS array design automation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombardi, T.; Feller, A.

    1976-01-01

    The design considerations and the circuit development for a 4096-bit CMOS SOS ROM chip, the ATL078 are described. Organization of the ATL078 is 512 words by 8 bits. The ROM was designed to be programmable either at the metal mask level or by a directed laser beam after processing. The development of a 4K CMOS SOS ROM fills a void left by available ROM chip types, and makes the design of a totally major high speed system more realizable.

  9. Automated solar collector installation design

    DOEpatents

    Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

    2014-08-26

    Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives.

  10. Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinxin; Li, Hongchang; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yadong; Peng, Bo; Celis, César Díaz; Xu, April; Zou, Qin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Xuefeng; Ren, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures of each individual particles of asymmetric and flexible proteins is essential in understanding those proteins’ functions; but their structures are difficult to determine. Electron tomography (ET) provides a tool for imaging a single and unique biological object from a series of tilted angles, but it is challenging to image a single protein for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction due to the imperfect mechanical control capability of the specimen goniometer under both a medium to high magnification (approximately 50,000–160,000×) and an optimized beam coherence condition. Here, we report a fully mechanical control method for automating ET data acquisition without using beam tilt/shift processes. This method could reduce the accumulation of beam tilt/shift that used to compensate the error from the mechanical control, but downgraded the beam coherence. Our method was developed by minimizing the error of the target object center during the tilting process through a closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm. The validations by both negative staining (NS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) suggest that this method has a comparable capability to other ET methods in tracking target proteins while maintaining optimized beam coherence conditions for imaging. PMID:27403922

  11. Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxin; Li, Hongchang; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yadong; Peng, Bo; Celis, César Díaz; Xu, April; Zou, Qin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Xuefeng; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-11

    Knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures of each individual particles of asymmetric and flexible proteins is essential in understanding those proteins' functions; but their structures are difficult to determine. Electron tomography (ET) provides a tool for imaging a single and unique biological object from a series of tilted angles, but it is challenging to image a single protein for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction due to the imperfect mechanical control capability of the specimen goniometer under both a medium to high magnification (approximately 50,000-160,000×) and an optimized beam coherence condition. Here, we report a fully mechanical control method for automating ET data acquisition without using beam tilt/shift processes. This method could reduce the accumulation of beam tilt/shift that used to compensate the error from the mechanical control, but downgraded the beam coherence. Our method was developed by minimizing the error of the target object center during the tilting process through a closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm. The validations by both negative staining (NS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) suggest that this method has a comparable capability to other ET methods in tracking target proteins while maintaining optimized beam coherence conditions for imaging.

  12. Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxin; Li, Hongchang; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yadong; Peng, Bo; Celis, César Díaz; Xu, April; Zou, Qin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Xuefeng; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures of each individual particles of asymmetric and flexible proteins is essential in understanding those proteins’ functions; but their structures are difficult to determine. Electron tomography (ET) provides a tool for imaging a single and unique biological object from a series of tilted angles, but it is challenging to image a single protein for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction due to the imperfect mechanical control capability of the specimen goniometer under both a medium to high magnification (approximately 50,000–160,000×) and an optimized beam coherence condition. Here, we report a fully mechanical control method for automating ET data acquisition without using beam tilt/shift processes. This method could reduce the accumulation of beam tilt/shift that used to compensate the error from the mechanical control, but downgraded the beam coherence. Our method was developed by minimizing the error of the target object center during the tilting process through a closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm. The validations by both negative staining (NS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) suggest that this method has a comparable capability to other ET methods in tracking target proteins while maintaining optimized beam coherence conditions for imaging.

  13. Automated mixed traffic vehicle design AMTV 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. R.; Marks, R. A.; Cassell, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    The design of an improved and enclosed Automated Mixed Traffic Transit (AMTT) vehicle is described. AMTT is an innovative concept for low-speed tram-type transit in which suitable vehicles are equipped with sensors and controls to permit them to operate in an automated mode on existing road or walkway surfaces. The vehicle chassis and body design are presented in terms of sketches and photographs. The functional design of the sensing and control system is presented, and modifications which could be made to the baseline design for improved performance, in particular to incorporate a 20-mph capability, are also discussed. The vehicle system is described at the block-diagram-level of detail. Specifications and parameter values are given where available.

  14. Automated design of controlled diffusion blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz, Jose M.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical automation procedure was developed to be used in conjunction with an inverse hodograph method for the design of controlled diffusion blades. With this procedure a cascade of airfoils with a prescribed solidity, inlet Mach No., inlet air flow angle and air flow turning can be produced automatically. The trailing edge thickness of the airfoil, an important quantity in inverse methods, is also prescribed. The automation procedure consists of a multi-dimensional Newton iteration in which the objective design conditions are achieved by acting on the hodograph input parameters of the underlying inverse code. The method, although more general in scope, is applied to the design of axial flow turbomachinery blade sections, both compressors and turbines. A collaborative effort with U.S. Engine Companies to identify designs of interest to the industry will be described.

  15. Automated lower limb prosthesis design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Gulab H.; Commean, Paul K.; Smith, Kirk E.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1994-09-01

    The design of lower limb prostheses requires definitive geometric data to customize socket shape. Optical surface imaging and spiral x-ray computed tomography were applied to geometric analysis of limb residua in below knee (BK) amputees. Residua (limb remnants after amputation) of BK amputees were digitized and measured. Surface (optical) and volumetric (CT) data of the residuum were used to generate solid models and specify socket shape in (SDRC I-DEAS) CAD software. Volume measurements on the solid models were found to correspond within 2% of surface models and direct determinations made using Archimedean weighing. Anatomic 3D reconstruction of the residuum by optical surface and spiral x-ray computed tomography imaging are feasible modalities for prosthesis design.

  16. Design Automation for Streaming Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-16

    AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14 . ABSTRACT RTL design methodologies are struggling to...transistor systems— AMD Athlon 64 X2: 233M transistors [Mitchell, 2005], IBM Cell: 241M transistors [Gschwind et al., 2005], nVidia GeForce 7800 GTX: 302M...buffers may be chosen by a compiler to match the resources 14 Chapter 1. Introduction of the target device. A small stream buffer might be implemented

  17. Adaptive Automation Design and Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-17

    function instantiation. Finally, we develop five analysis tools for isolat ing effective AA points within a human -machine system. A function is an action... analysis tools allowing designers to identify points within a function network where the transitions between human and machine entities can facilitate...based on the four-stages of human information processing: sensory processing, perception /- working memory, decision making, and response selection

  18. Automated design of controlled diffusion blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz, Jose M.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical automation procedure has been developed to be used in conjunction with an inverse hodograph method for the design of controlled diffusion blades. With this procedure a cascade of airfoils with a prescribed solidity, inlet Mach number, inlet air flow angle, and air flow turning can be produced automatically. The trailing edge thickness of the airfoil, an important quantity in inverse methods, is also prescribed. The automation procedure consists of a multidimensional Newton iteration in which the objective design conditions are achieved by acting on the hodograph input parameters of the underlying inverse code. The method, although more general in scope, is applied in this paper to the design of axial flow compressor blade sections, and a wide range of examples is presented.

  19. Design automation techniques for custom LSI arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, A.

    1975-01-01

    The standard cell design automation technique is described as an approach for generating random logic PMOS, CMOS or CMOS/SOS custom large scale integration arrays with low initial nonrecurring costs and quick turnaround time or design cycle. The system is composed of predesigned circuit functions or cells and computer programs capable of automatic placement and interconnection of the cells in accordance with an input data net list. The program generates a set of instructions to drive an automatic precision artwork generator. A series of support design automation and simulation programs are described, including programs for verifying correctness of the logic on the arrays, performing dc and dynamic analysis of MOS devices, and generating test sequences.

  20. Automated design of controlled-diffusion blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical automation procedure has been developed to be used in conjunction with an inverse hodograph method for the design of controlled diffusion blades. With this procedure a cascade of airfoils with a prescribed solidity, inlet Mach number, inlet air flow angle, and air flow turning can be produced automatically. The trailing edge thickness of the airfoil, an important quantity in inverse methods, is also prescribed. The automation procedure consists of a multidimensional Newton iteration in which the objective design conditions are achieved by acting on the hodograph input parameters of the underlying inverse code. The method, although more general in scope, is applied in this paper to the design of axial flow compressor blade sections, and a wide range of examples is presented.

  1. Automating software design system DESTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovitsky, Vladimir A.; Pearce, Patricia D.

    1992-01-01

    'DESTA' is the acronym for the Dialogue Evolutionary Synthesizer of Turnkey Algorithms by means of a natural language (Russian or English) functional specification of algorithms or software being developed. DESTA represents the computer-aided and/or automatic artificial intelligence 'forgiving' system which provides users with software tools support for algorithm and/or structured program development. The DESTA system is intended to provide support for the higher levels and earlier stages of engineering design of software in contrast to conventional Computer Aided Design (CAD) systems which provide low level tools for use at a stage when the major planning and structuring decisions have already been taken. DESTA is a knowledge-intensive system. The main features of the knowledge are procedures, functions, modules, operating system commands, batch files, their natural language specifications, and their interlinks. The specific domain for the DESTA system is a high level programming language like Turbo Pascal 6.0. The DESTA system is operational and runs on an IBM PC computer.

  2. j5 DNA assembly design automation software.

    PubMed

    Hillson, Nathan J; Rosengarten, Rafael D; Keasling, Jay D

    2012-01-20

    Recent advances in Synthetic Biology have yielded standardized and automatable DNA assembly protocols that enable a broad range of biotechnological research and development. Unfortunately, the experimental design required for modern scar-less multipart DNA assembly methods is frequently laborious, time-consuming, and error-prone. Here, we report the development and deployment of a web-based software tool, j5, which automates the design of scar-less multipart DNA assembly protocols including SLIC, Gibson, CPEC, and Golden Gate. The key innovations of the j5 design process include cost optimization, leveraging DNA synthesis when cost-effective to do so, the enforcement of design specification rules, hierarchical assembly strategies to mitigate likely assembly errors, and the instruction of manual or automated construction of scar-less combinatorial DNA libraries. Using a GFP expression testbed, we demonstrate that j5 designs can be executed with the SLIC, Gibson, or CPEC assembly methods, used to build combinatorial libraries with the Golden Gate assembly method, and applied to the preparation of linear gene deletion cassettes for E. coli. The DNA assembly design algorithms reported here are generally applicable to broad classes of DNA construction methodologies and could be implemented to supplement other DNA assembly design tools. Taken together, these innovations save researchers time and effort, reduce the frequency of user design errors and off-target assembly products, decrease research costs, and enable scar-less multipart and combinatorial DNA construction at scales unfeasible without computer-aided design.

  3. Expert System for Automated Design Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L., Jr.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1987-01-01

    Expert-system computer program EXADS developed to aid users of Automated Design Synthesis (ADS) general-purpose optimization program. EXADS aids engineer in determining best combination based on knowledge of specific problem and expert knowledge stored in knowledge base. Available in two interactive machine versions. IBM PC version (LAR-13687) written in IQ-LISP. DEC VAX version (LAR-13688) written in Franz-LISP.

  4. Design of the hybrid automated reliability predictor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geist, R.; Trivedi, K.; Dugan, J. B.; Smotherman, M.

    1983-01-01

    The design of the Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor (HARP), now under development at Duke University, is presented. The HARP approach to reliability prediction is characterized by a decomposition of the overall model into fault-occurrence and fault-handling sub-models. The fault-occurrence model is a non-homogeneous Markov chain which is solved analytically, while the fault-handling model is a Petri Net which is simulated. HARP provides automated analysis of sensitivity to uncertainties in the input parameters and in the initial state specifications. It then produces a predicted reliability band as a function of mission time, as well as estimates of the improvement (narrowing of the band) to be gained by a specified amount of reduction in uncertainty.

  5. Automated design and fabrication of ocular optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutin, Mikhail; Gutin, Olga

    2008-08-01

    Automated computer-aided procedure for component selection, optical design, and optimization was developed and used to produce prototype ocular optics of a head-mounted display for biomedical imaging, with the field of view and resolution approaching those of normal human vision. The new display has the potential to dramatically increase the amount and fidelity of real-time visual information presented to the user. The selected approach was based on a tiled configuration and "optically stitched" virtual image, resulting in seamless imagery generated by multiple micro-displays. Several optical configurations were studied in the design stage, to arrive at the optimal optical layout. The automated procedure provided for extensive search of the best candidate stock components out of thousands of candidate lenses offered by different vendors. At each iteration, the candidate lens was "digitally inserted" in the optical layout, its position was optimized, and the achieved merit function characterizing the quality of the stitched image was stored, along with the design prescription. A few best designs were then closely evaluated in a traditional "manual" procedure. The design effort was followed by experimental demonstration and tests of a limited prototype optical system.

  6. Automated design of ligands to polypharmacological profiles

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, Jérémy; Ruda, Gian Filippo; Setola, Vincent; Abecassis, Keren; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Norval, Suzanne; Sassano, Maria F.; Shin, Antony I.; Webster, Lauren A.; Simeons, Frederick R.C.; Stojanovski, Laste; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G.; Constam, Daniel B.; Bickerton, G. Richard; Read, Kevin D.; Wetsel, William C.; Gilbert, Ian H.; Roth, Bryan L.; Hopkins, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical efficacy and safety of a drug is determined by its activity profile across multiple proteins in the proteome. However, designing drugs with a specific multi-target profile is both complex and difficult. Therefore methods to rationally design drugs a priori against profiles of multiple proteins would have immense value in drug discovery. We describe a new approach for the automated design of ligands against profiles of multiple drug targets. The method is demonstrated by the evolution of an approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drug into brain penetrable ligands with either specific polypharmacology or exquisite selectivity profiles for G-protein coupled receptors. Overall, 800 ligand-target predictions of prospectively designed ligands were tested experimentally, of which 75% were confirmed correct. We also demonstrate target engagement in vivo. The approach can be a useful source of drug leads where multi-target profiles are required to achieve either selectivity over other drug targets or a desired polypharmacology. PMID:23235874

  7. Automating risk analysis of software design models.

    PubMed

    Frydman, Maxime; Ruiz, Guifré; Heymann, Elisa; César, Eduardo; Miller, Barton P

    2014-01-01

    The growth of the internet and networked systems has exposed software to an increased amount of security threats. One of the responses from software developers to these threats is the introduction of security activities in the software development lifecycle. This paper describes an approach to reduce the need for costly human expertise to perform risk analysis in software, which is common in secure development methodologies, by automating threat modeling. Reducing the dependency on security experts aims at reducing the cost of secure development by allowing non-security-aware developers to apply secure development with little to no additional cost, making secure development more accessible. To automate threat modeling two data structures are introduced, identification trees and mitigation trees, to identify threats in software designs and advise mitigation techniques, while taking into account specification requirements and cost concerns. These are the components of our model for automated threat modeling, AutSEC. We validated AutSEC by implementing it in a tool based on data flow diagrams, from the Microsoft security development methodology, and applying it to VOMS, a grid middleware component, to evaluate our model's performance.

  8. Automated Procedure for Roll Pass Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambiase, F.; Langella, A.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this work has been to develop an automatic roll pass design method, capable of minimizing the number of roll passes. The adoption of artificial intelligence technologies, particularly expert systems, and a hybrid model for the surface profile evaluation of rolled bars, has allowed us to model the search for the minimal sequence with a tree path search. This approach permitted a geometrical optimization of roll passes while allowing automation of the roll pass design process. Moreover, the heuristic nature of the inferential engine contributes a great deal toward reducing search time, thus allowing such a system to be employed for industrial purposes. Finally, this new approach was compared with other recently developed automatic systems to validate and measure possible improvements among them.

  9. Team-Centered Perspective for Adaptive Automation Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III

    2003-01-01

    Automation represents a very active area of human factors research. The journal, Human Factors, published a special issue on automation in 1985. Since then, hundreds of scientific studies have been published examining the nature of automation and its interaction with human performance. However, despite a dramatic increase in research investigating human factors issues in aviation automation, there remain areas that need further exploration. This NASA Technical Memorandum describes a new area of automation design and research, called adaptive automation. It discusses the concepts and outlines the human factors issues associated with the new method of adaptive function allocation. The primary focus is on human-centered design, and specifically on ensuring that adaptive automation is from a team-centered perspective. The document shows that adaptive automation has many human factors issues common to traditional automation design. Much like the introduction of other new technologies and paradigm shifts, adaptive automation presents an opportunity to remediate current problems but poses new ones for human-automation interaction in aerospace operations. The review here is intended to communicate the philosophical perspective and direction of adaptive automation research conducted under the Aerospace Operations Systems (AOS), Physiological and Psychological Stressors and Factors (PPSF) project.

  10. Automating analog design: Taming the shrew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, A.

    1990-01-01

    The pace of progress in the design of integrated circuits continues to amaze observers inside and outside of the industry. Three decades ago, a 50 transistor chip was a technological wonder. Fifteen year later, a 5000 transistor device would 'wow' the crowds. Today, 50,000 transistor chips will earn a 'not too bad' assessment, but it takes 500,000 to really leave an impression. In 1975 a typical ASIC device had 1000 transistors, took one year to first samples (and two years to production) and sold for about 5 cents per transistor. Today's 50,000 transistor gate array takes about 4 months from spec to silicon, works the first time, and sells for about 0.02 cents per transistor. Fifteen years ago, the single most laborious and error prone step in IC design was the physical layout. Today, most IC's never see the hand of a layout designer: and automatic place and route tool converts the engineer's computer captured schematic to a complete physical design using a gate array or a library of standard cells also created by software rather than by designers. CAD has also been a generous benefactor to the digital design process. The architect of today's digital systems creates the design using an RTL or other high level simulator. Then the designer pushes a button to invoke the logic synthesizer-optimizer tool. A fault analyzer checks the result for testability and suggests where scan based cells will improve test coverage. One obstinate holdout amidst this parade of progress is the automation of analog design and its reduction to semi-custom techniques. This paper investigates the application of CAD techniques to analog design.

  11. Analyzing Automated Instructional Systems: Metaphors from Related Design Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.; Wilson, Brent G.

    Noting that automation has had an impact on virtually every manufacturing and information operation in the world, including instructional design (ID), this paper suggests three basic metaphors for automating instructional design activities: (1) computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems; (2) expert system advisor systems; and (3)…

  12. Automated Antenna Design with Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.; Globus, Al; Linden, Derek S.; Lohn, Jason D.

    2006-01-01

    Current methods of designing and optimizing antennas by hand are time and labor intensive, and limit complexity. Evolutionary design techniques can overcome these limitations by searching the design space and automatically finding effective solutions. In recent years, evolutionary algorithms have shown great promise in finding practical solutions in large, poorly understood design spaces. In particular, spacecraft antenna design has proven tractable to evolutionary design techniques. Researchers have been investigating evolutionary antenna design and optimization since the early 1990s, and the field has grown in recent years as computer speed has increased and electromagnetic simulators have improved. Two requirements-compliant antennas, one for ST5 and another for TDRS-C, have been automatically designed by evolutionary algorithms. The ST5 antenna is slated to fly this year, and a TDRS-C phased array element has been fabricated and tested. Such automated evolutionary design is enabled by medium-to-high quality simulators and fast modern computers to evaluate computer-generated designs. Evolutionary algorithms automate cut-and-try engineering, substituting automated search though millions of potential designs for intelligent search by engineers through a much smaller number of designs. For evolutionary design, the engineer chooses the evolutionary technique, parameters and the basic form of the antenna, e.g., single wire for ST5 and crossed-element Yagi for TDRS-C. Evolutionary algorithms then search for optimal configurations in the space defined by the engineer. NASA's Space Technology 5 (ST5) mission will launch three small spacecraft to test innovative concepts and technologies. Advanced evolutionary algorithms were used to automatically design antennas for ST5. The combination of wide beamwidth for a circularly-polarized wave and wide impedance bandwidth made for a challenging antenna design problem. From past experience in designing wire antennas, we chose to

  13. Automated Design Space Exploration with Aspen

    DOE PAGES

    Spafford, Kyle L.; Vetter, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Architects and applications scientists often use performance models to explore a multidimensional design space of architectural characteristics, algorithm designs, and application parameters. With traditional performance modeling tools, these explorations forced users to first develop a performance model and then repeatedly evaluate and analyze the model manually. These manual investigations proved laborious and error prone. More importantly, the complexity of this traditional process often forced users to simplify their investigations. To address this challenge of design space exploration, we extend our Aspen (Abstract Scalable Performance Engineering Notation) language with three new language constructs: user-defined resources, parameter ranges, and a collection ofmore » costs in the abstract machine model. Then, we use these constructs to enable automated design space exploration via a nonlinear optimization solver. We show how four interesting classes of design space exploration scenarios can be derived from Aspen models and formulated as pure nonlinear programs. The analysis tools are demonstrated using examples based on Aspen models for a three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform, the CoMD molecular dynamics proxy application, and the DARPA Streaming Sensor Challenge Problem. Our results show that this approach can compose and solve arbitrary performance modeling questions quickly and rigorously when compared to the traditional manual approach.« less

  14. Designing the Electronic Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Laural L.

    In an increasingly technological environment, traditional teaching presentation methods such as the podium, overhead, and transparencies are no longer sufficient. This document serves as a guide to designing and planning an electronic classroom for "bidirectional" communication between teacher and student. Topics include: (1) determining…

  15. FINDMOL: automated identification of macromolecules in electron-density maps.

    PubMed

    McKee, E W; Kanbi, L D; Childs, K L; Grosse-Kunstleve, R W; Adams, P D; Sacchettini, J C; Ioerger, T R

    2005-11-01

    Automating the determination of novel macromolecular structures via X-ray crystallographic methods involves building a model into an electron-density map. Unfortunately, the conventional crystallographic asymmetric unit volumes are usually not well matched to the biological molecular units. In most cases, the facets of the asymmetric unit cut the molecules into a number of disconnected fragments, rendering interpretation by the crystallographer significantly more difficult. The FINDMOL algorithm is designed to quickly parse the arrangement of trace points (pseudo-atoms) derived from a skeletonized electron-density map without requiring higher level prior information such as sequence information or number of molecules in the asymmetric unit. The algorithm was tested with a variety of density-modified maps computed with medium- to low-resolution data. Typically, the resulting volume resembles the biological unit. In the remaining cases the number of disconnected fragments is very small. In all examples, secondary-structural elements such as alpha-helices or beta-sheets are easily identifiable in the defragmented arrangement. FINDMOL can greatly assist a crystallographer during manual model building or in cases where automatic model building can only build partial models owing to limitations of the data such as low resolution and/or poor phases.

  16. Electronic circuitry used to automate paper chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffensen, G. R.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic circuit is used in a paper chromatograph instrument that has excellent sensitivity and furnishes a printed record of each test. The circuit measures and records changes in conductivity in a strip of chromatographic paper as different solutions are placed on it.

  17. Design automation for wafer scale integration

    SciTech Connect

    Donlan, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    Wafer scale integration (WSI) is a technique for implementing large digital systems on a single wafer. This thesis describes a system of design automation tools developed to aid in the implementation of wafer scale integrated systems. An overview of wafer scale integration is given with fabrication details and yield considerations discussed. The Wafer architectural Design Language (WDL) used to describe and specify a system architecture to the development system is introduced along with a compiler that translates the high level WDL description into net lists and other internal data bases. Interactive placement tools used to map the system architecture onto the functional die sites on a wafer are described. A very fast line probe router was developed to perform the custom wafer level routing need to personalize each wafer. Router data structures, algorithms, techniques, and results are discussed in detail. Sample wafer scale architectures and the result of their WSI implementations are shown. Also presented is the Wafer Transmission Module (WTM) a packaging technology related to wafer scale integration.

  18. Automated monitoring to reduce electron microscope downtime.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Matthias J; Resch, Guenter P

    2009-10-01

    High-end transmission electron microscopes are complex and sensitive instruments. Failure of one of the external supplies, malfunction of the microscope hardware or maloperation are typical reasons for subsystems to fail. Especially if undiscovered for a longer period of time, this can cause unnecessary downtime, compromising user access and increasing operating costs. Utilizing the software introduced in this article ("MoniTEM"), we have succeeded to reduce downtime of an FEI Tecnai Polara by coupling constant monitoring of critical subsystems with automatic, remote feedback to the system supervisor, ensuring immediate problem solving. The software described here is freely available from http://www.imba.oeaw.ac.at/monitem/ and can be readily adapted for use with other FEI transmission electron microscopes.

  19. Optimized and Automated design of Plasma Diagnostics for Additive Manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuber, James; Quinley, Morgan; Melnik, Paul; Sieck, Paul; Smith, Trevor; Chun, Katherine; Woodruff, Simon

    2016-10-01

    Despite having mature designs, diagnostics are usually custom designed for each experiment. Most of the design can be now be automated to reduce costs (engineering labor, and capital cost). We present results from scripted physics modeling and parametric engineering design for common optical and mechanical components found in many plasma diagnostics and outline the process for automated design optimization that employs scripts to communicate data from online forms through proprietary and open-source CAD and FE codes to provide a design that can be sent directly to a printer. As a demonstration of design automation, an optical beam dump, baffle and optical components are designed via an automated process and printed. Supported by DOE SBIR Grant DE-SC0011858.

  20. Design automation for integrated nonlinear logic circuits (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Vaerenbergh, Thomas; Pelc, Jason; Santori, Charles; Bose, Ranojoy; Kielpinski, Dave; Beausoleil, Raymond G.

    2016-05-01

    A key enabler of the IT revolution of the late 20th century was the development of electronic design automation (EDA) tools allowing engineers to manage the complexity of electronic circuits with transistor counts now reaching into the billions. Recently, we have been developing large-scale nonlinear photonic integrated logic circuits for next generation all-optical information processing. At this time a sufficiently powerful EDA-style software tool chain to design this type of complex circuits does not yet exist. Here we describe a hierarchical approach to automating the design and validation of photonic integrated circuits, which can scale to several orders of magnitude higher complexity than the state of the art. Most photonic integrated circuits developed today consist of a small number of components, and only limited hierarchy. For example, a simple photonic transceiver may contain on the order of 10 building-block components, consisting of grating couplers for photonic I/O, modulators, and signal splitters/combiners. Because this is relatively easy to lay out by hand (or simple script) existing photonic design tools have relatively little automation in comparison to electronics tools. But demonstrating all-optical logic will require significantly more complex photonic circuits containing up to 1,000 components, hence becoming infeasible to design manually. Our design framework is based off Python-based software from Luceda Photonics which provides an environment to describe components, simulate their behavior, and export design files (GDS) to foundries for fabrication. At a fundamental level, a photonic component is described as a parametric cell (PCell) similarly to electronics design. PCells are described by geometric characteristics of their layout. A critical part of the design framework is the implementation of PCells as Python objects. PCell objects can then use inheritance to simplify design, and hierarchical designs can be made by creating composite

  1. Design of automated system for management of arrival traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz; Nedell, William

    1989-01-01

    The design of an automated air traffic control system based on a hierarchy of advisory tools for controllers is described. Compatibility of the tools with the human controller, a key objective of the design, is achieved by a judicious selection of tasks to be automated and careful attention to the design of the controller system interface. The design comprises three interconnected subsystems referred to as the Traffic Management Advisor, the Descent Advisor, and the Final Approach Spacing Tool. Each of these subsystems provides a collection of tools for specific controller positions and tasks. The design of two of these tools, the Descent Advisor, which provides automation tools for managing descent traffic, and the Traffic Management Advisor, which generates optimum landing schedules is focused on. The algorithms, automation modes, and graphical interfaces incorporated in the design are described.

  2. The Electronic Nose Training Automation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schattke, Nathan

    2002-01-01

    The electronic nose is a method of using several sensors in conjunction to identify an unknown gas. Statistical analysis has shown that a large number of training exposures need to be performed in order to get a model that can be depended on. The number of training exposures needed is on the order of 1000. Data acquisition from the noses are generally automatic and built in. The gas generation equipment consists of a Miller-Nelson (MN) flow/temperature/humidity controller and a Kin-Tek (KT) trace gas generator. This equipment has been controlled in the past by an old data acquisition and control system. The new system will use new control boards and an easy graphical user interface. The programming for this is in the LabVIEW G programming language. A language easy for the user to make modifications to. This paper details some of the issues in selecting the components and programming the connections. It is not a primer on LabVIEW programming, a separate CD is being delivered with website files to teach that.

  3. Delivery validation of an automated modulated electron radiotherapy plan

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, T. Papaconstadopoulos, P.; Alexander, A.; Serban, M.; Devic, S.; Seuntjens, J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) represents an active area of interest that offers the potential to improve healthy tissue sparing in treatment of certain cancer cases. Challenges remain however in accurate beamlet dose calculation, plan optimization, collimation method, and delivery accuracy. In this work, the authors investigate the accuracy and efficiency of an end-to-end MERT plan and automated delivery method. Methods: Treatment planning was initiated on a previously treated whole breast irradiation case including an electron boost. All dose calculations were performed using Monte Carlo methods and beam weights were determined using a research-based treatment planning system capable of inverse optimization. The plan was delivered to radiochromic film placed in a water equivalent phantom for verification, using an automated motorized tertiary collimator. Results: The automated delivery, which covered four electron energies, 196 subfields, and 6183 total MU was completed in 25.8 min, including 6.2 min of beam-on time. The remainder of the delivery time was spent on collimator leaf motion and the automated interfacing with the accelerator in service mode. Comparison of the planned and delivered film dose gave 3%/3mm gamma pass rates of 62.1%, 99.8%, 97.8%, 98.3%, and 98.7% for the 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV, and combined energy deliveries, respectively. Delivery was also performed with a MapCHECK device and resulted in 3%/3  mm gamma pass rates of 88.8%, 86.1%, 89.4%, and 94.8% for the 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV energies, respectively. Conclusions: Results of the authors’ study showed that an accurate delivery utilizing an add-on tertiary electron collimator is possible using Monte Carlo calculated plans and inverse optimization, which brings MERT closer to becoming a viable option for physicians in treating superficial malignancies.

  4. Semi-Automated Diagnosis, Repair, and Rework of Spacecraft Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Oeftering, Richard C.; Easton, John W.; Anderson, Eric E.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program for Exploration of the Moon and Mars places human crews in extreme isolation in resource scarce environments. Near Earth, the discontinuation of Space Shuttle flights after 2010 will alter the up- and down-mass capacity for the International Space Station (ISS). NASA is considering new options for logistics support strategies for future missions. Aerospace systems are often composed of replaceable modular blocks that minimize the need for complex service operations in the field. Such a strategy however, implies a robust and responsive logistics infrastructure with relatively low transportation costs. The modular Orbital Replacement Units (ORU) used for ISS requires relatively large blocks of replacement hardware even though the actual failed component may really be three orders of magnitude smaller. The ability to perform in-situ repair of electronics circuits at the component level can dramatically reduce the scale of spares and related logistics cost. This ability also reduces mission risk, increases crew independence and improves the overall supportability of the program. The Component-Level Electronics Assembly Repair (CLEAR) task under the NASA Supportability program was established to demonstrate the practicality of repair by first investigating widely used soldering materials and processes (M&P) performed by modest manual means. The work will result in program guidelines for performing manual repairs along with design guidance for circuit reparability. The next phase of CLEAR recognizes that manual repair has its limitations and some highly integrated devices are extremely difficult to handle and demand semi-automated equipment. Further, electronics repairs require a broad range of diagnostic capability to isolate the faulty components. Finally repairs must pass functional tests to determine that the repairs are successful and the circuit can be returned to service. To prevent equipment demands from exceeding spacecraft volume

  5. EXADS - EXPERT SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATED DESIGN SYNTHESIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The expert system called EXADS was developed to aid users of the Automated Design Synthesis (ADS) general purpose optimization program. Because of the general purpose nature of ADS, it is difficult for a nonexpert to select the best choice of strategy, optimizer, and one-dimensional search options from the one hundred or so combinations that are available. EXADS aids engineers in determining the best combination based on their knowledge of the problem and the expert knowledge previously stored by experts who developed ADS. EXADS is a customized application of the AESOP artificial intelligence program (the general version of AESOP is available separately from COSMIC. The ADS program is also available from COSMIC.) The expert system consists of two main components. The knowledge base contains about 200 rules and is divided into three categories: constrained, unconstrained, and constrained treated as unconstrained. The EXADS inference engine is rule-based and makes decisions about a particular situation using hypotheses (potential solutions), rules, and answers to questions drawn from the rule base. EXADS is backward-chaining, that is, it works from hypothesis to facts. The rule base was compiled from sources such as literature searches, ADS documentation, and engineer surveys. EXADS will accept answers such as yes, no, maybe, likely, and don't know, or a certainty factor ranging from 0 to 10. When any hypothesis reaches a confidence level of 90% or more, it is deemed as the best choice and displayed to the user. If no hypothesis is confirmed, the user can examine explanations of why the hypotheses failed to reach the 90% level. The IBM PC version of EXADS is written in IQ-LISP for execution under DOS 2.0 or higher with a central memory requirement of approximately 512K of 8 bit bytes. This program was developed in 1986.

  6. An Intelligent Automation Platform for Rapid Bioprocess Design

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tianyi

    2014-01-01

    Bioprocess development is very labor intensive, requiring many experiments to characterize each unit operation in the process sequence to achieve product safety and process efficiency. Recent advances in microscale biochemical engineering have led to automated experimentation. A process design workflow is implemented sequentially in which (1) a liquid-handling system performs high-throughput wet lab experiments, (2) standalone analysis devices detect the data, and (3) specific software is used for data analysis and experiment design given the user’s inputs. We report an intelligent automation platform that integrates these three activities to enhance the efficiency of such a workflow. A multiagent intelligent architecture has been developed incorporating agent communication to perform the tasks automatically. The key contribution of this work is the automation of data analysis and experiment design and also the ability to generate scripts to run the experiments automatically, allowing the elimination of human involvement. A first-generation prototype has been established and demonstrated through lysozyme precipitation process design. All procedures in the case study have been fully automated through an intelligent automation platform. The realization of automated data analysis and experiment design, and automated script programming for experimental procedures has the potential to increase lab productivity. PMID:24088579

  7. Designing Domain-Specific HUMS Architectures: An Automated Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, Ravi; Agarwal, Neha; Kumar, Pramod; Sundaram, Parthiban

    2004-01-01

    The HUMS automation system automates the design of HUMS architectures. The automated design process involves selection of solutions from a large space of designs as well as pure synthesis of designs. Hence the whole objective is to efficiently search for or synthesize designs or parts of designs in the database and to integrate them to form the entire system design. The automation system adopts two approaches in order to produce the designs: (a) Bottom-up approach and (b) Top down approach. Both the approaches are endowed with a Suite of quantitative and quantitative techniques that enable a) the selection of matching component instances, b) the determination of design parameters, c) the evaluation of candidate designs at component-level and at system-level, d) the performance of cost-benefit analyses, e) the performance of trade-off analyses, etc. In short, the automation system attempts to capitalize on the knowledge developed from years of experience in engineering, system design and operation of the HUMS systems in order to economically produce the most optimal and domain-specific designs.

  8. TARDIS: An Automation Framework for JPL Mission Design and Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roundhill, Ian M.; Kelly, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Mission Design and Navigation at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has implemented an automation framework tool to assist in orbit determination and maneuver design analysis. This paper describes the lessons learned from previous automation tools and how they have been implemented in this tool. In addition this tool has revealed challenges in software implementation, testing, and user education. This paper describes some of these challenges and invites others to share their experiences.

  9. Advanced characterization of twins using automated electron backscatter diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S. I.; Bingert, J. F.; Mason, T. A.; Larson, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained using an automated, crystallographically-based technique for twin identification. The technique is based on the automated collection of spatially specific orientation measurements by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The key features of the analysis are identification of potential twin boundaries by their misorientation character, identification of the distinct boundary planes among the symmetrically equivalent candidates, and validation of these boundaries through comparison with the boundary and twin plane traces in the sample cross section. Results on the application of this technique to deformation twins in zirconium are analyzed for the effect of twin type and amount and sense of uniaxial deformation. The accumulation of strain tends to increase the misorientation deviation at least to the degree of the trace deviation compared with recrystallization twins in nickel. In addition to the results on characterizing the twin character, results on extending the twin analysis to automated identification of parent and daughter material for structures exhibiting twin deformation are reported as well.

  10. 21 CFR 111.30 - What requirements apply to automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What requirements apply to automated, mechanical... Utensils § 111.30 What requirements apply to automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment? For any automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment that you use to manufacture, package, label, or hold...

  11. 21 CFR 111.30 - What requirements apply to automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What requirements apply to automated, mechanical... Utensils § 111.30 What requirements apply to automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment? For any automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment that you use to manufacture, package, label, or hold...

  12. 21 CFR 111.30 - What requirements apply to automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What requirements apply to automated, mechanical... Utensils § 111.30 What requirements apply to automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment? For any automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment that you use to manufacture, package, label, or hold...

  13. 21 CFR 111.30 - What requirements apply to automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What requirements apply to automated, mechanical... Utensils § 111.30 What requirements apply to automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment? For any automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment that you use to manufacture, package, label, or hold...

  14. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Kurth, William; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, f_{uhr}, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  15. Design Methodology for Automated Construction Machines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-11

    positioning of structural members, and tunneling [3,5]. U.S. construction firms typically allocate little or no funding for R & D; progress to date...addition, four general purpose robots for building construction tasks [1] and the automation of sandblasting and concrete formwork cleaning have been

  16. Automation of the electron-beam welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, E.; Dzharov, V.; Kardjiev, M.; Mladenov, G.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the automatic control is considered of the vacuum and cooling systems of the located in the IE-BAS equipment for electron-beam welding, evaporation and surface modification. A project was elaborated for the control and management based on the development of an engineering support system using existing and additional technical means of automation. Optimization of the indicators, which are critical for the duration of reaching the working regime and stopping the operation of the installation, can be made using experimentally obtained transient characteristics. The automation of the available equipment aimed at improving its efficiency and the repeatability of the obtained results, as well as at stabilizing the process parameters, should be integrated in an Engineering Support System which, besides the operator supervision, consists of several subsystems for equipment control, data acquisition, information analysis, system management and decision-making support.

  17. Software design for automated assembly of truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herstrom, Catherine L.; Grantham, Carolyn; Allen, Cheryl L.; Doggett, William R.; Will, Ralph W.

    1992-01-01

    Concern over the limited intravehicular activity time has increased the interest in performing in-space assembly and construction operations with automated robotic systems. A technique being considered at LaRC is a supervised-autonomy approach, which can be monitored by an Earth-based supervisor that intervenes only when the automated system encounters a problem. A test-bed to support evaluation of the hardware and software requirements for supervised-autonomy assembly methods was developed. This report describes the design of the software system necessary to support the assembly process. The software is hierarchical and supports both automated assembly operations and supervisor error-recovery procedures, including the capability to pause and reverse any operation. The software design serves as a model for the development of software for more sophisticated automated systems and as a test-bed for evaluation of new concepts and hardware components.

  18. A Toolset for Supporting Iterative Human Automation: Interaction in Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The addition of automation has greatly extended humans' capability to accomplish tasks, including those that are difficult, complex and safety critical. The majority of Human - Automation Interacton (HAl) results in more efficient and safe operations, ho,,:,ever ertain unpected atomatlon behaviors or "automation surprises" can be frustrating and, In certain safety critical operations (e.g. transporttion, manufacturing control, medicine), may result in injuries or. the loss of life.. (Mellor, 1994; Leveson, 1995; FAA, 1995; BASI, 1998; Sheridan, 2002). This papr describes he development of a design tool that enables on the rapid development and evaluation. of automaton prototypes. The ultimate goal of the work is to provide a design platform upon which automation surprise vulnerability analyses can be integrated.

  19. AI and workflow automation: The prototype electronic purchase request system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, Michael M.; Wolfe, Shawn R.

    1994-01-01

    Automating 'paper' workflow processes with electronic forms and email can dramatically improve the efficiency of those processes. However, applications that involve complex forms that are used for a variety of purposes or that require numerous and varied approvals often require additional software tools to ensure that (1) the electronic form is correctly and completely filled out, and (2) the form is routed to the proper individuals and organizations for approval. The prototype electronic purchase request (PEPR) system, which has been in pilot use at NASA Ames Research Center since December 1993, seamlessly links a commercial electronics forms package and a CLIPS-based knowledge system that first ensures that electronic forms are correct and complete, and then generates an 'electronic routing slip' that is used to route the form to the people who must sign it. The PEPR validation module is context-sensitive, and can apply different validation rules at each step in the approval process. The PEPR system is form-independent, and has been applied to several different types of forms. The system employs a version of CLIPS that has been extended to support AppleScript, a recently-released scripting language for the Macintosh. This 'scriptability' provides both a transparent, flexible interface between the two programs and a means by which a single copy of the knowledge base can be utilized by numerous remote users.

  20. Stressing Design in Electronics Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbert, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    Advocates a strong emphasis on the teaching of the design of electronic circuits in undergraduate courses. An instructional paradigm involving the design and construction of a single-transistor amplifier is provided. (CP)

  1. Automated Theorem Proving in High-Quality Software Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Swanson, Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The amount and complexity of software developed during the last few years has increased tremendously. In particular, programs are being used more and more in embedded systems (from car-brakes to plant-control). Many of these applications are safety-relevant, i.e. a malfunction of hardware or software can cause severe damage or loss. Tremendous risks are typically present in the area of aviation, (nuclear) power plants or (chemical) plant control. Here, even small problems can lead to thousands of casualties and huge financial losses. Large financial risks also exist when computer systems are used in the area of telecommunication (telephone, electronic commerce) or space exploration. Computer applications in this area are not only subject to safety considerations, but also security issues are important. All these systems must be designed and developed to guarantee high quality with respect to safety and security. Even in an industrial setting which is (or at least should be) aware of the high requirements in Software Engineering, many incidents occur. For example, the Warshaw Airbus crash, was caused by an incomplete requirements specification. Uncontrolled reuse of an Ariane 4 software module was the reason for the Ariane 5 disaster. Some recent incidents in the telecommunication area, like illegal "cloning" of smart-cards of D2GSM handies, or the extraction of (secret) passwords from German T-online users show that also in this area serious flaws can happen. Due to the inherent complexity of computer systems, most authors claim that only a rigorous application of formal methods in all stages of the software life cycle can ensure high quality of the software and lead to real safe and secure systems. In this paper, we will have a look, in how far automated theorem proving can contribute to a more widespread application of formal methods and their tools, and what automated theorem provers (ATPs) must provide in order to be useful.

  2. Automated Assistance for Designing Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlach, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    MagBear12 is a computer code that assists in the design of radial, heteropolar active magnetic bearings (AMBs). MagBear12 was developed to help in designing the system described in "Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System". Beyond this initial application, MagBear12 is expected to be useful for designing AMBs for a variety of rotating machinery. This program incorporates design rules and governing equations that are also implemented in other, proprietary design software used by AMB manufacturers. In addition, this program incorporates an advanced unpublished fringing-magnetic-field model that increases accuracy beyond that offered by the other AMB-design software.

  3. Conceptual design of an aircraft automated coating removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.; Draper, J.V.; Pin, F.G.; Primm, A.H.; Shekhar, S.

    1996-05-01

    Paint stripping of the U.S. Air Force`s large transport aircrafts is currently a labor-intensive, manual process. Significant reductions in costs, personnel and turnaround time can be accomplished by the judicious use of automation in some process tasks. This paper presents the conceptual design of a coating removal systems for the tail surfaces of the C-5 plane. Emphasis is placed on the technology selection to optimize human-automation synergy with respect to overall costs, throughput, quality, safety, and reliability. Trade- offs between field-proven vs. research-requiring technologies, and between expected gain vs. cost and complexity, have led to a conceptual design which is semi-autonomous (relying on the human for task specification and disturbance handling) yet incorporates sensor- based automation (for sweep path generation and tracking, surface following, stripping quality control and tape/breach handling).

  4. Automating expert role to determine design concept in Kansei Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokman, Anitawati Mohd; Haron, Mohammad Bakri Che; Abidin, Siti Zaleha Zainal; Khalid, Noor Elaiza Abd

    2016-02-01

    Affect has become imperative in product quality. In affective design field, Kansei Engineering (KE) has been recognized as a technology that enables discovery of consumer's emotion and formulation of guide to design products that win consumers in the competitive market. Albeit powerful technology, there is no rule of thumb in its analysis and interpretation process. KE expertise is required to determine sets of related Kansei and the significant concept of emotion. Many research endeavors become handicapped with the limited number of available and accessible KE experts. This work is performed to simulate the role of experts with the use of Natphoric algorithm thus providing sound solution to the complexity and flexibility in KE. The algorithm is designed to learn the process by implementing training datasets taken from previous KE research works. A framework for automated KE is then designed to realize the development of automated KE system. A comparative analysis is performed to determine feasibility of the developed prototype to automate the process. The result shows that the significant Kansei is determined by manual KE implementation and the automated process is highly similar. KE research advocates will benefit this system to automatically determine significant design concepts.

  5. Design flow automation for variable-shaped beam pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloecker, Martin; Ballhorn, Gerd

    2002-07-01

    Raster scan pattern generators have been used in the photomask industry for many years. Methods and software tools for data preparation for these pattern generators are well established and have been integrated into design flows with a high degree of automation. But the growing requirements for pattern fidelity have lead to the introduction of 50 kV variable shaped beam pattern generators. Due to their different writing strategy these tools use proprietary data formats and in turn require an optimized data preparation. As a result the existing design flow has to be adopted to account for these requirements. Due to the fact that cycle times have grown severely over the last years the automation of this adopted design flow will not only enhance the design flow quality by avoiding errors during manual operations but will also help to reduce turn-around times. We developed and implemented an automated design flow for a variable shaped beam pattern generator which had to fulfill two conflicting requirements: Well established automated tools originally developed for raster scan pattern generators had to be retained with only slight modifications to avoid the (re)implementation and the concurrent usage of two systems while on the other hand data generation especially during fracturing had to be optimized for a variable shaped beam pattern generator.

  6. Generative Representations for Computer-Automated Design Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.

    2004-01-01

    With the increasing computational power of Computers, software design systems are progressing from being tools for architects and designers to express their ideas to tools capable of creating designs under human guidance. One of the main limitations for these computer-automated design programs is the representation with which they encode designs. If the representation cannot encode a certain design, then the design program cannot produce it. Similarly, a poor representation makes some types of designs extremely unlikely to be created. Here we define generative representations as those representations which can create and reuse organizational units within a design and argue that reuse is necessary for design systems to scale to more complex and interesting designs. To support our argument we describe GENRE, an evolutionary design program that uses both a generative and a non-generative representation, and compare the results of evolving designs with both types of representations.

  7. Automating the design of scientific computing software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kant, Elaine

    1992-01-01

    SINAPSE is a domain-specific software design system that generates code from specifications of equations and algorithm methods. This paper describes the system's design techniques (planning in a space of knowledge-based refinement and optimization rules), user interaction style (user has option to control decision making), and representation of knowledge (rules and objects). It also summarizes how the system knowledge has evolved over time and suggests some issues in building software design systems to facilitate reuse.

  8. A Case Study in CAD Design Automation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Andrew G.; Hartman, Nathan W.

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD) software and other product life-cycle management (PLM) tools have become ubiquitous in industry during the past 20 years. Over this time they have continuously evolved, becoming programs with enormous capabilities, but the companies that use them have not evolved their design practices at the same rate. Due to the…

  9. Generative Representations for Computer-Automated Evolutionary Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing computational power of computers, software design systems are progressing from being tools for architects and designers to express their ideas to tools capable of creating designs under human guidance. One of the main limitations for these computer-automated design systems is the representation with which they encode designs. If the representation cannot encode a certain design, then the design system cannot produce it. To be able to produce new types of designs, and not just optimize pre-defined parameterizations, evolutionary design systems must use generative representations. Generative representations are assembly procedures, or algorithms, for constructing a design thereby allowing for truly novel design solutions to be encoded. In addition, by enabling modularity, regularity and hierarchy, the level of sophistication that can be evolved is increased. We demonstrate the advantages of generative representations on two different design domains: the evolution of spacecraft antennas and the evolution of 3D objects.

  10. Implementing and Improving Automated Electronic Tumor Molecular Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Staggs, David B.; Hackett, Lauren; Haberman, Erich; Tod, Mike; Levy, Mia; Warner, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Oncology practice increasingly requires the use of molecular profiling of tumors to inform the use of targeted therapeutics. However, many oncologists use third-party laboratories to perform tumor genomic testing, and these laboratories may not have electronic interfaces with the provider’s electronic medical record (EMR) system. The resultant reporting mechanisms, such as plain-paper faxing, can reduce report fidelity, slow down reporting procedures for a physician’s practice, and make reports less accessible. Vanderbilt University Medical Center and its genomic laboratory testing partner have collaborated to create an automated electronic reporting system that incorporates genetic testing results directly into the clinical EMR. This system was iteratively tested, and causes of failure were discovered and addressed. Most errors were attributable to data entry or typographical errors that made reports unable to be linked to the correct patient in the EMR. By providing direct feedback to providers, we were able to significantly decrease the rate of transmission errors (from 6.29% to 3.84%; P < .001). The results and lessons of 1 year of using the system and transmitting 832 tumor genomic testing reports are reported. PMID:26813927

  11. Universal electronics for miniature and automated chemical assays.

    PubMed

    Urban, Pawel L

    2015-02-21

    This minireview discusses universal electronic modules (generic programmable units) and their use by analytical chemists to construct inexpensive, miniature or automated devices. Recently, open-source platforms have gained considerable popularity among tech-savvy chemists because their implementation often does not require expert knowledge and investment of funds. Thus, chemistry students and researchers can easily start implementing them after a few hours of reading tutorials and trial-and-error. Single-board microcontrollers and micro-computers such as Arduino, Teensy, Raspberry Pi or BeagleBone enable collecting experimental data with high precision as well as efficient control of electric potentials and actuation of mechanical systems. They are readily programmed using high-level languages, such as C, C++, JavaScript or Python. They can also be coupled with mobile consumer electronics, including smartphones as well as teleinformatic networks. More demanding analytical tasks require fast signal processing. Field-programmable gate arrays enable efficient and inexpensive prototyping of high-performance analytical platforms, thus becoming increasingly popular among analytical chemists. This minireview discusses the advantages and drawbacks of universal electronic modules, considering their application in prototyping and manufacture of intelligent analytical instrumentation.

  12. DESIGN OF SMALL AUTOMATION WORK CELL SYSTEM DEMONSTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    C. TURNER; J. PEHL; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    The introduction of automation systems into many of the facilities dealing with the production, use and disposition of nuclear materials has been an ongoing objective. Many previous attempts have been made, using a variety of monolithic and, in some cases, modular technologies. Many of these attempts were less than successful, owing to the difficulty of the problem, the lack of maturity of the technology, and over optimism about the capabilities of a particular system. Consequently, it is not surprising that suggestions that automation can reduce worker Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) levels are often met with skepticism and caution. The development of effective demonstrations of these technologies is of vital importance if automation is to become an acceptable option for nuclear material processing environments. The University of Texas Robotics Research Group (UTRRG) has been pursuing the development of technologies to support modular small automation systems (each of less than 5 degrees-of-freedom) and the design of those systems for more than two decades. Properly designed and implemented, these technologies have a potential to reduce the worker ORE associated with work in nuclear materials processing facilities. Successful development of systems for these applications requires the development of technologies that meet the requirements of the applications. These application requirements form a general set of rules that applicable technologies and approaches need to adhere to, but in and of themselves are generally insufficient for the design of a specific automation system. For the design of an appropriate system, the associated task specifications and relationships need to be defined. These task specifications also provide a means by which appropriate technology demonstrations can be defined. Based on the requirements and specifications of the operations of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) pilot line at Los Alamos National

  13. Automated Design of the Europa Orbiter Tour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Andrew F.; Strange, Nathan J.; Longuski, James M.; Bonfiglio, Eugene P.; Taylor, Irene (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we investigate tours of the Jovian satellites Europa Ganymede, and Callisto for the Europa Orbiter Mission. The principal goal of the tour design is to lower arrival V_ for the final Europa encounter while meeting all of the design constraints. Key constraints arise from considering the total time of the tour and the radiation dosage of a tour. These tours may employ 14 or more encounters with the Jovian satellites. hence there is an enormous number of possible sequences of these satellites to investigate. We develop a graphical method that greatly aids the design process.

  14. Automated Design of the Europa Orbiter Tour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Andrew F.; Strange, Nathan J.; Longusaki, James M.; Bonfiglio, Eugene P.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we investigate tours of the Jovian satellites Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto for the Europa Orbiter Mission. The principal goal of the tour design is to lower arrival V(sub infinity) for the final Europa encounter while meeting all of the design constraints. Key constraints arise from considering the total time of the tour and the radiation dosage of a tour. These tours may employ 14 or more encounters with the Jovian satellites, hence there is an enormous number of possible sequences of these satellites to investigate. We develop a graphical method that greatly aids the design process.

  15. Automated Electron Microscopy for Evaluating Two-dimensional Crystallization of Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Minghui; Vink, Martin; Kim, Changki; Derr, KD; Koss, John; D'Amico, Kevin; Cheng, Anchi; Pulokas, James; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Stokes, David

    2010-01-01

    Membrane proteins fulfill many important roles in the cell and represent the target for a large number of therapeutic drugs. Although structure determination of membrane proteins has become a major priority, it has proven to be technically challenging. Electron microscopy of two-dimensional (2D) crystals has the advantage of visualizing membrane proteins in their natural lipidic environment, but has been underutilized in recent structural genomics efforts. To improve the general applicability of electron crystallography, high-throughput methods are needed for screening large numbers of conditions for 2D crystallization, thereby increasing the chances of obtaining well ordered crystals and thus achieving atomic resolution. Previous reports describe devices for growing 2D crystals on a 96-well format. The current report describes a system for automated imaging of these screens with an electron microscope. Samples are inserted with a two-part robot: a SCARA robot for loading samples into the microscope holder, and a Cartesian robot for placing the holder into the electron microscope. A standard JEOL 1230 electron microscope was used, though a new tip was designed for the holder and a toggle switch controlling the airlock was rewired to allow robot control. A computer program for controlling the robots was integrated with the Leginon program, which provides a module for automated imaging of individual samples. The resulting images are uploaded into the Sesame laboratory information management system database where they are associated with other data relevant to the crystallization screen. PMID:20197095

  16. Automated radiation hard ASIC design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Mike; Bartholet, Bill; Baze, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A commercial based, foundry independent, compiler design tool (ChipCrafter) with custom radiation hardened library cells is described. A unique analysis approach allows low hardness risk for Application Specific IC's (ASIC's). Accomplishments, radiation test results, and applications are described.

  17. CMOS-array design-automation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, A.; Lombardt, T.

    1979-01-01

    Thirty four page report discusses design of 4,096-bit complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) read-only memory (ROM). CMOSROM is either mask or laser programable. Report is divided into six sections; section one describes background of ROM chips; section two presents design goals for chip; section three discusses chip implementation and chip statistics; conclusions and recommendations are given in sections four thru six.

  18. Automated database design from natural language input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Fernando; Segami, Carlos; Delaune, Carl

    1995-01-01

    Users and programmers of small systems typically do not have the skills needed to design a database schema from an English description of a problem. This paper describes a system that automatically designs databases for such small applications from English descriptions provided by end-users. Although the system has been motivated by the space applications at Kennedy Space Center, and portions of it have been designed with that idea in mind, it can be applied to different situations. The system consists of two major components: a natural language understander and a problem-solver. The paper describes briefly the knowledge representation structures constructed by the natural language understander, and, then, explains the problem-solver in detail.

  19. A compendium of controlled diffusion blades generated by an automated inverse design procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz, Jose M.

    1989-01-01

    A set of sample cases was produced to test an automated design procedure developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center for the design of controlled diffusion blades. The range of application of the automated design procedure is documented. The results presented include characteristic compressor and turbine blade sections produced with the automated design code as well as various other airfoils produced with the base design method prior to the incorporation of the automated procedure.

  20. Towards automation of user interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gastner, Rainer; Kraetzschmar, Gerhard K.; Lutz, Ernst

    1992-01-01

    This paper suggests an approach to automatic software design in the domain of graphical user interfaces. There are still some drawbacks in existing user interface management systems (UIMS's) which basically offer only quantitative layout specifications via direct manipulation. Our approach suggests a convenient way to get a default graphical user interface which may be customized and redesigned easily in further prototyping cycles.

  1. Library Automation Design for Visually Impaired People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurtay, Nilufer; Bicil, Yucel; Celebi, Sait; Cit, Guluzar; Dural, Deniz

    2011-01-01

    Speech synthesis is a technology used in many different areas in computer science. This technology can bring a solution to reading activity of visually impaired people due to its text to speech conversion. Based on this problem, in this study, a system is designed needed for a visually impaired person to make use of all the library facilities in…

  2. Automated Design of Complex Dynamic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Michiel; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Bienstman, Peter; Dambre, Joni

    2014-01-01

    Several fields of study are concerned with uniting the concept of computation with that of the design of physical systems. For example, a recent trend in robotics is to design robots in such a way that they require a minimal control effort. Another example is found in the domain of photonics, where recent efforts try to benefit directly from the complex nonlinear dynamics to achieve more efficient signal processing. The underlying goal of these and similar research efforts is to internalize a large part of the necessary computations within the physical system itself by exploiting its inherent non-linear dynamics. This, however, often requires the optimization of large numbers of system parameters, related to both the system's structure as well as its material properties. In addition, many of these parameters are subject to fabrication variability or to variations through time. In this paper we apply a machine learning algorithm to optimize physical dynamic systems. We show that such algorithms, which are normally applied on abstract computational entities, can be extended to the field of differential equations and used to optimize an associated set of parameters which determine their behavior. We show that machine learning training methodologies are highly useful in designing robust systems, and we provide a set of both simple and complex examples using models of physical dynamical systems. Interestingly, the derived optimization method is intimately related to direct collocation a method known in the field of optimal control. Our work suggests that the application domains of both machine learning and optimal control have a largely unexplored overlapping area which envelopes a novel design methodology of smart and highly complex physical systems. PMID:24497969

  3. Designing Electronic Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschner, Paul; Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Kreijns, Karel; Beers, Pieter Jelle

    2004-01-01

    Electronic collaborative learning environments for learning and working are in vogue. Designers design them according to their own constructivist interpretations of what collaborative learning is and what it should achieve. Educators employ them with different educational approaches and in diverse situations to achieve different ends. Students use…

  4. Automated Design Framework for Synthetic Biology Exploiting Pareto Optimality.

    PubMed

    Otero-Muras, Irene; Banga, Julio R

    2017-04-12

    In this work we consider Pareto optimality for automated design in synthetic biology. We present a generalized framework based on a mixed-integer dynamic optimization formulation that, given design specifications, allows the computation of Pareto optimal sets of designs, that is, the set of best trade-offs for the metrics of interest. We show how this framework can be used for (i) forward design, that is, finding the Pareto optimal set of synthetic designs for implementation, and (ii) reverse design, that is, analyzing and inferring motifs and/or design principles of gene regulatory networks from the Pareto set of optimal circuits. Finally, we illustrate the capabilities and performance of this framework considering four case studies. In the first problem we consider the forward design of an oscillator. In the remaining problems, we illustrate how to apply the reverse design approach to find motifs for stripe formation, rapid adaption, and fold-change detection, respectively.

  5. Automated Processing of ISIS Topside Ionograms into Electron Density Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinisch, bodo W.; Huang, Xueqin; Bilitza, Dieter; Hills, H. Kent

    2004-01-01

    Modeling of the topside ionosphere has for the most part relied on just a few years of data from topside sounder satellites. The widely used Bent et al. (1972) model, for example, is based on only 50,000 Alouette 1 profiles. The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) (Bilitza, 1990, 2001) uses an analytical description of the graphs and tables provided by Bent et al. (1972). The Alouette 1, 2 and ISIS 1, 2 topside sounder satellites of the sixties and seventies were ahead of their times in terms of the sheer volume of data obtained and in terms of the computer and software requirements for data analysis. As a result, only a small percentage of the collected topside ionograms was converted into electron density profiles. Recently, a NASA-funded data restoration project has undertaken and is continuing the process of digitizing the Alouette/ISIS ionograms from the analog 7-track tapes. Our project involves the automated processing of these digital ionograms into electron density profiles. The project accomplished a set of important goals that will have a major impact on understanding and modeling of the topside ionosphere: (1) The TOPside Ionogram Scaling and True height inversion (TOPIST) software was developed for the automated scaling and inversion of topside ionograms. (2) The TOPIST software was applied to the over 300,000 ISIS-2 topside ionograms that had been digitized in the fkamework of a separate AISRP project (PI: R.F. Benson). (3) The new TOPIST-produced database of global electron density profiles for the topside ionosphere were made publicly available through NASA s National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) ftp archive at . (4) Earlier Alouette 1,2 and ISIS 1, 2 data sets of electron density profiles from manual scaling of selected sets of ionograms were converted fiom a highly-compressed binary format into a user-friendly ASCII format and made publicly available through nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov. The new database for the topside

  6. Design of automation tools for management of descent traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz; Nedell, William

    1988-01-01

    The design of an automated air traffic control system based on a hierarchy of advisory tools for controllers is described. Compatibility of the tools with the human controller, a key objective of the design, is achieved by a judicious selection of tasks to be automated and careful attention to the design of the controller system interface. The design comprises three interconnected subsystems referred to as the Traffic Management Advisor, the Descent Advisor, and the Final Approach Spacing Tool. Each of these subsystems provides a collection of tools for specific controller positions and tasks. This paper focuses primarily on the Descent Advisor which provides automation tools for managing descent traffic. The algorithms, automation modes, and graphical interfaces incorporated in the design are described. Information generated by the Descent Advisor tools is integrated into a plan view traffic display consisting of a high-resolution color monitor. Estimated arrival times of aircraft are presented graphically on a time line, which is also used interactively in combination with a mouse input device to select and schedule arrival times. Other graphical markers indicate the location of the fuel-optimum top-of-descent point and the predicted separation distances of aircraft at a designated time-control point. Computer generated advisories provide speed and descent clearances which the controller can issue to aircraft to help them arrive at the feeder gate at the scheduled times or with specified separation distances. Two types of horizontal guidance modes, selectable by the controller, provide markers for managing the horizontal flightpaths of aircraft under various conditions. The entire system consisting of descent advisor algorithm, a library of aircraft performance models, national airspace system data bases, and interactive display software has been implemented on a workstation made by Sun Microsystems, Inc. It is planned to use this configuration in operational

  7. Interchange of electronic design through VHDL and EIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    The need for both robust and unambiguous electronic designs is a direct requirement of the astonishing growth in design and manufacturing capability during recent years. In order to manage the plethora of designs, and have the design data both interchangeable and interoperable, the Very High Speed Integrated Circuits (VHSIC) program is developing two major standards for the electronic design community. The VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) is designed to be the lingua franca for transmission of design data between designers and their environments. The Engineering Information System (EIS) is designed to ease the integration of data betweeen diverse design automation systems. This paper describes the rationale for the necessity for these two standards and how they provide a synergistic expressive capability across the macrocosm of design environments.

  8. Interchange of electronic design through VHDL and EIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Richard M.

    1987-10-01

    The need for both robust and unambiguous electronic designs is a direct requirement of the astonishing growth in design and manufacturing capability during recent years. In order to manage the plethora of designs, and have the design data both interchangeable and interoperable, the Very High Speed Integrated Circuits (VHSIC) program is developing two major standards for the electronic design community. The VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) is designed to be the lingua franca for transmission of design data between designers and their environments. The Engineering Information System (EIS) is designed to ease the integration of data betweeen diverse design automation systems. This paper describes the rationale for the necessity for these two standards and how they provide a synergistic expressive capability across the macrocosm of design environments.

  9. An automated methodology development. [software design for combat simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    The design methodology employed in testing the applicability of Ada in large-scale combat simulations is described. Ada was considered as a substitute for FORTRAN to lower life cycle costs and ease the program development efforts. An object-oriented approach was taken, which featured definitions of military targets, the capability of manipulating their condition in real-time, and one-to-one correlation between the object states and real world states. The simulation design process was automated by the problem statement language (PSL)/problem statement analyzer (PSA). The PSL/PSA system accessed the problem data base directly to enhance the code efficiency by, e.g., eliminating non-used subroutines, and provided for automated report generation, besides allowing for functional and interface descriptions. The ways in which the methodology satisfied the responsiveness, reliability, transportability, modifiability, timeliness and efficiency goals are discussed.

  10. Design methodology of an automated scattering measurement facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, D. G.

    1985-12-01

    This thesis addresses the design methodology surrounding an automated scattering measurement facility. A brief historical survey of radar cross-section (RCS) measurements is presented. The electromagnetic theory associated with a continuous wave (CW) background cancellation technique for measuring RCS is discussed as background. In addition, problems associated with interfacing test equipment, data storage and output are addressed. The facility used as a model for this thesis is located at the Air Force Institute of Technology, WPARB, OH. The design methodology applies to any automated scattering measurement facility. A software package incorporating features that enhance the operation of AFIT's facility by students is presented. Finally, sample output from the software package illustrate formats for displaying RCS data.

  11. Crew aiding and automation: A system concept for terminal area operations, and guidelines for automation design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer, John P.

    1994-01-01

    This research and development program comprised two efforts: the development of guidelines for the design of automated systems, with particular emphasis on automation design that takes advantage of contextual information, and the concept-level design of a crew aiding system, the Terminal Area Navigation Decision Aiding Mediator (TANDAM). This concept outlines a system capable of organizing navigation and communication information and assisting the crew in executing the operations required in descent and approach. In service of this endeavor, problem definition activities were conducted that identified terminal area navigation and operational familiarization exercises addressing the terminal area navigation problem. Both airborne and ground-based (ATC) elements of aircraft control were extensively researched. The TANDAM system concept was then specified, and the crew interface and associated systems described. Additionally, three descent and approach scenarios were devised in order to illustrate the principal functions of the TANDAM system concept in relation to the crew, the aircraft, and ATC. A plan for the evaluation of the TANDAM system was established. The guidelines were developed based on reviews of relevant literature, and on experience gained in the design effort.

  12. Semi-Automated Neuron Boundary Detection and Nonbranching Process Segmentation in Electron Microscopy Images

    SciTech Connect

    Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Watanabe, Shigeki; Giuly, Richard J.; Paiva, Antonio R.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscientists are developing new imaging techniques and generating large volumes of data in an effort to understand the complex structure of the nervous system. The complexity and size of this data makes human interpretation a labor-intensive task. To aid in the analysis, new segmentation techniques for identifying neurons in these feature rich datasets are required. This paper presents a method for neuron boundary detection and nonbranching process segmentation in electron microscopy images and visualizing them in three dimensions. It combines both automated segmentation techniques with a graphical user interface for correction of mistakes in the automated process. The automated process first uses machine learning and image processing techniques to identify neuron membranes that deliniate the cells in each two-dimensional section. To segment nonbranching processes, the cell regions in each two-dimensional section are connected in 3D using correlation of regions between sections. The combination of this method with a graphical user interface specially designed for this purpose, enables users to quickly segment cellular processes in large volumes.

  13. A new design concept for an automated peanut processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ertas, A.; Tanju, B.T.; Fair, W.T.; Butts, C.

    1996-12-31

    Peanut quality is a major concern in all phases of the peanut industry from production to manufacturing. Postharvest processing of peanuts can have profound effects on the quality and safety of peanut food products. Curing is a key step in postharvest processing. Curing peanuts improperly can significantly reduce quality, and result in significant losses to both farmers and processors. The conventional drying system designed in the 1960`s is still being used in the processing of the peanuts today. The objectives of this paper is to design and develop a new automated peanut drying system for dry climates capable of handling approximately 20 million lbm of peanuts per harvest season.

  14. An automated quality assessor for Ada object-oriented designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailin, Sidney C.

    1988-01-01

    A tool for evaluating object-oriented designs (OODs) for Ada software is described. The tool assumes a design expressed as a hierarchy of object diagrams. A design of this type identifies the objects of a system, an interface to each object, and the usage relationships between objects. When such a design is implemented in Ada, objects become packages, interfaces become package specifications, and usage relationships become Ada `with' clauses and package references. An automated quality assessor has been developed that is based on flagging undesirable design constructs. For convenience, distinctions are made among three levels of severity: questionable, undesirable, and hazardous. A questionable construct is one that may well be appropriate. An undesirable construct is one that should be changed because it is potentially harmful to the reliability, maintainability, or reusability of the software. A hazardous construct is one that is undesirable and that introduces a high level of risk.

  15. The CADSS design automation system. [computerized design language for small digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    This research was designed to implement and extend a previously defined design automation system for the design of small digital structures. A description is included of the higher level language developed to describe systems as a sequence of register transfer operations. The system simulator which is used to determine if the original description is correct is also discussed. The design automation system produces tables describing the state transistions of the system and the operation of all registers. In addition all Boolean equations specifying system operation are minimized and converted to NAND gate structures. Suggestions for further extensions to the system are also given.

  16. Coupling Automated Electron Backscatter Diffraction with Transmission Electron and Atomic Force Microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A.J.; Kumar, M.; Bedrossian, P.J.; King, W.E.

    2000-01-26

    Grain boundary network engineering is an emerging field that encompasses the concept that modifications to conventional thermomechanical processing can result in improved properties through the disruption of the random grain boundary network. Various researchers have reported a correlation between the grain boundary character distribution (defined as the fractions of special and random grain boundaries) and dramatic improvements in properties such as corrosion and stress corrosion cracking, creep, etc. While much early work in the field emphasized property improvements, the opportunity now exists to elucidate the underlying materials science of grain boundary network engineering. Recent investigations at LLNL have coupled automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to elucidate these fundamental mechanisms. This investigation provides evidence that grain boundary network engineering and the formation of annealing twins disrupt the connectivity of the random grain boundary network and is likely responsible for the experimentally observed improvement in properties. This work illustrates that coupling of automated EBSD with other microstructural probes such as TEM and AFM provides data of greater value than any single technique in isolation. The coupled techniques have been applied to aid in understanding the underlying mechanisms of grain boundary network engineering and the corrosion properties of individual boundaries.

  17. 76 FR 27606 - Technical Corrections To Remove Obsolete References to Non-Automated Carriers From Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... commercial carrier (sea, air, rail, or truck) through a CBP-approved electronic data interchange system. The CBP-approved electronic data interchange (transmission) system is the Automated Manifest System (AMS... carrier (sea, air, rail, or truck) through the CBP-approved electronic data interchange system. The...

  18. An automated approach to magnetic divertor configuration design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blommaert, M.; Dekeyser, W.; Baelmans, M.; Gauger, N. R.; Reiter, D.

    2015-01-01

    Automated methods based on optimization can greatly assist computational engineering design in many areas. In this paper an optimization approach to the magnetic design of a nuclear fusion reactor divertor is proposed and applied to a tokamak edge magnetic configuration in a first feasibility study. The approach is based on reduced models for magnetic field and plasma edge, which are integrated with a grid generator into one sensitivity code. The design objective chosen here for demonstrative purposes is to spread the divertor target heat load as much as possible over the entire target area. Constraints on the separatrix position are introduced to eliminate physically irrelevant magnetic field configurations during the optimization cycle. A gradient projection method is used to ensure stable cost function evaluations during optimization. The concept is applied to a configuration with typical Joint European Torus (JET) parameters and it automatically provides plausible configurations with reduced heat load.

  19. An Innovative Method of Teaching Electronic System Design with PSoC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Zhaohui; Hua, Chengying

    2012-01-01

    Programmable system-on-chip (PSoC), which provides a microprocessor and programmable analog and digital peripheral functions in a single chip, is very convenient for mixed-signal electronic system design. This paper presents the experience of teaching contemporary mixed-signal electronic system design with PSoC in the Department of Automation,…

  20. Advanced manufacturing rules check (MRC) for fully automated assessment of complex reticle designs: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, J. A.; Aguilar, D.; Buck, P. D.; Dawkins, D.; Gladhill, R.; Nolke, S.; Riddick, J.

    2006-10-01

    Advanced electronic design automation (EDA) tools, with their simulation, modeling, design rule checking, and optical proximity correction capabilities, have facilitated the improvement of first pass wafer yields. While the data produced by these tools may have been processed for optimal wafer manufacturing, it is possible for the same data to be far from ideal for photomask manufacturing, particularly at lithography and inspection stages, resulting in production delays and increased costs. The same EDA tools used to produce the data can be used to detect potential problems for photomask manufacturing in the data. In the previous paper, it was shown how photomask MRC is used to uncover data related problems prior to automated defect inspection. It was demonstrated how jobs which are likely to have problems at inspection could be identified and separated from those which are not. The use of photomask MRC in production was shown to reduce time lost to aborted runs and troubleshooting due to data issues. In this paper, the effectiveness of this photomask MRC program in a high volume photomask factory over the course of a year as applied to more than ten thousand jobs will be shown. Statistics on the results of the MRC runs will be presented along with the associated impact to the automated defect inspection process. Common design problems will be shown as well as their impact to mask manufacturing throughput and productivity. Finally, solutions to the most common and most severe problems will be offered and discussed.

  1. Design, Development, and Commissioning of a Substation Automation Laboratory to Enhance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. S.; Kothari, D. P.; Prakash, A.

    2011-01-01

    Automation of power systems is gaining momentum across the world, and there is a need to expose graduate and undergraduate students to the latest developments in hardware, software, and related protocols for power automation. This paper presents the design, development, and commissioning of an automation lab to facilitate the understanding of…

  2. Electronic Design Automation (EDA) Roadmap Taskforce Report, Design of Microprocessors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    Manufacturing tests are performed solely to detect faults. Every source of potential fault must be identified, its probability of occurrence and severity of...format (i.e., the language, which in this example is VHDL and already defined) and a programming inter- face is developed. A new VHDL use-model standard...instructions, searching existing data sources , searching existing data sources , gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the

  3. Automated Determination of Electron Density from Electric Field Measurements on the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, I. S.; Spasojevic, M.; Shprits, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we present an algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurement made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. It accomplishes this by using feedforward neural networks to automatically infer the upper hybrid resonance frequency, 𝑓𝑢h𝑟, from plasma wave measurement, which is then used to determine the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detection (Kurth et al. [JGR, 2014]). We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm, as well as the resulting electron number density distribution. Resulting densities are compared with the densities obtained by Kurth et al. [JGR, 2014] and also to the empirical plasmasphere and trough density model of Sheeley et al. [JGR, 2001]. The analysis of the conditions, under which densities obtained by the proposed method differ significantly from the model of Sheeley et al. [JGR, 2001], is presented. Finally, we discuss the dependence of the electron number density on magnetic activity (Kp) and magnetic local time.

  4. The automated strength-aeroelastic design of aerospace structures program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. H.; Venkayya, V. B.

    1984-01-01

    An ongoing program whose goal is to develop an automated procedure that can assist in the preliminary design of aircraft and space structures is described. The approach and capabilities that are to be included in the final procedures are descussed. By using proven engineering software as a basis for the project, a reliable and interdisciplinary procedure is developed. The use of a control language for module sequencing and execution permits efficient development of the procedure and gives the user significant flexibility in altering or enhancing the procedure. The data base system provides reliable and efficient access to the large amounts of interrelated data required in an enterprise of this sort. In addition, the data base allows interfacing with existing pre- and post-processors in an almost trivial manner. Altogether, the procedure promises to be of considerable utility to preliminary structural design teams.

  5. Modular implementation of a digital hardware design automation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masud, M.

    An automation system based on AHPL (A Hardware Programming Language) was developed. The project may be divided into three distinct phases: (1) Upgrading of AHPL to make it more universally applicable; (2) Implementation of a compiler for the language; and (3) illustration of how the compiler may be used to support several phases of design activities. Several new features were added to AHPL. These include: application-dependent parameters, mutliple clocks, asynchronous results, functional registers and primitive functions. The new language, called Universal AHPL, has been defined rigorously. The compiler design is modular. The parsing is done by an automatic parser generated from the SLR(1)BNF grammar of the language. The compiler produces two data bases from the AHPL description of a circuit. The first one is a tabular representation of the circuit, and the second one is a detailed interconnection linked list. The two data bases provide a means to interface the compiler to application-dependent CAD systems.

  6. FRACSAT: Automated design synthesis for future space architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, R.; Uckun, S.; Do, Minh; Shah, J.

    This paper describes the algorithmic basis and development of FRACSAT (FRACtionated Spacecraft Architecture Toolkit), a new approach to conceptual design, cost-benefit analysis, and detailed trade studies for space systems. It provides an automated capability for exploration of candidate spacecraft architectures, leading users to near-optimal solutions with respect to user-defined requirements, risks, and program uncertainties. FRACSAT utilizes a sophisticated planning algorithm (PlanVisioner) to perform a quasi-exhaustive search for candidate architectures, constructing candidates from an extensible model-based representation of space system components and functions. These candidates are then evaluated with emphasis on the business case, computing the expected design utility and system costs as well as risk, presenting the user with a greatly reduced selection of candidates. The user may further refine the search according to cost or benefit uncertainty, adaptability, or other performance metrics as needed.

  7. Automating the packing heuristic design process with genetic programming.

    PubMed

    Burke, Edmund K; Hyde, Matthew R; Kendall, Graham; Woodward, John

    2012-01-01

    The literature shows that one-, two-, and three-dimensional bin packing and knapsack packing are difficult problems in operational research. Many techniques, including exact, heuristic, and metaheuristic approaches, have been investigated to solve these problems and it is often not clear which method to use when presented with a new instance. This paper presents an approach which is motivated by the goal of building computer systems which can design heuristic methods. The overall aim is to explore the possibilities for automating the heuristic design process. We present a genetic programming system to automatically generate a good quality heuristic for each instance. It is not necessary to change the methodology depending on the problem type (one-, two-, or three-dimensional knapsack and bin packing problems), and it therefore has a level of generality unmatched by other systems in the literature. We carry out an extensive suite of experiments and compare with the best human designed heuristics in the literature. Note that our heuristic design methodology uses the same parameters for all the experiments. The contribution of this paper is to present a more general packing methodology than those currently available, and to show that, by using this methodology, it is possible for a computer system to design heuristics which are competitive with the human designed heuristics from the literature. This represents the first packing algorithm in the literature able to claim human competitive results in such a wide variety of packing domains.

  8. Relocatable, Automated Cost-Benefit Analysis for Marine Sensor Network Design

    PubMed Central

    D’Este, Claire; de Souza, Paulo; Sharman, Chris; Allen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    When designing sensor networks, we need to ensure they produce representative and relevant data, but this must be offset by the financial cost of placing sensors. We describe a novel automated method for generating and combining cost and benefit values to decide on the best sensor locations using information about the specific constraints available in most coastal locations. Costs in maintenance, negotiation, equipment, exposure and communication are estimated using hydrodynamic models and Electronic Navigation Charts. Benefits in maximum coverage and reducing overall error are also determined using model output. This method demonstrates equivalent accuracy at predicting the whole system to expert-chosen locations, whilst significantly reducing the estimated costs. PMID:22736982

  9. The Automated Bicron Tester: Automated electronic instrument diagnostic, testing, and alignment system with records generation

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, G.S.; Maddox, S.R.; Turner, G.W.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1995-11-01

    The Bicron Surveyor MX is a portable radiation monitoring instrument used by the Office of Radiation Protection at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This instrument must be calibrated in order to assure reliable operation. A manual calibration procedure was developed, but it was time consuming and repetitive. Therefore, an automated tester station that would allow the technicians to calibrate the instruments faster and more reliably was developed. With the automated tester station, calibration records and accountability could be generated and maintained automatically. This allows the technicians to concentrate on repairing defective units. The Automated Bicron Tester consists of an operator interface, an analog board, and a digital controller board. The panel is the user interface that allows the technician to communicate with the tester. The analog board has an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) that converts the signals from the instrument into digital data that the tester can manipulate. The digital controller board contains the circuitry to perform the test and to communicate the results to the host personal computer (PC). The tester station is connected to the unit under test through a special test harness that attaches to a header on the Bicron. The tester sends pulse trains to the Bicron and measures the resulting meter output. This is done to determine if the unit is functioning properly. The testers are connected to the host PC through an RS-485 serial line. The host PC polls all the tester stations that are connected to it and collects data from those that have completed a calibration. It logs these data and stores the record in a format ready for export to the Maintenance, Accountability, Jobs, and Inventory Control (MAJIC) database. It also prints a report. The programs for the Automated Bicron Tester and the host are written in the C language.

  10. Reliability-Based Electronics Shielding Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; O'Neill, P. J.; Zang, T. A.; Pandolf, J. E.; Tripathi, R. K.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2007-01-01

    Shielding design on large human-rated systems allows minimization of radiation impact on electronic systems. Shielding design tools require adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and adequate follow-up on final design evaluation.

  11. The design of an automated electrolytic enrichment apparatus for tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J.L.

    1994-12-01

    The Radiation Analytical Sciences Section at Laboratory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory performs analysis of low-level tritium concentrations in various natural water samples from the Tri-Valley Area, DOE Nevada Test Site, Site 300 in Tracy, CA, and other various places around the world. Low levels of tritium, a radioactive isotope of hydrogen, which is pre-concentrated in the RAS laboratory using an electrolytic enrichment apparatus. Later these enriched waters are analyzed by liquid scintillation counting to determine the activity of tritium. The enrichment procedure and the subsequent purification process by vacuum distillation are currently undertaken manually, hence being highly labor-intensive. The whole process typically takes about 2 to 3 weeks to complete a batch of 30 samples, with a dedicated personnel operating the process. The goal is to automate the entire process, specifically having the operation PC-LabVIEW{trademark} controlled with real-time monitoring capability. My involvement was in the design and fabrication of a prototypical automated electrolytic enrichment cell. Work will be done on optimizing the electrolytic process by assessing the different parameters of the enrichment procedure. Hardware and software development have also been an integral component of this project.

  12. Automated Design of Restraint Layer of an Inflatable Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spexarth, Gary

    2007-01-01

    A Mathcad computer program largely automates the design and analysis of the restraint layer (the primary load-bearing layer) of an inflatable vessel that consists of one or more sections having cylindrical, toroidal, and/or spherical shape(s). A restraint layer typically comprises webbing in the form of multiple straps. The design task includes choosing indexing locations along the straps, computing the load at every location in each strap, computing the resulting stretch at each location, and computing the amount of undersizing required of each strap so that, once the vessel is inflated and the straps thus stretched, the vessel can be expected to assume the desired shape. Prior to the development of this program, the design task was performed by use of a difficult-to-use spreadsheet program that required manual addition of rows and columns depending on the numbers of strap rows and columns of a given design. In contrast, this program is completely parametric and includes logic that automatically adds or deletes rows and columns as needed. With minimal input from the user, this program automatically computes indexing locations, strap lengths, undersizing requirements, and all design data required to produce detailed drawings and assembly procedures. It also generates textual comments that help the user understand the calculations.

  13. Expert system approach to design an automated guided vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaraguru, Karthikeyan; Hall, Ernest L.

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an expert system to design the base of an automated guided vehicle. The components of the expert system include: (1) A user-friendly graphic user interface, where the user can enter specifications--like the environment used, application of the robot, etc.; (2) An engine that converts the managerial requirements into technical parameters and designs the robot--initially assuming some parameters and confirming its assumptions during the course of the design; when unable to do so, it iterates with different assumptions until they are met; the code also selects various materials to be used from a corresponding database; (3) A database of various materials from their manufacturers/suppliers; (4) The output data is interfaced with a CAD engine, which generates a 3D solid model of the vehicle; and (5) A `Bill of Materials' file is generated as the output and suggestions for how to assemble them are given. The method has been tested by designing a small mobile robot. The software provides an excellent tool to develop a mobile robot based on performance specifications. Modeling helps the user understand the constraints on the design of the robot and the bill of materials--along with the vendor address, helps the user buy the components needed to assemble the robot.

  14. Automated optimum design of wing structures. Deterministic and probabilistic approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    The automated optimum design of airplane wing structures subjected to multiple behavior constraints is described. The structural mass of the wing is considered the objective function. The maximum stress, wing tip deflection, root angle of attack, and flutter velocity during the pull up maneuver (static load), the natural frequencies of the wing structure, and the stresses induced in the wing structure due to landing and gust loads are suitably constrained. Both deterministic and probabilistic approaches are used for finding the stresses induced in the airplane wing structure due to landing and gust loads. A wing design is represented by a uniform beam with a cross section in the form of a hollow symmetric double wedge. The airfoil thickness and chord length are the design variables, and a graphical procedure is used to find the optimum solutions. A supersonic wing design is represented by finite elements. The thicknesses of the skin and the web and the cross sectional areas of the flanges are the design variables, and nonlinear programming techniques are used to find the optimum solution.

  15. Automated design of multiphase space missions using hybrid optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilan, Christian Miguel

    A modern space mission is assembled from multiple phases or events such as impulsive maneuvers, coast arcs, thrust arcs and planetary flybys. Traditionally, a mission planner would resort to intuition and experience to develop a sequence of events for the multiphase mission and to find the space trajectory that minimizes propellant use by solving the associated continuous optimal control problem. This strategy, however, will most likely yield a sub-optimal solution, as the problem is sophisticated for several reasons. For example, the number of events in the optimal mission structure is not known a priori and the system equations of motion change depending on what event is current. In this work a framework for the automated design of multiphase space missions is presented using hybrid optimal control (HOC). The method developed uses two nested loops: an outer-loop that handles the discrete dynamics and finds the optimal mission structure in terms of the categorical variables, and an inner-loop that performs the optimization of the corresponding continuous-time dynamical system and obtains the required control history. Genetic algorithms (GA) and direct transcription with nonlinear programming (NLP) are introduced as methods of solution for the outer-loop and inner-loop problems, respectively. Automation of the inner-loop, continuous optimal control problem solver, required two new technologies. The first is a method for the automated construction of the NLP problems resulting from the use of a direct solver for systems with different structures, including different numbers of categorical events. The method assembles modules, consisting of parameters and constraints appropriate to each event, sequentially according to the given mission structure. The other new technology is for a robust initial guess generator required by the inner-loop NLP problem solver. Two new methods were developed for cases including low-thrust trajectories. The first method, based on GA

  16. On the engineering design for systematic integration of agent-orientation in industrial automation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liyong; Schüller, Andreas; Epple, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    In today's automation industry, agent-oriented development of system functionalities appears to have a great potential for increasing autonomy and flexibility of complex operations, while lowering the workload of users. In this paper, we present a reference model for the harmonious and systematical integration of agent-orientation in industrial automation. Considering compatibility with existing automation systems and best practice, this model combines advantages of function block technology, service orientation and native description methods from the automation standard IEC 61131-3. This approach can be applied as a guideline for the engineering design of future agent-oriented automation systems.

  17. Automated telephone reminder messages can assist electronic diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Mollon, Brent; Holbrook, Anne M; Keshavjee, Karim; Troyan, Sue; Gaebel, Kathryn; Thabane, Lehana; Perera, Gihan

    2008-01-01

    Telephone reminder systems have been used to assist in the treatment of many chronic diseases. However, it is unclear if these systems can increase medication and appointment adherence in patients with diabetes without direct patient-provider telephone contact. We tested the feasibility of using an automated telephone reminder system (ATRS) to deliver reminder messages to 253 adults with diabetes enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. Eighty-four percent of the patients were able to register using voice recognition and at least one reminder was delivered to 95% of registered patients over a period of 7.5 months. None of the demographic features studied predicted a patient's ability to enroll or to receive reminder calls. At the end of the study, 63% of patients indicated that they wished to continue to receive ATRS calls. The level of system use as determined by the number of received reminder calls was not associated with a change in the number of physician visits or diabetes-related laboratory tests during follow-up. The clinical benefits and sustainability of ATRS remain unproven, but our results indicate that an automated reminder system can be effective for providing messages to a large group of older patients with diabetes.

  18. Software Would Largely Automate Design of Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Jason C. H.; Negast, William J.

    2005-01-01

    Embedded Navigation Filter Automatic Designer (ENFAD) is a computer program being developed to automate the most difficult tasks in designing embedded software to implement a Kalman filter in a navigation system. The most difficult tasks are selection of error states of the filter and tuning of filter parameters, which are timeconsuming trial-and-error tasks that require expertise and rarely yield optimum results. An optimum selection of error states and filter parameters depends on navigation-sensor and vehicle characteristics, and on filter processing time. ENFAD would include a simulation module that would incorporate all possible error states with respect to a given set of vehicle and sensor characteristics. The first of two iterative optimization loops would vary the selection of error states until the best filter performance was achieved in Monte Carlo simulations. For a fixed selection of error states, the second loop would vary the filter parameter values until an optimal performance value was obtained. Design constraints would be satisfied in the optimization loops. Users would supply vehicle and sensor test data that would be used to refine digital models in ENFAD. Filter processing time and filter accuracy would be computed by ENFAD.

  19. Design of a new automated multi-step outflow test apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, J.; Gribb, M. M.; McNamara, J. P.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling flow and transport in the vadose zone requires knowledge of the soil hydraulic properties. Laboratories studies involving vadose zone soils typically include use of the multistep outflow method (MSO), which can provide information about wetting and drying soil-moisture and hydraulic conductivity curves from a single test. However, manual MSO testing is time consuming and measurement errors can be easily introduced. A computer-automated system has been designed to allow convenient measurement of soil-water characteristic curves. Computer-controlled solenoid valves are used to regulate the pressure inside Tempe cells to drain soil samples, and outflow volumes are measured with a pressure transducer. The electronic components of the system are controlled using LabVIEW software. This system has been optimized for undisturbed core samples. System performance has been evaluated by comparing results from undisturbed samples subjected first to manual MSO testing and then automated testing. The automated and manual MSO tests yielded similar drying soil-water characteristic curves. These curves are further compared to in-situ measurements and those obtained using pedotransfer functions for a semi-arid watershed.

  20. Designing effective human-automation-plant interfaces: a control-theoretic perspective.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Greg A; Vicente, Kim J

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we propose the application of a control-theoretic framework to human-automation interaction. The framework consists of a set of conceptual distinctions that should be respected in automation research and design. We demonstrate how existing automation interface designs in some nuclear plants fail to recognize these distinctions. We further show the value of the approach by applying it to modes of automation. The design guidelines that have been proposed in the automation literature are evaluated from the perspective of the framework. This comparison shows that the framework reveals insights that are frequently overlooked in this literature. A new set of design guidelines is introduced that builds upon the contributions of previous research and draws complementary insights from the control-theoretic framework. The result is a coherent and systematic approach to the design of human-automation-plant interfaces that will yield more concrete design criteria and a broader set of design tools. Applications of this research include improving the effectiveness of human-automation interaction design and the relevance of human-automation interaction research.

  1. Ultrafast Electron Microscopes: Design Criteria, Electron Sources, and Column Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Joel A.

    Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy, and its picosecond/femtosecond subclass Ultrafast Electron Microscopy, is an emerging field in instrumentation science. It attempts to combine the nanoscale spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopes with the temporal resolution of modern ultrafast lasers. In this thesis, I present my contributions to this young field. These include a novel model for simulating the dynamics of ultrafast electron pulses in electron microscope systems, design criteria for constructing such a system, and theoretical and experimental groundwork geared towards selecting a useful photocathode for electron pulse generation. I also present the prototype ultrafast electron microscope system being built at UIC.

  2. The automated design of materials far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskin, Marc Z.

    Automated design is emerging as a powerful concept in materials science. By combining computer algorithms, simulations, and experimental data, new techniques are being developed that start with high level functional requirements and identify the ideal materials that achieve them. This represents a radically different picture of how materials become functional in which technological demand drives material discovery, rather than the other way around. At the frontiers of this field, materials systems previously considered too complicated can start to be controlled and understood. Particularly promising are materials far from equilibrium. Material robustness, high strength, self-healing and memory are properties displayed by several materials systems that are intrinsically out of equilibrium. These and other properties could be revolutionary, provided they can first be controlled. This thesis conceptualizes and implements a framework for designing materials that are far from equilibrium. We show how, even in the absence of a complete physical theory, design from the top down is possible and lends itself to producing physical insight. As a prototype system, we work with granular materials: collections of athermal, macroscopic identical objects, since these materials function both as an essential component of industrial processes as well as a model system for many non-equilibrium states of matter. We show that by placing granular materials in the context of design, benefits emerge simultaneously for fundamental and applied interests. As first steps, we use our framework to design granular aggregates with extreme properties like high stiffness, and softness. We demonstrate control over nonlinear effects by producing exotic aggregates that stiffen under compression. Expanding on our framework, we conceptualize new ways of thinking about material design when automatic discovery is possible. We show how to build rules that link particle shapes to arbitrary granular packing

  3. Electronic aids to conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouchard, Eugene E.

    1990-01-01

    Presented in viewgraph form are techniques to improve the conceptual design of complex systems. The paper discusses theory of design, flexible software tools for computer aided design, and methods for enhancing communication among design teams.

  4. Design of a miniaturized solid state laser for automated assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funck, Max C.; Dolkemeyer, Jan; Morasch, Valentin; Loosen, Peter

    2010-05-01

    A miniaturized solid state laser for marking applications has been developed featuring novel assembly strategies to reduce size, cost and assembly effort. Design and setup have been laid out with future automation of the assembly in mind. Using a high precision robot the optical components composing the laser system are directly placed on a planar substrate providing accurate positioning and alignment within a few microns. No adjustable mounts for mirrors and lenses are necessary, greatly simplifying the setup. Consisting of either a ND:YAG or a Nd:YVO4 crystal pumped with a fiber coupled diode laser, a q-switch for pulse generation and a beam expander the entire assembly is confined in a 100ml space and delivers 4 W of continuous output power at 1.064 μm with an efficiency greater than 40%. Pulse lengths of 10-20 ns and repetition rates of up to 150 kHz have been obtained with an acousto-optic modulator. In addition, a custom designed electro-optic modulator with integrated high voltage switch has been realized. A supply unit for the entire system, including scanner and water cooling, is integrated in a 19" industrial chassis and can be operated via a graphical user interface on a standard personal computer.

  5. Xyce parallel electronic simulator design.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornquist, Heidi K.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Mei, Ting; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Russo, Thomas V.

    2010-09-01

    This document is the Xyce Circuit Simulator developer guide. Xyce has been designed from the 'ground up' to be a SPICE-compatible, distributed memory parallel circuit simulator. While it is in many respects a research code, Xyce is intended to be a production simulator. As such, having software quality engineering (SQE) procedures in place to insure a high level of code quality and robustness are essential. Version control, issue tracking customer support, C++ style guildlines and the Xyce release process are all described. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been under development at Sandia since 1999. Historically, Xyce has mostly been funded by ASC, the original focus of Xyce development has primarily been related to circuits for nuclear weapons. However, this has not been the only focus and it is expected that the project will diversify. Like many ASC projects, Xyce is a group development effort, which involves a number of researchers, engineers, scientists, mathmaticians and computer scientists. In addition to diversity of background, it is to be expected on long term projects for there to be a certain amount of staff turnover, as people move on to different projects. As a result, it is very important that the project maintain high software quality standards. The point of this document is to formally document a number of the software quality practices followed by the Xyce team in one place. Also, it is hoped that this document will be a good source of information for new developers.

  6. Designing Automated Guidance for Concept Diagrams in Inquiry Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryoo, Kihyun; Linn, Marcia C.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in automated scoring technologies have the potential to support student learning during inquiry instruction by providing timely and adaptive guidance on individual students' responses. To identify which forms of automated guidance can be beneficial for inquiry learning, we compared reflective guidance to directive guidance for…

  7. 21 CFR 111.30 - What requirements apply to automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What requirements apply to automated, mechanical, or electronic equipment? 111.30 Section 111.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD...

  8. Managing Selection for Electronic Resources: Kent State University Develops a New System to Automate Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Kent State University has developed a centralized system that manages the communication and work related to the review and selection of commercially available electronic resources. It is an automated system that tracks the review process, provides selectors with price and trial information, and compiles reviewers' feedback about the resource. It…

  9. Which image parameter(s) for the automation of the electron microscope?

    PubMed

    Bonnet, N; Zinzindohoue, P

    1989-03-01

    Experiments on automating the transmission electron microscope rely on the search for minimum variance. This image parameter gives satisfactory results for automatic focusing, astigmatism correction, and beam alignment. We investigate here the different image descriptors that might also be used; we conclude that texture parameters, which are directional, would be better candidates correcting astigmatism and beam tilt.

  10. Matters concerned with designing distributed systems for automated control of electrical equipment at power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorozhankin, P. A.; Krasnova, M. E.

    2011-10-01

    Matters concerned with developing the working designs of systems for automated control of electrical equipment are discussed. Basic technical requirements for computerized automation facilities are formulated from the viewpoint of ensuring the required scope of functions and fault tolerance, and proposals for the layout and placement of these facilities are suggested. A special section devoted to protection of automated process control systems from computer viruses is given.

  11. Automated Design of Noise-Minimal, Safe Rotorcraft Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robert A.; Venable, K. Brent; Lindsay, James

    2012-01-01

    NASA and the international community are investing in the development of a commercial transportation infrastructure that includes the increased use of rotorcraft, specifically helicopters and aircraft such as a 40-passenger civil tilt rotors. Rotorcraft have a number of advantages over fixed wing aircraft, primarily in not requiring direct access to the primary fixed wing runways. As such they can operate at an airport without directly interfering with major air carrier and commuter aircraft operations. However, there is significant concern over the impact of noise on the communities surrounding the transportation facilities. In this paper we propose to address the rotorcraft noise problem by exploiting powerful search techniques coming from artificial intelligence, coupled with simulation and field tests, to design trajectories that are expected to improve on the amount of ground noise generated. This paper investigates the use of simulation based on predictive physical models to facilitate the search for low-noise trajectories using a class of automated search algorithms called local search. A novel feature of this approach is the ability to incorporate constraints into the problem formulation that addresses passenger safety and comfort.

  12. Electronic Resource Management and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Kimberly R.

    2015-01-01

    We have now reached a tipping point at which electronic resources comprise more than half of academic library budgets. Because of the increasing work associated with the ever-increasing number of e-resources, there is a trend to distribute work throughout the library even in the presence of an electronic resources department. In 2013, the author…

  13. Preparing Electronic Clinical Data for Quality Improvement and Comparative Effectiveness Research: The SCOAP CERTAIN Automation and Validation Project

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Emily Beth; Capurro, Daniel; van Eaton, Erik; Alfonso-Cristancho, Rafael; Devlin, Allison; Yanez, N. David; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha; Flum, David R.; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background: The field of clinical research informatics includes creation of clinical data repositories (CDRs) used to conduct quality improvement (QI) activities and comparative effectiveness research (CER). Ideally, CDR data are accurately and directly abstracted from disparate electronic health records (EHRs), across diverse health-systems. Objective: Investigators from Washington State’s Surgical Care Outcomes and Assessment Program (SCOAP) Comparative Effectiveness Research Translation Network (CERTAIN) are creating such a CDR. This manuscript describes the automation and validation methods used to create this digital infrastructure. Methods: SCOAP is a QI benchmarking initiative. Data are manually abstracted from EHRs and entered into a data management system. CERTAIN investigators are now deploying Caradigm’s Amalga™ tool to facilitate automated abstraction of data from multiple, disparate EHRs. Concordance is calculated to compare data automatically to manually abstracted. Performance measures are calculated between Amalga and each parent EHR. Validation takes place in repeated loops, with improvements made over time. When automated abstraction reaches the current benchmark for abstraction accuracy - 95% - itwill ‘go-live’ at each site. Progress to Date: A technical analysis was completed at 14 sites. Five sites are contributing; the remaining sites prioritized meeting Meaningful Use criteria. Participating sites are contributing 15–18 unique data feeds, totaling 13 surgical registry use cases. Common feeds are registration, laboratory, transcription/dictation, radiology, and medications. Approximately 50% of 1,320 designated data elements are being automatically abstracted—25% from structured data; 25% from text mining. Conclusion: In semi-automating data abstraction and conducting a rigorous validation, CERTAIN investigators will semi-automate data collection to conduct QI and CER, while advancing the Learning Healthcare System. PMID:25848565

  14. Automated design synthesis of robotic/human workcells for improved manufacturing system design in hazardous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Joshua M.

    2012-06-12

    Manufacturing tasks that are deemed too hazardous for workers require the use of automation, robotics, and/or other remote handling tools. The associated hazards may be radiological or nonradiological, and based on the characteristics of the environment and processing, a design may necessitate robotic labor, human labor, or both. There are also other factors such as cost, ergonomics, maintenance, and efficiency that also effect task allocation and other design choices. Handling the tradeoffs of these factors can be complex, and lack of experience can be an issue when trying to determine if and what feasible automation/robotics options exist. To address this problem, we utilize common engineering design approaches adapted more for manufacturing system design in hazardous environments. We limit our scope to the conceptual and embodiment design stages, specifically a computational algorithm for concept generation and early design evaluation. In regard to concept generation, we first develop the functional model or function structure for the process, using the common 'verb-noun' format for describing function. A common language or functional basis for manufacturing was developed and utilized to formalize function descriptions and guide rules for function decomposition. Potential components for embodiment are also grouped in terms of this functional language and are stored in a database. The properties of each component are given as quantitative and qualitative criteria. Operators are also rated for task-relevant criteria which are used to address task compatibility. Through the gathering of process requirements/constraints, construction of the component database, and development of the manufacturing basis and rule set, design knowledge is stored and available for computer use. Thus, once the higher level process functions are defined, the computer can automate the synthesis of new design concepts through alternating steps of embodiment and function structure updates

  15. Automated Detection of Sepsis Using Electronic Medical Record Data: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Despins, Laurel A

    2016-09-13

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are global issues with high mortality rates. Early recognition and intervention are essential to optimize patient outcomes. Automated detection using electronic medical record (EMR) data can assist this process. This review describes automated sepsis detection using EMR data. PubMed retrieved publications between January 1, 2005 and January 31, 2015. Thirteen studies met study criteria: described an automated detection approach with the potential to detect sepsis or sepsis-related deterioration in real or near-real time; focused on emergency department and hospitalized neonatal, pediatric, or adult patients; and provided performance measures or results indicating the impact of automated sepsis detection. Detection algorithms incorporated systemic inflammatory response and organ dysfunction criteria. Systems in nine studies generated study or care team alerts. Care team alerts did not consistently lead to earlier interventions. Earlier interventions did not consistently translate to improved patient outcomes. Performance measures were inconsistent. Automated sepsis detection is potentially a means to enable early sepsis-related therapy but current performance variability highlights the need for further research.

  16. Automated stitching of microtubule centerlines across serial electron tomograms.

    PubMed

    Weber, Britta; Tranfield, Erin M; Höög, Johanna L; Baum, Daniel; Antony, Claude; Hyman, Tony; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Prohaska, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Tracing microtubule centerlines in serial section electron tomography requires microtubules to be stitched across sections, that is lines from different sections need to be aligned, endpoints need to be matched at section boundaries to establish a correspondence between neighboring sections, and corresponding lines need to be connected across multiple sections. We present computational methods for these tasks: 1) An initial alignment is computed using a distance compatibility graph. 2) A fine alignment is then computed with a probabilistic variant of the iterative closest points algorithm, which we extended to handle the orientation of lines by introducing a periodic random variable to the probabilistic formulation. 3) Endpoint correspondence is established by formulating a matching problem in terms of a Markov random field and computing the best matching with belief propagation. Belief propagation is not generally guaranteed to converge to a minimum. We show how convergence can be achieved, nonetheless, with minimal manual input. In addition to stitching microtubule centerlines, the correspondence is also applied to transform and merge the electron tomograms. We applied the proposed methods to samples from the mitotic spindle in C. elegans, the meiotic spindle in X. laevis, and sub-pellicular microtubule arrays in T. brucei. The methods were able to stitch microtubules across section boundaries in good agreement with experts' opinions for the spindle samples. Results, however, were not satisfactory for the microtubule arrays. For certain experiments, such as an analysis of the spindle, the proposed methods can replace manual expert tracing and thus enable the analysis of microtubules over long distances with reasonable manual effort.

  17. Automated Stitching of Microtubule Centerlines across Serial Electron Tomograms

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Britta; Tranfield, Erin M.; Höög, Johanna L.; Baum, Daniel; Antony, Claude; Hyman, Tony; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Prohaska, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Tracing microtubule centerlines in serial section electron tomography requires microtubules to be stitched across sections, that is lines from different sections need to be aligned, endpoints need to be matched at section boundaries to establish a correspondence between neighboring sections, and corresponding lines need to be connected across multiple sections. We present computational methods for these tasks: 1) An initial alignment is computed using a distance compatibility graph. 2) A fine alignment is then computed with a probabilistic variant of the iterative closest points algorithm, which we extended to handle the orientation of lines by introducing a periodic random variable to the probabilistic formulation. 3) Endpoint correspondence is established by formulating a matching problem in terms of a Markov random field and computing the best matching with belief propagation. Belief propagation is not generally guaranteed to converge to a minimum. We show how convergence can be achieved, nonetheless, with minimal manual input. In addition to stitching microtubule centerlines, the correspondence is also applied to transform and merge the electron tomograms. We applied the proposed methods to samples from the mitotic spindle in C. elegans, the meiotic spindle in X. laevis, and sub-pellicular microtubule arrays in T. brucei. The methods were able to stitch microtubules across section boundaries in good agreement with experts' opinions for the spindle samples. Results, however, were not satisfactory for the microtubule arrays. For certain experiments, such as an analysis of the spindle, the proposed methods can replace manual expert tracing and thus enable the analysis of microtubules over long distances with reasonable manual effort. PMID:25438148

  18. Electronics Shielding and Reliability Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; ONeill, P. M.; Zang, Thomas A., Jr.; Pandolf, John E.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that electronics placement in large-scale human-rated systems provides opportunity to optimize electronics shielding through materials choice and geometric arrangement. For example, several hundred single event upsets (SEUs) occur within the Shuttle avionic computers during a typical mission. An order of magnitude larger SEU rate would occur without careful placement in the Shuttle design. These results used basic physics models (linear energy transfer (LET), track structure, Auger recombination) combined with limited SEU cross section measurements allowing accurate evaluation of target fragment contributions to Shuttle avionics memory upsets. Electronics shielding design on human-rated systems provides opportunity to minimize radiation impact on critical and non-critical electronic systems. Implementation of shielding design tools requires adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and an adequate follow-up on final design evaluation including results from a systems/device testing program tailored to meet design requirements.

  19. Designing Electronic Performance Support Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip; Banerji, Ashok

    1995-01-01

    Outlines the basic nature of performance support and describes a generic model that can be used to facilitate electronic performance support system (EPSS) development. Performance measures are discussed; performance support guidelines are summarized; and a case study of the use of an EPSS is presented. (LRW)

  20. Automated systems for creative processes in scientific research, design, and robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, V.M.; Stognii, A.A.; Biba, I.G.; Vashchenko, N.D.; Galagan, N.I.; Gladun, V.P.; Rabinovich, Z.L.; Sakunov, I.A.; Khomenko, L.V.

    1981-11-01

    The authors give a general description of software that was developed to automate the creative processes in scientific research, design and robotics. The systems APROS, SSP, Analizator-ES and Analizator are discussed. 12 references.

  1. Design and Implementation of an Open, Interoperable AutomatedDemand Response Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the concept for and lessons from the development and field-testing of an open, interoperable communications infrastructure to support automating demand response (DR). Automating DR allows greater levels of participation and improved reliability and repeatability of the demand response and customer facilities. Automated DR systems have been deployed for critical peak pricing and demand bidding and are being designed for real time pricing. The system is designed to generate, manage, and track DR signals between utilities and Independent System Operators (ISOs) to aggregators and end-use customers and their control systems.

  2. Automated Monte Carlo biasing for photon-generated electrons near surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Crawford, Martin James; Kensek, Ronald Patrick

    2009-09-01

    This report describes efforts to automate the biasing of coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo particle transport calculations. The approach was based on weight-windows biasing. Weight-window settings were determined using adjoint-flux Monte Carlo calculations. A variety of algorithms were investigated for adaptivity of the Monte Carlo tallies. Tree data structures were used to investigate spatial partitioning. Functional-expansion tallies were used to investigate higher-order spatial representations.

  3. Author Support for the Design of Automated Medical Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Maccabe, A.B.; Underwood, W.E.; Brunjes, Shannon

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes a prototype system that provides interactive author support for an automated medical interviewing system. An on-line users manual enables health care professionals to use the system without prior knowledge or experience. The approach taken was to make the author support programs interviews in the underlying interviewing system.

  4. Economics of automation for the design-to-mask interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erck, Wesley

    2009-04-01

    Mask order automation has increased steadily over the years through a variety of individual mask customer implementations. These have been supported by customer-specific software at the mask suppliers to support the variety of customer output formats. Some customers use the SEMI P10 1 standard, some use supplier-specific formats, and some use customer-specific formats. Some customers use little automation and depend instead on close customer-supplier relationships. Implementations are varied in quality and effectiveness. A major factor which has prolonged the adoption of more advanced and effective solutions has been a lack of understanding of the economic benefits. Some customers think standardized automation mainly benefits the mask supplier in order entry automation, but this ignores a number of other significant benefits which differ dramatically for each party in the supply chain. This paper discusses the nature of those differing advantages and presents simple models suited to four business cases: integrated device manufacturers (IDM), fabless companies, foundries and mask suppliers. Examples and estimates of the financial advantages for these business types will be shown.

  5. [Design of an electronic leech].

    PubMed

    Lomelí-Mejía, Pedro Alejandro; Domínguez-Rubio, René; Espinosa-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Lecona-Butrón, Hugo; Rodríguez-Reyna, Reynaldo Manuel

    2014-07-01

    This research presents the development of a continual suction electromechanical device (CSED) which emulates the feeding characteristics of a medicinal leech to drain body fluids. After the research, design and building of the device, its performance in normal conditions with fluids of different viscosity was evaluated. Finally, the device was submitted to a test of blood draining in three adult male rabbits NZW with a weight of three kilograms, obtaining drain.

  6. The Application of a General Purpose Data Base Management System to Design Automation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    unrelated to the computer industry. One instance of a CAD system is the Structured Computer Aided Logic Design (SCALD) system, developed out of Lawrence... Structured Computer Aided Logic Design", 15th Design Automation Conference Proceedings, 1978, Las Vegas, Nevada. 3. Sherlock, Barbara J., User

  7. Some Challenges in the Design of Human-Automation Interaction for Safety-Critical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael S.; Roth, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Increasing amounts of automation are being introduced to safety-critical domains. While the introduction of automation has led to an overall increase in reliability and improved safety, it has also introduced a class of failure modes, and new challenges in risk assessment for the new systems, particularly in the assessment of rare events resulting from complex inter-related factors. Designing successful human-automation systems is challenging, and the challenges go beyond good interface development (e.g., Roth, Malin, & Schreckenghost 1997; Christoffersen & Woods, 2002). Human-automation design is particularly challenging when the underlying automation technology generates behavior that is difficult for the user to anticipate or understand. These challenges have been recognized in several safety-critical domains, and have resulted in increased efforts to develop training, procedures, regulations and guidance material (CAST, 2008, IAEA, 2001, FAA, 2013, ICAO, 2012). This paper points to the continuing need for new methods to describe and characterize the operational environment within which new automation concepts are being presented. We will describe challenges to the successful development and evaluation of human-automation systems in safety-critical domains, and describe some approaches that could be used to address these challenges. We will draw from experience with the aviation, spaceflight and nuclear power domains.

  8. Design for the automation of composite wind turbine blade manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polcari, M. J.; White, K. D.; Sherwood, J. A.

    2016-10-01

    The majority of large wind turbine blades are manufactured from textile-reinforced resin-infused composites using an open mold. The placement of the textile reinforcements in the mold is traditionally accomplished by a manual process where dozens of workers hand place each dry fabric in the mold. Depending on the level of skill and experience of each worker and the relative complexity of the mold geometry, local areas may exhibit out-of-plane wrinkling and in-plane waviness. Fabric imperfections such as these can adversely impact the strength and stiffness of the blade, thereby compromising its durability in service. In an effort to reduce the variabilities associated with a manual-labor process, an automated piecewise shifting method has been proposed for fabric placement. This automated layup method saves time on the preform process and reduces variability from blade to blade. In the current research the automated shifting layup method is investigated using a robust and easy-to-use finite element modelling approach. User-defined material models utilizing a mesoscopic unit-cell modeling approach are linked with Abaqus to capture the evolution of the fabric shear stiffness and changes in the fiber orientations during the fabric-placement process. The simulation approach is demonstrated for the geometry of the trailing edge of a typical wind turbine blade. The simulation considers the mechanical behavior of the fabric and reliably predicts fabric deformation and failure zones.

  9. Designing of smart home automation system based on Raspberry Pi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Ravi Prakash; Singh, Bhanu Pratap; Sharma, Mahesh Kumar; Wattanawisuth, Nattapol; Leeprechanon, Nopbhorn

    2016-03-01

    Locally networked or remotely controlled home automation system becomes a popular paradigm because of the numerous advantages and is suitable for academic research. This paper proposes a method for an implementation of Raspberry Pi based home automation system presented with an android phone access interface. The power consumption profile across the connected load is measured accurately through programming. Users can access the graph of total power consumption with respect to time worldwide using their Dropbox account. An android application has been developed to channelize the monitoring and controlling operation of home appliances remotely. This application facilitates controlling of operating pins of Raspberry Pi by pressing the corresponding key for turning "on" and "off" of any desired appliance. Systems can range from the simple room lighting control to smart microcontroller based hybrid systems incorporating several other additional features. Smart home automation systems are being adopted to achieve flexibility, scalability, security in the sense of data protection through the cloud-based data storage protocol, reliability, energy efficiency, etc.

  10. Design And Implementation Of A Hierarchical Automated Inspection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarbox, Glenn H.; Gerhardt, Lester A.

    1990-02-01

    In order to provide a framework for the evaluation of, and need for, sensor information appropriate to real time manufacturing control, a workcell based on a 5-axis machining center was developed. This workcell defines a problem space within which automated inspection is to be applied. Primarily, we are interested in evaluating the use of machine vision and Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM's) as means to provide information to an automated workcell controller. This controller will use these sensing technologies in a hierarchical fashion exploiting the speed vs. accuracy tradeoff's characteristic of tactile and non-tactile coordinate acquisition. We have implemented an Octree solid modeling system which has the capabilities of model generation from the information provided by the vision system. In addition, the Octree method lends itself to simulating the actual manufacturing process. Our system reads the machine tool G-Codes generated by our CAD system and simulates the material removal operation by successively removing intersections between the tool and workpiece. This machined model is then used for automatic inspection sequence generation. This paper will describe the framework and architecture of our automated inspection system, as well as specifics relating to the Octree modeling system.

  11. Tevatron Electron Lenses: Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kozub, Sergei; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; /Fermilab /SLAC /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Novosibirsk, IYF /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [1]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [2]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported in [3,4,5]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  12. Radiation design criteria handbook. [design criteria for electronic parts applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, A. G.; Martin, K. E.; Douglas, S.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation design criteria for electronic parts applications in space environments are provided. The data were compiled from the Mariner/Jupiter Saturn 1977 electronic parts radiation test program. Radiation sensitive device types were exposed to radiation environments compatible with the MJS'77 requirements under suitable bias conditions. A total of 189 integrated circuits, transistors, and other semiconductor device types were tested.

  13. Microwave Digestion--Vacuum Filtration-Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy as a sensitive method for forensic diatom test.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Liu, Chao; Hu, Sunlin; He, Shuwen; Lu, Siya

    2013-03-01

    Diagnosis of drowning is one of the most difficult issues in forensic practice. A number of methods have been developed over the years to determine whether a person was drowned. Microwave Digestion-Vacuum Filtration-Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy (MD-VF-Auto SEM) method we developed is a new qualitative and quantitative method of diatom test for diagnosis of drowning. The new method is based on microwave digestion technique, vacuum filtration, and automated SEM, which would achieve a maximal recovery of diatoms and identify diatoms easily by SEM with high resolution. This study was designed to evaluate the sensitivity of this method, the recovery of diatom, and loss ratio of centrifugation, which were compared using the MD-VF-Auto SEM method and the conventional acid digestion method. Two groups of samples were designed in the study. Groups A (n = 20) and B (n = 20) were performed by MD-VF-Auto SEM method and the conventional acid digestion method, respectively. In addition, another eight water samples were centrifuged, and the diatoms in the supernatant and precipitate were counted and measured, respectively, in order to find out how many diatoms were lost after centrifugation. The difference between the two groups was statistically highly significant, and about 34 % of diatoms were lost after centrifugation at 4,000 rpm for 15 min. The results showed that the MD-VF-Auto SEM method was more sensitive and specific.

  14. An automated tool for the design and assessment of space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalcambre, Lois M. L.; Landry, Steve P.

    1990-01-01

    Space systems can be characterized as both large and complex but they often rely on reusable subcomponents. One problem in the design of such systems is the representation and validation of the system, particularly at the higher levels of management. An automated tool is described for the representation, refinement, and validation of such complex systems based on a formal design theory, the Theory of Plausible Design. In particular, the steps necessary to automate the tool and make it a competent, usable assistant, are described.

  15. Designing automation for complex work environments under different levels of stress.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Juergen; Nickel, Peter; Wastell, David

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of different forms of static and adaptable automation under low- and high-stress conditions. Forty participants were randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions, comparing three levels of static automation (low, medium and high) and one level of adaptable automation, with the environmental stressor (noise) being varied as a within-subjects variable. Participants were trained for 4 h on a simulation of a process control environment, called AutoCAMS, followed by a 2.5-h testing session. Measures of performance, psychophysiology and subjective reactions were taken. The results showed that operators preferred higher levels of automation under noise than under quiet conditions. A number of parameters indicated negative effects of noise exposure, such as performance impairments, physiological stress reactions and higher mental workload. It also emerged that adaptable automation provided advantages over low and intermediate static automation, with regard to mental workload, effort expenditure and diagnostic performance. The article concludes that for the design of automation a wider range of operational scenarios reflecting adverse as well as ideal working conditions needs to be considered.

  16. Design and implementation of Ada programs to facilitate automated testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Jack; Fox, Barry; Oropeza, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An automated method utilized to test the software components of COMPASS, an interactive computer aided scheduling system, is presented. Each package of this system introduces a private type, and works to construct instances of that type, along with read and write routines for that type. Generic procedures that can generate test drivers for these functions are given and show how the test drivers can read from a test data file the functions to call, the arguments for those functions, what the anticipated result should be, and whether an exception should be raised for the function given the arguments.

  17. Designing Microcomputer Networks (and) LANS: A New Technology to Improve Library Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Evan L.; Farr, Rick C.

    1984-01-01

    Two articles address the design of microcomputer networks and the use of local area computer networks (LAN) to improve library automation. Topics discussed include network design criteria, media for local networks, transmission mode, typical communication protocols, user interface, basic local network architectures, and examples of microcomputer…

  18. Reliability-Based Design of a Safety-Critical Automation System: A Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Carol W.; Dunn, W.; Doty, L.; Frank, M. V.; Hulet, M.; Alvarez, Teresa (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In 1986, NASA funded a project to modernize the NASA Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels, including the replacement of obsolescent controls with a modern, automated distributed control system (DCS). The project effort on this system included an independent safety analysis (ISA) of the automation system. The purpose of the ISA was to evaluate the completeness of the hazard analyses which had already been performed on the Modernization Project. The ISA approach followed a tailoring of the risk assessment approach widely used on existing nuclear power plants. The tailoring of the nuclear industry oriented risk assessment approach to the automation system and its role in reliability-based design of the automation system is the subject of this paper.

  19. Automated determination of size and morphology information from soot transmission electron microscope (TEM)-generated images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Chan, Qing N.; Zhang, Renlin; Kook, Sanghoon; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yeoh, Guan H.; Medwell, Paul R.

    2016-05-01

    The thermophoretic sampling of particulates from hot media, coupled with transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging, is a combined approach that is widely used to derive morphological information. The identification and the measurement of the particulates, however, can be complex when the TEM images are of low contrast, noisy, and have non-uniform background signal level. The image processing method can also be challenging and time consuming, when the samples collected have large variability in shape and size, or have some degree of overlapping. In this work, a three-stage image processing sequence is presented to facilitate time-efficient automated identification and measurement of particulates from the TEM grids. The proposed processing sequence is first applied to soot samples that were thermophoretically sampled from a laminar non-premixed ethylene-air flame. The parameter values that are required to be set to facilitate the automated process are identified, and sensitivity of the results to these parameters is assessed. The same analysis process is also applied to soot samples that were acquired from an externally irradiated laminar non-premixed ethylene-air flame, which have different geometrical characteristics, to assess the morphological dependence of the proposed image processing sequence. Using the optimized parameter values, statistical assessments of the automated results reveal that the largest discrepancies that are associated with the estimated values of primary particle diameter, fractal dimension, and prefactor values of the aggregates for the tested cases, are approximately 3, 1, and 10 %, respectively, when compared with the manual measurements.

  20. Automated particle picking for low-contrast macromolecules in cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Robert; Pallesen, Jesper; Ash, Jordan T.; Ho, Danny Nam; Rubinstein, John L.; Frank, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy is an increasingly popular tool for studying the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules at high resolution. A crucial step in automating single-particle reconstruction of a biological sample is the selection of particle images from a micrograph. We present a novel algorithm for selecting particle images in low-contrast conditions; it proves more effective than the human eye on close-to-focus micrographs, yielding improved or comparable resolution in reconstructions of two macromolecular complexes. PMID:24607413

  1. Designing electron wave functions in assembled nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Christopher Ryan

    We use the scanning tunneling microscope to not only to map electron wave functions but also to engineer them. By assembling nanostructures from individual atoms and molecules, we confine two-dimensional electronic states into closed electron resonators, or "quantum corrals". Precise control over the geometry of these structures allows electronic states to be tailored to suit particular experiments. Specifically, we design wave functions that enable studies of normally inaccessible quantum phases. First, we create pairs of quantum corrals with shapes drawn from contemporary mathematics. Exploiting special topological relationships between these structures, we retrieve internal quantum phase of electron wave functions without using interferometry. Second, we demonstrate that adding a single atom to a quantum corral can cause its electronic states to recombine into coherent superpositions. The real-space position of the additional atom controls abstract superposition phase angles, enabling arbitrary time-independent superpositions to be created. Third, we study geometric phase by creating a series of quantum corrals that traverse a closed path through a parameter space. Tracking the corral wave functions reveals a phase shift depending solely on the path taken, directly visualizing Berry's phase evolution in a quantum system. Finally, we extend beyond closed electron resonators and engineer wave functions in open nanostructures. We show that arbitrary patterns can be encoded into electronic states, creating a new form of holography on the nanoscale. We exhibit letters written in electron density rather than with atomic matter, and show that multiple letters may be simultaneously embedded at different energies in the same region of space. Because the wavelength of the electrons diminishes as energy is increased, this technique allows local information densities that exceed the conventionally assumed limit of 1 bit per atom. Taken together, the results in this thesis

  2. Designs for a quantum electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Kruit, P; Hobbs, R G; Kim, C-S; Yang, Y; Manfrinato, V R; Hammer, J; Thomas, S; Weber, P; Klopfer, B; Kohstall, C; Juffmann, T; Kasevich, M A; Hommelhoff, P; Berggren, K K

    2016-05-01

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This 'quantum weirdness' could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or "quantum electron microscope". A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope.

  3. Integrative approach to teaching electronics design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Donald G.; Mercer, Ken; O'Driscoll, Bob; Plaw, Colin; Page, Wyatt H.; Nilson, Ross

    2000-10-01

    Students in the introductory electronics papers work together on a group project in parallel with their regularly scheduled lectures and laboratories. Each team of four students has to design and construct a complex electronic system. The staff involved with the project act as consultants to the design teams. The project is integrative in that it combines together a wide range of tools and techniques form across the spectrum of topics covered in lectures. The system to be designed is split into seven modules, with each module defined explicitly through a set of specifications. For each module, students are required to design a suitable circuit to meet the specifications, verify their design through simulation, prototype their design on breadboard, and realize their design on a PCB. By running the design project in parallel with the theory, the project improves the students understanding of the theory at the same time as developing design skills. An important factor to the success of the project is that the students find it fun.

  4. Optimizing ELISAs for precision and robustness using laboratory automation and statistical design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Joelsson, Daniel; Moravec, Phil; Troutman, Matthew; Pigeon, Joseph; DePhillips, Pete

    2008-08-20

    Transferring manual ELISAs to automated platforms requires optimizing the assays for each particular robotic platform. These optimization experiments are often time consuming and difficult to perform using a traditional one-factor-at-a-time strategy. In this manuscript we describe the development of an automated process using statistical design of experiments (DOE) to quickly optimize immunoassays for precision and robustness on the Tecan EVO liquid handler. By using fractional factorials and a split-plot design, five incubation time variables and four reagent concentration variables can be optimized in a short period of time.

  5. Automation and Accountability in Decision Support System Interface Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Mary L.

    2006-01-01

    When the human element is introduced into decision support system design, entirely new layers of social and ethical issues emerge but are not always recognized as such. This paper discusses those ethical and social impact issues specific to decision support systems and highlights areas that interface designers should consider during design with an…

  6. An Electronics Course Emphasizing Circuit Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeson, Haven E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a one-quarter introductory electronics course in which the students use a variety of inexpensive integrated circuits to design and construct a large number of useful circuits. Presents the subject matter of the course in three parts: linear circuits, digital circuits, and more complex circuits. (GS)

  7. Enhancing Creative Thinking through Designing Electronic Slides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokaram, Al-Ali Khaled; Al-Shabatat, Ahmad Mohammad; Fong, Fook Soon; Abdallah, Andaleeb Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    During the shifting of teaching and learning methods using computer technologies, much emphasis was paid on the knowledge content more than the thinking skills. Thus, this study investigated the effects of a computer application, namely, designing electronic slides on the development of creative thinking skills of a sample of undergraduate…

  8. Fractal design concepts for stretchable electronics.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jonathan A; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Su, Yewang; Hattori, Yoshiaki; Lee, Woosik; Jung, Sung-Young; Zhang, Yihui; Liu, Zhuangjian; Cheng, Huanyu; Falgout, Leo; Bajema, Mike; Coleman, Todd; Gregoire, Dan; Larsen, Ryan J; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2014-01-01

    Stretchable electronics provide a foundation for applications that exceed the scope of conventional wafer and circuit board technologies due to their unique capacity to integrate with soft materials and curvilinear surfaces. The range of possibilities is predicated on the development of device architectures that simultaneously offer advanced electronic function and compliant mechanics. Here we report that thin films of hard electronic materials patterned in deterministic fractal motifs and bonded to elastomers enable unusual mechanics with important implications in stretchable device design. In particular, we demonstrate the utility of Peano, Greek cross, Vicsek and other fractal constructs to yield space-filling structures of electronic materials, including monocrystalline silicon, for electrophysiological sensors, precision monitors and actuators, and radio frequency antennas. These devices support conformal mounting on the skin and have unique properties such as invisibility under magnetic resonance imaging. The results suggest that fractal-based layouts represent important strategies for hard-soft materials integration.

  9. Fractal design concepts for stretchable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jonathan A.; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Su, Yewang; Hattori, Yoshiaki; Lee, Woosik; Jung, Sung-Young; Zhang, Yihui; Liu, Zhuangjian; Cheng, Huanyu; Falgout, Leo; Bajema, Mike; Coleman, Todd; Gregoire, Dan; Larsen, Ryan J.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-02-01

    Stretchable electronics provide a foundation for applications that exceed the scope of conventional wafer and circuit board technologies due to their unique capacity to integrate with soft materials and curvilinear surfaces. The range of possibilities is predicated on the development of device architectures that simultaneously offer advanced electronic function and compliant mechanics. Here we report that thin films of hard electronic materials patterned in deterministic fractal motifs and bonded to elastomers enable unusual mechanics with important implications in stretchable device design. In particular, we demonstrate the utility of Peano, Greek cross, Vicsek and other fractal constructs to yield space-filling structures of electronic materials, including monocrystalline silicon, for electrophysiological sensors, precision monitors and actuators, and radio frequency antennas. These devices support conformal mounting on the skin and have unique properties such as invisibility under magnetic resonance imaging. The results suggest that fractal-based layouts represent important strategies for hard-soft materials integration.

  10. Electronic health records in rheumatology: emphasis on automated scoring and additional use.

    PubMed

    Richter, Jutta G; Chehab, Gamal; Schneider, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records are increasingly used and frequently required from various regulatory authorities. Apart from their day-to-day use by health care professionals for routine clinical practice and/or the improvement of quality of care processes, patients with chronic inflammatory disease may become increasingly involved in the data retrieval process by self-monitoring and providing patient-reported (outcome) data. Among key features of electronic health records are automated scoring, visualisation of validated measures, and long-term systematic patient-centered data collection in a structured and standardised manner. Data derived from electronic health records are increasingly incorporated into patient-centered research, registries, and other secondary uses. Thus, electronic health records offer opportunities to improve knowledge and to create new process flows in rheumatology health care. The article summarises some of these opportunities in patient care, as well as an overview of secondary use scenarios. In addition, the article focuses on patients' active involvement in the disease management process via health information applications, reports on patients' perspectives, as well as some legal and regulatory matters concerning electronic health records.

  11. Design of microcontroller based system for automation of streak camera

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, M. J.; Upadhyay, J.; Deshpande, P. P.; Sharma, M. L.; Navathe, C. P.

    2010-08-15

    A microcontroller based system has been developed for automation of the S-20 optical streak camera, which is used as a diagnostic tool to measure ultrafast light phenomenon. An 8 bit MCS family microcontroller is employed to generate all control signals for the streak camera. All biasing voltages required for various electrodes of the tubes are generated using dc-to-dc converters. A high voltage ramp signal is generated through a step generator unit followed by an integrator circuit and is applied to the camera's deflecting plates. The slope of the ramp can be changed by varying values of the capacitor and inductor. A programmable digital delay generator has been developed for synchronization of ramp signal with the optical signal. An independent hardwired interlock circuit has been developed for machine safety. A LABVIEW based graphical user interface has been developed which enables the user to program the settings of the camera and capture the image. The image is displayed with intensity profiles along horizontal and vertical axes. The streak camera was calibrated using nanosecond and femtosecond lasers.

  12. Design of microcontroller based system for automation of streak camera.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M J; Upadhyay, J; Deshpande, P P; Sharma, M L; Navathe, C P

    2010-08-01

    A microcontroller based system has been developed for automation of the S-20 optical streak camera, which is used as a diagnostic tool to measure ultrafast light phenomenon. An 8 bit MCS family microcontroller is employed to generate all control signals for the streak camera. All biasing voltages required for various electrodes of the tubes are generated using dc-to-dc converters. A high voltage ramp signal is generated through a step generator unit followed by an integrator circuit and is applied to the camera's deflecting plates. The slope of the ramp can be changed by varying values of the capacitor and inductor. A programmable digital delay generator has been developed for synchronization of ramp signal with the optical signal. An independent hardwired interlock circuit has been developed for machine safety. A LABVIEW based graphical user interface has been developed which enables the user to program the settings of the camera and capture the image. The image is displayed with intensity profiles along horizontal and vertical axes. The streak camera was calibrated using nanosecond and femtosecond lasers.

  13. PS2-40: Using Automation to Add Electronic Clinical Data to a Research Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Sharon; Carrell, David; Green, Beverly

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Clinical research trials often rely on automated data systems, such as the electronic medical record to create and maintain a patient registry, to determine a participant’s progress through the study, or for analytic purposes. Data might come from a variety of sources and include such elements as procedures, lab results, hospitalization, vital status, enrollment and participant responses from survey software. An automated process for adding outside data to a study tracking database can save significant time over abstraction or manual data import processes, and can allow determination of an individual’s study status in close to real time. Methods There are a number of ways of setting up an automated import process, depending on data needs and availability. Over the course of several clinical trials, we have developed a process with the following steps, all occurring automatically on a scheduled basis: 1. A SAS program performs Extract/Transform/Load (ETL) tasks: 1a. Extract and transform the desired data from each source. 1b. Load new data into a SAS dataset for historical purposes and into a staging table in the tracking database preparatory to actual use. 1c. Generate automated emails when specific milestones occur (e.g., study end date reached or first use of a given lab test code). 2. Another SAS program checks the ETL logs and sends email about any errors occurring in the ETL process. 3. A database job calls stored procedures to insert data from the staging tables into the main study events table and send email detailing how many records were processed. 3a. If manual intervention is needed before the final data is loaded, the user can call the stored procedure once data entry is complete. 3b. A master stored procedure can call individual procedures in order (e.g., importing a positive lab result may trigger randomization). Results The ETL process described above has proven itself to be robust and adaptable in a variety of study contexts

  14. Fast and Accurate Circuit Design Automation through Hierarchical Model Switching.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Linh; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2015-08-21

    In computer-aided biological design, the trifecta of characterized part libraries, accurate models and optimal design parameters is crucial for producing reliable designs. As the number of parts and model complexity increase, however, it becomes exponentially more difficult for any optimization method to search the solution space, hence creating a trade-off that hampers efficient design. To address this issue, we present a hierarchical computer-aided design architecture that uses a two-step approach for biological design. First, a simple model of low computational complexity is used to predict circuit behavior and assess candidate circuit branches through branch-and-bound methods. Then, a complex, nonlinear circuit model is used for a fine-grained search of the reduced solution space, thus achieving more accurate results. Evaluation with a benchmark of 11 circuits and a library of 102 experimental designs with known characterization parameters demonstrates a speed-up of 3 orders of magnitude when compared to other design methods that provide optimality guarantees.

  15. GeNeDA: An Open-Source Workflow for Design Automation of Gene Regulatory Networks Inspired from Microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Madec, Morgan; Pecheux, François; Gendrault, Yves; Rosati, Elise; Lallement, Christophe; Haiech, Jacques

    2016-10-01

    The topic of this article is the development of an open-source automated design framework for synthetic biology, specifically for the design of artificial gene regulatory networks based on a digital approach. In opposition to other tools, GeNeDA is an open-source online software based on existing tools used in microelectronics that have proven their efficiency over the last 30 years. The complete framework is composed of a computation core directly adapted from an Electronic Design Automation tool, input and output interfaces, a library of elementary parts that can be achieved with gene regulatory networks, and an interface with an electrical circuit simulator. Each of these modules is an extension of microelectronics tools and concepts: ODIN II, ABC, the Verilog language, SPICE simulator, and SystemC-AMS. GeNeDA is first validated on a benchmark of several combinatorial circuits. The results highlight the importance of the part library. Then, this framework is used for the design of a sequential circuit including a biological state machine.

  16. SLC polarized beam source electron optics design

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.; Lavine, T.L.; Early, R.A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Spencer, C.M.; Yeremian, A.D.

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the design of the beam-line from the polarized electron gun to the linac injector in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The polarized electron source is a GaAs photocathode, requiring 10{sup {minus}11}-Torr-range pressure for adequate quantum efficiency and longevity. The photocathode is illuminated by 3-nsec-long laser pulses. The quality of the optics for the 160-kV beam is crucial since electron-stimulated gas desorption from beam loss in excess of 0.1% of the 20-nC pulses may poison the photocathode. Our design for the transport line consists of a differential pumping region isolated by a pair of valves. Focusing is provided by a pair of Helmholtz coils and by several iron-encased solenoidal lenses. Our optics design is based on beam transport simulations using 2{1/2}-D particle-in-cell codes to model the gun and to solve the fully-relativistic time-dependent equations of motion in three dimensions for electrons in the presence of azimuthally symmetric electromagnetic fields. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Automated drafting and design for the Civil engineer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, M. V.

    1981-09-01

    This thesis presents the results of a survey of twelve interactive graphics systems manufacturers and develops a simple model for economic decision analysis. The survey information includes costs of the systems, training times, and software available. From the survey information and extensive literature review, an analysis is developed to determine the feasibility of developing guidelines for each design office to determine whether it could justify automatic drafting. The model is based on: (1) the salaries of design engineers authorized in the design section; (2) the salaries of site developers authorized in the site development section; (3) the amount of time spent on design work and drafting; and (4) the cost of the interactive graphics system used to produce the designs and drawings.

  18. Imaging Electron Spectrometer (IES) Electron Preprocessor (EPP) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennell, J. F.; Osborn, J. V.; Christensen, John L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Aerospace Corporation developed the Electron PreProcessor (EPP) to support the Imaging Electron Spectrometer (IES) that is part of the RAPID experiment on the ESA/NASA CLUSTER mission. The purpose of the EPP is to collect raw data from the IES and perform processing and data compression on it before transferring it to the RAPID microprocessor system for formatting and transmission to the CLUSTER satellite data system. The report provides a short history of the RAPID and CLUSTER programs and describes the EPP design. Four EPP units were fabricated, tested, and delivered for the original CLUSTER program. These were destroyed during a launch failure. Four more EPP units were delivered for the CLUSTER II program. These were successfully launched and are operating nominally on orbit.

  19. Design, development, test, and evaluation of an automated analytical electrophoresis apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, P. A.; Bier, M.

    1977-01-01

    An Automated Analytical Electrophoresis Apparatus (AAEA) was designed, developed, assembled, and preliminarily tested. The AAEA was demonstrated to be a feasible apparatus for automatically acquiring, displaying, and storing (and eventually analyzing) electrophoresis mobility data from living blood cells. The apparatus and the operation of its major assemblies are described in detail.

  20. Automated Tetrahedral Mesh Generation for CFD Analysis of Aircraft in Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordaz, Irian; Li, Wu; Campbell, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    The paper introduces an automation process of generating a tetrahedral mesh for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of aircraft configurations in early conceptual design. The method was developed for CFD-based sonic boom analysis of supersonic configurations, but can be applied to aerodynamic analysis of aircraft configurations in any flight regime.

  1. Designing an Automated Assessment of Public Speaking Skills Using Multimodal Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Lei; Feng, Gary; Leong, Chee Wee; Joe, Jilliam; Kitchen, Christopher; Lee, Chong Min

    2016-01-01

    Traditional assessments of public speaking skills rely on human scoring. We report an initial study on the development of an automated scoring model for public speaking performances using multimodal technologies. Task design, rubric development, and human rating were conducted according to standards in educational assessment. An initial corpus of…

  2. Automated design of minimum drag light aircraft fuselages and nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.; Fox, S. R.; Karlin, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    The constrained minimization algorithm of Vanderplaats is applied to the problem of designing minimum drag faired bodies such as fuselages and nacelles. Body drag is computed by a variation of the Hess-Smith code. This variation includes a boundary layer computation. The encased payload provides arbitrary geometric constraints, specified a priori by the designer, below which the fairing cannot shrink. The optimization may include engine cooling air flows entering and exhausting through specific port locations on the body.

  3. A Case Study of Reverse Engineering Integrated in an Automated Design Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescaru, R.; Kyratsis, P.; Oancea, G.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a design methodology which automates the generation of curves extracted from the point clouds that have been obtained by digitizing the physical objects. The methodology is described on a product belonging to the industry of consumables, respectively a footwear type product that has a complex shape with many curves. The final result is the automated generation of wrapping curves, surfaces and solids according to the characteristics of the customer's foot, and to the preferences for the chosen model, which leads to the development of customized products.

  4. Automation for pattern library creation and in-design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Rock; Zou, Elain; Hong, Sid; Wang, Jinyan; Zhang, Yifan; Sweis, Jason; Lai, Ya-Chieh; Ding, Hua; Huang, Jason

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor manufacturing technologies are becoming increasingly complex with every passing node. Newer technology nodes are pushing the limits of optical lithography and requiring multiple exposures with exotic material stacks for each critical layer. All of this added complexity usually amounts to further restrictions in what can be designed. Furthermore, the designs must be checked against all these restrictions in verification and sign-off stages. Design rules are intended to capture all the manufacturing limitations such that yield can be maximized for any given design adhering to all the rules. Most manufacturing steps employ some sort of model based simulation which characterizes the behavior of each step. The lithography models play a very big part of the overall yield and design restrictions in patterning. However, lithography models are not practical to run during design creation due to their slow and prohibitive run times. Furthermore, the models are not usually given to foundry customers because of the confidential and sensitive nature of every foundry's processes. The design layout locations where a model flags unacceptable simulated results can be used to define pattern rules which can be shared with customers. With advanced technology nodes we see a large growth of pattern based rules. This is due to the fact that pattern matching is very fast and the rules themselves can be very complex to describe in a standard DRC language. Therefore, the patterns are left as either pattern layout clips or abstracted into pattern-like syntax which a pattern matcher can use directly. The patterns themselves can be multi-layered with "fuzzy" designations such that groups of similar patterns can be found using one description. The pattern matcher is often integrated with a DRC tool such that verification and signoff can be done in one step. The patterns can be layout constructs that are "forbidden", "waived", or simply low-yielding in nature. The patterns can also

  5. Program Calculates Power Demands Of Electronic Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    1995-01-01

    CURRENT computer program calculates power requirements of electronic designs. For given design, CURRENT reads in applicable parts-list file and file containing current required for each part. Program also calculates power required for circuit at supply potentials of 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5 volts. Written by use of AWK utility for Sun4-series computers running SunOS 4.x and IBM PC-series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. Sun version of program (NPO-19590). PC version of program (NPO-19111).

  6. Scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation

    DOEpatents

    Hillson, Nathan J.

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides a method of a method of designing an implementation of a DNA assembly. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) receiving a list of DNA sequence fragments to be assembled together and an order in which to assemble the DNA sequence fragments, (2) designing DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) for each of the DNA sequence fragments, and (3) creating a plan for adding flanking homology sequences to each of the DNA oligos. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) receiving a list of DNA sequence fragments to be assembled together and an order in which to assemble the DNA sequence fragments, (2) designing DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) for each of the DNA sequence fragments, and (3) creating a plan for adding optimized overhang sequences to each of the DNA oligos.

  7. Automated simulation as part of a design workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Elizabeth; Shenk, T.; Robinson, P.; Upadhye, R.

    1990-01-01

    A development project for a design workstation for advanced life-support systems (called the DAWN Project, for Design Assistant Workstation), incorporating qualitative simulation, required the implementation of a useful qualitative simulation capability and the integration of qualitative and quantitative simulation such that simulation capabilities are maximized without duplication. The reason is that to produce design solutions to a system goal, the behavior of the system in both a steady and perturbed state must be represented. The Qualitative Simulation Tool (QST), on an expert-system-like model building and simulation interface toll called ScratchPad (SP), and on the integration of QST and SP with more conventional, commercially available simulation packages now being applied in the evaluation of life-support system processes and components are discussed.

  8. Automated Design and Optimization of Pebble-bed Reactor Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

    2010-07-01

    We present a conceptual design approach for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors using recirculating pebble-bed cores. The design approach employs PEBBED, a reactor physics code specifically designed to solve for and analyze the asymptotic burnup state of pebble-bed reactors, in conjunction with a genetic algorithm to obtain a core that maximizes a fitness value that is a function of user-specified parameters. The uniqueness of the asymptotic core state and the small number of independent parameters that define it suggest that core geometry and fuel cycle can be efficiently optimized toward a specified objective. PEBBED exploits a novel representation of the distribution of pebbles that enables efficient coupling of the burnup and neutron diffusion solvers. With this method, even complex pebble recirculation schemes can be expressed in terms of a few parameters that are amenable to modern optimization techniques. With PEBBED, the user chooses the type and range of core physics parameters that represent the design space. A set of traits, each with acceptable and preferred values expressed by a simple fitness function, is used to evaluate the candidate reactor cores. The stochastic search algorithm automatically drives the generation of core parameters toward the optimal core as defined by the user. The optimized design can then be modeled and analyzed in greater detail using higher resolution and more computationally demanding tools to confirm the desired characteristics. For this study, the design of pebble-bed high temperature reactor concepts subjected to demanding physical constraints demonstrated the efficacy of the PEBBED algorithm.

  9. Genetic design automation: engineering fantasy or scientific renewal?

    PubMed

    Lux, Matthew W; Bramlett, Brian W; Ball, David A; Peccoud, Jean

    2012-02-01

    The aim of synthetic biology is to make genetic systems more amenable to engineering, which has naturally led to the development of computer-aided design (CAD) tools. Experimentalists still primarily rely on project-specific ad hoc workflows instead of domain-specific tools, which suggests that CAD tools are lagging behind the front line of the field. Here, we discuss the scientific hurdles that have limited the productivity gains anticipated from existing tools. We argue that the real value of efforts to develop CAD tools is the formalization of genetic design rules that determine the complex relationships between genotype and phenotype.

  10. Automated Verification of Design Patterns with LePUS3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Jonathan; Gasparis, Epameinondas; Eden, Ammon H.; Kazman, Rick

    2009-01-01

    Specification and [visual] modelling languages are expected to combine strong abstraction mechanisms with rigour, scalability, and parsimony. LePUS3 is a visual, object-oriented design description language axiomatized in a decidable subset of the first-order predicate logic. We demonstrate how LePUS3 is used to formally specify a structural design pattern and prove ( verify ) whether any JavaTM 1.4 program satisfies that specification. We also show how LePUS3 specifications (charts) are composed and how they are verified fully automatically in the Two-Tier Programming Toolkit.

  11. Automated Tactical Symbology System (TACSYM): System Design Specifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    138. Personal Demand 39. Microphones 89. CBR 139. Repair Parts 40. Target Designator 90. Chemical 140. Wire 41. Visual Station 91. Combined Arms...allmi for modification of the database. Insertion and removal of data from the database is controlled by DATABsE . C. 2.1.4 Software Suppot t. The

  12. CMOS array design automation techniques. [metal oxide semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramondetta, P.; Feller, A.; Noto, R.; Lombardi, T.

    1975-01-01

    A low cost, quick turnaround technique for generating custom metal oxide semiconductor arrays using the standard cell approach was developed, implemented, tested and validated. Basic cell design topology and guidelines are defined based on an extensive analysis that includes circuit, layout, process, array topology and required performance considerations particularly high circuit speed.

  13. Accelerating Chart Review Using Automated Methods on Electronic Health Record Data for Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhen; Melton, Genevieve B.; Moeller, Nathan D.; Arsoniadis, Elliot G.; Wang, Yan; Kwaan, Mary R.; Jensen, Eric H.; Simon, Gyorgy J.

    2016-01-01

    Manual Chart Review (MCR) is an important but labor-intensive task for clinical research and quality improvement. In this study, aiming to accelerate the process of extracting postoperative outcomes from medical charts, we developed an automated postoperative complications detection application by using structured electronic health record (EHR) data. We applied several machine learning methods to the detection of commonly occurring complications, including three subtypes of surgical site infection, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, sepsis, and septic shock. Particularly, we applied one single-task and five multi-task learning methods and compared their detection performance. The models demonstrated high detection performance, which ensures the feasibility of accelerating MCR. Specifically, one of the multi-task learning methods, propensity weighted observations (PWO) demonstrated the highest detection performance, with single-task learning being a close second. PMID:28269941

  14. Automated simulation as part of a design workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, E.; Shenk, T.; Robinson, P.; Upadhye, R.

    1990-01-01

    A development project for a design workstation for advanced life-support systems incorporating qualitative simulation, required the implementation of a useful qualitative simulation capability and the integration of qualitative and quantitative simulations, such that simulation capabilities are maximized without duplication. The reason is that to produce design solutions to a system goal, the behavior of the system in both a steady and perturbed state must be represented. The paper reports on the Qualitative Simulation Tool (QST), on an expert-system-like model building and simulation interface toll called ScratchPad (SP), and on the integration of QST and SP with more conventional, commercially available simulation packages now being applied in the evaluation of life-support system processes and components.

  15. Automated Interior Lighting Design Software for Base Civil Engineers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    Auditoriums 20 9 Cafeterias 25 10 Computer rooms 50 11 Conference rooms 30 12 Corridors 10 13 Drafting rooms 75 14 Elevator mach. rms is 15 EM. Generator...biological rhythms, regulates production of * hormones, and affects metabolism of specific areas in the brain (30: 11 )." Simply stated, "Research...this process in lighting design, Chapter 11 of this thesis will provide a much more detailed explanation of the process, and also works examples to help

  16. Theory and Design of Adaptive Automation in Aviation Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-17

    and KOALAS programs at the Naval Air Development Center. The latter is an intelligent, man-in-the-loop, architecture that is presently being...7 This approach has been applied as a model in the Knowledgeable Operator Analysis- Unked System ( KOALAS ) for decision aiding and has in turn been...Barrett,C.L. (1988) The Knowledgeable Ooerator Analysis-Linked Advisory System ( KOALAS ) A1oroach to Decision Suooort System Design. Analysis and Synthesis

  17. A Multi-Agent Design for Power Distribution Systems Automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, M. Jawad

    A new Multi Agent System (MAS) design for fault location, isolation and restoration in power distribution systems is presented. In proposed approach, when there is a fault in the Power Distribution System (PDS), MAS quickly isolates the fault and restores the service to fault-free zones. Hierarchical coordination strategy is introduced to manage the agents which integrate the advantages of both centralized and decentralized coordination strategies. In this framework, Zone Agent (ZA) locate and isolate the fault based on the locally available information and assist the Feeder Agent (FA) for reconfiguration and restoration. FA can solve the restoration problem using the existing algorithms for the 0-1 Knapsack problem. A novel Q-learning mechanism is also introduced to support the FAs in decision making for restoration. Also a distributed MAS-Based Load Shedding (LS) technique has been used to supply as many of higher priority customers as possible, in case there is more demand than generation. The design is illustrated by the use of simulation case studies for fault location, isolation and restoration on West Virginia Super Circuit (WVSC) and hardware implementation for fault location and isolation in a laboratory platform. The results from the case studies indicate the performance of proposed MAS designs.

  18. Automated design of image operators that detect interest points.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Leonardo; Olague, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    This work describes how evolutionary computation can be used to synthesize low-level image operators that detect interesting points on digital images. Interest point detection is an essential part of many modern computer vision systems that solve tasks such as object recognition, stereo correspondence, and image indexing, to name but a few. The design of the specialized operators is posed as an optimization/search problem that is solved with genetic programming (GP), a strategy still mostly unexplored by the computer vision community. The proposed approach automatically synthesizes operators that are competitive with state-of-the-art designs, taking into account an operator's geometric stability and the global separability of detected points during fitness evaluation. The GP search space is defined using simple primitive operations that are commonly found in point detectors proposed by the vision community. The experiments described in this paper extend previous results (Trujillo and Olague, 2006a,b) by presenting 15 new operators that were synthesized through the GP-based search. Some of the synthesized operators can be regarded as improved manmade designs because they employ well-known image processing techniques and achieve highly competitive performance. On the other hand, since the GP search also generates what can be considered as unconventional operators for point detection, these results provide a new perspective to feature extraction research.

  19. A New Automated Design Method Based on Machine Learning for CMOS Analog Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Behzad; Mirzaei, Abdolreza

    2016-11-01

    A new simulation based automated CMOS analog circuit design method which applies a multi-objective non-Darwinian-type evolutionary algorithm based on Learnable Evolution Model (LEM) is proposed in this article. The multi-objective property of this automated design of CMOS analog circuits is governed by a modified Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm (SPEA) incorporated in the LEM algorithm presented here. LEM includes a machine learning method such as the decision trees that makes a distinction between high- and low-fitness areas in the design space. The learning process can detect the right directions of the evolution and lead to high steps in the evolution of the individuals. The learning phase shortens the evolution process and makes remarkable reduction in the number of individual evaluations. The expert designer's knowledge on circuit is applied in the design process in order to reduce the design space as well as the design time. The circuit evaluation is made by HSPICE simulator. In order to improve the design accuracy, bsim3v3 CMOS transistor model is adopted in this proposed design method. This proposed design method is tested on three different operational amplifier circuits. The performance of this proposed design method is verified by comparing it with the evolutionary strategy algorithm and other similar methods.

  20. Application of δ recycling to electron automated diffraction tomography data from inorganic crystalline nanovolumes.

    PubMed

    Rius, Jordi; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Vallcorba, Oriol; Kolb, Ute

    2013-07-01

    δ Recycling is a simple procedure for directly extracting phase information from Patterson-type functions [Rius (2012). Acta Cryst. A68, 399-400]. This new phasing method has a clear theoretical basis and was developed with ideal single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. On the other hand, introduction of the automated diffraction tomography (ADT) technique has represented a significant advance in electron diffraction data collection [Kolb et al. (2007). Ultramicroscopy, 107, 507-513]. When combined with precession electron diffraction, it delivers quasi-kinematical intensity data even for complex inorganic compounds, so that single-crystal diffraction data of nanometric volumes are now available for structure determination by direct methods. To check the tolerance of δ recycling to missing data-collection corrections and to deviations from kinematical behaviour of ADT intensities, δ recycling has been applied to differently shaped nanocrystals of various inorganic materials. The results confirm that it can phase ADT data very efficiently. In some cases even more complete structure models than those derived from conventional direct methods and least-squares refinement have been found. During this study it has been demonstrated that the Wilson-plot scaling procedure is largely insensitive to sample thickness variations and missing absorption corrections affecting electron ADT intensities.

  1. DESIGN AND PRELIMINARY VALIDATION OF A RAPID AUTOMATED BIODOSIMETRY TOOL FOR HIGH THROUGPUT RADIOLOGICAL TRIAGE

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Youhua; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Hongliang; Garty, Guy; Xu, Yanping; Lyulko, Oleksandra V.; Turner, Helen C.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Simaan, Nabil; Yao, Y. Lawrence; Brenner, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents design, hardware, software, and parameter optimization for a novel robotic automation system. RABiT is a Rapid Automated Biodosimetry Tool for high throughput radiological triage. The design considerations guiding the hardware and software architecture are presented with focus on methods of communication, ease of implementation, and need for real-time control versus soft time control cycles. The design and parameter determination for a non-contact PVC capillary laser cutting system is presented. A novel approach for lymphocyte concentration estimation based on computer vision is reported. Experimental evaluations of the system components validate the success of our prototype system in achieving a throughput of 6,000 samples in a period of 18 hours. PMID:21258614

  2. Three-dimensional rotation electron diffraction: software RED for automated data collection and data processing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wei; Sun, Junliang; Su, Jie; Hovmöller, Sven; Zou, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    Implementation of a computer program package for automated collection and processing of rotation electron diffraction (RED) data is described. The software package contains two computer programs: RED data collection and RED data processing. The RED data collection program controls the transmission electron microscope and the camera. Electron beam tilts at a fine step (0.05-0.20°) are combined with goniometer tilts at a coarse step (2.0-3.0°) around a common tilt axis, which allows a fine relative tilt to be achieved between the electron beam and the crystal in a large tilt range. An electron diffraction (ED) frame is collected at each combination of beam tilt and goniometer tilt. The RED data processing program processes three-dimensional ED data generated by the RED data collection program or by other approaches. It includes shift correction of the ED frames, peak hunting for diffraction spots in individual ED frames and identification of these diffraction spots as reflections in three dimensions. Unit-cell parameters are determined from the positions of reflections in three-dimensional reciprocal space. All reflections are indexed, and finally a list with hkl indices and intensities is output. The data processing program also includes a visualizer to view and analyse three-dimensional reciprocal lattices reconstructed from the ED frames. Details of the implementation are described. Data collection and data processing with the software RED are demonstrated using a calcined zeolite sample, silicalite-1. The structure of the calcined silicalite-1, with 72 unique atoms, could be solved from the RED data by routine direct methods.

  3. Design principles and algorithms for automated air traffic management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents design principles and algorithm for building a real time scheduler. The primary objective of the scheduler is to assign arrival aircraft to a favorable landing runway and schedule them to land at times that minimize delays. A further objective of the scheduler is to allocate delays between high altitude airspace far from the airport and low altitude airspace near the airport. A method of delay allocation is described that minimizes the average operating cost in the presence of errors in controlling aircraft to a specified landing time.

  4. Automated design of two-zero rational Chebychev filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, K. H.

    1981-10-01

    The Rational Chebychev function is used to design elliptic-characteristic filters. The filter has N/2 ripples in the passband but only one ripple in the stopband for all orders. As N increases from three, the result is a substantial saving in number of capacitors in the passive ladder realization of the above function as compared to that of traditional elliptic filters of the same order N. The ladder's element values can be expressed as explicit involving only the coefficients of the transfer function. These expressions can also be used for other types of filters. Numerically, the design can be carried out by a Fortran program or a set of programs on a programmable calculator. The user needs only to give the three specifications: the filter order N, the stopband zeros Z, and the passband ripple amount R sub p. The program automatically selects the starting point for the given case and proceeds. The numerical results of the above programs over a range of specifications relate the above specifications to the minimum stopband attenuation.

  5. New hardware and workflows for semi-automated correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy/tomography.

    PubMed

    Schorb, Martin; Gaechter, Leander; Avinoam, Ori; Sieckmann, Frank; Clarke, Mairi; Bebeacua, Cecilia; Bykov, Yury S; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Lihl, Reinhard; Briggs, John A G

    2017-02-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy allows features of interest defined by fluorescence signals to be located in an electron micrograph of the same sample. Rare dynamic events or specific objects can be identified, targeted and imaged by electron microscopy or tomography. To combine it with structural studies using cryo-electron microscopy or tomography, fluorescence microscopy must be performed while maintaining the specimen vitrified at liquid-nitrogen temperatures and in a dry environment during imaging and transfer. Here we present instrumentation, software and an experimental workflow that improves the ease of use, throughput and performance of correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. The new cryo-stage incorporates a specially modified high-numerical aperture objective lens and provides a stable and clean imaging environment. It is combined with a transfer shuttle for contamination-free loading of the specimen. Optimized microscope control software allows automated acquisition of the entire specimen area by cryo-fluorescence microscopy. The software also facilitates direct transfer of the fluorescence image and associated coordinates to the cryo-electron microscope for subsequent fluorescence-guided automated imaging. Here we describe these technological developments and present a detailed workflow, which we applied for automated cryo-electron microscopy and tomography of various specimens.

  6. Automated recycling of chemistry for virtual screening and library design.

    PubMed

    Vainio, Mikko J; Kogej, Thierry; Raubacher, Florian

    2012-07-23

    An early stage drug discovery project needs to identify a number of chemically diverse and attractive compounds. These hit compounds are typically found through high-throughput screening campaigns. The diversity of the chemical libraries used in screening is therefore important. In this study, we describe a virtual high-throughput screening system called Virtual Library. The system automatically "recycles" validated synthetic protocols and available starting materials to generate a large number of virtual compound libraries, and allows for fast searches in the generated libraries using a 2D fingerprint based screening method. Virtual Library links the returned virtual hit compounds back to experimental protocols to quickly assess the synthetic accessibility of the hits. The system can be used as an idea generator for library design to enrich the screening collection and to explore the structure-activity landscape around a specific active compound.

  7. An Approach to Automated Fusion System Design and Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Fritze, Alexander; Mönks, Uwe; Holst, Christoph-Alexander; Lohweg, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Industrial applications are in transition towards modular and flexible architectures that are capable of self-configuration and -optimisation. This is due to the demand of mass customisation and the increasing complexity of industrial systems. The conversion to modular systems is related to challenges in all disciplines. Consequently, diverse tasks such as information processing, extensive networking, or system monitoring using sensor and information fusion systems need to be reconsidered. The focus of this contribution is on distributed sensor and information fusion systems for system monitoring, which must reflect the increasing flexibility of fusion systems. This contribution thus proposes an approach, which relies on a network of self-descriptive intelligent sensor nodes, for the automatic design and update of sensor and information fusion systems. This article encompasses the fusion system configuration and adaptation as well as communication aspects. Manual interaction with the flexibly changing system is reduced to a minimum. PMID:28300762

  8. Provider acceptance of an automated electronic alert for acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Janice; Bia, Joshua R.; Ubaid-Ullah, Muhamad; Testani, Jeffrey M.; Wilson, Francis Perry

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical decision support systems, including electronic alerts, ideally provide immediate and relevant patient-specific information to improve clinical decision-making. Despite the growing capabilities of such alerts in conjunction with an expanding electronic medical record, there is a paucity of information regarding their perceived usefulness. We surveyed healthcare providers' opinions concerning the practicality and efficacy of a specific text-based automated electronic alert for acute kidney injury (AKI) in a single hospital during a randomized trial of AKI alerts. Methods Providers who had received at least one electronic AKI alert in the previous 6 months, as part of a separate randomized controlled trial (clinicaltrials.gov #01862419), were asked to complete a survey concerning their opinions about this specific AKI alert system. Individual approval of the alert system was defined by a provider's desire to continue receiving the alert after termination of the trial. Results A total of 98 individuals completed the survey, including 62 physicians, 27 pharmacists and 7 non-physician providers. Sixty-nine percent of responders approved the alert, with no significant difference among the various professions (P = 0.28). Alert approval was strongly correlated with the belief that the alerts improved patient care (P < 0.0001), and negatively correlated with the belief that alerts did not provide novel information (P = 0.0001). With each additional 30 days of trial duration, odds of approval decreased by 20% (3–35%) (P = 0.02). Conclusions The alert system was generally well received, although approval waned with time. Approval was correlated with the belief that this type of alert improved patient care. These findings suggest that perceived efficacy is critical to the success of future alert trials. PMID:27478598

  9. Using Tomoauto: A Protocol for High-throughput Automated Cryo-electron Tomography.

    PubMed

    Morado, Dustin R; Hu, Bo; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-30

    Cryo-electron tomography (Cryo-ET) is a powerful three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technique for visualizing macromolecular complexes in their native context at a molecular level. The technique involves initially preserving the sample in its native state by rapidly freezing the specimen in vitreous ice, then collecting a series of micrographs from different angles at high magnification, and finally computationally reconstructing a 3-D density map. The frozen-hydrated specimen is extremely sensitive to the electron beam and so micrographs are collected at very low electron doses to limit the radiation damage. As a result, the raw cryo-tomogram has a very low signal to noise ratio characterized by an intrinsically noisy image. To better visualize subjects of interest, conventional imaging analysis and sub-tomogram averaging in which sub-tomograms of the subject are extracted from the initial tomogram and aligned and averaged are utilized to improve both contrast and resolution. Large datasets of tilt-series are essential to understanding and resolving the complexes at different states, conditions, or mutations as well as obtaining a large enough collection of sub-tomograms for averaging and classification. Collecting and processing this data can be a major obstacle preventing further analysis. Here we describe a high-throughput cryo-ET protocol based on a computer-controlled 300kV cryo-electron microscope, a direct detection device (DDD) camera and a highly effective, semi-automated image-processing pipeline software wrapper library tomoauto developed in-house. This protocol has been effectively utilized to visualize the intact type III secretion system (T3SS) in Shigella flexneri minicells. It can be applicable to any project suitable for cryo-ET.

  10. Automated design optimization of supersonic airplane wing structures under dynamic constraints.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. L.; Miura, H.; Rao, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    The problems of the preliminary and first level detail design of supersonic aircraft wings are stated as mathematical programs and solved using automated optimum design techniques. The problem is approached in two phases: the first is a simplified equivalent plate model in which the envelope, plan form and structural parameters are varied to produce a design, the second is a finite element model with fixed configuration in which the material distribution is varied. Constraints include flutter, aeroelastically computed stresses and deflections, natural frequency and a variety of geometric limitations. The Phase I objective is a combination of weight and drag while Phase II is a weight minimization.

  11. Space Station automated systems testing/verification and the Galileo Orbiter fault protection design/verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landano, M. R.; Easter, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of Space Station automated systems testing and verification are discussed, taking into account several program requirements. It is found that these requirements lead to a number of issues of uncertainties which require study and resolution during the Space Station definition phase. Most, if not all, of the considered uncertainties have implications for the overall testing and verification strategy adopted by the Space Station Program. A description is given of the Galileo Orbiter fault protection design/verification approach. Attention is given to a mission description, an Orbiter description, the design approach and process, the fault protection design verification approach/process, and problems of 'stress' testing.

  12. Automated Detection of Synapses in Serial Section Transmission Electron Microscopy Image Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Kreshuk, Anna; Koethe, Ullrich; Pax, Elizabeth; Bock, Davi D.; Hamprecht, Fred A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method for fully automated detection of chemical synapses in serial electron microscopy images with highly anisotropic axial and lateral resolution, such as images taken on transmission electron microscopes. Our pipeline starts from classification of the pixels based on 3D pixel features, which is followed by segmentation with an Ising model MRF and another classification step, based on object-level features. Classifiers are learned on sparse user labels; a fully annotated data subvolume is not required for training. The algorithm was validated on a set of 238 synapses in 20 serial 7197×7351 pixel images (4.5×4.5×45 nm resolution) of mouse visual cortex, manually labeled by three independent human annotators and additionally re-verified by an expert neuroscientist. The error rate of the algorithm (12% false negative, 7% false positive detections) is better than state-of-the-art, even though, unlike the state-of-the-art method, our algorithm does not require a prior segmentation of the image volume into cells. The software is based on the ilastik learning and segmentation toolkit and the vigra image processing library and is freely available on our website, along with the test data and gold standard annotations (http://www.ilastik.org/synapse-detection/sstem). PMID:24516550

  13. Automated Detection and Segmentation of Synaptic Contacts in Nearly Isotropic Serial Electron Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Kreshuk, Anna; Straehle, Christoph N.; Sommer, Christoph; Koethe, Ullrich; Cantoni, Marco; Knott, Graham; Hamprecht, Fred A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a protocol for fully automated detection and segmentation of asymmetric, presumed excitatory, synapses in serial electron microscopy images of the adult mammalian cerebral cortex, taken with the focused ion beam, scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM). The procedure is based on interactive machine learning and only requires a few labeled synapses for training. The statistical learning is performed on geometrical features of 3D neighborhoods of each voxel and can fully exploit the high z-resolution of the data. On a quantitative validation dataset of 111 synapses in 409 images of 1948×1342 pixels with manual annotations by three independent experts the error rate of the algorithm was found to be comparable to that of the experts (0.92 recall at 0.89 precision). Our software offers a convenient interface for labeling the training data and the possibility to visualize and proofread the results in 3D. The source code, the test dataset and the ground truth annotation are freely available on the website http://www.ilastik.org/synapse-detection. PMID:22031814

  14. Crystallographic Tool Box (CrysTBox): automated tools for transmission electron microscopists and crystallographers

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Miloslav; Jäger, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Three tools for an automated analysis of electron diffraction pattern and crystallographic visualization are presented. Firstly, diffractGUI determines the zone axis from selected area diffraction, convergent beam diffraction or nanodiffraction patterns and allows for indexing of individual reflections. Secondly, ringGUI identifies crystallographic planes corresponding to the depicted rings in the ring diffraction pattern and can select the sample material from a list of candidates. Both diffractGUI and ringGUI employ methods of computer vision for a fast, robust and accurate analysis. Thirdly, cellViewer is an intuitive visualization tool which is also helpful for crystallographic calculations or educational purposes. diffractGUI and cellViewer can be used together during a transmission electron microscopy session to determine the sample holder tilts required to reach a desired zone axis. All the tools offer a graphical user interface. The toolbox is distributed as a standalone application, so it can be installed on the microscope computer and launched directly from DigitalMicrograph (Gatan Inc.). PMID:26664349

  15. Determination of aberration center of Ronchigram for automated aberration correctors in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sannomiya, Takumi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Nakamichi, Tomohiro; Hosokawa, Fumio; Nakamura, Yoshio; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2013-12-01

    A generic method to determine the aberration center is established, which can be utilized for aberration calculation and axis alignment for aberration corrected electron microscopes. In this method, decentering induced secondary aberrations from inherent primary aberrations are minimized to find the appropriate axis center. The fitness function to find the optimal decentering vector for the axis was defined as a sum of decentering induced secondary aberrations with properly distributed weight values according to the aberration order. Since the appropriate decentering vector is determined from the aberration values calculated at an arbitrary center axis, only one aberration measurement is in principle required to find the center, resulting in /very fast center search. This approach was tested for the Ronchigram based aberration calculation method for aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Both in simulation and in experiments, the center search was confirmed to work well although the convergence to find the best axis becomes slower with larger primary aberrations. Such aberration center determination is expected to fully automatize the aberration correction procedures, which used to require pre-alignment of experienced users. This approach is also applicable to automated aperture positioning.

  16. End-to-end automated microfluidic platform for synthetic biology: from design to functional analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Linshiz, Gregory; Jensen, Erik; Stawski, Nina; ...

    2016-02-02

    Synthetic biology aims to engineer biological systems for desired behaviors. The construction of these systems can be complex, often requiring genetic reprogramming, extensive de novo DNA synthesis, and functional screening. Here, we present a programmable, multipurpose microfluidic platform and associated software and apply the platform to major steps of the synthetic biology research cycle: design, construction, testing, and analysis. We show the platform’s capabilities for multiple automated DNA assembly methods, including a new method for Isothermal Hierarchical DNA Construction, and for Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformation. The platform enables the automated control of cellular growth, gene expression induction, andmore » proteogenic and metabolic output analysis. Finally, taken together, we demonstrate the microfluidic platform’s potential to provide end-to-end solutions for synthetic biology research, from design to functional analysis.« less

  17. On Abstractions and Simplifications in the Design of Human-Automation Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, Michael; Degani, Asaf; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report addresses the design of human-automation interaction from a formal perspective that focuses on the information content of the interface, rather than the design of the graphical user interface. It also addresses the issue of the information provided to the user (e.g., user-manuals, training material, and all other resources). In this report, we propose a formal procedure for generating interfaces and user-manuals. The procedure is guided by two criteria: First, the interface must be correct, that is, with the given interface the user will be able to perform the specified tasks correctly. Second, the interface should be succinct. The report discusses the underlying concepts and the formal methods for this approach. Two examples are used to illustrate the procedure. The algorithm for constructing interfaces can be automated, and a preliminary software system for its implementation has been developed.

  18. On Abstractions and Simplifications in the Design of Human-Automation Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, Michael; Degani, Asaf; Shafto, Michael; Meyer, George; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report addresses the design of human-automation interaction from a formal perspective that focuses on the information content of the interface, rather than the design of the graphical user interface. It also addresses the, issue of the information provided to the user (e.g., user-manuals, training material, and all other resources). In this report, we propose a formal procedure for generating interfaces and user-manuals. The procedure is guided by two criteria: First, the interface must be correct, i.e., that with the given interface the user will be able to perform the specified tasks correctly. Second, the interface should be as succinct as possible. The report discusses the underlying concepts and the formal methods for this approach. Several examples are used to illustrate the procedure. The algorithm for constructing interfaces can be automated, and a preliminary software system for its implementation has been developed.

  19. End-to-end automated microfluidic platform for synthetic biology: from design to functional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Linshiz, Gregory; Jensen, Erik; Stawski, Nina; Bi, Changhao; Elsbree, Nick; Jiao, Hong; Kim, Jungkyu; Mathies, Richard; Keasling, Jay D.; Hillson, Nathan J.

    2016-02-02

    Synthetic biology aims to engineer biological systems for desired behaviors. The construction of these systems can be complex, often requiring genetic reprogramming, extensive de novo DNA synthesis, and functional screening. Here, we present a programmable, multipurpose microfluidic platform and associated software and apply the platform to major steps of the synthetic biology research cycle: design, construction, testing, and analysis. We show the platform’s capabilities for multiple automated DNA assembly methods, including a new method for Isothermal Hierarchical DNA Construction, and for Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformation. The platform enables the automated control of cellular growth, gene expression induction, and proteogenic and metabolic output analysis. Finally, taken together, we demonstrate the microfluidic platform’s potential to provide end-to-end solutions for synthetic biology research, from design to functional analysis.

  20. Tevatron Electron Lenses: Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kozub, Sergei; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; Seryi, Andrei; Solyak, Nikolai; Sytnik, Veniamin; Tiunov, Mikhail; Tkachenko, Leonid; Wildman, David; Wolff, Daniel; Zhang, Xiao-Long; /Fermilab

    2011-09-12

    Fermilab's Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy accelerator in which tightly focused beams of 980 GeV protons and antiprotons collide at two dedicated interaction points (IPs). Both beams share the same beam pipe and magnet aperture and, in order to avoid multiple detrimental head-on collisions, the beams are placed on separated orbits everywhere except the main IPs by using high-voltage (HV) electrostatic separators. The electromagnetic beam-beam interaction at the main IPs together with the long-range interactions between separated beams adversely affect the collider performance, reducing the luminosity integral per store (period of continuous collisions) by 10-30%. Tuning the collider operation for optimal performance becomes more and more cumbersome as the beam intensities and luminosity increase. The long-range effects which (besides being nonlinear) vary from bunch to bunch are particularly hard to mitigate. A comprehensive review of the beam-beam effects in the Tevatron Collider Run II can be found in Ref. [1]. The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [1]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [2]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported in [3,4,5]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  1. An automation of design and modelling tasks in NX Siemens environment with original software - generator module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbiciak, M.; Grabowik, C.; Janik, W.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays the design constructional process is almost exclusively aided with CAD/CAE/CAM systems. It is evaluated that nearly 80% of design activities have a routine nature. These design routine tasks are highly susceptible to automation. Design automation is usually made with API tools which allow building original software responsible for adding different engineering activities. In this paper the original software worked out in order to automate engineering tasks at the stage of a product geometrical shape design is presented. The elaborated software works exclusively in NX Siemens CAD/CAM/CAE environment and was prepared in Microsoft Visual Studio with application of the .NET technology and NX SNAP library. The software functionality allows designing and modelling of spur and helicoidal involute gears. Moreover, it is possible to estimate relative manufacturing costs. With the Generator module it is possible to design and model both standard and non-standard gear wheels. The main advantage of the model generated in such a way is its better representation of an involute curve in comparison to those which are drawn in specialized standard CAD systems tools. It comes from fact that usually in CAD systems an involute curve is drawn by 3 points that respond to points located on the addendum circle, the reference diameter of a gear and the base circle respectively. In the Generator module the involute curve is drawn by 11 involute points which are located on and upper the base and the addendum circles therefore 3D gear wheels models are highly accurate. Application of the Generator module makes the modelling process very rapid so that the gear wheel modelling time is reduced to several seconds. During the conducted research the analysis of differences between standard 3 points and 11 points involutes was made. The results and conclusions drawn upon analysis are shown in details.

  2. Electronic bolus design impacts on administration.

    PubMed

    Hentz, F; Umstätter, C; Gilaverte, S; Prado, O R; Silva, C J A; Monteiro, A L G

    2014-06-01

    Electronic identification of animals has become increasingly important worldwide to improve and ensure traceability. In warm and hot climates, such as Brazil, boluses can have advantages over ear tags as the internal devices reduce the risks of ear tag losses, tissue damage, and lesions on the ear. Electronic boluses, however, are often perceived as having negative characteristics, including reported difficulties of administration in small ruminants. This paper describes the factors associated with bolus design that affect the swallowing of a bolus in sheep. Other factors that might influence bolus swallowing time have also been considered. In addition, the effect of bolus design on its performance was evaluated. A total of 56 Suffolk ewes were used to assess the ease of administration and retention of 3 types of electronic ruminal boluses (mini, 11.5 × 58.0 mm and 21.7 g; small, 14.8 × 48.5 mm and 29.5 g; standard, 19.3 × 69.8 mm and 74.4 g) during a whole productive year, including pregnancy and lamb suckling. Ewe age (5.6 ± 2.3 yr) and weight (85.07 ± 8.2 kg BW) were recorded, as well as time for bolus swallowing. The deglutition of the bolus and any resulting blockages in the esophagus were monitored by visual observations. Retention and readability of the boluses were regularly monitored for d 1, wk 1, mo 1, and every mo until 1 yr. Time for bolus swallowing differed substantially with bolus type and was greater (P < 0.05) for the standard bolus (32.8 ± 6.9 s) when compared to small and mini boluses, which did not differ (8.5 ± 2.0 vs. 9.2 ± 2.7 s; P > 0.05). The bolus o.d. and length were positively correlated with swallowing time (P < 0.01). The ewe weight was negatively correlated with swallowing time (P < 0.05). At 6 mo all electronic boluses showed 100% retention rate, and at 12 mo, bolus retention was 100%, 94.5%, and 100% for mini, small, and standard boluses, respectively (P > 0.05). At 12 mo, all boluses showed 100% readability, except for

  3. Using tomoauto – a protocol for high-throughput automated cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Morado, Dustin R.; Hu, Bo; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We present a protocol on how to utilize high-throughput cryo-electron tomography to determine high resolution in situ structures of molecular machines. The protocol permits large amounts of data to be processed, avoids common bottlenecks and reduces resource downtime, allowing the user to focus on important biological questions. Cryo-electron tomography (Cryo-ET) is a powerful three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technique for visualizing macromolecular complexes in their native context at a molecular level. The technique involves initially preserving the sample in its native state by rapidly freezing the specimen in vitreous ice, then collecting a series of micrographs from different angles at high magnification, and finally computationally reconstructing a 3-D density map. The frozen-hydrated specimen is extremely sensitive to the electron beam and so micrographs are collected at very low electron doses to limit the radiation damage. As a result, the raw cryo-tomogram has a very low signal to noise ratio characterized by an intrinsically noisy image. To better visualize subjects of interest, conventional imaging analysis and sub-tomogram averaging in which sub-tomograms of the subject are extracted from the initial tomogram and aligned and averaged are utilized to improve both contrast and resolution. Large datasets of tilt-series are essential to understanding and resolving the complexes at different states, conditions, or mutations as well as obtaining a large enough collection of sub-tomograms for averaging and classification. Collecting and processing this data can be a major obstacle preventing further analysis. Here we describe a high-throughput cryo-ET protocol based on a computer-controlled 300kV cryo-electron microscope, a direct detection device (DDD) camera and a highly effective, semi-automated image-processing pipeline software wrapper library tomoauto developed in-house. This protocol has been effectively utilized to visualize the intact type III

  4. Design automation techniques for high-resolution current folding and interpolating CMOS A/D converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevaert, D.

    2007-05-01

    The design and testing of a 12-bit Analog-to-Digital (A/D) converter, in current mode, arranged in an 8-bit LSB and a 4- bit MSB architecture together with the integration of specialized test building blocks on chip allows the set up of a design automation technique for current folding and interpolation CMOS A/D converter architectures. The presented design methodology focuses on the automation for CMOS A/D building blocks in a flexible target current folding and interpolating architecture for a downscaling technology and for different quality specifications. The comprehensive understanding of all sources of mismatching in the crucial building blocks and the use of physical based mismatch modeling in the prediction of mismatch errors, more adequate and realistic sizing of all transistors will result in an overall area reduction of the A/D converter. In this design the folding degree is 16, the number of folders is 64 and the interpolation level is 4. The number of folders is reduced by creating intermediate folding signals with a 4-level interpolator based on current division techniques. Current comparators detect the zero-crossing between the differential folder output currents. The outputs of the comparators deliver a cyclic thermometer code. The digital synthesis part for decoding and error correction building blocks is a standardized digital standard cell design. The basic building blocks in the target architecture were designed in 0.35μ CMOS technology; they are suitable for topological reuse and are in an automated way downscaled into a 0.18μ CMOS technology.

  5. Integrating automated structured analysis and design with Ada programming support environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Alan; Simmons, Andy

    1986-01-01

    Ada Programming Support Environments (APSE) include many powerful tools that address the implementation of Ada code. These tools do not address the entire software development process. Structured analysis is a methodology that addresses the creation of complete and accurate system specifications. Structured design takes a specification and derives a plan to decompose the system subcomponents, and provides heuristics to optimize the software design to minimize errors and maintenance. It can also produce the creation of useable modules. Studies have shown that most software errors result from poor system specifications, and that these errors also become more expensive to fix as the development process continues. Structured analysis and design help to uncover error in the early stages of development. The APSE tools help to insure that the code produced is correct, and aid in finding obscure coding errors. However, they do not have the capability to detect errors in specifications or to detect poor designs. An automated system for structured analysis and design TEAMWORK, which can be integrated with an APSE to support software systems development from specification through implementation is described. These tools completement each other to help developers improve quality and productivity, as well as to reduce development and maintenance costs. Complete system documentation and reusable code also resultss from the use of these tools. Integrating an APSE with automated tools for structured analysis and design provide capabilities and advantages beyond those realized with any of these systems used by themselves.

  6. New Insights into the Composition and Texture of Lunar Regolith Using Ultrafast Automated Electron-Beam Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Wentworth, Susan J.; Schrader, Christian M.; Stoeser, Doug; Botha, Pieter WSK; Butcher, Alan R.; Horsch, Hanna E.; Benedictus, Aukje; Gottlieb, Paul; McKay, David

    2008-01-01

    Sieved grain mounts of Apollo 16 drive tube samples have been examined using QEMSCAN - an innovative electron beam technology. By combining multiple energy-dispersive X-ray detectors, fully automated control, and off-line image processing, to produce digital mineral maps of particles exposed on polished surfaces, the result is an unprecedented quantity of mineralogical and petrographic data, on a particle-by-particle basis. Experimental analysis of four size fractions (500-250 microns, 150-90 microns, 75-45 microns and < 20 microns), prepared from two samples (64002,374 and 64002,262), has produced a robust and uniform dataset which allows for the quantification of mineralogy; texture; particle shape, size and density; and the digital classification of distinct particle types in each measured sample. These preliminary data show that there is a decrease in plagioclase modal content and an opposing increase in glass modal content, with decreasing particle size. These findings, together with data on trace phases (metals, sulphides, phosphates, and oxides), provide not only new insights into the make-up of lunar regolith at the Apollo 16 landing site, but also key physical parameters which can be used to design lunar simulants, and compute Figures of Merit for each material produced.

  7. Adaptive and Adaptable Automation Design: A Critical Review of the Literature and Recommendations for Future Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kaber, David B.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a review of literature on approaches to adaptive and adaptable task/function allocation and adaptive interface technologies for effective human management of complex systems that are likely to be issues for the Next Generation Air Transportation System, and a focus of research under the Aviation Safety Program, Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck Project. Contemporary literature retrieved from an online database search is summarized and integrated. The major topics include the effects of delegation-type, adaptable automation on human performance, workload and situation awareness, the effectiveness of various automation invocation philosophies and strategies to function allocation in adaptive systems, and the role of user modeling in adaptive interface design and the performance implications of adaptive interface technology.

  8. ConfMatch: automating electron-density map interpretation by matching conformations.

    PubMed

    Wang, C E

    2000-12-01

    Building a protein model from the initial three-dimensional electron-density distribution (density map) is an important task in X-ray crystallography. This problem is computationally challenging because proteins are extremely flexible. The algorithm ConfMatch is a global real-space fitting procedure in torsion-angle space. It solves this 'map-interpretation' problem by matching a detailed conformation of the molecule to the density map (conformational matching). This 'best-match' structure is defined as one which maximizes the sum of the density at atom positions. ConfMatch is a practical systematic algorithm based on a branch-and-bound search. The most important idea of ConfMatch is an efficient method for computing accurate bounds. ConfMatch relaxes the conformational matching problem, a problem which can only be solved in exponential time, into one which can be solved in polynomial time. The solution to the relaxed problem is a guaranteed upper bound for the conformational matching problem. In most empirical cases, these bounds are accurate enough to prune the search space dramatically, enabling ConfMatch to solve structures with more than 100 free dihedral angles. Experiments have shown that ConfMatch may be able to automate the interpretation of density maps of small proteins.

  9. Automated insulin granule segmentation from electron photomicrographs of rat pancreatic β-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Straub, Susanne G.; Sharp, Geoffrey W. G.; Loew, Murray

    2005-04-01

    Increased blood glucose stimulates pancreatic β-cells and induces an exocytotic release of insulin. The β-cell, which contains ~10^4 insulin-containing granules, releases only a few percent of the granules during a given stimulus such as a meal. The temporal response function to a square wave increase in the concentration of glucose is characteristically biphasic. It is not known whether the granules exhibit random or directed migration patterns as a function of phase. Directed migration would suggest the development of an intracellular gradient directing the path and velocity of insulin granule movement. Our ongoing research investigates this process using manual morphometric analysis of electron micrographs of rat pancreatic β-cells. This is a tedious and time-consuming stereological process. Consequently, we have developed an automated algorithm for accurately segmenting and deriving granule counts, areas, and measuring distance to the plasma membrane. The method is a data-driven image processing approach that implements Mahalanobis classifiers to hierarchically classify pixel candidates and subsequently pixel aggregates as insulin granules. Granule cores and halos are classified independently and fused by intersecting the convex difference of granule halos with core candidates. Once fused, total and individual granule areas and distance metrics to the β-cell plasma membrane are obtained. This algorithm provides a rapid and accurate method for the determination of granule numbers, location, and potential gradients in the pancreatic β-cell under different experimental conditions.

  10. Automated determination of parameters describing power spectra of micrograph images in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhong; Baldwin, Philip R; Mullapudi, Srinivas; Penczek, Pawel A

    2003-01-01

    The current theory of image formation in electron microscopy has been semi-quantitatively successful in describing data. The theory involves parameters due to the transfer function of the microscope (defocus, spherical aberration constant, and amplitude constant ratio) as well as parameters used to describe the background and attenuation of the signal. We present empirical evidence that at least one of the features of this model has not been well characterized. Namely the spectrum of the noise background is not accurately described by a Gaussian and associated "B-factor;" this becomes apparent when one studies high-quality far-from focus data. In order to have both our analysis and conclusions free from any innate bias, we have approached the questions by developing an automated fitting algorithm. The most important features of this routine, not currently found in the literature, are (i). a process for determining the cutoff for those frequencies below which observations and the currently adopted model are not in accord, (ii). a method for determining the resolution at which no more signal is expected to exist, and (iii). a parameter-with units of spatial frequency-that characterizes which frequencies mainly contribute to the signal. Whereas no general relation is seen to exist between either of these two quantities and the defocus, a simple empirical relationship approximately relates all three.

  11. Evidence Report, Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumbado, Jennifer Rochlis; Billman, Dorrit; Feary, Mike; Green, Collin

    2011-01-01

    The success of future exploration missions depends, even more than today, on effective integration of humans and technology (automation and robotics). This will not emerge by chance, but by design. Both crew and ground personnel will need to do more demanding tasks in more difficult conditions, amplifying the costs of poor design and the benefits of good design. This report has looked at the importance of good design and the risks from poor design from several perspectives: 1) If the relevant functions needed for a mission are not identified, then designs of technology and its use by humans are unlikely to be effective: critical functions will be missing and irrelevant functions will mislead or drain attention. 2) If functions are not distributed effectively among the (multiple) participating humans and automation/robotic systems, later design choices can do little to repair this: additional unnecessary coordination work may be introduced, workload may be redistributed to create problems, limited human attentional resources may be wasted, and the capabilities of both humans and technology underused. 3) If the design does not promote accurate understanding of the capabilities of the technology, the operators will not use the technology effectively: the system may be switched off in conditions where it would be effective, or used for tasks or in contexts where its effectiveness may be very limited. 4) If an ineffective interaction design is implemented and put into use, a wide range of problems can ensue. Many involve lack of transparency into the system: operators may be unable or find it very difficult to determine a) the current state and changes of state of the automation or robot, b) the current state and changes in state of the system being controlled or acted on, and c) what actions by human or by system had what effects. 5) If the human interfaces for operation and control of robotic agents are not designed to accommodate the unique points of view and

  12. Effects of an Advanced Reactor’s Design, Use of Automation, and Mission on Human Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Joe; Johanna H. Oxstrand

    2014-06-01

    The roles, functions, and tasks of the human operator in existing light water nuclear power plants (NPPs) are based on sound nuclear and human factors engineering (HFE) principles, are well defined by the plant’s conduct of operations, and have been validated by years of operating experience. However, advanced NPPs whose engineering designs differ from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) will impose changes on the roles, functions, and tasks of the human operators. The plans to increase the use of automation, reduce staffing levels, and add to the mission of these advanced NPPs will also affect the operator’s roles, functions, and tasks. We assert that these factors, which do not appear to have received a lot of attention by the design engineers of advanced NPPs relative to the attention given to conceptual design of these reactors, can have significant risk implications for the operators and overall plant safety if not mitigated appropriately. This paper presents a high-level analysis of a specific advanced NPP and how its engineered design, its plan to use greater levels of automation, and its expanded mission have risk significant implications on operator performance and overall plant safety.

  13. Modeling biology with HDL languages: a first step toward a genetic design automation tool inspired from microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Gendrault, Yves; Madec, Morgan; Lallement, Christophe; Haiech, Jacques

    2014-04-01

    Nowadays, synthetic biology is a hot research topic. Each day, progresses are made to improve the complexity of artificial biological functions in order to tend to complex biodevices and biosystems. Up to now, these systems are handmade by bioengineers, which require strong technical skills and leads to nonreusable development. Besides, scientific fields that share the same design approach, such as microelectronics, have already overcome several issues and designers succeed in building extremely complex systems with many evolved functions. On the other hand, in systems engineering and more specifically in microelectronics, the development of the domain has been promoted by both the improvement of technological processes and electronic design automation tools. The work presented in this paper paves the way for the adaptation of microelectronics design tools to synthetic biology. Considering the similarities and differences between the synthetic biology and microelectronics, the milestones of this adaptation are described. The first one concerns the modeling of biological mechanisms. To do so, a new formalism is proposed, based on an extension of the generalized Kirchhoff laws to biology. This way, a description of all biological mechanisms can be made with languages widely used in microelectronics. Our approach is therefore successfully validated on specific examples drawn from the literature.

  14. RHIC electron lens beam transport system design considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Heimerle, M.; Fischer, W.; Pikin, A.; Beebe, E.; Bruno, D.; Gassner, D.; Gu, X.; Gupta, R. C.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.; Lambiase, R.; Mapes, M.; Meng, W.; Montag, C.; Oerter, B.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, W.

    2010-08-03

    To apply head-on beam-beam compensation for RHIC, two electron lenses are designed and will be installed at IP6 and IP8. Each electron lens has several sub-systems, including electron gun, electron collector, superconducting main solenoid (SM), diagnostics system and power supply system. In addition to these systems, beam transport system which can transport electron beam from electron gun side to collector side is also needed.

  15. Automated Generation of Finite-Element Meshes for Aircraft Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Robinson, Jay

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for automated generation of fully connected finite-element meshes for all internal structural components and skins of a given wing-body geometry model, controlled by a few conceptual-level structural layout parameters. Internal structural components include spars, ribs, frames, and bulkheads. Structural layout parameters include spar/rib locations in wing chordwise/spanwise direction and frame/bulkhead locations in longitudinal direction. A simple shell thickness optimization problem with two load conditions is used to verify versatility and robustness of the automated meshing process. The automation process is implemented in ModelCenter starting from an OpenVSP geometry and ending with a NASTRAN 200 solution. One subsonic configuration and one supersonic configuration are used for numerical verification. Two different structural layouts are constructed for each configuration and five finite-element meshes of different sizes are generated for each layout. The paper includes various comparisons of solutions of 20 thickness optimization problems, as well as discussions on how the optimal solutions are affected by the stress constraint bound and the initial guess of design variables.

  16. Rapid and Semi-Automated Extraction of Neuronal Cell Bodies and Nuclei from Electron Microscopy Image Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Paul S.; Morehead, Michael; Doretto, Gianfranco; Chen, Peter; Berg, Stuart; Plaza, Stephen; Spirou, George

    2016-01-01

    Connectomics—the study of how neurons wire together in the brain—is at the forefront of modern neuroscience research. However, many connectomics studies are limited by the time and precision needed to correctly segment large volumes of electron microscopy (EM) image data. We present here a semi-automated segmentation pipeline using freely available software that can significantly decrease segmentation time for extracting both nuclei and cell bodies from EM image volumes. PMID:27259933

  17. Espina: A Tool for the Automated Segmentation and Counting of Synapses in Large Stacks of Electron Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Juan; Alonso-Nanclares, Lidia; Rodríguez, José-Rodrigo; DeFelipe, Javier; Rodríguez, Ángel; Merchán-Pérez, Ángel

    2011-01-01

    The synapses in the cerebral cortex can be classified into two main types, Gray's type I and type II, which correspond to asymmetric (mostly glutamatergic excitatory) and symmetric (inhibitory GABAergic) synapses, respectively. Hence, the quantification and identification of their different types and the proportions in which they are found, is extraordinarily important in terms of brain function. The ideal approach to calculate the number of synapses per unit volume is to analyze 3D samples reconstructed from serial sections. However, obtaining serial sections by transmission electron microscopy is an extremely time consuming and technically demanding task. Using focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope microscopy, we recently showed that virtually all synapses can be accurately identified as asymmetric or symmetric synapses when they are visualized, reconstructed, and quantified from large 3D tissue samples obtained in an automated manner. Nevertheless, the analysis, segmentation, and quantification of synapses is still a labor intensive procedure. Thus, novel solutions are currently necessary to deal with the large volume of data that is being generated by automated 3D electron microscopy. Accordingly, we have developed ESPINA, a software tool that performs the automated segmentation and counting of synapses in a reconstructed 3D volume of the cerebral cortex, and that greatly facilitates and accelerates these processes. PMID:21633491

  18. Space Electronics: A Challenging World for Designers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poivey, Christian; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of: 1) The Space Radiation Environment; 2) The Effects on Electronics; 3) The Environment in Action; 4) Hardening Approaches to Commercial CMOS Electronics (including device vulnerabilities).

  19. Design of a novel automated methanol feed system for pilot-scale fermentation of Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hamaker, Kent H; Johnson, Daniel C; Bellucci, Joseph J; Apgar, Kristie R; Soslow, Sherry; Gercke, John C; Menzo, Darrin J; Ton, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale fermentation of Pichia pastoris requires a large volume of methanol feed during the induction phase. However, a large volume of methanol feed is difficult to use in the processing suite because of the inconvenience of constant monitoring, manual manipulation steps, and fire and explosion hazards. To optimize and improve safety of the methanol feed process, a novel automated methanol feed system has been designed and implemented for industrial fermentation of P. pastoris. Details of the design of the methanol feed system are described. The main goals of the design were to automate the methanol feed process and to minimize the hazardous risks associated with storing and handling large quantities of methanol in the processing area. The methanol feed system is composed of two main components: a bulk feed (BF) system and up to three portable process feed (PF) systems. The BF system automatically delivers methanol from a central location to the portable PF system. The PF system provides precise flow control of linear, step, or exponential feed of methanol to the fermenter. Pilot-scale fermentations with linear and exponential methanol feeds were conducted using two Mut(+) (methanol utilization plus) strains, one expressing a recombinant therapeutic protein and the other a monoclonal antibody. Results show that the methanol feed system is accurate, safe, and efficient. The feed rates for both linear and exponential feed methods were within ± 5% of the set points, and the total amount of methanol fed was within 1% of the targeted volume.

  20. Automated design and optimization of flexible booster autopilots via linear programming, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, F. D.

    1972-01-01

    A nonlinear programming technique was developed for the automated design and optimization of autopilots for large flexible launch vehicles. This technique, which resulted in the COEBRA program, uses the iterative application of linear programming. The method deals directly with the three main requirements of booster autopilot design: to provide (1) good response to guidance commands; (2) response to external disturbances (e.g. wind) to minimize structural bending moment loads and trajectory dispersions; and (3) stability with specified tolerances on the vehicle and flight control system parameters. The method is applicable to very high order systems (30th and greater per flight condition). Examples are provided that demonstrate the successful application of the employed algorithm to the design of autopilots for both single and multiple flight conditions.

  1. Optimizing RF gun cavity geometry within an automated injector design system

    SciTech Connect

    Alicia Hofler ,Pavel Evtushenko

    2011-03-28

    RF guns play an integral role in the success of several light sources around the world, and properly designed and optimized cw superconducting RF (SRF) guns can provide a path to higher average brightness. As the need for these guns grows, it is important to have automated optimization software tools that vary the geometry of the gun cavity as part of the injector design process. This will allow designers to improve existing designs for present installations, extend the utility of these guns to other applications, and develop new designs. An evolutionary algorithm (EA) based system can provide this capability because EAs can search in parallel a large parameter space (often non-linear) and in a relatively short time identify promising regions of the space for more careful consideration. The injector designer can then evaluate more cavity design parameters during the injector optimization process against the beam performance requirements of the injector. This paper will describe an extension to the APISA software that allows the cavity geometry to be modified as part of the injector optimization and provide examples of its application to existing RF and SRF gun designs.

  2. Working Notes from the 1992 AAAI Workshop on Automating Software Design. Theme: Domain Specific Software Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M. (Editor); Barstow, David; Lowry, Michael R.; Tong, Christopher H.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this workshop is to identify different architectural approaches to building domain-specific software design systems and to explore issues unique to domain-specific (vs. general-purpose) software design. Some general issues that cut across the particular software design domain include: (1) knowledge representation, acquisition, and maintenance; (2) specialized software design techniques; and (3) user interaction and user interface.

  3. Electronic-Power-Transformer Design Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Lagadinos, J. C.; Ahearn, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Compilation of information on design procedures, electrical properties, and fabrication. Guide provides information on design procedures; magnetic and insulating material electrical properties; impregnating, encapsulating and processing techniques.

  4. Using standards to automate electronic health records (EHRs) and to create integrated healthcare enterprises.

    PubMed

    Sloane, Elliot B; Carey, Carole C

    2007-01-01

    President Bush's 2004 Executive Order mandated the creation within the Secretary of Health and Human Services' staff of a new Office of the National Coordinator for Healthcare Information Technology (ONCHIT) that was tasked with creating the United States National Healthcare Information Network (NHIN). The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) and the 2004 and a subsequent 2006 Executive Orders have finally set the stage to design, and require, the use of standardized, electronic data interchange-enabled information systems as quickly as possible.

  5. Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hwisoo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-06-12

    A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model.

  6. Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Hwisoo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-01-01

    A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model. PMID:26076406

  7. Simulation of the sea of electrons in metals using three-dimensional cell-by-cell automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesnel, David J.; Zhang, Yingrui

    2012-01-01

    A 3D cellular automation discretely moves electrons in a metal according to combined thermal and electrical driving forces by including all of the metal cations and all of the loosely bound electrons comprising the sea of electrons to compute the local electric fields. This cell-by-cell automation is asynchronous, acting on individual species sequentially with immediate neighborhood updates, thereby capturing the outcomes of temporally sparse thermally activated events. Calculations are carried out in a personal computer using the graphics processing unit to efficiently update the electric fields. A population of electron and missing-electron pairs is created to allow the metal to generate a dynamic equilibrium distribution of moving charge at each electron site that is then responsible for creating appropriate fields and potentials while simultaneously maintaining local charge neutrality. Examples are given to show that the simulation produces the expected zero fields inside conductors, the expected localization of excess charge of either sign on the surface of a conductor, and the expected equipotential inside a metal. Exterior fields caused by excess charge are consistent with Gauss's law and excess charge accumulates at sharp corners. Surface relaxation of the lattice of cation and electron sites thought to occur at free surfaces appears to be required to enable a zero equipotential in a zero net charge system. The possibility that these relaxations create an electric double layer within the metal that is needed to terminate the effect of the periodic array of cations is under consideration. The approach is useful to examine interactions between electrons in metals and ions in solution expected during interfacial electrochemistry, but may have deeper implications on the origin of the equations governing electrostatics by linking them to localized 1/r2 Coulomb interactions.

  8. Structure and design of the electron lens for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, A.; Fischer, W.; Alessi, J.; Anerella, M.; Beebe, E. Gassner, D.; Gu, X.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.; Lambiase, R.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.; Okamura, M.; Tan, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.; Thieberger, P.; Zhang, W.

    2011-03-28

    Two electron lenses for a head-on beam-beam compensation are being planned for RHIC; one for each circulating proton beam. The transverse profile of the electron beam will be Gaussian up to a maximum radius of r{sub e} = 3{sigma}. Simulations and design of the electron gun with Gaussian radial emission current density profile and of the electron collector are presented. Ions of the residual gas generated in the interaction region by electron and proton beams will be removed by an axial gradient of the electric field towards the electron collector. A method for the optical observation of the transverse profile of the electron beam is described.

  9. Designing a beam transport system for RHIC's electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Raparia, D.

    2011-03-28

    We designed two electron lenses to apply head-on beam-beam compensation for RHIC; they will be installed near IP10. The electron-beam transport system is an important subsystem of the entire electron-lens system. Electrons are transported from the electron gun to the main solenoid and further to the collector. The system must allow for changes of the electron beam size inside the superconducting magnet, and for changes of the electron position by 5 mm in the horizontal- and vertical-planes.

  10. Rapid prototyping of an automated video surveillance system: a hardware-software co-design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Hau T.; Rakvic, Ryan N.; Broussard, Randy P.; Ives, Robert W.

    2011-06-01

    FPGA devices with embedded DSP and memory blocks, and high-speed interfaces are ideal for real-time video processing applications. In this work, a hardware-software co-design approach is proposed to effectively utilize FPGA features for a prototype of an automated video surveillance system. Time-critical steps of the video surveillance algorithm are designed and implemented in the FPGAs logic elements to maximize parallel processing. Other non timecritical tasks are achieved by executing a high level language program on an embedded Nios-II processor. Pre-tested and verified video and interface functions from a standard video framework are utilized to significantly reduce development and verification time. Custom and parallel processing modules are integrated into the video processing chain by Altera's Avalon Streaming video protocol. Other data control interfaces are achieved by connecting hardware controllers to a Nios-II processor using Altera's Avalon Memory Mapped protocol.

  11. SBROME: a scalable optimization and module matching framework for automated biosystems design.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Linh; Tsoukalas, Athanasios; Köppe, Matthias; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2013-05-17

    The development of a scalable framework for biodesign automation is a formidable challenge given the expected increase in part availability and the ever-growing complexity of synthetic circuits. To allow for (a) the use of previously constructed and characterized circuits or modules and (b) the implementation of designs that can scale up to hundreds of nodes, we here propose a divide-and-conquer Synthetic Biology Reusable Optimization Methodology (SBROME). An abstract user-defined circuit is first transformed and matched against a module database that incorporates circuits that have previously been experimentally characterized. Then the resulting circuit is decomposed to subcircuits that are populated with the set of parts that best approximate the desired function. Finally, all subcircuits are subsequently characterized and deposited back to the module database for future reuse. We successfully applied SBROME toward two alternative designs of a modular 3-input multiplexer that utilize pre-existing logic gates and characterized biological parts.

  12. ADS: A FORTRAN program for automated design synthesis: Version 1.10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1985-01-01

    A new general-purpose optimization program for engineering design is described. ADS (Automated Design Synthesis - Version 1.10) is a FORTRAN program for solution of nonlinear constrained optimization problems. The program is segmented into three levels: strategy, optimizer, and one-dimensional search. At each level, several options are available so that a total of over 100 possible combinations can be created. Examples of available strategies are sequential unconstrained minimization, the Augmented Lagrange Multiplier method, and Sequential Linear Programming. Available optimizers include variable metric methods and the Method of Feasible Directions as examples, and one-dimensional search options include polynomial interpolation and the Golden Section method as examples. Emphasis is placed on ease of use of the program. All information is transferred via a single parameter list. Default values are provided for all internal program parameters such as convergence criteria, and the user is given a simple means to over-ride these, if desired.

  13. E-learning platform for automated testing of electronic circuits using signature analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherghina, Cǎtǎlina; Bacivarov, Angelica; Bacivarov, Ioan C.; Petricǎ, Gabriel

    2016-12-01

    Dependability of electronic circuits can be ensured only through testing of circuit modules. This is done by generating test vectors and their application to the circuit. Testability should be viewed as a concerted effort to ensure maximum efficiency throughout the product life cycle, from conception and design stage, through production to repairs during products operating. In this paper, is presented the platform developed by authors for training for testability in electronics, in general and in using signature analysis method, in particular. The platform allows highlighting the two approaches in the field namely analog and digital signature of circuits. As a part of this e-learning platform, it has been developed a database for signatures of different electronic components meant to put into the spotlight different techniques implying fault detection, and from this there were also self-repairing techniques of the systems with this kind of components. An approach for realizing self-testing circuits based on MATLAB environment and using signature analysis method is proposed. This paper analyses the benefits of signature analysis method and simulates signature analyzer performance based on the use of pseudo-random sequences, too.

  14. Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences

    DOEpatents

    Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

    2014-04-29

    Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre -defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

  15. Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences

    DOEpatents

    Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

    2013-01-08

    Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

  16. Application of the H-Mode, a Design and Interaction Concept for Highly Automated Vehicles, to Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Flemisch, Frank O.; Schutte, Paul C.; Williams, Ralph A.

    2006-01-01

    Driven by increased safety, efficiency, and airspace capacity, automation is playing an increasing role in aircraft operations. As aircraft become increasingly able to autonomously respond to a range of situations with performance surpassing human operators, we are compelled to look for new methods that help us understand their use and guide their design using new forms of automation and interaction. We propose a novel design metaphor to aid the conceptualization, design, and operation of highly-automated aircraft. Design metaphors transfer meaning from common experiences to less familiar applications or functions. A notable example is the "Desktop metaphor" for manipulating files on a computer. This paper describes a metaphor for highly automated vehicles known as the H-metaphor and a specific embodiment of the metaphor known as the H-mode as applied to aircraft. The fundamentals of the H-metaphor are reviewed followed by an overview of an exploratory usability study investigating human-automation interaction issues for a simple H-mode implementation. The envisioned application of the H-mode concept to aircraft is then described as are two planned evaluations.

  17. Models of an Integrated Design Data Base in Support of a Design Automation System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Glossary of Terms....................161 C. Questionnaire.......................163 D. Software Engineering Tools ad Tecniques 16 Vita...independence is to clearly differentiate between the logical and physical aspects of data base management . These differ- ences include data base design...applications so that the complexity of the design and verification tasks is reduced to a manageable level. Large amounts of data and a variety of design

  18. Automated sub-5 nm image registration in integrated correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy using cathodoluminescence pointers

    PubMed Central

    Haring, Martijn T.; Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Voortman, Lenard M.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2017-01-01

    In the biological sciences, data from fluorescence and electron microscopy is correlated to allow fluorescence biomolecule identification within the cellular ultrastructure and/or ultrastructural analysis following live-cell imaging. High-accuracy (sub-100 nm) image overlay requires the addition of fiducial markers, which makes overlay accuracy dependent on the number of fiducials present in the region of interest. Here, we report an automated method for light-electron image overlay at high accuracy, i.e. below 5 nm. Our method relies on direct visualization of the electron beam position in the fluorescence detection channel using cathodoluminescence pointers. We show that image overlay using cathodoluminescence pointers corrects for image distortions, is independent of user interpretation, and does not require fiducials, allowing image correlation with molecular precision anywhere on a sample. PMID:28252673

  19. An Automated Electronic Tongue for In-Situ Quick Monitoring of Trace Heavy Metals in Water Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Li, Yi; Gao, Xiaoming; Guo, Hongsun; Zhao, Huixin; Wang, Ping

    2009-05-01

    An automated electronic tongue instrumentation has been developed for in-situ concentration determination of trace heavy metals in water environment. The electronic tongue contains two main parts. The sensor part consists of a silicon-based Hg-coated Au microelectrodes array (MEA) for the detection of Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) and a multiple light-addressable potentiometric sensor (MLAPS) for the detection of Fe(III) and Cr(VI). The control part employs pumps, valves and tubes to enable the pick-up and pretreatment of aqueous sample. The electronic tongue realized detection of the six metals mentioned above at part-per-billion (ppb) level without manual operation. This instrumentation will have wide application in quick monitoring and prediction the heavy metal pollution in lakes and oceans.

  20. Three-dimensional structure of lipid vesicles embedded in vitreous ice and investigated by automated electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Dierksen, K; Typke, D; Hegerl, R; Walz, J; Sackmann, E; Baumeister, W

    1995-04-01

    Automated electron tomography is shown to be a suitable means to visualize the shape of phospholipid vesicles embedded in vitrified ice. With a slow-scan charge-coupled device camera as a recording device, the cumulative electron dose needed to record a data set of 60 projections at a magnification of 20,000X can be kept as low as 15 e-/A2 (or 1500 electrons/nm2). The membrane of the three-dimensionally reconstructed vesicles is clearly visible in two-dimensional sections through the three-dimensionally reconstructed volume. Some edges indicating a polygonal shape of the vesicles, frozen from the gel phase, are also clearly recognized. Because of the presently limited tilt angle range (+/- 60 degrees), the upper and lower "caps" of the vesicles (representing about 35% of the surface of the ellipsoidal particles) remain invisible in the three-dimensional reconstruction.

  1. Automated sub-5 nm image registration in integrated correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy using cathodoluminescence pointers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haring, Martijn T.; Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Voortman, Lenard M.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2017-03-01

    In the biological sciences, data from fluorescence and electron microscopy is correlated to allow fluorescence biomolecule identification within the cellular ultrastructure and/or ultrastructural analysis following live-cell imaging. High-accuracy (sub-100 nm) image overlay requires the addition of fiducial markers, which makes overlay accuracy dependent on the number of fiducials present in the region of interest. Here, we report an automated method for light-electron image overlay at high accuracy, i.e. below 5 nm. Our method relies on direct visualization of the electron beam position in the fluorescence detection channel using cathodoluminescence pointers. We show that image overlay using cathodoluminescence pointers corrects for image distortions, is independent of user interpretation, and does not require fiducials, allowing image correlation with molecular precision anywhere on a sample.

  2. Algorithm design for automated transportation photo enforcement camera image and video quality diagnostic check modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Ajay; Saha, Bhaskar

    2013-03-01

    Photo enforcement devices for traffic rules such as red lights, toll, stops, and speed limits are increasingly being deployed in cities and counties around the world to ensure smooth traffic flow and public safety. These are typically unattended fielded systems, and so it is important to periodically check them for potential image/video quality problems that might interfere with their intended functionality. There is interest in automating such checks to reduce the operational overhead and human error involved in manually checking large camera device fleets. Examples of problems affecting such camera devices include exposure issues, focus drifts, obstructions, misalignment, download errors, and motion blur. Furthermore, in some cases, in addition to the sub-algorithms for individual problems, one also has to carefully design the overall algorithm and logic to check for and accurately classifying these individual problems. Some of these issues can occur in tandem or have the potential to be confused for each other by automated algorithms. Examples include camera misalignment that can cause some scene elements to go out of focus for wide-area scenes or download errors that can be misinterpreted as an obstruction. Therefore, the sequence in which the sub-algorithms are utilized is also important. This paper presents an overview of these problems along with no-reference and reduced reference image and video quality solutions to detect and classify such faults.

  3. Design and implementation of an automated compound management system in support of lead optimization.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Catherine; Kariv, Ilona

    2009-06-01

    To meet the needs of the increasingly rapid and parallelized lead optimization process, a fully integrated local compound storage and liquid handling system was designed and implemented to automate the generation of assay-ready plates directly from newly submitted and cherry-picked compounds. A key feature of the system is the ability to create project- or assay-specific compound-handling methods, which provide flexibility for any combination of plate types, layouts, and plate bar-codes. Project-specific workflows can be created by linking methods for processing new and cherry-picked compounds and control additions to produce a complete compound set for both biological testing and local storage in one uninterrupted workflow. A flexible cherry-pick approach allows for multiple, user-defined strategies to select the most appropriate replicate of a compound for retesting. Examples of custom selection parameters include available volume, compound batch, and number of freeze/thaw cycles. This adaptable and integrated combination of software and hardware provides a basis for reducing cycle time, fully automating compound processing, and ultimately increasing the rate at which accurate, biologically relevant results can be produced for compounds of interest in the lead optimization process.

  4. Designs and Concept-Reliance of a Fully Automated High Content Screening Platform

    PubMed Central

    Radu, Constantin; Adrar, Hosna Sana; Alamir, Ab; Hatherley, Ian; Trinh, Trung; Djaballah, Hakim

    2013-01-01

    High content screening (HCS) is becoming an accepted platform in academic and industry screening labs and does require slightly different logistics for execution. To automate our stand alone HCS microscopes, namely an alpha IN Cell Analyzer 3000 (INCA3000) originally a Praelux unit hooked to a Hudson Plate Crane with a maximum capacity of 50 plates per run; and the IN Cell Analyzer 2000 (INCA2000) where up to 320 plates could be fed per run using the Thermo Fisher Scientific Orbitor, we opted for a 4 meter linear track system harboring both microscopes, plate washer, bulk dispensers, and a high capacity incubator allowing us to perform both live and fixed cell based assays while accessing both microscopes on deck. Considerations in design were given to the integration of the alpha INCA3000, a new gripper concept to access the onboard nest, and peripheral locations on deck to ensure a self reliant system capable of achieving higher throughput. The resulting system, referred to as Hestia, has been fully operational since the New Year, has an onboard capacity of 504 plates, and harbors the only fully automated alpha INCA3000 unit in the World. PMID:22797489

  5. An Automated Tool for Developing Experimental Designs: The Computer-Aided Design Reference for Experiments (CADRE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    survey procedures, and cognitive task analysis), system design methods (e.g., focus groups , design guidelines, specifications, and requirements), and...LABORATORY - HRED ATTN AMSRD ARL HR MZ A DAVISON 199 E 4TH ST STE C TECH PARK BLG 2 FT LEONARD WOOD MO 65473-1949 1 ARMY RSCH LABORATORY

  6. Logic Design Pathology and Space Flight Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Barto, Rod L.; Erickson, K.

    1997-01-01

    Logic design errors have been observed in space flight missions and the final stages of ground test. The technologies used by designers and their design/analysis methodologies will be analyzed. This will give insight to the root causes of the failures. These technologies include discrete integrated circuit based systems, systems based on field and mask programmable logic, and the use computer aided engineering (CAE) systems. State-of-the-art (SOTA) design tools and methodologies will be analyzed with respect to high-reliability spacecraft design and potential pitfalls are discussed. Case studies of faults from large expensive programs to "smaller, faster, cheaper" missions will be used to explore the fundamental reasons for logic design problems.

  7. D{O} upgrade muon electronics design

    SciTech Connect

    Baldin, B.; Green, D.; Haggerty, H.; Hansen, S.

    1994-11-01

    The planned luminosity for the upgrade is ten times higher than at present (L {approximately} 10{sup 32}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}) and involves a time between collisions as small as 132 ns. To operate in this environment, completely new electronics is required for the 17,500 proportional drift tubes of the system. These electronics include a deadtimeless readout, a digital TDC with about 1 ns binning for the wire signals, fast charge integrators and pipelined ADCs for digitizing the pad electrode signals, a new wire signal triggering scheme and its associated trigger logic, and high level DSP processing. Some test results of measurements performed on prototype channels and a comparison with the existing electronics are presented.

  8. A conceptual design for an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    1999-02-15

    This report is a brief description of a model electron beam, which is meant to serve as a pulsed heat source that vaporizes a metal fleck into an ''under-dense'' cloud. See Reference 1. The envelope of the electron beam is calculated from the paraxial ray equation, as stated in Reference 2. The examples shown here are for 5 A, 200 keV beams that focus to waists of under 0.4 mm diameter, within a cylindrical volume of 10 cm radius and length. The magnetic fields assumed in the examples are moderate, 0.11 T and 0.35 T, and can probably be created by permanent magnets.

  9. An introduction to the BANNING design automation system for shuttle microelectronic hardware development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrady, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    The BANNING MOS design system is presented. It complements rather than supplant the normal design activities associated with the design and fabrication of low-power digital electronic equipment. BANNING is user-oriented and requires no programming experience to use effectively. It provides the user a simulation capability to aid in his circuit design and it eliminates most of the manual operations involved in the layout and artwork generation of integrated circuits. An example of its operation is given and some additional background reading is provided.

  10. Logic Design Pathology and Space Flight Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard B.; Barto, Rod L.; Erickson, Ken

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a look at logic design from early in the US Space Program and examines faults in recent logic designs. Most examples are based on flight hardware failures and analysis of new tools and techniques. The paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  11. Design and implementation of an automated secondary cooling system for the continuous casting of billets.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Subhasis; Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Patwari, Kuntal; Majumdar, Susanta; Ray, Asim Kumar; Singh, Arun Kumar Prasad; Neogi, Nirbhar

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a heat transfer model based automatic secondary cooling system for a billet caster. The model aims to minimize the variation in surface temperature and excessive reheating of the billet strands. It is also used to avoid the low ductility trough of the solidifying steel, which aggravates the tendency of steel to crack. The system has been designed and implemented in an integrated steel plant. A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based automation system has been developed to control the water flow in the secondary cooling zones of the strand. The results obtained through field trials have shown complete elimination of internal and off-corner cracks for the fifty billet samples that were monitored.

  12. An automated calibration laboratory for flight research instrumentation: Requirements and a proposed design approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill-Rood, Nora; Glover, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility (Ames-Dryden), operates a diverse fleet of research aircraft which are heavily instrumented to provide both real time data for in-flight monitoring and recorded data for postflight analysis. Ames-Dryden's existing automated calibration (AUTOCAL) laboratory is a computerized facility which tests aircraft sensors to certify accuracy for anticipated harsh flight environments. Recently, a major AUTOCAL lab upgrade was initiated; the goal of this modernization is to enhance productivity and improve configuration management for both software and test data. The new system will have multiple testing stations employing distributed processing linked by a local area network to a centralized database. The baseline requirements for the new AUTOCAL lab and the design approach being taken for its mechanization are described.

  13. Research Initiatives and Preliminary Results In Automation Design In Airspace Management in Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corker, Kevin; Lebacqz, J. Victor (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA and the FAA have entered into a joint venture to explore, define, design and implement a new airspace management operating concept. The fundamental premise of that concept is that technologies and procedures need to be developed for flight deck and ground operations to improve the efficiency, the predictability, the flexibility and the safety of airspace management and operations. To that end NASA Ames has undertaken an initial development and exploration of "key concepts" in the free flight airspace management technology development. Human Factors issues in automation aiding design, coupled aiding systems between air and ground, communication protocols in distributed decision making, and analytic techniques for definition of concepts of airspace density and operator cognitive load have been undertaken. This paper reports the progress of these efforts, which are not intended to definitively solve the many evolving issues of design for future ATM systems, but to provide preliminary results to chart the parameters of performance and the topology of the analytic effort required. The preliminary research in provision of cockpit display of traffic information, dynamic density definition, distributed decision making, situation awareness models and human performance models is discussed as they focus on the theme of "design requirements".

  14. Automated fit quantification of tibial nail designs during the insertion using computer three-dimensional modelling.

    PubMed

    Amarathunga, Jayani P; Schuetz, Michael A; Yarlagadda, Prasad Kvd; Schmutz, Beat

    2014-12-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the standard fixation method for displaced diaphyseal fractures of the tibia. An optimal nail design should both facilitate insertion and anatomically fit the bone geometry at its final position in order to reduce the risk of stress fractures and malalignments. Due to the nonexistence of suitable commercial software, we developed a software tool for the automated fit assessment of nail designs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that an optimised nail, which fits better at the final position, is also easier to insert. Three-dimensional models of two nail designs and 20 tibiae were used. The fitting was quantified in terms of surface area, maximum distance, sum of surface areas and sum of maximum distances by which the nail was protruding into the cortex. The software was programmed to insert the nail into the bone model and to quantify the fit at defined increment levels. On average, the misfit during the insertion in terms of the four fitting parameters was smaller for the Expert Tibial Nail Proximal bend (476.3 mm(2), 1.5 mm, 2029.8 mm(2), 6.5 mm) than the Expert Tibial Nail (736.7 mm(2), 2.2 mm, 2491.4 mm(2), 8.0 mm). The differences were statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05). The software could be used by nail implant manufacturers for the purpose of implant design validation.

  15. Automated fast extraction of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soil by focused microwave-assisted Soxhlet extraction prior to gas chromatography--electron-capture detection.

    PubMed

    Priego-Capote, F; Luque-García, J L; Luque de Castro, M D

    2003-04-25

    An approach for the automated fast extraction of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitroPAHs) from soil, using a focused microwave-assisted Soxhlet extractor, is proposed. The main factors affecting the extraction efficiency (namely: irradiation power, irradiation time, number of cycles and extractant volume) were optimised by using experimental design methodology. The reduction of the nitro-PAHs to amino-PAHs and the derivatisation of the reduced analytes with heptafluorobutyric anhydride was mandatory prior to the separation-determination step by gas chromatography--electron-capture detection. The proposed approach has allowed the extraction of these pollutants from spiked and "real" contaminated soils with extraction efficiencies similar to those provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency methods 3540-8091, but with a drastic reduction in both the extraction time and sample handling, and using less organic solvent, as 75-85% of it was recycled.

  16. Pilot opinions on high level flight deck automation issues: Toward the development of a design philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, Yvette J.; Rogers, William H.; Pew, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    There has been much concern in recent years about the rapid increase in automation on commercial flight decks. The survey was composed of three major sections. The first section asked pilots to rate different automation components that exist on the latest commercial aircraft regarding their obtrusiveness and the attention and effort required in using them. The second section addressed general 'automation philosophy' issues. The third section focused on issues related to levels and amount of automation. The results indicate that pilots of advanced aircraft like their automation, use it, and would welcome more automation. However, they also believe that automation has many disadvantages, especially fully autonomous automation. They want their automation to be simple and reliable and to produce predictable results. The biggest needs for higher levels of automation were in pre-flight, communication, systems management, and task management functions, planning as well as response tasks, and high workload situations. There is an irony and a challenge in the implications of these findings. On the one hand pilots would like new automation to be simple and reliable, but they need it to support the most complex part of the job--managing and planning tasks in high workload situations.

  17. Designing Flexible Software for the "Electronic Board."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hativa, Nira

    1984-01-01

    Argues that software for electronic boards should address a variety of teaching styles, student abilities and ages, class textbooks, teaching objectives, and learning environments for flexibility of use. The software features that contribute to flexibility include frequent stops, options for going backwards, inter- and intra-unit jumps, and…

  18. Democratic Designs for Electronic Town Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Jeffrey B.

    The 1992 presidential campaign put the idea of the electronic town meeting firmly on the political scene, and each of the presidential debates during that campaign experimented with the town meeting format. This paper reviews the tradition of town meeting democracy in the United States and proposes ways to carry that tradition on with the help of…

  19. Automated Work Package: Initial Wireless Communication Platform Design, Development, and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Al Rashdan, Ahmad Yahya Mohammad; Agarwal, Vivek

    2016-03-01

    The Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is developing the scientific basis to ensure long-term reliability, productivity, safety, and security of the nuclear power industry in the United States. The Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) pathway of the program aims to increase the role of advanced II&C technologies to achieve this objective. One of the pathway efforts at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to improve the work packages execution process by replacing the expensive, inefficient, bulky, complex, and error-prone paper-based work orders with automated work packages (AWPs). An AWP is an automated and dynamic presentation of the work package designed to guide the user through the work process. It is loaded on a mobile device, such as a tablet, and is capable of communicating with plant equipment and systems to acquire plant and procedure states. The AWP replaces those functions where a computer is more efficient and reliable than a human. To enable the automatic acquisition of plant data, it is necessary to design and develop a prototype platform for data exchange between the field instruments and the AWP mobile devices. The development of the platform aims to reveal issues and solutions generalizable to large-scale implementation of a similar system. Topics such as bandwidth, robustness, response time, interference, and security are usually associated with wireless communication. These concerns, along with other requirements, are listed in an earlier INL report. Specifically, the targeted issues and performance aspects in this work are relevant to the communication infrastructure from the perspective of promptness, robustness, expandability, and interoperability with different technologies.

  20. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Fangei; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Harwood, Leigh; Hutton, Andrew; Morozov, Vasiliy; Pilat, Fulvia; Zhang, Yuhong; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, Michael; Wang, M.-H; Wienands, Uli

    2015-09-01

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEP-II components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  1. Update on the MEIC electron collider ring design

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Morozov, V. S.; Pilat, F.; Zhang, Y.; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, M.; Wang, M-H; Wienands, U.

    2015-07-14

    The electron collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab is designed to accumulate and store a high-current polarized electron beam for collisions with an ion beam. We consider a design of the electron collider ring based on reusing PEPII components, such as magnets, power supplies, vacuum system, etc. This has the potential to significantly reduce the cost and engineering effort needed to bring the project to fruition. This paper reports on an electron ring optics design considering the balance of PEP-II hardware parameters (such as dipole sagitta, magnet field strengths and acceptable synchrotron radiation power) and electron beam quality in terms of equilibrium emittances.

  2. Binding the Electronic Book: Design Features for Bibliophiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruecker, Stan; Uszkalo, Kirsten C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a design for the electronic book based on discussions with frequent book readers. We adopted a conceptual framework for this project consisting of a spectrum of possible designs, with the conventional bound book at one difference pole, and the laptop computer at the other; the design activity then consisted of appropriately…

  3. De novo automated design of small RNA circuits for engineering synthetic riboregulation in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Landrain, Thomas E.; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    A grand challenge in synthetic biology is to use our current knowledge of RNA science to perform the automatic engineering of completely synthetic sequences encoding functional RNAs in living cells. We report here a fully automated design methodology and experimental validation of synthetic RNA interaction circuits working in a cellular environment. The computational algorithm, based on a physicochemical model, produces novel RNA sequences by exploring the space of possible sequences compatible with predefined structures. We tested our methodology in Escherichia coli by designing several positive riboregulators with diverse structures and interaction models, suggesting that only the energy of formation and the activation energy (free energy barrier to overcome for initiating the hybridization reaction) are sufficient criteria to engineer RNA interaction and regulation in bacteria. The designed sequences exhibit nonsignificant similarity to any known noncoding RNA sequence. Our riboregulatory devices work independently and in combination with transcription regulation to create complex logic circuits. Our results demonstrate that a computational methodology based on first-principles can be used to engineer interacting RNAs with allosteric behavior in living cells. PMID:22949707

  4. Aircraft wing structural design optimization based on automated finite element modelling and ground structure approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weizhu; Yue, Zhufeng; Li, Lei; Wang, Peiyan

    2016-01-01

    An optimization procedure combining an automated finite element modelling (AFEM) technique with a ground structure approach (GSA) is proposed for structural layout and sizing design of aircraft wings. The AFEM technique, based on CATIA VBA scripting and PCL programming, is used to generate models automatically considering the arrangement of inner systems. GSA is used for local structural topology optimization. The design procedure is applied to a high-aspect-ratio wing. The arrangement of the integral fuel tank, landing gear and control surfaces is considered. For the landing gear region, a non-conventional initial structural layout is adopted. The positions of components, the number of ribs and local topology in the wing box and landing gear region are optimized to obtain a minimum structural weight. Constraints include tank volume, strength, buckling and aeroelastic parameters. The results show that the combined approach leads to a greater weight saving, i.e. 26.5%, compared with three additional optimizations based on individual design approaches.

  5. Using Formal Modeling With an Automated Analysis Tool to Design and Parametrically Analyze a Multirobot Coordination Protocol: A Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    mode with predictable performance. However, requiring stable equilibria to lie in the given regions is difficult in all, but the simplest topological ... spaces . A game- theoretic approach to designing controllers for hybrid systems with a hierarchical structure is shown to be applicable to automated

  6. Beyond the Design of Automated Writing Evaluation: Pedagogical Practices and Perceived Learning Effectiveness in EFL Writing Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi-Fen Emily; Cheng, Wei-Yuan Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Automated writing evaluation (AWE) software is designed to provide instant computer-generated scores for a submitted essay along with diagnostic feedback. Most studies on AWE have been conducted on psychometric evaluations of its validity; however, studies on how effectively AWE is used in writing classes as a pedagogical tool are limited. This…

  7. Free electron laser designs for laser amplification

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, Donald; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques. With wiggler magnetic field strength B.sub.w and wavelength .lambda..sub.w =2.pi./k.sub.w regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B.sub.w /k.sub.w or k.sub.w or B.sub.w and k.sub.w (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space "bucket" area.

  8. Spreader Design for FERMI@Elettra Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, A.; Bacescu, D.; Chow, K.; Diviacco, B.; Ferianis, M.; Di Mitri, S.; Wells, R.

    2007-01-18

    In this note we describe a conceptual design of a part ofthe electron beam delivery system for FERMI@Elettra free electron laser(FEL) located between the end of the linac and the entrance to the FEL.This part includes the emittance diagnostic section, the electron beamswitchyard for two FELs called spreader and matching sections. The designmeets various constrains imposed by the existing and planned buildingboundaries, desire for utilization of existing equipment and demands forvarious diagnostic instruments.

  9. Design Alternatives for a Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, K; Bosch, R A; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Keil, R G; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J G; Rogers, G C; Wehlitz, R; Chiang, T; Miller, T J; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R A; York, R C

    2012-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison is continuing design efforts for a vacuum ultraviolet/X-ray Free Electron Laser facility. The design incorporates seeding the FEL to provide fully coherent photon output at energies up to {approx}1 keV. The focus of the present work is to minimize the cost of the facility while preserving its performance. To achieve this we are exploring variations in the electron beam driver for the FEL, in undulator design, and in the seeding mechanism. Design optimizations and trade-offs between the various technologies and how they affect the FEL scientific program will be presented.

  10. Two-dimensional optimization of free electron laser designs

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, Donald; Haas, Roger A.

    1985-01-01

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a "synchronous electron" at an optimal transverse radius r>0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  11. Two-dimensional optimization of free-electron-laser designs

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, D.; Haas, R.A.

    1982-05-04

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers are described that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a synchronous electron at an optimal transverse radius r > 0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  12. Design study for electronic system for Jupiter Orbit Probe (JOP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elero, B. P., Jr.; Carignan, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    The conceptual design of the Jupiter probe spectrometer is presented. Block and circuit diagrams are presented along with tabulated parts lists. Problem areas are considered to be (1) the schedule, (2) weight limitations for the electronic systems, and (3) radiation hardness of the electronic devices.

  13. System Design and Development of a Robotic Device for Automated Venipuncture and Diagnostic Blood Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balter, Max L.; Chen, Alvin I.; Fromholtz, Alex; Gorshkov, Alex; Maguire, Tim J.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic blood testing is the most prevalent medical procedure performed in the world and forms the cornerstone of modern health care delivery. Yet blood tests are still predominantly carried out in centralized labs using large-volume samples acquired by manual venipuncture, and no end-to-end solution from blood draw to sample analysis exists today. Our group is developing a platform device that merges robotic phlebotomy with automated diagnostics to rapidly deliver patient information at the site of the blood draw. The system couples an image-guided venipuncture robot, designed to address the challenges of routine venous access, with a centrifuge-based blood analyzer to obtain quantitative measurements of hematology. In this paper, we first present the system design and architecture of the integrated device. We then perform a series of in vitro experiments to evaluate the cannulation accuracy of the system on blood vessel phantoms. Next, we assess the effects of vessel diameter, needle gauge, flow rate, and viscosity on the rate of sample collection. Finally, we demonstrate proof-of-concept of a white cell assay on the blood analyzer using in vitro human samples spiked with fluorescently labeled microbeads. PMID:28239509

  14. Design of a Tool Integrating Force Sensing With Automated Insertion in Cochlear Implantation.

    PubMed

    Schurzig, Daniel; Labadie, Robert F; Hussong, Andreas; Rau, Thomas S; Webster, Robert J

    2012-04-01

    The quality of hearing restored to a deaf patient by a cochlear implant in hearing preservation cochlear implant surgery (and possibly also in routine cochlear implant surgery) is believed to depend on preserving delicate cochlear membranes while accurately inserting an electrode array deep into the spiral cochlea. Membrane rupture forces, and possibly, other indicators of suboptimal placement, are below the threshold detectable by human hands, motivating a force sensing insertion tool. Furthermore, recent studies have shown significant variability in manual insertion forces and velocities that may explain some instances of imperfect placement. Toward addressing this, an automated insertion tool was recently developed by Hussong et al. By following the same insertion tool concept, in this paper, we present mechanical enhancements that improve the surgeon's interface with the device and make it smaller and lighter. We also present electomechanical design of new components enabling integrated force sensing. The tool is designed to be sufficiently compact and light that it can be mounted to a microstereotactic frame for accurate image-guided preinsertion positioning. The new integrated force sensing system is capable of resolving forces as small as 0.005 N, and we provide experimental illustration of using forces to detect errors in electrode insertion.

  15. System Design and Development of a Robotic Device for Automated Venipuncture and Diagnostic Blood Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Balter, Max L; Chen, Alvin I; Fromholtz, Alex; Gorshkov, Alex; Maguire, Tim J; Yarmush, Martin L

    2016-10-01

    Diagnostic blood testing is the most prevalent medical procedure performed in the world and forms the cornerstone of modern health care delivery. Yet blood tests are still predominantly carried out in centralized labs using large-volume samples acquired by manual venipuncture, and no end-to-end solution from blood draw to sample analysis exists today. Our group is developing a platform device that merges robotic phlebotomy with automated diagnostics to rapidly deliver patient information at the site of the blood draw. The system couples an image-guided venipuncture robot, designed to address the challenges of routine venous access, with a centrifuge-based blood analyzer to obtain quantitative measurements of hematology. In this paper, we first present the system design and architecture of the integrated device. We then perform a series of in vitro experiments to evaluate the cannulation accuracy of the system on blood vessel phantoms. Next, we assess the effects of vessel diameter, needle gauge, flow rate, and viscosity on the rate of sample collection. Finally, we demonstrate proof-of-concept of a white cell assay on the blood analyzer using in vitro human samples spiked with fluorescently labeled microbeads.

  16. A Practical Approach for Integrating Automatically Designed Fixtures with Automated Assembly Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Calton, Terri L.; Peters, Ralph R.

    1999-07-20

    This paper presents a practical approach for integrating automatically designed fixtures with automated assembly planning. Product assembly problems vary widely; here the focus is on assemblies that are characterized by a single base part to which a number of smaller parts and subassemblies are attached. This method starts with three-dimension at CAD descriptions of an assembly whose assembly tasks require a fixture to hold the base part. It then combines algorithms that automatically design assembly pallets to hold the base part with algorithms that automatically generate assembly sequences. The designed fixtures rigidly constrain and locate the part, obey task constraints, are robust to part shape variations, are easy to load, and are economical to produce. The algorithm is guaranteed to find the global optimum solution that satisfies these and other pragmatic conditions. The assembly planner consists of four main elements: a user interface, a constraint system, a search engine, and an animation module. The planner expresses all constraints at a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. Fast replanning enables an interactive plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constrain discovery and documentation. The combined algorithms guarantee that the fixture will hold the base part without interfering with any of the assembly operations. This paper presents an overview of the planners, the integration approach, and the results of the integrated algorithms applied to several practical manufacturing problems. For these problems initial high-quality fixture designs and assembly sequences are generated in a matter of minutes with global optimum solutions identified in just over an hour.

  17. Design study report. Volume 2: Electronic unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The recording system discussed is required to record and reproduce wideband data from either of the two primary Earth Resources Technology Satellite sensors: Return Beam Vidicon (RBV) camera or Multi-Spectral Scanner (MSS). The camera input is an analog signal with a bandwidth from dc to 3.5 MHz; this signal is accommodated through FM recording techniques which provide a recorder signal-to-noise ratio in excess of 39 db, black-to-white signal/rms noise, over the specified bandwidth. The MSS provides, as initial output, 26 narrowband channels. These channels are multiplexed prior to transmission, or recording, into a single 15 Megabit/second digital data stream. Within the recorder, the 15 Megabit/second NRZL signal is processed through the same FM electronics as the RBV signal, but the basic FM standards are modified to provide an internal, 10.5 MHz baseland response with signal-to-noise ratio of about 25 db. Following FM demodulation, however, the MSS signal is digitally re-shaped and re-clocked so that good bit stability and signal-to-noise exist at the recorder output.

  18. Feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using electronic portal imaging: A comparison of methods

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Emma J. . E-mail: eharris@icr.ac.uk; McNair, Helen A.; Evans, Phillip M.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using portal images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device. Methods and Materials: We have made a direct comparison of 4 different methods (2 template matching-based methods, a method incorporating attenuation and constellation analyses and a cross correlation method) that have been published in the literature for the automatic detection of fiducial markers. The cross-correlation technique requires a-priory information from the portal images, therefore the technique is not fully automated for the first treatment fraction. Images of 7 patients implanted with gold fiducial markers (8 mm in length and 1 mm in diameter) were acquired before treatment (set-up images) and during treatment (movie images) using 1MU and 15MU per image respectively. Images included: 75 anterior (AP) and 69 lateral (LAT) set-up images and 51 AP and 83 LAT movie images. Using the different methods described in the literature, marker positions were automatically identified. Results: The method based upon cross correlation techniques gave the highest percentage detection success rate of 99% (AP) and 83% (LAT) set-up (1MU) images. The methods gave detection success rates of less than 91% (AP) and 42% (LAT) set-up images. The amount of a-priory information used and how it affects the way the techniques are implemented, is discussed. Conclusions: Fully automated marker detection in set-up images for the first treatment fraction is unachievable using these methods and that using cross-correlation is the best technique for automatic detection on subsequent radiotherapy treatment fractions.

  19. The design of electronic map displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretz, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive analysis of a pilot's navigation task and describes an experiment comparing a new map display that employs the principle of visual momentum with the two traditional approaches, track-up and north-up. The data show that the advantage of a track-up alignment is its congruence with the egocentered forward view; however, the inconsistency of the rotating display hinders development of a cognitive map. The stability of a north-up alignment aids the acquisition of a cognitive map, but there is a cost associated with the mental rotation of the display to a track-up alignment for tasks involving the ego-centered forward view. The data also show that the visual momentum design captures the benefits and reduces the costs associated with the two traditional approaches.

  20. The design of electronic map displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aretz, Anthony J.

    1991-02-01

    This paper presents a cognitive analysis of a pilot's navigation task and describes an experiment comparing a new map display that employs the principle of visual momentum with the two traditional approaches, track-up and north-up. The data show that the advantage of a track-up alignment is its congruence with the egocentered forward view; however, the inconsistency of the rotating display hinders development of a cognitive map. The stability of a north-up alignment aids the acquisition of a cognitive map, but there is a cost associated with the mental rotation of the display to a track-up alignment for tasks involving the ego-centered forward view. The data also show that the visual momentum design captures the benefits and reduces the costs associated with the two traditional approaches.

  1. Laboratory design for high-performance electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Turner, John H.; Hetherington, Crispin J.D.; Cullis, A.G.; Carragher, Bridget; Jenkins, Ron; Milgrim, Julie; Milligan,Ronald A.; Potter, Clinton S.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.; Degenhardt, Lynn; Sides, William H.

    2004-04-23

    Proliferation of electron microscopes with field emission guns, imaging filters and hardware spherical aberration correctors (giving higher spatial and energy resolution) has resulted in the need to construct special laboratories. As resolutions improve, transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) become more sensitive to ambient conditions. State-of-the-art electron microscopes require state-of-the-art environments, and this means careful design and implementation of microscope sites, from the microscope room to the building that surrounds it. Laboratories have been constructed to house high-sensitive instruments with resolutions ranging down to sub-Angstrom levels; we present the various design philosophies used for some of these laboratories and our experiences with them. Four facilities are described: the National Center for Electron Microscopy OAM Laboratory at LBNL; the FEGTEM Facility at the University of Sheffield; the Center for Integrative Molecular Biosciences at TSRI; and the Advanced Microscopy Laboratory at ORNL.

  2. Program user's manual for optimizing the design of a liquid or gaseous propellant rocket engine with the automated combustor design code AUTOCOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichel, R. H.; Hague, D. S.; Jones, R. T.; Glatt, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    This computer program manual describes in two parts the automated combustor design optimization code AUTOCOM. The program code is written in the FORTRAN 4 language. The input data setup and the program outputs are described, and a sample engine case is discussed. The program structure and programming techniques are also described, along with AUTOCOM program analysis.

  3. Resonator design for a visible wavelength free-electron laser (*)

    SciTech Connect

    Bhowmik, A.; Lordi, N. . Rocketdyne Div.); Ben-Zvi, I.; Gallardo, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Design requirements for a visible wavelength free-electron laser being developed at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented along with predictions of laser performance from 3-D numerical simulations. The design and construction of the optical resonator, its alignment and control systems are also described. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. RHIC electron lens beam transport system design considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.; Raparia, D.

    2010-10-01

    To apply head-on beam-beam compensation for RHIC, two electron lenses are designed and will be installed at IP10. Electron beam transport system is one of important subsystem, which is used to transport electron beam from electron gun side to collector side. This system should be able to change beam size inside superconducting magnet and control beam position with 5 mm in horizontal and vertical plane. Some other design considerations for this beam transport system are also reported in this paper. The head-on beam-beam effect is one of important nonlinear source in storage ring and linear colliders, which have limited the luminosity improvement of many colliders, such as SppS, Tevatron and RHIC. In order to enhance the performance of colliders, beam-beam effects can be compensated with direct space charge compensation, indirect space charge compensation or betatron phase cancellation scheme. Like other colliders, indirect space charge compensation scheme (Electron Lens) was also proposed for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam-beam compensation at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The two similar electron lenses are located in IR10 between the DX magnets. One RHIC electron lens consists of one DC electron gun, one superconducting magnet, one electron collector and beam transport system.

  5. Habitat automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swab, Rodney E.

    1992-01-01

    A habitat, on either the surface of the Moon or Mars, will be designed and built with the proven technologies of that day. These technologies will be mature and readily available to the habitat designer. We believe an acceleration of the normal pace of automation would allow a habitat to be safer and more easily maintained than would be the case otherwise. This document examines the operation of a habitat and describes elements of that operation which may benefit from an increased use of automation. Research topics within the automation realm are then defined and discussed with respect to the role they can have in the design of the habitat. Problems associated with the integration of advanced technologies into real-world projects at NASA are also addressed.

  6. A novel automated instrument designed to determine photosensitivity thresholds (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Mariela C.; Gonzalez, Alex; Rowaan, Cornelis; De Freitas, Carolina; Rosa, Potyra R.; Alawa, Karam; Lam, Byron L.; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    2016-03-01

    As there is no clinically available instrument to systematically and reliably determine the photosensitivity thresholds of patients with dry eyes, blepharospasms, migraines, traumatic brain injuries, and genetic disorders such as Achromatopsia, retinitis pigmentosa and other retinal dysfunctions, a computer-controlled optoelectronics system was designed. The BPEI Photosensitivity System provides a light stimuli emitted from a bi-cupola concave, 210 white LED array with varying intensity ranging from 1 to 32,000 lux. The system can either utilize a normal or an enhanced testing mode for subjects with low light tolerance. The automated instrument adjusts the intensity of each light stimulus. The subject is instructed to indicate discomfort by pressing a hand-held button. Reliability of the responses is tracked during the test. The photosensitivity threshold is then calculated after 10 response reversals. In a preliminary study, we demonstrated that subjects suffering from Achromatopsia experienced lower photosensitivity thresholds than normal subjects. Hence, the system can safely and reliably determine the photosensitivity thresholds of healthy and light sensitive subjects by detecting and quantifying the individual differences. Future studies will be performed with this system to determine the photosensitivity threshold differences between normal subjects and subjects suffering from other conditions that affect light sensitivity.

  7. Cloud-Based Automated Design and Additive Manufacturing: A Usage Data-Enabled Paradigm Shift

    PubMed Central

    Lehmhus, Dirk; Wuest, Thorsten; Wellsandt, Stefan; Bosse, Stefan; Kaihara, Toshiya; Thoben, Klaus-Dieter; Busse, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Integration of sensors into various kinds of products and machines provides access to in-depth usage information as basis for product optimization. Presently, this large potential for more user-friendly and efficient products is not being realized because (a) sensor integration and thus usage information is not available on a large scale and (b) product optimization requires considerable efforts in terms of manpower and adaptation of production equipment. However, with the advent of cloud-based services and highly flexible additive manufacturing techniques, these obstacles are currently crumbling away at rapid pace. The present study explores the state of the art in gathering and evaluating product usage and life cycle data, additive manufacturing and sensor integration, automated design and cloud-based services in manufacturing. By joining and extrapolating development trends in these areas, it delimits the foundations of a manufacturing concept that will allow continuous and economically viable product optimization on a general, user group or individual user level. This projection is checked against three different application scenarios, each of which stresses different aspects of the underlying holistic concept. The following discussion identifies critical issues and research needs by adopting the relevant stakeholder perspectives. PMID:26703606

  8. Automated physics-based design of synthetic riboswitches from diverse RNA aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Espah Borujeni, Amin; Mishler, Dennis M.; Wang, Jingzhi; Huso, Walker; Salis, Howard M.

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are shape-changing regulatory RNAs that bind chemicals and regulate gene expression, directly coupling sensing to cellular actuation. However, it remains unclear how their sequence controls the physics of riboswitch switching and activation, particularly when changing the ligand-binding aptamer domain. We report the development of a statistical thermodynamic model that predicts the sequence-structure-function relationship for translation-regulating riboswitches that activate gene expression, characterized inside cells and within cell-free transcription–translation assays. Using the model, we carried out automated computational design of 62 synthetic riboswitches that used six different RNA aptamers to sense diverse chemicals (theophylline, tetramethylrosamine, fluoride, dopamine, thyroxine, 2,4-dinitrotoluene) and activated gene expression by up to 383-fold. The model explains how aptamer structure, ligand affinity, switching free energy and macromolecular crowding collectively control riboswitch activation. Our model-based approach for engineering riboswitches quantitatively confirms several physical mechanisms governing ligand-induced RNA shape-change and enables the development of cell-free and bacterial sensors for diverse applications. PMID:26621913

  9. Cloud-Based Automated Design and Additive Manufacturing: A Usage Data-Enabled Paradigm Shift.

    PubMed

    Lehmhus, Dirk; Wuest, Thorsten; Wellsandt, Stefan; Bosse, Stefan; Kaihara, Toshiya; Thoben, Klaus-Dieter; Busse, Matthias

    2015-12-19

    Integration of sensors into various kinds of products and machines provides access to in-depth usage information as basis for product optimization. Presently, this large potential for more user-friendly and efficient products is not being realized because (a) sensor integration and thus usage information is not available on a large scale and (b) product optimization requires considerable efforts in terms of manpower and adaptation of production equipment. However, with the advent of cloud-based services and highly flexible additive manufacturing techniques, these obstacles are currently crumbling away at rapid pace. The present study explores the state of the art in gathering and evaluating product usage and life cycle data, additive manufacturing and sensor integration, automated design and cloud-based services in manufacturing. By joining and extrapolating development trends in these areas, it delimits the foundations of a manufacturing concept that will allow continuous and economically viable product optimization on a general, user group or individual user level. This projection is checked against three different application scenarios, each of which stresses different aspects of the underlying holistic concept. The following discussion identifies critical issues and research needs by adopting the relevant stakeholder perspectives.

  10. Automated physics-based design of synthetic riboswitches from diverse RNA aptamers.

    PubMed

    Espah Borujeni, Amin; Mishler, Dennis M; Wang, Jingzhi; Huso, Walker; Salis, Howard M

    2016-01-08

    Riboswitches are shape-changing regulatory RNAs that bind chemicals and regulate gene expression, directly coupling sensing to cellular actuation. However, it remains unclear how their sequence controls the physics of riboswitch switching and activation, particularly when changing the ligand-binding aptamer domain. We report the development of a statistical thermodynamic model that predicts the sequence-structure-function relationship for translation-regulating riboswitches that activate gene expression, characterized inside cells and within cell-free transcription-translation assays. Using the model, we carried out automated computational design of 62 synthetic riboswitches that used six different RNA aptamers to sense diverse chemicals (theophylline, tetramethylrosamine, fluoride, dopamine, thyroxine, 2,4-dinitrotoluene) and activated gene expression by up to 383-fold. The model explains how aptamer structure, ligand affinity, switching free energy and macromolecular crowding collectively control riboswitch activation. Our model-based approach for engineering riboswitches quantitatively confirms several physical mechanisms governing ligand-induced RNA shape-change and enables the development of cell-free and bacterial sensors for diverse applications.

  11. Design and implementation of a highly integrated and automated in situ bioremediation system for petroleum hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, J.C.; Rosenwinkel, P.; Norris, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    The proposed sale of an industrial property required that an environmental investigation be conducted as part of the property transfer agreement. The investigation revealed petroleum hydrocarbon compounds (PHCs) in the subsurface. Light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) varsol (a gasoline like solvent), gasoline, and fuel oil were found across a three (3) acre area and were present as liquid phase PHCs, as dissolved phase PHCs, and as adsorbed phase PHCs in both saturated and unsaturated soils. Fuel oil was largely present in the unsaturated soils. Fuel oil was largely present in the unsaturated soils. Varsol represented the majority of the PHCs present. The presence of liquid phase PHCs suggested that any remedial action incorporate free phase recovery. The volatility of varsol and gasoline and the biodegradability of the PHCs present in the subsurface suggested that bioremediation, air sparging, and soil vapor extraction/bioventing were appropriate technologies for incorporation in a remedy. The imminent conversion of the impacted area to a retail facility required that any long term remedy be unobtrusive and require minimum activity across much of the impacted area. In the following sections the site investigation, selection and testing of remedial technologies, and design and implementation of an integrated and automated remedial system is discussed.

  12. Strategies for handling missing clinical data for automated surgical site infection detection from the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Melton, Genevieve B; Arsoniadis, Elliot G; Wang, Yan; Kwaan, Mary R; Simon, Gyorgy J

    2017-03-16

    Proper handling of missing data is important for many secondary uses of electronic health record (EHR) data. Data imputation methods can be used to handle missing data, but their use for analyzing EHR data is limited and specific efficacy for postoperative complication detection is unclear. Several data imputation methods were used to develop data models for automated detection of three types (i.e., superficial, deep, and organ space) of surgical site infection (SSI) and overall SSI using American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) Registry 30-day SSI occurrence data as a reference standard. Overall, models with missing data imputation almost always outperformed reference models without imputation that included only cases with complete data for detection of SSI overall achieving very good average area under the curve values. Missing data imputation appears to be an effective means for improving postoperative SSI detection using EHR clinical data.

  13. Design for low-power and reliable flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tsung-Ching (Jim)

    Flexible electronics are emerging as an alternative to conventional Si electronics for large-area low-cost applications such as e-paper, smart sensors, and disposable RFID tags. By utilizing inexpensive manufacturing methods such as ink-jet printing and roll-to-roll imprinting, flexible electronics can be made on low-cost plastics just like printing a newspaper. However, the key elements of exible electronics, thin-film transistors (TFTs), have slower operating speeds and less reliability than their Si electronics counterparts. Furthermore, depending on the material property, TFTs are usually mono-type -- either p- or n-type -- devices. Making air-stable complementary TFT circuits is very challenging and not applicable to most TFT technologies. Existing design methodologies for Si electronics, therefore, cannot be directly applied to exible electronics. Other inhibiting factors such as high supply voltage, large process variation, and lack of trustworthy device modeling also make designing larger-scale and robust TFT circuits a significant challenge. The major goal of this dissertation is to provide a viable solution for robust circuit design in exible electronics. I will first introduce a reliability simulation framework that can predict the degraded TFT circuits' performance under bias-stress. This framework has been validated using the amorphous-silicon (a-Si) TFT scan driver for TFT-LCD displays. To reuse the existing CMOS design ow for exible electronics, I propose a Pseudo-CMOS cell library that can make TFT circuits operable under low supply voltage and which has post-fabrication tunability for reliability and performance enhancement. This cell library has been validated using 2V self-assembly-monolayer (SAM) organic TFTs with a low-cost shadow-mask deposition process. I will also demonstrate a 3-bit 1.25KS/s Flash ADC in a-Si TFTs, which is based on the proposed Pseudo-CMOS cell library, and explore more possibilities in display, energy, and sensing

  14. Design of an ultra-portable field transfer radiometer supporting automated vicarious calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Nikolaus; Thome, Kurtis; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey; Biggar, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    The University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group (RSG) began outfitting the radiometric calibration test site (RadCaTS) at Railroad Valley Nevada in 2004 for automated vicarious calibration of Earth-observing sensors. RadCaTS was upgraded to use RSG custom 8-band ground viewing radiometers (GVRs) beginning in 2011 and currently four GVRs are deployed providing an average reflectance for the test site. This measurement of ground reflectance is the most critical component of vicarious calibration using the reflectance-based method. In order to ensure the quality of these measurements, RSG has been exploring more efficient and accurate methods of on-site calibration evaluation. This work describes the design of, and initial results from, a small portable transfer radiometer for the purpose of GVR calibration validation on site. Prior to deployment, RSG uses high accuracy laboratory calibration methods in order to provide radiance calibrations with low uncertainties for each GVR. After deployment, a solar radiation based calibration has typically been used. The method is highly dependent on a clear, stable atmosphere, requires at least two people to perform, is time consuming in post processing, and is dependent on several large pieces of equipment. In order to provide more regular and more accurate calibration monitoring, the small portable transfer radiometer is designed for quick, one-person operation and on-site field calibration comparison results. The radiometer is also suited for laboratory calibration use and thus could be used as a transfer radiometer calibration standard for ground viewing radiometers of a RadCalNet site.

  15. A novel 2D and 3D method for automated insulin granule measurement and its application in assessing accepted preparation methods for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantell, J.; Nam, D.; Bull, D.; Achim, A.; Verkade, P.

    2014-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy images of insulin-producing beta cells in the islets of Langerhans contain many complex structures, making it difficult to accurately segment insulin granules. Furthermore the appearance of the granules and surrounding halo and limiting membrane can vary enormously depending on the methods used for sample preparation. An automated method has been developed using active contours to segment the insulin core initially and then expand to segment the halos [1]. The method has been validated against manual measurements and also yields higher accuracy than other automated methods [2]. It has then been extended to three dimensions to analyse a tomographic reconstruction from a thick section of the same material. The final step has been to produce a GUI and use the automated process to compare a number of different electron microscopy preparation protocols including chemical fixation (where many of halos are often distended) and to explore the many subtleties of high pressure freezing (where the halos are often minimal, [3]).

  16. Stochastic Micro-Pattern for Automated Correlative Fluorescence - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Isabell; Viplav, Abhiyan; Rasch, Christiane; Galic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Studies of cellular surface features gain from correlative approaches, where live cell information acquired by fluorescence light microscopy is complemented by ultrastructural information from scanning electron micrographs. Current approaches to spatially align fluorescence images with scanning electron micrographs are technically challenging and often cost or time-intensive. Relying exclusively on open-source software and equipment available in a standard lab, we have developed a method for rapid, software-assisted alignment of fluorescence images with the corresponding scanning electron micrographs via a stochastic gold micro-pattern. Here, we provide detailed instructions for micro-pattern production and image processing, troubleshooting for critical intermediate steps, and examples of membrane ultra-structures aligned with the fluorescence signal of proteins enriched at such sites. Together, the presented method for correlative fluorescence – scanning electron microscopy is versatile, robust and easily integrated into existing workflows, permitting image alignment with accuracy comparable to existing approaches with negligible investment of time or capital. PMID:26647824

  17. Wearable design issues for electronic vision enhancement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Joe

    2006-09-01

    As the baby boomer generation ages, visual impairment will overtake a significant portion of the US population. At the same time, more and more of our world is becoming digital. These two trends, coupled with the continuing advances in digital electronics, argue for a rethinking in the design of aids for the visually impaired. This paper discusses design issues for electronic vision enhancement systems (EVES) [R.C. Peterson, J.S. Wolffsohn, M. Rubinstein, et al., Am. J. Ophthalmol. 136 1129 (2003)] that will facilitate their wearability and continuous use. We briefly discuss the factors affecting a person's acceptance of wearable devices. We define the concept of operational inertia which plays an important role in our design of wearable devices and systems. We then discuss how design principles based upon operational inertia can be applied to the design of EVES.

  18. Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Watson, David; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the concept for and lessons from the development and field-testing of an open, interoperable communications infrastructure to support automated demand response (auto-DR). Automating DR allows greater levels of participation, improved reliability, and repeatability of the DR in participating facilities. This paper also presents the technical and architectural issues associated with auto-DR and description of the demand response automation server (DRAS), the client/server architecture-based middle-ware used to automate the interactions between the utilities or any DR serving entity and their customers for DR programs. Use case diagrams are presented to show the role of the DRAS between utility/ISO and the clients at the facilities.

  19. Terahertz Free Electron Laser: Design, Simulation and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    general principal is that a “pump” light pulse (usually a high peak power laser ) is incident upon a sample and causes an excitation . A certain time...light in free electron lasers , x-ray sources, and THz sources, and neutron production. Niowave also builds radio frequency ( RF ) guns, superconducting...FREE ELECTRON LASER : DESIGN, SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS by Conor M. Pogue December 2014 Dissertation Supervisor William B. Colson THIS PAGE

  20. A precision cryostat design for manual and semi-automated cryo-plunge instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Christopher J.; Scotcher, Steve; Kyte, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Here we describe a bench-top cryostat system to control the temperature of liquid ethane in a cryo-plunge apparatus designed for biological specimen preparation for electron cryomicroscopy. It comprises a foam insulated Dewar containing a copper cryostat cup, whose temperature is controlled via an active feedback system to within 0.1 K. The device can easily be incorporated into existing manual and semi-automatic cryo-plunge instruments that are not equipped with cryogenic temperature control. Over the course of normal use, we find that using a cryostat is convenient, fast, and does not require special mixtures of cryogens like ethane/propane. This simple cryostat improves the reliability and reproducibility of biological specimen preparation for electron cryomicroscopy.

  1. A precision cryostat design for manual and semi-automated cryo-plunge instruments

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Christopher J.; Scotcher, Steve; Kyte, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe a bench-top cryostat system to control the temperature of liquid ethane in a cryo-plunge apparatus designed for biological specimen preparation for electron cryomi-croscopy. It comprises a foam insulated Dewar containing a copper cryostat cup, whose temperature is controlled via an active feedback system to within 0.1 K. The device can easily be incorporated into existing manual and semi-automatic cryo-plunge instruments that are not equipped with cryogenic temperature control. Over the course of normal use, we find that using a cryostat is convenient, fast, and does not require special mixtures of cryogens like ethane/propane. This simple cryostat improves the reliability and reproducibility of biological specimen preparation for electron cryomicroscopy. PMID:27910462

  2. Design studies for the next generation electron ion colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Hisham Kamal; Bogacz, S. A.; Krafft, G.

    2014-04-01

    The next generation Electron Ion Collider (EIC) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB) utilizes a figure-8 shaped ion and electron rings. EIC has the ability to preserve the ion polarization during acceleration, where the electron ring matches in footprint with a figure-8 ion ring. The electron ring is designed to deliver a highly polarized high luminous electron beam at interaction point (IP). The main challenges of the electron ring design are the chromaticity compensation and maintaining high beam polarization of 70% at all energies 3-11 GeV without introducing transverse orbital coupling before the IP. The very demanding detector design limits the minimum distance between the final focus quadrupole and the interaction point to 3.5 m which results in a large β function inside the final focus quadrupoles leading to increased beam chromaticity. In this paper, we present a novel chromaticity compensation scheme that mitigates IP chromaticity by a compact chromaticity compensation section with multipole magnet components. In addition, a set of spin rotators are utilized to manipulate the polarization vector of the electron beam in order to preserve the beam polarization. The spin rotator solenoids introduce undesired coupling between the horizontal and vertical betatron motion of the beam. We introduce a compact and modular orbit decoupling insert that can fit in the limited space of the straight section in the figure-8 ring. We show a numerical study of the figure-8 ring design with the compact straight section, which includes the interaction region, chromaticity compensation section, and the spin rotators, the figure-8 design performance is evaluated with particle tracking.

  3. Design studies for the next generation electron ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sayed, Hisham Kamal; Bogacz, Slawomir A.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.

    2014-04-01

    The next generation Electron Ion Collider (EIC) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB) utilizes a figure-8 shaped ion and electron rings. EIC has the ability to preserve the ion polarization during acceleration, where the electron ring matches in footprint with a figure-8 ion ring. The electron ring is designed to deliver a highly polarized high luminous electron beam at interaction point (IP). The main challenges of the electron ring design are the chromaticity compensation and maintaining high beam polarization of 70% at all energies 3–11 GeV without introducing transverse orbital coupling before the IP. The very demanding detector design limits the minimum distance between the final focus quadrupole and the interaction point to 3.5 m which results in a large β function inside the final focus quadrupoles leading to increased beam chromaticity. In this paper, we present a novel chromaticity compensation scheme that mitigates IP chromaticity by a compact chromaticity compensation section with multipole magnet components. In addition, a set of spin rotators are utilized to manipulate the polarization vector of the electron beam in order to preserve the beam polarization. The spin rotator solenoids introduce undesired coupling between the horizontal and vertical betatron motion of the beam. We introduce a compact and modular orbit decoupling insert that can fit in the limited space of the straight section in the figure-8 ring. We show a numerical study of the figure-8 ring design with the compact straight section, which includes the interaction region, chromaticity compensation section, and the spin rotators, the figure-8 design performance is evaluated with particle tracking.

  4. Designs for surge immunity in critical electronic facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Edward F., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) embarked on a program replacing older tube type electronic equipment with newer solid state equipment. This replacement program dramatically increased the susceptibility of the FAA's facilities to lightning related damages. The proposal is presented of techniques which may be employed to lessen the susceptibility of new FAA electronic facility designs to failures resulting from lightning related surges and transients as well as direct strikes. The general concept espoused is one of a consistent system approach employing both perimeter and internal protection. It compares the technique presently employed to reduce electronic noise with other techniques which reduce noise while lowering susceptibility to lightning related damage. It is anticipated that these techniques will be employed in the design of an Air Traffic Control Tower in a high isokeraunic area. This facility would be subjected to rigorous monitoring over a multi-year period to provide quantitative data hopefully supporting the advantage of this design.

  5. ILC Polarized Electron Source Design and R&D Program

    SciTech Connect

    Brachmann, A.; Sheppard, J.; Zhou, F.; Poelker, M.; /SLAC

    2012-04-06

    The R and D program for the ILC electron focuses on three areas. These are the source drive laser system, the electron gun and photo cathodes necessary to produce a highly polarized electron beam. Currently, the laser system and photo cathode development take place at SLAC's 'ILC Injector Test facility', which is an integrated lab (laser and gun) that allows the production of the electron beam and is equipped with a set of diagnostics, necessary to characterize the source performance. Development of the ILC electron gun takes place at Jefferson Lab, where advanced concepts and technologies for HV DC electron guns for polarized beams are being developed. The goal is to combine both efforts at one facility to demonstrate an electron beam with ILC specifications, which are electron beam charge and polarization as well as the cathode's lifetime. The source parameters are summarized in Table 1. The current schematic design of the ILC central complex is depicted in Figure 1. The electron and positron sources are located and laid out approximately symmetric on either side of the damping rings.

  6. Is automated electronic surveillance for healthcare-associated infections accurate in the burn unit?

    PubMed

    Venable, Amanda; Dissanaike, Sharmila

    2013-01-01

    As monitoring requirements for healthcare-acquired infection increase, an efficient and accurate method for surveillance has been sought. The authors evaluated the accuracy of electronic surveillance in multiple intensive care unit settings. Data from 500 intensive care unit patients were reviewed to determine the presence of central line-associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI). An electronic surveillance report was obtained to determine whether patients had a blood-line nosocomial infection marker or a urine nosocomial infection marker. Manual review was based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. An infection preventionist then reviewed all discrepant cases and made a final determination, which was used as the gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity, false-positive rate, and false-negative rate were then calculated for electronic surveillance. In the burn population the sensitivity of electronic surveillance for CAUTI was 66.66%, specificity 96.5%, false-positive rate 3.44%, false-negative rate 33%; and for CLABSI the sensitivity was 100%, specificity 95%, false-positive rate 4.96%, false-negative rate 0%. In the nonburn population the sensitivity for CAUTI was 50%, specificity 97.9%, false-positive rate 2%, and false-negative rate 30%; and for CLABSI sensitivity was 60%, specificity 98.8%, false-positive rate 1%, and false-negative rate 60%. Burn centers may experience a higher false-positive rate for electronic surveillance of CLABSI and CAUTI than other critical care units.

  7. Design, Operation, and Maintenance of the Automated Rotation Control System for the 2.5-Meter Observa-Dome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    AFRL-RH-WP-TP-2013-0017 Design, Operation, and Maintenance of the Automated Rotation Control System for the 2.5-Meter Observa-Dome Judson...Government procurement does not in any way obligate the U.S. Government. The fact that the Government formulated or supplied the drawings, specifications...or other data does not license the holder or any other person or corporation; or convey any rights or permission to manufacture, use, or sell any

  8. Lattice design for the ERL electron ion collider in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Tsoupas, N.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Ptitsyn, V.; Litvinenko, V.; Hao, Y.; Parker, B.; Pozdeyev, E.

    2010-05-23

    We present electron ion collider lattice design for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) where the electrons have multi-passes through recirculating linacs (ERL) and arcs placed in the existing RHIC tunnel. The present RHIC interaction regions (IR's), where the electron ion collisions will occur, are modified to allow for the large luminosity. Staging of eRHIC will bring the electron energy from 4 up to 20 (30) GeV as the superconducting cavities are built and installed sequentially. The synchrotron radiation from electrons at the IR is reduced as they arrive straight to the collision while ions and protons come with 10 mrad crossing angle using the crab cavities.

  9. Note: Design of transverse electron gun for electron beam based reactive evaporation system.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Namita; Barve, U D; Bhatia, M S; Das, A K

    2011-05-01

    In this paper design of a 10 kV, 10 kW transverse electron gun, suitable for reactive evaporation, supported by simulation and modeling, is presented. Simulation of the electron beam trajectory helps in locating the emergence aperture after 90° bend and also in designing the crucible on which the beam is finally incident after 270° bend. The dimension of emergence aperture plays a vital role in designing the differential pumping system between the gun chamber and the substrate chamber. Experimental validation is done for beam trajectory by piercing a stainless steel plate at 90° position which is kept above the crucible.

  10. An automated system for studying the power distribution of electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Filarowski, C.A.

    1994-12-01

    Precise welds with an electron beam welder are difficult to reproduce because the factors effecting the electron beam current density distribution are not easily controlled. One method for measuring the power density distribution in EB welds uses computer tomography to reconstruct an image of the current density distribution. This technique uses many separate pieces of hardware and software packages to obtain the data and then reconstruct it consequently, transferring this technology between different machines and operators is difficult. Consolidating all of the hardware and software into one machine to execute the same tasks will allow for real-time measurement of the EB power density distribution and will provide a facilitated means for transferring various welding procedure between different machines and operators, thereby enhancing reproducibility of electron beam welds.

  11. Maintainability design criteria for packaging of spacecraft replaceable electronic equipment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kappler, J. R.; Folsom, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    Maintainability must be designed into long-duration spacecraft and equipment to provide the required high probability of mission success with the least cost and weight. The ability to perform repairs quickly and easily in a space environment can be achieved by imposing specific maintainability design criteria on spacecraft equipment design and installation. A study was funded to investigate and define design criteria for electronic equipment that would permit rapid removal and replacement in a space environment. The results of the study are discussed together with subsequent simulated zero-g demonstration tests of a mockup with new concepts for packaging.

  12. Three Experiments Examining the Use of Electroencephalogram,Event-Related Potentials, and Heart-Rate Variability for Real-Time Human-Centered Adaptive Automation Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Parasuraman, Raja; Freeman, Frederick G.; Scerbo, Mark W.; Mikulka, Peter J.; Pope, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Adaptive automation represents an advanced form of human-centered automation design. The approach to automation provides for real-time and model-based assessments of human-automation interaction, determines whether the human has entered into a hazardous state of awareness and then modulates the task environment to keep the operator in-the-loop , while maintaining an optimal state of task engagement and mental alertness. Because adaptive automation has not matured, numerous challenges remain, including what the criteria are, for determining when adaptive aiding and adaptive function allocation should take place. Human factors experts in the area have suggested a number of measures including the use of psychophysiology. This NASA Technical Paper reports on three experiments that examined the psychophysiological measures of event-related potentials, electroencephalogram, and heart-rate variability for real-time adaptive automation. The results of the experiments confirm the efficacy of these measures for use in both a developmental and operational role for adaptive automation design. The implications of these results and future directions for psychophysiology and human-centered automation design are discussed.

  13. The Automated Instrumentation and Monitoring System (AIMS): Design and Architecture. 3.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jerry C.; Schmidt, Melisa; Schulbach, Cathy; Bailey, David (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Whether a researcher is designing the 'next parallel programming paradigm', another 'scalable multiprocessor' or investigating resource allocation algorithms for multiprocessors, a facility that enables parallel program execution to be captured and displayed is invaluable. Careful analysis of such information can help computer and software architects to capture, and therefore, exploit behavioral variations among/within various parallel programs to take advantage of specific hardware characteristics. A software tool-set that facilitates performance evaluation of parallel applications on multiprocessors has been put together at NASA Ames Research Center under the sponsorship of NASA's High Performance Computing and Communications Program over the past five years. The Automated Instrumentation and Monitoring Systematic has three major software components: a source code instrumentor which automatically inserts active event recorders into program source code before compilation; a run-time performance monitoring library which collects performance data; and a visualization tool-set which reconstructs program execution based on the data collected. Besides being used as a prototype for developing new techniques for instrumenting, monitoring and presenting parallel program execution, AIMS is also being incorporated into the run-time environments of various hardware testbeds to evaluate their impact on user productivity. Currently, the execution of FORTRAN and C programs on the Intel Paragon and PALM workstations can be automatically instrumented and monitored. Performance data thus collected can be displayed graphically on various workstations. The process of performance tuning with AIMS will be illustrated using various NAB Parallel Benchmarks. This report includes a description of the internal architecture of AIMS and a listing of the source code.

  14. Automated Methods to Extract Patient New Information from Clinical Notes in Electronic Health Record Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The widespread adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) has resulted in rapid text proliferation within clinical care. Clinicians' use of copying and pasting functions in EHR systems further compounds this by creating a large amount of redundant clinical information in clinical documents. A mixture of redundant information (especially outdated…

  15. Office automation.

    PubMed

    Arenson, R L

    1986-03-01

    By now, the term "office automation" should have more meaning for those readers who are not intimately familiar with the subject. Not all of the preceding material pertains to every department or practice, but certainly, word processing and simple telephone management are key items. The size and complexity of the organization will dictate the usefulness of electronic mail and calendar management, and the individual radiologist's personal needs and habits will determine the usefulness of the home computer. Perhaps the most important ingredient for success in the office automation arena relates to the ability to integrate information from various systems in a simple and flexible manner. Unfortunately, this is perhaps the one area that most office automation systems have ignored or handled poorly. In the personal computer world, there has been much emphasis recently on integration of packages such as spreadsheet, database management, word processing, graphics, time management, and communications. This same philosophy of integration has been applied to a few office automation systems, but these are generally vendor-specific and do not allow for a mixture of foreign subsystems. During the next few years, it is likely that a few vendors will emerge as dominant in this integrated office automation field and will stress simplicity and flexibility as major components.

  16. Automated scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis for in situ quantification of gadolinium deposits in skin.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Charu; Abraham, Jerrold L

    2007-10-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) has been identified as a possible causative agent of an emerging cutaneous and systemic fibrosing disorder, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), which can cause serious disability and even death. To date, there are only two known associations with this disorder--renal insufficiency and Gd enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We developed an automated quantitative scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) method for Gd in tissue of NSF patients. Freshly cut paraffin block surfaces examined using the variable pressure mode under standardized conditions and random search of the tissue area allow in situ detection and semiquantitative morphometric (volumetric) analysis of insoluble higher atomic number features using backscattered electron imaging. We detected Gd ranging from 1 to 2270 cps/mm2 in 57 cutaneous biopsies of NSF. Gd was associated with P, Ca, and usually Na in tissue deposits. Our method reproducibly determines the elemental composition, relative concentration, and spatial distribution of detected features within the tissue. However, we cannot detect features below our spatial resolution, nor concentrations below the detection limit of our SEM/EDS system. The findings confirm transmetallation and release of toxic Gd ions in NSF and allow dose-response analysis at the histologic level.

  17. A Closed-Loop Proportional-Integral (PI) Control Software for Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    REN, GANG; LIU, JINXIN; LI, HONGCHANG; CHEN, XUEFENG

    2016-06-23

    A closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control software is provided for fully mechanically controlled automated electron microscopic tomography. The software is developed based on Gatan DigitalMicrograph�, and is compatible with Zeiss LIBRA� 120 transmission electron microscope. However, it can be expanded to other TEM instrument with modification. The software consists of a graphical user interface, a digital PI controller, an image analyzing unit, and other drive units (i.e.: image acquire unit and goniometer drive unit). During a tomography data collection process, the image analyzing unit analyzes both the accumulated shift and defocus value of the latest acquired image, and provides the results to the digital PI controller. The digital PI control compares the results with the preset values and determines the optimum adjustments of the goniometer. The goniometer drive unit adjusts the spatial position of the specimen according to the instructions given by the digital PI controller for the next tilt angle and image acquisition. The goniometer drive unit achieves high precision positioning by using a backlash elimination method. The major benefits of the software are: 1) the goniometer drive unit keeps pre-aligned/optimized beam conditions unchanged and achieves position tracking solely through mechanical control; 2) the image analyzing unit relies on only historical data and therefore does not require additional images/exposures; 3) the PI controller enables the system to dynamically track the imaging target with extremely low system error.

  18. Mechanical Designs for Inorganic Stretchable Circuits in Soft Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuodao; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical concepts and designs in inorganic circuits for different levels of stretchability are reviewed in this paper, through discussions of the underlying mechanics and material theories, fabrication procedures for the constituent microscale/nanoscale devices, and experimental characterization. All of the designs reported here adopt heterogeneous structures of rigid and brittle inorganic materials on soft and elastic elastomeric substrates, with mechanical design layouts that isolate large deformations to the elastomer, thereby avoiding potentially destructive plastic strains in the brittle materials. The overall stiffnesses of the electronics, their stretchability, and curvilinear shapes can be designed to match the mechanical properties of biological tissues. The result is a class of soft stretchable electronic systems that are compatible with traditional high-performance inorganic semiconductor technologies. These systems afford promising options for applications in portable biomedical and health-monitoring devices. Mechanics theories and modeling play a key role in understanding the underlining physics and optimization of these systems. PMID:27668126

  19. Advanced Air Traffic Management Research (Human Factors and Automation): NASA Research Initiatives in Human-Centered Automation Design in Airspace Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corker, Kevin M.; Condon, Gregory W. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    NASA has initiated a significant thrust of research and development focused on providing the flight crew and air traffic managers automation aids to increase capacity in en route and terminal area operations through the use of flexible, more fuel-efficient routing, while improving the level of safety in commercial carrier operations. In that system development, definition of cognitive requirements for integrated multi-operator dynamic aiding systems is fundamental. The core processes of control and the distribution of decision making in that control are undergoing extensive analysis. From our perspective, the human operators and the procedures by which they interact are the fundamental determinants of the safe, efficient, and flexible operation of the system. In that perspective, we have begun to explore what our experience has taught will be the most challenging aspects of designing and integrating human-centered automation in the advanced system. We have performed a full mission simulation looking at the role shift to self-separation on board the aircraft with the rules of the air guiding behavior and the provision of a cockpit display of traffic information and an on-board traffic alert system that seamlessly integrates into the TCAS operations. We have performed and initial investigation of the operational impact of "Dynamic Density" metrics on controller relinquishing and reestablishing full separation authority. (We follow the assumption that responsibility at all times resides with the controller.) This presentation will describe those efforts as well as describe the process by which we will guide the development of error tolerant systems that are sensitive to shifts in operator work load levels and dynamic shifts in the operating point of air traffic management.

  20. Designing an Electronic Educational Game to Facilitate Immersion and Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Yuxin; Williams, Doug; Prejean, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Advocates of electronic educational games often cite the work on motivation to support the use of games in education. However, motivation alone is inadequate to facilitate learning. Many of the educational games that focused their game design solely on the motivational effect failed to be either educational or entertaining. Theory and research is…

  1. Automation of a primer design and evaluation pipeline for subsequent sequencing of the coding regions of all human Refseq genes

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Daniel; Love, Donald R

    2012-01-01

    Screening for mutations in human disease-causing genes in a molecular diagnostic environment demands simplicity with a view to allowing high throughput approaches. In order to advance these requirements, we have developed and applied a primer design program, termed BatchPD, to achieve the PCR amplification of coding exons of all known human Refseq genes. Primer design, in silico PCR checks and formatted primer information for subsequent web-based interrogation are queried from existing online tools. BatchPD acts as an intermediate to automate queries and results processing and provides exon-specific information that is summarised in a spreadsheet format. PMID:22570517

  2. Design and Prototype of an Automated Column-Switching HPLC System for Radiometabolite Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vasdev, Neil; Collier, Thomas Lee

    2016-01-01

    Column-switching high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is extensively used for the critical analysis of radiolabeled ligands and their metabolites in plasma. However, the lack of streamlined apparatus and consequently varying protocols remain as a challenge among positron emission tomography laboratories. We report here the prototype apparatus and implementation of a fully automated and simplified column-switching procedure to allow for the easy and automated determination of radioligands and their metabolites in up to 5 mL of plasma. The system has been used with conventional UV and coincidence radiation detectors, as well as with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. PMID:27548189

  3. Design and Prototype of an Automated Column-Switching HPLC System for Radiometabolite Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vasdev, Neil; Collier, Thomas Lee

    2016-08-17

    Column-switching high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is extensively used for the critical analysis of radiolabeled ligands and their metabolites in plasma. However, the lack of streamlined apparatus and consequently varying protocols remain as a challenge among positron emission tomography laboratories. We report here the prototype apparatus and implementation of a fully automated and simplified column-switching procedure to allow for the easy and automated determination of radioligands and their metabolites in up to 5 mL of plasma. The system has been used with conventional UV and coincidence radiation detectors, as well as with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer.

  4. Designing the Electronic Classroom: Applying Learning Theory and Ergonomic Design Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmons, Mark; Wilkinson, Frances C.

    2001-01-01

    Applies learning theory and ergonomic principles to the design of effective learning environments for library instruction. Discusses features of electronic classroom ergonomics, including the ergonomics of physical space, environmental factors, and workstations; and includes classroom layouts. (Author/LRW)

  5. Design, Development, and Testing of Software for Automation of a Naval Tactical Aviation Squadron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Management System (SIMS) is flexible, supportable, and transportable. The SIMS will help slay the paper dragon in the TACAIR community, letting the pilots...automate the Operations department of an A-7 or F/A-18 squadron. Subsequent additions may extend to other departments. The Squadron Information

  6. Design of an Automated Essay Grading (AEG) System in Indian Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Siddhartha; Fatima, Sameen S.

    2007-01-01

    Automated essay grading or scoring systems are no more a myth, but they are a reality. As of today, the human written (not hand written) essays are corrected not only by examiners/teachers but also by machines. The TOEFL exam is one of the best examples of this application. The students' essays are evaluated both by human and web based automated…

  7. Automated identification of patients with a diagnosis of binge eating disorder from narrative electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Bellows, Brandon K; LaFleur, Joanne; Kamauu, Aaron W C; Ginter, Thomas; Forbush, Tyler B; Agbor, Stephen; Supina, Dylan; Hodgkins, Paul; DuVall, Scott L

    2014-02-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) does not have an International Classification of Diseases, 9th or 10th edition code, but is included under 'eating disorder not otherwise specified' (EDNOS). This historical cohort study identified patients with clinician-diagnosed BED from electronic health records (EHR) in the Department of Veterans Affairs between 2000 and 2011 using natural language processing (NLP) and compared their characteristics to patients identified by EDNOS diagnosis codes. NLP identified 1487 BED patients with classification accuracy of 91.8% and sensitivity of 96.2% compared to human review. After applying study inclusion criteria, 525 patients had NLP-identified BED only, 1354 had EDNOS only, and 68 had both BED and EDNOS. Patient characteristics were similar between the groups. This is the first study to use NLP as a method to identify BED patients from EHR data and will allow further epidemiological study of patients with BED in systems with adequate clinical notes.

  8. Automated identification of patients with a diagnosis of binge eating disorder from narrative electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Bellows, Brandon K; LaFleur, Joanne; Kamauu, Aaron W C; Ginter, Thomas; Forbush, Tyler B; Agbor, Stephen; Supina, Dylan; Hodgkins, Paul; DuVall, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) does not have an International Classification of Diseases, 9th or 10th edition code, but is included under ‘eating disorder not otherwise specified’ (EDNOS). This historical cohort study identified patients with clinician-diagnosed BED from electronic health records (EHR) in the Department of Veterans Affairs between 2000 and 2011 using natural language processing (NLP) and compared their characteristics to patients identified by EDNOS diagnosis codes. NLP identified 1487 BED patients with classification accuracy of 91.8% and sensitivity of 96.2% compared to human review. After applying study inclusion criteria, 525 patients had NLP-identified BED only, 1354 had EDNOS only, and 68 had both BED and EDNOS. Patient characteristics were similar between the groups. This is the first study to use NLP as a method to identify BED patients from EHR data and will allow further epidemiological study of patients with BED in systems with adequate clinical notes. PMID:24201026

  9. Electronic and software systems of an automated portable static mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichagov, Yu. V.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Lebedev, D. S.; Kogan, V. T.; Tubol'tsev, Yu. V.; Kozlenok, A. V.; Moroshkin, V. S.; Berezina, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The electronic systems of a small high-sensitivity static mass spectrometer and software and hardware tools, which allow one to determine trace concentrations of gases and volatile compounds in air and water samples in real time, have been characterized. These systems and tools have been used to set up the device, control the process of measurement, synchronize this process with accompanying measurements, maintain reliable operation of the device, process the obtained results automatically, and visualize and store them. The developed software and hardware tools allow one to conduct continuous measurements for up to 100 h and provide an opportunity for personnel with no special training to perform maintenance on the device. The test results showed that mobile mass spectrometers for geophysical and medical research, which were fitted with these systems, had a determination limit for target compounds as low as several ppb(m) and a mass resolving power (depending on the current task) as high as 250.

  10. Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy: An Investigation On Fast Beam Models and Radiation-Tolerant Solutions For Automated Motion Control Of A Few Leaf Electron Collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaconstadopoulos, Paul

    The purpose of this study was to address two specific issues related with the clinical application of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy (MERT). The first was to investigate radiation-tolerant solutions for automated motion control of a Few Leaf Electron Collimator. Secondly, we implemented a fast, Monte Carlo-based, parameterized beam model for characterization of the electron beam in modulated deliveries. Two approaches were investigated for the implementation of a radiation-tolerant position feedback system: (i) the use of CMOS-based optical encoders protected by a prototype shield and (ii) the use of an analog device, such as a potentiometer, whose radiation tolerance is significantly higher. The two approaches were implemented and their performance tested. Results indicated that the optical encoders could not be safely used under radiation even with the presence of a shield. The analog position feedback system showed to be a viable solution. Future work will be focused towards the direction of implementing an analog position feedback system suitable for clinical use. The MC-based, parameterized beam model is based on the idea of deriving the scattered electron beam characteristics directly on the exit plane of the linear accelerator by the use of source scatter fluence kernels. Primary beam characteristics are derived by fast Monte Carlo simulations. The novelty of the method is that arbitrary rectangular fields can be recreated fast by superposition of the appropriate source kernels directly on the output plane. Depth, profile dose distributions and dose output, were derived for three field sizes (8 x 8, 2 x 2 and 2 x 8 cm 2) and energies of 6 MeV and 20 MeV electron beams by the beam model and compared with full Monte Carlo simulations. The primary beam showed excellent agreement in all cases. Scattered particles agreed well for the larger field sizes of 8 x 8 and 2 x 8 cm2, while discrepancies were encountered for scattered particles for the smaller field

  11. Automated Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Electron Transfer Dissociation High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Measured at Single-Amide Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, Rachelle R.; Chalmers, Michael J.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a well established method for the measurement of solution-phase deuterium incorporation into proteins, which can provide insight into protein conformational mobility. However, most HDX measurements are constrained to regions of the protein where pepsin proteolysis allows detection at peptide resolution. Recently, single-amide resolution deuterium incorporation has been achieved by limiting gas-phase scrambling in the mass spectrometer. This was accomplished by employing a combination of soft ionization and desolvation conditions coupled with the radical-driven fragmentation technique electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Here, a hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap XL is systematically evaluated for its utility in providing single-amide deuterium incorporation for differential HDX analysis of a nuclear receptor upon binding small molecule ligands. We are able to show that instrumental parameters can be optimized to minimize scrambling and can be incorporated into an established and fully automated HDX platform making differential single-amide HDX possible for bottom-up analysis of complex systems. We have applied this system to determine differential single amide resolution HDX data for the peroxizome proliferator activated receptor bound with two ligands of interest.

  12. Accuracy of software designed for automated localization of the inferior alveolar nerve canal on cone beam CT images

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Ali; Kashkouli, Sadegh; Soltanimehr, Elham; Ghofrani Jahromi, Mohsen; Sanaeian Pourshirazi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to design and evaluate a new method for automated localization of the inferior alveolar nerve canal on CBCT images. Methods: The proposed method is based on traversing both panoramic and cross-sectional slices. For the panoramic slices, morphological skeletonization is imposed, and a modified Hough transform is used while traversing the cross-sectional slices. A total of 40 CBCT images were randomly selected. Two experts twice located the inferior alveolar nerve canal during two examinations set 6 weeks apart. Agreement between experts was achieved, and the result of this manual technique was considered the gold standard for our study. The distances for the automated method and those determined using the gold standard method were calculated and recorded. The mean time required for the automated detection was also recorded. Results: The average mean distance error from the baseline was 0.75 ± 0.34 mm. In all, 86% of the detected points had a mean error of <1 mm compared with those determined by the manual gold standard method. Conclusions: The proposed method is far more accurate and faster than previous methods. It also provides more accuracy than human annotation within a shorter time. PMID:26652929

  13. Automated Transmission-Mode Scanning Electron Microscopy (tSEM) for Large Volume Analysis at Nanoscale Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Kuwajima, Masaaki; Mendenhall, John M.; Lindsey, Laurence F.; Harris, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    Transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM) on a field emission SEM platform was developed for efficient and cost-effective imaging of circuit-scale volumes from brain at nanoscale resolution. Image area was maximized while optimizing the resolution and dynamic range necessary for discriminating key subcellular structures, such as small axonal, dendritic and glial processes, synapses, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, vesicles, microtubules, polyribosomes, and endosomes which are critical for neuronal function. Individual image fields from the tSEM system were up to 4,295 µm2 (65.54 µm per side) at 2 nm pixel size, contrasting with image fields from a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) system, which were only 66.59 µm2 (8.160 µm per side) at the same pixel size. The tSEM produced outstanding images and had reduced distortion and drift relative to TEM. Automated stage and scan control in tSEM easily provided unattended serial section imaging and montaging. Lens and scan properties on both TEM and SEM platforms revealed no significant nonlinear distortions within a central field of ∼100 µm2 and produced near-perfect image registration across serial sections using the computational elastic alignment tool in Fiji/TrakEM2 software, and reliable geometric measurements from RECONSTRUCT™ or Fiji/TrakEM2 software. Axial resolution limits the analysis of small structures contained within a section (∼45 nm). Since this new tSEM is non-destructive, objects within a section can be explored at finer axial resolution in TEM tomography with current methods. Future development of tSEM tomography promises thinner axial resolution producing nearly isotropic voxels and should provide within-section analyses of structures without changing platforms. Brain was the test system given our interest in synaptic connectivity and plasticity; however, the new tSEM system is readily applicable to other biological systems. PMID:23555711

  14. Automated physician order recommendations and outcome predictions by data-mining electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan H; Altman, Russ B

    2014-01-01

    The meaningful use of electronic medical records (EMR) will come from effective clinical decision support (CDS) applied to physician orders, the concrete manifestation of clinical decision making. CDS development is currently limited by a top-down approach, requiring manual production and limited end-user awareness. A statistical data-mining alternative automatically extracts expertise as association statistics from structured EMR data (>5.4M data elements from >19K inpatient encounters). This powers an order recommendation system analogous to commercial systems (e.g., Amazon.com's "Customers who bought this…"). Compared to a standard benchmark, the association method improves order prediction precision from 26% to 37% (p<0.01). Introducing an inverse frequency weighted recall metric demonstrates a quantifiable improvement from 3% to 17% (p<0.01) in recommending more specifically relevant orders. The system also predicts clinical outcomes, such as 30 day mortality and 1 week ICU intervention, with ROC AUC of 0.88 and 0.78 respectively, comparable to state-of-the-art prognosis scores.

  15. Automated defect review of the wafer bevel with a defect review scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarvey, Steve; Kanezawa, Masakazu

    2009-03-01

    One of the few remaining bastions of non-regulated Integrated Circuit defectivity is the wafer bevel. Recent internal Integrated Circuit Manufacturing studies have suggested that the edge bevel may be responsible for as much as a two to three percent yield loss during a defect excursion on the manufacturing line and a one to two percent yield loss during ongoing wafer manufacturing. A new generation of defect inspection equipment has been introduced to the Research and Development, Integrated Circuit, MEM's and Si wafer manufacturing markets that has imparted the ability for the end equipment user to detect defects located on the bevel of the wafer. The inherent weakness of the current batch of wafer bevel inspection equipment is the lack of automatic discrete defect classification data into multiple, significant classification bins and the lack of discrete elemental analysis data. Root cause analysis is based on minimal discrete defect analysis as a surrogate for a statistically valid sampling of defects from the bevel. This paper provides a study of the methods employed with a Hitachi RS-5500EQEQ Defect Review Scanning Electron Microscope (DRSEM) to automatically capture high resolution/high magnification images and collect elemental analysis on a statistically valid sample of the discrete defects that were located by a bevel inspection system.

  16. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N.

    1995-12-31

    Paper presents conceptual design of free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three. FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wave-lengths ({lambda} = 0.3...20 {mu}m) and with the average output power 10 - 20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2 x 250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the. FEL oscillators, up to 20 %. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering.

  17. INTERACTION REGION DESIGN FOR THE ELECTRON-ION COLLIDER ERHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.; PARKER, B.; TEPIKIAN, S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    To facilitate the study of collisions between 10 GeV polarized electrons and 100 GeV/u heavy ions or 250 GeV polarized protons at luminosities in the 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} range (e-p case), adding a 10 GeV electron storage ring to the existing RHIC complex has been proposed. The interaction region of this electron-ion collider eRHIC has to provide the required low-beta focusing, while simultaneously accommodating the synchrotron radiation fan generated by beam separation close to the interaction point, which is particularly challenging. The latest design status of the eRHIC interaction region will be presented.

  18. The Design of a Decentralized Electronic Triage System

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Tammara; Gao, Tia; Welsh, Matt; Sharp, Jonathan H.; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Health and Disaster Aid Network (AID-N) project seeks to identify unmet needs of emergency response teams in the Washington, DC area during mass casualty incidents and conduct feasibility tests of technology-based solutions. The decentralized electronic triage and sensing system uses low power, electronic triage sensors to monitor the vital signs of patients and provide location tracking capabilities. The robust, decentralized location tracking software runs on a small, embedded system with limited memory and computational power that efficiently locates patients. A field study demonstrates the process of current emergency procedures and the design implications of the prototype. This field study, along with the hardware and software architecture of the electronic triage system, lay the foundation for a reliable, decentralized sensor deployment that will continuously extend network coverage during a mass casualty incident. PMID:17238400

  19. Collimated Photo-Electron Gun (CPEG) Development for Spaceflight Applications: Electronics Design and Preliminary Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A.; Everding, D.; Krause, L. H.

    2012-12-01

    In previous decades, active space experiments have been conducted with electron beams generate artificial aurora, trace magnetic field lines, and stimulate Very Low Frequency (VLF) emissions. A new electron source called the collimated photo-electron gun (CPEG) is presently under development for spaceflight applications. High-energy Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are used to photo-eject electrons off a target material, and these photoelectrons are then focused into a beam using electrostatic lenses. The beam electron energy is controlled by the voltage on the lenses, and the electron flux is controlled by the brightness of the LEDs. The LEDs require a narrow range of both voltage and current setpoints, and thus must be pulse-width modulated at a high frequency to control the brightness. Because the lens and target voltages must be kept at fixed ratio to ensure a laminar beam, the target is powered by a voltage-controlled current source. An Arduino is used to provide command and data handling for the electron gun and the telemetry interface with the host spacecraft. To measure the current flowing to the target, an instrumentation amplifier boosts the voltage from a current-viewing resistor and feeds this voltage to one of the analog inputs of the Arduino. The LEDs are powered using a highly-specialized integrated circuit designed for sourcing high-power LEDs: The LM3500-21. The detailed design and preliminary results of the calibration of the electronics will be presented with this paper. The CPEG is presently under consideration for numerous flight opportunities, and a prototype is scheduled for environmental and functional testing in the fourth quarter of 2012.

  20. FIJI Macro 3D ART VeSElecT: 3D Automated Reconstruction Tool for Vesicle Structures of Electron Tomograms

    PubMed Central

    Kaltdorf, Kristin Verena; Schulze, Katja; Helmprobst, Frederik; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Stigloher, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Automatic image reconstruction is critical to cope with steadily increasing data from advanced microscopy. We describe here the Fiji macro 3D ART VeSElecT which we developed to study synaptic vesicles in electron tomograms. We apply this tool to quantify vesicle properties (i) in embryonic Danio rerio 4 and 8 days past fertilization (dpf) and (ii) to compare Caenorhabditis elegans N2 neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) wild-type and its septin mutant (unc-59(e261)). We demonstrate development-specific and mutant-specific changes in synaptic vesicle pools in both models. We confirm the functionality of our macro by applying our 3D ART VeSElecT on zebrafish NMJ showing smaller vesicles in 8 dpf embryos then 4 dpf, which was validated by manual reconstruction of the vesicle pool. Furthermore, we analyze the impact of C. elegans septin mutant unc-59(e261) on vesicle pool formation and vesicle size. Automated vesicle registration and characterization was implemented in Fiji as two macros (registration and measurement). This flexible arrangement allows in particular reducing false positives by an optional manual revision step. Preprocessing and contrast enhancement work on image-stacks of 1nm/pixel in x and y direction. Semi-automated cell selection was integrated. 3D ART VeSElecT removes interfering components, detects vesicles by 3D segmentation and calculates vesicle volume and diameter (spherical approximation, inner/outer diameter). Results are collected in color using the RoiManager plugin including the possibility of manual removal of non-matching confounder vesicles. Detailed evaluation considered performance (detected vesicles) and specificity (true vesicles) as well as precision and recall. We furthermore show gain in segmentation and morphological filtering compared to learning based methods and a large time gain compared to manual segmentation. 3D ART VeSElecT shows small error rates and its speed gain can be up to 68 times faster in comparison to manual annotation

  1. GeV C. W. electron microtron design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    Rising interest in the nuclear physics community in a GeV C.W. electron accelerator reflects the growing importance of high-resolution short-range nuclear physics to future advances in the field. In this report major current problems are reviewed and the details of prospective measurements which could be made with a GeV C.W. electron facility are discussed, together with their impact on an understanding of nuclear forces and the structure of nuclear matter. The microtron accelerator has been chosen as the technology to generate the electron beams required for the research discussed because of the advantages of superior beam quality, low capital and operating cost and capability of furnishing beams of several energies and intensities simultaneously. A complete technical description of the conceptual design for a 2 GeV double-sided C.W. electron microtron is presented. The accelerator can furnish three beams with independently controlled energy and intensity. The maximum current per beam is 100 ..mu..amps. Although the precise objective for maximum beam energy is still a subject of debate, the design developed in this study provides the base technology for microtron accelerators at higher energies (2 to 6 GeV) using multi-sided geometries.

  2. Design and Analysis of Megawatt Class Free Electron Laser Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    using the FEL 4-D code developed by the Physics Directed Energy (DE) Group at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS). Propagation analysis is performed...on the designs using the Atmospheric NPS Code for High Energy Laser Optical Propagation (ANCHOR), also developed by the NPS Physics DE Group, to...and super-sonic anti- ship missiles. 14. SUBJECT TERMS directed energy weapons, high energy lasers, Free Electron Laser, FEL oscillator, FEL

  3. The design of PLC circuits based on power electronics topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qi; Ouyang, Mingsan

    2011-10-01

    The paper presents a new design method and power lines communication circuit consolidates their power and data in a single bus. This method is based on power electronic topology and can export new application circuit. Our-the bus's principle are briefly introduced. Buck-by considering the circuit transmission line, the characteristics of the steady-state circuit influence and dynamic switch characteristics are analyzed. The validity of this method is verified by the experiment results.

  4. Integrating Library and Book Trade Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonk, Sharon C.

    1983-01-01

    Discussion of increased automation in the book trade and in library acquisitions systems, which will lead to a new type of bookseller-library interface and relationship, notes electronic equipment, library requirements, book-trade response, and design of interactive systems. Thirteen references are provided. (EJS)

  5. Automated Multiple-Sample Tray Manipulation Designed and Fabricated for Atomic Oxygen Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sechkar, Edward A.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Dever, Joyce A.; Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive improvements to increase testing capacity and flexibility and to automate the in situ Reflectance Measurement System (RMS) are in progress at the Electro-Physics Branch s Atomic Oxygen (AO) beam facility of the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. These improvements will triple the system s capacity while placing a significant portion of the testing cycle under computer control for added reliability, repeatability, and ease of use.

  6. Preliminary Design and Evaluation of Portable Electronic Flight Progress Strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doble, Nathan A.; Hansman, R. John

    2002-01-01

    There has been growing interest in using electronic alternatives to the paper Flight Progress Strip (FPS) for air traffic control. However, most research has been centered on radar-based control environments, and has not considered the unique operational needs of the airport air traffic control tower. Based on an analysis of the human factors issues for control tower Decision Support Tool (DST) interfaces, a requirement has been identified for an interaction mechanism which replicates the advantages of the paper FPS (e.g., head-up operation, portability) but also enables input and output with DSTs. An approach has been developed which uses a Portable Electronic FPS that has attributes of both a paper strip and an electronic strip. The prototype flight strip system uses Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) to replace individual paper strips in addition to a central management interface which is displayed on a desktop computer. Each PDA is connected to the management interface via a wireless local area network. The Portable Electronic FPSs replicate the core functionality of paper flight strips and have additional features which provide a heads-up interface to a DST. A departure DST is used as a motivating example. The central management interface is used for aircraft scheduling and sequencing and provides an overview of airport departure operations. This paper will present the design of the Portable Electronic FPS system as well as preliminary evaluation results.

  7. Design and function of an electron mobility spectrometer with a thick gas electron multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Gloria M.; Puddu, Silvia; Waker, Anthony J.

    2016-04-01

    The design and function of an electron mobility spectrometer (EMS) including a thick gas electron multiplier (THGEM) is presented. The THGEM was designed to easily be incorporated in an existing EMS to investigate the ability to detect tritium in air using a micropattern gas detector. The THGEM and a collection plate (anode) were installed and the appropriate circuitry was designed and connected to supply the required voltages to the THGEM-EMS. An alpha source (241Am) was used to generate electron-ion pairs within the gas-filled sensitive volume of the EMS. The electrons were used to investigate the THGEM-EMS response as a function of applied voltage to the THGEM and anode. The relative gas-gain and system resolution of the THGEM-EMS were measured at various applied voltage settings. It was observed a potential difference across the THGEM of +420 V and potential difference across the induction region of +150 V for this EMS setup resulted in the minimum voltage requirements to operate with a stable gain and system resolution. Furthermore, as expected, the gain is strongly affected not only by the potential difference across the THGEM, but also by the applied voltage to the anode and resulting potential difference between the THGEM and anode.

  8. Theoretical descriptions of electron transport through single molecules: Developing design tools for molecular electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Natalie R.

    There are vast numbers of organic compounds that could be considered for use in molecular electronics. Hence there is a need for efficient and economical screening tools. Here we develop theoretical methods to describe electron transport through individual molecules, the ultimate goal of which is to establish design tools for molecular electronic devices. To successfully screen a compound for its use as a device component requires a proper representation of the quantum mechanics of electron transmission. In this work we report the development of tools for the description of electron transmission that are: Charge self-consistent, valid in the presence of a finite applied potential field and (in some cases) explicitly time-dependent. In addition, the tools can be extended to any molecular system, including biosystems, because they are free of restrictive parameterizations. Two approaches are explored: (1) correlation of substituent parameter values (sigma), (commonly found in organic chemistry textbooks) to properties associated with electron transport, (2) explicit tracking of the time evolution of the wave function of a nonstationary electron. In (1) we demonstrate that the a correlate strongly with features of the charge migration process, establishing them as useful indicators of electronic properties. In (2) we employ a time-dependent description of electron transport through molecular junctions. To date, the great majority of theoretical treatments of electron transport in molecular junctions have been of the time-independent variety. Time dependence, however, is critical to such properties as switching speeds in binary computer components and alternating current conductance, so we explored methods based on time-dependent quantum mechanics. A molecular junction is modeled as a single molecule sandwiched between two clusters of close-packed metal atoms or other donor and acceptor groups. The time dependence of electron transport is investigated by initially

  9. Sci—Thur PM: Planning and Delivery — 03: Automated delivery and quality assurance of a modulated electron radiation therapy plan

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, T; Papaconstadopoulos, P; Alexander, A; Serban, M; Devic, S; Seuntjens, J

    2014-08-15

    Modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) offers the potential to improve healthy tissue sparing through increased dose conformity. Challenges remain, however, in accurate beamlet dose calculation, plan optimization, collimation method and delivery accuracy. In this work, we investigate the accuracy and efficiency of an end-to-end MERT plan and automated-delivery workflow for the electron boost portion of a previously treated whole breast irradiation case. Dose calculations were performed using Monte Carlo methods and beam weights were determined using a research-based treatment planning system capable of inverse optimization. The plan was delivered to radiochromic film placed in a water equivalent phantom for verification, using an automated motorized tertiary collimator. The automated delivery, which covered 4 electron energies, 196 subfields and 6183 total MU was completed in 25.8 minutes, including 6.2 minutes of beam-on time with the remainder of the delivery time spent on collimator leaf motion and the automated interfacing with the accelerator in service mode. The delivery time could be reduced by 5.3 minutes with minor electron collimator modifications and the beam-on time could be reduced by and estimated factor of 2–3 through redesign of the scattering foils. Comparison of the planned and delivered film dose gave 3%/3 mm gamma pass rates of 62.1, 99.8, 97.8, 98.3, and 98.7 percent for the 9, 12, 16, 20 MeV, and combined energy deliveries respectively. Good results were also seen in the delivery verification performed with a MapCHECK 2 device. The results showed that accurate and efficient MERT delivery is possible with current technologies.

  10. Mission Design Evaluation Using Automated Planning for High Resolution Imaging of Dynamic Surface Processes from the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Russell; Donnellan, Andrea; Green, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    A challenge for any proposed mission is to demonstrate convincingly that the proposed systems will in fact deliver the science promised. Funding agencies and mission design personnel are becoming ever more skeptical of the abstractions that form the basis of the current state of the practice with respect to approximating science return. To address this, we have been using automated planning and scheduling technology to provide actual coverage campaigns that provide better predictive performance with respect to science return for a given mission design and set of mission objectives given implementation uncertainties. Specifically, we have applied an adaptation of ASPEN and SPICE to the Eagle-Eye domain that demonstrates the performance of the mission design with respect to coverage of science imaging targets that address climate change and disaster response. Eagle-Eye is an Earth-imaging telescope that has been proposed to fly aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

  11. FOLD-EM: automated fold recognition in medium- and low-resolution (4–15 Å) electron density maps

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Mitul; Morais, Marc C.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Owing to the size and complexity of large multi-component biological assemblies, the most tractable approach to determining their atomic structure is often to fit high-resolution radiographic or nuclear magnetic resonance structures of isolated components into lower resolution electron density maps of the larger assembly obtained using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). This hybrid approach to structure determination requires that an atomic resolution structure of each component, or a suitable homolog, is available. If neither is available, then the amount of structural information regarding that component is limited by the resolution of the cryo-EM map. However, even if a suitable homolog cannot be identified using sequence analysis, a search for structural homologs should still be performed because structural homology often persists throughout evolution even when sequence homology is undetectable, As macromolecules can often be described as a collection of independently folded domains, one way of searching for structural homologs would be to systematically fit representative domain structures from a protein domain database into the medium/low resolution cryo-EM map and return the best fits. Taken together, the best fitting non-overlapping structures would constitute a ‘mosaic’ backbone model of the assembly that could aid map interpretation and illuminate biological function. Result: Using the computational principles of the Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT), we have developed FOLD-EM—a computational tool that can identify folded macromolecular domains in medium to low resolution (4–15 Å) electron density maps and return a model of the constituent polypeptides in a fully automated fashion. As a by-product, FOLD-EM can also do flexible multi-domain fitting that may provide insight into conformational changes that occur in macromolecular assemblies. Availability and implementation: FOLD-EM is available at: http

  12. Design of Electron and Ion Crabbing Cavities for an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Alejandro Castilla Loeza, Geoffrey Krafft, Jean Delayen

    2012-07-01

    Beyond the 12 GeV upgrade at the Jefferson Lab a Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) has been considered. In order to achieve the desired high luminosities at the Interaction Points (IP), the use of crabbing cavities is under study. In this work, we will present to-date designs of superconducting cavities, considered for crabbing both ion and electron bunches. A discussion of properties such as peak surface fields and higher-order mode separation will be presented. Keywords: super conducting, deflecting cavity, crab cavity.

  13. Development and Design of a User Interface for a Computer Automated Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning System

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.; /Fermilab

    1999-10-08

    A user interface is created to monitor and operate the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system. The interface is networked to the system's programmable logic controller. The controller maintains automated control of the system. The user through the interface is able to see the status of the system and override or adjust the automatic control features. The interface is programmed to show digital readouts of system equipment as well as visual queues of system operational statuses. It also provides information for system design and component interaction. The interface is made easier to read by simple designs, color coordination, and graphics. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermi lab) conducts high energy particle physics research. Part of this research involves collision experiments with protons, and anti-protons. These interactions are contained within one of two massive detectors along Fermilab's largest particle accelerator the Tevatron. The D-Zero Assembly Building houses one of these detectors. At this time detector systems are being upgraded for a second experiment run, titled Run II. Unlike the previous run, systems at D-Zero must be computer automated so operators do not have to continually monitor and adjust these systems during the run. Human intervention should only be necessary for system start up and shut down, and equipment failure. Part of this upgrade includes the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system (HVAC system). The HVAC system is responsible for controlling two subsystems, the air temperatures of the D-Zero Assembly Building and associated collision hall, as well as six separate water systems used in the heating and cooling of the air and detector components. The BYAC system is automated by a programmable logic controller. In order to provide system monitoring and operator control a user interface is required. This paper will address methods and strategies used to design and implement an effective user interface

  14. Design of the large hadron electron collider interaction region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Alaniz, E.; Newton, D.; Tomás, R.; Korostelev, M.

    2015-11-01

    The large hadron electron collider (LHeC) is a proposed upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) within the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, to provide electron-nucleon collisions and explore a new regime of energy and luminosity for deep inelastic scattering. The design of an interaction region for any collider is always a challenging task given that the beams are brought into crossing with the smallest beam sizes in a region where there are tight detector constraints. In this case integrating the LHeC into the existing HL-LHC lattice, to allow simultaneous proton-proton and electron-proton collisions, increases the difficulty of the task. A nominal design was presented in the the LHeC conceptual design report in 2012 featuring an optical configuration that focuses one of the proton beams of the LHC to β*=10 cm in the LHeC interaction point to reach the desired luminosity of L =1033 cm-2 s-1 . This value is achieved with the aid of a new inner triplet of quadrupoles at a distance L*=10 m from the interaction point. However the chromatic beta beating was found intolerable regarding machine protection issues. An advanced chromatic correction scheme was required. This paper explores the feasibility of the extension of a novel optical technique called the achromatic telescopic squeezing scheme and the flexibility of the interaction region design, in order to find the optimal solution that would produce the highest luminosity while controlling the chromaticity, minimizing the synchrotron radiation power and maintaining the dynamic aperture required for stability.

  15. Maneuver Automation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uffelman, Hal; Goodson, Troy; Pellegrin, Michael; Stavert, Lynn; Burk, Thomas; Beach, David; Signorelli, Joel; Jones, Jeremy; Hahn, Yungsun; Attiyah, Ahlam; Illsley, Jeannette

    2009-01-01

    The Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) automates the process of generating commands for maneuvers to keep the spacecraft of the Cassini-Huygens mission on a predetermined prime mission trajectory. Before MAS became available, a team of approximately 10 members had to work about two weeks to design, test, and implement each maneuver in a process that involved running many maneuver-related application programs and then serially handing off data products to other parts of the team. MAS enables a three-member team to design, test, and implement a maneuver in about one-half hour after Navigation has process-tracking data. MAS accepts more than 60 parameters and 22 files as input directly from users. MAS consists of Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) scripts that link, sequence, and execute the maneuver- related application programs: "Pushing a single button" on a graphical user interface causes MAS to run navigation programs that design a maneuver; programs that create sequences of commands to execute the maneuver on the spacecraft; and a program that generates predictions about maneuver performance and generates reports and other files that enable users to quickly review and verify the maneuver design. MAS can also generate presentation materials, initiate electronic command request forms, and archive all data products for future reference.

  16. Bilateral Automated Continuous Distraction Osteogenesis in a Design Model: Proof of Principle

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Zachary S.; Tricomi, Brad J.; Faquin, William C.; Magill, John C.; Murphy, Brian A.; Kaban, Leonard B.; Troulis, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that automated, continuous, curvilinear distraction osteogenesis (DO) in a minipig model is effective when performed bilaterally, at rates up to 3mm/day, to achieve clinically relevant lengthening. A Yucatan minipig in the mixed dentition phase, underwent bilateral, continuous DO at a rate of 2 mm/day at the center of rotation; 1.0 and 3.0 mm/day at the superior and inferior regions, respectively. The distraction period was 13 days with no latency period. Vector and rate of distraction were remotely monitored without radiographs, using the device sensor. After fixation and euthanasia, the mandible and digastric muscles were harvested. The ex-vivo appearance, stability, and radiodensity of the regenerate were evaluated using a semi-quantitative scale. Percent surface area (PSA) occupied by bone, fibrous tissue, cartilage, and hematoma were calculated using histomorphometrics. The effects of DO on the digastric muscles and mandibular condyles were assessed via microscopy and degenerative changes were quantified. The animal was distracted to 21 mm and 24 mm on the right and left sides, respectively. Clinical appearance, stability, and radiodensity were scored as ‘3’ bilaterally indicating osseous union. The total PSA occupied by bone (right = 75.53±2.19%; left PSA = 73.11±2.18%) approached that of an unoperated mandible (84.67±0.86%). Digastric muscles and condyles showed negligible degenerative or abnormal histologic changes. This proof of principle study is the first report of osseous healing with no ill-effect on associated soft tissue and the mandibular condyle using bilateral, automated, continuous, curvilinear DO at rates up to 3 mm/day. The model approximates potential human application of continuous automated distraction with a semiburied device. PMID:26594967

  17. 3D-printed microfluidic automation.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Horowitz, Lisa F; Chang, Tim C; Folch, Albert

    2015-04-21

    Microfluidic automation - the automated routing, dispensing, mixing, and/or separation of fluids through microchannels - generally remains a slowly-spreading technology because device fabrication requires sophisticated facilities and the technology's use demands expert operators. Integrating microfluidic automation in devices has involved specialized multi-layering and bonding approaches. Stereolithography is an assembly-free, 3D-printing technique that is emerging as an efficient alternative for rapid prototyping of biomedical devices. Here we describe fluidic valves and pumps that can be stereolithographically printed in optically-clear, biocompatible plastic and integrated within microfluidic devices at low cost. User-friendly fluid automation devices can be printed and used by non-engineers as replacement for costly robotic pipettors or tedious manual pipetting. Engineers can manipulate the designs as digital modules into new devices of expanded functionality. Printing these devices only requires the digital file and electronic access to a printer.

  18. 3D-Printed Microfluidic Automation

    PubMed Central

    Au, Anthony K.; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Horowitz, Lisa F.; Chang, Tim C.; Folch, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic automation – the automated routing, dispensing, mixing, and/or separation of fluids through microchannels – generally remains a slowly-spreading technology because device fabrication requires sophisticated facilities and the technology’s use demands expert operators. Integrating microfluidic automation in devices has involved specialized multi-layering and bonding approaches. Stereolithography is an assembly-free, 3D-printing technique that is emerging as an efficient alternative for rapid prototyping of biomedical devices. Here we describe fluidic valves and pumps that can be stereolithographically printed in optically-clear, biocompatible plastic and integrated within microfluidic devices at low cost. User-friendly fluid automation devices can be printed and used by non-engineers as replacement for costly robotic pipettors or tedious manual pipetting. Engineers can manipulate the designs as digital modules into new devices of expanded functionality. Printing these devices only requires the digital file and electronic access to a printer. PMID:25738695

  19. Electron-proton spectrometer: Summary for critical design review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The electron-proton spectrometer (EPS) is mounted external to the Skylab module complex on the command service module. It is designed to make a 2 pi omni-directional measurement of electrons and protons which result from solar flares or enhancement of the radiation belts. The EPS data will provide accurate radiation dose information so that uncertain Relative biological effectiveness factors are eliminated by measuring the external particle spectra. Astronaut radiation safety, therefore, can be ensured, as the EPS data can be used to correct or qualify radiation dose measurements recorded by other radiation measuring instrumentation within the Skylab module complex. The EPS has the capability of measuring and extremely wide dynamic radiation dose rate range, approaching 10 to the 7th power. Simultaneously the EPS has the capability to process data from extremely high radiation fields such as might be encountered in the wake of an intense solar flare.

  20. Work and Programmable Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVore, Paul W.

    A new industrial era based on electronics and the microprocessor has arrived, an era that is being called intelligent automation. Intelligent automation, in the form of robots, replaces workers, and the new products, using microelectronic devices, require significantly less labor to produce than the goods they replace. The microprocessor thus…

  1. Design of III-Nitride Hot Electron Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Geetak

    III-Nitride based devices have made great progress over the past few decades in electronics and photonics applications. As the technology and theoretical understanding of the III-N system matures, the limitations on further development are based on very basic electronic properties of the material, one of which is electron scattering (or ballistic electron effects). This thesis explores the design space of III-N based ballistic electron transistors using novel design, growth and process techniques. The hot electron transistor (HET) is a unipolar vertical device that operates on the principle of injecting electrons over a high-energy barrier (φBE) called the emitter into an n-doped region called base and finally collecting the high energy electrons (hot electrons) over another barrier (φBC) called the collector barrier. The injected electrons traverse the base in a quasi-ballistic manner. Electrons that get scattered in the base contribute to base current. High gain in the HET is thus achieved by enabling ballistic transport of electrons in the base. In addition, low leakage across the collector barrier (I BCleak) and low base resistance (RB) are needed to achieve high performance. Because of device attributes such as vertical structure, ballistic transport and low-resistance n-type base, the HET has the potential of operating at very high frequencies. Electrical measurements of a HET structure can be used to understand high-energy electron physics and extract information like mean free path in semiconductors. The III-Nitride material system is particularly suited for HETs as it offers a wide range of DeltaEcs and polarization charges which can be engineered to obtain barriers which can inject hot-electrons and have low leakage at room temperature. In addition, polarization charges in the III-N system can be engineered to obtain a high-density and high-mobility 2DEG in the base, which can be used to reduce base resistance and allow vertical scaling. With these

  2. Automated Work Packages Prototype: Initial Design, Development, and Evaluation. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Oxstrand, Johanna Helene; Ahmad Al Rashdan; Le Blanc, Katya Lee; Bly, Aaron Douglas; Agarwal, Vivek

    2015-07-01

    The goal of the Automated Work Packages (AWP) project is to demonstrate how to enhance work quality, cost management, and nuclear safety through the use of advanced technology. The work described in this report is part of the digital architecture for a highly automated plant project of the technical program plan for advanced instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies. This report addresses the DOE Milestone M2LW-15IN0603112: Describe the outcomes of field evaluations/demonstrations of the AWP prototype system and plant surveillance and communication framework requirements at host utilities. A brief background to the need for AWP research is provided, then two human factors field evaluation studies are described. These studies focus on the user experience of conducting a task (in this case a preventive maintenance and a surveillance test) while using an AWP system. The remaining part of the report describes an II&C effort to provide real time status updates to the technician by wireless transfer of equipment indications and a dynamic user interface.

  3. Design and experimental tests of free electron laser wire scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, G. L.; Heimgartner, P.; Ischebeck, R.; Loch, C. Ozkan; Trovati, S.; Valitutti, P.; Schlott, V.; Ferianis, M.; Penco, G.

    2016-09-01

    SwissFEL is a x-rays free electron laser (FEL) driven by a 5.8 GeV linac under construction at Paul Scherrer Institut. In SwissFEL, wire scanners (WSCs) will be complementary to view-screens for emittance measurements and routinely used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam during FEL operations. The SwissFEL WSC is composed of an in-vacuum beam-probe—motorized by a stepper motor—and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire signal. The mechanical stability of the WSC in-vacuum hardware has been characterized on a test bench. In particular, the motor induced vibrations of the wire have been measured and mapped for different motor speeds. Electron-beam tests of the entire WSC setup together with different wire materials have been carried out at the 250 MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility (SITF, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH) and at FERMI (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). In particular, a comparative study of the relative measurement accuracy and the radiation-dose release of Al (99 )∶Si (1 ) and tungsten (W) wires has been carried out. On the basis of the outcome of the bench and electron-beam tests, the SwissFEL WSC can be qualified as a high resolution and machine-saving diagnostic tool in consideration of the mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level and the choice of the wire material ensuring a drastic reduction of the radiation-dose release with respect to conventional metallic wires. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and electron beam tests of the SwissFEL WSCs are presented.

  4. Design, simulation and construction of a Wire Chamber electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istemihan, Zehra

    2017-02-01

    Tracking charged particles has a wide spectrum of applications in scientific and industrial projects. The Delay Wire Chamber (DWC) is a kind of gaseous detector which is a simpler form of the Multi Wire Proportional Chamber, and was developed by the Beam Instrumentation Group at CERN. It is preferred in accelerator and particle physics experiments because of its ease of use, affordability and durability, and it also provides decent position precision. In this work, we describe the working principles of the readout electronics of a new DWC that is being designed and constructed at our laboratory. Results from the simulation of the circuit and the constructed prototype will be presented.

  5. GASICA: generic automated stress induction and control application design of an application for controlling the stress state

    PubMed Central

    van der Vijgh, Benny; Beun, Robbert J.; van Rood, Maarten; Werkhoven, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In a multitude of research and therapy paradigms it is relevant to know, and desirably to control, the stress state of a patient or participant. Examples include research paradigms in which the stress state is the dependent or independent variable, or therapy paradigms where this state indicates the boundaries of the therapy. To our knowledge, no application currently exists that focuses specifically on the automated control of the stress state while at the same time being generic enough to be used in various therapy and research purposes. Therefore, we introduce GASICA, an application aimed at the automated control of the stress state in a multitude of therapy and research paradigms. The application consists of three components: a digital stressor game, a set of measurement devices, and a feedback model. These three components form a closed loop (called a biocybernetic loop by Pope et al. (1995) and Fairclough (2009) that continuously presents an acute psychological stressor, measures several physiological responses to this stressor, and adjusts the stressor intensity based on these measurements by means of the feedback model, hereby aiming to control the stress state. In this manner GASICA presents multidimensional and ecological valid stressors, whilst continuously in control of the form and intensity of the presented stressors, aiming at the automated control of the stress state. Furthermore, the application is designed as a modular open-source application to easily implement different therapy and research tasks using a high-level programming interface and configuration file, and allows for the addition of (existing) measurement equipment, making it usable for various paradigms. PMID:25538554

  6. Collaborating with human factors when designing an electronic textbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, J.A.; Zadoks, R.I.; Attaway, S.W.

    1996-04-01

    The development of on-line engineering textbooks presents new challenges to authors to effectively integrate text and tools in an electronic environment. By incorporating human factors principles of interface design and cognitive psychology early in the design process, a team at Sandia National Laboratories was able to make the end product more usable and shorten the prototyping and editing phases. A critical issue was simultaneous development of paper and on-line versions of the textbook. In addition, interface consistency presented difficulties with distinct goals and limitations for each media. Many of these problems were resolved swiftly with human factors input using templates, style guides and iterative usability testing of both paper and on-line versions. Writing style continuity was also problematic with numerous authors contributing to the text.

  7. Dual scattering foil design for poly-energetic electron beams.

    PubMed

    Kainz, K K; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D; Hogstrom, K R

    2005-03-07

    The laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism can accelerate electrons to energies within the 6-20 MeV range desired for therapy application. However, the energy spectrum of LWFA-generated electrons is broad, on the order of tens of MeV. Using existing laser technology, the therapeutic beam might require a significant energy spread to achieve clinically acceptable dose rates. The purpose of this work was to test the assumption that a scattering foil system designed for a mono-energetic beam would be suitable for a poly-energetic beam with a significant energy spread. Dual scattering foil systems were designed for mono-energetic beams using an existing analytical formalism based on Gaussian multiple-Coulomb scattering theory. The design criterion was to create a flat beam that would be suitable for fields up to 25 x 25 cm2 at 100 cm from the primary scattering foil. Radial planar fluence profiles for poly-energetic beams with energy spreads ranging from 0.5 MeV to 6.5 MeV were calculated using two methods: (a) analytically by summing beam profiles for a range of mono-energetic beams through the scattering foil system, and (b) by Monte Carlo using the EGS/BEAM code. The analytic calculations facilitated fine adjustments to the foil design, and the Monte Carlo calculations enabled us to verify the results of the analytic calculation and to determine the phase-space characteristics of the broadened beam. Results showed that the flatness of the scattered beam is fairly insensitive to the width of the input energy spectrum. Also, results showed that dose calculated by the analytical and Monte Carlo methods agreed very well in the central portion of the beam. Outside the useable field area, the differences between the analytical and Monte Carlo results were small but significant, possibly due to the small angle approximation. However, these did not affect the conclusion that a scattering foil system designed for a mono-energetic beam will be suitable for a poly

  8. IMPACT OF CANAL DESIGN LIMITATIONS ON WATER DELIVERY OPERATIONS AND AUTOMATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation canals are often designed for water transmission. The design engineer simply ensures that the canal will pass the maximum design discharge. However, irrigation canals frequently operated far below design capacity. Because demands and the distribution of flow at bifurcations (branch points...

  9. Measurement of gamma' precipitates in a nickel-based superalloy using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy coupled with automated segmenting techniques.

    PubMed

    Tiley, J S; Viswanathan, G B; Shiveley, A; Tschopp, M; Srinivasan, R; Banerjee, R; Fraser, H L

    2010-08-01

    Precipitates of the ordered L1(2) gamma' phase (dispersed in the face-centered cubic or FCC gamma matrix) were imaged in Rene 88 DT, a commercial multicomponent Ni-based superalloy, using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM). Imaging was performed using the Cr, Co, Ni, Ti and Al elemental L-absorption edges in the energy loss spectrum. Manual and automated segmentation procedures were utilized for identification of precipitate boundaries and measurement of precipitate sizes. The automated region growing technique for precipitate identification in images was determined to measure accurately precipitate diameters. In addition, the region growing technique provided a repeatable method for optimizing segmentation techniques for varying EFTEM conditions.

  10. Electronics for the pulsed rubidium clock: design and characterization.

    PubMed

    Calosso, Claudio E; Micalizio, Salvatore; Godone, Aldo; Bertacco, Elio K; Levi, Filippo

    2007-09-01

    Pulsing the different operation phases of a vapor-cell clock (optical pumping, interrogation, and detection) has been recognized as one of the most effective techniques to reduce light shift and then to improve the stability perspectives of vapor cell clocks. However, in order to take full advantage of the pulsed scheme, a fast-gated electronics is required, the times involved being of the order of milliseconds. In this paper we describe the design and the implementation of the electronics that synchronizes the different phases of the clock operation, as well as of the electronics that is mainly devoted to the thermal stabilization of the clock physics package. We also report some characterization measurements, including a measurement of the clock frequency stability. In particular, in terms of Allan deviation, we measured a frequency stability of 1.2 x 10(-12) tao(-1/2) for averaging times up to tao = 10(5) s, a very interesting result by itself and also for a possible space application of such a clock.

  11. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  12. Design and demonstration of automated data analysis algorithms for ultrasonic inspection of complex composite panels with bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrin, John C.; Forsyth, David S.; Welter, John T.

    2016-02-01

    To address the data review burden and improve the reliability of the ultrasonic inspection of large composite structures, automated data analysis (ADA) algorithms have been developed to make calls on indications that satisfy the detection criteria and minimize false calls. The original design followed standard procedures for analyzing signals for time-of-flight indications and backwall amplitude dropout. However, certain complex panels with varying shape, ply drops and the presence of bonds can complicate this interpretation process. In this paper, enhancements to the automated data analysis algorithms are introduced to address these challenges. To estimate the thickness of the part and presence of bonds without prior information, an algorithm tracks potential backwall or bond-line signals, and evaluates a combination of spatial, amplitude, and time-of-flight metrics to identify bonded sections. Once part boundaries, thickness transitions and bonded regions are identified, feature extraction algorithms are applied to multiple sets of through-thickness and backwall C-scan images, for evaluation of both first layer through thickness and layers under bonds. ADA processing results are presented for a variety of complex test specimens with inserted materials and other test discontinuities. Lastly, enhancements to the ADA software interface are presented, which improve the software usability for final data review by the inspectors and support the certification process.

  13. Conjugated Polymer Design and Engineering for Organic Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Claire Hoi Kar

    The molecular structure of a conjugated polymer critically impacts its physical and optoelectronic properties, thus determining its ultimate performance in organic electronic devices. In this work, new polymers and derivatives are designed, synthesized, characterized, and tested in photovoltaic devices. Through device engineering and nanoscale characterization, general structure-function relationships are established to aid the design of the next-generation of high performance polymer semiconductors for organic electronic applications. Using a prototypical conjugated polymer, the influence of backbone regioregularity is examined and found to highly impact polymer crystallinity, solid state morphology and device stability. The investigation of alternative aromatic units in the backbone also led to new understandings in polymer processability and the development of promising materials for organic photovoltaics. Besides the backbone structure, the side chain choice of the polymer can significantly affect material properties and device performance as well. In fact, the side chain substitution can influence both the optoelectronic properties and the physical properties of the polymer. A sterically bulky side chain can be used to tune the donor/acceptor separation distance, which in turn determines the charge separation efficiency. The addition of a polar side group increases the dielectric constant of a polymer and improves overall charge separation. Choosing the appropriate solubilizing group can also induce solid state packing of the polymer and considerably enhance device efficiency. Finally, the influence of post-fabrication processing techniques on the crystallinity and charge transport properties of a polymer is highlighted.

  14. New design of electronic display system for spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ji-peng; Li, Jin-huan; Tang, Cheng-chang; Huang, Zhao-wei; Han, Rui; Pan, Er-ting; Dai, Wei-kun

    2016-09-01

    There are several disadvantages in existing electronic display systems for spectrometer, such as the images with noise and fuzziness, the cross hair with low sharpness and so on. In order to solve these problems, a new type of electronic display system for spectrometer is designed in this paper, connecting the spectrometer eyepiece to a CCD Camera with a Camera Link interface, and setting up a video processing system platform with a high performance FPGA. The Camera Link signals collected by the front-end system are sent into two pieces of SDRAM. The controller of SDRAM generated on the FPGA realizes data with caching and processing high speed data streams by ping-pong operation. Then the data signals are filtered by filter module generated on the FPGA and the color space of treated signals are converted. In the back-end system, signals encoded by two coder chip are separately outputted through the CVBS and the VGA interfaces. This design solves above problems of the original system.

  15. Tools for Designing, Evaluating, and Certifying NextGen Technologies and Procedures: Automation Roles and Responsibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.

    2011-01-01

    Barbara Kanki from NASA Ames Research Center will discuss research that focuses on the collaborations between pilots, air traffic controllers and dispatchers that will change in NextGen systems as automation increases and roles and responsibilities change. The approach taken by this NASA Ames team is to build a collaborative systems assessment template (CSAT) based on detailed task descriptions within each system to establish a baseline of the current operations. The collaborative content and context are delineated through the review of regulatory and advisory materials, policies, procedures and documented practices as augmented by field observations and interviews. The CSAT is developed to aid the assessment of key human factors and performance tradeoffs that result from considering different collaborative arrangements under NextGen system changes. In theory, the CSAT product may be applied to any NextGen application (such as Trajectory Based Operations) with specified ground and aircraft capabilities.

  16. Automated information extraction of key trial design elements from clinical trial publications.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, Berry; Carini, Simona; Kiritchenko, Svetlana; Martin, Joel; Sim, Ida

    2008-11-06

    Clinical trials are one of the most valuable sources of scientific evidence for improving the practice of medicine. The Trial Bank project aims to improve structured access to trial findings by including formalized trial information into a knowledge base. Manually extracting trial information from published articles is costly, but automated information extraction techniques can assist. The current study highlights a single architecture to extract a wide array of information elements from full-text publications of randomized clinical trials (RCTs). This architecture combines a text classifier with a weak regular expression matcher. We tested this two-stage architecture on 88 RCT reports from 5 leading medical journals, extracting 23 elements of key trial information such as eligibility rules, sample size, intervention, and outcome names. Results prove this to be a promising avenue to help critical appraisers, systematic reviewers, and curators quickly identify key information elements in published RCT articles.

  17. Integration of numerical analysis tools for automated numerical optimization of a transportation package design

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowski, W.R.; Eldred, M.S.; Harding, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    The use of state-of-the-art numerical analysis tools to determine the optimal design of a radioactive material (RAM) transportation container is investigated. The design of a RAM package`s components involves a complex coupling of structural, thermal, and radioactive shielding analyses. The final design must adhere to very strict design constraints. The current technique used by cask designers is uncoupled and involves designing each component separately with respect to its driving constraint. With the use of numerical optimization schemes, the complex couplings can be considered directly, and the performance of the integrated package can be maximized with respect to the analysis conditions. This can lead to more efficient package designs. Thermal and structural accident conditions are analyzed in the shape optimization of a simplified cask design. In this paper, details of the integration of numerical analysis tools, development of a process model, nonsmoothness difficulties with the optimization of the cask, and preliminary results are discussed.

  18. Evaluation of green infrastructure designs using the Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In arid and semi-arid regions, green infrastructure (GI) designs can address several issues facing urban environments, including augmenting water supply, mitigating flooding, decreasing pollutant loads, and promoting greenness in the built environment. An optimum design captures stormwater, addressi...

  19. Ultrasonic Imaging and Automated Flaw Detection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    imager sold by Searle Ultrasound. An LSI-11 microcomputer is interfaced to the imager with custom designed modules. Ultrasonic image data is loaded...phased array ultrasonic imager, an LSI-11 microcomputer , and an assortment of custom-designed electronic modules. There is also a CRT display terminal...AD CONTRACTOR REPORT ARCCB-CR-86011 ULTRASONIC IMAGING AND AUTOMATED FLAW DETECTION SYSTEM L. JONES DTIC3ZLECTE J. F. MC DONALD JUNCTE G.P

  20. Search Hanford accessible reports electronically system design description. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gilomen, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    The Search Hanford Accessible Records Electronically (SHARE) system was produced by a combined team of personnel from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Corrective Action Data Systems (CADS) and Information Resource Management (IRM) Information and Scientific Systems (ISS) organizations. The ESQD Text Evaluation and exchange Tool (ETEXT) prototype was used as a basis for the requirements used to support this design/build effort. TOPIC was used to build the SHARE application. TOPIC is a text search and retrieval software product produced by the Verity Corporation. The TOPIC source code is not provided with the product, and the programs cannot be changed. TOPIC can be customized for special requirements. The software is fully documented. Help messages, menu and screen layouts, command edits and options, and internal system design are all described in the TOPIC documentation. This System Design Description (SDD) will not reiterate the TOPIC documentation and design. Instead, it will focus on the SHARE installation of TOPIC. This SDD is designed to assist the SHARE database/infobase administrator (DBA) in maintaining and supporting the application. It assumes that the assigned DBA is knowledgeable in using the TOPIC product, and is also knowledgeable in using a personal computer (PC), Disk Operating System (DOS) commands, and the document WHC-CM-3-10. SHARE is an Impact Level 4 system, and all activities related to SHARE must conform with the WHC-CM-3-10 procedures for an Impact Level 4 system. The Alternatives Analysis will be treated as a level 3-Q document, to allow for reference by potential future projects.

  1. Demonstration of electronic design automation flow for massively parallel e-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Pieter; Belledent, Jérôme; Tranquillin, Céline; Figueiro, Thiago; Meunier, Stéfanie; Bayle, Sébastien; Fay, Aurélien; Milléquant, Matthieu; Icard, Beatrice; Wieland, Marco

    2014-07-01

    For proximity effect correction in 5 keV e-beam lithography, three elementary building blocks exist: dose modulation, geometry (size) modulation, and background dose addition. Combinations of these three methods are quantitatively compared in terms of throughput impact and process window (PW). In addition, overexposure in combination with negative bias results in PW enhancement at the cost of throughput. In proximity effect correction by over exposure (PEC-OE), the entire layout is set to fixed dose and geometry sizes are adjusted. In PEC-dose to size (DTS) both dose and geometry sizes are locally optimized. In PEC-background (BG), a background is added to correct the long-range part of the point spread function. In single e-beam tools (Gaussian or Shaped-beam), throughput heavily depends on the number of shots. In raster scan tools such as MAPPER Lithography's FLX 1200 (MATRIX platform) this is not the case and instead of pattern density, the maximum local dose on the wafer is limiting throughput. The smallest considered half-pitch is 28 nm, which may be considered the 14-nm node for Metal-1 and the 10-nm node for the Via-1 layer, achieved in a single exposure with e-beam lithography. For typical 28-nm-hp Metal-1 layouts, it was shown that dose latitudes (size of process window) of around 10% are realizable with available PEC methods. For 28-nm-hp Via-1 layouts this is even higher at 14% and up. When the layouts do not reach the highest densities (up to 10∶1 in this study), PEC-BG and PEC-OE provide the capability to trade throughput for dose latitude. At the highest densities, PEC-DTS is required for proximity correction, as this method adjusts both geometry edges and doses and will reduce the dose at the densest areas. For 28-nm-hp lines critical dimension (CD), hole&dot (CD) and line ends (edge placement error), the data path errors are typically 0.9, 1.0 and 0.7 nm (3σ) and below, respectively. There is not a clear data path performance difference between the investigated PEC methods. After the simulations, the methods were successfully validated in exposures on a MAPPER pre-alpha tool. A 28-nm half pitch Metal-1 and Via-1 layouts show good performance in resist that coincide with the simulation result. Exposures of soft-edge stitched layouts show that beam-to-beam position errors up to ±7 nm specified for FLX 1200 show no noticeable impact on CD. The research leading to these results has been performed in the frame of the industrial collaborative consortium IMAGINE.

  2. Opto-Electronic and Interconnects Hierarchical Design Automation System (OE-IDEAS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    line (v2 and i2, at 0.9 of the length – green curves). 1000 time steps corresponds to 5 ps of simulated time..................................21 Figure...beginning (red) and end ( green ...of the Wigner-based moment equation, we have composed a nonequilibrium Green function (NEGF) solver, which provides information in the dimensions of

  3. Achievements and challenges in automated parameter, shape and topology optimization for divertor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baelmans, M.; Blommaert, M.; Dekeyser, W.; Van Oevelen, T.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma edge transport codes play a key role in the design of future divertor concepts. Their long simulation times in combination with a large number of control parameters turn the design into a challenging task. In aerodynamics and structural mechanics, adjoint-based optimization techniques have proven successful to tackle similar design challenges. This paper provides an overview of achievements and remaining challenges with these techniques for complex divertor design. It is shown how these developments pave the way for fast sensitivity analysis and improved design from different perspectives.

  4. Design and construction of a medium-scale automated direct measurement respirometric system to assess aerobic biodegradation of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Aguirre, Edgar

    A medium-scale automated direct measurement respirometric (DMR) system was designed and built to assess the aerobic biodegradation of up to 30 materials in triplicate simultaneously. Likewise, a computer application was developed for rapid analysis of the data generated. The developed DMR system was able to simulate different testing conditions by varying temperature and relative humidity, which are the major exposure conditions affecting biodegradation. Two complete tests for determining the aerobic biodegradation of polymers under composting conditions were performed to show the efficacy and efficiency of both the DMR system and the DMR data analyzer. In both cases, cellulose reached 70% mineralization at 139 and 45 days. The difference in time for cellulose to reach 70% mineralization was attributed to the composition of the compost and water availability, which highly affect the biodegradation rate. Finally, among the tested materials, at least 60% of the organic carbon content of the biodegradable polymers was converted into carbon dioxide by the end of the test.

  5. An expert system for choosing the best combination of options in a general purpose program for automated design synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L.; Barthelemy, J.-F. M.

    1986-01-01

    An expert system called EXADS has been developed to aid users of the Automated Design Synthesis (ADS) general purpose optimization program. ADS has approximately 100 combinations of strategy, optimizer, and one-dimensional search options from which to choose. It is difficult for a nonexpert to make this choice. This expert system aids the user in choosing the best combination of options based on the users knowledge of the problem and the expert knowledge stored in the knowledge base. The knowledge base is divided into three categories; constrained problems, unconstrained problems, and constrained problems being treated as unconstrained problems. The inference engine and rules are written in LISP, contains about 200 rules, and executes on DEC-VAX (with Franz-LISP) and IBM PC (with IQ-LISP) computers.

  6. Automated a complex computer aided design concept generated using macros programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizal Ramly, Mohammad; Asrokin, Azharrudin; Abd Rahman, Safura; Zulkifly, Nurul Ain Md

    2013-12-01

    Changing a complex Computer Aided design profile such as car and aircraft surfaces has always been difficult and challenging. The capability of CAD software such as AutoCAD and CATIA show that a simple configuration of a CAD design can be easily modified without hassle, but it is not the case with complex design configuration. Design changes help users to test and explore various configurations of the design concept before the production of a model. The purpose of this study is to look into macros programming as parametric method of the commercial aircraft design. Macros programming is a method where the configurations of the design are done by recording a script of commands, editing the data value and adding a certain new command line to create an element of parametric design. The steps and the procedure to create a macro programming are discussed, besides looking into some difficulties during the process of creation and advantage of its usage. Generally, the advantages of macros programming as a method of parametric design are; allowing flexibility for design exploration, increasing the usability of the design solution, allowing proper contained by the model while restricting others and real time feedback changes.

  7. Design and Simulation of Electron Gun for a Multibeam Klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehra, A. K.; Gupta, R. K.; Sharma, S. M.; Panda, P. C.; Choyal, Y.; Sharma, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    This paper represents the design of multi-beam (sixty-beam) electron gun and focusing system for high power, compact klystron. The beam voltage is 4 kV with a total beam current of 513 (8.55 × 60) mA which is equally divided among sixty-beam. Each beam has a perveance of 0.033 μP making a total gun perveance of 2.02 μP corresponding to a total beam power of more than 2 kW. The cathode radius is7 mm and individual emitter radius is 0.2 mm having current density 6.7 A/cm2. The design has been accomplished using OPERA 3D code. All beamlets have individual anode as well as BFE and a common focusing system. Potential difference between cathode and anode is 4 kV. A magnetic field of 1200 Gauss is applied along the beam axis. A major challenge for the development of multi-beam klystron is design and technology for the focusing of off-axis beamlets because off-axis beams are at various azimuths.

  8. Software integration for automated stability analysis and design optimization of a bearingless rotor blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunduz, Mustafa Emre

    Many government agencies and corporations around the world have found the unique capabilities of rotorcraft indispensable. Incorporating such capabilities into rotorcraft design poses extra challenges because it is a complicated multidisciplinary process. The concept of applying several disciplines to the design and optimization processes may not be new, but it does not currently seem to be widely accepted in industry. The reason for this might be the lack of well-known tools for realizing a complete multidisciplinary design and analysis of a product. This study aims to propose a method that enables engineers in some design disciplines to perform a fairly detailed analysis and optimization of a design using commercially available software as well as codes developed at Georgia Tech. The ultimate goal is when the system is set up properly, the CAD model of the design, including all subsystems, will be automatically updated as soon as a new part or assembly is added to the design; or it will be updated when an analysis and/or an optimization is performed and the geometry needs to be modified. Designers and engineers will be involved in only checking the latest design for errors or adding/removing features. Such a design process will take dramatically less time to complete; therefore, it should reduce development time and costs. The optimization method is demonstrated on an existing helicopter rotor originally designed in the 1960's. The rotor is already an effective design with novel features. However, application of the optimization principles together with high-speed computing resulted in an even better design. The objective function to be minimized is related to the vibrations of the rotor system under gusty wind conditions. The design parameters are all continuous variables. Optimization is performed in a number of steps. First, the most crucial design variables of the objective function are identified. With these variables, Latin Hypercube Sampling method is used

  9. Automated divertor target design by adjoint shape sensitivity analysis and a one-shot method

    SciTech Connect

    Dekeyser, W.; Reiter, D.; Baelmans, M.

    2014-12-01

    As magnetic confinement fusion progresses towards the development of first reactor-scale devices, computational tokamak divertor design is a topic of high priority. Presently, edge plasma codes are used in a forward approach, where magnetic field and divertor geometry are manually adjusted to meet design requirements. Due to the complex edge plasma flows and large number of design variables, this method is computationally very demanding. On the other hand, efficient optimization-based design strategies have been developed in computational aerodynamics and fluid mechanics. Such an optimization approach to divertor target shape design is elaborated in the present paper. A general formulation of the design problems is given, and conditions characterizing the optimal designs are formulated. Using a continuous adjoint framework, design sensitivities can be computed at a cost of only two edge plasma simulations, independent of the number of design variables. Furthermore, by using a one-shot method the entire optimization problem can be solved at an equivalent cost of only a few forward simulations. The methodology is applied to target shape design for uniform power load, in simplified edge plasma geometry.

  10. Design Considerations for High Energy Electron -- Positron Storage Rings

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Richter, B.

    1966-11-01

    High energy electron-positron storage rings give a way of making a new attack on the most important problems of elementary particle physics. All of us who have worked in the storage ring field designing, building, or using storage rings know this. The importance of that part of storage ring work concerning tests of quantum electrodynamics and mu meson physics is also generally appreciated by the larger physics community. However, I do not think that most of the physicists working tin the elementary particle physics field realize the importance of the contribution that storage ring experiments can make to our understanding of the strongly interacting particles. I would therefore like to spend the next few minutes discussing the sort of things that one can do with storage rings in the strongly interacting particle field.

  11. Extensive burn injury caused by fundamental electronic cigarette design flaw

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, S.; Almarzouqi, F.; Pallua, N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Currently, electronic cigarette (EC) devices are widely used as an alternative to conventional smoking. The underlying technical principle is an electric coil-based vaporizer unit, which vaporizes various solutions for inhalation purposes with a rechargeable lithium battery unit as power source. We report a case of extensive burn injury resulting from the thermal explosion of a battery unit within an EC device. Though internal thermal instabilities of lithium ion batteries are a known safety issue, the unique feature here is a pronounced amplification of the extent of burn injury due to an additional scalding burn mechanism that resulted from heating of the liquid reservoir adjacent to the battery. Thus, we demonstrate a relevant design flaw in various EC devices, which in the authors’ opinion needs to be addressed both by manufacturers and safety regulations. PMID:28149256

  12. The User-Assisted Automated Experimental (TEST) Design Program (AED): Version II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK System Development Corporation AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS 4134 Linden Avenue Suite 305 62202F, 7184-00-09...pro- cedures and which maximize information return while minimizing the number of observations (tests) required. The overall experimental design...E. Taylor, SDC Colorado Springs, CO, for his work on the Central Composite Design, Mr. Edwin G. Meyer who developed many of the algorithms and

  13. Design of an Automated-Counting System of Cell Micronuclei in Micrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, A. V.; Márquez, J. A.; Buenfil, A. E.; Gonsebatt, M. E.

    2004-09-01

    We developed and tested a system for the automatic analysis of cell images in order to identify and count micronuclei configurations in digital images from a microscope. The presence of micronuclei has been used as an indicator of DNA damage, and a fast automated analysis may be suitable for early cancer detection, for example. We describe in this work the image-processing protocol and system comprising: acquisition, color normalization, contrast enhancement, color-background removing, color segmentation, mathematical-morphology filtering and restoration, morphometry, feature extraction and analysis, and counting. Among the morphological features used for discriminating micronuclei configurations, we tested compactness, area ratios and separation of selected features (ideally, a nucleus and one or more micronuclei). Among the mathematical-morphology techniques, we used for instance a modified watershed segmentation algorithm for separating touching features. We present our results on several images, the evaluation and performance of each step, and the main problems we solved by using several techniques from mathematical morphology and color-image processing.

  14. Design and Implementation of an Automated Illuminating, Culturing, and Sampling System for Microbial Optogenetic Applications.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cameron J; McClean, Megan N

    2017-02-19

    Optogenetic systems utilize genetically-encoded proteins that change conformation in response to specific wavelengths of light to alter cellular processes. There is a need for culturing and measuring systems that incorporate programmed illumination and stimulation of optogenetic systems. We present a protocol for building and using a continuous culturing apparatus to illuminate microbial cells with programmed doses of light, and automatically acquire and analyze images of cells in the effluent. The operation of this apparatus as a chemostat allows the growth rate and the cellular environment to be tightly controlled. The effluent of the continuous cell culture is regularly sampled and the cells are imaged by multi-channel microscopy. The culturing, sampling, imaging, and image analysis are fully automated so that dynamic responses in the fluorescence intensity and cellular morphology of cells sampled from the culture effluent are measured over multiple days without user input. We demonstrate the utility of this culturing apparatus by dynamically inducing protein production in a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered with an optogenetic system that activates transcription.

  15. Design of power electronics for TVC EMA systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, R. Mark

    1993-01-01

    The Composite Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing a class of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for use in space transportation applications such as thrust vector control (TVC) and propellant control valves (PCV). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 volts. MSFC has selected the brushless dc motor for implementation in EMA's. This report presents the results of an investigation into the applicability of two new technologies, MOS-controlled thyristors (MCT's) and pulse density modulation (PDM), to the control of brushless dc motors in EMA systems. MCT's are new power semiconductor devices, which combine the high voltage and current capabilities of conventional thyristors and the low gate drive requirements of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET's). The commanded signals in a PDM system are synthesized using a series of sinusoidal pulses instead of a series of square pulses as in a pulse width modulation (PWM) system. A resonant dc link inverter is employed to generate the sinusoidal pulses in the PDM system. This inverter permits zero-voltage switching of all semiconductors which reduces switching losses and switching stresses. The objectives of this project are to develop and validate an analytical model of the MCT device when used in high power motor control applications and to design, fabricate, and test a prototype electronic circuit employing both MCT and PDM technology for controlling a brushless dc motor.

  16. Design of power electronics for TVC EMA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelms, R. Mark

    1993-08-01

    The Composite Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing a class of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for use in space transportation applications such as thrust vector control (TVC) and propellant control valves (PCV). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 volts. MSFC has selected the brushless dc motor for implementation in EMA's. This report presents the results of an investigation into the applicability of two new technologies, MOS-controlled thyristors (MCT's) and pulse density modulation (PDM), to the control of brushless dc motors in EMA systems. MCT's are new power semiconductor devices, which combine the high voltage and current capabilities of conventional thyristors and the low gate drive requirements of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET's). The commanded signals in a PDM system are synthesized using a series of sinusoidal pulses instead of a series of square pulses as in a pulse width modulation (PWM) system. A resonant dc link inverter is employed to generate the sinusoidal pulses in the PDM system. This inverter permits zero-voltage switching of all semiconductors which reduces switching losses and switching stresses. The objectives of this project are to develop and validate an analytical model of the MCT device when used in high power motor control applications and to design, fabricate, and test a prototype electronic circuit employing both MCT and PDM technology for controlling a brushless dc motor.

  17. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  18. Design and practices for use of automated drilling and sample handling in MARTE while minimizing terrestrial and cross contamination.

    PubMed

    Miller, David P; Bonaccorsi, Rosalba; Davis, Kiel

    2008-10-01

    Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE) investigators used an automated drill and sample processing hardware to detect and categorize life-forms found in subsurface rock at Río Tinto, Spain. For the science to be successful, it was necessary for the biomass from other sources--whether from previously processed samples (cross contamination) or the terrestrial environment (forward contamination)-to be insignificant. The hardware and practices used in MARTE were designed around this problem. Here, we describe some of the design issues that were faced and classify them into problems that are unique to terrestrial tests versus problems that would also exist for a system that was flown to Mars. Assessment of the biomass at various stages in the sample handling process revealed mixed results; the instrument design seemed to minimize cross contamination, but contamination from the surrounding environment sometimes made its way onto the surface of samples. Techniques used during the MARTE Río Tinto project, such as facing the sample, appear to remove this environmental contamination without introducing significant cross contamination from previous samples.

  19. HotSpot Wizard 2.0: automated design of site-specific mutations and smart libraries in protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Sebestova, Eva; Vavra, Ondrej; Musil, Milos; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    HotSpot Wizard 2.0 is a web server for automated identification of hot spots and design of smart libraries for engineering proteins’ stability, catalytic activity, substrate specificity and enantioselectivity. The server integrates sequence, structural and evolutionary information obtained from 3 databases and 20 computational tools. Users are guided through the processes of selecting hot spots using four different protein engineering strategies and optimizing the resulting library's size by narrowing down a set of substitutions at individual randomized positions. The only required input is a query protein structure. The results of the calculations are mapped onto the protein's structure and visualized with a JSmol applet. HotSpot Wizard lists annotated residues suitable for mutagenesis and can automatically design appropriate codons for each implemented strategy. Overall, HotSpot Wizard provides comprehensive annotations of protein structures and assists protein engineers with the rational design of site-specific mutations and focused libraries. It is freely available at http://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/hotspotwizard. PMID:27174934

  20. The Design and Synthesis of Epoxy Matrix Composites Curable by Electron Beam Induced Cationic Polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crivello, James V.

    2000-01-01

    Several new series of novel, high reactivity epoxy resins are described which are designed specifically for the fabrication of high performance carbon fiber reinforced composites for commercial aircraft structural applications using cationic UV and e-beam curing. The objective of this investigation is to provide resin matrices which rapidly and efficiently cure under low e-beam doses which are suitable to high speed automated composite fabrication techniques such as automated tape and tow placement. It was further the objective of this work to provide resins with superior thermal, oxidative and atomic oxygen resistance.

  1. Investigating the intrinsic cleanliness of automated handling designed for EUV mask pod-in-pod systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brux, O.; van der Walle, P.; van der Donck, J. C. J.; Dress, P.

    2011-11-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is the most promising solution for technology nodes 16nm (hp) and below. However, several unique EUV mask challenges must be resolved for a successful launch of the technology into the market. Uncontrolled introduction of particles and/or contamination into the EUV scanner significantly increases the risk for device yield loss and potentially scanner down-time. With the absence of a pellicle to protect the surface of the EUV mask, a zero particle adder regime between final clean and the point-of-exposure is critical for the active areas of the mask. A Dual Pod concept for handling EUV masks had been proposed by the industry as means to minimize the risk of mask contamination during transport and storage. SuSS-HamaTech introduces MaskTrackPro InSync as a fully automated solution for the handling of EUV masks in and out of this Dual Pod System and therefore constitutes an interface between various tools inside the Fab. The intrinsic cleanliness of each individual handling and storage step of the inner shell (EIP) of this Dual Pod and the EUV mask inside the InSync Tool has been investigated to confirm the capability for minimizing the risk of cross-contamination. An Entegris Dual Pod EUV-1000A-A110 has been used for the qualification. The particle detection for the qualification procedure was executed with the TNO's RapidNano Particle Scanner, qualified for particle sizes down to 50nm (PSL equivalent). It has been shown that the target specification of < 2 particles @ 60nm per 25 cycles has been achieved. In case where added particles were measured, the EIP has been identified as a potential root cause for Ni particle generation. Any direct Ni-Al contact has to be avoided to mitigate the risk of material abrasion.

  2. Automated water analyser computer supported system (AWACSS) Part I: Project objectives, basic technology, immunoassay development, software design and networking.

    PubMed

    Tschmelak, Jens; Proll, Guenther; Riedt, Johannes; Kaiser, Joachim; Kraemmer, Peter; Bárzaga, Luis; Wilkinson, James S; Hua, Ping; Hole, J Patrick; Nudd, Richard; Jackson, Michael; Abuknesha, Ram; Barceló, Damià; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; de Alda, Maria J López; Sacher, Frank; Stien, Jan; Slobodník, Jaroslav; Oswald, Peter; Kozmenko, Helena; Korenková, Eva; Tóthová, Lívia; Krascsenits, Zoltan; Gauglitz, Guenter

    2005-02-15

    A novel analytical system AWACSS (automated water analyser computer-supported system) based on immunochemical technology has been developed that can measure several organic pollutants at low nanogram per litre level in a single few-minutes analysis without any prior sample pre-concentration nor pre-treatment steps. Having in mind actual needs of water-sector managers related to the implementation of the Drinking Water Directive (DWD) (98/83/EC, 1998) and Water Framework Directive WFD (2000/60/EC, 2000), drinking, ground, surface, and waste waters were major media used for the evaluation of the system performance. The instrument was equipped with remote control and surveillance facilities. The system's software allows for the internet-based networking between the measurement and control stations, global management, trend analysis, and early-warning applications. The experience of water laboratories has been utilised at the design of the instrument's hardware and software in order to make the system rugged and user-friendly. Several market surveys were conducted during the project to assess the applicability of the final system. A web-based AWACSS database was created for automated evaluation and storage of the obtained data in a format compatible with major databases of environmental organic pollutants in Europe. This first part article gives the reader an overview of the aims and scope of the AWACSS project as well as details about basic technology, immunoassays, software, and networking developed and utilised within the research project. The second part article reports on the system performance, first real sample measurements, and an international collaborative trial (inter-laboratory tests) to compare the biosensor with conventional anayltical methods.

  3. Evaluation of Green Infrastructure Designs Using the Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    In arid and semi-arid regions, green infrastructure (GI) can address several issues facing urban environments, including augmenting water supply, mitigating flooding, decreasing pollutant loads, and promoting greenness in the built environment. An optimum design captures stormwat...

  4. Green Infrastructure Design Evaluation Using the Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    In arid and semi-arid regions, green infrastructure (GI) can address several issues facing urban environments, including augmenting water supply, mitigating flooding, decreasing pollutant loads, and promoting greenness in the built environment. An optimum design captures stormwat...

  5. Studies relevant to the design of reliable automotive electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hua

    This dissertation describes three independent studies related to the design of reliable automotive electronics. The topics covered are: the estimation of the radiated emissions from power bus structures, EM propagation of tire pressure monitoring systems (TPMS), and examinations of corrosion-induced faults in a connector. The first chapter describes a method for estimating the maximum possible radiated emissions from a printed circuit board power bus. An analysis based on a lossy cavity model is performed to determine the maximum possible radiated field corresponding to a given power bus noise voltage. A closed-form expression relating the maximum power bus noise voltage to the radiation peaks is then derived. This expression is solved in reverse to determine the minimum power bus voltage necessary to generate a radiated field and can be applied to measured values of power bus noise voltage to determine whether radiation directly from the power bus is potentially the emissions source. The second chapter identifies transmission parameters from a rotating tire and the vehicle body's effect on tire sensor transmission and propagation; relates these effects to receiver antenna packaging requirements; and then, based on these results, proposes the antenna design of employing car body as a part. In the new proposed TPMS design, a 20mm x 5mm loop antenna with a 40mm x 10mm slot beneath it is added to capture the surface currents of the car body and block the current path to increase the current density around the loop antenna. The simulation results show that this design exhibits a propagation factor 150 times larger than the traditional design. The third chapter investigates the effects of different contaminants (salt, oil, grease) on the shunt resistance between pins of a cable connector. The test results show that salt-induced corrosion and moisture may cause intermittent shunting resistances capable of affecting the normal operation of automotive systems. One

  6. Automated design and optimization of flexible booster autopilots via linear programming. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, F. D.; Szollosi, G. D.; Lakin, W. S.

    1972-01-01

    COEBRA, the Computerized Optimization of Elastic Booster Autopilots, is an autopilot design program. The bulk of the design criteria is presented in the form of minimum allowed gain/phase stability margins. COEBRA has two optimization phases: (1) a phase to maximize stability margins; and (2) a phase to optimize structural bending moment load relief capability in the presence of minimum requirements on gain/phase stability margins.

  7. Enhanced Aircraft Design Capability for the Automated Structural Optimization System. Phase 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-31

    creation and evolution . The creation takes place in the GOA in the form of a finite number of designs randomly generated to form the initial population...are feasible or not. Evolution is then applied to the population to produce a new population of, hopefully, better designs. The evolution B-3 of a...chromosomal" diploid strings that are closer, in structure, to human codings than traditional GOA haploid strings. For example, the human code carries 23 pairs

  8. Design and Performance of an Automated Bioreactor for Cell Culture Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youn-Kyu; Park, Seul-Hyun; Lee, Joo-Hee; Choi, Gi-Hyuk

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a bioreactor for a cell-culture experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). The bioreactor is an experimental device for culturing mouse muscle cells in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the impact of microgravity on the muscles to address the possibility of longterm human residence in space. After investigation of previously developed bioreactors, and analysis of the requirements for microgravity cell culture experiments, a bioreactor design is herein proposed that is able to automatically culture 32 samples simultaneously. This reactor design is capable of automatic control of temperature, humidity, and culture-medium injection rate; and satisfies the interface requirements of the ISS. Since bioreactors are vulnerable to cell contamination, the medium-circulation modules were designed to be a completely replaceable, in order to reuse the bioreactor after each experiment. The bioreactor control system is designed to circulate culture media to 32 culture chambers at a maximum speed of 1 ml/min, to maintain the temperature of the reactor at 36°C, and to keep the relative humidity of the reactor above 70%. Because bubbles in the culture media negatively affect cell culture, a de-bubbler unit was provided to eliminate such bubbles. A working model of the reactor was built according to the new design, to verify its performance, and was used to perform a cell culture experiment that confirmed the feasibility of this device.

  9. Optimization and automation of the semi-submersible platforms mooring design

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, J.A. Jr.; Morooka, C.K.

    1994-12-31

    There are a few calculation programs around the world used for determining the main aspects of the Mooring Design of Semi-Submersible Platforms . These programs bold a worldwide acknowledgement and their results are actually reliable. But they require many runs to get a solution that comply with the Classification Society requirements. This paper presents some procedures in order to optimize the semi-submersible mooring design as well as to make it automatic. Regarding the optimization philosophies, the following aspects are treated: (1) the optimization of the platform heading and the mooring pattern based on the spreading of the environmental forces; (2) the searching for the optimum mooring line composition in an automatic mode. Basically, the paper`s main goal is to introduce some methods to find the lowest cost solution for the mooring system in a short time. All of these methods were computationally implemented creating the intelligent system named PROANC, which deals with the semi-submersible mooring design in a quasi-static and deterministic approach. It should be noted that the proposed system exerts a strong appeal as a design tool for feasibility studies of a given oil field and its quasi-static results can be directly applied to a mooring program capable of performing dynamic analysis. Finally some simulations are executed for different water depths and its final results, including the expended time to run, are presented in order to prove the PROANC system wide potential as a design tool.

  10. Automated procedure for design of wing structures to satisfy strength and flutter requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    A pilot computer program was developed for the design of minimum mass wing structures under flutter, strength, and minimum gage constraints. The wing structure is idealized by finite elements, and second-order piston theory aerodynamics is used in the flutter calculation. Mathematical programing methods are used for the optimization. Computation times during the design process are reduced by three techniques. First, iterative analysis methods used to reduce significantly reanalysis times. Second, the number of design variables is kept small by not using a one-to-one correspondence between finite elements and design variables. Third, a technique for using approximate second derivatives with Newton's method for the optimization is incorporated. The program output is compared witH previous published results. It is found that some flutter characteristics, such as the flutter speed, can display discontinous dependence on the design variables (which are the thicknesses of the structural elements). It is concluded that it is undesirable to use such quantities in the formulation of the flutter constraint.

  11. A Tool for the Automated Design and Evaluation of Habitat Interior Layouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Matthew A.; Wilhite, Alan W.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of space habitat design is to minimize mass and system size while providing adequate space for all necessary equipment and a functional layout that supports crew health and productivity. Unfortunately, development and evaluation of interior layouts is often ignored during conceptual design because of the subjectivity and long times required using current evaluation methods (e.g., human-in-the-loop mockup tests and in-depth CAD evaluations). Early, more objective assessment could prevent expensive design changes that may increase vehicle mass and compromise functionality. This paper describes a new interior design evaluation method to enable early, structured consideration of habitat interior layouts. This interior layout evaluation method features a comprehensive list of quantifiable habitat layout evaluation criteria, automatic methods to measure these criteria from a geometry model, and application of systems engineering tools and numerical methods to construct a multi-objective value function measuring the overall habitat layout performance. In addition to a detailed description of this method, a C++/OpenGL software tool which has been developed to implement this method is also discussed. This tool leverages geometry modeling coupled with collision detection techniques to identify favorable layouts subject to multiple constraints and objectives (e.g., minimize mass, maximize contiguous habitable volume, maximize task performance, and minimize crew safety risks). Finally, a few habitat layout evaluation examples are described to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method and tool to influence habitat design.

  12. Automated screening of 2D crystallization trials using transmission electron microscopy: a high-throughput tool-chain for sample preparation and microscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Coudray, Nicolas; Hermann, Gilles; Caujolle-Bert, Daniel; Karathanou, Argyro; Erne-Brand, Françoise; Buessler, Jean-Luc; Daum, Pamela; Plitzko, Juergen M; Chami, Mohamed; Mueller, Urs; Kihl, Hubert; Urban, Jean-Philippe; Engel, Andreas; Rémigy, Hervé-W

    2011-02-01

    We have built and extensively tested a tool-chain to prepare and screen two-dimensional crystals of membrane proteins by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at room temperature. This automated process is an extension of a new procedure described recently that allows membrane protein 2D crystallization in parallel (Iacovache et al., 2010). The system includes a gantry robot that transfers and prepares the crystalline solutions on grids suitable for TEM analysis and an entirely automated microscope that can analyze 96 grids at once without human interference. The operation of the system at the user level is solely controlled within the MATLAB environment: the commands to perform sample handling (loading/unloading in the microscope), microscope steering (magnification, focus, image acquisition, etc.) as well as automatic crystal detection have been implemented. Different types of thin samples can efficiently be screened provided that the particular detection algorithm is adapted to the specific task. Hence, operating time can be shared between multiple users. This is a major step towards the integration of transmission electron microscopy into a high throughput work-flow.

  13. Human-Automation Integration: Principle and Method for Design and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, Dorrit; Feary, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Future space missions will increasingly depend on integration of complex engineered systems with their human operators. It is important to ensure that the systems that are designed and developed do a good job of supporting the needs of the work domain. Our research investigates methods for needs analysis. We included analysis of work products (plans for regulation of the space station) as well as work processes (tasks using current software), in a case study of Attitude Determination and Control Officers (ADCO) planning work. This allows comparing how well different designs match the structure of the work to be supported. Redesigned planning software that better matches the structure of work was developed and experimentally assessed. The new prototype enabled substantially faster and more accurate performance in plan revision tasks. This success suggests the approach to needs assessment and use in design and evaluation is promising, and merits investigatation in future research.

  14. PopupCAD: a tool for automated design, fabrication, and analysis of laminate devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aukes, Daniel M.; Wood, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in laminate manufacturing techniques have driven the development of new classes of millimeter-scale sensorized medical devices, robots capable of terrestrial locomotion and sustained flight, and new techniques for sensing and actuation. Recently, the analysis of laminate micro-devices has focused more manufacturability concerns and not on mechanics. Considering the nature of such devices, we draw from existing research in composites, origami kinematics, and finite element methods in order to identify issues related to sequential assembly and self-folding prior to fabrication as well as the stiffness of composite folded systems during operation. These techniques can be useful for understanding how such devices will bend and flex under normal operating conditions, and when added to new design tools like popupCAD, will give designers another means to develop better devices throughout the design process.

  15. A Camera and Multi-Sensor Automated Station Design for Polar Physical and Biological Systems Monitoring: AMIGOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlander, J. A.; Ross, R.; Scambos, T.; Haran, T. M.; Bauer, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Automated Meteorology - Ice/Indigenous species - Geophysics Observation System (AMIGOS) consists of a set of measurement instruments and camera(s) controlled by a single-board computer with a simplified Linux operating system and an Iridium satellite modem supporting two-way communication. Primary features of the system relevant to polar operations are low power requirements, daily data uploading, reprogramming, tolerance for low temperatures, and various approaches for automatic resets and recovery from low power or cold shut-down. Instruments include a compact weather station, C/A or dual-frequency GPS, solar flux and reflectivity sensors, sonic snow gages, simplified radio-echo-sounder, and resistance thermometer string in the firn column. In the current state of development, there are two basic designs. One is intended for in situ observations of glacier conditions. The other design supports a high-resolution camera for monitoring biological or geophysical systems from short distances (100 m to 20 km). The stations have been successfully used in several locations for operational support, monitoring rapid ice changes in response to climate change or iceberg drift, and monitoring penguin colony activity. As of June, 2012, there are 9 AMIGOS systems installed, all on the Antarctic continent. The stations are a working prototype for a planned series of upgraded stations, currently termed 'Sentinels'. These stations would carry further instrumentation, communications, and processing capability to investigate ice - ocean interaction from ice tongue, ice shelf, or fjord coastline areas.

  16. Integrated Design Engineering Analysis (IDEA) Environment Automated Generation of Structured CFD Grids using Topology Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hilmi N.

    2012-01-01

    This report documents the work performed from March 2010 to March 2012. The Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA) environment is a collaborative environment based on an object-oriented, multidisciplinary, distributed framework using the Adaptive Modeling Language (AML) as a framework and supporting the configuration design and parametric CFD grid generation. This report will focus on describing the work in the area of parametric CFD grid generation using novel concepts for defining the interaction between the mesh topology and the geometry in such a way as to separate the mesh topology from the geometric topology while maintaining the link between the mesh topology and the actual geometry.

  17. RHIC electron lenses upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Bruno, D.; Binello, S.; Costanzo, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D. M.; Hock, J.; Hock, K.; Harvey, M.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Mi, C.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; Pikin, A. I.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Samms, T.; Shrey, T. C.; Schoefer, V.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; White, S. M.

    2015-05-03

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 100 GeV polarized proton run in 2015, two electron lenses were used to partially compensate for the head-on beam-beam effect for the first time. Here, we describe the design of the current electron lens, detailing the hardware modifications made after the 2014 commissioning run with heavy ions. A new electron gun with 15-mm diameter cathode is characterized. The electron beam transverse profile was measured using a YAG screen and fitted with a Gaussian distribution. During operation, the overlap of the electron and proton beams was achieved using the electron backscattering detector in conjunction with an automated orbit control program.

  18. Technology and Jobs: Computer-Aided Design. Numerical-Control Machine-Tool Operators. Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Michael; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Three reports on the effects of high technology on the nature of work include (1) Stanton on applications and implications of computer-aided design for engineers, drafters, and architects; (2) Nardone on the outlook and training of numerical-control machine tool operators; and (3) Austin and Drake on the future of clerical occupations in automated…

  19. HiVy automated translation of stateflow designs for model checking verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pingree, Paula

    2003-01-01

    tool set enables model checking of finite state machines designs. This is acheived by translating state-chart specifications into the input language of the Spin model checker. An abstract syntax of hierarchical sequential automata (HSA) is provided as an intermediate format tool set.

  20. Automated preliminary design of simplified wing structures to satisfy strength and flutter requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.; Dexter, C. B.; Stein, M.

    1972-01-01

    A simple structural model of an aircraft wing is used to show the effects of strength (stress) and flutter requirements on the design of minimum-weight aircraft-wing structures. The wing is idealized as an isotropic sandwich plate with a variable cover thickness distribution and a variable depth between covers. Plate theory is used for the structural analysis, and piston theory is used for the unsteady aerodynamics in the flutter analysis. Mathematical programming techniques are used to find the minimum-weight cover thickness distribution which satisfies flutter, strength, and minimum-gage constraints. The method of solution, some sample results, and the computer program used to obtain these results are presented. The results indicate that the cover thickness distribution obtained when designing for the strength requirement alone may be quite different from the cover thickness distribution obtained when designing for either the flutter requirement alone or for both the strength and flutter requirements concurrently. This conclusion emphasizes the need for designing for both flutter and strength from the outset.

  1. An automated system for chromosome analysis. Volume 1: Goals, system design, and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Melnyk, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a complete system to produce karyotypes and chromosome measurement data from human blood samples, and a basis for statistical analysis of quantitative chromosome measurement data is described. The prototype was assembled, tested, and evaluated on clinical material and thoroughly documented.

  2. Design and commissioning of an aberration-corrected ultrafast spin-polarized low energy electron microscope with multiple electron sources.

    PubMed

    Wan, Weishi; Yu, Lei; Zhu, Lin; Yang, Xiaodong; Wei, Zheng; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Feng, Jun; Kunze, Kai; Schaff, Oliver; Tromp, Ruud; Tang, Wen-Xin

    2016-12-27

    We describe the design and commissioning of a novel aberration-corrected low energy electron microscope (AC-LEEM). A third magnetic prism array (MPA) is added to the standard AC-LEEM with two prism arrays, allowing the incorporation of an ultrafast spin-polarized electron source alongside the standard cold field emission electron source, without degrading spatial resolution. The high degree of symmetries of the AC-LEEM are utilized while we design the electron optics of the ultrafast spin-polarized electron source, so as to minimize the deleterious effect of time broadening, while maintaining full control of electron spin. A spatial resolution of 2nm and temporal resolution of 10ps (ps) are expected in the future time resolved aberration-corrected spin-polarized LEEM (TR-AC-SPLEEM). The commissioning of the three-prism AC-LEEM has been successfully finished with the cold field emission source, with a spatial resolution below 2nm.

  3. Design of a proton-electron beam overlap monitor for the new RHIC electron lens, based on detecting energetic backscattered electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger T.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Gu, X.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Minty, M.; Miller, T.; Montag, C.; Pikin, A.

    2012-04-15

    The optimal performance of the two electron lenses that are being implemented for high intensity polarized proton operation of RHIC requires excellent collinearity of the {approx}0.3 mm RMS wide electron beams with the proton bunch trajectories over the {approx}2m interaction lengths. The main beam overlap diagnostic tool will make use of electrons backscattered in close encounters with the relativistic protons. These electrons will spiral along the electron guiding magnetic field and will be detected in a plastic scintillator located close to the electron gun. A fraction of these electrons will have energies high enough to emerge from the vacuum chamber through a thin window thus simplifying the design and operation of the detector. The intensity of the detected electrons provides a measure of the overlap between the e- and the opposing proton beams. Joint electron arrival time and energy discrimination may be used additionally to gain some longitudinal position information with a single detector per lens.

  4. EGUN: An electron optics and gun design program

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1988-10-01

    The name EGUN has become commonly associated with the program also known as the SLAC Electron Trajectory Program. This document is an updated version of SLAC-226, published in 1979. The program itself has had substantial upgrading since then, but only a few new features are of much concern to the user. Most of the improvements are internal and are intended to improve speed or accuracy. EGUN is designed to compute trajectories of charged particles in electrostatic and magnetostatic fields, including the effects of space charge and self-magnetic fields. Starting options include Child's Law conditions on cathodes of various shapes, as well as used specified initial conditions. Either rectangular or cylindrical symmetry may be used. In the new jargon, the program is a 2-1/2 dimension code meaning 2-D in all fields and 3-D in all particle motion. A Poisson's Equation Solver is used to find the electrostatic fields by using difference equations derived from the boundary conditions. Magnetic fields are to be specified externally, by the user, by using one of several methods including data from another program or arbitrary configurations of coils. This edition of the documentation also covers the program EGN87c, which is a recently developed version of EGUN designed to be used on the newer models of personal computers, small main frames, work stations, etc. The EGN87c program uses the programming language C which is very transportable so the program should operate on any system that supports C. Plotting routines for most common PC monitors are included, and the capability to make hard copy plots on dot-matrix printer-plotters is provided. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Design and Development of the SMAP Microwave Radiometer Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Medeiros, James J.; Horgan, Kevin A.; Brambora, Clifford K.; Estep, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer will measure land surface brightness temperature at L-band (1413 MHz) in the presence of radio frequency interference (RFI) for soil moisture remote sensing. The radiometer design was driven by the requirements to incorporate internal calibration, to operate synchronously with the SMAP radar, and to mitigate the deleterious effects of RFI. The system design includes a highly linear super-heterodyne microwave receiver with internal reference loads and noise sources for calibration and an innovative digital signal processor and detection system. The front-end comprises a coaxial cable-based feed network, with a pair of diplexers and a coupled noise source, and radiometer front-end (RFE) box. Internal calibration is provided by reference switches and a common noise source inside the RFE. The RF back-end (RBE) downconverts the 1413 MHz channel to an intermediate frequency (IF) of 120 MHz. The IF signals are then sampled and quantized by high-speed analog-to-digital converters in the radiometer digital electronics (RDE) box. The RBE local oscillator and RDE sampling clocks are phase-locked to a common reference to ensure coherency between the signals. The RDE performs additional filtering, sub-band channelization, cross-correlation for measuring third and fourth Stokes parameters, and detection and integration of the first four raw moments of the signals. These data are packetized and sent to the ground for calibration and further processing. Here we discuss the novel features of the radiometer hardware particularly those influenced by the need to mitigate RFI.

  6. Evaluating the Validity of an Automated Device for Asthma Monitoring for Adolescents: Correlational Design

    PubMed Central

    Belyea, Michael J; Sterling, Mark; Bocko, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptom monitoring is a cornerstone of asthma self-management. Conventional methods of symptom monitoring have fallen short in producing objective data and eliciting patients’ consistent adherence, particularly in teen patients. We have recently developed an Automated Device for Asthma Monitoring (ADAM) using a consumer mobile device as a platform to facilitate continuous and objective symptom monitoring in adolescents in vivo. Objective The objectives of the study were to evaluate the validity of the device using spirometer data, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), existing measures of asthma symptoms/control and health care utilization data, and to examine the sensitivity and specificity of the device in discriminating asthma cases from nonasthma cases. Methods A total of 84 teens (42 teens with a current asthma diagnosis; 42 without asthma) aged between 13 and 17 years participated in the study. All participants used ADAM for 7 consecutive days during which participants with asthma completed an asthma diary two times a day. ADAM recorded the frequency of coughing for 24 hours throughout the 7-day trial. Pearson correlation and multiple regression were used to examine the relationships between ADAM data and asthma control, quality of life, and health care utilization at the time of the 7-day trial and 3 months later. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was conducted to examine sensitivity and specificity based on the area under the curve (AUC) as an indicator of the device’s capacity to discriminate between asthma versus nonasthma cases. Results ADAM data (cough counts) were negatively associated with forced expiratory volume in first second of expiration (FEV1) (r=–.26, P=.05), forced vital capacity (FVC) (r=–.31, P=.02), and overall asthma control (r=–.41, P=.009) and positively associated with daily activity limitation (r=.46, P=.01), nighttime (r=.40, P=.02) and daytime symptoms (r=.38, P=.02), and health care

  7. Xenon International Automated Control

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-05

    The Xenon International Automated Control software monitors, displays status, and allows for manual operator control as well as fully automatic control of multiple commercial and PNNL designed hardware components to generate and transmit atmospheric radioxenon concentration measurements every six hours.

  8. Design and Implementation of the Automated Rendezvous Targeting Algorithms for Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DSouza, Christopher; Weeks, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Orion vehicle will be designed to perform several rendezvous missions: rendezvous with the ISS in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), rendezvous with the EDS/Altair in LEO, a contingency rendezvous with the ascent stage of the Altair in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) and a contingency rendezvous in LLO with the ascent and descent stage in the case of an aborted lunar landing. Therefore, it is not difficult to realize that each of these scenarios imposes different operational, timing, and performance constraints on the GNC system. To this end, a suite of on-board guidance and targeting algorithms have been designed to meet the requirement to perform the rendezvous independent of communications with the ground. This capability is particularly relevant for the lunar missions, some of which may occur on the far side of the moon. This paper will describe these algorithms which are designed to be structured and arranged in such a way so as to be flexible and able to safely perform a wide variety of rendezvous trajectories. The goal of the algorithms is not to merely fly one specific type of canned rendezvous profile. Conversely, it was designed from the start to be general enough such that any type of trajectory profile can be flown.(i.e. a coelliptic profile, a stable orbit rendezvous profile, and a expedited LLO rendezvous profile, etc) all using the same rendezvous suite of algorithms. Each of these profiles makes use of maneuver types which have been designed with dual goals of robustness and performance. They are designed to converge quickly under dispersed conditions and they are designed to perform many of the functions performed on the ground today. The targeting algorithms consist of a phasing maneuver (NC), an altitude adjust maneuver (NH), and plane change maneuver (NPC), a coelliptic maneuver (NSR), a Lambert targeted maneuver, and several multiple-burn targeted maneuvers which combine one of more of these algorithms. The derivation and implementation of each of these

  9. Design and implementation of the ATLAS TRT front end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcomer, Mitch; Atlas TRT Collaboration

    2006-07-01

    The ATLAS TRT subsystem is comprised of 380,000 4 mm straw tube sensors ranging in length from 30 to 80 cm. Polypropelene plastic layers between straws and a xenon-based gas mixture in the straws allow the straws to be used for both tracking and transition radiation detection. Detector-mounted electronics with data sparsification was chosen to minimize the cable plant inside the super-conducting solenoid of the ATLAS inner tracker. The "on detector" environment required a small footprint, low noise, low power and radiation-tolerant readout capable of triggering at rates up to 20 MHz with an analog signal dynamic range of >300 times the discriminator setting. For tracking, a position resolution better than 150 μm requires leading edge trigger timing with ˜1 ns precision and for transition radiation detection, a charge collection time long enough to integrate the direct and reflected signal from the unterminated straw tube is needed for position-independent energy measurement. These goals have been achieved employing two custom Application-specific integrated circuits (ASICS) and board design techniques that successfully separate analog and digital functionality while providing an integral part of the straw tube shielding.

  10. An automation of design and modelling tasks in NX Siemens environment with original software - cost module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbiciak, R.; Grabowik, C.; Janik, W.

    2015-11-01

    The design-constructional process is a creation activity which strives to fulfil, as well as it possible at the certain moment of time, all demands and needs formulated by a user taking into account social, technical and technological advances. Engineer knowledge and skills and their inborn abilities have the greatest influence on the final product quality and cost. They have also deciding influence on product technical and economic value. Taking into account above it seems to be advisable to make software tools that support an engineer in the process of manufacturing cost estimation. The Cost module is built with analytical procedures which are used for relative manufacturing cost estimation. As in the case of the Generator module the Cost module was written in object programming language C# in Visual Studio environment. During the research the following eight factors, that have the greatest influence on overall manufacturing cost, were distinguished and defined: (i) a gear wheel teeth type it is straight or helicoidal, (ii) a gear wheel design shape A, B with or without wheel hub, (iii) a gear tooth module, (iv) teeth number, (v) gear rim width, (vi) gear wheel material, (vii) heat treatment or thermochemical treatment, (viii) accuracy class. Knowledge of parameters (i) to (v) is indispensable for proper modelling of 3D gear wheels models in CAD system environment. These parameters are also processed in the Cost module. The last three parameters it is (vi) to (viii) are exclusively used in the Cost module. The estimation of manufacturing relative cost is based on indexes calculated for each particular parameter. Estimated in this way the manufacturing relative cost gives an overview of design parameters influence on the final gear wheel manufacturing cost. This relative manufacturing cost takes values from 0.00 to 1,00 range. The bigger index value the higher relative manufacturing cost is. Verification whether the proposed algorithm of relative manufacturing

  11. Automated Design of Synthetic Ribosome Binding Sites to Precisely Control Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Salis, Howard M.; Mirsky, Ethan A.; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial engineering often requires fine control over protein expression; for example, to connect genetic circuits 1-7 or control flux through a metabolic pathway 8-13. We have developed a predictive design method for synthetic ribosome binding sites that enables the rational control of a protein's production rate on a proportional scale. Experimental validation of over 100 predictions in Escherichia coli shows that the method is accurate to within a factor of 2.3 over a range of 100,000-fold. The design method also correctly predicts that reusing a ribosome binding site sequence in different genetic contexts can result in different protein expression levels. We demonstrate the method's utility by rationally optimizing a protein's expression level to connect a genetic sensor to a synthetic circuit. The proposed forward engineering approach will accelerate the construction and systematic optimization of large genetic systems. PMID:19801975

  12. Use of Automated Testing to Facilitate Affordable Design of Military Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 The Naval Testing Challenge – Infinity is a Big Place • Size and Complexity – The environment is harsh and...Use constraint solvers to synthesize test inputs for majority of cases 5 Testing is a Design Requirement 6 Level Testability Level...operational interfaces or published augmented testing interfaces 5 measurable All properties needed to check the requirements have clearly defined

  13. The ERL-based Design of Electron-Hadron Collider eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyn, Vadim

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments of the ERL-based design of future high-luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC focused on balancing technological risks present in the design versus the design cost. As a result a lower risk design has been adopted at moderate cost increase. The modifications include a change of the main linac RF frequency, reduced number of SRF cavity types and modified electron spin transport using a spin rotator. A luminosity-staged approach is being explored with a Nominal design ($L \\sim 10^{33} {\\rm cm}^2 {\\rm s}^{-1}$) that employs reduced electron current and could possibly be based on classical electron cooling, and then with the Ultimate design ($L \\gt 10^{34} {\\rm cm}^{-2} {\\rm s}^{-1}$) that uses higher electron current and an innovative cooling technique (CeC). The paper describes the recent design modifications, and presents the full status of the eRHIC ERL-based design.

  14. Aviation safety and automation technology for subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed here are aviation safety human factors and air traffic control (ATC) automation research conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center. Research results are given in the areas of flight deck and ATC automations, displays and warning systems, crew coordination, and crew fatigue and jet lag. Accident investigation and an incident reporting system that is used to guide the human factors research is discussed. A design philosophy for human-centered automation is given, along with an evaluation of automation on advanced technology transports. Intelligent error tolerant systems such as electronic checklists are discussed along with design guidelines for reducing procedure errors. The data on evaluation of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training indicates highly significant positive changes in appropriate flight deck behavior and more effective use of available resources for crew members receiving the training.

  15. Distribution automation applications of fiber optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold; Johnston, A.; Friend, H.

    1989-01-01

    Motivations for interest and research in distribution automation are discussed. The communication requirements of distribution automation are examined and shown to exceed the capabilities of power line carrier, radio, and telephone systems. A fiber optic based communication system is described that is co-located with the distribution system and that could satisfy the data rate and reliability requirements. A cost comparison shows that it could be constructed at a cost that is similar to that of a power line carrier system. The requirements for fiber optic sensors for distribution automation are discussed. The design of a data link suitable for optically-powered electronic sensing is presented. Empirical results are given. A modeling technique that was used to understand the reflections of guided light from a variety of surfaces is described. An optical position-indicator design is discussed. Systems aspects of distribution automation are discussed, in particular, the lack of interface, communications, and data standards. The economics of distribution automation are examined.

  16. Automated Design of Synthetic Cell Classifier Circuits Using a Two-Step Optimization Strategy.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Pejman; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Benenson, Yaakov

    2017-02-22

    Cell classifiers are genetic logic circuits that transduce endogenous molecular inputs into cell-type-specific responses. Designing classifiers that achieve optimal differential response between specific cell types is a hard computational problem because it involves selection of endogenous inputs and optimization of both biochemical parameters and a logic function. To address this problem, we first derive an optimal set of biochemical parameters with the largest expected differential response over a diverse set of logic circuits, and second, we use these parameters in an evolutionary algorithm to select circuit inputs and optimize the logic function. Using this approach, we design experimentally feasible microRNA-based circuits capable of perfect discrimination for several real-world cell-classification tasks. We also find that under realistic cell-to-cell variation, circuit performance is comparable to standard cross-validation performance estimates. Our approach facilitates the generation of candidate circuits for experimental testing in therapeutic settings that require precise cell targeting, such as cancer therapy.

  17. IRIS upper stage - The design and performances of electronic system for multipurpose application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Tolle, F.; Biondo, F.; Esposti, M. L.

    The onboard electronics complement of the IRIS upper stage for injection of satellites into orbit from the Shuttle is described. The approach of electronics design was to build modular structures which would allow easy reconfiguration to fulfill a variety of mission objectives. The major design criteria used in the development of the electronics payload are identified. Distinctive features of the major electronics subsystems are described. These include: an Electrical Sequencing System (ESS); Nutation Control Electronics (NCE); and a Telemetry Data Handling (TDH) equipment. Block diagrams of all the electronic systems are provided.

  18. Automated Methodologies for the Design of Flow Diagrams for Development and Maintenance Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivanand M., Handigund; Shweta, Bhat

    The Software Requirements Specification (SRS) of the organization is a text document prepared by strategic management incorporating the requirements of the organization. These requirements of ongoing business/ project development process involve the software tools, the hardware devices, the manual procedures, the application programs and the communication commands. These components are appropriately ordered for achieving the mission of the concerned process both in the project development and the ongoing business processes, in different flow diagrams viz. activity chart, workflow diagram, activity diagram, component diagram and deployment diagram. This paper proposes two generic, automatic methodologies for the design of various flow diagrams of (i) project development activities, (ii) ongoing business process. The methodologies also resolve the ensuing deadlocks in the flow diagrams and determine the critical paths for the activity chart. Though both methodologies are independent, each complements other in authenticating its correctness and completeness.

  19. Design of power electronics for TVC and EMA systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, R. Mark; Bell, J. Brett; Shepherd, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    The Component Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing a class of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for use in space transportation applications such as thrust vector control (TVC) and propellant control valves (PCV). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 volts. MSFC has selected the brushless dc motor for implementation in EMA's. A previous project performed by Auburn University examined the use of the resonant dc link (RDCL) inverter, pulse density modulation (PDM), and mos-controlled thyristors (MCT's) for speed control of a brushless dc motor. The speed of the brushless dc motor is proportional to the applied stator voltage. In a PDM system, the control system determines the number of resonant voltage pulses which must be applied to the stator to achieve a desired speed. The addition of a waveshaping circuit to the front end of a standard three-phase inverter yields a RDCL inverter; the resonant voltage pulses are produced through the action of this wave shaping circuit and the inverter. This project has focused on the implementation of a system which permits zero-voltage switching with the bus voltage clamped at the input voltage level. In the same manner as the RDCL inverter, the inverter selected for this implementation is a combination of waveshaping circuit and a standard three-phase inverter. In addition, this inverter allows a pulse-width modulated (PWM)-like control scheme instead of a PDM scheme. The operation of waveshaping circuit will be described through analysis and waveforms. Design relationships will also be presented.

  20. Design of power electronics for TVC and EMA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelms, R. Mark; Bell, J. Brett; Shepherd, Michael T.

    1994-11-01

    The Component Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing a class of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for use in space transportation applications such as thrust vector control (TVC) and propellant control valves (PCV). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 volts. MSFC has selected the brushless dc motor for implementation in EMA's. A previous project performed by Auburn University examined the use of the resonant dc link (RDCL) inverter, pulse density modulation (PDM), and mos-controlled thyristors (MCT's) for speed control of a brushless dc motor. The speed of the brushless dc motor is proportional to the applied stator voltage. In a PDM system, the control system determines the number of resonant voltage pulses which must be applied to the stator to achieve a desired speed. The addition of a waveshaping circuit to the front end of a standard three-phase inverter yields a RDCL inverter; the resonant voltage pulses are produced through the action of this wave shaping circuit and the inverter. This project has focused on the implementation of a system which permits zero-voltage switching with the bus voltage clamped at the input voltage level. In the same manner as the RDCL inverter, the inverter selected for this implementation is a combination of waveshaping circuit and a standard three-phase inverter. In addition, this inverter allows a pulse-width modulated (PWM)-like control scheme instead of a PDM scheme. The operation of waveshaping circuit will be described through analysis and waveforms. Design relationships will also be presented.

  1. Design of an Electrically Automated RF Transceiver Head Coil in MRI.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sung-Min; DelaBarre, Lance; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, John Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used nonionizing and noninvasive diagnostic instrument to produce detailed images of the human body. The radio-frequency (RF) coil is an essential part of MRI hardware as an RF front-end. RF coils transmit RF energy to the subject and receive the returning MR signal. This paper presents an MRI-compatible hardware design of the new automatic frequency tuning and impedance matching system. The system automatically corrects the detuned and mismatched condition that occurs due to loading effects caused by the variable subjects (i.e., different human heads or torsos). An eight-channel RF transceiver head coil with the automatic system has been fabricated and tested at 7 Tesla (T) MRI system. The automatic frequency tuning and impedance matching system uses digitally controlled capacitor arrays with real-time feedback control capability. The hardware design is not only compatible with current MRI scanners in all aspects but also it operates the tuning and matching function rapidly and accurately. The experimental results show that the automatic function increases return losses from 8.4 dB to 23.7 dB (maximum difference) and from 12.7 dB to 19.6 dB (minimum difference) among eight channels within 550 ms . The reflected RF power decrease from 23.1% to 1.5% (maximum difference) and from 5.3% to 1.1% (minimum difference). Therefore, these results improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in MR images with phantoms.

  2. A hybrid systems strategy for automated spacecraft tour design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Jeffrey R.

    As the number of operational spacecraft increases, autonomous operations is rapidly evolving into a critical necessity. Additionally, the capability to rapidly generate baseline trajectories greatly expands the range of options available to analysts as they explore the design space to meet mission demands. Thus, a general strategy is developed, one that is suitable for the construction of flight plans for both Earth-based and interplanetary spacecraft that encounter multiple objects, where these multiple encounters comprise a ``tour''. The proposed scheme is flexible in implementation and can readily be adjusted to a variety of mission architectures. Heuristic algorithms that autonomously generate baseline tour trajectories and, when appropriate, adjust reference solutions in the presence of rapidly changing environments are investigated. Furthermore, relative priorities for ranking the targets are explicitly accommodated during the construction of potential tour sequences. As a consequence, a priori, as well as newly acquired, knowledge concerning the target objects enhances the potential value of the ultimate encounter sequences. A variety of transfer options are incorporated, from rendezvous arcs enabled by low-thrust engines to more conventional impulsive orbit adjustments via chemical propulsion technologies. When advantageous, trajectories are optimized in terms of propellant consumption via a combination of indirect and direct methods; such a combination of available technologies is an example of hybrid optimization. Additionally, elements of hybrid systems theory, i.e., the blending of dynamical states, some discrete and some continuous, are integrated into the high-level tour generation scheme. For a preliminary investigation, this strategy is applied to mission design scenarios for a Sun-Jupiter Trojan asteroid tour as well as orbital debris removal for near-Earth applications.

  3. Design of an Electrically Automated RF Transceiver Head Coil in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sung-Min; DelaBarre, Lance; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, John Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used nonionizing and noninvasive diagnostic instrument to produce detailed images of the human body. The radio-frequency (RF) coil is an essential part of MRI hardware as an RF front-end. RF coils transmit RF energy to the subject and receive the returning MR signal. This paper presents an MRI-compatible hardware design of the new automatic frequency tuning and impedance matching system. The system automatically corrects the detuned and mismatched condition that occurs due to loading effects caused by the variable subjects (i.e., different human heads or torsos). An eight-channel RF transceiver head coil with the automatic system has been fabricated and tested at 7 Tesla (T) MRI system. The automatic frequency tuning and impedance matching system uses digitally controlled capacitor arrays with real-time feedback control capability. The hardware design is not only compatible with current MRI scanners in all aspects but also it operates the tuning and matching function rapidly and accurately. The experimental results show that the automatic function increases return losses from 8.4 dB to 23.7 dB (maximum difference) and from 12.7 dB to 19.6 dB (minimum difference) among eight channels within 550 ms. The reflected RF power decrease from 23.1 % to 1.5 % (maximum difference) and from 5.3 % to 1.1 % (minimum difference). Therefore, these results improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in MR images with phantoms. PMID:25361512

  4. New Automated and High-Throughput Quantitative Analysis of Urinary Ketones by Multifiber Exchange-Solid Phase Microextraction Coupled to Fast Gas Chromatography/Negative Chemical-Electron Ionization/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pacenti, Marco; Dugheri, Stefano; Traldi, Pietro; Degli Esposti, Filippo; Perchiazzi, Nicola; Franchi, Elena; Calamante, Massimo; Kikic, Ireneo; Alessi, Paolo; Bonacchi, Alice; Salvadori, Edoardo; Arcangeli, Giulio; Cupelli, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The present research is focused on automation, miniaturization, and system interaction with high throughput for multiple and specific Direct Immersion-Solid Phase Microextraction/Fast Gas Chromatography analysis of the urinary ketones. The specific Mass Spectrometry instrumentation, capable of supporting such the automated changeover from Negative Chemical to Electron Ionization mode, as well as the automation of the preparation procedure by new device called MultiFiber Exchange, through change of the fibers, allowed a friendly use of mass spectrometry apparatus with a number of advantages including reduced analyst time and greater reproducibility (2.01–5.32%). The detection limits for the seven ketones were less than 0.004 mg/L. For an innovative powerful meaning in high-throughput routine, the generality of the structurally informative Mass Spectrometry fragmentation patterns together with the chromatographic separation and software automation are also investigated. PMID:20628512

  5. The design and automated testing of an expert system for the differential diagnosis of acute stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Wain, R. A.; Tuhrim, S.; D'Autrechy, L.; Reggia, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and a major source of morbidity. [1] Recent studies have shown a potential use for thrombolytic agents in the treatment of ischemic stroke (IS) but these agents are contraindicated in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). A computed tomographic scan is used to distinguish between these two stroke types prior to the use of thrombolytic agents, but may not be readily obtainable. Decision making aids such as algorithms developed at Guy's Hospital and Strong Memorial Hospital have been designed in an attempt to make this distinction on clinical grounds. We have constructed computerized medical decision-making (CMD) systems based upon these algorithms and compared their performance to a system we developed with the use of National Stroke Data Bank data. Relevant medical data for each of 337 patient cases in the Mount Sinai Hospital Stroke Data Bank were presented to each of the CMD systems. In consideration of the clinical task of using thrombolytic agents, we attempted to maximize the positive predictive value (PPV) for ischemic stroke. The CMD systems based upon the Guy's Hospital and Mount Sinai algorithms produced PPV's of 95% and 94% with sensitivities of 77% and 78% respectively compared to a PPV of 93% and sensitivity of 56% with the Strong Memorial CMD system. The Mount Sinai CMD system was judged more efficacious than the Guy's Hospital system in that it required less clinical information that could be more easily obtained to arrive at similar results. PMID:1807759

  6. Alternative positron-target design for electron-positron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J. ); Nelson, W.R. )

    1991-04-01

    Current electron-positron linear colliders are limited in luminosity by the number of positrons which can be generated from targets presently used. This paper examines the possibility of using an alternate wire-target geometry for the production of positrons via an electron-induced electromagnetic cascade shower. 39 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Note: Design and development of improved indirectly heated cathode based strip electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Namita; Patil, D. S.; Dasgupta, K.; Bade, Abhijeet; Tembhare, G. U.

    2015-02-15

    An improved design of indirectly heated solid cathode based electron gun (200 kW, 45 kV, 270° bent strip type electron gun) has been presented. The solid cathode is made of thoriated tungsten, which acts as an improved source of electron at lower temperature. So, high power operation is possible without affecting structural integrity of the electron gun. The design issues are addressed based on the uniformity of temperature on the solid cathode and the single long filament based design. The design approach consists of simulation followed by extensive experimentation. In the design, the effort has been put to tailor the non-uniformity of the heat flux from the filament to the solid cathode to obtain better uniformity of temperature on the solid cathode. Trial beam experiments have been carried out and it is seen that the modified design achieves one to one correspondence of the solid cathode length and the electron beam length.

  8. Note: design and development of improved indirectly heated cathode based strip electron gun.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Namita; Bade, Abhijeet; Tembhare, G U; Patil, D S; Dasgupta, K

    2015-02-01

    An improved design of indirectly heated solid cathode based electron gun (200 kW, 45 kV, 270° bent strip type electron gun) has been presented. The solid cathode is made of thoriated tungsten, which acts as an improved source of electron at lower temperature. So, high power operation is possible without affecting structural integrity of the electron gun. The design issues are addressed based on the uniformity of temperature on the solid cathode and the single long filament based design. The design approach consists of simulation followed by extensive experimentation. In the design, the effort has been put to tailor the non-uniformity of the heat flux from the filament to the solid cathode to obtain better uniformity of temperature on the solid cathode. Trial beam experiments have been carried out and it is seen that the modified design achieves one to one correspondence of the solid cathode length and the electron beam length.

  9. Application of the microwave digestion-vacuum filtration-automated scanning electron microscopy method for diatom detection in the diagnosis of drowning.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Wang, Yuzhong; Wang, Guipeng; Ma, Yanbing; Shi, He; Wen, Jinfeng; Li, Xiangyang; Hu, Sunlin; Chen, Fei; Liu, Chao

    2015-07-01

    The cause of death for the decomposed corpses recovered from water is still a difficult issue in current forensic practice. In this article, we present two cases of bodies recovered from water with no positive findings to indicate the cause of their death. We apply both conventional acid digestion method as well as the microwave digestion-vacuum filtration-automated scanning electron microscopy method (MD-VF-Auto SEM) for diatom detection in different organs of both bodies. Our results indicate that MD-VF-Auto SEM method provide more accurate information and match further police investigation. This novel method would be a useful technique in assessing cause of death for body found in water.

  10. An ultra-lightweight design for imperceptible plastic electronics.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Reeder, Jonathan; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Kuribara, Kazunori; Tokuhara, Takeyoshi; Drack, Michael; Schwödiauer, Reinhard; Graz, Ingrid; Bauer-Gogonea, Simona; Bauer, Siegfried; Someya, Takao

    2013-07-25

    Electronic devices have advanced from their heavy, bulky origins to become smart, mobile appliances. Nevertheless, they remain rigid, which precludes their intimate integration into everyday life. Flexible, textile and stretchable electronics are emerging research areas and may yield mainstream technologies. Rollable and unbreakable backplanes with amorphous silicon field-effect transistors on steel substrates only 3 μm thick have been demonstrated. On polymer substrates, bending radii of 0.1 mm have been achieved in flexible electronic devices. Concurrently, the need for compliant electronics that can not only be flexed but also conform to three-dimensional shapes has emerged. Approaches include the transfer of ultrathin polyimide layers encapsulating silicon CMOS circuits onto pre-stretched elastomers, the use of conductive elastomers integrated with organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) on polyimide islands, and fabrication of OFETs and gold interconnects on elastic substrates to realize pressure, temperature and optical sensors. Here we present a platform that makes electronics both virtually unbreakable and imperceptible. Fabricated directly on ultrathin (1 μm) polymer foils, our electronic circuits are light (3 g m(-2)) and ultraflexible and conform to their ambient, dynamic environment. Organic transistors with an ultra-dense oxide gate dielectric a few nanometres thick formed at room temperature enable sophisticated large-area electronic foils with unprecedented mechanical and environmental stability: they withstand repeated bending to radii of 5 μm and less, can be crumpled like paper, accommodate stretching up to 230% on prestrained elastomers, and can be operated at high temperatures and in aqueous environments. Because manufacturing costs of organic electronics are potentially low, imperceptible electronic foils may be as common in the future as plastic wrap is today. Applications include matrix-addressed tactile sensor foils for health care and

  11. Design of the MEMS Piezoresistive Electronic Heart Sound Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojun; Liu, Mengran; Guo, Nan; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-11-07

    This paper proposes the electronic heart sound sensor, based on the piezoresistive principle and MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) technology. Firstly, according to the characteristics of heart sound detection, the double-beam-block microstructure has been proposed, and the theoretical analysis and finite element method (FEM) simulation have been carried out. Combined with the natural frequency response of the heart sound (20~600 Hz), its structure sizes have been determined. Secondly, the processing technology of the microstructure with the stress concentration grooves has been developed. The material and sizes of the package have been determined by the three-layer medium transmission principle. Lastly, the MEMS piezoresistive electronic heart sound sensor has been tested compared with the 3200-type electronic stethoscope from 3M (São Paulo, MN, USA). The test results show that the heart sound waveform tested by the MEMS electronic heart sound sensor are almost the same as that tested by the 3200-type electronic stethoscope. Moreover, its signal-to-noise ratio is significantly higher. Compared with the traditional stethoscope, the MEMS heart sound sensor can provide the first and second heart sounds containing more abundant information about the lesion. Compared with the 3200-type electronic stethoscope from 3M, it has better performance and lower cost.

  12. Design of the MEMS Piezoresistive Electronic Heart Sound Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guojun; Liu, Mengran; Guo, Nan; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the electronic heart sound sensor, based on the piezoresistive principle and MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) technology. Firstly, according to the characteristics of heart sound detection, the double-beam-block microstructure has been proposed, and the theoretical analysis and finite element method (FEM) simulation have been carried out. Combined with the natural frequency response of the heart sound (20~600 Hz), its structure sizes have been determined. Secondly, the processing technology of the microstructure with the stress concentration grooves has been developed. The material and sizes of the package have been determined by the three-layer medium transmission principle. Lastly, the MEMS piezoresistive electronic heart sound sensor has been tested compared with the 3200-type electronic stethoscope from 3M (São Paulo, MN, USA). The test results show that the heart sound waveform tested by the MEMS electronic heart sound sensor are almost the same as that tested by the 3200-type electronic stethoscope. Moreover, its signal-to-noise ratio is significantly higher. Compared with the traditional stethoscope, the MEMS heart sound sensor can provide the first and second heart sounds containing more abundant information about the lesion. Compared with the 3200-type electronic stethoscope from 3M, it has better performance and lower cost. PMID:27827981

  13. A Design and Development Model for Building Electronic Performance Support Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagiltay, Kursat

    This proposed study is to investigate the design and development process of electronic performance support systems (EPSSs). The primary purpose of this study is to help the EPSS designers by proposing a more effective and productive EPSS design and developmental model. By analyzing EPSS products and observing EPSS design projects, the research…

  14. Automated Pilot Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, J. L., Jr.; Haidt, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    An Automated Pilot Advisory System (APAS) was developed and operationally tested to demonstrate the concept that low cost automated systems can provide air traffic and aviation weather advisory information at high density uncontrolled airports. The system was designed to enhance the see and be seen rule of flight, and pilots who used the system preferred it over the self announcement system presently used at uncontrolled airports.

  15. Design, construction and testing of a low-cost automated 68Gallium-labeling synthesis unit for clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Pedram; Szretter, Alicia; Rushford, Laura E; Stevens, Maria; Collier, Lee; Sore, Judit; Hooker, Jacob; Mahmood, Umar

    2016-01-01

    The interest in 68Gallium labeled PET probes continues to increase around the world. Widespread use in Europe and Asia has led to great interest for use at numerous sites in the US. One barrier to entry is the cost of the automated synthesis units for relatively simple labeling procedures. We describe the construction and testing of a relatively low-cost automated 68Ga-labeling unit for human-use. We provide a guide for construction, including part lists and synthesis timelists to facilitate local implementation. Such inexpensive systems could help increase use around the globe and in the US in particular by removing one of the barriers to greater widespread availability. The developed automated synthesis unit reproducibly synthesized 68Ga-DOTATOC with average yield of 71 ± 8% and a radiochemical purity ≥ 95% in a synthesis time of 25 ± 1 minutes. Automated product yields are comparable to that of manual synthesis. We demonstrate in-house construction and use of a low-cost automated synthesis unit for labeling of DOTATOC and similar peptides with 68Gallium. PMID:27508104

  16. Design, construction and testing of a low-cost automated (68)Gallium-labeling synthesis unit for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Pedram; Szretter, Alicia; Rushford, Laura E; Stevens, Maria; Collier, Lee; Sore, Judit; Hooker, Jacob; Mahmood, Umar

    2016-01-01

    The interest in (68)Gallium labeled PET probes continues to increase around the world. Widespread use in Europe and Asia has led to great interest for use at numerous sites in the US. One barrier to entry is the cost of the automated synthesis units for relatively simple labeling procedures. We describe the construction and testing of a relatively low-cost automated (68)Ga-labeling unit for human-use. We provide a guide for construction, including part lists and synthesis timelists to facilitate local implementation. Such inexpensive systems could help increase use around the globe and in the US in particular by removing one of the barriers to greater widespread availability. The developed automated synthesis unit reproducibly synthesized (68)Ga-DOTATOC with average yield of 71 ± 8% and a radiochemical purity ≥ 95% in a synthesis time of 25 ± 1 minutes. Automated product yields are comparable to that of manual synthesis. We demonstrate in-house construction and use of a low-cost automated synthesis unit for labeling of DOTATOC and similar peptides with (68)Gallium.

  17. Self-similar and fractal design for stretchable electronics

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A.; Fan, Jonathan; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Su, Yewang; Huang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yihui

    2017-04-04

    The present invention provides electronic circuits, devices and device components including one or more stretchable components, such as stretchable electrical interconnects, electrodes and/or semiconductor components. Stretchability of some of the present systems is achieved via a materials level integration of stretchable metallic or semiconducting structures with soft, elastomeric materials in a configuration allowing for elastic deformations to occur in a repeatable and well-defined way. The stretchable device geometries and hard-soft materials integration approaches of the invention provide a combination of advance electronic function and compliant mechanics supporting a broad range of device applications including sensing, actuation, power storage and communications.

  18. Translation: Aids, Robots, and Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreyewsky, Alexander

    1981-01-01

    Examines electronic aids to translation both as ways to automate it and as an approach to solve problems resulting from shortage of qualified translators. Describes the limitations of robotic MT (Machine Translation) systems, viewing MAT (Machine-Aided Translation) as the only practical solution and the best vehicle for further automation. (MES)

  19. Designing, Constructing, and Using an Inexpensive Electronic Buret

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Tingting; Zhang, Qing; Thompson, Jonathan E.

    2015-01-01

    A syringe-based, electronic fluid dispenser is described. The device mechanically connects a syringe plunger to a linear slide potentiometer. As the syringe plunger moves, the electrical resistance between terminals of the potentiometer varies. Application and subsequent measurement of a DC voltage between the potentiometer pins is used to track…

  20. Patients’ Perspective of the Design of Provider-Patients Electronic Communication Services

    PubMed Central

    Silhavy, Petr; Silhavy, Radek; Prokopova, Zdenka

    2014-01-01

    Information Delivery is one the most important tasks in healthcare practice. This article discusses patient’s tasks and perspectives, which are then used to design a new Effective Electronic Methodology. The system design methods applicable to electronic communication in the healthcare sector are also described. The architecture and the methodology for the healthcare service portal are set out in the proposed system design. PMID:24927038