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Sample records for electronic excitation effect

  1. Electronic excitations and correlation effects in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Eguiluz, A.G.; Schoene, W.D. |

    1997-07-01

    Theoretical descriptions of the spectrum of electronic excitations in real metals have not yet reached a fully predictive, first-principles stage. In this paper the authors begin by presenting brief highlights of recent progress made in the evaluation of dynamical electronic response in metals. A comparison between calculated and measured spectra--they use the loss spectra of Al and Cs as test cases--leads them to the conclusion that, even in weakly-correlated metals, correlation effects beyond mean-field theory play an important role. Furthermore, the effects of the underlying band structure turn out to be significant. Calculations which incorporate the effects of both dynamical correlations and band structure from first principles are not yet available. As a first step towards such goal, they outline a numerical algorithm for the self-consistent solution of the Dyson equation for the one-particle Green`s function. The self-energy is evaluated within the shielded-interaction approximation of Baym and Kadanoff. Their method, which is fully conserving, is a finite-temperature scheme which determines the Green`s function and the self-energy at the Matsubara frequencies on the imaginary axis. The analytical continuation to real frequencies is performed via Pade` approximant. They present results for the homogeneous electron gas which exemplify the importance of many-body self-consistency.

  2. Electrostatic excitations in carbon nanotubes including many-electron effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shabbir A.; Ikram, Muhammad

    2016-08-01

    Electrostatic excitations in single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated taking into account both the many-electron effects of exchange and correlations and the Fermi degeneracy pressure. Quantum hydrodynamics equations for electrons and ions are employed and solved by using the Fourier transformation technique to obtain the dispersion equation relevant to the cylindrical geometry of tubules. The result shows the existence of low-frequency quantum ion-acoustic excitations exhibiting dispersion due to electron quantum effects. The electron Fermi degeneracy in the range of quantum ion-acoustic excitations turns out to be more pronounced compared to electron exchange and correlation effects. The results are explained numerically for typical systems to reveal the role of quantum degeneracy, geometrical parameters and electron exchange and correlation effects in the wave dynamics.

  3. Excited Spectator Electron Effects on Spectral Line Shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, C A

    2009-10-12

    Excited spectator electron effects on Stark broadened spectral line shapes of transitions involving tightly bound electrons are investigated. It is shown that the interference terms in the electron impact broadening are essential to describe the overlapping lines generated by these configurations (e.g.; dielectronic satellite lines). The main impact is narrower spectral features and reduced far wing intensities compared to calculations neglecting the interference terms.

  4. Different effects of electronic excitation on metals and semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Gai-Qin; Cheng, Xin-Lu; Zhang, Hong; Zhu, Zhi-Yang; Ren, Da-Hua

    2016-06-01

    We study the electronic excitation effect upon ultrafast and intense laser irradiation on the stability of target materials, using density functional perturbation theory. The target materials include metals (Li, Na, Mg, Al, K, W, Au), Bi as a semimetal, and Si as a semiconductor. We found that the electronic excitation had different effects on the two distinct materials. For metals, the electronic pressure induces an increase in the shear modulus and presents a negative effect on the phonon entropy, which increases the lattice vibration frequency and melting temperature, leading to a higher stability for the close-packed structure (Al, Au, Mg). Conversely, the electronic pressure induces a decreasing trend in all these quantities, leading to a lower degree of stability and even a structural destabilization in the case of bcc-structured metals (W, Na, K, and Li). For semimetals and semiconductors, the internal pressure induces a completely opposite behavior with respect to close-packed structure metals. This can lead to structural destabilization for semimetals and even collapse for semiconductors. Finally, a shift of the Raman and infrared active modes is revealed for semimetals and semiconductors.

  5. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Thin Film Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2011-01-31

    The effect of nanosecond pulsed laser excitation on surface diffusion during growth of Ge on Si(100) at 250 degrees C was studied. In Situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was used to measure the surface diffusion coefficient while ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to probe the structure and morphology of the grown quantum dots. The results show that laser excitation of the substrate increases the surface diffusion during growth of Ge on Si(100), changes the growth morphology, improves crystalline structure of the grown quantum dots, and decreases their size distribution. A purely electronic mechanism of enhanced surface diffusion of the deposited Ge is proposed. Ge quantum dots were grown on Si(100)-(2x1) by pulsed laser deposition at various substrate temperatures using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. In-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex-situ atomic force microscopy were used to analyze the fim structure and morphology. The morphology of germanium islands on silicon was studied at differect coverages. The results show that femtosecond pulsed laser depositon reduces the minimum temperature for epitaxial growth of Ge quantum dots to ~280 degrees C, which is 120 degrees C lower then previously observed in nanosecond pulsed laser deposition and more than 200 degrees C lower than that reported for molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition.

  6. Solvent Effects on Electronic Excitations of an Organic Chromophore.

    PubMed

    Zuehlsdorff, T J; Haynes, P D; Hanke, F; Payne, M C; Hine, N D M

    2016-04-12

    In this work we study the solvatochromic shift of a selected low-energy excited state of alizarin in water by using a linear-scaling implementation of large-scale time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). While alizarin, a small organic dye, is chosen as a simple example of solute-solvent interactions, the findings presented here have wider ramifications for the realistic modeling of dyes, paints, and pigment-protein complexes. We find that about 380 molecules of explicit water need to be considered in order to yield an accurate representation of the solute-solvent interaction and a reliable solvatochromic shift. By using a novel method of constraining the TDDFT excitation vector, we confirm that the origin of the slow convergence of the solvatochromic shift with system size is due to two different effects. The first factor is a strong redshift of the excitation due to an explicit delocalization of a small fraction of the electron and the hole from the alizarin onto the water, which is mainly confined to within a distance of 7 Å from the alizarin molecule. The second factor can be identified as long-range electrostatic influences of water molecules beyond the 7 Å region on the ground-state properties of alizarin. We also show that these electrostatic influences are not well reproduced by a QM/MM model, suggesting that full QM studies of relatively large systems may be necessary in order to obtain reliable results. PMID:26967019

  7. Including the Effects of Electronic Excitations and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cascade Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, Dorothy |

    2008-07-01

    Radiation damage has traditionally been modeled using cascade simulations however such simulations generally neglect the effects of electron-ion interactions, which may be significant in high energy cascades. A model has been developed which includes the effects of electronic stopping and electron-phonon coupling in Molecular Dynamics simulations by means of an inhomogeneous Langevin thermostat. The energy lost by the atoms to electronic excitations is gained by the electronic system and the energy evolution of the electronic system is modeled by the heat diffusion equation. Energy is exchanged between the electronic system and the atoms in the Molecular Dynamics simulation by means of a Langevin thermostat, the temperature of which is the local electronic temperature. The model is applied to a 10 keV cascade simulation for Fe. (authors)

  8. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs.

  9. Core excitation effects on oscillator strengths for transitions in four electron atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. N.; Luo, Yuxiang

    2007-06-01

    By including explicitly the electronic configurations with two and three simultaneously excited electronic orbital, we have extended the BSCI (B-spline based configuration interaction) method [1] to estimate directly the effect of inner shell core excitation to oscillator strengths for transitions in four-electron atomic systems. We will present explicitly the change in oscillator strengths due to core excitations, especially for transitions involving doubly excited states and those with very small oscillator strengths. The length and velocity results are typically in agreement better than 1% or less. [1] Tu-nan Chang, in Many-body Theory of Atomic Structure and Photoionization, edited by T. N. Chang (World Scientific, Singapore, 1993), p. 213-47; and T. N. Chang and T. K. Fang, Elsevier Radiation Physics and Chemistry 70, 173-190 (2004).

  10. Free electron degeneracy effects on collisional excitation, ionization, de-excitation and three-body recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallents, G. J.

    2016-09-01

    Collisional-radiative models enable average ionization and ionization populations, plus the rates of absorption and emission of radiation to be calculated for plasmas not in thermal equilbrium. At high densities and low temperatures, electrons may have a high occupancy of the free electron quantum states and evaluations of rate coefficients need to take into account the free electron degeneracy. We demonstrate that electron degeneracy can reduce collisional rate coefficients by orders-of-magnitude from values calculated neglecting degeneracy. We show that assumptions regarding the collisional differential cross-section can alter collisional ionization and recombination rate coefficients by a further factor two under conditions relevant to inertial fusion.

  11. Effects of Thermal Electronic Excitations on the Diffusion of Oxygen Adatoms on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Yao, Xinxin; Fabris, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    We conduct first-principles calculations to study oxygen diffusion on the graphene surface as a function of temperature up to 3000 K. The minimum energy migration path and the corresponding activation energy are determined by the nudged elastic band method with explicit inclusion of thermal electronic excitations. Below 1000 K the activation energy for epoxy oxygen to migrate remains close to its room temperature value (0.72 eV). Above 1000 K the activation energy decreases near linearly with temperature, from 0.70 eV at 1000 K to 0.47 eV at 3000 K. We show that this reduction originates from thermal electronic excitations. In particular, the effect is determined by the large contrasts in the electronic structures of the initial and transition states: the transition state exhibits much larger electronic density of states near the Fermi level and is more susceptible to thermal electronic excitations. The reduction in activation energy leads to appreciable enhancement in the diffusivity of oxygen adatoms. A moderate decrease in the vibrational prefactor, also caused by thermal electronic excitations, does not alter this trend. These findings may facilitate future works to accurately describe the dynamics of O adatoms on graphene at high T, which are critical for determining surface thermodynamic properties such as equilibrium coverage. PMID:27074529

  12. How Electronic Excitation Can be Used to Inhibit Some Mechanisms Associated to Substituent Effects.

    PubMed

    Ferro-Costas, David; Francisco, Evelio; Martín Pendás, Ángel; Mosquera, Ricardo A

    2016-09-01

    Despite the fact that transferability and chemistry go hand in hand, transferability studies in electronically excited states (EESs) are normally omitted, although these states are becoming extremely important in modern processes and applications. In this work, it is shown that this kind of studies can be used to understand how substituent effects can be modified in EESs. Thus, for example, the analysis of the carbonyl oxygen transferability in different HCO-R molecules allowed us to find that the nO→πCO* excitation can be used to break the π conjugation associated to the resonance substituent effect. Moreover, as a direct consequence, the oxygen transferability is enhanced in the first electronically excited state.

  13. Plasma-screening effects on the electron-impact excitation of hydrogenic ions in dense plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Young-Dae

    1993-01-01

    Plasma-screening effects are investigated on electron-impact excitation of hydrogenic ions in dense plasmas. Scaled cross sections Z(exp 4) sigma for 1s yields 2s and 1s yields 2p are obtained for a Debye-Hueckel model of the screened Coulomb interaction. Ground and excited bound wave functions are modified in the screened Coulomb potential (Debye-Hueckel model) using the Ritz variation method. The resulting atomic wave functions and their eigenenergies agree well with the numerical and high-order perturbation theory calculations for the interesting domain of the Debye length not less than 10. The Born approximation is used to describe the continuum states of the projectile electron. Plasma screening effects on the atomic electrons cannot be neglected in the high-density cases. Including these effects, the cross sections are appreciably increased for 1s yields 2s transitions and decreased for 1s yields 2p transitions.

  14. The effect of electron collisions on rotational excitation of cometary water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Xingfa; Mumma, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The e-H2O collisional rate for exciting rotational transitions in cometary water is evaluated for conditions found in Comet Halley. The e-H2O collisional rate exceeds that for excitation by neutral-neutral collisions at distances exceeding 3000 km from the cometary nucleus, in the case of the O sub 00 yields 1 sub 11 transition. The estimates are based on theoretical and experimental studies of e-H2O collisions, on ion and electron parameters acquired in-situ by instruments on the Giotto and Vega spacecraft, and on results obtained from models of the cometary ionosphere. The contribution of electron collisions may explain the need for large water-water cross-sections in models which neglect the effect of electrons. The importance of electron collisions is enhanced for populations of water molecules in regions where their rotational lines are optically thick.

  15. Multicentered valence electron effective potentials: a solution to the link atom problem for ground and excited electronic states.

    PubMed

    Slavícek, Petr; Martínez, Todd J

    2006-02-28

    We introduce a multicentered valence electron effective potential (MC-VEEP) description of functional groups which succeeds even in the context of excited electronic states. The MC-VEEP is formulated within the ansatz which is familiar for effective core potentials in quantum chemistry, and so can be easily incorporated in any quantum chemical calculation. By demanding that both occupied and virtual orbitals are described correctly on the MC-VEEP, we are able to ensure correct behavior even when the MC-VEEP borders an electronically excited region. However, the present formulation does require that the electrons represented by the MC-VEEP are primarily spectators and not directly participating in the electronic excitation. We point out the importance of separating the electrostatic and exchange-repulsion components of the MC-VEEP in order that interactions between the effective potential and other nuclei can be modeled correctly. We present a MC-VEEP for methyl radical with one active electron which is tested in several conjugated molecules. We discuss the use of the MC-VEEP as a solution to the "link atom" problem in hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical methods. We also discuss the limitations and further development of this approach.

  16. Distortion effects in electron excitation of hydrogen atoms by impact of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, C.A.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    Electron excitation from the fundamental state of hydrogen atoms by impact of bare ions is studied at intermediate and high collision velocities. Total cross sections for final {ital np} states by impact of protons, alpha particles, and He{sup +} ions are calculated using the symmetric eikonal approximation and compared with experimental data. This comparison supports the existence of distortion effects recently predicted by Bugacov and co-workers [Phys. Rev. A {bold 47}, 1052 (1993)]. The validity of scaling laws is analyzed.

  17. Radiation effects from first principles : the role of excitons in electronic-excited processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Bryan Matthew

    2009-09-01

    Electron-hole pairs, or excitons, are created within materials upon optical excitation or irradiation with X-rays/charged particles. The ability to control and predict the role of excitons in these energetically-induced processes would have a tremendous impact on understanding the effects of radiation on materials. In this report, the excitonic effects in large cycloparaphenylene carbon structures are investigated using various first-principles methods. These structures are particularly interesting since they allow a study of size-scaling properties of excitons in a prototypical semi-conducting material. In order to understand these properties, electron-hole transition density matrices and exciton binding energies were analyzed as a function of size. The transition density matrices allow a global view of electronic coherence during an electronic excitation, and the exciton binding energies give a quantitative measure of electron-hole interaction energies in these structures. Based on overall trends in exciton binding energies and their spatial delocalization, we find that excitonic effects play a vital role in understanding the unique photoinduced dynamics in these systems.

  18. Effective collision strengths for excitation and de-excitation of nebular [O III] optical and infrared lines with κ distributed electron energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, Taha

    2015-05-01

    We present effective collision strengths for electron excitation and de-excitation of the 10 forbidden transitions between the five lowest energy levels of the astronomically abundant doubly ionized oxygen ion, O2+. The raw collision strength data were obtained from an R-matrix intermediate coupling calculation using the Breit-Pauli relativistic approximation published previously by the authors. The effective collision strengths were calculated with κ-distributed electron energies and are tabulated as a function of the electron temperature and κ.

  19. Entanglement entropy of electronic excitations.

    PubMed

    Plasser, Felix

    2016-05-21

    A new perspective into correlation effects in electronically excited states is provided through quantum information theory. The entanglement between the electron and hole quasiparticles is examined, and it is shown that the related entanglement entropy can be computed from the eigenvalue spectrum of the well-known natural transition orbital (NTO) decomposition. Non-vanishing entanglement is obtained whenever more than one NTO pair is involved, i.e., in the case of a multiconfigurational or collective excitation. An important implication is that in the case of entanglement it is not possible to gain a complete description of the state character from the orbitals alone, but more specific analysis methods are required to decode the mutual information between the electron and hole. Moreover, the newly introduced number of entangled states is an important property by itself giving information about excitonic structure. The utility of the formalism is illustrated in the cases of the excited states of two interacting ethylene molecules, the conjugated polymer para-phenylene vinylene, and the naphthalene molecule.

  20. Entanglement entropy of electronic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasser, Felix

    2016-05-01

    A new perspective into correlation effects in electronically excited states is provided through quantum information theory. The entanglement between the electron and hole quasiparticles is examined, and it is shown that the related entanglement entropy can be computed from the eigenvalue spectrum of the well-known natural transition orbital (NTO) decomposition. Non-vanishing entanglement is obtained whenever more than one NTO pair is involved, i.e., in the case of a multiconfigurational or collective excitation. An important implication is that in the case of entanglement it is not possible to gain a complete description of the state character from the orbitals alone, but more specific analysis methods are required to decode the mutual information between the electron and hole. Moreover, the newly introduced number of entangled states is an important property by itself giving information about excitonic structure. The utility of the formalism is illustrated in the cases of the excited states of two interacting ethylene molecules, the conjugated polymer para-phenylene vinylene, and the naphthalene molecule.

  1. The effect of electron beams on cyclotron maser emission excited by lower-energy cutoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) is one of the most important emission mechanisms in astrophysics and can be excited efficiently by lower-energy cutoffs of power-law electrons. These non-thermal electrons probably propagate as a directed collimated beam along ambient magnetic fields. This paper investigates the ECM, in which the effect of electron beams is emphasized. Results show the dependence of emission properties of the ECM on the beam feature. The maximum growth rate of the extraordinary mode (X2) rapidly decreases as the beam momentum increases, while the growth rate of the ordinary mode (O1) changes slightly. In particular, the ordinary mode can overcome the extraordinary mode and becomes the fastest growth mode once the beam momentum is large enough. This research presents an extension of the conventional studies on ECM driven by lower-energy cutoffs and may be helpful to understand better the emission process of solar type I radio bursts, which are dominated by the ordinary mode emission.

  2. Evidence for charge exchange effects in electronic excitations in Al by slow singly charged He ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, P.; Sindona, A.; Dukes, C. A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on experiments of secondary electron emission in the interaction of helium ions with aluminum surfaces. Comparison between the electron emission induced by the impact of 3He+ and 4He+ on Al illustrates similarities and differences between the two projectiles. The intensity of emission shows the same dependence on velocity for the two isotopes, showing that KEE yields for helium ions impact on Al are dominated by direct excitation of valence electrons and not by electron promotion. Electron promotion and charge transfer processes are unambiguously identified by the observation of Auger electron emission from Al, at energies below the excitation threshold of Al-Al collisions, indicating energy losses for the projectiles higher than those commonly considered.

  3. Effect of nonthermal electrons on oblique electrostatic excitations in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.

    2012-05-15

    The linear and nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves are investigated in a magnetized electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma with nonthermal electrons. In the linear regime, the propagation of two possible modes and their evolution are studied via a dispersion relation. In the cases of parallel and perpendicular propagation, it is shown that these two possible modes are always stable. Then, the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the dynamics of ion-acoustic solitary waves is derived from a weakly nonlinear analysis. The influence on the solitary wave characteristics of relevant physical parameters such as nonthermal electrons, magnetic field, obliqueness, positron concentration, and temperature ratio is examined. It is observed that the increasing nonthermal electrons parameter makes the solitary structures much taller and narrower. Also, it is revealed that the magnetic field strength makes the solitary waves more spiky. The present investigation contributes to the physics of the nonlinear electrostatic ion-acoustic waves in space and laboratory e-p-i plasmas in which wave damping produces an electron tail.

  4. Effect of collective response on electron capture and excitation in collisions of highly charged ions with fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Kadhane, U; Misra, D; Singh, Y P; Tribedi, Lokesh C

    2003-03-01

    Projectile deexcitation Lyman x-ray emission following electron capture and K excitation has been studied in collisions of bare and Li-like sulphur ions (of energy 110 MeV) with fullerenes (C(60)/C(70)) and different gaseous targets. The intensity ratios of different Lyman x-ray lines in collisions with fullerenes are found to be substantially lower than those for the gas targets, both for capture and excitation. This has been explained in terms of a model based on "solidlike" effect, namely, wakefield induced stark mixing of the excited states populated via electron capture or K excitation: a collective phenomenon of plasmon excitation in the fullerenes under the influence of heavy, highly charged ions.

  5. Effect of collective response on electron capture and excitation in collisions of highly charged ions with fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Kadhane, U; Misra, D; Singh, Y P; Tribedi, Lokesh C

    2003-03-01

    Projectile deexcitation Lyman x-ray emission following electron capture and K excitation has been studied in collisions of bare and Li-like sulphur ions (of energy 110 MeV) with fullerenes (C(60)/C(70)) and different gaseous targets. The intensity ratios of different Lyman x-ray lines in collisions with fullerenes are found to be substantially lower than those for the gas targets, both for capture and excitation. This has been explained in terms of a model based on "solidlike" effect, namely, wakefield induced stark mixing of the excited states populated via electron capture or K excitation: a collective phenomenon of plasmon excitation in the fullerenes under the influence of heavy, highly charged ions. PMID:12689221

  6. Effect of electronic excitation on high-temperature flows behind strong shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2014-12-09

    In the present paper, a strongly non-equilibrium one-dimensional steady-state flow behind the plane shock wave is studied. We consider a high-temperature chemically reacting five-component ionized mixture of nitrogen species (N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}{sup 2}/N/N{sup +}/e{sup −}) taking into account electronic degrees of freedom in N and N{sup +} (170 and 625 electronic energy levels respectively), and electronic-rotational-vibrational modes in N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}{sup +} (5 and 7 electronic terms). Non-equilibrium reactions of ionization, dissociation, recombination and charge-transfer are included to the kinetic scheme. The system of governing equations is written under the assumption that translation and internal energy relaxation is fast whereas chemical reactions and ionization proceed on the macroscopic gas-dynamics time-scale. The developed model is applied to simulate the flow behind a plane shock wave under initial conditions characteristic for the spacecraft re-entry from an interplanetary flight (Hermes and Fire II experiments). Fluid-dynamic parameters behind the shock wave as well as transport coefficients and the heat flux are calculated for the (N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}{sup +}/N/N{sup +}/e{sup −}) mixture. The effect of electronic excitation on kinetics, dynamics and heat transfer is analyzed. Whereas the contribution of electronic degrees of freedom to the flow macroparameters is negligible, their influence on the heat flux is found to be important under conditions of Hermes re-entry.

  7. Excitation of plasmonic terahertz photovoltaic effects in a periodic two-dimensional electron system by the attenuated total reflection method

    SciTech Connect

    Fateev, D. V. Mashinsky, K. V.; Bagaeva, T. Yu.; Popov, V. V.

    2015-01-15

    The problem of the rectification of terahertz radiation due to plasmonic nonlinearities in a periodic two-dimensional electron system upon the excitation of plasma oscillations by the attenuated total reflection method is solved. This model allows the independent study of different plasmonic rectification mechanisms, i.e., plasmonic electron drag and plasmonic ratchet effects.

  8. On The Effect of Electron Collisions in the Excitation of Cometary HCN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Amy J.; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Schloerb, F. Peter; Combi, Michael R.; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2004-01-01

    The electron-HCN collision rate for the excitation of rotational transitions of the HCN molecule is evaluated in comets C/1995 01 (Hale-Bopp) and C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake). Based on theoretical models of the cometary atmosphere, we show that collisions with electrons can provide a significant excitation mechanism for rotational transitions in the HCN molecule. Computed values of the cross section sigma(sub e-HCN) can be as high as 1.3 x cm2, more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than the commonly assumed HCN-H2O cross section. For the ground rotational transitions of HCN, the electron-HCN collision rate is found to exceed the HCN-H2O collision rate at distances greater than 3000 km from the cometary nucleus of Hale-Bopp and 1000 km from that of Hyakutake. Collisional excitation processes dominate over radiative excitation processes up to a distance of 160,000 km from the cometary nucleus of Hale-Bopp and 50,000 km from that of Hyakutake. Excitation models that neglect electron collisions can underestimate the HCN gas production rates by as much as a factor of 2.

  9. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Hydrogen Atom Transfer (Tautomerization) Reactions for the DNA Base Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Salter, Latasha M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for four different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest single excited state potential energy surface are studied. The energetic order of the tautomers on the ground state potential surface is 9H less than 7H less than 3H less than 1H, while on the excited state surface this order is found to be different: 3H less than 1H less than 9H less than 7H. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (9 yields 3 tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic state. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic state, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. The barrier for this reaction in the excited state may become very low in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules, and therefore such tautomerization reaction may play an important role in the solution phase photochemistry of adenine.

  10. Nonequilibrium solvent effects in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for ground and excited electronic states.

    PubMed

    Bjorgaard, J A; Velizhanin, K A; Tretiak, S

    2016-04-21

    The effects of solvent on molecular processes such as excited state relaxation and photochemical reaction often occurs in a nonequilibrium regime. Dynamic processes such as these can be simulated using excited statemolecular dynamics. In this work, we describe methods of simulating nonequilibrium solvent effects in excited statemolecular dynamics using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory and apparent surface charge methods. These developments include a propagation method for solvent degrees of freedom and analytical energy gradients for the calculation of forces. Molecular dynamics of acetaldehyde in water or acetonitrile are demonstrated where the solute-solvent system is out of equilibrium due to photoexcitation and emission. PMID:27389206

  11. Nonequilibrium solvent effects in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for ground and excited electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of solvent on molecular processes such as excited state relaxation and photochemical reaction often occurs in a nonequilibrium regime. Dynamic processes such as these can be simulated using excited state molecular dynamics. In this work, we describe methods of simulating nonequilibrium solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory and apparent surface charge methods. These developments include a propagation method for solvent degrees of freedom and analytical energy gradients for the calculation of forces. Molecular dynamics of acetaldehyde in water or acetonitrile are demonstrated where the solute-solvent system is out of equilibrium due to photoexcitation and emission.

  12. Selectivity of peptide bond dissociation on excitation of a core electron: Effects of a phenyl group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Cheng; Chen, Jien-Lian; Hu, Wei-Ping; Lin, Yi-Shiue; Lin, Huei-Ru; Lee, Tsai-Yun; Lee, Yuan T.; Ni, Chi-Kung; Liu, Chen-Lin

    2016-09-01

    The selective dissociation of a peptide bond upon excitation of a core electron in acetanilide and N-benzylacetamide was investigated. The total-ion-yield near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra were recorded and compared with the predictions from time-dependent density functional theory. The branching ratios for the dissociation of a peptide bond are observed as 16-34% which is quite significant. This study explores the core-excitation, the X-ray photodissociation pathways, and the theoretical explanation of the NEXAFS spectra of organic molecules containing both a peptide bond and a phenyl group.

  13. Solvent effects on excited-state electron-transfer rate of pyrene-labeled deoxyuridine: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Shintaro; Sato, Ryuma; Hirao, Kimihiko; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2016-01-01

    Solvent effects on the quenching process from the first excited state of 5-(1-pyrenyl)-2‧-deoxyuridine (Py-dU) were theoretically examined. Our results suggest that the excited-state electron transfer occurs without the so-called proton-coupled electron transfer process, which supports experimental results. Although there are no remarkable differences observed in the structure and the corresponding S1 excitation energy between the solutions of MeOH and MeCN within a polarizable continuum model, we report here that hydrogen bonds between the explicit MeOH molecule with the dU moiety, whose structure was frequently found in molecular dynamics simulations, result in an enhancement of the electron-transfer rate constant.

  14. Dynamic screening and wake effects on electronic excitation in ion-solid and ion-surface collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. . Dept. of Physics Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1991-01-01

    The collective electronic response in a solid effectively alters ionic and atomic potentials giving rise to dynamic screening and to a wake'' of density fluctuations trailing ions as they propagate through the solid. The presence of dynamic screening modifies electronic excitation processes of projectiles in ion-solid collisions as compared to binary ion-atom collisions. We review recent theoretical and experimental studies directed at the search for and identification of signatures of dynamic screening and wake effects. Examples include the formation of excited projectile bound states under channeling conditions, radiative electron capture, the search for wake riding'' electrons in antiproton-solid collisions, and the neutralization of highly charged ions near surfaces. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Experimental evidence of excited electron number density and temperature effects on electron-phonon coupling in gold films

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, Ashutosh; Gaskins, John T.; Foley, Brian M.; Cheaito, Ramez; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-01-28

    The electronic transport properties of metals with weak electron-phonon coupling can be influenced by non-thermal electrons. Relaxation processes involving non-thermal electrons competing with the thermalized electron system have led to inconsistencies in the understanding of how electrons scatter and relax with the less energetic lattice. Recent theoretical and computational works have shown that the rate of energy relaxation with the metallic lattice will change depending on the thermalization state of the electrons. Even though 20 years of experimental works have focused on understanding and isolating these electronic relaxation mechanisms with short pulsed irradiation, discrepancies between these existing works have not clearly answered the fundamental question of the competing effects between non-thermal and thermal electrons losing energy to the lattice. In this work, we demonstrate the ability to measure the electron relaxation for varying degrees of both electron-electron and electron-phonon thermalization. This series of measurements of electronic relaxation over a predicted effective electron temperature range up to ∼3500 K and minimum lattice temperatures of 77 K validate recent computational and theoretical works that theorize how a nonequilibrium distribution of electrons transfers energy to the lattice. Utilizing this wide temperature range during pump-probe measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, we explain discrepancies in the past two decades of literature of electronic relaxation rates. We experimentally demonstrate that the electron-phonon coupling factor in gold increases with increasing lattice temperature and laser fluences. Specifically, we show that at low laser fluences corresponding to small electron perturbations, energy relaxation between electrons and phonons is mainly governed by non-thermal electrons, while at higher laser fluences, non-thermal electron scattering with the lattice is less influential on the energy relaxation

  16. Solvent electronic polarization effects on a charge transfer excitation studied by the mean-field QM/MM method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Hiroshi

    2015-12-31

    Electronic polarization effects of a medium can have a significant impact on a chemical reaction in condensed phases. We discuss the effects on the charge transfer excitation of a chromophore, N,N-dimethyl-4-nitroaniline, in various solvents using the mean-field QM/MM method with a polarizable force field. The results show that the explicit consideration of the solvent electronic polarization effects is important especially for a solvent with a low dielectric constant when we study the solvatochromism of the chromophore.

  17. Electron excitations in solids and novel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spataru, Catalin-Dan

    Several applications of the use of ab initio many-body methods in condensed matter theory are presented. In particular, these methods are used for the study of electronic excitations in various kinds of materials, ranging from bulk to low dimensional systems, and from metals to semiconductors. Two types of electron excitations are considered: quasiparticle excitations and electron-hole excitations. The work is organized in five chapters as follows: (1) The first chapter gives an introduction to the concept of quasiparticle and electron-hole excitations, as well as to the many-body framework underlying the theoretical formalism used in this work. (2) Chapter two presents the calculation of quasiparticle lifetimes in graphite. The inverse lifetime of low energy quasi-electrons shows significant deviations from the quadratic behavior naively expected from Fermi liquid theory. The deviations are explained in terms of the unique features of the band structure of this material. (3) In chapter three, the real and imaginary parts of the quasiparticle self-energy in jellium and crystalline Al are calculated at high electron temperatures. We find a decrease in the electron lifetime and an increase in the valence and conduction band widths as the temperature is increased. Calculation of the spectral function suggests that the quasiparticle concept may still be reasonable at high electron temperatures. (4) Chapter four presents calculations of the quasiparticle spectrum of highly irradiated crystalline GaAs. Our results indicate that the valence-conduction band gap is a sensitive function of the amount of electrons excited above the ground state. However, contrary to previous results, we find that it is not possible to induce a complete band gap closure by purely electronic means. (5) In chapter five we present calculations of the electron-hole interaction effects on the optical spectra of several single-walled carbon nanotubes. We show that the optical spectra of both

  18. High electronic excitations and ion beam mixing effects in high energy ion irradiated Fe/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, P.; Dufour, C.; Jaouen, C.; Marchal, G.; Pacaud, J.; Grilhe, J.; Jousset, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    M{umlt o}ssbauer spectroscopy ({sup 57}Fe) shows evidence for mixing effects induced by electronic energy deposition in nanoscale Fe/Si multilayers irradiated with swift heavy ions. A decrease in the mixing efficiency with electronic stopping power is reported; a threshold is found, under which iron environment modifications no longer occur. The kinetics of Fe{endash}Si phase formation after irradiation suggests the existence of three regimes: (i) for high excitation levels, a magnetic amorphous phase is formed directly in the wake of the incoming ion and an almost complete mixing is reached at low fluence (10{sup 13} U/cm{sup 2}); (ii) for low excitation levels, a paramagnetic Si-rich amorphous phase is favored at the interface while crystalline iron subsists at high fluences; (iii) for intermediate excitation levels, saturation effects are observed and the formation rate of both magnetic and paramagnetic phases points to direct mixing in the ion wake but with a reduced track length in comparison to U irradiation. The measured interfacial mixing cross section induced by electronic energy deposition suggests that a thermal diffusion process is mainly involved in addition to damage creation. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. One-electron excitations, correlation effects, and the plasmon in cesium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Fleszar, A. ||; Stumpf, R.; Eguiluz, A.G. ||

    1997-01-01

    We study the dynamical electronic response of Cs at a first-principles level. The spatially localized 5p semicore shell induces a physical interplay between crystal local fields and electron correlations, leading to a novel, and relatively large, many-body shift of the plasmon energy. This effect, combined with that of one-electron transitions into empty states near the plasmon energy, yields a plasmon dispersion curve which is in excellent agreement with experiment for small wave vectors. In addition, our results feature a flat dispersion for large wave vectors, in qualitative agreement with experiment. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. An effective Hamiltonian for an electronically excited solute in a polarizable molecular solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslen, P. E.; Faeder, J.; Parson, R.

    An effective Hamiltonian suitable for non-adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations is derived for the low-lying electronic states of a molecular ion interacting with an assembly of polarizable solvent molecules. The Hamiltonian includes both induction and low-frequency dispersion effects. It is based on a molecular treatment of the solvent, but is similar to effective Hamiltonians that treat the solvent as a dielectric continuum. The electronic structure of the solute is described in a space defined by the low-lying electronic states of the isolated molecule, and no assumptions are made about the form of the basis states. The effective Hamiltonian uses distributed multipoles and distributed transition multipoles, both of which may be obtained from ab initio calculations, to describe the charge distribution and polarizability of the molecular ion.

  1. Excited electronic state mixing in 7-azaindole. Quantitative measurements using the Stark effect.

    PubMed

    Young, Justin W; Pozun, Zachary D; Jordan, Kenneth D; Pratt, David W

    2013-12-12

    Stark effect measurements of the +280 cm(-1) vibronic band at ∼286 nm in the high resolution S1-S0 fluorescence excitation spectrum of 7-azaindole (7AI) in a molecular beam show that the permanent (electric) dipole moment (PDM) of the upper state vibrational level reached in this transition is 4.6 D, twice as large as the PDM of the zero-point level of the S1 state. This large difference is attributed to state mixing with a more polar state. EOM-CSSD calculations suggest that this more polar state is σπ* in nature and that it crosses the ππ* state in energy along the coordinate connecting the two potential energy minima. Such state mixing apparently provides more facile access to conical intersections with the ground state, and subsequent hydrogen atom detachment reactions, since independent studies by Sakota and Sekiya have shown that the N-H stretching frequency of 7AI is significantly reduced when it is excited to the +280 cm(-1) vibrational level of the S1 state.

  2. Quantum size effects in the volume plasmon excitation of bismuth nanoparticles investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. W.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, G. H.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2006-04-01

    Quantum size effects in volume plasmon excitation of bismuth nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 5to500nm have been studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy. The Bi nanoparticles were prepared by reducing Bi3+ with sodium borohydride in the presence of poly(vinylpyrroldone). The volume plasmon energy and its peak width increase with decreasing nanoparticle diameter, due to the quantum size effect. For the particles with diameter less than 40nm, the increase of the volume plasmon energy is proportional to the inverse square of the nanoparticle diameter, confirming the semimetal to semiconductor transition in Bi nanoparticles.

  3. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  4. Theoretical studies of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Besley, Nicholas A.

    2014-10-06

    Time-dependent density functional theory is the most widely used quantum chemical method for studying molecules in electronically excited states. However, excited states can also be computed within Kohn-Sham density functional theory by exploiting methods that converge the self-consistent field equations to give excited state solutions. The usefulness of single reference self-consistent field based approaches for studying excited states is demonstrated by considering the calculation of several types of spectroscopy including the infrared spectroscopy of molecules in an electronically excited state, the rovibrational spectrum of the NO-Ar complex, core electron binding energies and the emission spectroscopy of BODIPY in water.

  5. Theoretical study of Raman chirped adiabatic passage by X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Highly excited electronic states and rotational effects

    SciTech Connect

    Engin, Selma; Sisourat, Nicolas Selles, Patricia; Taïeb, Richard; Carniato, Stéphane

    2014-06-21

    Raman Chirped Adiabatic Passage (RCAP) is an efficient method to climb the vibrational ladder of molecules. It was shown on the example of fixed-in-space HCl molecule that selective vibrational excitation can thus be achieved by RCAP and that population transfer can be followed by X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy [S. Engin, N. Sisourat, P. Selles, R. Taïeb, and S. Carniato, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 192–195 (2012)]. Here, in a more detailed analysis of the process, we investigate the effects of highly excited electronic states and of molecular rotation on the efficiency of RCAP. Furthermore, we propose an alternative spectroscopic way to monitor the transfer by means of X-ray absorption spectra.

  6. Description of electronic excited states using electron correlation operator.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Bryan; Rassolov, Vitaly A

    2013-09-14

    The electron correlation energy in a chemical system is defined as a difference between the energy of an exact energy for a given Hamiltonian, and a mean-field, or single determinant, approximation to it. A promising way to model electron correlation is through the expectation value of a linear two-electron operator for the Kohn-Sham single determinant wavefunction. For practical reasons, it is desirable for such an operator to be universal, i.e., independent of the positions and types of nuclei in a molecule. The correlation operator models the effect of electron correlation on the interaction energy in a electron pair. We choose an operator expanded in a small number of Gaussians as a model for electron correlation, and test it by computing atomic and molecular adiabatic excited states. The computations are performed within the Δ Self-Consistent Field (ΔSCF) formalism, and are compared to the time-dependent density functional theory model with popular density functionals. The simplest form of the correlation operator contains only one parameter derived from the helium atom ground state correlation energy. The correlation operator approach significantly outperforms other methods in computation of atomic excitation energies. The accuracy of molecular excitation energies computed with the correlation operator is limited by the shortcomings of the ΔSCF methodology in describing excited states.

  7. Effect of Solvation on Electron Detachment and Excitation Energies of a Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Variant.

    PubMed

    Bose, Samik; Chakrabarty, Suman; Ghosh, Debashree

    2016-05-19

    Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is applied to the fluorinated green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore (DFHBDI) in its deprotonated form to understand the solvatochromic shifts in its vertical detachment energy (VDE) and vertical excitation energy (VEE). This variant of the GFP chromophore becomes fluorescent in an RNA environment and has a wide range of applications in biomedical and biochemical fields. From microsolvation studies, we benchmark (with respect to full QM) the accuracy of our QM/MM calculations with effective fragment potential (EFP) as the MM method of choice. We show that while the solvatochromic shift in the VEE is minimal (0.1 eV blue shift) and its polarization component is only 0.03 eV, the effect of the solvent on the VDE is quite large (3.85 eV). We also show by accurate calculations on the solvatochromic shift of the VDE that polarization accounts for ∼0.23 eV and therefore cannot be neglected. The effect of the counterions on the VDE of the deprotonated chromophore in solvation is studied in detail, and a charge-smearing scheme is suggested for charged chromophores. PMID:27116477

  8. Localization of electrons and excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven

    2006-07-01

    Electrons, electron holes, or excitations in finite or infinite 'multimer systems' may be localized or delocalized. In the theory of Hush, localization depends on the ratio Δ/ λ ( Δ/2 = coupling; λ = reorganization energy). The latter theory has been extended to the infinite system [S. Larsson, A. Klimkāns, Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 355 (2000) 217]. The metal/insulator transition often takes place abruptly as a function of Δ/ λ. It is argued that localization in a system with un-filled bands cannot be determined on the basis of Mott-Hubbard U alone, but depends on the number of accessible valence states, reorganization energy λ and coupling Δ (=2t). In fact U = 0 does not necessarily imply delocalization. The analysis here shows that there are many different situations for an insulator to metal transition. Charge transfer in doped NiO is characterized by Ni 2+ - Ni 3+ exchange while charge transfer in pure NiO is characterized by a disproportionation 2Ni 2+ → Ni + + Ni 3+. In spite of the great differences between these two cases, U has been applied without discrimination to both. The relevant localization parameters appear to be Δ and λ in the first case, with only two oxidation states, and U, Δ and λ in the second case with three oxidation states. The analysis is extended to insulator-metal transitions, giant magnetic resistance (GMR) and high Tc superconductivity (SC). λ and Δ can be determined quite accurately in quantum mechanical calculations involving only one and two monomers, respectively.

  9. Investigation of effect of excitation frequency on electron energy distribution functions in low pressure radio frequency bounded plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2011-07-15

    Particle in cell (PIC) simulations are employed to investigate the effect of excitation frequency {omega} on electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in a low pressure radio frequency (rf) discharge. The discharge is maintained over a length of 0.10 m, bounded by two infinite parallel plates, with the coherent heating field localized at the center of the discharge over a distance of 0.05 m and applied perpendicularly along the y and z directions. On varying the excitation frequency f (={omega}/2{pi}) in the range 0.01-50 MHz, it is observed that for f {<=} 5 MHz the EEDF shows a trend toward a convex (Druyvesteyn-like) distribution. For f > 5 MHz, the distribution resembles more like a Maxwellian with the familiar break energy visible in most of the distributions. A prominent ''hot tail'' is observed at f{>=} 20 MHz and the temperature of the tail is seen to decrease with further increase in frequency (e.g., at 30 MHz and 50 MHz). The mechanism for the generation of the ''hot tail'' is considered to be due to preferential transit time heating of energetic electrons as a function of {omega}, in the antenna heating field. There exists an optimum frequency for which high energy electrons are maximally heated. The occurrence of the Druyvesteyn-like distributions at lower {omega} may be explained by a balance between the heating of the electrons in the effective electric field and elastic cooling due to electron neutral collision frequency {nu}{sub en}; the transition being dictated by {omega} {approx} 2{pi}{nu}{sub en}.

  10. Investigation of effect of excitation frequency on electron energy distribution functions in low pressure radio frequency bounded plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2011-07-01

    Particle in cell (PIC) simulations are employed to investigate the effect of excitation frequency ω on electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in a low pressure radio frequency (rf) discharge. The discharge is maintained over a length of 0.10 m, bounded by two infinite parallel plates, with the coherent heating field localized at the center of the discharge over a distance of 0.05 m and applied perpendicularly along the y and z directions. On varying the excitation frequency f (=ω/2π) in the range 0.01-50 MHz, it is observed that for f ≤ 5 MHz the EEDF shows a trend toward a convex (Druyvesteyn-like) distribution. For f > 5 MHz, the distribution resembles more like a Maxwellian with the familiar break energy visible in most of the distributions. A prominent "hot tail" is observed at f ≥ 20 MHz and the temperature of the tail is seen to decrease with further increase in frequency (e.g., at 30 MHz and 50 MHz). The mechanism for the generation of the "hot tail" is considered to be due to preferential transit time heating of energetic electrons as a function of ω, in the antenna heating field. There exists an optimum frequency for which high energy electrons are maximally heated. The occurrence of the Druyvesteyn-like distributions at lower ω may be explained by a balance between the heating of the electrons in the effective electric field and elastic cooling due to electron neutral collision frequency νen; the transition being dictated by ω ˜ 2πνen.

  11. Solvation of electronically excited I2 -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslen, P. E.; Papanikolas, J. M.; Faeder, J.; Parson, R.; ONeil, S. V.

    1994-10-01

    The interaction potentials between the six lowest electronic states of I-2 and an arbitrary discrete charge distribution are calculated approximately using a one-electron model. The model potentials are much easier to calculate than ab initio potentials, with the cost of a single energy point scaling linearly with the number of solvent molecules, enabling relatively large systems to be studied. Application of the model to simulation of electronically excited I-2 in liquids and CO2 clusters is discussed. In a preliminary application, solvent effects are approximated by a uniform electric field. If electronically excited (2Πg,1/2) I-2 undergoes dissociation in the presence of a strong electric field, the negative charge localizes so as to minimize the total potential energy. However, in a weak field the negative charge localizes in the opposite direction, maximizing the potential energy. Based on a study of the field-dependent potential surfaces, a solvent-transfer mechanism is proposed for the electronic relaxation of 2Πg,1/2I-2, in contrast to the conventional view of relaxation via electron transfer.

  12. Pressure anisotropy effects on nonlinear electrostatic excitations in magnetized electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, Muhammad; Williams, Gina; Qamar, Anisa; Mahmood, Shahzad; Kourakis, Ioannis

    2014-09-01

    The propagation of linear and nonlinear electrostatic waves is investigated in a magnetized anisotropic electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma with superthermal electrons and positrons. A two-dimensional plasma geometry is assumed. The ions are assumed to be warm and anisotropic due to an external magnetic field. The anisotropic ion pressure is defined using the double adiabatic Chew-Golberger-Low (CGL) theory. In the linear regime, two normal modes are predicted, whose characteristics are investigated parametrically, focusing on the effect of superthermality of electrons and positrons, ion pressure anisotropy, positron concentration and magnetic field strength. A Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) type equation is derived for the electrostatic potential (disturbance) via a reductive perturbation method. The parametric role of superthermality, positron content, ion pressure anisotropy and magnetic field strength on the characteristics of solitary wave structures is investigated. Following Allen and Rowlands [J. Plasma Phys. 53, 63 (1995)], we have shown that the pulse soliton solution of the ZK equation is unstable to oblique perturbations, and have analytically traced the dependence of the instability growth rate on superthermality and ion pressure anisotropy.

  13. Laser cooling via excitation of localized electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, David

    2007-07-01

    Under appropriate conditions, absorption of light by a solid can initiate a process by which it is cooled. In particular, energy is extracted from a material when its absorption of a photon is followed by emission of a photon of higher energy. This up-conversion requires some of the solid’s electrons to garner energy from atomic vibrations. Here, two schemes for laser cooling via localized electronic states are addressed. The first scheme utilizes the ground state and an excited state of a localized center. In this two-level scheme, the cooling process is initiated with photon absorption in the extreme low-energy tail of a localized state’s vibrationally broadened absorption spectrum. The subsequent atomic relaxation transfers energy of especially large vibratory atomic strains into electrical energy that is then extracted via photon emission. The second scheme involves the ground state and two excited states of a localized center. Cooling is facilitated when (i) the photoexcitation of an electron from its ground state to the lower excited level is followed by (ii) electron-phonon-induced promotion to the uppermost level and the subsequent (iii) return of the electron to its ground state with emission of a photon of higher energy than that of the absorbed photon. However, competing relaxation processes contribute to heating. The net cooling power per unit volume is maximized for both schemes, thereby determining characteristics of localized electronic systems that foster optical cooling. The cooling power per unit volume is greatest at high temperatures and falls rapidly as the thermal energy is reduced below each system’s luminescence Stokes shift. Moreover, cooling via the three-level scheme is most effective when (i) the energy separation between excited states is smaller than the thermal energy and (ii) the degeneracy of the highest-lying excited state is much larger than that of the center’s middle level. These restrictive conditions appear to be

  14. Nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium effects in stratospheric HF by collisional energy transfer from electronically excited O2 and implications for infrared remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, Jack A.

    1989-01-01

    A possible nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) effect involving stratospheric HF arising from the direct photochemical excitation of vibrationally excited HF by collisional energy transfer from electronically excited O2 is presented. Although this non-LTE effect is smaller that one associated with the direct solar excitation of both HF(nv = 1) and HF(nv = 2), calculations show that inclusion of the mechanism into retrieval algorithms is necessary if correct daytime upper stratosphere HF profiles are to be inferred in future IR thermal emission measurements.

  15. Effects of the Perpendicular Electron Spatial Diffusion on the Excitation Properties of the Drift-Tearing Mode*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roytershteyn, V.; Coppi, B.; Crabtree, C.

    2006-10-01

    Contrary to relevant experimental observations, the linear theory of the drift-tearing mode[1] predicts that the mode should not be excited in the high temperature regimes in the presence of a finite perpendicular gradient of the electron temperature[2]. In particular, the values of the stability parameter δ' (the jump in the first derivative of the perturbed magnetic field across the reconnection layer) for the modes observed in experiments are well below the linearized theory threshold δ'crit. We have proposed that the interaction of the drift-tearing mode with a background of microscopic modes reduces δ'crit. In particular, such effects as a local depression in the electron parallel thermal conductivity, or local flattening of the electron temperature profile, destabilize the mode. The limit, where the role of the background is only to create perpendicular electron spatial diffusion is investigated considering the collisionless regime[3], where such diffusion acts to mostly affect the thermal energy transport by modifying Landau resonances. For reasonable values of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, the reduction of δ'crit is rather small. Therefore other effects of a background microturbulence that can further decrease δ'crit are analyzed. [1] B. Coppi, Phys. Fluids 8, 2273, 1965; [2] J. Drake et al. Phys. Fluids 26, 2509, 1983; [3] G. Bertin et al. Annals of Physics 119,371, 1979; *Supported in part by U.S. D.O.E.

  16. Electronic excitations in fast ion-solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    We review recent developments in the study of electronic excitation of projectiles in fast ion-solid collisions. Our focus will be primarily on theory but experimental advances will also be discussed. Topics include the evidence for velocity-dependent thresholds for the existence of bound states, wake-field effects on excited states, the electronic excitation of channeled projectiles, transport phenomena, and the interaction of highly charged ions with surfaces. 44 refs., 14 figs.

  17. Electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of pentafluorophenol: Effects of low-lying πσ{sup ∗} states

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, Shreetama; Mukhopadhyay, Deb Pratim; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2015-05-14

    Multiple fluorine atom substitution effect on photophysics of an aromatic chromophore has been investigated using phenol as the reference system. It has been noticed that the discrete vibronic structure of the S{sub 1}←S{sub 0} absorption system of phenol vapor is completely washed out for pentafluorophenol (PFP), and the latter also shows very large Stokes shift in the fluorescence spectrum. For excitations beyond S{sub 1} origin, the emission yield of PFP is reduced sharply with increase in excess vibronic energy. However, in a collisional environment like liquid hydrocarbon, the underlying dynamical process that drives the non-radiative decay is hindered drastically. Electronic structure theory predicts a number of low-lying dark electronic states of πσ{sup ∗} character in the vicinity of the lowest valence ππ{sup ∗} state of this molecule. Tentatively, we have attributed the excitation energy dependent non-radiative decay of the molecule observed only in the gas phase to an interplay between the lowest ππ{sup ∗} and a nearby dissociative πσ{sup ∗} state. Measurements in different liquids reveal that some of the dark excited states light up with appreciable intensity only in protic liquids like methanol and water due to hydrogen bonding between solute and solvents. Electronic structure theory methods indeed predict that for PFP-(H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters (n = 1-11), intensities of a number of πσ{sup ∗} states are enhanced with increase in cluster size. In contrast with emitting behavior of the molecule in the gas phase and solutions of nonpolar and polar aprotic liquids, the fluorescence is completely switched off in polar protic liquids. This behavior is a chemically significant manifestation of perfluoro effect, because a very opposite effect occurs in the case of unsubstituted phenol for which fluorescence yield undergoes a very large enhancement in protic liquids. Several dynamical mechanisms have been suggested to interpret the

  18. Effective collision strengths for electron impact excitations in S II. [Plasma torus of Io

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S.S.; Henry, R.J.W.; Nakazaki, S.

    1987-02-01

    Electron impact collision strengths for forbidden, semiforbidden, and allowed transitions in S II calculated using the R-matrix method are presented. Configuration interaction wave functions are used to represent the six target states included in the calculation. At low impact energies the collision strengths are dominated by resonances for several transitions. The contribution from higher partial waves is obtained in the close-coupling approximation with exchange terms omitted. Results are presented for the effective collision strengths over a wide temperature range (5000-150,000 K) of astrophysical interest. The present results for the 4S(0) yields 2P(0) transition are 20-30 percent lower than previous calculations, while for the 4S(0) yields 2D(0) transition they are in good agreement. The results are approximately 30 percent higher than those of Ho and Henry (1983) for the 4S(0) yields 2P(0) transition at 80,000 K, and the difference between the two results increases with decreasing temperatures (under 80,000 K). 38 references.

  19. Collective Excitations in Electron-Hole Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kalman, G. J.; Hartmann, P.; Donko, Z.; Golden, K. I.

    2007-06-08

    We report a combined analytic and molecular dynamics analysis of the collective mode spectrum of a bipolar (electron-hole) bilayer in the strong coupling classical limit. A robust, isotropic energy gap is identified in the out-of-phase spectra, generated by the combined effect of correlations and of the excitation of the bound dipoles. In the in-phase spectra we identify longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes wholly maintained by correlations. Strong nonlinear generation of higher harmonics of the fundamental dipole oscillation frequency and the transfer of harmonics between different modes is observed.

  20. Simple model of bulk and surface excitation effects to inelastic scattering in low-energy electron beam irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2011-09-01

    The effect of bulk and surface excitations to inelastic scattering in low-energy electron beam irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) is studied using the dielectric formalism. Calculations are based on a semiempirical dielectric response function for MWCNTs determined by means of a many-pole plasmon model with parameters adjusted to available experimental spectroscopic data under theoretical sum-rule constrains. Finite-size effects are considered in the context of electron gas theory via a boundary correction term in the plasmon dispersion relations, thus, allowing a more realistic extrapolation of the electronic excitation spectrum over the whole energy-momentum plane. Energy-loss differential and total inelastic scattering cross sections as a function of electron energy and distance from the surface, valid over the energy range {approx}50-30,000 eV, are calculated with the individual contribution of bulk and surface excitations separated and analyzed for the case of normally incident and escaping electrons. The sensitivity of the results to the various approximations for the spatial dispersion of the electronic excitations is quantified. Surface excitations are shown to have a strong influence upon the shape and intensity of the energy-loss differential cross section in the near surface region whereas the general notion of a spatially invariant inelastic mean free path inside the material is found to be of good approximation.

  1. Rotational and translational effects in collisions of electronically excited diatomic hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1988-01-01

    Collisional quenching and vibrational energy proceed competitively with rotational energy transfer for several excited states of the diatomic radicals OH, NH, and CH. This occurs for a wide variety of molecular collision partners. This phenomenon permits the examination of the influence of rotational motion on the collision dynamics of these theoretically tractable species. Measurements can also be made as a function of temperature, i.e., collision velocity. In OH (sup 2 sigma +), both vibrational transfer and quenching are found to decrease with an increase in rotational level, while quenching decreases with increasing temperature. This behavior indicates that for OH, anisotropic attractive forces govern the entrance channel dynamics for these collisions. The quenching of NH (sup 3 pi sub i) by many (although not all) collision partners also decreases with increasing rotational and translational energy, and NH (sup 1 pi) behaves much like OH (sup 2 sigma +). However, the quenching of CH (sup 2 delta) appears to decrease with increasing rotation but increases with increasing temperature, suggesting in this case anisotropic forces involving a barrier or repulsive wall. Such similarities and differences should furnish useful comparisons with both simple and detailed theoretical pictures of the appropriate collision dynamics.

  2. Effect of multipole excitations in electron energy-loss spectroscopy of surface plasmon modes in silver nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiuli; Norris, Theodore B.; Hörl, Anton; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Herzing, Andrew A.

    2014-12-14

    We have characterized the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in silver nanowires using spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the scanning transmission electron microscope. Non-symmetric EELS spectra due to high-k SPR propagation along the nanowire and spectral shifts due to higher-order mode excitation are observed when the beam is positioned near the tip of the nanowire. When the beam is far from the tip region and on the side of nanowire, no spectral shifts are observed as the beam is scanned in the radial direction of the nanowire. The experimental spectra are compared with three different theoretical approaches: direct numerical calculation of the energy loss, analytical models for energy loss, and numerical simulations using an optical model. All three models reproduce the spectral shifts as the electron beam approaches the cap of the nanowire. The analytical model reveals the origin of the shifts in high-order plasmon mode excitation.

  3. Collisional excitation of electron Landau levels in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, S. H.

    1981-01-01

    The cross sections for the excitation and deexcitation of the quantized transverse energy levels of an electron in a magnetic field are calculated for electron-proton and electron-electron collisions in light of the importance of the cross sections for studies of X-ray pulsar emission. First-order matrix elements are calculated using the Dirac theory of the electron, thus taking into account relativistic effects, which are believed to be important in accreting neutron stars. Results for the collisional excitation of ground state electrons by protons are presented which demonstrate the importance of proton recoil and relativistic effects, and it is shown that electron-electron excitations may contribute 10 to 20% of the excitation rate from electron-proton scattering in a Maxwellian plasma. Finally, calculations of the cross section for electron-proton small-angle scattering are presented which lead to relaxation rates for the electron velocity distribution which are modified by the magnetic field, and to a possible increase in the value of the Coulomb logarithm.

  4. Electron-impact vibrational excitation of cyclopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Čurík, R. Čársky, P.; Allan, M.

    2015-04-14

    We report a very detailed test of the ab initio discrete momentum representation (DMR) method of calculating vibrational excitation of polyatomic molecules by electron impact, by comparison of its results with an extensive set of experimental data, covering the entire range of scattering angles from 10{sup ∘} to 180{sup ∘} and electron energies from 0.4 to 20 eV. The DMR calculations were carried out by solving the two-channel Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the momentum space, and the interaction between the scattered electron and the target molecule was described by exact static-exchange potential corrected by a density functional theory (DFT) correlation-polarization interaction that models target’s response to the field of incoming electron. The theory is found to quantitatively reproduce the measured spectra for all normal modes, even at the difficult conditions of extreme angles and at low energies, and thus provides full understanding of the excitation mechanism. It is shown that the overlap of individual vibrational bands caused by limited experimental resolution and rotational excitation must be properly taken into account for correct comparison of experiment and theory. By doing so, an apparent discrepancy between published experimental data could be reconciled. A substantial cross section is found for excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry by the 5.5 eV A{sub 2}{sup ′} resonance, surprisingly because the currently accepted selection rules predict this process to be forbidden. The DMR theory shows that the excitation is caused by an incoming electron in an f-wave of A{sub 2}{sup ′} symmetry which causes excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of the A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry and departs in p- and f-waves of A{sub 2}{sup ″} symmetry.

  5. Electron-impact vibrational excitation of cyclopropane.

    PubMed

    Čurík, R; Čársky, P; Allan, M

    2015-04-14

    We report a very detailed test of the ab initio discrete momentum representation (DMR) method of calculating vibrational excitation of polyatomic molecules by electron impact, by comparison of its results with an extensive set of experimental data, covering the entire range of scattering angles from 10° to 180° and electron energies from 0.4 to 20 eV. The DMR calculations were carried out by solving the two-channel Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the momentum space, and the interaction between the scattered electron and the target molecule was described by exact static-exchange potential corrected by a density functional theory (DFT) correlation-polarization interaction that models target's response to the field of incoming electron. The theory is found to quantitatively reproduce the measured spectra for all normal modes, even at the difficult conditions of extreme angles and at low energies, and thus provides full understanding of the excitation mechanism. It is shown that the overlap of individual vibrational bands caused by limited experimental resolution and rotational excitation must be properly taken into account for correct comparison of experiment and theory. By doing so, an apparent discrepancy between published experimental data could be reconciled. A substantial cross section is found for excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν4 of A1 (″) symmetry by the 5.5 eV A2 (') resonance, surprisingly because the currently accepted selection rules predict this process to be forbidden. The DMR theory shows that the excitation is caused by an incoming electron in an f-wave of A2 (') symmetry which causes excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν4 of the A1 (″) symmetry and departs in p- and f-waves of A2 (″) symmetry. PMID:25877583

  6. Excitation of metastable argon and helium atoms by electron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borst, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    Using a time-of-flight method, the excitation of argon and helium metastables by electron impact is investigated in the energy range from threshold to about 50 eV. The secondary-electron yields of the metastable detector used are reviewed in detail. The effect of metastable recoil is also discussed. Comparisons with data from other investigators are presented.

  7. Electron-driven excitations and dissociation of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Greg; Orel, Ann E.

    2015-02-13

    This program studied how energy is interchanged in electron and photon collisions with molecules leading to ex-citation and dissociation. Modern ab initio techniques, both for the photoionization and electron scattering, and the subsequent nuclear dynamics studies, are used to accurately treat these problems. This work addresses vibrational ex-citation and dissociative attachment following electron impact, and the dynamics following inner shell photoionzation. These problems are ones for which a full multi-dimensional treatment of the nuclear dynamics is essential and where non-adiabatic effects are expected to be important.

  8. Solvent Effects on the Electronic Absorption and Fluorescence Spectra of HNP: Estimation of Ground and Excited State Dipole Moments.

    PubMed

    Desai, Vani R; Hunagund, Shirajahammad M; Basanagouda, Mahantesha; Kadadevarmath, Jagadish S; Sidarai, Ashok H

    2016-07-01

    We report the effect of solvents on absorption and fluorescence spectra of biologically active 3(2H)-pyridazinone namely 5-(2-hydroxy-naphthalen-1-yl)-2-phenyl-2H-pyridazin-3-one (HNP) in different solvents at room temperature. The ground and the excited state dipole moments of HNP molecule was estimated from Lippert's, Bakshiev's and Kawski-Chamma-Viallet's equations using the solvatochromic shift method. The ground state dipole moment (μ g ) was also estimated by Guggenheim and Higasi method using the dielectric constant and refractive index of solute at different concentrations, the μ g value obtained from these two methods are comparable to the μ g value obtained by the solvatochromic shift method. The excited state dipole moment (μ e ) is greater than the ground state dipole moment (μ g ), which indicates that the excited state is more polar than the ground state. Further, we have evaluated the change in dipole moment (Δμ) from the solvatochromic shift method and on the basis of molecular-microscopic solvent polarity parameter[Formula: see text], later on the values were compared. PMID:27220623

  9. How Geometric Distortions Scatter Electronic Excitations in Conjugated Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tian; Li, Hao; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y

    2014-11-20

    Effects of disorder and exciton-phonon interactions are the major factors controlling photoinduced dynamics and energy-transfer processes in conjugated organic semiconductors, thus defining their electronic functionality. All-atom quantum-chemical simulations are potentially capable of describing such phenomena in complex "soft" organic structures, yet they are frequently computationally restrictive. Here we efficiently characterize how electronic excitations in branched conjugated molecules interact with molecular distortions using the exciton scattering (ES) approach as a fundamental principle combined with effective tight-binding models. Molecule geometry deformations are incorporated to the ES view of electronic excitations by identifying the dependence of the Frenkel-type exciton Hamiltonian parameters on the characteristic geometry parameters. We illustrate our methodology using two examples of intermolecular distortions, bond length alternation and single bond rotation, which constitute vibrational degrees of freedom strongly coupled to the electronic system in a variety of conjugated systems. The effect on excited-state electronic structures has been attributed to localized variation of exciton on-site energies and couplings. As a result, modifications of the entire electronic spectra due to geometric distortions can be efficiently and accurately accounted for with negligible numerical cost. The presented approach can be potentially extended to model electronic structures and photoinduced processes in bulk amorphous polymer materials. PMID:26276475

  10. How Geometric Distortions Scatter Electronic Excitations in Conjugated Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tian; Li, Hao; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y

    2014-11-20

    Effects of disorder and exciton-phonon interactions are the major factors controlling photoinduced dynamics and energy-transfer processes in conjugated organic semiconductors, thus defining their electronic functionality. All-atom quantum-chemical simulations are potentially capable of describing such phenomena in complex "soft" organic structures, yet they are frequently computationally restrictive. Here we efficiently characterize how electronic excitations in branched conjugated molecules interact with molecular distortions using the exciton scattering (ES) approach as a fundamental principle combined with effective tight-binding models. Molecule geometry deformations are incorporated to the ES view of electronic excitations by identifying the dependence of the Frenkel-type exciton Hamiltonian parameters on the characteristic geometry parameters. We illustrate our methodology using two examples of intermolecular distortions, bond length alternation and single bond rotation, which constitute vibrational degrees of freedom strongly coupled to the electronic system in a variety of conjugated systems. The effect on excited-state electronic structures has been attributed to localized variation of exciton on-site energies and couplings. As a result, modifications of the entire electronic spectra due to geometric distortions can be efficiently and accurately accounted for with negligible numerical cost. The presented approach can be potentially extended to model electronic structures and photoinduced processes in bulk amorphous polymer materials.

  11. Four-electron model for singlet and triplet excitation energy transfers with inclusion of coherence memory, inelastic tunneling and nuclear quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yosuke; Ebina, Kuniyoshi; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2016-08-01

    A computational scheme to describe the coherent dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) in molecular systems is proposed on the basis of generalized master equations with memory kernels. This formalism takes into account those physical effects in electron-bath coupling system such as the spin symmetry of excitons, the inelastic electron tunneling and the quantum features of nuclear motions, thus providing a theoretical framework to perform an ab initio description of EET through molecular simulations for evaluating the spectral density and the temporal correlation function of electronic coupling. Some test calculations have then been carried out to investigate the dependence of exciton population dynamics on coherence memory, inelastic tunneling correlation time, magnitude of electronic coupling, quantum correction to temporal correlation function, reorganization energy and energy gap.

  12. Intense field electron excitation in transparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modoran, Georgia C.

    The propagation of an intense laser through transparent materials can only be understood by considering a wide range of nonlinear effects and their simultaneous interaction. Electron plasma formation plays a crucial role and is the focus of this work. The mechanisms of the nonlinear ionization are not well understood. There are two proposed interactions that contribute to electron plasma formation: photoionization and avalanche ionization, but the individual contribution of each of these ionization processes is controversial. Keldysh theory has been proposed as a description of photoionization. Two models for avalanche ionization are used in the literature, but with different intensity dependence. We address and resolve these issues. In this thesis we present a spectrally resolved pump-probe experiment that directly measures the nonlinear ionization rates and plasma evolution in solid state media. Both pump and probe are derived from an 800 nm, 120 fs laser. The maximum ionization rates were obtained in sapphire (˜1.9x10 18 fs-1 ·cm-3), while in water (˜7.2x1017 fs-1 ·cm -3), fused silica (˜8.6x1017 fs -1 ·cm-3) and methanol (˜6.6x10 17 fs-1 ·cm-3) the ionization rates were slightly different. Our measured ionization rates are consistently larger that the theoretical rate given by Keldysh theory, suggesting that this theory does not correctly describe the photoionization process. We also present measurements that separate the two excitation processes and identify the role played by each in the ionization of media. The idea underneath these experiments is a very simple one: since the two ionization processes have different intensity dependence, the absorption of light in the medium should differ similarly. Therefore it should be possible to distinguish the two mechanisms by looking at the energy dependence of the absorption. From our result we find that avalanche and multiphoton ionization have varying relative contributions, depending on the band gap. For

  13. Effects of Mn Substitution on the Thermoelectric Properties and Thermal Excitations of the Electron-doped Perovskite Sr1-xLaxTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Tetsuji; Hata, Hiroto; Eto, Takahiro; Sobaru, Shogo; Oda, Ryosuke; Kaji, Hiroki; Nishina, Kousuke; Kuwahara, Hideki; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Kajimoto, Ryoichi

    2016-09-01

    We studied how Mn substitution affects the thermoelectric properties and thermal excitations of the electron-doped perovskite Sr1-xLaxTiO3 by measuring its electrical and thermal transport properties, magnetization, specific heat, and inelastic neutron scattering. Slight Mn substitution with the lattice defects enhanced the Seebeck coefficient, perhaps because of coupling between itinerant electrons and localized spins or between itinerant electrons and local lattice distortion around Mn3+ ions, while it enhanced anharmonic lattice vibrations, which effectively suppressed thermal conductivity in a state of high electrical conductivity. Consequently, slight Mn substitution increased the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit for Sr1-xLaxTiO3 near room temperature.

  14. Separation of ionization and subsequent electronic excitation for formation of electronically excited ethanol cation in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, T.; Hosaka, K.; Akagi, H.; Yokoyama, A.; Yamanouchi, K.; Kannari, F.; Itakura, R.

    2011-10-01

    Ionization and subsequent electronic excitation occurring within the same laser pulse (400 nm, 96 fs, 1.3 ~ 18 TW cm-2) are separately investigated by measuring in coincidence an electron and a product ion produced from C2H5OH. It is revealed that the nascent population in the electronically excited C2H5OH+ prepared by the ionization decreases as the laser intensity increases, while the subsequent electronic excitation is enhanced through the resonant electronic transitions. Ionization and electronic excitation mechanisms are described based on the electronic-state distributions of C2H5OH+.

  15. Electron impact excitation of highly charged sodium-like ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaha, M.; Davis, J.

    1978-01-01

    Optical transition probabilities and electron collision strengths for Ca X, Fe XVI, Zn XX, Kr XXVI and Mo XXXII are calculated for transitions between n equal to 3 and n equal to 4 levels. The calculations neglect relativistic effects on the radial functions. A semi-empirical approach provides wave functions of the excited states; a distorted wave function without exchange is employed to obtain the excitation cross sections. The density dependence of the relative intensities of certain emission lines in the sodium isoelectronic sequence is also discussed.

  16. Electron-impact excitation of Ni II. Collision strengths and effective collision strengths for low-lying fine-structure forbidden transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.

    2010-04-01

    Context. Considerable demand exists for electron excitation data for ion{Ni}{ii}, since lines from this abundant ion are observed in a wide variety of laboratory and astrophysical spectra. The accurate theoretical determination of these data can present a significant challenge however, due to complications arising from the presence of an open 3d-shell in the description of the target ion. Aims: In this work we present collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of ion{Ni}{ii}. Attention is concentrated on the 153 forbidden fine-structure transitions between the energetically lowest 18 levels of ion{Ni}{ii}. Effective collision strengths have been evaluated at 27 individual electron temperatures ranging from 30-100 000 K. To our knowledge this is the most extensive theoretical collisional study carried out on this ion to date. Methods: The parallel R-matrix package RMATRX II has recently been extended to allow for the inclusion of relativistic effects. This suite of codes has been utilised in the present work in conjunction with PSTGF to evaluate collision strengths and effective collision strengths for all of the low-lying forbidden fine-structure transitions. The following basis configurations were included in the target model - 3d9, 3d84s, 3d84p, 3d74s2 and 3d74s4p - giving rise to a sophisticated 295 jj-level, 1930 coupled channel scattering problem. Results: Comprehensive comparisons are made between the present collisional data and those obtained from earlier theoretical evaluations. While the effective collision strengths agree well for some transitions, significant discrepancies exist for others. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/513/A55

  17. Coherent excitation with short electron pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guertler, Andreas; Robicheaux, Francis; Noordam, Bart

    2000-06-01

    [1pt] The probability for a transition within an atom to be driven by a collision with a long pulse of electrons is proportional to the electron flux with the proportionality factor being the cross section for this transition. Recently it was shown [1] that for electron pulses shorter than the orbit time of the electron in the atom, a contribution of coherent scattering plays a role, which is proportional to the differential cross section in forward direction and the square of the electron flux. To investigate this effect, we are developing a picosecond electron gun [2]. Collision experiments will be done with Rydberg states in lithium around n=40 with Kepler orbit times in the order of 10 ps. For picosecond electron pulses, a quadratic dependance of the transition probability on the electron flux is expected in contrast to the linear dependance expected for nanosecond electron pulses. [1pt] References [1pt] [1] F. Robicheaux and L. D. Noordam, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. [1pt] [2] F. Robicheaux, G. M. Lankhuijzen, and L. D. Noordam, JOSA B 15, 1 (1998)

  18. Comparison of the quadratic configuration interaction and coupled cluster approaches to electron correlation including the effect of triple excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.; Rendell, Alistair P.

    1990-01-01

    The recently proposed quadratic configuration interaction (QCI) method is compared with the more rigorous coupled cluster (CC) approach for a variety of chemical systems. Some of these systems are well represented by a single-determinant reference function and others are not. The finite order singles and doubles correlation energy, the perturbational triples correlation energy, and a recently devised diagnostic for estimating the importance of multireference effects are considered. The spectroscopic constants of CuH, the equilibrium structure of cis-(NO)2 and the binding energies of Be3, Be4, Mg3, and Mg4 were calculated using both approaches. The diagnostic for estimating multireference character clearly demonstrates that the QCI method becomes less satisfactory than the CC approach as non-dynamical correlation becomes more important, in agreement with a perturbational analysis of the two methods and the numerical estimates of the triple excitation energies they yield. The results for CuH show that the differences between the two methods become more apparent as the chemical systems under investigation becomes more multireference in nature and the QCI results consequently become less reliable. Nonetheless, when the system of interest is dominated by a single reference determinant both QCI and CC give very similar results.

  19. Excitation of local magnetic moments by tunneling electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre; Lorente, Nicolás; Novaes, Frederico Dutilh

    2012-05-01

    The advent of milli-kelvin scanning tunneling microscopes (STM) with inbuilt magnetic fields has opened access to the study of magnetic phenomena with atomic resolution at surfaces. In the case of single atoms adsorbed on a surface, the existence of different magnetic energy levels localized on the adsorbate is due to the breaking of the rotational invariance of the adsorbate spin by the interaction with its environment, leading to energy terms in the meV range. These structures were revealed by STM experiments in IBM Almaden in the early 2000s for atomic adsorbates on CuN surfaces. The experiments consisted in the study of the changes in conductance caused by inelastic tunneling of electrons (IETS, inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy). Manganese and Iron adatoms were shown to have different magnetic anisotropies induced by the substrate. More experiments by other groups followed up, showing that magnetic excitations could be detected in a variety of systems: e.g. complex organic molecules showed that their magnetic anisotropy was dependent on the molecular environment, piles of magnetic molecules showed that they interact via intermolecular exchange interaction, spin waves were excited on ferromagnetic surfaces and in Mn chains, and magnetic impurities have been analyzed on semiconductors. These experiments brought up some intriguing questions: the efficiency of magnetic excitations was very high, the excitations could or could not involve spin flip of the exciting electron and singular-like behavior was sometimes found at the excitation thresholds. These facts called for extended theoretical analysis; perturbation theories, sudden-approximation approaches and a strong coupling scheme successfully explained most of the magnetic inelastic processes. In addition, many-body approaches were also used to decipher the interplay between inelastic processes and the Kondo effect. Spin torque transfer has been shown to be effective in changing spin orientations of an

  20. Cumulant approach for electronic excitations in x-ray and electron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehr, J. J.

    A quantitative treatment of electronic excitations and other many-body effects in x-ray and electron spectra has long been challenging. Physically, electronic correlations and atomic vibrations lead to inelastic losses and damping effects that are ignored in ground state methods or approximations such as TDDFT. Quasi-particle (QP) approaches such as the GW approximation yield significant improvements, as demonstrated in real-space Green's function and GW/Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations, but still ignore multi-electron excitations. Recently such excitations have been treated with considerable success using cumulant expansion techniques and the quasi-boson approximation. In this beyond QP approach, excitations such as plasmons and electron-hole excitations appear as satellites in the spectral function. The method naturally accounts for multiple-satellites and can be extended to include extrinsic losses and interference effects. Extensions for effects of vibrations and strong correlations including charge-transfer satellites may also be possible. These advances are illustrated with a number of applications. Supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER45623.

  1. High temperature electronic excitation and ionization rates in gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Frederick

    1991-01-01

    The relaxation times for electronic excitation due to electron bombardment of atoms was found to be quite short, so that electron kinetic temperature (T sub e) and the electron excitation temperature (T asterisk) should equilibrate quickly whenever electrons are present. However, once equilibrium has been achieved, further energy to the excited electronic states and to the kinetic energy of free electrons must be fed in by collisions with heavy particles that cause vibrational and electronic state transitions. The rate coefficients for excitation of electronic states produced by heavy particle collision have not been well known. However, a relatively simple semi-classical theory has been developed here which is analytic up to the final integration over a Boltzmann distribution of collision energies; this integral can then be evaluated numerically by quadrature. Once the rate coefficients have been determined, the relaxation of electronic excitation energy can be evaluated and compared with the relaxation rates of vibrational excitation. Then the relative importance of these two factors, electronic excitation and vibrational excitation by heavy particle collision, on the transfer of energy to free electron motion, can be assessed.

  2. Shape and core excited resonances in electron collisions with diazines.

    PubMed

    Mašín, Zdeněk; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D

    2012-11-28

    We present a comprehensive ab-initio study of electron collisions with pyrazine, pyrimidine, and pyridazine. The emphasis is placed on the identification and characterization of electron resonances in these systems. We use the R-matrix method and show that analysing the time-delay reveals resonances whose signature is not visible in the eigenphase sums. In addition to the well known π∗ resonances below 5 eV, we find three core-excited shape resonances in the energy range 5.5-8.5 eV and a few Feshbach resonances in the dipolar molecules. Additionally, 11 resonances with little effect on the elastic scattering from ground state diazines (but significant effect in elastic collisions with the molecules in an excited state) are found and characterized. We correlate these resonances across the three molecules and discuss their possible correspondence to resonances described in earlier studies on uracil.

  3. Nuclear excitation by electronic transition of 235U

    DOE PAGES

    Chodash, P. A.; Norman, E. B.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Fisher, S. E.; Holliday, K. S.; Jeffries, J. R.; Wakeling, M. A.; Wilks, S. C.

    2016-03-11

    Here, nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that can occur in isotopes containing a low-lying nuclear excited state. Over the past 40 yr, several experiments have attempted to measure NEET of 235U and those experiments have yielded conflicting results.

  4. Effect of high-optical excitation on the ultrafast electron dynamics in stacked-monolayer graphene samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda, Juan A.; Guimarães Rosa, Henrique; Gomes, José C. V.; Thoroh de Souza, Eunezio A.; de Brito-Cruz, Carlos H.; Fragnito, Hugo L.; Padilha, Lázaro A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on transient absorption experiments performed at high optical excitation fluences and used to study the ultrafast dynamics in graphene. We employed a degenerated scheme of pump and probe at 800 nm (1.55 eV). The time resolution of our measurements was limited by the pulse duration ~ 100 fs. The samples were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as single-layers on silica and, then staked layer-by-layer in order to make a stack of up to 5 graphene monolayers. We observed saturable absorption (SA) and fluence-dependent relaxation times. We see that the ultrafast carrier dynamics is composed by two decay mechanisms, one with response time of about 200 fs and a slower process of about 1 ps. The fast decay, due to both carrier-carrier and carrier-optical phonon scattering, becomes slower when the density of excited carrier was increased. We implemented a theoretical model and found that both the optical phonon rate emission and the optical phonon lifetime are affect by the pump fluence.

  5. Density domains of a photo-excited electron gas on liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monarkha, Yu. P.

    2016-06-01

    The Coulombic effect on the stability range of the photo-excited electron gas on liquid helium is shown to favor formation of domains of different densities. Domains appear to eliminate or greatly reduce regions with negative conductivity. An analysis of the density domain structure allows explaining remarkable observations reported recently for the photo-excited electron gas.

  6. Plasmoelectronics: coupling plasmonic excitation with electron flow.

    PubMed

    Warren, Scott C; Walker, David A; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2012-06-19

    Explorations of the coupling of light and charge via localized surface plasmons have led to the discovery that plasmonic excitation can influence macroscopic flows of charge and, conversely, that charging events can change the plasmonic excitation. We discuss recent theory and experiments in the emerging field of plasmoelectronics, with particular emphasis on the application of these materials to challenges in nanotechnology, energy use, and sensing. PMID:22385329

  7. Symmetry-adapted cluster and symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction method in the polarizable continuum model: Theory of the solvent effect on the electronic excitation of molecules in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammi, Roberto; Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    In this paper we present the theory and implementation of the symmetry-adapted cluster (SAC) and symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method, including the solvent effect, using the polarizable continuum model (PCM). The PCM and SAC/SAC-CI were consistently combined in terms of the energy functional formalism. The excitation energies were calculated by means of the state-specific approach, the advantage of which over the linear-response approach has been shown. The single-point energy calculation and its analytical energy derivatives are presented and implemented, where the free-energy and its derivatives are evaluated because of the presence of solute-solvent interactions. We have applied this method to s-trans-acrolein and metylenecyclopropene of their electronic excitation in solution. The molecular geometries in the ground and excited states were optimized in vacuum and in solution, and both the vertical and adiabatic excitations were studied. The PCM-SAC/SAC-CI reproduced the known trend of the solvent effect on the vertical excitation energies but the shift values were underestimated. The excited state geometry in planar and nonplanar conformations was investigated. The importance of using state-specific methods was shown for the solvent effect on the optimized geometry in the excited state. The mechanism of the solvent effect is discussed in terms of the Mulliken charges and electronic dipole moment.

  8. Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition - NEET

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.A.

    2002-06-10

    Experiments seeking to demonstrate nuclear excitation induced by synchrotron radiation have been enabled by the development of intense synchrotron radiation. The phenomena has been demonstrated in {sup 197}Au, while realistic upper limits for {sup 189}Os have been established. A new experiment in {sup 189}Os is described. The experimental claim of NEET in isomeric {sup 178}Hf is not credible.

  9. Electronic excitation of the surface of UV-irradiated solids in heterogeneous recombination of hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grankin, V. P.; Grankin, D. V.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction energy transfer to electrons and release of electrons from traps under the action of the recombination of H atoms on the surface of light-sum-storing crystals (Zn2SiO4-Mn, ZnS, ZnS,CdS-Ag) was studied. This effect is associated with the reaction energy accommodation via the electronic channel. The transfer of electronic excitations to the atomic recombination event is independent of the reaction rate, but depends on the electron transition energy in a solid. The possibility of electronic excitation per heterogeneous recombination event of H atoms increased exponentially as the electron transition energy decreased.

  10. Theoretical Studies of Chemical Reactions following Electronic Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.

    2003-01-01

    The use of multi-configurational wave functions is demonstrated for several processes: tautomerization reactions in the ground and excited states of the DNA base adenine, dissociation of glycine molecule after electronic excitation, and decomposition/deformation of novel rare gas molecules HRgF. These processes involve bond brealung/formation and require multi-configurational approaches that include dynamic correlation.

  11. Electron impact excitation of Kr XXVIII

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, K.M.; Keenan, F.P.; Lawson, K.D.

    2011-05-15

    Collision strengths ({Omega}) are calculated for all 6328 transitions among the lowest 113 levels belonging to the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5},2s2p{sup 6},2s{sup 2}2p{sup 4}3l,2s2p{sup 5}3l, and 2p{sup 6}3l configurations of fluorine-like krypton, Kr XXVIII, using the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code. All partial waves with angular momentum J{<=}40 are included, sufficient for the convergence of {Omega} for forbidden transitions. For allowed transitions a top-up is employed to obtain converged values of {Omega} up to an energy of 400 Ryd. Resonances in the thresholds region are resolved on a narrow energy mesh, and results for effective collision strengths (Y) are obtained after averaging the values of {Omega} over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. Values of Y are reported over a wide temperature range below 10{sup 7.1}K, and the accuracy of the results is assessed. In addition, effective collision strengths are listed for the temperature range 7.0{<=}logT{sub e}(K){<=}9.0, obtained from non-resonant collision strengths generated with the FAC code.

  12. Electronic excited states and relaxation dynamics in polymer heterojunction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramon, John Glenn Santos

    , we examine the effect of the nanoscale interfacial morphology and solvation on the electronic excited states of TFB/F8BT. Here, we employ time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to investigate the relevant excited states of two stacking configurations. We show that the calculated states agree with the excited states responsible for the experimentally observed emission peaks and that these states are blue shifted relative to those of the isolated chain. Furthermore, slight lateral shifts in the stacking orientation not only shift the excited state energies; more importantly, they alter the nature of these states altogether. Lastly, we see that solvation greatly stabilizes the charge-transfer states.

  13. Electron impact excitation of Kr XXXII

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, K.M. Keenan, F.P.; Lawson, K.D.

    2009-09-15

    Collision strengths ({omega}) have been calculated for all 7750 transitions among the lowest 125 levels belonging to the 2s{sup 2}2p,2s2p{sup 2},2p{sup 3},2s{sup 2}3l,2s2p3l, and 2p{sup 2}3l configurations of boron-like krypton, Kr XXXII, for which the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code has been adopted. All partial waves with angular momentum J{<=}40 have been included, sufficient for the convergence of {omega} for forbidden transitions. For allowed transitions, a top-up has been included in order to obtain converged values of {omega} up to an energy of 500 Ryd. Resonances in the thresholds region have been resolved in a narrow energy mesh, and results for effective collision strengths (Y) have been obtained after averaging the values of {omega} over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. Values of Y are reported over a wide temperature range below 10{sup 7.3}K, and the accuracy of the results is assessed. Values of Y are also listed in the temperature range 7.3{<=}logT{sub e}(K){<=}9.0, obtained from the nonresonant collision strengths from the Flexible Atomic Code.

  14. Ultrafast electronic dynamics in laser-excited crystalline bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Alexey A.; Misochko, Oleg V.; Chekalin, Sergey V.

    2013-07-01

    Femtosecond spectroscopy is applied to study transient electronic processes in bismuth. The components with relaxation times of 1 ps, 7 ps, and ˜1 ns are detected in the photoinduced reflectivity response of the crystal. To facilitate assignment of the observed relaxation to the decay of particular excited electronic states, we use pump pulses with central wavelengths ranging from 400 to 2300 nm. Additionally, we examine the variation of parameters of coherent A1g phonons upon the change of excitation and probing conditions. Data analysis reveals significant wavevector dependence of electron-hole and electron-phonon coupling strength along Γ-T direction of the Brillouin zone.

  15. Computing electronic structures: A new multiconfiguration approach for excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Cances, Eric . E-mail: cances@cermics.enpc.fr; Galicher, Herve . E-mail: galicher@cermics.enpc.fr; Lewin, Mathieu . E-mail: lewin@cermic.enpc.fr

    2006-02-10

    We present a new method for the computation of electronic excited states of molecular systems. This method is based upon a recent theoretical definition of multiconfiguration excited states [due to one of us, see M. Lewin, Solutions of the multiconfiguration equations in quantum chemistry, Arch. Rat. Mech. Anal. 171 (2004) 83-114]. Our algorithm, dedicated to the computation of the first excited state, always converges to a stationary state of the multiconfiguration model, which can be interpreted as an approximate excited state of the molecule. The definition of this approximate excited state is variational. An interesting feature is that it satisfies a non-linear Hylleraas-Undheim-MacDonald type principle: the energy of the approximate excited state is an upper bound to the true excited state energy of the N-body Hamiltonian. To compute the first excited state, one has to deform paths on a manifold, like this is usually done in the search for transition states between reactants and products on potential energy surfaces. We propose here a general method for the deformation of paths which could also be useful in other settings. We also compare our method to other approaches used in Quantum Chemistry and give some explanation of the unsatisfactory behaviours which are sometimes observed when using the latter. Numerical results for the special case of two-electron systems are provided: we compute the first singlet excited state potential energy surface of the H {sub 2} molecule.

  16. Theory of nuclear excitation by electron capture for heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Palffy, Adriana; Scheid, Werner; Harman, Zoltan

    2006-01-15

    We investigate the resonant process of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC), in which a continuum electron is captured into a bound state of an ion with the simultaneous excitation of the nucleus. In order to derive the cross section a Feshbach projection operator formalism is introduced. Nuclear states and transitions are described by a nuclear collective model and making use of experimental data. Transition rates and total cross sections for NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the excited nucleus are calculated for various heavy-ion collision systems.

  17. Dissociative excitation of molecular hydrogen by electron impact.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Zorn, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    A pulsed electron beam was employed in the experiment to excite a diffuse gas of hydrogen molecules. The energy resolution of the electron gun permitted careful measurements of the thresholds for the production of slow and fast H(2s) atoms. The experiment was conducted in a vacuum system that facilitated a systematic study of the angular distribution of the fragments in the dissociative excitation process. The results permit the identification of the several excited states that are involved in the production of the H(2s) fragments.

  18. Electronic Excitations and Metal-Insulator Transition inPoly(3-hexylthiophene) Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Sai, N.; Li, Z.Q.; Martin, M.C.; Basov, D.N.; Di Ventra, M.

    2006-11-07

    We carry out a comprehensive theoretical and experimentalstudy of charge injection in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) to determinethe most likely scenario for metal-insulator transition in this system.Wecalculate the optical-absorption frequencies corresponding to a polaronand a bipolaron lattice in P3HT. We also analyze the electronicexcitations for three possible scenarios under which a first- or asecond-order metal-insulator transition can occur in doped P3HT. Thesetheoretical scenarios are compared with data from infrared absorptionspectroscopy on P3HT thin-film field-effect transistors (FETs). Ourmeasurements and theoretical predictions suggest that charge-inducedlocalized states in P3HT FETs are bipolarons and that the highest dopinglevel achieved in our experiments approaches that required for afirst-order metal-insulator transition.

  19. Electron-pair excitations and the molecular Coulomb continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James

    2009-01-01

    Electron-pair excitations in the molecular hydrogen continuum are described by quantizing rotations of the momentum plane of the electron pair about by the pair's relative momentum. A helium-like description of the molecular pi.Joto double ionization is thus extended to higher angular momenta of the electron pair. A simple three-state superposition is found to account surprisingly well for recent observations of noncoplanar electron-pair, molecular-axis angular distributions.

  20. Dynamics Of Electronic Excitation Of Solids With Ultrashort Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Nikita; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2010-10-08

    When ultrashort laser pulses irradiate a solid, photoabsorption by electrons in conduction band produces nonequilibrium highly energetic free electrons gas. We study the ionization and excitation of the electronic subsystem in a semiconductor and a metal (solid silicon and aluminum, respectively). The irradiating femtosecond laser pulse has a duration of 10 fs and a photon energy of h-bar {omega} = 38 eV. The classical Monte Carlo method is extended to take into account the electronic band structure and Pauli's principle for electrons excited to the conduction band. In the case of semiconductors this applies to the holes as well. Conduction band electrons and valence band holes induce secondary excitation and ionization processes which we simulate event by event. We discuss the transient electron dynamics with respect to the differences between semiconductors and metals. For metals the electronic distribution is split up into two branches: a low energy distribution as a slightly distorted Fermi-distribution and a long high energy tail. For the case of semiconductors it is split into two parts by the band gap. To thermalize, these excited electronic subsystems need longer times than the characteristic pulse duration. Therefore, the analysis of experimental data with femtosecond lasers must be based on non-equilibrium concepts.

  1. Atomic electron excitation probabilities during orbital electron capture by the nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crasemann, B.; Chen, M. H.; Briand, J. P.; Chevallier, P.; Chetioui, A.; Tavernier, M.

    1979-01-01

    Approximate probabilities of electron excitation (shakeup/shakeoff) from various atomic states during nuclear ns electron capture have been calculated in the sudden approximation, using Hartree-Fock wave functions. Total excitation probabilities are much lower than during inner-shell ionization by photons or electrons, and ns states are more likely to be excited than np states. This latter result is borne out by K-alpha X-ray satellite spectra.

  2. "Delta Plots"--A New Way to Visualize Electronic Excitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Harry; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Presents procedures for obtaining and examples of delta plots (a way of illustrating electron density changes associated with electronic excitation). These plots are pedagogically useful for visualizing simple and complex transitions and provide a way of "seeing" the origin of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-dictated carbonyl…

  3. Electron-phonon relaxation and excited electron distribution in gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, V. P.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Chulkov, E. V.; Echenique, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a theory of energy relaxation in semiconductors and insulators highly excited by the long-acting external irradiation. We derive the equation for the non-equilibrium distribution function of excited electrons. The solution for this function breaks up into the sum of two contributions. The low-energy contribution is concentrated in a narrow range near the bottom of the conduction band. It has the typical form of a Fermi distribution with an effective temperature and chemical potential. The effective temperature and chemical potential in this low-energy term are determined by the intensity of carriers' generation, the speed of electron-phonon relaxation, rates of inter-band recombination, and electron capture on the defects. In addition, there is a substantial high-energy correction. This high-energy "tail" largely covers the conduction band. The shape of the high-energy "tail" strongly depends on the rate of electron-phonon relaxation but does not depend on the rates of recombination and trapping. We apply the theory to the calculation of a non-equilibrium distribution of electrons in an irradiated GaN. Probabilities of optical excitations from the valence to conduction band and electron-phonon coupling probabilities in GaN were calculated by the density functional perturbation theory. Our calculation of both parts of distribution function in gallium nitride shows that when the speed of the electron-phonon scattering is comparable with the rate of recombination and trapping then the contribution of the non-Fermi "tail" is comparable with that of the low-energy Fermi-like component. So the high-energy contribution can essentially affect the charge transport in the irradiated and highly doped semiconductors.

  4. Radiative and non radiative decay of electronically excited HNF (DNF)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Dagdigian, P.J.

    1993-12-31

    Laser experiments probing the dynamics of the decay of electronically excited HNF/DNF({tilde A}{sup 2}A`) will be reported. Measured decay lifetimes of individual (J`,K) excited levels revealed the onset of a rapid nonradiative decay process at a threshold energy of 23,800 {+-} 500 cm{sup {minus}1} above the HNF({tilde X}{sup 2}A``) zero-point level. The assignment of this threshold to the predissociation process, HNF/DNF{sup *} {yields} NH/ND(X{sup 3}{Sigma}{sup {minus}}) + F({sup 2}P), has been confirmed by direct observation of the NH/ND fragment. Photofragmentation excitation spectra, which exhibits strong mixing between the excited and ground electronic states, will be presented and discussed.

  5. Electronic excitation spectrum of ABC-stacked multilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henni, Y.; Nogajewski, K.; Ojeda Collado, H. P.; Usaj, G.; Balseiro, C. A.; Potemski, M.; Faugeras, C.

    The electronic properties of ABC graphene trilayers has attracted lot of attention recently due to their potential applications in engineering carbon-based devices with gate tunable electrical conductivity. Morever,ABC-stacked thin layers of graphite are predicted to host peculiar surface electronic states, with a flat dispersion over most of the Brillouin zone. The associated high density of states is likely to favour the emergence of exotic electronic phases, such as charge density waves or even superconductivity. We present a micro-magneto-Raman scattering study of a thin graphite flake produced by exfoliation of natural graphite, composed of ~15graphene layers, and including a large ABC-stacked domain. Exploring the low temperature Raman scattering spectrum of this domain up to B=29T,we identify inter Landau level electronic excitations within the surface flat bands,together with electronic excitations involving the gapped states in the bulk. This interband electronic excitation at B=0T can be observed,up to room temperature, directly in the Raman scattering spectrum as a broad(~ 180 cm-1) feature. Because the energy gap strongly depends on the number of layers,this electronic excitation can be used to identify and characterize ABC-stacked graphite thin layers.

  6. Effect of the medium and the formation of nanostructures on deexcitation of electronic excitation of Eu(III) and Tb(III) chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveshnikova, E. B.; Dudar, S. S.; Shablya, A. V.; Ermolaev, V. L.

    2006-10-01

    The intensity I lum and lifetime τlum of the luminescence of complexes of Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions with β-diketones and o-phenanthroline in water-ethanol solutions of these ligands have been analyzed as functions of the concentrations of ligand, luminescing lanthanide ions, and added ions causing columinescence and of the solvent deuteration. It is shown that the formation of nanostructures from Ln complexes and their coarsening leads to an increase in τlum of Eu(III) and Tb(III) and that this increase is due to the suppression of both photochemical deexcitation of these ions and transfer of their electronic excitation energy to OH vibrations of water molecules. The disappearance of the dependence of I lum of Eu(III) on deuteration of water-ethanol solutions of n-methoxybenzoyltrifluoracetone + o-phenanthroline caused by adding Gd(III) ions is explained by the shift of the equilibrium of formation of complexes of Ln chelates to neutral hydrophoblic forms corresponding to the formation of nanostructures of these chelates in the solution. The differences in effect of La(III) and Gd(III) ions on I lum and τlum of Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes are explained. It is shown that the widely discussed effect of columinescence not only results from the energy migration in mixed structures of Eu or Tb complexes and Gd complexes but is also due to a large extent to the decrease in τlum of Eu(III) or Tb(III) caused by their incorporation into nanostructures.

  7. Ultrafast electronic processes in highly excited solids: subpicosecond optical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petite, Guillaume

    1998-09-01

    Modern short pulse lasers are efficient tools for production of high levels of electronic excitation in solids under irradiation, a state which mimics that of the same materials after the passage of any particle which deposits its energy under the form of electronic excitation. Because they can also be used in a number of optical experiments of charge carriers and defect detection, they offer the unique opportunity of unraveling the ultrafast kinetic aspects of atomic processes induced by the electronic excitation, whose final state is the only aspect accessible in the case of other irradiations. After mentioning a few orders of magnitudes concerning the energy deposition, we will show some examples of recent experiments concerning the mechanisms of irradiation defect creation in insulators. The perspectives opened by recent developments of light sources in a wide range of wavelengths will be finally presented.

  8. Electronic excitation and isentropic coefficients of high temperature planetary atmosphere plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Colonna, Gianpiero; Capitelli, Mario

    2012-07-15

    In this paper, we have discussed the effects of electronically excited states of atomic species in affecting the isentropic coefficients of plasmas, focusing on mixtures representing the atmospheres of Jupiter, Mars, and Earth. General behaviors have been rationalized on the basis of simplified approaches. The contribution of the electronically excited states has been evidenced by comparing results obtained considering only the ground state and those obtained using either Fermi or Griem cutoff criteria.

  9. Superelastic electron scattering from laser-excited cesium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D. S.; Karaganov, V.; Brunger, M. J.; Teubner, P. J. O.; Bray, I.; Bartschat, K.

    2007-06-15

    We present results from a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of superelastic electron scattering from laser-excited Cs atoms in the (6p){sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state. Comparison of the measured pseudo-Stokes parameters P{sub 1}, P{sub 2}, and P{sub 3} and the total degree of polarization P{sup +} for incident energies of 5.5 eV and 13.5 eV, respectively, with theoretical predictions based upon a nonrelativistic convergent close-coupling method and a 24-state semirelativistic Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach indicates that driving channel coupling to convergence for these observables is more important than accounting for relativistic effects.

  10. Benchmark Calculations for Electron-Impact Excitation of Krypton.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Bartschat, K.

    2000-06-01

    Angular correlation and polarization studies of electron-impact excitation of the heavy rare gases provide important benchmarks for testing theoretical approaches. For e--Kr collisions, simulations must treat a complex target structure and the scattering dynamics, both with the inclusion of relativistic effects. A variety of observables calculated with our improved model will be presented, the convergence of the results with the number of coupled channels will be analyzed, and the results will be compared with detailed experimental data [1,2]. Finally, our predictions for the angular momentum transfer L_⊥ at small scattering angles suggest a promising test for a deeper understanding of propensity rules in these transitions. [1] X. Guo et al. (1999), J. Phys. B 32 L155. [2] M. Dümmler et al. (1995), J. Phys. B 28 2985.

  11. Integrating proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) and excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Kent, Caleb A.; Paul, Jared J.; Papanikolas, John M.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2010-11-01

    In many of the chemical steps in photosynthesis and artificial photosynthesis, proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays an essential role. An important issue is how excited state reactivity can be integrated with PCET to carry out solar fuel reactions such as water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen or water reduction of CO2 to methanol or hydrocarbons. The principles behind PCET and concerted electron–proton transfer (EPT) pathways are reasonably well understood. In Photosystem II antenna light absorption is followed by sensitization of chlorophyll P680 and electron transfer quenching to give P680+. The oxidized chlorophyll activates the oxygen evolving complex (OEC), a CaMn4 cluster, through an intervening tyrosine–histidine pair, YZ. EPT plays a major role in a series of four activation steps that ultimately result in loss of 4e-/4H+ from the OEC with oxygen evolution. The key elements in photosynthesis and artificial photosynthesis – light absorption, excited state energy and electron transfer, electron transfer activation of multiple-electron, multiple-proton catalysis – can also be assembled in dye sensitized photoelectrochemical synthesis cells (DS-PEC). In this approach, molecular or nanoscale assemblies are incorporated at separate electrodes for coupled, light driven oxidation and reduction. Separate excited state electron transfer followed by proton transfer can be combined in single semi-concerted steps (photo-EPT) by photolysis of organic charge transfer excited states with H-bonded bases or in metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited states in pre-associated assemblies with H-bonded electron transfer donors or acceptors. In these assemblies, photochemically induced electron and proton transfer occur in a single, semi-concerted event to give high-energy, redox active intermediates.

  12. Axial- and radial-resolved electron density and excitation temperature of aluminum plasma induced by nanosecond laser: Effect of the ambient gas composition and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dawood, Mahmoud S.; Hamdan, Ahmad E-mail: Joelle.margot@umontreal.ca; Margot, Joëlle E-mail: Joelle.margot@umontreal.ca

    2015-11-15

    The spatial variation of the characteristics of an aluminum plasma induced by a pulsed nanosecond XeCl laser is studied in this paper. The electron density and the excitation temperature are deduced from time- and space- resolved Stark broadening of an ion line and from a Boltzmann diagram, respectively. The influence of the gas pressure (from vacuum up to atmospheric pressure) and compositions (argon, nitrogen and helium) on these characteristics is investigated. It is observed that the highest electron density occurs near the laser spot and decreases by moving away both from the target surface and from the plume center to its edge. The electron density increases with the gas pressure, the highest values being occurred at atmospheric pressure when the ambient gas has the highest mass, i.e. in argon. The excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot of line intensities of iron impurities present in the aluminum target. The highest temperature is observed close to the laser spot location for argon at atmospheric pressure. It decreases by moving away from the target surface in the axial direction. However, no significant variation of temperature occurs along the radial direction. The differences observed between the axial and radial direction are mainly due to the different plasma kinetics in both directions.

  13. Electron impact excitation cross sections in F-like selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Guoxin |; Ong, P.P.

    1998-09-01

    Cross sections for excitation induced by electron collision between low-lying 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5} and 1s{sup 2}2s2p{sup 6} states of f-like selenium and from these states to singly excited states with the excited electron occupying the M shell have been calculated by relativistic distorted-wave Born procedures. The GRASP{sup 2} code was used for the atomic structure calculations. The continuum orbitals for the construction of continuum states were computed in the distorted-wave approximation, in which the distorted-wave potential used was the spherically averaged potential of the nucleus plus the potential of the bound electrons of the bound state. The cross sections for excitations were computed first by a 233-level multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) configuration expansion and then by a 279-level MCDF configuration expansion. The latter procedure, which also took into account contributions from all the participating singly excited N-shell states, was found to be necessary for improved accuracy. The cross section data should be a useful reference in the development of x-ray lasers and other related fields involving highly stripped ions.

  14. Rotational excitation of physisorbed molecules by resonant electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    2002-04-01

    The resonant rotational excitation of physisorbed H 2 molecules by low energy electron impact is studied using the rotational sudden approximation. The rotational excitation efficiency is analysed as a function of the constraint imposed on the molecular rotation by the adsorption. This allows the description of the variation of the energy loss spectrum corresponding to rovibrational excitation as a function of the constraint on molecular rotation. This model study is then used to discuss the recent results by Svensson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 124] on the rovibrational excitation of H 2 molecules adsorbed at steps on Cu(5 1 0), in terms of quasi-2D rotor and of constrained 3D rotors.

  15. A multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock method for excited electronic states. II. Coulomb interaction effects in single conjugated polymer chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, R. P.; Fisher, A. J.; Stella, L.; Horsfield, A. P.

    2011-06-01

    Conjugated polymers have attracted considerable attention in the last few decades due to their potential for optoelectronic applications. A key step that needs optimisation is charge carrier separation following photoexcitation. To understand better the dynamics of the exciton prior to charge separation, we have performed simulations of the formation and dynamics of localised excitations in single conjugated polymer strands. We use a nonadiabatic molecular dynamics method which allows for the coupled evolution of the nuclear degrees of freedom and of multiconfigurational electronic wavefunctions. We show the relaxation of electron-hole pairs to form excitons and oppositely charged polaron pairs and discuss the modifications to the relaxation process predicted by the inclusion of the Coulomb interaction between the carriers. The issue of charge photogeneration in conjugated polymers in dilute solution is also addressed.

  16. Electron impact excitation of Ti XXI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Keenan, F. P.

    2012-11-01

    Energy levels and radiative rates for E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions among the lowest 49 levels, belonging to the n <= 5 configurations of Ti XXI, are calculated using the GRASP code. Collision strengths are also calculated over a wide energy range using the fully relativistic DARC code. Resonances are resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region and effective collision strengths are calculated for all 1176 transitions at temperatures up to 107.5 K. Comparisons are made with the earlier available as well as other parallel calculations from the FAC code, and discrepancies are noted for some of the transitions, particularly the forbidden ones.

  17. Electron excitation collision strengths for positive atomic ions: a collection of theoretical data

    SciTech Connect

    Merts, A.L.; Mann, J.B.; Robb, W.D.; Magee, N.H. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains data on theoretical and experimental cross sections for electron impact excitation of positive atomic ions. It is an updated and corrected version of a preliminary manuscript which was used during an Atomic Data Workshop on Electron Excitation of Ions held at Los Alamos in November 1978. The current status of quantitative knowledge of collisional excitation collision strengths is shown for highly stripped ions where configuration mixing, relativistic and resonance effects may be important. The results show a reasonably satisfactory state for first-row isoelectronic ions and indicate that a considerable amount of work remains to be done for second-row and heavier ions.

  18. Minimal-excitation states for electron quantum optics using levitons.

    PubMed

    Dubois, J; Jullien, T; Portier, F; Roche, P; Cavanna, A; Jin, Y; Wegscheider, W; Roulleau, P; Glattli, D C

    2013-10-31

    The on-demand generation of pure quantum excitations is important for the operation of quantum systems, but it is particularly difficult for a system of fermions. This is because any perturbation affects all states below the Fermi energy, resulting in a complex superposition of particle and hole excitations. However, it was predicted nearly 20 years ago that a Lorentzian time-dependent potential with quantized flux generates a minimal excitation with only one particle and no hole. Here we report that such quasiparticles (hereafter termed levitons) can be generated on demand in a conductor by applying voltage pulses to a contact. Partitioning the excitations with an electronic beam splitter generates a current noise that we use to measure their number. Minimal-excitation states are observed for Lorentzian pulses, whereas for other pulse shapes there are significant contributions from holes. Further identification of levitons is provided in the energy domain with shot-noise spectroscopy, and in the time domain with electronic Hong-Ou-Mandel noise correlations. The latter, obtained by colliding synchronized levitons on a beam splitter, exemplifies the potential use of levitons for quantum information: using linear electron quantum optics in ballistic conductors, it is possible to imagine flying-qubit operation in which the Fermi statistics are exploited to entangle synchronized electrons emitted by distinct sources. Compared with electron sources based on quantum dots, the generation of levitons does not require delicate nanolithography, considerably simplifying the circuitry for scalability. Levitons are not limited to carrying a single charge, and so in a broader context n-particle levitons could find application in the study of full electron counting statistics. But they can also carry a fraction of charge if they are implemented in Luttinger liquids or in fractional quantum Hall edge channels; this allows the study of Abelian and non-Abelian quasiparticles in the

  19. Minimal-excitation states for electron quantum optics using levitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, J.; Jullien, T.; Portier, F.; Roche, P.; Cavanna, A.; Jin, Y.; Wegscheider, W.; Roulleau, P.; Glattli, D. C.

    2013-10-01

    The on-demand generation of pure quantum excitations is important for the operation of quantum systems, but it is particularly difficult for a system of fermions. This is because any perturbation affects all states below the Fermi energy, resulting in a complex superposition of particle and hole excitations. However, it was predicted nearly 20 years ago that a Lorentzian time-dependent potential with quantized flux generates a minimal excitation with only one particle and no hole. Here we report that such quasiparticles (hereafter termed levitons) can be generated on demand in a conductor by applying voltage pulses to a contact. Partitioning the excitations with an electronic beam splitter generates a current noise that we use to measure their number. Minimal-excitation states are observed for Lorentzian pulses, whereas for other pulse shapes there are significant contributions from holes. Further identification of levitons is provided in the energy domain with shot-noise spectroscopy, and in the time domain with electronic Hong-Ou-Mandel noise correlations. The latter, obtained by colliding synchronized levitons on a beam splitter, exemplifies the potential use of levitons for quantum information: using linear electron quantum optics in ballistic conductors, it is possible to imagine flying-qubit operation in which the Fermi statistics are exploited to entangle synchronized electrons emitted by distinct sources. Compared with electron sources based on quantum dots, the generation of levitons does not require delicate nanolithography, considerably simplifying the circuitry for scalability. Levitons are not limited to carrying a single charge, and so in a broader context n-particle levitons could find application in the study of full electron counting statistics. But they can also carry a fraction of charge if they are implemented in Luttinger liquids or in fractional quantum Hall edge channels; this allows the study of Abelian and non-Abelian quasiparticles in the

  20. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron; Yang, Zeng-hui; Ullrich, Carsten A.; Trail, John R.; Needs, Richard J.

    2014-05-14

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two-electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange, is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble.

  1. Electron impact excitation of argon in the extreme vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentall, J. E.; Morgan, H. D.

    1976-01-01

    Polarization-free excitation cross sections in the extreme vacuum ultraviolet have been measured for electron impact on Ar. Observed spectral features were those lines of Ar I and Ar II which lie between 700 and 1100 A. Excitation functions were measured for the Ar I resonance line at 1048 A and the Ar II resonance line at 920 A. Peak cross sections for these two lines were found to be (39.4 plus or minus 7.9) x 10 to the -18th and (6.9 plus or minus 1.4) x 10 to the -18th, respectively. At low energies, excitation of the Ar II resonance line is dominated by an electron exchange transition.

  2. Dissociative excitation and fragmentation of S8 by electron impact.

    PubMed

    Brotton, S J; McConkey, J W

    2011-05-28

    The vacuum-ultraviolet emission spectrum from 136 nm to 168 nm following the dissociative excitation of a predominantly S(8) target by electron impact at 100 eV incident energy was measured. The relative cross sections for the dominant multiplets at 138.9, 142.9, 147.9, and 166.7 nm are presented. Excitation functions are shown for electron-impact energies from below threshold to 360 eV for the two most prominent emissions at 142.5 nm and 147.4 nm. Five thresholds are clearly apparent in both excitation functions. For the four highest energy channels, the energy separation between the adjacent thresholds is approximately constant and the cross sections reduce regularly as the threshold energies increase. We suggest possible fragmentation pathways of the dissociating S(8) molecule that reproduce the energies of our observed thresholds.

  3. Excited State Electronic Properties of Sodium Iodide and Cesium Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei

    2013-05-01

    We compute from first principles the dielectric function, loss function, lifetime and scattering rate of quasiparticles due to electronic losses, and secondary particle spectrum due to plasmon decay in two scintillating alkali halides, sodium iodide and cesium iodide. Particular emphasis is placed on quasiparticles within several multiples of the band gap from the band edges. A theory for the decay spectra of plasmons and other electronic excitations in crystals is presented. Applications to Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are discussed.

  4. Electron excitations in Na_xCoO_2(*)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, O. D.; Eguiluz, A. G.

    2004-03-01

    We report a study of electron-hole excitations in Na_xCoO2 for x=1/3. Starting from the paramagnetic LDA ground state, we then discuss the impact of correlation on the nature of the ground state within the correlated band theory LDA+U method. The possible significance of the neglect of quantum fluctuations is oulined. The excitation spectrum is also calculated within mean field theory (the random phase approximation). Novel loss structure in the energy domain ˜ U10 to 3U is reported; the same corresponds to low-energy electron-hole excitations in the half-metal LSDA regime, to collective electronic modes present more generally. These excitations should be observed rather directly with available loss spectroscopies (electrons and x-rays), thus providing an additional set of constraints on the description of the correlated ground state. (*) Collaboration supported by the PCSCS network, within the DOE-CMSN. (1) Supported by NSF-DMR 0219332 (2) Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. (3) DOE Grant DE-FG03-01ER45876

  5. Tuning ground states and excitations in complex electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.R.

    1996-09-01

    Modern electronic materials are characterized by a great variety of broken-symmetry ground states and excitations. Their control requires understanding and tuning underlying driving forces of spin-charge-lattice coupling, critical to macroscopic properties and applications. We report representative model calculations which demonstrate some of the richness of the phenomena and the challenges for successful microscopic modeling.

  6. Excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fomichev, V. V.; Fainshtein, S. M.; Chernov, G. P.

    2013-05-15

    An alternative mechanism for the excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics as a result of the development of explosive instability in a weakly relativistic beam-plasma system in the solar atmosphere is proposed. The efficiency of the new mechanism as compared to the previously discussed ones is analyzed.

  7. Photoionization of furan from the ground and excited electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponzi, Aurora; Sapunar, Marin; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Došlić, Nada; Decleva, Piero

    2016-02-01

    Here we present a comparative computational study of the photoionization of furan from the ground and the two lowest-lying excited electronic states. The study aims to assess the quality of the computational methods currently employed for treating bound and continuum states in photoionization. For the ionization from the ground electronic state, we show that the Dyson orbital approach combined with an accurate solution of the continuum one particle wave functions in a multicenter B-spline basis, at the density functional theory (DFT) level, provides cross sections and asymmetry parameters in excellent agreement with experimental data. On the contrary, when the Dyson orbitals approach is combined with the Coulomb and orthogonalized Coulomb treatments of the continuum, the results are qualitatively different. In excited electronic states, three electronic structure methods, TDDFT, ADC(2), and CASSCF, have been used for the computation of the Dyson orbitals, while the continuum was treated at the B-spline/DFT level. We show that photoionization observables are sensitive probes of the nature of the excited states as well as of the quality of excited state wave functions. This paves the way for applications in more complex situations such as time resolved photoionization spectroscopy.

  8. Photoionization of furan from the ground and excited electronic states.

    PubMed

    Ponzi, Aurora; Sapunar, Marin; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Došlić, Nađa; Decleva, Piero

    2016-02-28

    Here we present a comparative computational study of the photoionization of furan from the ground and the two lowest-lying excited electronic states. The study aims to assess the quality of the computational methods currently employed for treating bound and continuum states in photoionization. For the ionization from the ground electronic state, we show that the Dyson orbital approach combined with an accurate solution of the continuum one particle wave functions in a multicenter B-spline basis, at the density functional theory (DFT) level, provides cross sections and asymmetry parameters in excellent agreement with experimental data. On the contrary, when the Dyson orbitals approach is combined with the Coulomb and orthogonalized Coulomb treatments of the continuum, the results are qualitatively different. In excited electronic states, three electronic structure methods, TDDFT, ADC(2), and CASSCF, have been used for the computation of the Dyson orbitals, while the continuum was treated at the B-spline/DFT level. We show that photoionization observables are sensitive probes of the nature of the excited states as well as of the quality of excited state wave functions. This paves the way for applications in more complex situations such as time resolved photoionization spectroscopy. PMID:26931702

  9. Investigations of ultrafast dynamics in electronically excited alkylbenzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Gerber, T.; Radi, P.; Sych, Y.; Maksyutenko, P.; Knopp, G.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate ultrafast dynamics in electronically excited states of some typical alkylbenzenes by time-resolved two-colour four wave mixing and velocity map imaging as complementary methods. In this context an upgraded double-sided time-resolved velocity map imaging setup is also proposed.

  10. An incompressible state of a photo-excited electron gas

    PubMed Central

    Chepelianskii, Alexei D.; Watanabe, Masamitsu; Nasyedkin, Kostyantyn; Kono, Kimitoshi; Konstantinov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrons in a magnetic field can form new states of matter characterized by topological properties and strong electronic correlations as displayed in the integer and fractional quantum Hall states. In these states, the electron liquid displays several spectacular characteristics, which manifest themselves in transport experiments with the quantization of the Hall resistance and a vanishing longitudinal conductivity or in thermodynamic equilibrium when the electron fluid becomes incompressible. Several experiments have reported that dissipationless transport can be achieved even at weak, non-quantizing magnetic fields when the electrons absorb photons at specific energies related to their cyclotron frequency. Here we perform compressibility measurements on electrons on liquid helium demonstrating the formation of an incompressible electronic state under these resonant excitation conditions. This new state provides a striking example of irradiation-induced self-organization in a quantum system. PMID:26007282

  11. Dynamics of two-electron excitations in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, C.D.; Menzel, A.; Frigo, S.P.

    1997-04-01

    Excitation of both electrons in helium offers a unique window for studying electron correlation at the most basic level in an atom in which these two electrons and the nucleus form a three-body system. The authors utilized the first light available at the U-8 undulator-SGM monochromator beamline to investigate the dynamic parameters, partial cross sections, differential cross sections, and photoelectron angular distribution parameters ({beta}), with a high resolving power for the photon beam and at the highly differential level afforded by the use of their electron spectrometer. In parallel, they carried out detailed calculations of the relevant properties by a theoretical approach that is based on the hyperspherical close-coupling method. Partial photoionization cross sections {sigma}{sub n}, and photoelectron angular distributions {beta}{sub n} were measured for all possible final ionic states He{sup +}(n) in the region of the double excitations N(K,T){sup A} up to the N=5 threshold. At a photon energy bandpass of 12 meV below the thresholds N=3, 4, and 5, this level of differentiation offers the most critical assessment of the dynamics of the two-electron excitations to date. The experimental data were seen to be very well described by the most advanced theoretical calculations.

  12. The DIET from semiconductor surfaces by excitation of valence electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanasaki, Jun'ichi; Okano, Akiko; Ishikawa, Ken'ichi; Nakai, Yasuo; Itoh, Noriaki

    1995-06-01

    We discuss the desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) of constituent atoms from several types of non-metallic solids, particularly the DIET from semiconductors by valence electron excitations. We first classify the non-metallic solids into type A, in which no self-trapping of excitons occurs, and type B, in which self-trapping occurs. We argue that in type B solids the localization of electron-hole pairs or excitons through the self-trapping on the surfaces induces the Menzel-Gomer-Redhead-type anti-bonding state resulting in DIET. For the DIET from type A non-metals, typically semiconductors, in which the self-trapping is not induced, we derive two important characteristics: (1) the emission is related to defects on the surfaces and (2) single electronic excitation cannot induce the emissions. The recent experimental observations of laser-induced emissions satisfying these characteristics for the DIET from semiconductors are surveyed. Furthermore we present experimental evidence demonstrating that the observed emissions are of the electronic origin: the emission occurs dominantly when the excitation is localized on the surface. Finally, surface phenomena, such as laser ablation and dry etching, related to the DIET from semiconductors, and the applications of the DIET from semiconductors are discussed.

  13. Statistics of excitations in the electron glass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palassini, Matteo

    2011-03-01

    We study the statistics of elementary excitations in the classical electron glass model of localized electrons interacting via the unscreened Coulomb interaction in the presence of disorder. We reconsider the long-standing puzzle of the exponential suppression of the single-particle density of states near the Fermi level, by measuring accurately the density of states of charged and electron-hole pair excitations via finite temperature Monte Carlo simulation and zero-temperature relaxation. We also investigate the statistics of large charge rearrangements after a perturbation of the system, which may shed some light on the slow relaxation and glassy phenomena recently observed in a variety of Anderson insulators. In collaboration with Martin Goethe.

  14. Spodumene and garnet luminescence excited by subnanosecond electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Solomonov, V. I.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2011-11-01

    Pulsed cathodoluminescence of spodumene and yttrium-aluminum garnet crystals activated by Mn2+ and Nd3+ ions, respectively, is investigated. The luminescence was excited upon crystal irradiation by electron beams with current densities of 35 and 100 A/cm2 and average electron energy of ˜ 50 keV for 0.1, 0.25, and 0.65 ns. It is demonstrated that the electron beam duration decreased to several tenth of a nanosecond does not lead to essential changes of the mechanisms of pulsed cathodoluminescence excitation and character of its spectrum, but in this case, the intensity of luminescence of the hole centers increases compared with the intracenter luminescence.

  15. Electron-impact excitation and ionization cross sections for ground state and excited helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ralchenko, Yu. Janev, R.K.; Kato, T.; Fursa, D.V.; Bray, I.; Heer, F.J. de

    2008-07-15

    Comprehensive and critically assessed cross sections for the electron-impact excitation and ionization of ground state and excited helium atoms are presented. All states (atomic terms) with n{<=}4 are treated individually, while the states with n{>=}5 are considered degenerate. For the processes involving transitions to and from n{>=}5 levels, suitable cross section scaling relations are presented. For a large number of transitions, from both ground and excited states, convergent close coupling calculations were performed to achieve a high accuracy of the data. The evaluated/recommended cross section data are presented by analytic fit functions, which preserve the correct asymptotic behavior of the cross sections. The cross sections are also displayed in graphical form.

  16. Searching for nuclear excitation by electronic transition in U-235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodash, P.; Norman, E. B.; Swanberg, E.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Wilks, S.

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that is predicted to occur in numerous isotopes, including U-235. NEET can occur when a nuclear transition closely matches the energy and multipolarity of an electronic transition. U-235 has a 1/2+ isomeric state that decays to the 7/2- ground state with a transition energy of 77 eV and a half life of 26 minutes. Theory predicts that electronic transitions exist within a partially ionized uranium plasma that would allow NEET to occur. The NEET process would excite U-235 into its isomeric state and then it will subsequently decay to the ground state via internal conversion. It is currently not known if this excitation occurs in U-235 and at what rate. In order to generate the uranium plasma with the correct conditions, a high power Q-switched Nd:YAG laser will irradiate a sample of highly enriched uranium. The resulting plasma will be collected on a catcher foil and counted using a microchannel plate detector. Current progress on the experiment will be presented.

  17. Chemical excitation of electrons: A dark path to melanoma.

    PubMed

    Premi, Sanjay; Brash, Douglas E

    2016-08-01

    Sunlight's ultraviolet wavelengths induce cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), which then cause mutations that lead to melanoma or to cancers of skin keratinocytes. In pigmented melanocytes, we found that CPDs arise both instantaneously and for hours after UV exposure ends. Remarkably, the CPDs arising in the dark originate by a novel pathway that resembles bioluminescence but does not end in light: First, UV activates the enzymes nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and NADPH oxidase (NOX), which generate the radicals nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2(-)); these combine to form the powerful oxidant peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). A fragment of the skin pigment melanin is then oxidized, exciting an electron to an energy level so high that it is rarely seen in biology. This process of chemically exciting electrons, termed "chemiexcitation", is used by fireflies to generate light but it had never been seen in mammalian cells. In melanocytes, the energy transfers radiationlessly to DNA, inducing CPDs. Chemiexcitation is a new source of genome instability, and it calls attention to endogenous mechanisms of genome maintenance that prevent electronic excitation or dissipate the energy of excited states. Chemiexcitation may also trigger pathogenesis in internal tissues because the same chemistry should arise wherever superoxide and nitric oxide arise near cells that contain melanin. PMID:27262612

  18. Eucken correction in high-temperature gases with electronic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V. Mekhonoshina, M. A.

    2014-05-14

    In the present paper, thermal conductivity coefficient of high-temperature molecular and atomic gases with excited electronic states is studied using both the kinetic theory algorithm developed by authors earlier and the well known simple expression for the thermal conductivity coefficient proposed by Eucken and generalized by Hirschfelder. The influence of large collision diameters of excited states on the thermal conductivity is discussed. The limit of validity of the Eucken correction is evaluated on the basis of the kinetic theory calculations; an improved model suitable for air species under high-temperature conditions is proposed.

  19. Electron scattering by laser-excited barium atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.; Jensen, S. W.; Poe, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    Inelastic and superelastic scattering of 30- and 100-eV electrons by laser-excited 6s 6p 1P and subsequent cascade-populated 6s 6p 3P, 6s 5d 1D, and 6s 5d 3D Ba atoms have been observed. Absolute differential cross sections for the singlet and relative scattering intensities for the triplet species have been determined in the 5 to 20 deg angular region. Under the present conditions excitations dominate over deexcitations.

  20. Excitation of the surface flute waves in electron cyclotron frequency range by internal rotating electron beam in a coaxial waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blednov, O.; Girka, I.; Girka, V.; Pavlenko, I.; Sydora, R.

    2014-12-01

    The initial stage of interaction between a gyrating beam of electrons, which move along Larmor orbits in a narrow gap between a cylindrical plasma layer and an internal screen of a metal coaxial waveguide and electromagnetic eigen waves, is studied theoretically. These waves are extraordinary polarized ones; they propagate along the azimuthal angle across an axial external steady magnetic field in the electron cyclotron frequency range. The numerical analysis shows that the excitation process is stable enough in respect to changing plasma waveguide parameters. The wider the plasma layer, the broader the range of plasma waveguide parameters within which effective wave excitation takes place. The main influence on the excitation of these modes is performed by the applied axial magnetic field, namely: its increase leads to an increase of growth rate and a broadening of the range of the waveguide parameters within which wave excitation is effective.

  1. Chlorophyll fluorescence images demonstrate variable pathways in the effects of plasma membrane excitation on electron flow in chloroplasts of Chara cells.

    PubMed

    Krupenina, Natalia A; Bulychev, Alexander A; Schreiber, Ulrich

    2011-07-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence Imaging and Microscopy PAM fluorometry were applied to study spatial dynamics of photosystem II quantum yield (ΔF/F'(m)) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in resting and electrically stimulated Chara corallina cells in the absence and presence of the hydrophilic electron acceptor methyl viologen (MV) in the external medium. Electrical excitation of the plasma membrane temporarily enhanced the heterogeneity of photosynthetic patterns under physiological conditions (in the absence of MV), but irreversibly eliminated these patterns in the presence of MV. These findings suggest that the action potential (AP) of the excitable plant cell affects the spatial patterns of photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence through different pathways operated in the absence and presence of MV. Based on the extent of NPQ as an indicator of MV-dependent electron flow, it is supposed that MV cannot permeate into the chloroplasts of photosynthetically active "acid cell regions" but gains an immediate access to the stroma of these chloroplasts after triggering of an AP. The AP-triggered MV-dependent non-photochemical quenching in the chloroplasts of acidic cell regions was routinely observed at 0.1 mM Ca(2+) in the medium but not at elevated (2 mM) external Ca(2+) concentration. The results are interpreted in terms of competition between two permeant divalent ion species, Ca(2+) and MV(2+), for their passage through the voltage-gated calcium channels of the plasma membrane. It is proposed that the herbicidal activity of MV in characean cells, here serving as model object, can be manipulated by triggering AP and varying Ca(2+) concentration in the environmental medium.

  2. Theoretical Studies on the Reaction Pathways of Electronically Excited Daaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenneville, J.; Moore, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    The use of temporally and spectrally shaped ultrafast laser pulses to initiate, as well as detect, high explosives is being explored at Los Alamos. High level ab initio calculations, presented here, are employed to help guide and interpret the experiments. The ground and first excited electronic states of 3, 3'-diamino-4, 4'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) are investigated using complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The geometrical and energetic character of the excited state minima, conical intersections and reaction pathways of DAAF are described. Two radiative and two non-radiative excited state population quenching mechanisms are outlined, and possible pathways for photochemical and spectroscopic control are discussed.

  3. Controlling autoionization in strontium two-electron-excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Robert; Zhang, Xinyue; Dunning, F. Barry; Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    One challenge in engineering long-lived two-electron-excited states, i.e., so-called planetary atoms, is autoionization. Autoionization, however, can be suppressed if the outermost electron is placed in a high- n, n ~ 300 - 600 , high- L state because such states have only a very small overlap with the inner electron, even when this is also excited to a state of relatively high n and hence of relatively long lifetime. Here the L-dependence of the autoionization rate for high- n strontium Rydberg atoms is examined during excitation of the core ion 5 s 2S1 / 2 - 5 p 2P3 / 2 transition. Measurements in which the angular momentum of the Rydberg electron is controlled using a pulsed electric field show that the autoionization rate decreases rapidly with increasing L and becomes very small for values larger than ~ 20 . The data are analyzed with the aid of calculations undertaken using complex scaling. Research supported by the NSF and Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  4. An Absolute Measurement of Resonance-Resolved Electron Impact Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisenfeld, Daniel Brett

    1998-11-01

    An experiment to measure electron-impact excitation (EIE) of multiply-charged ions is described. An absolute measurement has been carried out of the cross section for EIE of Si2+(3s2/ 1S/to3s3p/ 1P) from energies below threshold to 11 eV above. A beams modulation technique with inclined electron and ion beams was used. Radiation at 120.7 nm from the excited ions was detected using an absolutely calibrated optical system. The analysis of the experimental data requires a determination of the population fraction of the Si2+ (3s3p/ 3Po) metastable state in the incident ion beam, which was measured to be 0.210 ± 0.018. The data have been corrected for contributions to the signal from radiative decay following excitation from the metastable state to 3s3p1P and 3p2/ 3P, and excitation of the ground state to levels above 3s3p/ 1P. The experimental 0.56 ± 0.08 eV energy spread has allowed us to resolve complex resonance structure throughout the studied energy range. At the reported ±14% uncertainty level (90% confidence limit), the measured structure and absolute scale of the cross section are in good agreement with 12-state close-coupling R-matrix calculations.

  5. The role of electron-impact vibrational excitation in electron transport through gaseous tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, H. V.; Do, T. P. T.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    In this paper, we report newly derived integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact vibrational excitation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) at intermediate impact energies. These cross sections extend the currently available data from 20 to 50 eV. Further, they indicate that the previously recommended THF ICS set [Garland et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 062712 (2013)] underestimated the strength of the electron-impact vibrational excitation processes. Thus, that recommended vibrational cross section set is revised to address those deficiencies. Electron swarm transport properties were calculated with the amended vibrational cross section set, to quantify the role of electron-driven vibrational excitation in describing the macroscopic swarm phenomena. Here, significant differences of up to 17% in the transport coefficients were observed between the calculations performed using the original and revised cross section sets for vibrational excitation.

  6. Electron doping evolution of the magnetic excitations in NaFe1 xCoxAs

    DOE PAGES

    Carr, Scott V.; Zhang, Chenglin; Song, Yu; Tan, Guotai; Li, Yu; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Perring, T. G.; Dai, Pengcheng

    2016-06-13

    We use time-of-flight (TOF) inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy to investigate the doping dependence of magnetic excitations across the phase diagram of NaFe1-xCoxAs with x = 0, 0.0175, 0.0215, 0.05, and 0.11. The effect of electron-doping by partially substituting Fe by Co is to form resonances that couple with superconductivity, broaden and suppress low energy (E 80 meV) spin excitations compared with spin waves in undoped NaFeAs. However, high energy (E > 80 meV) spin excitations are weakly Co-doping dependent. Integration of the local spin dynamic susceptibility "(!) of NaFe1-xCoxAs reveals a total fluctuating moment of 3.6 μ2 B/Fe andmore » a small but systematic reduction with electron doping. The presence of a large spin gap in the Cooverdoped nonsuperconducting NaFe0.89Co0.11As suggests that Fermi surface nesting is responsible for low-energy spin excitations. These results parallel Ni-doping evolution of spin excitations in BaFe2-xNixAs2, confirming the notion that low-energy spin excitations coupling with itinerant electrons are important for superconductivity, while weakly doping dependent high-energy spin excitations result from localized moments.« less

  7. Electron acceleration by parametrically excited Langmuir waves. [in ionospheric modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, J. A.; Graham, K. N.

    1974-01-01

    Simple physical arguments are used to estimate the downward-going energetic electron flux due to parametrically excited Langmuir waves in ionospheric modification experiments. The acceleration mechanism is a single velocity reversal as seen in the frame of the Langmuir wave. The flux is sufficient to produce the observed ionospheric airglow if focusing-type instabilities are invoked to produce moderate local enhancements of the pump field.

  8. Total electron scattering and electronic state excitations cross sections for O2, CO, and CH4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanik, I.; Trajmar, S.; Nickel, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Available electron collision cross section data concerning total and elastic scattering, vibrational excitation, and ionization for O2, CO, and CH4 have been critically reviewed, and a set of cross sections for modeling of planetary atmospheric behavior is recommended. Utilizing these recommended cross sections, we derived total electronic state excitation cross sections and upper limits for dissociation cross sections, which in the case of CH4 should very closely equal the actual dissociation cross section.

  9. Search for Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition in U-235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodash, P. A.; Norman, E. B.; Burke, J. T.; Wilks, S. C.; Casperson, R. J.; Swanberg, E. L.; Wakeling, M. A.; Cordeiro, T. J.

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that is predicted to occur in numerous isotopes, including U-235. When a nuclear transition matches the energy and the multipolarity of an electronic transition, there is a possibility that NEET will occur. If NEET were to occur in U-235, the nucleus would be excited to its 1/2 + isomeric state that subsequently decays by internal conversion with a decay energy of 77 eV and a half-life of 26 minutes. Theory predicts that NEET can occur in partially ionized uranium plasma with a charge state of 23 +. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with a pulse energy of 780 mJ and a pulse width of 9 ns was used to generate the uranium plasma. The plasma was collected on a plate and the internal conversion electrons were focused onto a microchannel plate detector by a series of electrostatic lenses. Depleted uranium and highly enriched uranium samples were used for the experiment. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was further supported by the U.S. DHS, UC Berkeley, and the NNIS Fellowship.

  10. Indistinguishability in electron-impact excitation-ionization of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, A. L.; Milum, B.; Madison, D. H.

    2011-11-15

    We present fully differential cross section (FDCS) calculations for electron-impact excitation-ionization of helium using the four-body distorted wave-exchange (4DWE) model. This model includes both the direct and exchange amplitudes, which account for the indistinguishability of the free electrons in the final state. The results of the 4DWE model are compared with absolute experimental results, and we find that the exchange amplitude has a minimal impact in determining the shape and magnitude of the FDCS.

  11. Electron plasma dynamics during autoresonant excitation of the diocotron mode

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C. J. Danielson, J. R. Hurst, N. C. Surko, C. M.

    2015-02-15

    Chirped-frequency autoresonant excitation of the diocotron mode is used to move electron plasmas confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap across the magnetic field for advanced plasma and antimatter applications. Plasmas of 10{sup 8} electrons, with radii small compared to that of the confining electrodes, can be moved from the magnetic axis to ≥90% of the electrode radius with near unit efficiency and reliable angular positioning. Translations of ≥70% of the wall radius are possible for a wider range of plasma parameters. Details of this process, including phase and displacement oscillations in the plasma response and plasma expansion, are discussed, as well as possible extensions of the technique.

  12. Electronic properties of solids excited with intermediate laser power densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirotti, Fausto; Tempo Beamline Team

    Intermediate laser power density up to about 100 GW/cm2 is below the surface damage threshold is currently used to induce modification in the physical properties on short time scales. The absorption of a short laser pulse induces non-equilibrium electronic distributions followed by lattice-mediated equilibrium taking place only in the picosecond range. The role of the hot electrons is particularly important in several domains as for example fast magnetization and demagnetization processes, laser induced phase transitions, charge density waves. Angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measuring directly energy and momentum of electrons is the most adapted tool to study the electronic excitations at short time scales during and after fast laser excitations. The main technical problem is the space charge created by the pumping laser pulse. I will present angular resolved multiphoton photoemission results obtained with 800 nm laser pulses showing how space charge electrons emitted during fast demagnetization processes can be measured. Unable enter Affiliation: CNRS-SOLEIL Synchrotron L'Orme des Merisiers , Saint Aubin 91192 Gif sur Yvette France.

  13. A theoretical forecast of the hydrogen bond changes in the electronic excited state for BN and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dandan; Hao, Ce; Wang, Se; Dong, Hong; Qiu, Jieshan

    2012-02-01

    The relationship between electronic spectral shifts and hydrogen-bonding dynamics in electronically excited states of the hydrogen-bonded complex is put forward. Hydrogen bond strengthening will induce a redshift of the corresponding electronic spectra, while hydrogen bond weakening will cause a blueshift. Time-dependent density function theory (TDDFT) was used to study the excitation energies in both singlet and triplet electronically excited states of Benzonitrile (BN), 4-aminobenzonitrile (ABN), and 4-dimethylaminobenzonitrile (DMABN) in methanol solvents. Only the intermolecular hydrogen bond C≡N...H-O was involved in our system. A fairly accurate forecast of the hydrogen bond changes in lowlying electronically excited states were presented in light of a very thorough consideration of their related electronic spectra. The deduction we used to depict the trend of the hydrogen bond changes in excited states could help others understand hydrogen-bonding dynamics more effectively.

  14. Nature of ground and electronic excited states of higher acenes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Davidson, Ernest R; Yang, Weitao

    2016-08-30

    Higher acenes have drawn much attention as promising organic semiconductors with versatile electronic properties. However, the nature of their ground state and electronic excited states is still not fully clear. Their unusual chemical reactivity and instability are the main obstacles for experimental studies, and the potentially prominent diradical character, which might require a multireference description in such large systems, hinders theoretical investigations. Here, we provide a detailed answer with the particle-particle random-phase approximation calculation. The (1)Ag ground states of acenes up to decacene are on the closed-shell side of the diradical continuum, whereas the ground state of undecacene and dodecacene tilts more to the open-shell side with a growing polyradical character. The ground state of all acenes has covalent nature with respect to both short and long axes. The lowest triplet state (3)B2u is always above the singlet ground state even though the energy gap could be vanishingly small in the polyacene limit. The bright singlet excited state (1)B2u is a zwitterionic state to the short axis. The excited (1)Ag state gradually switches from a double-excitation state to another zwitterionic state to the short axis, but always keeps its covalent nature to the long axis. An energy crossing between the (1)B2u and excited (1)Ag states happens between hexacene and heptacene. Further energetic consideration suggests that higher acenes are likely to undergo singlet fission with a low photovoltaic efficiency; however, the efficiency might be improved if a singlet fission into multiple triplets could be achieved. PMID:27528690

  15. Nature of ground and electronic excited states of higher acenes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Davidson, Ernest R; Yang, Weitao

    2016-08-30

    Higher acenes have drawn much attention as promising organic semiconductors with versatile electronic properties. However, the nature of their ground state and electronic excited states is still not fully clear. Their unusual chemical reactivity and instability are the main obstacles for experimental studies, and the potentially prominent diradical character, which might require a multireference description in such large systems, hinders theoretical investigations. Here, we provide a detailed answer with the particle-particle random-phase approximation calculation. The (1)Ag ground states of acenes up to decacene are on the closed-shell side of the diradical continuum, whereas the ground state of undecacene and dodecacene tilts more to the open-shell side with a growing polyradical character. The ground state of all acenes has covalent nature with respect to both short and long axes. The lowest triplet state (3)B2u is always above the singlet ground state even though the energy gap could be vanishingly small in the polyacene limit. The bright singlet excited state (1)B2u is a zwitterionic state to the short axis. The excited (1)Ag state gradually switches from a double-excitation state to another zwitterionic state to the short axis, but always keeps its covalent nature to the long axis. An energy crossing between the (1)B2u and excited (1)Ag states happens between hexacene and heptacene. Further energetic consideration suggests that higher acenes are likely to undergo singlet fission with a low photovoltaic efficiency; however, the efficiency might be improved if a singlet fission into multiple triplets could be achieved.

  16. Quantitative Measurements of Electronically Excited CH Concentration in Normal Gravity and Microgravity Coflow Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giassi, D.; Cao, S.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Smooke, M. D.; Long, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    With the conclusion of the SLICE campaign aboard the ISS in 2012, a large amount of data was made available for the analysis of the effect of microgravity on laminar coflow diffusion flames. Previous work focused on the study of sooty flames in microgravity as well as the ability of numerical models to predict its formation in a simplified buoyancy-free environment. The current work shifts the investigation to soot-free flames, putting an emphasis on the chemiluminescence emission from electronically excited CH (CH*). This radical species is of significant interest in combustion studies: it has been shown that the electronically excited CH spatial distribution is indicative of the flame front position and, given the relatively simple diagnostic involved with its measurement, several works have been done trying to understand the ability of electronically excited CH chemiluminescence to predict the total and local flame heat release rate. In this work, a subset of the SLICE nitrogen-diluted methane flames has been considered, and the effect of fuel and coflow velocity on electronically excited CH concentration is discussed and compared with both normal gravity results and numerical simulations. Experimentally, the spectral characterization of the DSLR color camera used to acquire the flame images allowed the signal collected by the blue channel to be considered representative of the electronically excited CH emission centered around 431 nm. Due to the axisymmetric flame structure, an Abel deconvolution of the line-of-sight chemiluminescence was used to obtain the radial intensity profile and, thanks to an absolute light intensity calibration, a quantification of the electronically excited CH concentration was possible. Results show that, in microgravity, the maximum flame electronically excited CH concentration increases with the coflow velocity, but it is weakly dependent on the fuel velocity; normal gravity flames, if not lifted, tend to follow the same trend

  17. Review of electron impact excitation cross sections for copper atom

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, N.W.; Hazi, A.U.

    1982-02-01

    Excitation of atomic copper by electron impact plays an important role in the copper vapor laser and accurate cross sections are needed for understanding and modeling laser performance. During the past seven years, there have been several attempts to normalize the relative elastic and inelastic cross sections measured by Trajmar and coworkers. However, each of these efforts have yielded different cross sections, and the uncertainty in the correct normalization of the data has been a source of confusion and concern for the kinetic modeling efforts. This difficulty has motivated us to review previous work on the electron impact excitation of copper atom and to perform new calculations of the inelastic cross sections using the impact parameter method. In this memorandum we review the previous attempts to normalize the experimental data and provide a critical assessment of the accuracy of the resulting cross sections. We also present new theoretical cross sections for the electron impact excitation of the /sup 2/S ..-->.. /sup 2/P/sup 0/ and /sup 2/S ..-->.. /sup 2/D transitions in copper. When the experimental cross sections are renormalized to the results of the impact parameter calculations, they are a factor of three smaller than those published in the latest paper of Trajmar et. al. At impact energies above 60 eV the excitation cross sections obtained with the impact parameter method agree well with the results of the very recent, unpublished, close-coupling calculations of Henry. This agreement suggests that the present normalization of the experimental cross sections is probably the most reliable one obtained to date.

  18. Complete Solution of Electronic Excitation and Ionization in Electron-Hydrogen Molecule Scattering.

    PubMed

    Zammit, Mark C; Savage, Jeremy S; Fursa, Dmitry V; Bray, Igor

    2016-06-10

    The convergent close-coupling method has been used to solve the electron-hydrogen molecule scattering problem in the fixed-nuclei approximation. Excellent agreement with experiment is found for the grand total, elastic, electronic-excitation, and total ionization cross sections from the very low to the very high energies. This shows that for the electronic degrees of freedom the method provides a complete treatment of electron scattering on molecules as it does for atoms. PMID:27341229

  19. Complete Solution of Electronic Excitation and Ionization in Electron-Hydrogen Molecule Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zammit, Mark C.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2016-06-01

    The convergent close-coupling method has been used to solve the electron-hydrogen molecule scattering problem in the fixed-nuclei approximation. Excellent agreement with experiment is found for the grand total, elastic, electronic-excitation, and total ionization cross sections from the very low to the very high energies. This shows that for the electronic degrees of freedom the method provides a complete treatment of electron scattering on molecules as it does for atoms.

  20. Complete solution of electronic excitation and ionization in electron-hydrogen molecule scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Zammit, Mark C.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2016-06-08

    The convergent close-coupling method has been used to solve the electron-hydrogen molecule scattering problem in the fixed-nuclei approximation. Excellent agreement with experiment is found for the grand total, elastic, electronic-excitation, and total ionization cross sections from the very low to the very high energies. This shows that for the electronic degrees of freedom the method provides a complete treatment of electron scattering on molecules as it does for atoms.

  1. Validation of local hybrid functionals for TDDFT calculations of electronic excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Toni M.; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The first systematic evaluation of local hybrid functionals for the calculation of electronic excitation energies within linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is reported. Using our recent efficient semi-numerical TDDFT implementation [T. M. Maier et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4226 (2015)], four simple, thermochemically optimized one-parameter local hybrid functionals based on local spin-density exchange are evaluated against a database of singlet and triplet valence excitations of organic molecules, and against a mixed database including also Rydberg, intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) and core excitations. The four local hybrids exhibit comparable performance to standard global or range-separated hybrid functionals for common singlet valence excitations, but several local hybrids outperform all other functionals tested for the triplet excitations of the first test set, as well as for relative energies of excited states. Evaluation for the combined second test set shows that local hybrids can also provide excellent Rydberg and core excitations, in the latter case rivaling specialized functionals optimized specifically for such excitations. This good performance of local hybrids for different excitation types could be traced to relatively large exact-exchange (EXX) admixtures in a spatial region intermediate between valence and asymptotics, as well as close to the nucleus, and lower EXX admixtures in the valence region. In contrast, the tested local hybrids cannot compete with the best range-separated hybrids for intra- and intermolecular CT excitation energies. Possible directions for improvement in the latter category are discussed. As the used efficient TDDFT implementation requires essentially the same computational effort for global and local hybrids, applications of local hybrid functionals to excited-state problems appear promising in a wide range of fields. Influences of current-density dependence of local kinetic

  2. Electronically Excited C2 from Laser Photodissociated C60

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Scott, Carl D.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.

    1999-01-01

    Spectral and transient emission measurements are made of radiation from products of laser excitation of buckminsterfullerene (C60) vapor diluted in argon at 973 K. The principal radiation is from the Swan band system of C2 and, at early times, also from a black body continuum. The C2 radiation is observed only when C60 is excited by green (532 nm) and not with IR (1064 nm) laser radiation at energy densities of about 1.5 J/square cm. Transient measurements indicate that there are two characteristic periods of decay of radiation. The first period, lasting about 2 micro seconds, has a characteristic decay time of about 0.3 micro seconds. The second period, lasting at least 50 micro seconds, has a characteristic decay time of about 5 micro seconds. These characteristic times are thought to be associated with cooling of C60 molecules or nanosized carbon particles during the early period; and with electronically excited C2 that is a decomposition product of laser excited C60, C58, ... molecules during the later period.

  3. Excitation of plasmonic nanoantennas by nonresonant and resonant electron tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Protsenko, Igor E.; Smetanin, Igor V.; Bouhelier, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    A rigorous theory of photon emission generated by inelastic electron tunnelling inside the gap of plasmonic nanoantennas is developed. The disappointingly low efficiency of the electrical excitation of surface plasmon polaritons in these structures can be increased by orders of magnitude when a resonant tunnelling structure is incorporated inside the gap. A resonant tunnelling assisted surface plasmon emitter may become a key element in future electrically-driven plasmonic nanocircuits.A rigorous theory of photon emission generated by inelastic electron tunnelling inside the gap of plasmonic nanoantennas is developed. The disappointingly low efficiency of the electrical excitation of surface plasmon polaritons in these structures can be increased by orders of magnitude when a resonant tunnelling structure is incorporated inside the gap. A resonant tunnelling assisted surface plasmon emitter may become a key element in future electrically-driven plasmonic nanocircuits. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Plasmonic mode in nanowires, the probability of stimulated emission in tunnelling through the Fermi's Golden Rule and electron wave functions in tunnelling structures with nonresonant and resonant tunnelling. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01931e

  4. Electronic excited States of polynucleotides: a study by electroabsorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Stanislaw; Luchowski, Rafal

    2007-02-01

    Electroabsorption spectra were obtained for single-stranded polynucleotides poly(U), poly(C), poly(A), and poly(G) in glycerol/water glass at low temperature, and the differences in permanent dipole moment (Deltamu) and polarizability (Deltaalpha) were estimated for several spectral ranges covering the lowest energy absorption band around 260 nm. In each spectral range, the electrooptical parameters associated with apparent features in the absorption spectrum exhibit distinct values representing either a dominant single transition or the resultant value for a group of a relatively narrow cluster of overlapping transitions. The estimated spacing in energy between electronic origins of these transitions is larger than the electronic coupling within the Coulombic interaction model which is usually adopted in computational studies. The electroabsorption data allow us to distinguish a weak electronic transition associated with a wing in polynucleotide absorption spectra, at an energy below the electronic origin in absorption spectra of monomeric nucleobases. In poly(C) and poly(G), these low-energy transitions are related to increased values of Deltamu and Deltaalpha, possibly indicating a weak involvement of charge resonance in the respective excited states. A model capable of explaining the origin of low-energy excited states, based on the interaction of pipi* and npi* transitions in neighboring bases, is introduced and briefly discussed on the grounds of point dipole interaction. PMID:17266277

  5. Quantum defects and specific-isotopic-shift measurements in ns and np highly excited states of lithium: Exchange effects between Rydberg and core electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Goy, P.; Liang, J.; Gross, M.; Haroche, S.

    1986-10-01

    By high-resolution double-resonance spectroscopy experiments in the millimeter-wavelength domain, we have determined precise values of the quantum defects in the s and p Rydberg levels of /sup 6/Li and /sup 7/Li (principal quantum number n ranging from 18 to 40). A detailed comparison of the /sup 6/Li and /sup 7/Li data has yielded the value of the specific isotopic shift in the np series, which is the first evidence to our knowledge of an exchange effect between a tightly bound core electron and a very weakly bound Rydberg electron in an alkali-metal atom.

  6. Magnetic field effects on the decay rate of photogenerated biradical from intramolecular electron transfer of triplet excited fullerene in a fullerene phenothiazine linked compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemura, Hiroaki; Tokudome, Hiromasa; Yamada, Sunao

    2001-10-01

    Transient absorption spectra of a fullerene (C 60)-phenothiazine (PH) linked compound indicated that the intramolecular electron transfer occurred in benzonitrile, while not in benzene. In benzonitrile, the lifetime (118 ns) of photogenerated biradical was very long, in spite of being around the top region in Marcus theory. The lifetime of the biradical was enhanced by 1.8 times in the presence of magnetic fields (>0.2 T). The magnetic field effects verified that the triplet biradical was generated from the intramolecular electron transfer from PH to the triplet C 60. The long lifetime is most likely ascribed to spin multiplicities of the biradical.

  7. Surface excitations in the modelling of electron transport for electron-beam-induced deposition experiments

    PubMed Central

    Valentí, Roser; Werner, Wolfgang S

    2015-01-01

    Summary The aim of the present overview article is to raise awareness of an essential aspect that is usually not accounted for in the modelling of electron transport for focused-electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID) of nanostructures: Surface excitations are on the one hand responsible for a sizeable fraction of the intensity in reflection-electron-energy-loss spectra for primary electron energies of up to a few kiloelectronvolts and, on the other hand, they play a key role in the emission of secondary electrons from solids, regardless of the primary energy. In this overview work we present a general perspective of recent works on the subject of surface excitations and on low-energy electron transport, highlighting the most relevant aspects for the modelling of electron transport in FEBID simulations. PMID:26171301

  8. Electron-impact excitation for F-like selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Guo-xin, C.; Yu-bo, Q.

    1997-11-01

    Electron-impact excitation cross sections from the low-lying 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5} state of F-like selenium to singly excited states have been calculated. Our relativistic distorted-wave Born procedures have been used for the present calculations. Instead of atomic structure code GRASP, the latest version GRASP{sup 2} code is used as multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock atomic structure calculations. The present results have been comprehensively compared with earlier calculations. One of the motivations for the present work is that there are some discrepancies between our results and those of others. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Excitation of CO2/+/ by electron impact on CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentall, J. E.; Coplan, M. A.; Kushlis, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Consideration of a discrepancy concerning the correct value of the cross section for excitation of the CO2(+) B state by electron impact on CO2. It is suggested that the reason for the disparate results obtained by various authors for the B state can be traced to a calibration error due to scattered light. In particular, the tungsten filament lamps used in the experiments cited have very low intensity at wavelengths below 3000 A where the B state emissions occur, so that even a small amount of scattered light in the spectrometer will produce a large error in the measured cross section. In a remeasurement of the cross section for excitation of the B state at an energy of 150 eV it was found that at 2900 A the scattered light signal, if uncorrected for, would introduce an error of about 50%.

  10. Determination of differential cross sections for electron-impact excitation of electronic states of molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.; Green, M. A.; Brunger, M. J.; Teubner, P. J. O.; Cartwright, D. C.

    2000-02-01

    The development and initial results of a method for the determination of differential cross sections for electron scattering by molecular oxygen are described. The method has been incorporated into an existing package of computer programs which, given spectroscopic factors, dissociation energies and an energy-loss spectrum for electron-impact excitation, determine the differential cross sections for each electronic state relative to that of the elastic peak. Enhancements of the original code were made to deal with particular aspects of electron scattering from O{sub 2}, such as the overlap of vibrational levels of the ground state with transitions to excited states, and transitions to levels close to and above the dissocation energy in the Herzberg and Schumann-Runge continua. The utility of the code is specifically demonstrated for the ''6-eV states'' of O{sub 2}, where we report absolute differential cross sections for their excitation by 15-eV electrons. In addition an integral cross section, derived from the differential cross section measurements, is also reported for this excitation process and compared against available theoretical results. The present differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the ''6-eV states'' of O{sub 2} are the first to be reported in the literature for electron-impact energies below 20 eV. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Dissociative electron attachment and vibrational excitation of the chlorine molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolorenč, Přemysl; Horáček, Jiří

    2006-12-01

    This paper is aimed at the theoretical investigation of the inelastic processes taking place in resonant collisions of low-energy electrons with the chlorine molecule. Dissociative electron attachment and vibrational excitation of Cl2 by electron impact is investigated in the energy range 0-1.5eV , where the Σu+2 resonance plays the central role. The calculations were carried out within the framework of the nonlocal resonance model. This approach makes it possible to calculate the integrated cross sections of the above-mentioned processes for a variety of initial and final rovibrational states of the target molecule. The present model is constructed on the basis of ab initio fixed-nuclei R -matrix calculations using the so-called Feshbach-Fano R -matrix method. The Schwinger-Lanczos algorithm was utilized to solve the Lippmann-Schwinger equation describing the motion of the nuclei.

  12. Electronically excited rubidium atom in a helium cluster or film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leino, Markku; Viel, Alexandra; Zillich, Robert E.

    2008-11-01

    We present theoretical studies of helium droplets and films doped with one electronically excited rubidium atom Rb∗ (P2). Diffusion and path integral Monte Carlo approaches are used to investigate the energetics and the structure of clusters containing up to 14 helium atoms. The surface of large clusters is approximated by a helium film. The nonpair additive potential energy surface is modeled using a diatomic in molecule scheme. Calculations show that the stable structure of Rb∗Hen consists of a seven helium atom ring centered at the rubidium, surrounded by a tirelike second solvation shell. A very different structure is obtained when performing a "vertical Monte Carlo transition." In this approach, a path integral Monte Carlo equilibration starts from the stable configuration of a rubidium atom in the electronic ground state adsorbed to the helium surface after switching to the electronically excited surface. In this case, Rb∗Hen relaxes to a weakly bound metastable state in which Rb∗ sits in a shallow dimple. The interpretation of the results is consistent with the recent experimental observations [G. Auböck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 035301 (2008)].

  13. Experimental investigation of the ionospheric hysteresis effect on the threshold excitation level of the Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samimi, A.; Scales, W.; Cruz, M.; Isham, B.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent experimental observations of the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) spectrum during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic show structures ordered by ion gyro-frequency. The proposed generation mechanism considers parametric decay of a pump upper hybrid/electron Bernstein (UH/EB) wave into another UH/EB and a group of neutralized ion Bernstein waves. The presumption of the proposed mechanism is that the pump electromagnetic wave is converted into the UH/EB wave. This conversion process generates field aligned irregularity which exhibits hysteresis effect. The predicted ionospheric hysteresis effect is studied during the PARS 2012 at HAARP. The preliminary results are presented for the first time. Also, experimental study of the effects of 1) the transmitter beam angle and 2) the transmitter frequency offset relative to the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency on the ion gyro-harmonic structures in the SEE spectrum are provided. The aforementioned observations are compared to the predictions of the analytical model. Possible connection of the SEE spectral features and artificially generated ionospheric descending layer is also discussed

  14. Excitation of surface modes by electron beam in semi-bounded quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, B. F.; Elbasha, N. M.

    2015-10-15

    The excitation of the TM surface modes due to the interaction of electron beam with a semi-bounded quantum magnetized plasma is investigated. The generated current and the perturbed densities of the electron beam and plasma are obtained. The wave equation that describes the excited fields has been solved to obtain the dispersion relation for these modes. It is found that the quantum effects play important role for frequencies less and bigger than plasma frequency such that the phase velocity of modes increases with increasing the quantum effects compared to the classical case. It has also been displayed that in the absence of external magnetic field, the surface modes appear in the all regions of the wavelength while they have been only excited for high wavenumber in the presence of the magnetic field. Besides, it has been shown that the dispersion curves of the modes depend essentially on the density ratio of beam and plasma.

  15. Excited State Dynamics of Protonated Phenylalanine and Tyrosine: Photo-Induced Reactions Following Electronic Excitation.

    PubMed

    Féraud, Géraldine; Broquier, Michel; Dedonder, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Grégoire, Gilles; Soorkia, Satchin

    2015-06-11

    The electronic spectroscopy and the electronic excited state properties of cold protonated phenylalanine and protonated tyrosine have been revisited on a large spectral domain and interpreted by comparison with ab initio calculations. The protonated species are stored in a cryogenically cooled Paul trap, maintained at ∼10 K, and the parent and all the photofragment ions are mass-analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, which allows detecting the ionic species with an improved mass resolution compared to what is routinely achieved with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. These new results emphasize the competition around the band origin between two proton transfer reactions from the ammonium group toward either the aromatic chromophore or the carboxylic acid group. These reactions are initiated by the coupling of the locally excited ππ* state with higher charge transfer states, the positions and coupling of which depend on the conformation of the protonated molecules. Each of these reaction processes gives rise to specific fragmentation channels that supports the conformer selectivity observed in the photofragmentation spectra of protonated tyrosine and phenylalanine.

  16. Inner-shell excitation of acetylene by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Michelin, S.E.; Pessoa, O.; Oliveira, H.L.; Veiteinheimer, E.; Santos, A.M.S.; Fujimoto, M.M.; Iga, I.; Lee, M.-T.

    2005-08-15

    The distorted-wave approximation (DWA) is applied to study K-shell excitation in C{sub 2}H{sub 2} by electron impact. More specifically, calculated differential and integral cross sections for the X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}{yields}{sup 1,3}{pi}{sub g}(1s{sigma}{sub g}{yields}1p{pi}{sub g}) and X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}{yields}{sup 1,3}{pi}{sub u}(1s{sigma}{sub u}{yields}1p{pi}{sub g}) transitions in this target in the 300-800 eV incident energy range are reported. The triplet-to-singlet ratios of respective integral cross sections, namely, RI(3:1), calculated by dividing the integral cross sections for transitions leading to the triplet core-excited states by those leading to the corresponding singlet states, are also reported as a function of incident energies. In general, our calculated sums of the generalized oscillator strength for transitions leading to the {sup 1}{pi}{sub g} and {sup 1}{pi}{sub u} excited states are in good agreement with the available experimental data. On the other hand, the present calculated integral cross sections and the corresponding data for its isoelectronic species CO are significantly different. Possible physical origins for this difference are discussed.

  17. Ultrafast Electronic Excitation in CaF2 Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shizhen; Jia, Tianqing; Li, Xiaoxi; Feng, Donghai; Sun, Haiyi; Li, Chengbin; Wang, Xiaofeng; Kuroda, Hirao; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2005-11-01

    A new pump and probe experimental system was developed, the pump pulse duration of which is stretched and is much longer than that of the probe pulse. Using this system, time-resolved electronic excitation processes and damage mechanisms in CaF2 crystals were studied. The measured reflectivity of the probe pulse begins to increase at the peak of the pump pulse and increases rapidly in the latter half of the pump pulse, when the pump pulse duration is stretched to 580 fs. Our experimental results indicate that both multiphoton ionization and impact ionization play important roles in the generation of conduction band electrons, at least they do so when the pump pulse durations are equal to or longer than 580 fs.

  18. Copper bromide vapour laser excited by an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhan, P. A.; Gugin, P. P.; Zakrevskii, D. E.

    2016-09-01

    Lasing on self-terminating copper atom transitions is obtained for the first time by pumping the Ne – CuBr mixture by regular pulses and by a pulse train of low-energy electron beams formed in an 'open' discharge. In these regimes in a range of experimental conditions, a growth of power and radiation energy is demonstrated with an increase in the electron beam current and pulse repetition rate. In a double pulse excitation regime, the lasing energy is completely recovered in ~2.5 μs. In a central zone of the active element where CuBr molecules are totally dissociated, the specific lasing energy of ~44 μJ cm-3 is obtained at a physical efficiency of 8.5%.

  19. Excitation of the lowest electronic transitions in ethanol by low-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, L. R.; Khakoo, M. A.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2016-09-01

    We report absolute differential and integral cross sections for electronic excitation of ethanol, by low-energy electron impact. Cross sections for low-lying excited states were measured at incident electron energies from 9 to 20 eV and at scattering angles from {5}\\circ through {130}\\circ . Our results include cross sections for excitation of the 1{}3A\\prime \\prime and 1{}1A\\prime \\prime states as well as for the 2{}3A\\prime \\prime + 1{}3A\\prime and 2{}1A\\prime \\prime + 2{}1A\\prime cross section sums. Corresponding calculations were also performed using the Schwinger multichannel method, within an 11-channel close-coupling scheme.

  20. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gunst, Jonas; Wu, Yuanbin Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2015-11-15

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic theoretical model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of {sup 93}Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV Mössbauer transition in {sup 57}Fe. These findings are most relevant for future nuclear quantum optics experiments at x-ray free electron laser facilities.

  1. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunst, Jonas; Wu, Yuanbin; Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2015-11-01

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic theoretical model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of 93Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV Mössbauer transition in 57Fe. These findings are most relevant for future nuclear quantum optics experiments at x-ray free electron laser facilities.

  2. Ultrafast electronic relaxation of excited state vitamin B 12 in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoıˆt

    2008-06-01

    The time evolution of electronically excited vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) has been observed for the first time in the gas phase. It reveals an ultrafast decay to a state corresponding to metal excitation. This decay is interpreted as resulting from a ring to metal electron transfer. This opens the observation of the excited state of other complex biomimetic systems in the gas phase, the key to the characterisation of their complex evolution through excited electronic states.

  3. Real-time observation of interference between atomic one-electron and two-electron excitations.

    PubMed

    Geiseler, Henning; Rottke, Horst; Zhavoronkov, Nickolai; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2012-03-23

    We present results of real-time tracking of atomic two-electron dynamics in an autoionizing transient wave packet in krypton. A coherent superposition of two Fano resonances is excited with a femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulse. The evolution of the corresponding wave packet is subsequently probed with a delayed infrared pulse. In our specific case, we get access to the interference between one- and two-electron excitation channels in the launched wave packet, which is superimposed on its decay through autoionization. A simple model is able to account for the observed dynamical evolution of this wave packet.

  4. Role of Geometric Distortion and Polarization in Localizing Electronic Excitations in Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Nayyar, Iffat H; Batista, Enrique R; Tretiak, Sergei; Saxena, Avadh; Smith, Darryl L; Martin, Richard L

    2013-02-12

    Five different Density Functional Theory (DFT) models (ranging from pure GGA to long-range-corrected hybrid functionals) were used to study computationally the nature of the self-trapped electronic states in oligophenylene vinylenes. The electronic excitations in question include the lowest singlet (S1) and triplet (T1(†)) excitons (calculated using Time Dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method), positive (P(+)) and negative (P(-)) polarons, and the lowest triplet (T1) states (computed with the Self-Consistent Field (SCF) scheme). The polaron formation (spatial localization of excitations) is observed only with the use of range-corrected hybrid DFT models including long-range electronic exchange interactions. The extent of localization for all studied excitations is found to be invariant with respect to the size of the oligomer chain in their corresponding optimal geometries. We have analyzed the interdependence between the extent of the geometrical distortion and the localization of the orbital and spin density, and have observed that the localization of the P(+) and P(-) charged species is quite sensitive to solvent polarization effects and the character of the DFT functional used, rather than the structural deformations. In contrast, the localization of neutral states, S1 and T1(†), is found to follow the structural distortions. Notably, T1 excitation obtained with the mean field SCF approach is always strongly localized in range-corrected hybrid DFT models. The molecular orbital energetics of these excitations was further investigated to identify the relationship between state localization and the corresponding orbital structure. A characteristic stabilization (destabilization) of occupied (virtual) orbitals is observed in hybrid DFT models, compared to tight-binding model-like orbital filling in semilocal GGA functionals. The molecular and natural orbital representation allows visualization of the spatial extent of the underlying electronic states. In terms of

  5. Vertical and adiabatic excitations in anthracene from quantum Monte Carlo: Constrained energy minimization for structural and electronic excited-state properties in the JAGP ansatz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, Nicolas; Bouaouli, Samira; Mauri, Francesco; Sorella, Sandro; Casula, Michele

    2015-06-01

    We study the ionization energy, electron affinity, and the π → π∗ (1La) excitation energy of the anthracene molecule, by means of variational quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods based on a Jastrow correlated antisymmetrized geminal power (JAGP) wave function, developed on molecular orbitals (MOs). The MO-based JAGP ansatz allows one to rigorously treat electron transitions, such as the HOMO → LUMO one, which underlies the 1La excited state. We present a QMC optimization scheme able to preserve the rank of the antisymmetrized geminal power matrix, thanks to a constrained minimization with projectors built upon symmetry selected MOs. We show that this approach leads to stable energy minimization and geometry relaxation of both ground and excited states, performed consistently within the correlated QMC framework. Geometry optimization of excited states is needed to make a reliable and direct comparison with experimental adiabatic excitation energies. This is particularly important in π-conjugated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, where there is a strong interplay between low-lying energy excitations and structural modifications, playing a functional role in many photochemical processes. Anthracene is an ideal benchmark to test these effects. Its geometry relaxation energies upon electron excitation are of up to 0.3 eV in the neutral 1La excited state, while they are of the order of 0.1 eV in electron addition and removal processes. Significant modifications of the ground state bond length alternation are revealed in the QMC excited state geometry optimizations. Our QMC study yields benchmark results for both geometries and energies, with values below chemical accuracy if compared to experiments, once zero point energy effects are taken into account.

  6. Vertical and adiabatic excitations in anthracene from quantum Monte Carlo: Constrained energy minimization for structural and electronic excited-state properties in the JAGP ansatz

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, Nicolas; Bouaouli, Samira; Mauri, Francesco Casula, Michele; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-06-07

    We study the ionization energy, electron affinity, and the π → π{sup ∗} ({sup 1}L{sub a}) excitation energy of the anthracene molecule, by means of variational quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods based on a Jastrow correlated antisymmetrized geminal power (JAGP) wave function, developed on molecular orbitals (MOs). The MO-based JAGP ansatz allows one to rigorously treat electron transitions, such as the HOMO → LUMO one, which underlies the {sup 1}L{sub a} excited state. We present a QMC optimization scheme able to preserve the rank of the antisymmetrized geminal power matrix, thanks to a constrained minimization with projectors built upon symmetry selected MOs. We show that this approach leads to stable energy minimization and geometry relaxation of both ground and excited states, performed consistently within the correlated QMC framework. Geometry optimization of excited states is needed to make a reliable and direct comparison with experimental adiabatic excitation energies. This is particularly important in π-conjugated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, where there is a strong interplay between low-lying energy excitations and structural modifications, playing a functional role in many photochemical processes. Anthracene is an ideal benchmark to test these effects. Its geometry relaxation energies upon electron excitation are of up to 0.3 eV in the neutral {sup 1}L{sub a} excited state, while they are of the order of 0.1 eV in electron addition and removal processes. Significant modifications of the ground state bond length alternation are revealed in the QMC excited state geometry optimizations. Our QMC study yields benchmark results for both geometries and energies, with values below chemical accuracy if compared to experiments, once zero point energy effects are taken into account.

  7. Excitation of Plasma Waves in Aurora by Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    daSilva, C. E.; Vinas, A. F.; deAssis, A. S.; deAzevedo, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we study numerically the excitation of plasma waves by electron beams, in the auroral region above 2000 km of altitude. We have solved the fully kinetic dispersion relation, using numerical method and found the real frequency and the growth rate of the plasma wave modes. We have examined the instability properties of low-frequency waves such as the Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) wave as well as Lower-Hybrid (LH) wave in the range of high-frequency. In all cases, the source of free energy are electron beams propagating parallel to the geomagnetic field. We present some features of the growth rate modes, when the cold plasma parameters are changed, such as background electrons and ions species (H(+) and O(+)) temperature, density or the electron beam density and/or drift velocity. These results can be used in a test-particle simulation code, to investigate the ion acceleration and their implication in the auroral acceleration processes, by wave-particle interaction.

  8. Possible excitation of solitary electron holes in a laboratory plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, S.; Mukherjee, S.; Ravi, G.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2010-10-15

    Plasma response to a fast rising high positive voltage pulse is experimentally studied in a uniform and unmagnetized plasma. The pulse is applied to a metallic disk electrode immersed in a low pressure argon plasma (n{sub p{approx}}10{sup 9} cm{sup -3} and T{sub e{approx}}0.5-2 eV) with the pulse magnitude U{sub 0}>>kT{sub e}/e, where T{sub e} is the electron temperature. Experiments have been carried out for various applied pulse widths {tau}{sub p} ranging from less than 3f{sub i}{sup -1} to greater than 3f{sub i}{sup -1}, where f{sub i} is the ion plasma frequency. For pulse widths less than 3f{sub i}{sup -1}, potential disturbances are observed to propagate in two opposite directions from a location different from the actual exciter (metal disk electrode), indicating the presence of a virtual source. For pulse widths equal or greater than 3f{sub i}{sup -1}, there is no indication of such virtual source. These disturbances propagate with two phase speeds, i.e., v{sub p}/v{sub e}=1.36{+-}0.11 and 0.4{+-}0.15, where v{sub e} is the electron thermal speed. It is also observed that by increasing plasma density, the speed of these disturbances increases, whereas the speed is independent of pulse magnitude. Analysis of these disturbances indicates the excitation of solitary electron holes.

  9. Two-Photon Excitation of trans-Stilbene: Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Electronically Excited States above S1.

    PubMed

    Houk, Amanda L; Zheldakov, Igor L; Tommey, Tyler A; Elles, Christopher G

    2015-07-23

    The photoisomerization dynamics of trans-stilbene have been well studied in the lowest excited state, but much less is known about the behavior following excitation to higher-lying electronically excited states. This contribution reports a combined study of the spectroscopy and dynamics of two-photon accessible states above S1. Two-photon absorption (2PA) measurements using a broadband pump-probe technique reveal distinct bands near 5.1 and 6.4 eV. The 2PA bands have absolute cross sections of 40 ± 16 and 270 ± 110 GM, respectively, and a pump-probe polarization dependence that suggests both of the transitions access Ag-symmetry excited states. Separate transient absorption measurements probe the excited-state dynamics following two-photon excitation into each of the bands using intense pulses of 475 and 380 nm light, respectively. The initially excited states rapidly relax via internal conversion, leading to the formation of an S1 excited-state absorption band that is centered near 585 nm and evolves on a time scale of 1-2 ps due to intramolecular vibrational relaxation. The subsequent evolution of the S1 excited-state absorption is identical to the behavior following direct one-photon excitation of the lowest excited state at 4.0 eV. The complementary spectroscopy and dynamics measurements provide new benchmarks for computational studies of the electronic structure and dynamics of this model system on excited states above S1. Probing the dynamics of molecules in their higher-lying excited states is an important frontier in chemical reaction dynamics.

  10. The contribution of electronically excited states to the radiation chemistry of organic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lipsky, S.

    1992-01-01

    At low concentrations ({le}10{sup {minus}3}M) of aromatic solutes in saturated. hydrocarbon solvents, very efficient transport of electronic energy from photo-excited solvent to aromatic is observed. Effects of temperature, dilution, and quenching additives are being studied. Two-photon pulsed laser excitation gives no evidence of long lived metastable states. The fluorescence quantum yields of saturated hydrocarbon liquids have been studied for excitation wavelengths from 200 to 120 nm. For many compounds, the quantum yields for fluorescence are observed to decline to a minimum value at, or near, previously reported ionization thresholds. At higher energies, the magnitude of the quantum yield for fluorescence begins to increase. Magnetic field effects on intensity of steady-state recombination fluorescence have been observed both for photo-generated and {Beta}{sup {minus}} generated, electron and positive ion geminate pairs in saturated hydrocarbon liquids. The comparison indicates an important contribution . to observed recombination fluorescence from multiple ion-pairs under radiation chemical conditions. For photo-excited aromatic solutes dissolved in saturated hydrocarbon liquids, no magnetic field effect could be observed until surprisingly large excess energies above the threshold for ionization were achieved. This suggests a much smaller average range for the thermalized electron than expected from photoconductivity.

  11. Electron doping evolution of the magnetic excitations in NaFe1 -xCoxAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Scott V.; Zhang, Chenglin; Song, Yu; Tan, Guotai; Li, Yu; Abernathy, D. L.; Stone, M. B.; Granroth, G. E.; Perring, T. G.; Dai, Pengcheng

    2016-06-01

    We use time-of-flight (TOF) inelastic-neutron-scattering (INS) spectroscopy to investigate the doping dependence of magnetic excitations across the phase diagram of NaFe1 -xCoxAs with x =0 , 0.0175, 0.0215, 0.05, and 0.11 . The effect of electron doping by partially substituting Fe by Co is to form resonances that couple with superconductivity, broaden, and suppress low-energy (E ≤80 meV) spin excitations compared with spin waves in undoped NaFeAs. However, high-energy (E >80 meV) spin excitations are weakly Co-doping-dependent. Integration of the local spin dynamic susceptibility χ''(ω ) of NaFe1 -xCoxAs reveals a total fluctuating moment of 3.6 μB2/Fe and a small but systematic reduction with electron doping. The presence of a large spin gap in Co-overdoped nonsuperconducting NaFe0.89Co0.11As suggests that Fermi surface nesting is responsible for low-energy spin excitations. These results parallel the Ni-doping evolution of spin excitations in BaFe2 -xNixAs2 in spite of the differences in crystal structures and Fermi surface evolution in these two families of iron pnictides, thus confirming the notion that low-energy spin excitations coupling with itinerant electrons are important for superconductivity, while weakly doping-dependent high-energy spin excitations result from localized moments.

  12. Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation of vibrational and electronic states in phenol.

    PubMed

    Neves, R F C; Jones, D B; Lopes, M C A; Blanco, F; García, G; Ratnavelu, K; Brunger, M J

    2015-05-21

    We report on measurements of integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of composite vibrational modes and electronic-states in phenol, where the energy range of those experiments was 15-250 eV. There are currently no other results against which we can directly compare those measured data. We also report results from our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction computations, namely, for the inelastic ICS (all discrete electronic states and neutral dissociation) and the total ionisation ICS. In addition, for the relevant dipole-allowed excited electronic states, we also report f-scaled Born-level and energy-corrected and f-scaled Born-level (BEf-scaled) ICS. Where possible, our measured and calculated ICSs are compared against one another with the general level of accord between them being satisfactory to within the measurement uncertainties.

  13. Correlated electron ion dynamics: the excitation of atomic motion by energetic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfield, Andrew P.; Bowler, D. R.; Fisher, A. J.; Todorov, Tchavdar N.; Sánchez, Cristián G.

    2005-08-01

    Correlated electron-ion dynamics (CEID) is an extension of molecular dynamics that allows us to introduce in a correct manner the exchange of energy between electrons and ions. The formalism is based on a systematic approximation: small amplitude moment expansion. This formalism is extended here to include the explicit quantum spread of the ions and a generalization of the Hartree-Fock approximation for incoherent sums of Slater determinants. We demonstrate that the resultant dynamical equations reproduce analytically the selection rules for inelastic electron-phonon scattering from perturbation theory, which control the mutually driven excitations of the two interacting subsystems. We then use CEID to make direct numerical simulations of inelastic current-voltage spectroscopy in atomic wires, and to exhibit the crossover from ionic cooling to heating as a function of the relative degree of excitation of the electronic and ionic subsystems.

  14. The separation of vibrational coherence from ground- and excited-electronic states in P3HT film.

    PubMed

    Song, Yin; Hellmann, Christoph; Stingelin, Natalie; Scholes, Gregory D

    2015-06-01

    Concurrence of the vibrational coherence and ultrafast electron transfer has been observed in polymer/fullerene blends. However, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the role that the excited-state vibrational coherence plays during the electron transfer process since vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states is usually temporally and spectrally overlapped. Here, we performed 2-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D ES) measurements on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films. By Fourier transforming the whole 2D ES datasets (S(λ1,T̃2,λ3)) along the population time (T̃2) axis, we develop and propose a protocol capable of separating vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states in 3D rephasing and nonrephasing beating maps (S(λ1,ν̃2,λ3)). We found that the vibrational coherence from pure excited electronic states appears at positive frequency (+ν̃2) in the rephasing beating map and at negative frequency (-ν̃2) in the nonrephasing beating map. Furthermore, we also found that vibrational coherence from excited electronic state had a long dephasing time of 244 fs. The long-lived excited-state vibrational coherence indicates that coherence may be involved in the electron transfer process. Our findings not only shed light on the mechanism of ultrafast electron transfer in organic photovoltaics but also are beneficial for the study of the coherence effect on photoexcited dynamics in other systems.

  15. Total Electron Scattering and Electronic State Excitations Cross Sections for O_2, CO, and CH_4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanik, I.; Trajmar, S.; Nickel, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Available electron collision cross section data concerning total and elastic scattering, vibrationalexcitation, and ionization for O_2, CO, and CH_4 have been critically reviewed, and a set of crosssections for modeling of planetary atmospheric behavior is recommended. Utilizing theserecommended cross sections, we derived total electronic state excitation cross sections and upperlimits for dissociation cross sections, which in the case of CH_4 should very closely equal the actualdissociation cross section.

  16. General active space commutator-based coupled cluster theory of general excitation rank for electronically excited states: Implementation and application to ScH

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, Mickaël; Loras, Jessica; Fleig, Timo; Olsen, Jeppe

    2013-11-21

    We present a new implementation of general excitation rank coupled cluster theory for electronically excited states based on the single-reference multi-reference formalism. The method may include active-space selected and/or general higher excitations by means of the general active space concept. It may employ molecular integrals over the four-component Lévy-Leblond Hamiltonian or the relativistic spin-orbit-free four-component Hamiltonian of Dyall. In an initial application to ground- and excited states of the scandium monohydride molecule we report spectroscopic constants using basis sets of up to quadruple-zeta quality and up to full iterative triple excitations in the cluster operators. Effects due to spin-orbit interaction are evaluated using two-component multi-reference configuration interaction for assessing the accuracy of the coupled cluster results.

  17. Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition of U-235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodash, Perry Adam

    Nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that is theorized to occur in numerous isotopes. One isotope in particular, U-235, has been studied several times over the past 40 years and NEET of U-235 has never been conclusively observed. These past experiments generated conflicting results with some experiments claiming to observe NEET of U-235 and others setting limits for the NEET rate. This dissertation discusses the latest attempt to measure NEET of U-235. If NEET of U-235 were to occur, U-235m would be created. U-235m decays by internal conversion with a decay energy of 76 eV and a half-life of 26 minutes. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with a pulse energy of 789 mJ and a pulse width of 9 ns was used to generate a uranium plasma. The plasma was captured on a catcher plate and electrons emitted from the catcher plate were accelerated and focused onto a microchannel plate detector. A decay of 26 minutes would suggest the creation of U-235m and the possibility that NEET occurred. However, measurements performed using a variety of uranium targets spanning depleted uranium up to 99.4% enriched uranium did not observe a 26 minute decay. Numerous other decays were observed with half-lives ranging from minutes up to hundreds of minutes. While NEET of U-235 was not observed during this experiment, an upper limit for the NEET rate of U-235 was determined. In addition, explanations for the conflicting results from previous experiments are given. Based on the results of this experiment and the previous experiments looking for NEET of U-235, it is likely that NEET of U-235 has never been observed.

  18. The dynamics of highly excited electronic systems: Applications of the electron force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Julius T.; Goddard, William A.

    2009-12-01

    Highly excited heterogeneous complex materials are essential elements of important processes, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to semiconductor device fabrication. Understanding the dynamics of these systems has been challenging because of the difficulty in extracting mechanistic information from either experiment or theory. We describe here the electron force field (eFF) approximation to quantum mechanics which provides a practical approach to simulating the dynamics of such systems. eFF includes all the normal electrostatic interactions between electrons and nuclei and the normal quantum mechanical description of kinetic energy for the electrons, but contains two severe approximations: first, the individual electrons are represented as floating Gaussian wave packets whose position and size respond instantaneously to various forces during the dynamics; and second, these wave packets are combined into a many-body wave function as a Hartree product without explicit antisymmetrization. The Pauli principle is accounted for by adding an extra spin-dependent term to the Hamiltonian. These approximations are a logical extension of existing approaches to simulate the dynamics of fermions, which we review. In this paper, we discuss the details of the equations of motion and potentials that form eFF, and evaluate the ability of eFF to describe ground-state systems containing covalent, ionic, multicenter, and/or metallic bonds. We also summarize two eFF calculations previously reported on electronically excited systems: (1) the thermodynamics of hydrogen compressed up to ten times liquid density and heated up to 200 000 K; and (2) the dynamics of Auger fragmentation in a diamond nanoparticle, where hundreds of electron volts of excitation energy are dissipated over tens of femtoseconds. These cases represent the first steps toward using eFF to model highly excited electronic processes in complex materials.

  19. Electronic excitation of ground state atoms by collision with heavy gas particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1993-01-01

    Most of the important chemical reactions which occur in the very high temperature air produced around space vehicles as they enter the atmosphere were investigated both experimentally and theoretically, to some extent at least. One remaining reaction about which little is known, and which could be quite important at the extremely high temperatures that will be produced by the class of space vehicles now contemplated - such as the AOTV - is the excitation of bound electron states due to collisions between heavy gas particles. Rates of electronic excitation due to free electron collisions are known to be very rapid, but because these collisions quickly equilibrate the free and bound electron energy, the approach to full equilibrium with the heavy particle kinetic energy will depend primarily on the much slower process of bound electron excitation in heavy particle collisions and the subsequent rapid transfer to free electron energy. This may be the dominant mechanism leading to full equilibrium in the gas once the dissociation process has depleted the molecular states so the transfer between molecular vibrational energy and free electron energy is no longer available as a channel for equilibration of free electron and heavy particle kinetic energies. Two mechanisms seem probable in electronic excitation by heavy particle impact. One of these is the collision excitation and deexcitation of higher electronic states which are Rydberg like. A report, entitled 'Semi-Classical Theory of Electronic Excitation Rates', was submitted previously. This presented analytic expressions for the transition probabilities, assuming that the interaction potential is an exponential repulsion with a perturbation ripple due to the dipole-induced dipole effect in the case of neutral-neutral collisions, and to the ion-dipole interaction in the case of ion-neutral collisions. However the above may be, there is little doubt that excitation of ground state species by collision occurs at the

  20. Electron-impact excitation heating rates in the atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, L.; Kato, H.; Brunger, M. J.; Bradshaw, M. D.

    2010-09-01

    A previous study of various heating rates in the atmosphere of Titan included electron-impact excitation of molecular nitrogen as one component. This work examines this component in more detail, using a statistical equilibrium calculation to avoid approximations made in the earlier work. The sensitivity of the results to different cross-section sets is investigated. It is found that using recent and more physical cross sections for vibrational excitation produces a significant increase in the heating rate. On the other hand, using more accurate cross sections for the electronic states had little apparent effect on the heating rates when used within the approximations made in the previous model. However, the inclusion of more transitions in this study produces a significant increase in the electronic state heating rates, as states that were originally neglected are now accounted for here.

  1. Cross Sections for Electron Impact Excitation of Astrophysically Abundant Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    Electron collisional excitation rates and transition probabilities are important for computing electron temperatures and densities, ionization equilibria, and for deriving elemental abundances from emission lines formed in the collisional and photoionized astrophysical plasmas. Accurate representation of target wave functions that properly account for the important correlation and relaxation effects and inclusion of coupling effects including coupling to the continuum are essential components of a reliable collision calculation. Non-orthogonal orbitals technique in multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities. The effect of coupling to the continuum spectrum is included through the use of pseudostates which are chosen to account for most of the dipole polarizabilities of target states. The B-spline basis is used in the R-matrix approach to calculate electron excitation collision strengths and rates. Results for oscillator strengths and electron excitation collision strengths for transitions in N I, O I, O II, O IV, S X and Fe XIV have been produced

  2. Correlation between excitation temperature and electron temperature with two groups of electron energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hoyong; Choe, Wonho; You, S. J.

    2010-10-15

    The relationship between the electron excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) determined by optical emission spectroscopy and the electron temperature (T{sub e}) using a rf-compensated Langmuir probe was investigated in argon capacitively coupled plasmas. In the experiment performed at the gas pressure range of 30 mTorr to 1 Torr and the rf power range of 5-37 W, the electron energy probability function (EEPF) obtained from the probe current versus voltage characteristic curve showed two energy groups of electrons. The measured EEPF demonstrated that the electron energy distribution changed from Druyvesteyn to single Maxwellian as the discharge current was increased and from bi-Maxwellian to Druyvesteyn as the pressure was increased. As a result, T{sub exc} showed a tendency identical to that of T{sub e} of the high energy part of electrons as pressure and rf power were varied. This suggests that electron temperature can be determined from the measured T{sub exc} through a calibration experiment by which the ratio between electron and excitation temperatures is measured.

  3. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ∼1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl6 (2-) dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ thymine and PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)4 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)4 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a "dynamic tag" which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to allow autodetachment.

  4. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Hexachloroplatinate-Nucleobase Complexes: Nucleobase Excited State Decay Observed via Delayed Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue B.; Dessent, Caroline

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ~1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl6 2- dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl6 2-∙thymine and PtCl6 2-∙adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes [Sen et al, J. Phys. Chem. B, 119, 11626, 2015]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl6 2-∙nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes, is attributed to onephoton excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a timescale long enough to allow autodetachment.

  5. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ∼1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl6 (2-) dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ thymine and PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)4 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl6 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)4 (2-) ⋅ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a "dynamic tag" which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to allow autodetachment. PMID:26567662

  6. Application of DSMC Electronic Excitation Modeling to Radiation Calculation of Hypersonic Reentry Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Sohn, Ilyoup; Levin, Deborah A.; Modest, Michael F.

    2011-05-01

    The current work implemented excited levels of atomic N and corresponding electron impact excitation/de-excitation and ionization processes in DSMC. Results show that when excitation models are included, the Stardust 68.9 km re-entry flow has an observable change in the ion number densities and electron temperature. Adding in the excited levels of atoms improves the degree of ionization by providing additional intermediate steps to ionization. The extra ionization reactions consume the electron energy and reduce the electron temperature. The DSMC results of number densities of excited levels are lower than the prediction of quasi steady state calculation. Comparison of radiation calculations using electronic excited populations from DSMC and QSS indicates that, at the stagnation point, there is about 20% difference of the radiative heat flux between DSMC and QSS.

  7. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor–acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene–perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  8. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor-acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene-perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  9. Link atom bond length effect in ONIOM excited state calculations.

    PubMed

    Caricato, Marco; Vreven, Thom; Trucks, Gary W; Frisch, Michael J

    2010-08-01

    We investigate how the choice of the link atom bond length affects an electronic transition energy calculation with the so-called our own N-layer integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics (ONIOM) hybrid method. This follows our previous paper [M. Caricato et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 134105 (2009)], where we showed that ONIOM is able to accurately approximate electronic transition energies computed at a high level of theory such as the equation of motion coupled cluster singles and doubles (EOM-CCSD) method. In this study we show that the same guidelines used in ONIOM ground state calculations can also be followed in excited state calculations, and that the link atom bond length has little effect on the ONIOM energy when a sensible model system is chosen. We also suggest further guidelines for excited state calculations which can help in checking the effectiveness of the definition of the model system and controlling the noise in the calculation.

  10. Ballistic effects and intersubband excitations in multiple quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, H.; Schönbein, C.; Schwarz, K.; Walther, M.

    1998-07-01

    We have studied the transport properties of electrons in asymmetric quantum well structures upon far-infrared optical excitation of carriers from the lowest subband into the continuum. Here the photocurrent consists of a coherent component originating from ballistic transport upon excitation, and of an incoherent part associated with asymmetric diffusion and relaxation processes, which occur after the coherence has been lost. The signature of the coherent contribution is provided by a sign reversal of the photocurrent upon changing the excitation energy. This sign reversal arises from the energy-dependent interference between continuum states, which have a twofold degeneracy characterized by positive and negative momenta. The interference effect also allows us to estimate the coherent mean free path ( >20 nm at 77K). In specifically designed device structures, we use both the coherent and incoherent components in order to achieve a pronounced photovoltaic infrared response for detector applications.

  11. Ultrafast electron injection into photo-excited organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Cvetko, Dean; Fratesi, Guido; Kladnik, Gregor; Cossaro, Albano; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Venkataraman, Latha; Morgante, Alberto

    2016-08-10

    Charge transfer rates at metal/organic interfaces affect the efficiencies of devices for organic based electronics and photovoltaics. A quantitative study of electron transfer rates, which take place on the femtosecond timescale, is often difficult, especially since in most systems the molecular adsorption geometry is unknown. Here, we use X-ray resonant photoemission spectroscopy to measure ultrafast charge transfer rates across pyridine/Au(111) interfaces while also controlling the molecular orientation on the metal. We demonstrate that a bi-directional charge transfer across the molecule/metal interface is enabled upon creation of a core-exciton on the molecule with a rate that has a strong dependence on the molecular adsorption angle. Through density functional theory calculations, we show that the alignment of molecular levels relative to the metal Fermi level is dramatically altered when a core-hole is created on the molecule, allowing the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital to fall partially below the metal Fermi level. We also calculate charge transfer rates as a function of molecular adsorption geometry and find a trend that agrees with the experiment. These findings thus give insight into the charge transfer dynamics of a photo-excited molecule on a metal surface. PMID:27444572

  12. TlII excitation cross-sections in collisions of slow electrons with thallium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Yu M.

    2016-09-01

    Excitation of a singly-charged thallium ion in electron collisions with thallium atoms has been studied experimentally. Seventy excitation cross sections have been measured at an exciting electron energy of 30 eV. Ten optical excitation functions (OEFs) have been recorded in the incident electron energy range of 0-200 eV. For seven TlII spectral series, the dependence of excitation cross-sections on the principal quantum numbers of upper levels has been studied. A comparison of findings with data from preceding publications is presented.

  13. Dissociative excitation of the N(+)(5S) state by electron impact on N2 - Excitation function and quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdman, P. W.; Zipf, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    Metastable N(+)(5S) ions were produced in the laboratory by dissociative excitation of N2 with energetic electrons. The resulting radiative decay of the N(+)(5S) state was observed with sufficient resolution to completely resolve the doublet from the nearby N2 molecular radiation. The excitation function was measured from threshold to 500 eV. The cross section peaks at a high electron energy and also exhibits a high threshold energy both of which are typical of dissociative excitation-ionization processes. This finding complicates the explanation of electron impact on N2 as the mechanism for the source of the 2145 A 'auroral mystery feature' by further increasing the required peak cross section. It is suggested that the apparent N(+)(5S) quenching in auroras may be an artifact due to the softening of the electron energy spectrum in the auroral E region.

  14. Effect of frequency on microplasmas driven by microwave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-07-01

    The effect of excitation frequency on the breakdown voltage of a microwave (mw) microdischarge and its steady-state plasma parameters is studied by the self-consistent one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo collisions model. It is found that for microdischarges in which the electron wall losses are significant, an increase in the mw frequency results in a decrease in the breakdown voltage. For conditions in which the electron wall losses become negligible, an increase in the frequency does not influence significantly the breakdown voltage. At the same time, for both regimes, the increase in the frequency results in an increase in the steady-state plasma density. The analysis of the steady-state plasma parameters have shown that the dominant electron heating mechanism is the Joule heating while the stochastic heating is negligible. Also, it is found that the electron energy distribution function consists of two electron groups, namely, slow and fast electrons. The presence of fast electrons in the plasma bulk indicates the non-local nature of microwave excited microdischarges.

  15. Effect of frequency on microplasmas driven by microwave excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-07-28

    The effect of excitation frequency on the breakdown voltage of a microwave (mw) microdischarge and its steady-state plasma parameters is studied by the self-consistent one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo collisions model. It is found that for microdischarges in which the electron wall losses are significant, an increase in the mw frequency results in a decrease in the breakdown voltage. For conditions in which the electron wall losses become negligible, an increase in the frequency does not influence significantly the breakdown voltage. At the same time, for both regimes, the increase in the frequency results in an increase in the steady-state plasma density. The analysis of the steady-state plasma parameters have shown that the dominant electron heating mechanism is the Joule heating while the stochastic heating is negligible. Also, it is found that the electron energy distribution function consists of two electron groups, namely, slow and fast electrons. The presence of fast electrons in the plasma bulk indicates the non-local nature of microwave excited microdischarges.

  16. Electron impact excitation collision strengths for extreme ultraviolet lines of Fe VII

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O. E-mail: oleg.zatsarinny@drake.edu

    2014-06-10

    Extensive calculations have been performed for electron impact excitation collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the Fe VII extreme ultraviolet lines of astrophysical importance. The collision strengths for fine-structure transitions are calculated in the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach. The target wavefunctions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The close-coupling expansion includes 189 fine-structure levels of Fe VII belonging to terms of the ground 3p {sup 6}3d {sup 2} and excited 3p {sup 5}3d {sup 3}, 3p {sup 6}3d4l, 3p {sup 6}3d5s, and 3p {sup 6}3d5p configurations. The effective collision strengths are determined from the electron excitation collision strengths by integration over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. The effective collision strengths are provided for 17766 fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} K. Our results normally agree with the previous R-matrix frame-transformation calculations by Witthoeft and Badnell. However, there are important differences for some transitions with the previous calculations. The corrections to the previous results are mainly due to more extensive expansions for the Fe VII target states.

  17. Energy shift of collective electron excitations in highly corrugated graphitic nanostructures: Experimental and theoretical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Sedelnikova, O. V. Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Asanov, I. P.; Yushina, I. V.

    2014-04-21

    Effect of corrugation of hexagonal carbon network on the collective electron excitations has been studied using optical absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in conjunction with density functional theory calculations. Onion-like carbon (OLC) was taken as a material, where graphitic mantle enveloping agglomerates of multi-shell fullerenes is strongly curved. Experiments showed that positions of π and π + σ plasmon modes as well as π → π* absorption peak are substantially redshifted for OLC as compared with those of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and thermally exfoliated graphite consisted of planar sheets. This effect was reproduced in behavior of dielectric functions of rippled graphite models calculated within the random phase approximation. We conclude that the energy of electron excitations in graphitic materials could be precisely tuned by a simple bending of hexagonal network without change of topology. Moreover, our investigation suggests that in such materials optical exciton can transfer energy to plasmon non-radiatively.

  18. Excitation of plasmons in Ag/Fe/W structure by spin-polarized electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Samarin, Sergey N.; Kostylev, Mikhail; Williams, J. F.; Artamonov, Oleg M.; Baraban, Alexander P.; Guagliardo, Paul

    2015-09-07

    Using Spin-polarized Electron-Energy Loss Spectroscopy (SPEELS), the plasmon excitations were probed in a few atomic layers thick Ag film deposited on an Fe layer or on a single crystal of W(110). The measurements were performed at two specular geometries with either a 25° or 72° angle of incidence. On a clean Fe layer (10 atomic layers thick), Stoner excitation asymmetry was observed, as expected. Deposition of a silver film on top of the Fe layer dramatically changed the asymmetry of the SPEELS spectra. The spin-effect depends on the kinematics of the scattering: angles of incidence and detection. The spin-dependence of the plasmon excitations in the silver film on the W(110) surface and on the ferromagnetic Fe film is suggested to arise from the spin-active Ag/W or Ag/Fe interfaces.

  19. Electronic excitation and quenching of atoms at insulator surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaminathan, P. K.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Murthy, C. S.

    1988-01-01

    A trajectory-based semiclassical method is used to study electronically inelastic collisions of gas atoms with insulator surfaces. The method provides for quantum-mechanical treatment of the internal electronic dynamics of a localized region involving the gas/surface collision, and a classical treatment of all the nuclear degrees of freedom (self-consistently and in terms of stochastic trajectories), and includes accurate simulation of the bath-temperature effects. The method is easy to implement and has a generality that holds promise for many practical applications. The problem of electronically inelastic dynamics is solved by computing a set of stochastic trajectories that on thermal averaging directly provide electronic transition probabilities at a given temperature. The theory is illustrated by a simple model of a two-state gas/surface interaction.

  20. Controlling the excitation process of free electrons by a femtosecond elliptically polarized laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lili; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Lan; Qu, Liangti; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-11-01

    This paper is focused on the excitation rates of free electrons of an aluminum (Al) bulk irradiated by an elliptically polarized laser in simulation, using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The polarized 400 nm, 10 fs laser pulse consisted of two elementary sinusoidal beams, and is adjusted by changing the phase difference φ and the intersection angle θ of the polarization directions between the two beams. The simulation includes cases of φ = π/2 with θ = 30°, θ = 45°, θ = 60°, θ = 90°, θ = 120°, θ = 135°, θ = 150°, and cases of θ = 90° with φ = π/4, φ = π/3, φ = π/2, φ = 2π/3, φ = 3π/4. The absorbed energy, the excitation rates and the density distributions of free electrons after laser termination are investigated. At the given power intensity (1×1014Wcm-2), pulse width (10 fs) and wavelength (400 nm) of each elementary laser beam, computational results indicate that the excitation rate of free electrons is impacted by three major factors: the long axis direction of the laser projected profile, the amplitude difference of the first main oscillation (1st AD), and the total amplitude difference of main oscillations (TAD) of the external electric field. Among the aforementioned three factors for the excitation rate of free electrons, the direction of long axis plays the most significant role. The screen effect is crucial to compare the importance of the remaining two factors. The analysis approach to investigate the electron dynamics under an elliptically polarized laser is both pioneering and effective.

  1. Coherence, Energy and Charge Transfers in De-Excitation Pathways of Electronic Excited State of Biomolecules in Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Henrik G.; Malik, F. Bary

    2013-11-01

    The observed multiple de-excitation pathways of photo-absorbed electronic excited state in the peridinin-chlorophyll complex, involving both energy and charge transfers among its constituents, are analyzed using the bio-Auger (B-A) theory. It is also shown that the usually used Förster-Dexter theory, which does not allow for charge transfer, is a special case of B-A theory. The latter could, under appropriate circumstances, lead to excimers.

  2. Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition of U-235

    SciTech Connect

    Chodash, Perry Adam

    2015-07-14

    Nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that is theorized to occur in numerous isotopes. One isotope in particular, 235U, has been studied several times over the past 40 years and NEET of 235U has never been conclusively observed. These past experiments generated con icting results with some experiments claiming to observe NEET of 235U and others setting limits for the NEET rate. This dissertation discusses the latest attempt to measure NEET of 235U. If NEET of 235U were to occur, 235mU would be created. 235mU decays by internal conversion with a decay energy of 76 eV and a half-life of 26 minutes. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with a pulse energy of 789 mJ and a pulse width of 9 ns was used to generate a uranium plasma. The plasma was captured on a catcher plate and electrons emitted from the catcher plate were accelerated and focused onto a microchannel plate detector. A decay of 26 minutes would suggest the creation of 235mU and the possibility that NEET occurred. However, measurements performed using a variety of uranium targets spanning depleted uranium up to 99.4% enriched uranium did not observe a 26 minute decay. Numerous other decays were observed with half-lives ranging from minutes up to hundreds of minutes. While NEET of 235U was not observed during this experiment, an upper limit for the NEET rate of 235U was determined. In addition, explanations for the con icting results from previous experiments are given. Based on the results of this experiment and the previous experiments looking for NEET of 235U, it is likely that NEET of 235U has never been observed.

  3. Theoretical and experimental differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the electronic bands of furfural

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; da Costa, R. F.; do N. Varella, M. T.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Brunger, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    We report results from a joint experimental and theoretical investigation into electron scattering from the important industrial species furfural (C5H4O2). Specifically, differential cross sections (DCSs) have been measured and calculated for the electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of C5H4O2. The measurements were carried out at energies in the range 20-40 eV, and for scattered-electron angles between 10° and 90°. The energy resolution of those experiments was typically ˜80 meV. Corresponding Schwinger multichannel method with pseudo-potential calculations, for energies between 6-50 eV and with and without Born-closure, were also performed for a sub-set of the excited electronic-states that were accessed in the measurements. Those calculations were undertaken at the static exchange plus polarisation-level using a minimum orbital basis for single configuration interaction (MOB-SCI) approach. Agreement between the measured and calculated DCSs was qualitatively quite good, although to obtain quantitative accord, the theory would need to incorporate even more channels into the MOB-SCI. The role of multichannel coupling on the computed electronic-state DCSs is also explored in some detail.

  4. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Egidi, Franco Segado, Mireia; Barone, Vincenzo; Koch, Henrik; Cappelli, Chiara

    2014-12-14

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π{sup *}, π-π{sup *}, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  5. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egidi, Franco; Segado, Mireia; Koch, Henrik; Cappelli, Chiara; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π*, π-π*, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  6. Development of an electron-temperature-dependent interatomic potential for molecular dynamics simulation of tungsten under electronic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakshouri, S.; Alfè, D.; Duffy, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Irradiation of a metal by lasers or swift heavy ions causes the electrons to become excited. In the vicinity of the excitation, an electronic temperature is established within a thermalization time of 10-100 fs, as a result of electron-electron collisions. For short times, corresponding to less than 1 ps after excitation, the resulting electronic temperature may be orders of magnitude higher than the lattice temperature. During this short time, atoms in the metal experience modified interatomic forces as a result of the excited electrons. These forces can lead to ultrafast nonthermal phenomena such as melting, ablation, laser-induced phase transitions, and modified vibrational properties. We develop an electron-temperature-dependent empirical interatomic potential for tungsten that can be used to model such phenomena using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Finite-temperature density functional theory calculations at high electronic temperatures are used to parametrize the model potential.

  7. Electron impact excitation of lambda 7990-A multiplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdman, P. W.; Zipf, E. C.

    1983-09-01

    The authors have investigated the dissociative excitation of the atomic oxygen multiplet O I (3sarcmin3D0→3p3P; λ7990 Å) due to electron impact on O2 and NO. The results are consistent with a λ7990/λ989 branching ratio of ≡2.5×10-5 that is at least an order of magnitude smaller than either the previous experimental upper limits or a recent theoretical calculation. This finding complicates the study of (3sarcmin3D0→2P4 3P; λ989 Å) radiation entrapment in the thermosphere and increases the potential importance of selective absorption of the λ989-Å multiplet by N2. Although the latter process may help to explain some aspects of the behaviour of λ7990-Å emission in aurorae, it is nonetheless difficult, in the light of the present results, to account for the observed absolute intensity of this infrared cascade transition using current entrapment models.

  8. Reevaluation of experiments and new theoretical calculations for electron-impact excitation of C3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, P. H.; Gardner, L. D.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Savin, D. W.; Kohl, J. L.; Bartschat, K.

    1999-06-01

    Experimental absolute-rate coefficients for electron-impact excitation of C3+ (2s 2S1/2-->2p 2P1/2,3/2) near threshold [D. W. Savin, L. D. Gardner, D. B. Reisenfeld, A. R. Young, and J. L. Kohl, Phys. Rev. A 51, 2162 (1995)] have been reanalyzed to include a more accurate determination of optical efficiency and revised radiometric uncertainties which reduce the total systematic uncertainty of the results. Also, new R matrix with pseudostates (RMPS) calculations for this transition near threshold are presented. Comparison of the RMPS results to those of simpler close-coupling calculations indicates the importance of accounting for target continuum effects. The reanalyzed results of Savin et al. are in excellent agreement with the RMPS calculations; comparisons are also made to other measurements of this excitation. Agreement with the RMPS results is better for fluorescence technique measurements than for electron-energy-loss measurements.

  9. Differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the electronic bands of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Neves, R. F. C.; Jones, D. B.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Nixon, K. L.; Silva, G. B. da; Duque, H. V.; Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; and others

    2015-03-14

    We report results from a joint theoretical and experimental investigation into electron scattering from the important organic species phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). Specifically, differential cross sections (DCSs) have been measured and calculated for the electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH. The measurements were carried out at energies in the range 15–40 eV, and for scattered-electron angles between 10{sup ∘} and 90{sup ∘}. The energy resolution of those experiments was typically ∼80 meV. Corresponding Schwinger multichannel method with pseudo-potentials calculations, with and without Born-closure, were also performed for a sub-set of the excited electronic-states that were accessed in the measurements. Those calculations were conducted at the static exchange plus polarisation (SEP)-level using a minimum orbital basis for single configuration interaction (MOBSCI) approach. Agreement between the measured and calculated DCSs was typically fair, although to obtain quantitative accord, the theory would need to incorporate even more channels into the MOBSCI.

  10. Persistent order due to transiently enhanced nesting in an electronically excited charge density wave

    PubMed Central

    Rettig, L.; Cortés, R.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I. R.; Schmitt, F.; Moore, R. G.; Shen, Z.-X.; Kirchmann, P. S.; Wolf, M.; Bovensiepen, U.

    2016-01-01

    Non-equilibrium conditions may lead to novel properties of materials with broken symmetry ground states not accessible in equilibrium as vividly demonstrated by non-linearly driven mid-infrared active phonon excitation. Potential energy surfaces of electronically excited states also allow to direct nuclear motion, but relaxation of the excess energy typically excites fluctuations leading to a reduced or even vanishing order parameter as characterized by an electronic energy gap. Here, using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate a tendency towards transient stabilization of a charge density wave after near-infrared excitation, counteracting the suppression of order in the non-equilibrium state. Analysis of the dynamic electronic structure reveals a remaining energy gap in a highly excited transient state. Our observation can be explained by a competition between fluctuations in the electronically excited state, which tend to reduce order, and transiently enhanced Fermi surface nesting stabilizing the order. PMID:26804717

  11. Vertical and adiabatic electronic excitations in biphenylene: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, M. E.; Rebentisch, R.; Hohlneicher, G.; Fülscher, M. P.; Serrano-Andrés, L.; Roos, B. O.

    1997-12-01

    The low-lying singlet states of biphenylene have been studied using ab initio methods. Vertical excitation energies were calculated by multiconfigurational perturbation theory (CASPT2), starting from a complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) reference. The geometries of the most important low-lying excited states were individually optimized at the CASSCF level to study the difference between vertical and adiabatic excitations. Extended atomic natural orbital (ANO)-type basis sets were used to calculate state energies. Geometry optimizations were done with smaller ANO-type basis sets. Excitations from the ground state to the 1 1B3g and 1 1B2u excited singlet states lead to pronounced geometry changes which alter the bond alternation pattern. The theoretical results provide a solid basis for the assignment and interpretation of experimental spectra.

  12. Ultrafast Excitation of an Inner-Shell Electron by Laser-Induced Electron Recollision.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yunpei; Zeng, Zhinan; Jia, Zhengmao; Komm, Pavel; Zheng, Yinhui; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Ruxin; Marcus, Gilad

    2016-02-19

    Extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulses, generated by a process known as laser-induced electron recollision, are a key ingredient for attosecond metrology, providing a tool to precisely initiate and probe subfemtosecond dynamics in atoms, molecules, and solids. However, extending attosecond metrology to scrutinize the dynamics of the inner-shell electrons is a challenge, that is because of the lower efficiency in generating the required soft x-ray (ℏω>300  eV) attosecond bursts. A way around this problem is to use the recolliding electron to directly initiate the desired inner-shell process, instead of using the currently low flux x-ray attosecond sources. Such an excitation process occurs in a subfemtosecond time scale, and may provide the necessary "pump" step in a pump-probe experiment. Here we used a few cycle infrared (λ_{0}≈1800  nm) source and observed direct evidence for inner-shell excitations through the laser-induced electron recollision process. It is the first step toward time-resolved core-hole studies in the keV energy range with subfemtosecond time resolution. PMID:26943536

  13. Ultrafast Excitation of an Inner-Shell Electron by Laser-Induced Electron Recollision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yunpei; Zeng, Zhinan; Jia, Zhengmao; Komm, Pavel; Zheng, Yinhui; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Ruxin; Marcus, Gilad

    2016-02-01

    Extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulses, generated by a process known as laser-induced electron recollision, are a key ingredient for attosecond metrology, providing a tool to precisely initiate and probe subfemtosecond dynamics in atoms, molecules, and solids. However, extending attosecond metrology to scrutinize the dynamics of the inner-shell electrons is a challenge, that is because of the lower efficiency in generating the required soft x-ray (ℏω >300 eV ) attosecond bursts. A way around this problem is to use the recolliding electron to directly initiate the desired inner-shell process, instead of using the currently low flux x-ray attosecond sources. Such an excitation process occurs in a subfemtosecond time scale, and may provide the necessary "pump" step in a pump-probe experiment. Here we used a few cycle infrared (λ0≈1800 nm ) source and observed direct evidence for inner-shell excitations through the laser-induced electron recollision process. It is the first step toward time-resolved core-hole studies in the keV energy range with subfemtosecond time resolution.

  14. R-matrix calculations along sequences: photoionization and electron-impact excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Witthoeft, M. C.

    2009-09-10

    As computer power continues to increase, so does our ability to carry out extensive, non-perturbative calculations of atomic processes. Much work has been done on increasing the target representation of complex systems in step with advances in computational power. However there is also a need for coverage in terms of atomic data used in astrophysical or fusion plasma modeling. In this talk, we discuss recent R-matrix calculations of electron-impact excitation and photoionization over iso-electronic sequences. While automation of R-matrix codes and data analysis are reviewed, the talk is focused on iso-electronic trends observed in the data. Specifically, we show the effect that resonant enhancement and level mixing can have on expected iso-electronic trends.

  15. Electrostatic ion cyclotron, beam-plasma, and lower hybrid waves excited by an electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves have been extensively investigated in connection with both space and laboratory plasmas. The present investigation has the objective to study the excitation of low-frequency waves in a multiion plasma by electron beams. The frequencies considered range from below the lowest gyrofrequency of the heaviest ion to about the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that electron-beam instabilities can produce peaks in the growth rate below the cyclotron frequency of each ion species if nonzero perpendicular wave number effects are included in the ion dynamics. The dispersion relations for neutralized ion Bernstein (NIB) and pure ion Bernstein (PIB) waves are considered along with an instability analysis for a cold plasma and warm electron beam, the electron beam-plasma mode, banded ion cyclotron (EIC) waves with small perpendicular wavelengths, and the growth lengths of the waves.

  16. Electron capture and excitation processes in H+‑H collisions in dense quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakimovski, D.; Markovska, N.; Janev, R. K.

    2016-10-01

    Electron capture and excitation processes in proton–hydrogen atom collisions taking place in dense quantum plasmas are studied by employing the two-centre atomic orbital close-coupling (TC-AOCC) method. The Debye–Hückel cosine (DHC) potential is used to describe the plasma screening effects on the Coulomb interaction between charged particles. The properties of a hydrogen atom with DHC potential are investigated as a function of the screening strength of the potential. It is found that the decrease in binding energy of nl levels with increasing screening strength is considerably faster than in the case of the Debye–Hückel (DH) screening potential, appropriate for description of charged particle interactions in weakly coupled classical plasmas. This results in a reduction in the number of bound states in the DHC potential with respect to that in the DH potential for the same plasma screening strength, and is reflected in the dynamics of excitation and electron capture processes for the two screened potentials. The TC-AOCC cross sections for total and state-selective electron capture and excitation cross sections with the DHC potential are calculated for a number of representative screening strengths in the 1–300 keV energy range and compared with those for the DH and pure Coulomb potential. The total capture cross sections for a selected number of screening strengths are compared with the available results from classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations.

  17. Two-electron excitation in slow ion-atom collisions: Excitation mechanisms and interferences among autoionizing states

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, M. Rice Univ., Houston, TX . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    The two-electron capture or excitation process resulting from collisions of H{sup +} and O{sup 6+} ions with He atoms in the energy range from 0.5 keV/amu to 5 keV/amu is studied within a molecular representation. The collision dynamics for formation of doubly excited O{sup 4+} ions and He** atoms and their (n{ell}, n{prime}{ell}{prime}) populations are analyzed in conjunction with electron correlations. Autoionizing states thus formed decay through the Auger process. An experimental study of an ejected electron energy spectrum shows ample structures in addition to two characteristic peaks that are identified by atomic and molecular autoionizations. These structures are attributable to various interferences among electronic states and trajectories. We examine the dominant sources of the interferences. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  18. New tools for the systematic analysis and visualization of electronic excitations. II. Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Plasser, Felix Bäppler, Stefanie A.; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2014-07-14

    The excited states of a diverse set of molecules are examined using a collection of newly implemented analysis methods. These examples expose the particular power of three of these tools: (i) natural difference orbitals (the eigenvectors of the difference density matrix) for the description of orbital relaxation effects, (ii) analysis of the one-electron transition density matrix in terms of an electron-hole picture to identify charge resonance and excitonic correlation effects, and (iii) state-averaged natural transition orbitals for a compact simultaneous representation of several states. Furthermore, the utility of a wide array of additional analysis methods is highlighted. Five molecules with diverse excited state characteristics are chosen for these tasks: pyridine as a prototypical small heteroaromatic molecule, a model system of six neon atoms to study charge resonance effects, hexatriene in its neutral and radical cation forms to exemplify the cases of double excitations and spin-polarization, respectively, and a model iridium complex as a representative metal organic compound. Using these examples a number of phenomena, which are at first sight unexpected, are highlighted and their physical significance is discussed. Moreover, the generality of the conclusions of this paper is verified by a comparison of single- and multireference ab initio methods.

  19. Influence of a polarizable surrounding on the electronically excited states of aggregated perylene materials.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Daniel; Settels, Volker; Liu, Wenlan; Fink, Reinhold F; Engels, Bernd

    2016-06-30

    To tune the efficiency of organic semiconductor devices it is important to understand limiting factors as trapping mechanisms for excitons or charges. An understanding of such mechanisms deserves an accurate description of the involved electronical states in the given environment. In this study, we investigate how a polarizable surrounding influences the relative positions of electronically excited states of dimers of different perylene dyes. Polarization effects are particularly interesting for these systems, because gas phase computations predict that the CT states lie slightly above the corresponding Frenkel states. A polarizable environment may change this energy order because CT states are thought to be more sensitive to a polarizable surrounding than Frenkel states. A first insight we got via a TD-HF approach in combination with a polarizable continuum model (PCM). These give limited insights because TD-HF overestimates excitation energies of CT states. However, SCS-CC2 approaches, which are sufficiently accurate, cannot easily be used in combination with continuum solvent models. Hence, we developed two approaches to combine gas phase SCS-CC2 results with solvent effects based on TD-HF computations. Their accuracies were finally checked via ADC(2)//COSMO computations. The results show that for perylene dyes a polarizable surrounding alone does not influence the energetic ordering of CT and Frenkel states. Variations in the energy order of the states only result from nuclear relaxation effects after the excitation process. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27030658

  20. Peroxyacetyl radical: Electronic excitation energies, fundamental vibrational frequencies, and symmetry breaking in the first excited state

    SciTech Connect

    Copan, Andreas V.; Wiens, Avery E.; Nowara, Ewa M.; Schaefer, Henry F.; Agarwal, Jay

    2015-02-07

    Peroxyacetyl radical [CH{sub 3}C(O)O{sub 2}] is among the most abundant peroxy radicals in the atmosphere and is involved in OH-radical recycling along with peroxyacetyl nitrate formation. Herein, the ground (X{sup ~}) and first (A{sup ~}) excited state surfaces of cis and trans peroxyacetyl radical are characterized using high-level ab initio methods. Geometries, anharmonic vibrational frequencies, and adiabatic excitation energies extrapolated to the complete basis-set limit are reported from computations with coupled-cluster theory. Excitation of the trans conformer is found to induce a symmetry-breaking conformational change due to second-order Jahn-Teller interactions with higher-lying excited states. Additional benchmark computations are provided to aid future theoretical work on peroxy radicals.

  1. Excitation, propagation, and damping of electron Bernstein waves in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, A. K.; Schultz, S. D.

    2000-10-01

    The conventional ordinary O-mode and the extraordinary X-mode in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies are not suitable for core heating in high-β spherical tokamak plasmas, like the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, S. Kaye, M. Peng et al., in Proceedings of the 17th International Atomic Energy Agency Fusion Energy Conference (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1999), Vol. 3, p. 1135], as they are weakly damped at high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency. However, electron Bernstein waves (EBW) can be effective for heating and driving currents in spherical tokamak plasmas. Power can be coupled to EBWs via mode conversion of either the X-mode or the O-mode. The two mode conversions are optimized in different regions of the parameter space spanned by the parallel wavelength and wave frequency. The conditions for optimized mode conversion to EBWs are evaluated analytically and numerically using a cold plasma model and an approximate kinetic model. From geometric optics ray tracing it is found that the EBWs damp strongly near the Doppler-broadened resonance at harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency.

  2. Intermediate energy cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D. B.; Ellis-Gibbings, L.; García, G.; Nixon, K. L.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-09-07

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) and integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine, at incident electron energies in the range 15–50 eV. The scattered electron angular range for the DCS measurements was 15°–90°. The measurements at the DCS-level are the first to be reported for vibrational-excitation in pyrimidine via electron impact, while for the ICS we extend the results from the only previous condensed-phase study [P. L. Levesque, M. Michaud, and L. Sanche, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094701 (2005)], for electron energies ⩽12 eV, to higher energies. Interestingly, the trend in the magnitude of the lower energy condensed-phase ICSs is much smaller when compared to the corresponding gas phase results. As there is no evidence for the existence of any shape-resonances, in the available pyrimidine total cross sections [Baek et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 032702 (2013); Fuss et al., ibid. 88, 042702 (2013)], between 10 and 20 eV, this mismatch in absolute magnitude between the condensed-phase and gas-phase ICSs might be indicative for collective-behaviour effects in the condensed-phase results.

  3. Spin excitations in systems with hopping electron transport and strong position disorder in a large magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Shumilin, A V

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the spin excitations in systems with hopping electron conduction and strong position disorder. We focus on the problem in a strong magnetic field when the spin Hamiltonian can be reduced to the effective single-particle Hamiltonian and treated with conventional numerical technics. It is shown that in a 3D system with Heisenberg exchange interaction the spin excitations have a delocalized part of the spectrum even in the limit of strong disorder, thus leading to the possibility of the coherent spin transport. The spin transport provided by the delocalized excitations can be described by a diffusion coefficient. Non-homogenous magnetic fields lead to the Anderson localization of spin excitations while anisotropy of the exchange interaction results in the Lifshitz localization of excitations. We discuss the possible effect of the additional exchange-driven spin diffusion on the organic spin-valve devices. PMID:27484892

  4. Spin excitations in systems with hopping electron transport and strong position disorder in a large magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilin, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the spin excitations in systems with hopping electron conduction and strong position disorder. We focus on the problem in a strong magnetic field when the spin Hamiltonian can be reduced to the effective single-particle Hamiltonian and treated with conventional numerical technics. It is shown that in a 3D system with Heisenberg exchange interaction the spin excitations have a delocalized part of the spectrum even in the limit of strong disorder, thus leading to the possibility of the coherent spin transport. The spin transport provided by the delocalized excitations can be described by a diffusion coefficient. Non-homogenous magnetic fields lead to the Anderson localization of spin excitations while anisotropy of the exchange interaction results in the Lifshitz localization of excitations. We discuss the possible effect of the additional exchange-driven spin diffusion on the organic spin-valve devices.

  5. Vibronic structure and coupling of higher excited electronic states in carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Stanisław; Luchowski, Rafał

    2013-03-01

    Absorption spectra of all-trans carotenoids (lycopene, violaxanthin, ζ-carotene) at low temperature exhibit peculiar features in the UV range. The transition to the 11Ag+ state ('cis-band') weakens on cooling, indicating that it is induced by thermal deformations of the conjugated chain. The higher energy band has unique vibrational structure indicating the vibronic coupling of nBu with another electronic state. The electroabsorption spectra point to the electric field-induced mixing of the nBu state with the vibrational continuum of a lower-lying excited state (Fano effect). These observations widen the basis for elucidation of the vibronic coupling effects in the lower excited states.

  6. Decoherence dynamics of coherent electronic excited states in the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xian-Ting; Zhang, Wei-Min; Zhuo, Yi-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical description to the quantum coherence and decoherence phenomena of energy transfer in photosynthesis observed in a recent experiment [Science 316, 1462 (2007)]. As a successive two-color laser pulses with selected frequencies cast on a sample of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rb. sphaeroides two resonant excitations of electrons in chromophores can be generated. However, this effective two-level subsystem will interact with its protein environment and decoherence is inevitable. We describe this subsystem coupled with its environment as a dynamical spin-boson model. The non-Markovian decoherence dynamics is described using a quasiadiabatic propagator path integral (QUAPI) approach. With the photon-induced effective time-dependent level splitting energy and level flip coupling coefficient between the two excited states and the environment-induced non-Markovian decoherence dynamics, our theoretical result is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Electron-phonon interaction and excited states relaxation in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perebeinos, Vasili

    2008-03-01

    We will discuss the role of electron-phonon interaction on excited states relaxation and phonon spectra in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The electron-phonon interaction leads to the polaronic effects of the charge carriers, but it also renormalizes the energy and the lifetime of phonons. We present a theoretical model that predicts the changes induced in the phonon modes of CNTs as a function of the charge carrier doping, i.e. position of the Fermi level. In agreement with the predictions, our experiments show sharpening and blue shifts of the G-phonons of metallic CNTs, but only blue shifts for semiconducting CNTs, making the Raman scattering a useful probe of local doping of CNTs [1]. The non-equilibrium dynamics of charge carriers under external electric field is determined by the electron-phonon scattering. The hot carriers under unipolar transport conditions can be produced, leading to the strong impact excitation and light emission, which intensity is determined by electric field, phonon scattering, and impact excitation cross section [2, 3]. In the reverse process of photoconductivity, light is absorbed creating excited states. We will discuss electronic relaxation of high energy excited states leading to the free carriers, contributing to the photoconductivity, and phonon relaxation, leading to the bound excitons [4]. The later can contribute to the photocurrent only after ionization by the external field [5]. Finally, we will discuss the role of phonons in the long puzzling question regarding the nature of the dominant decay channel of the low energy excited states and the potential of optoelectronic applications of CNTs. [1] J.C. Tsang, M. Freitag, V. Perebeinos, J. Liu, and Ph. Avouris, Nature Nanotechnology 2, 725 (2007); [2] J. Chen, V. Perebeinos, M. Freitag, J. Tsang, Q. Fu, J. Liu, Ph. Avouris, Science 310, 1171 (2005); [3] V. Perebeinos and Ph. Avouris, Phys. Rev. B. 74, 121410(R), (2006); [4] T. Hertel, V. Perebeinos, J. Crochet, K. Arnold, M. Kappes

  8. Doppler effect in fragment autoionization following core-to-valence excitation in O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemin, Renaud; Simon, Marc; Shigemasa, Eiji

    2010-11-15

    Atomic autoionization following O 1s resonant excitation in O{sub 2} is studied using high-resolution electron spectroscopy. The resonant Auger spectrum showing evidence of ultrafast dissociation as well as the autoionization of oxygen atoms is measured and discussed. Evidence of the electronic Doppler effect is observed in both electronic decay mechanisms.

  9. Ultrafast electronic dynamics in laser-excited crystalline bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A.; Misochko, O.; Chekalin, S.

    2013-03-01

    Femtosecond spectroscopy was applied to capture complex dynamics of non equilibrium electrons in bismuth. Data analysis reveals significant wavevector dependence of electron-hole and electron-phonon coupling strength along the Γ-T direction of the Brillouin zone

  10. Metallic bond effects on mean excitation energies for stopping powers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    Mean excitation energies for first row metals are evaluated by means of the local plasma approximation. Particle corrections based on Pines' (1953) procedure and the Wigner Seitz (1934) model of the metallic state are included. The agreement with experimental values is remarkably good. In contrast to previous work, the calculations given here estimate shifts in the plasma frequency according to the theory for plane wave states in an extended plasma as calculated by Pines. It is demonstrated that the effects of the metallic bond in lithium and beryllium are quite large and that they appear mainly as a result of collective oscillations in the 'free' electron gas formed from the valence electrons. The usefulness of the plasma frequency shift derived for a degenerate electron gas in predicting the plasma frequency shift within the ion core is considered surprising.

  11. Electron impact excitation and assignment of the low-lying electronic states of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. I.; Trajmar, S.

    1973-01-01

    Electron scattering spectra of CO2 are reported in the 7 to 10 eV energy-loss range, at energies of 0.2, 0.35, 0.6, 0.7, and 7.0 eV above threshold, and at a scattering angle of 90 deg. Several new distinct overlapping continua with weak, diffuse bands superimposed are observed to lie in this energy-loss range. The experimental spectra are discussed in the light of recent ab initio configuration-interaction calculations of the vertical transition energies of CO2. The experimental spectra are shown to be consistent with the excitation states of CO2.

  12. The separation of vibrational coherence from ground- and excited-electronic states in P3HT film

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yin; Hellmann, Christoph; Stingelin, Natalie; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2015-06-07

    Concurrence of the vibrational coherence and ultrafast electron transfer has been observed in polymer/fullerene blends. However, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the role that the excited-state vibrational coherence plays during the electron transfer process since vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states is usually temporally and spectrally overlapped. Here, we performed 2-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D ES) measurements on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films. By Fourier transforming the whole 2D ES datasets (S(λ{sub 1},T{sup ~}{sub 2},λ{sub 3})) along the population time (T{sup ~}{sub 2}) axis, we develop and propose a protocol capable of separating vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states in 3D rephasing and nonrephasing beating maps (S(λ{sub 1},ν{sup ~}{sub 2},λ{sub 3})). We found that the vibrational coherence from pure excited electronic states appears at positive frequency (+ν{sup ~}{sub 2}) in the rephasing beating map and at negative frequency (−ν{sup ~}{sub 2}) in the nonrephasing beating map. Furthermore, we also found that vibrational coherence from excited electronic state had a long dephasing time of 244 fs. The long-lived excited-state vibrational coherence indicates that coherence may be involved in the electron transfer process. Our findings not only shed light on the mechanism of ultrafast electron transfer in organic photovoltaics but also are beneficial for the study of the coherence effect on photoexcited dynamics in other systems.

  13. Electron-impact excited term ionisation along the Boron isonuclear sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, C. P.; Lee, T.; Ludlow, J. A.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2010-03-01

    Non-perturbative theoretical methods over the last decade have mainly focused on electron-impact ionization of the ground and first metastable states for light fusion related species [1]. However, collisional-radiative models predict that effective ionisation rates, which include the ionisation from excited levels of an atom, can be an order of magnitude greater greater than those which include the groundstate alone. For example, this stepwise ionisation has been experimentally confirmed by measurements taken at the DIII-D facility as part of a Li transport study, where excited state ionisation was found to be essential in describing Li transport [2]. We shall present in our poster an overview of excited state ionisation along the boron ionisation sequence. Using boron as a test case, we focus on the most appropriate use of computationally non-perturbative methods and simpler non-pertubative/semi-empirical methods to account for excited ionisation along other iso-nuclear sequences.[4pt] [1] Griffin D C and Pindzola M S, Adv. Atm. Mol. Opt. Phys. 54, 203 (2006)[0pt] [2] Allain J P, Whyte D G and Brooks J N, Nucl. Fusion 44 655 (2004)

  14. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Dessent, Caroline E. H. E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ∼1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ thymine and PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to

  15. Linear energy relationships in ground state proton transfer and excited state proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P; Magomedov, Artiom; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R I

    2015-02-12

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes are elementary chemical reactions involved in a broad range of radical and redox reactions. Elucidating fundamental PCET reaction mechanisms are thus of central importance for chemical and biochemical research. Here we use quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT), time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), and the algebraic diagrammatic-construction through second-order (ADC(2)) to study the mechanism, thermodynamic driving force effects, and reaction barriers of both ground state proton transfer (pT) and photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) between nitrosylated phenyl-phenol compounds and hydrogen-bonded t-butylamine as an external base. We show that the obtained reaction barriers for the ground state pT reactions depend linearly on the thermodynamic driving force, with a Brønsted slope of 1 or 0. Photoexcitation leads to a PCET reaction, for which we find that the excited state reaction barrier depends on the thermodynamic driving force with a Brønsted slope of 1/2. To support the mechanistic picture arising from the static potential energy surfaces, we perform additional molecular dynamics simulations on the excited state energy surface, in which we observe a spontaneous PCET between the donor and the acceptor groups. Our findings suggest that a Brønsted analysis may distinguish the ground state pT and excited state PCET processes.

  16. Excitation and ionization of outer shells in Rb by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, V.; Kupliauskienė, A.; Borovik, A.

    2015-10-01

    The relativistic distorted-wave and binary-encounter-dipole approximations were employed for calculating the electron-impact single ionization cross sections of the 5s, 4p6, 4s2, 3d10 shells and 4p6 excitation cross section for Rb atom taking into account both configuration interaction and relativistic effects. The capabilities of the most used theoretical approaches in describing the single ionization of Rb atom were considered by comparing the present and other available calculated data with the experimental total ionization and total direct single ionization cross sections over the electron-impact energy range from the 5s threshold to 600 eV. The best agreement within experimental uncertainty was obtained by using the non-relativistic binary-encounter-dipole approximation included in the LANL Atomic Physics Codes package. At present none of the used approximations (plane-wave Born or relativistic distorted wave) can satisfactorily describe the experimental excitation-autoionization cross section in rubidium because the efficient formation of the 4p6 core-excited negative-ion rubidium states at near-threshold impact energies is ignored in calculations.

  17. On the ultrashort lifetime of electronically excited thiophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovejas, Virginia; Fernández-Fernández, Marta; Montero, Raúl; Longarte, Asier

    2016-09-01

    The relaxation dynamics of thiophenol, excited from the onset of the S1 (11ππ∗) state absorption, to the more intense S3 (21ππ∗) state band (290-244 nm), has been studied by time resolved ion yield spectroscopy. Along the studied energy range, the reached excited states relax in less 100 fs. These results evidence that the photophysics is dominated by the non-adiabatic coupling between the initially excited S1 and S31ππ∗ states, and the dissociative character 1πσ∗ state. Contrarily to phenol, the 11ππ∗/1πσ∗ crossing is reached from the origin of the 11ππ∗ state absorption, through a nearly barrierless pathway.

  18. Microtaper fiber excitation effects in bottle microresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Nasir, M. Narizee; Ding, Ming; Murugan, G. Senthil; Zervas, Michalis N.

    2013-03-01

    We have carried out a systematic study of the effect of microtaper diameter on the spectral characteristics of bottle microresonators. By increasing the microtaper-diameter (Dt) from 2μm to 10μm results in progressively cleaner spectra. The transmission depth at resonance varies from ~15dB (@Dt=2μm) to >3dB (@Dt=10μm). The loaded Q factors were measured to be >10+6 in all cases. However, with microtaper Dt=10μm clearly-resolved single resonance peaks could be observed and free-spectral ranges could be easily identified. At some transmission resonances, we have observed LP01-->LP11 mode transformation at the excitation microtaper waist, for the first time, as the resonance is scanned.

  19. Excitation of positive ions by low-energy electrons - Relevance to the Io Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1993-03-01

    The importance of measuring electron-ion excitation cross sections in singly and multiply charged positive ions is outlined, and recent results for Mg II and O II ions are given using the JPL's electron energy-loss merged-beams apparatus. Theoretical comparisons are given with two five-state close-coupling calculations. The energy variation of the collision strength is fitted with a semiempirical analytic function which includes approximations to polarization, resonance, and exchange contributions. In O II, first spectra anywhere of electron excitation of the optically allowed transitions are presented. In addition, excitations of two low lying, optically forbidden transitions are detected for the first time.

  20. Impact excitation of neon atoms by heated seed electrons in filamentary plasma gratings.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liping; Li, Wenxue; Zhou, Hui; Ding, Liang'en; Zeng, Heping

    2013-02-15

    We demonstrate impact ionization and dissociative recombination of neon (Ne) atoms by means of seeded-electron heating and subsequent electron-atom collisions in an ultraviolet plasma grating, allowing for a substantial fraction of the neutral Ne atomic population to reside in high-lying excited states. A buffer gas with relatively low ionization potential (nitrogen or argon) was used to provide high-density seed electrons. A three-step excitation model is verified by the fluorescence emission from the impact excitation of Ne atoms.

  1. Ultrafast spectroscopy of electron transfer dynamics in liquids; excitation transfer studies of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goun, Alexei A.

    The transfer of an electron from a donor to an acceptor is the fundamental step in a wide range of chemical and biological processes. As a result, electron-transfer reactions have been the focus of numerous theoretical and experimental efforts aimed at understanding the kinetics and mechanism of the transfer event. Liquid solvents are an important medium for electron-transfer processes. The influences of the distance dependence, diffusion, the radial distribution function, and the hydrodynamic effect have been incorporated into the theory of electron transfer in solution, as well as into the theory of electron transfer between donors and acceptors in the head group regions of micelles. The development of new laser system with a pulse duration of tens of femtoseconds, with tunable wavelength allowed us to study these processes on a considerably shorter time scale than previous studies. This allowed us to observe not only the diffusion controlled but also the kinetics of electron transfer for donor/acceptor pairs that are in close proximity. In one set of experiments we have studied the kinetics of electron transfer in electron accepting molecule (rhodamine 3B) dissolved in electron donating solvent (N,N-dimethylaniline). The data for the forward electron transfer and geminate recombination are approximated by the statistical theory of the electron transfer. Optical anisotropy observed in the experiment demonstrates the orientation dependence of the electron transfer rate. In further experiments we investigated the electron transfer in non-hydrogen bonding liquids of increasing viscosity. The effective value of the donor/acceptor electronic coupling was found to decrease with viscosity. Electron transfer experiments were also carried out on the surface of micelles. The systems studied are the hole donor octadecyl-rhodamine B (ODRB) and the hole acceptor N,N-dimethyl-aniline (DMA) in micelles made of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and

  2. Electronic State Interferences in Resonant X-Ray Emission after K-Shell Excitation in HCl

    SciTech Connect

    Kavcic, M.; Zitnik, M.; Bucar, K.; Mihelic, A.; Carniato, S.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Simon, M.

    2010-09-10

    We have measured a series of high-resolution x-ray spectra emitted upon resonant photoexcitation of HCl. The photon energy was tuned across the dissociative 1s{yields}6{sigma}* resonance and the Rydberg states converging to the Cl 1s{sup -1} threshold, and inelastic photon scattering was observed in the region of KL emission lines. Excellent agreement is found between fully ab initio calculated and measured spectra if interferences between different excitation-emission paths are taken into account. The effect of electronic state interferences is enhanced due to dynamical broadening of the 6{sigma}* resonance in HCl.

  3. Electron impact excitation of Astrophysically Important C III Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; KEENAN, FRANCIS P.

    2015-08-01

    Emission lines of many Be-like ions, including C~III, have been observed in the solar and stellar plasmas and are useful for density and temperature diagnostics. C~III is also important for studies of fusion plasmas. For modelling and diagnostics, atomic data for energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and excitation rates (equivalently effective collision strengths) are required. Therefore, we have adopted the GRASP code to calculate energy levels, A-values (for E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions) and lifetimes among 166 levels of the n <= 5 configurations. Energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 1% for most levels, and A-values to better than 20% for most transitions. For A-values and lifetimes there are no large discrepancies between theory and measurement. For collision strengths DARC is adopted, resonances are resolved in a fine energy mesh and are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to determine effective collision strengths up to a temperature of 800,000 K. Unfortunately, a comparison with the similar R-matrix calculations of Fernandez-Menchero et al [A&A 566 (2014) A104] shows differences up to over an order of magnitude for about 20% transitions (among the lowest 78 levels) over the complete temperature range of the results. In most cases their results are larger, up to a factor of 20, and the differences are similar and comparable to those already noted for other Be-like ions, namely Al~X, Cl~XIV, K~XVI, Ti~XIX and Ge~XXIX - see Aggarwal & Keenan [MNRAS 447 (2015) 3849]. Based on several comparisons and considering the wide range of partial waves included (up to 40.5) and the energy range adopted for collision strengths (up to 21 Ryd), our results are estimated to be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of transitions, allowed and forbidden. Detailed comparisons for all parameters for C~III and possible reasons for discrepancies will be presented during the conference and will also be soon available in MNRAS.

  4. One-electron and multi-electron transitions observed in the excitation function of the dissociative photoionization excitation of ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Masashi; Ukai, Masatoshi; Machida, Shuntaro; Kameta, Kosei; Ehresmann, Arno; Kouchi, Noriyuki; Hatano, Yoshihiko; Hayaishi, Tatsuji; Shigemasa, Eiji; Ito, Kenji

    1996-05-01

    The excitation function of the dissociative photoionization excitation ( DIE) of 0953-4075/29/9/017/img14 has been measured with the detection technique of coincidence between photoion 0953-4075/29/9/017/img15 and a fluorescence photon emitted from an excited atom N* using extreme- UV synchrotron radiation ( SR) as an excitation source in the energy region of 35 - 65 eV. The axis of the detection system was set at two angles, parallel or perpendicular with respect to the major axis of the elliptically polarized SR, in the present measurement. The coincidence spectra obtained in this energy region show at least two qualitatively different structures originating from two different DIE processes. The major components of the DIE in the present energy region are ascribed to the dissociation of the 0953-4075/29/9/017/img16 state which is strongly coupled with correlation states in the 0953-4075/29/9/017/img17 symmetry. In addition, DIE from other precursor states in the 0953-4075/29/9/017/img18 symmetry or dissociative photo-double ionization excitation ( DDIE) was also observed.

  5. Direct Electron Impact Excitation of Rydberg-Valence States of Molecular Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, C. P.; Johnson, P. V.; Liu, X.; Ajdari, B.; Muleady, S.; Kanik, I.; Khakoo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Collisions between electrons and neutral N2 molecules result in emissions that provide an important diagnostic probe for understanding the ionospheric energy balance and the effects of space weather in upper atmospheres. Also, transitions to singlet ungerade states cause N2 to be a strong absorber of solar radiation in the EUV spectral range where many ro-vibrational levels of these Rydberg-valence (RV) states are predissociative. Thus, their respective excitation and emission cross sections are important parameters for understanding the [N]/[N2] ratio in the thermosphere of nitrogen dominated atmospheres. The following work provides improved constraints on absolute and relative excitation cross sections of numerous RV states of N2, enabling more physically accurate atmospheric modeling. Here, we present recent integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of RV states of N2 [6], which were based on the differential cross sections (DCSs) derived from electron energy-loss (EEL) spectra of [5]. This work resulted in electronic excitation cross sections over the following measured vibrational levels: b 1Πu (v‧=0-14), c3 1Πu (v‧=0-3), o3 1Πu (v‧=0-3), b‧ 1Σu+ (v‧=0-10), c‧4 1Σu+ (v‧=0-3), G 3Πu (v‧=0-3), and F 3Πu (v‧=0-3). We further adjusted the cross sections of the RV states by extending the vibronic contributions to unmeasured v‧-levels via the relative excitation probabilities (REPs) as discussed in [6]. This resulted in REP-scaled ICSs over the following vibrational levels for the singlet ungerade states: b(0-19), c3(0-4), o3(0-4), b‧(0-16), and c‧4(0-8). Comparison of the ICSs of [6] with available EEL based measurements, theoretical calculations, and emission based work generally shows good agreement within error estimations, except with the recent reevaluation provided by [1]. Further, we have extended these results, using the recent EEL data of [3], to include the unfolding of better resolved features above ~13

  6. Electron impact excitation of helium in Debye plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, S.; Gomis, L.; Faye, I. G.; Tall, M. S.; Diédhiou, I.; Diatta, C. S.; Zammit, M.

    2015-03-15

    The probability, differential, and integral scattering cross sections of the 1{sup 1}S→2{sup 1}S and 1{sup 1}S→2{sup 1}P transitions of helium have been calculated in the first Born approximation. The projectile-target interactions depending on the temperature and the density of plasma are described by the Debye-Hückel model. Wave functions of the target before and after collision were modeled by non orthogonal Hartree-Fock orbitals. The wave functions parameters are calculated with the Ritz variational method. We improve our unscreened first Born approximation integral cross sections by using the BE-scaled (B stands for binding energy and E excitation energy) method. The second Born approximation has also been used to calculate the excitation cross sections in Debye plasma. Our calculations are compared to other theoretical and experimental results where applicable.

  7. Modeling of electronic excitation and radiation in non-continuum hypersonic reentry flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Ozawa, Takashi; Sohn, Ilyoup; Levin, Deborah A.

    2011-06-01

    The modeling of hypersonic radiation in non-equilibrium, non-continuum flows is considered in the framework of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) approach. The study explores the influence of electronic states on the flow chemistry and degree of ionization as well as the assumption that the electronic states can be described by a steady state solution to a system of rate equations of excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transfer processes. The work implements selected excited levels of atomic nitrogen and oxygen and the corresponding electron impact excitation/de-excitation and ionization processes in DSMC. The simulations show that when excitation models are included, the degree of ionization in the Stardust transitional re-entry flow increases due to additional intermediate steps to ionization. The extra ionization reactions consume the electron energy to reduce the electron temperature. The DSMC predicted excited state level populations are lower than those predicted by a quasi steady state calculation, but the differences can be understood in terms of the flow distribution functions.

  8. Excitation of the half-cyclotron waves by the counterstreaming electron-positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shokri, B.; Khorashadizadeh, S.M.

    2005-08-15

    The dispersion relation of the half-cyclotron waves excited by the interaction of the two counterstreaming electron-positron-plasma beams is obtained. Furthermore, obtaining the growth rate and the threshold for the instability development, the excitation of the half-cyclotron waves in a system of two rotating monoenergetic electron-positron counterstreaming beams flowing parallel to the external magnetic field is investigated.

  9. Plasmon-resonant Raman spectroscopy in metallic nanoparticles: Surface-enhanced scattering by electronic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carles, R.; Bayle, M.; Benzo, P.; Benassayag, G.; Bonafos, C.; Cacciato, G.; Privitera, V.

    2015-11-01

    Since the discovery of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) 40 years ago, the origin of the "background" that is systematically observed in SERS spectra has remained questionable. To deeply analyze this phenomenon, plasmon-resonant Raman scattering was recorded under specific experimental conditions on a panel of composite multilayer samples containing noble metal (Ag and Au) nanoparticles. Stokes, anti-Stokes, and wide, including very low, frequency ranges have been explored. The effects of temperature, size (in the nm range), embedding medium (SiO2, Si3N4, or TiO2) or ligands have been successively analyzed. Both lattice (Lamb modes and bulk phonons) and electron (plasmon mode and electron-hole excitations) dynamics have been investigated. This work confirms that in Ag-based nanoplasmonics composite layers, only Raman scattering by single-particle electronic excitations accounts for the background. This latter appears as an intrinsic phenomenon independently of the presence of molecules on the metallic surface. Its spectral shape is well described by revisiting a model developed in the 1990s for analyzing electron scattering in dirty metals, and used later in superconductors. The gs factor, that determines the effective mean-free path of free carriers, is evaluated, gsexpt=0.33 ±0.04 , in good agreement with a recent evaluation based on time-dependent local density approximation gstheor=0.32 . Confinement and interface roughness effects at the nanometer range thus appear crucial to understand and control SERS enhancement and more generally plasmon-enhanced processes on metallic surfaces.

  10. Ultrafast excited state relaxation dynamics of electron deficient porphyrins: Conformational and electronic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okhrimenko, Albert N.

    Metallo-tetrapyrroles (MTP) are highly stable macrocyclic pi-systems that display interesting properties that make them potential candidates for various applications. Among these applications are optoelectronics, magnetic materials, photoconductive materials, non-linear optical materials and photo tumor therapeutic drugs. These applications are generally related to their high stability and efficient light absorption ability in the visible and near-infrared region of the optical spectrum. Metallo porphyrins are well known and widely studied representatives of metallotetrapyrroles. Electron deficient substituents in the meso positions are well known to greatly influence the interaction between the metal d-orbitals and the nitrogen orbitals of the tetrapyrrole macrocycle. In this work, a series of electron deficient porphyrins has been studied to gain some knowledge about the change in the excited state dynamics with structural and electronic modifications. Among these porphyrins is nickel and iron modified species bearing perfluoro-, perprotio-, p-nitrophenyl- and perfluorophenyl-meso substituents. Ultrafast transient absorption spectrometry has been used as the main research instrument along with other spectroscopic and electrochemical methods. A new technique has been employed to study the photophysical properties of zinc (II) tetraphenylporphine cation radical. It employs a combination of controlled potential coulometry and femtosecond absorption spectrometry. The fast transient lifetime of 17 ps of the pi-cation species originates in very efficient mixing of the a2u HOMO cation orbital that places electronic density mainly on pyrrolic nitrogens and metal d-orbitals. That explains the lack of any emission of the cationic species. This non-radiative decay process might elucidate the processes taking place in photosynthetic systems when electron is removed from porphyrinic moiety and the hole is produced. In this work zinc(II) meso-tetraphenylporphine radial cation

  11. Analytic energy gradient of excited electronic state within TDDFT/MMpol framework: Benchmark tests and parallel implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Qiao; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-10-07

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the most popular method to calculate the electronic excitation energies, describe the excited-state properties, and perform the excited-state geometric optimization of medium and large-size molecules due to the implementation of analytic excited-state energy gradient and Hessian in many electronic structure software packages. To describe the molecules in condensed phase, one usually adopts the computationally efficient hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) models. Here, we extend our previous work on the energy gradient of TDDFT/MM excited state to account for the mutual polarization effects between QM and MM regions, which is believed to hold a crucial position in the potential energy surface of molecular systems when the photoexcitation-induced charge rearrangement in the QM region is drastic. The implementation of a simple polarizable TDDFT/MM (TDDFT/MMpol) model in Q-Chem/CHARMM interface with both the linear response and the state-specific features has been realized. Several benchmark tests and preliminary applications are exhibited to confirm our implementation and assess the effects of different treatment of environmental polarization on the excited-state properties, and the efficiency of parallel implementation is demonstrated as well.

  12. Analytic energy gradient of excited electronic state within TDDFT/MMpol framework: Benchmark tests and parallel implementation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiao; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-10-01

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the most popular method to calculate the electronic excitation energies, describe the excited-state properties, and perform the excited-state geometric optimization of medium and large-size molecules due to the implementation of analytic excited-state energy gradient and Hessian in many electronic structure software packages. To describe the molecules in condensed phase, one usually adopts the computationally efficient hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) models. Here, we extend our previous work on the energy gradient of TDDFT/MM excited state to account for the mutual polarization effects between QM and MM regions, which is believed to hold a crucial position in the potential energy surface of molecular systems when the photoexcitation-induced charge rearrangement in the QM region is drastic. The implementation of a simple polarizable TDDFT/MM (TDDFT/MMpol) model in Q-Chem/CHARMM interface with both the linear response and the state-specific features has been realized. Several benchmark tests and preliminary applications are exhibited to confirm our implementation and assess the effects of different treatment of environmental polarization on the excited-state properties, and the efficiency of parallel implementation is demonstrated as well. PMID:26450289

  13. Analytic energy gradient of excited electronic state within TDDFT/MMpol framework: Benchmark tests and parallel implementation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiao; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-10-01

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the most popular method to calculate the electronic excitation energies, describe the excited-state properties, and perform the excited-state geometric optimization of medium and large-size molecules due to the implementation of analytic excited-state energy gradient and Hessian in many electronic structure software packages. To describe the molecules in condensed phase, one usually adopts the computationally efficient hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) models. Here, we extend our previous work on the energy gradient of TDDFT/MM excited state to account for the mutual polarization effects between QM and MM regions, which is believed to hold a crucial position in the potential energy surface of molecular systems when the photoexcitation-induced charge rearrangement in the QM region is drastic. The implementation of a simple polarizable TDDFT/MM (TDDFT/MMpol) model in Q-Chem/CHARMM interface with both the linear response and the state-specific features has been realized. Several benchmark tests and preliminary applications are exhibited to confirm our implementation and assess the effects of different treatment of environmental polarization on the excited-state properties, and the efficiency of parallel implementation is demonstrated as well.

  14. T-3 electron-beam-excited laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R A

    1981-02-01

    A laser system specifically designed to study the kinetics of electron-beam driven systems is described. Details of the system are given along with measurements of the electron-beam uniformity and deposition in the laser medium. Some HF laser results obtained with this system are also given.

  15. Differential cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran at intermediate impact energies

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T. P. T.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran, at intermediate incident electron energies (15-50 eV) and over the 10°-90° scattered electron angular range. These measurements extend the available DCS data for vibrational excitation for this species, which have previously been obtained at lower incident electron energies (≤20 eV). Where possible, our data are compared to the earlier measurements in the overlapping energy ranges. Here, quite good agreement was generally observed where the measurements overlapped.

  16. Nonequilibrium Dynamics in a Quasi-Two-Dimensional Electron Plasma after Ultrafast Intersubband Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lutgen, S.; Kaindl, R.A.; Woerner, M.; Elsaesser, T.; Hase, A.; Kuenzel, H.; Gulia, M.; Meglio, D.; Lugli, P.

    1996-10-01

    The dynamics of electrons in GaInAs/AlInAs quantum wells is studied after excitation from the {ital n}=1 to the {ital n}=2 conduction subband. Femtosecond pump-probe experiments demonstrate for the first time athermal distributions of {ital n}=1 electrons on a surprisingly long time scale of 2ps. Thermalization involves intersubband scattering of excited electrons via optical phonon emission with a time constant of 1ps and intrasubband Coulomb and phonon scattering. Ensemble Monte Carlo simulations show that the slow electron equilibration results from Pauli blocking and screening of carrier-carrier scattering. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Theory of ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer: Contributions of direct charge transfer excitations to the absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luxia; Willig, Frank; May, Volkhard

    2007-04-01

    Absorption spectra related to heterogeneous electron transfer are analyzed with the focus on direct charge transfer transition from the surface attached molecule into the semiconductor band states. The computations are based on a model of reduced dimensionality with a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate but a complete account for the continuum of conduction band states. The applicability of this model to perylene on TiO2 has been demonstrated in a series of earlier papers. Here, based on a time-dependent formulation, the absorbance is calculated with the inclusion of charge transfer excitations. A broad parameter set inspired by the perylene TiO2 systems is considered. In particular, the description generalizes the Fano effect to heterogeneous electron transfer reactions. Preliminary simulations of measured spectra are presented for perylene-catechol attached to TiO2.

  18. Theory of ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer: Contributions of direct charge transfer excitations to the absorbance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Luxia; Willig, Frank; May, Volkhard

    2007-04-07

    Absorption spectra related to heterogeneous electron transfer are analyzed with the focus on direct charge transfer transition from the surface attached molecule into the semiconductor band states. The computations are based on a model of reduced dimensionality with a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate but a complete account for the continuum of conduction band states. The applicability of this model to perylene on TiO{sub 2} has been demonstrated in a series of earlier papers. Here, based on a time-dependent formulation, the absorbance is calculated with the inclusion of charge transfer excitations. A broad parameter set inspired by the perylene TiO{sub 2} systems is considered. In particular, the description generalizes the Fano effect to heterogeneous electron transfer reactions. Preliminary simulations of measured spectra are presented for perylene-catechol attached to TiO{sub 2}.

  19. Excitation of a cylindrical cavity by a helical current and an axial electron beam current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidovich, M. V.; Bushuev, N. A.

    2013-07-01

    The explicit expressions (in the Vainshtein and Markov forms) are derived for the excitation of a cylindrical cavity with perfectly conducting walls and with impedance end faces. Excitation of a cylindrical cavity and a cylindrical waveguide with a preset nonuniform axial electron-beam current and a helical current with a variable pitch, which is excited by a concentrated voltage source and is loaded by a preset pointlike matched load, is considered. For the helical current, the integro-differential equation is formulated. The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is simulated in the preset beam current approximation taking into account the nonuniform winding of the spiral coil, nonuniform electron beam, and losses.

  20. Exciton dispersion in silicon nanostructures formed by intense, ultra-fast electronic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, A. V.; Newman, M. W.; Thielen, P. A.; Lee, H. W. H.; Schenkel, T.; McDonald, J. W.; Schneider, D. H.

    The intense, ultra-fast electronic excitation of clean silicon (100)-(2×1) surfaces leads to the formation of silicon nanostructures embedded in silicon, which photoluminesce in the yellow-green ( 2-eV band gap). The silicon surfaces were irradiated with slow, highly charged ions (e.g. Xe44+ and Au53+) to produce the ultra-fast electronic excitation. The observation of excitonic features in the luminescence from these nanostructures has recently been reported. In this paper we report the dispersion of the excitonic features with laser excitation energy. A phonon-scattering process is proposed to explain the observed dispersion.

  1. Theoretical Study of Tautomerization Reactions for the Ground and First Excited Electronic States of Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salter, Latasha M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest singlet excited state potential energy surfaces are studied. Four tautomeric forms are considered, and their energetic order is found to be different on the ground and the excited state potential energy surfaces. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic states. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic states, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. This tautomerization process should become possible in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules and should play an important role in the photochemistry of adenine.

  2. Ab Initio Investigations of the Excited Electronic States of CaOCa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawzy, Wafaa M.; Heaven, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Chemical bonding in alkaline earth hypermetalic oxides is of fundamental interest. Previous Ab initio studies of CaOCa predicted a centrosymmetric linear geometry for both the 1Σg^+ ground state and the low lying triplet 3Σu^+ state. However, there have been no reports concerning the higher energy singlet and triplet states. The present work is focused on characterization of the potential energy surface (PES) of the excited 1Σu^+ state (assuming a centrosymmetric linear geometry) and obtaining predictions for the 1Σu^+←1Σg^+ vibronic transitions. We employed the multireference configuration interaction (MRCISD) method with state-averaged, full-valence complete active space self-consistent field (SA-FV-CASSCF) wavefunctions. In these calculations, the active space consisted of ten valence electrons in twelve orbitals, where all the valence electrons were correlated. Contributions of higher excitation and relativistic effects were taken into account using the Davidson correction and the Douglas-Kroll (DK) Hamiltonian, respectively. The correlation-consistent polarized weighed core-valence quadruple zeta basis set (cc-pwCVQZ-DK) was used for all three atoms. The full level of theory is abbreviated as SA-FV-CASSCF (10,12)-MRCISD-Q/cc-pwCVQZ-DK. The calculations were carried out using the MOLPRO2012 suite of programs. For the centrosymmetric linear geometry in all states, initial investigations of one-dimensional radial cuts provided equilibrium bond distances of 2.034 {Å}, 2.034 {Å}, and 1.999 {Å} for the 1Σg^+ , 3Σu^+ , and 1Σu^+ states, respectively. The vertical excitation frequency of the 1Σu^+←1Σg^+ optical transition was calculated to occur at 14801 wn. These predictions were followed by spectroscopic searches by Heaven et al. Indeed, rotationally resolved vibronic progressions were recorded in the vicinity of the predicted electronic band origin. Calculation of the three-dimensional PES showed that the potential minimum in the 1Σu^+ corresponds

  3. Contribution of electronic excitation to the structural evolution of ultrafast laser-irradiated tungsten nanofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Samuel T.; Giret, Yvelin; Daraszewicz, Szymon L.; Lim, Anthony C.; Shluger, Alexander L.; Tanimura, Katsumi; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2016-03-01

    The redistribution of the electron density in a material during laser irradiation can have a significant impact on its structural dynamics. This electronic excitation can be incorporated into two temperature molecular dynamics (2T-MD) simulations through the use of electronic temperature dependent potentials. Here, we study the structural dynamics of laser irradiated tungsten nanofilms using 2T-MD simulations with an electronic temperature dependent potential and compare the results to equivalent simulations that employ a ground-state interatomic potential. Electronic excitation leads to an expansion of the crystal and a decrease in the melting point of tungsten. During laser irradiation these factors ensure that the threshold fluences to the different melting regimes are reduced. Furthermore, both heterogenous and homogeneous melting are predicted to occur more rapidly due to excitation and oscillations in the film thickness will be accentuated.

  4. Modeling the nonradiative decay rate of electronically excited thioflavin T.

    PubMed

    Erez, Yuval; Liu, Yu-Hui; Amdursky, Nadav; Huppert, Dan

    2011-08-01

    A computational model of nonradiative decay is developed and applied to explain the time-dependent emission spectrum of thioflavin T (ThT). The computational model is based on a previous model developed by Glasbeek and co-workers (van der Meer, M. J.; Zhang, H.; Glasbeek, M. J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112, 2878) for auramine O, a molecule that, like ThT, exhibits a high nonradiative rate. The nonradiative rates of both auramine O and ThT are inversely proportional to the solvent viscosity. The Glasbeek model assumes that the excited state consists of an adiabatic potential surface constructed by adiabatic coupling of emissive and dark states. For ThT, the twist angle between the benzothiazole and the aniline is responsible for the extensive mixing of the two excited states. At a twist angle of 90°, the S(1) state assumes a charge-transfer-state character with very small oscillator strength, which causes the emission intensity to be very small as well. In the ground state, the twist angle of ThT is rather small. The photoexcitation leads first to a strongly emissive state (small twist angle). As time progresses, the twist angle increases and the oscillator strength decreases. The fit of the experimental results by the model calculations is good for times longer than 3 ps. When a two-coordinate model is invoked or a solvation spectral-shift component is added, the fit to the experimental results is good at all times. PMID:21711024

  5. Dipole approximation in the L2,3 electron excited spectra in 3d transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuroh, K.

    2008-12-01

    A theoretical model based on the autoionization and characteristic decay processes following electron impact ionization of a core electron in solids that has previously been used in calculating electron-energy-loss spectra of transition metals near the 3p -excitation edge has been extended to the 2p -excitation edge for S21c through N27i as well. In the first set of calculations, magnetic effects were ignored and the relative scattering intensity was formulated in terms of the electrostatic interaction U(p,d) between the 3p and 3d electrons of the intermediate resonant configuration state p5dn+1 , using many-body perturbation theory that led to a generalized Fano-type formula for the intensity profiles. In the second set of calculations in which magnetic effects were included as well, an analysis based on the Bethe-Born formalism of inelastic scattering of electrons on atoms was used. The nature of the relative magnitudes of U(p,d) and the spin-orbit parameters ς3p and ς3d and the localized nature of the 3p state necessitated the diagonalization of the intermediate configuration state p5dn+1 to determine the multiplet splitting and their corresponding intensities in the LS -coupling limit using fractional parentage scheme. The nonrelativistic multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) code was used in determining the ground and continuum state wave functions, and the itinerant 3d states in the solid were approximated with an atomic MCHF-wave function. The outline above is applied to the 2p -excitation edge, except that because of the relative magnitudes of U(p,d) , ς2p , and ς3d , it is found that LK coupling is suitable for Sc, Ti, and V, while jK coupling is appropriate for Cr to Ni when it comes to the diagonalization of the configuration p5dn+1 to determine the multiplet splitting and their associated scattering intensities. In the dipole approximation, the scattering intensities separate into two distinct manifolds that arise from the p3/2 and p1/2 states. The

  6. [Long-range electron transfer in globular proteins by polaron excitation].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V L; Chuev, G N

    1997-01-01

    Considering polaron model, we have calculated an electron state localized in the protein heme. Using these calculations: the electron density and electron energy, we estimated the self-exchange rate constant for cyt c (horse heart), its reorganization energy, matrix element, and dependence of this rate on the distance between hemes. The results are compared with the experimental data and other theoretical estimations. We discuss the role of polaron excitations in the long-range electron transfer in globular proteins.

  7. Electron impact excitation of SO2 - Differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vuskovic, L.; Trajmar, S.

    1982-01-01

    Electron impact excitation of the electronic states of SO2 was investigated. Differential, integral, and inelastic momentum transfer cross sections were obtained by normalizing the relative measurements to the elastic cross sections. The cross sections are given for seven spectral ranges of the energy-loss spectra extending from the lowest electronic state to near the first ionization limit. Most of the regions represent the overlap of several electronic transitions. No measurements for these cross sections have been reported previously.

  8. Calculation of Ground State Rotational Populations for Kinetic Gas Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules including Electron-Impact Excitation and Wall Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Farley

    2010-08-19

    A model has been developed to calculate the ground-state rotational populations of homonuclear diatomic molecules in kinetic gases, including the effects of electron-impact excitation, wall collisions, and gas feed rate. The equations are exact within the accuracy of the cross sections used and of the assumed equilibrating effect of wall collisions. It is found that the inflow of feed gas and equilibrating wall collisions can significantly affect the rotational distribution in competition with non-equilibrating electron-impact effects. The resulting steady-state rotational distributions are generally Boltzmann for N≥3, with a rotational temperature between the wall and feed gas temperatures. The N=0,1,2 rotational level populations depend sensitively on the relative rates of electron-impact excitation versus wall collision and gas feed rates.

  9. Back-action-induced excitation of electrons in a silicon quantum dot with a single-electron transistor charge sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Horibe, Kosuke; Oda, Shunri; Kodera, Tetsuo

    2015-02-02

    Back-action in the readout of quantum bits is an area that requires a great deal of attention in electron spin based-quantum bit architecture. We report here back-action measurements in a silicon device with quantum dots and a single-electron transistor (SET) charge sensor. We observe the back-action-induced excitation of electrons from the ground state to an excited state in a quantum dot. Our measurements and theoretical fitting to the data reveal conditions under which both suitable SET charge sensor sensitivity for qubit readout and low back-action-induced transition rates (less than 1 kHz) can be achieved.

  10. Helicon wave excitation to produce energetic electrons for manufacturing semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Molvik, A.W.; Ellingboe, A.R.

    1998-10-20

    A helicon plasma source is controlled by varying the axial magnetic field or rf power controlling the formation of the helicon wave. An energetic electron current is carried on the wave when the magnetic field is 90 G; but there is minimal energetic electron current when the magnetic field is 100 G in one particular plasma source. Similar performance can be expected from other helicon sources by properly adjusting the magnetic field and power to the particular geometry. This control for adjusting the production of energetic electrons can be used in the semiconductor and thin-film manufacture process. By applying energetic electrons to the insulator layer, such as silicon oxide, etching ions are attracted to the insulator layer and bombard the insulator layer at higher energy than areas that have not accumulated the energetic electrons. Thus, silicon and metal layers, which can neutralize the energetic electron currents will etch at a slower or non-existent rate. This procedure is especially advantageous in the multilayer semiconductor manufacturing because trenches can be formed that are in the range of 0.18--0.35 mm or less. 16 figs.

  11. Helicon wave excitation to produce energetic electrons for manufacturing semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Molvik, Arthur W.; Ellingboe, Albert R.

    1998-01-01

    A helicon plasma source is controlled by varying the axial magnetic field or rf power controlling the formation of the helicon wave. An energetic electron current is carried on the wave when the magnetic field is 90 G; but there is minimal energetic electron current when the magnetic field is 100 G in one particular plasma source. Similar performance can be expected from other helicon sources by properly adjusting the magnetic field and power to the particular geometry. This control for adjusting the production of energetic electrons can be used in the semiconductor and thin-film manufacture process. By applying energetic electrons to the insulator layer, such as silicon oxide, etching ions are attracted to the insulator layer and bombard the insulator layer at higher energy than areas that have not accumulated the energetic electrons. Thus, silicon and metal layers, which can neutralize the energetic electron currents will etch at a slower or non-existent rate. This procedure is especially advantageous in the multilayer semiconductor manufacturing because trenches can be formed that are in the range of 0.18-0.35 mm or less.

  12. Excited-State Effective Masses in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    George Fleming, Saul Cohen, Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-10-01

    We apply black-box methods, i.e. where the performance of the method does not depend upon initial guesses, to extract excited-state energies from Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions. In particular, we extend the widely used effective-mass method to incorporate multiple correlation functions and produce effective mass estimates for multiple excited states. In general, these excited-state effective masses will be determined by finding the roots of some polynomial. We demonstrate the method using sample lattice data to determine excited-state energies of the nucleon and compare the results to other energy-level finding techniques.

  13. An amorphous phase formation at palladium / silicon oxide (Pd/SiO{sub x}) interface through electron irradiation - electronic excitation process

    SciTech Connect

    Nagase, Takeshi; Yamashita, Ryo; Yabuuchi, Atsushi; Lee, Jung-Goo

    2015-11-15

    A Pd-Si amorphous phase was formed at a palladium/silicon oxide (Pd/SiO{sub x}) interface at room temperature by electron irradiation at acceleration voltages ranging between 25 kV and 200 kV. Solid-state amorphization was stimulated without the electron knock-on effects. The total dose required for the solid-state amorphization decreases with decreasing acceleration voltage. This is the first report on electron irradiation induced metallic amorphous formation caused by the electronic excitation at metal/silicon oxide interface.

  14. Determination of the geometry change of benzimidazole upon electronic excitation from a combined Franck-Condon/rotational constants fit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhlmann, Benjamin; Gmerek, Felix; Krügler, Daniel; Schmitt, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Single vibronic level fluorescence spectra of the electronic origin and of seven vibronic bands between 0,0 and 0,0 + 1265 cm-1 have been measured and analyzed by means of a combined Franck-Condon/rotational constants fit. The rotational constants in ground and lowest electronically excited singlet state of four different isotopologues have been taken from previous rotationally resolved measurements of Schmitt et al. (2006). The intensities of 182 vibronic emission bands and of 8 rotational constants have been used for a fit of the complete heavy atom geometry changes upon electronic excitation. Vibronic modes, about 1000 cm-1 above the electronic origin, show strong deviations from Franck-Condon behavior in emission. Herzberg-Teller coupling contributes to this effect. 1300 cm-1 above the origin, we observe the onset of intramolecular vibrational redistribution in the emission spectra.

  15. The relativistic polarization propagator for the calculation of electronic excitations in heavy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pernpointner, Markus

    2014-02-28

    In this work, we present a new four-component implementation of the polarization propagator for accurate calculations of excited states in heavy systems. Differences to existing nonrelativistic realizations are detailed and the energetically lowest final states of the ns{sup 2}np{sup 6} → ns{sup 2}np{sup 5}(n + 1)s{sup 1} and ns{sup 2}np{sup 6} → ns{sup 2}np{sup 5}(n + 1)p{sup 1} transitions in noble gases are calculated and compared with experimental data. Already for the light atoms Ne and Ar spin-orbit coupling leads to noticeable zero field splitting that gradually increases in the heavier homologues and eventually invalidates the LS-based description of singlet and triplet excited states. For all four noble gases Ne through Xe, we observe a very good agreement with experimental transition energies in the considered energetic range where the extended version of the propagator implementation in general yields better excitation energy differences than the strict variant. In the extended version, off-diagonal first-order contributions in the two-particle-two-hole block are included that are not present in the strict variant. In case of Kr and Xe, nonrelativistic approaches already exhibit unacceptable deviations in the reproduction of transition energies and the spectral structure. The obtained excited final states are analyzed in terms of atomic contributions to the donor and acceptor orbitals constituting the corresponding wave functions. The relativistic polarization propagator provides a consistent description of electron correlation and relativistic effects especially relevant for the heavier systems where these two contributions are no longer separable.

  16. New tools for the systematic analysis and visualization of electronic excitations. I. Formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Plasser, Felix Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2014-07-14

    A variety of density matrix based methods for the analysis and visualization of electronic excitations are discussed and their implementation within the framework of the algebraic diagrammatic construction of the polarization propagator is reported. Their mathematical expressions are given and an extensive phenomenological discussion is provided to aid the interpretation of the results. Starting from several standard procedures, e.g., population analysis, natural orbital decomposition, and density plotting, we proceed to more advanced concepts of natural transition orbitals and attachment/detachment densities. In addition, special focus is laid on information coded in the transition density matrix and its phenomenological analysis in terms of an electron-hole picture. Taking advantage of both the orbital and real space representations of the density matrices, the physical information in these analysis methods is outlined, and similarities and differences between the approaches are highlighted. Moreover, new analysis tools for excited states are introduced including state averaged natural transition orbitals, which give a compact description of a number of states simultaneously, and natural difference orbitals (defined as the eigenvectors of the difference density matrix), which reveal details about orbital relaxation effects.

  17. Imaging Electronic Excitation of NO by Ultrafast Laser Tunneling Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Tomoyuki; Matsuda, Akitaka; Fushitani, Mizuho; Yasuike, Tomokazu; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Tunneling-ionization imaging of photoexcitation of NO has been demonstrated by using few-cycle near-infrared intense laser pulses (8 fs, 800 nm, 1.1 ×1014 W /cm2 ). The ion image of N+ fragment ions produced by dissociative ionization of NO in the ground state, NO (X2Π ,2 π )→NO+ +e-→N+ +O +e- , exhibits a characteristic momentum distribution peaked at 45° with respect to the laser polarization direction. On the other hand, a broad distribution centered at ˜0 ° appears when the A2Σ+ (3 s σ ) excited state is prepared as the initial state by deep-UV photoexcitation. The observed angular distributions are in good agreement with the corresponding theoretical tunneling ionization yields, showing that the fragment anisotropy reflects changes of the highest-occupied molecular orbital by photoexcitation.

  18. Semiempirical Quantum-Chemical Orthogonalization-Corrected Methods: Benchmarks of Electronically Excited States.

    PubMed

    Tuna, Deniz; Lu, You; Koslowski, Axel; Thiel, Walter

    2016-09-13

    The semiempirical orthogonalization-corrected OMx methods have recently been shown to perform well in extensive ground-state benchmarks. They can also be applied to the computation of electronically excited states when combined with a suitable multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) treatment. We report on a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of the OMx/MRCI methods for electronically excited states. The present benchmarks cover vertical excitation energies, excited-state equilibrium geometries (including an analysis of significant changes between ground- and excited-state geometries), minimum-energy conical intersections, ground- and excited-state zero-point vibrational energies, and 0-0 transition energies for a total of 520 molecular structures and 412 excited states. For comparison, we evaluate the TDDFT/B3LYP method for all benchmark sets, and the CC2, MRCISD, and CASPT2 methods for some of them. We find that the current OMx/MRCI methods perform reasonably well for many of the excited-state properties. However, in comparison to the first-principles methods, there are also a number of shortcomings that should be addressed in future developments. PMID:27380455

  19. Exploring the vibrational fingerprint of the electronic excitation energy via molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Deyne, Andy Van Yperen-De; Pauwels, Ewald; Ghysels, An; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Hemelsoet, Karen; De Meyer, Thierry; De Clerck, Karen

    2014-04-07

    A Fourier-based method is presented to relate changes of the molecular structure during a molecular dynamics simulation with fluctuations in the electronic excitation energy. The method implies sampling of the ground state potential energy surface. Subsequently, the power spectrum of the velocities is compared with the power spectrum of the excitation energy computed using time-dependent density functional theory. Peaks in both spectra are compared, and motions exhibiting a linear or quadratic behavior can be distinguished. The quadratically active motions are mainly responsible for the changes in the excitation energy and hence cause shifts between the dynamic and static values of the spectral property. Moreover, information about the potential energy surface of various excited states can be obtained. The procedure is illustrated with three case studies. The first electronic excitation is explored in detail and dominant vibrational motions responsible for changes in the excitation energy are identified for ethylene, biphenyl, and hexamethylbenzene. The proposed method is also extended to other low-energy excitations. Finally, the vibrational fingerprint of the excitation energy of a more complex molecule, in particular the azo dye ethyl orange in a water environment, is analyzed.

  20. Semiempirical Quantum-Chemical Orthogonalization-Corrected Methods: Benchmarks of Electronically Excited States.

    PubMed

    Tuna, Deniz; Lu, You; Koslowski, Axel; Thiel, Walter

    2016-09-13

    The semiempirical orthogonalization-corrected OMx methods have recently been shown to perform well in extensive ground-state benchmarks. They can also be applied to the computation of electronically excited states when combined with a suitable multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) treatment. We report on a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of the OMx/MRCI methods for electronically excited states. The present benchmarks cover vertical excitation energies, excited-state equilibrium geometries (including an analysis of significant changes between ground- and excited-state geometries), minimum-energy conical intersections, ground- and excited-state zero-point vibrational energies, and 0-0 transition energies for a total of 520 molecular structures and 412 excited states. For comparison, we evaluate the TDDFT/B3LYP method for all benchmark sets, and the CC2, MRCISD, and CASPT2 methods for some of them. We find that the current OMx/MRCI methods perform reasonably well for many of the excited-state properties. However, in comparison to the first-principles methods, there are also a number of shortcomings that should be addressed in future developments.

  1. Excited state X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Probing both electronic and structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Simon P.; Averbukh, Vitali; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectra, simulated using a general method, to properties of molecular excited states. Recently, Averbukh and co-workers [M. Ruberti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 184107 (2014)] introduced an efficient and accurate L 2 method for the calculation of excited state valence photoionization cross-sections based on the application of Stieltjes imaging to the Lanczos pseudo-spectrum of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) representation of the electronic Hamiltonian. In this paper, we report an extension of this method to the calculation of excited state core photoionization cross-sections. We demonstrate that, at the ADC(2)x level of theory, ground state X-ray absorption spectra may be accurately reproduced, validating the method. Significantly, the calculated X-ray absorption spectra of the excited states are found to be sensitive to both geometric distortions (structural dynamics) and the electronic character (electronic dynamics) of the initial state, suggesting that core excitation spectroscopies will be useful probes of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics. We anticipate that the method presented here can be combined with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to simulate the time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of excited state molecular wavepacket dynamics.

  2. Electron Exciter Speeds Associated with Interplanetary Type III Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    This article provides a comprehensive quantitative investigation of the kinematics of the electron exciters associated with interplanetary type III solar radio bursts. Detailed multispacecraft analyses of the radio and plasma wave data from the widely separated Wind and STEREO spacecraft are provided for five interplanetary type III bursts that illustrate different aspects of the problems involved in establishing the electron exciter speeds. The exciter kinematics are determined from the observed frequency drift and in-situ radiation characteristics for each type III burst. The analysis assumes propagation of the electron exciters along a Parker spiral, with origin at the associated solar active region, and curvature determined by the measured solar wind speed. The analyses take fully into account the appropriate light-propagation-time corrections from the radio source to the observing spacecraft as the exciters propagate along the Parker spiral path. For the five in-situ type III bursts analyzed in detail here, we found that their initial exciter speeds, near the Sun, ranged from 0.2c to 0.38c, where c is the speed of light. This is significantly higher than the exciter speeds derived from other recent analyses. The results presented here further suggest that the type III electron exciters normally decelerate as they propagate through the interplanetary medium. We argue based on the observations by the widely separated spacecraft that the initial part of the type III radiation usually occurs at the fundamental of the plasma frequency. Finally, we compare the results for the exciter speeds to all previous determinations and provide quantitative arguments to explain the differences.

  3. Positron-electron decay of 28Si at an excitation energy of 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buda, A.; Bacelar, J. C.; Balanda, A.; van der Ploeg, H.; Sujkowski, Z.; van der Woude, A.

    1993-03-01

    The electron-position pair decay of 28Si at 50 MeV excitation produced by the isospin T=0 (α + 24Mg) and the mixed isospin T=0,1 (3He + 25Mg) reactions has been studied using a special designed Positron-Electron pair spectrometer PEPSI.

  4. Measurements of electron excitation and recombination for Ne-like Ba/sup 46 +/

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Levine, M.A.; Knapp, D.A.; Henderson, J.R.

    1987-07-01

    A new facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been used to obtain measurements for electron-impact excitation, dielectronic recombination and radiative recombination for the neon-like Ba/sup 46 +/ ion. The experimental technique consists of trapping highly charged ions inside the space charge of an electron beam and measuring their x-ray emission spectra.

  5. Electron Spectroscopy: Ultraviolet and X-Ray Excitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, A. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent growth in electron spectroscopy (54 papers cited). Emphasizes advances in instrumentation and interpretation (52); photoionization, cross-sections and angular distributions (22); studies of atoms and small molecules (35); transition, lanthanide and actinide metal complexes (50); organometallic (12) and inorganic compounds (2);…

  6. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  7. Excitation of the ligand-to-metal charge transfer band induces electron tunnelling in azurin

    SciTech Connect

    Baldacchini, Chiara; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2014-03-03

    Optical excitation of azurin blue copper protein immobilized on indium-tin oxide, in resonance with its ligand-to-metal charge transfer absorption band, resulted in a light-induced current tunnelling within the protein milieu. The related electron transport rate is estimated to be about 10{sup 5} s{sup −1}. A model based on resonant tunnelling through an azurin excited molecular state is proposed. The capability of controlling electron transfer processes through light pulses opens interesting perspectives for implementation of azurin in bio-nano-opto-electronic devices.

  8. Fast Electronic Relaxation in Metal Clusters via Excitation of Coherent Shape Deformations: Slipping Through a Bottleneck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresin, Vitaly; Ovchinnikov, Yuri; Kresin, Vladimir

    2005-03-01

    We introduce and describe a fast electronic relaxation channel which is particular to free metallic nanoclusters. This channel overcomes the possibility of a phonon bottleneck by invoking the essential role of cluster shape deformations. Such a deformation entails the appearance of coherent surface phonon excitations and enables internal conversion at the level crossing point, thus allowing large energy transfer from an excited electron to the ionic subsystem. As a result, one can show that (unlike usual multiphonon processes) the shape deformation channel is capable of producing short electronic relaxation times, much less than a picosecond. The calculations are in agreement with recent pump-probe photoelectron measurements of relaxation in Aln^- clusters.

  9. Measurements of Electron Impact Excitation Cross Sections at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, L. D.; Kohl, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of absolute spectral line intensities and intensity ratios with spectroscopic diagnostic techniques provides empirical determinations of chemical abundances, electron densities and temperatures in astrophysical objects. Since spectral line intensities and their ratios are controlled by the excitation rate coefficients for the electron temperature of the observed astrophysical structure, it is imperative that one have accurate values for the relevant rate coefficients. Here at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, we have been carrying out measurements of electron impact excitation (EIE) for more than 25 years.

  10. Dissociative excitation of vacuum ultraviolet emission features by electron impact on molecular gases. 3: CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.; Borst, W. L.; Zipf, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet multiplets of C I, C II, and O I were produced by electron impact on CO2. Absolute emission cross sections for these multiplets were measured from threshold to 350 eV. The electrostatically focused electron gun used is described in detail. The atomic multiplets which were produced by dissociative excitation of CO2 and the cross sections at 100 eV are presented. The dependence of the excitation functions on electron energy shows that these multiplets are produced by electric-dipole-allowed transitions in CO2.

  11. Luminescence of spodumene and garnet crystals excited by subnanosecond and nanosecond electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Solomonov, V. I.; Polisadova, E. F.; Burachenko, A. G.; Baksht, E. Kh.

    2012-05-01

    The pulsed cathode luminescence of spodumene and yttrium-aluminum garnet crystals activated by Mn2+ and Nd3+ ions, respectively, is studied. Luminescence is excited by the irradiation of the crystals by electron beams with a duration of 0.1, 0.25, 0.65, and 10 ns and a current density of ˜40 and 100 A/cm2 at an electron energy of ˜200 keV. A decrease in the electron beam duration to several tenths of a nanosecond is shown not to cause substantial changes in the excitation mechanisms of pulsed cathode luminescence and its spectrum.

  12. Persistent order due to transiently enhanced nesting in an electronically excited charge density wave

    DOE PAGES

    Rettig, L.; Cortés, R.; Chu, J. -H.; Fisher, I. R.; Schmitt, F.; Moore, R. G.; Shen, Z. -X.; Kirchmann, P. S.; Wolf, M.; Bovensiepen, U.

    2016-01-25

    Non-equilibrium conditions may lead to novel properties of materials with broken symmetry ground states not accessible in equilibrium as vividly demonstrated by non-linearly driven mid-infrared active phonon excitation. Potential energy surfaces of electronically excited states also allow to direct nuclear motion, but relaxation of the excess energy typically excites fluctuations leading to a reduced or even vanishing order parameter as characterized by an electronic energy gap. Here, using femtosecond time-and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate a tendency towards transient stabilization of a charge density wave after near-infrared excitation, counteracting the suppression of order in the non-equilibrium state. Analysis of themore » dynamic electronic structure reveals a remaining energy gap in a highly excited transient state. In conclusion, our observation can be explained by a competition between fluctuations in the electronically excited state, which tend to reduce order, and transiently enhanced Fermi surface nesting stabilizing the order.« less

  13. Electronic excitation induced amorphization in titanate pyrochlores: an ab initio molecular dynamics study

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen; Zu, X. T.; Li, Sean

    2015-02-09

    In this study, the response of titanate pyrochlores (A2Ti2O7, A = Y, Gd and Sm) to electronic excitation is investigated utilizing an ab initio molecular dynamics method. All the titanate pyrochlores are found to undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous structural transition under a low concentration of electronic excitations. The transition temperature at which structural amorphization starts to occur depends on the concentration of electronic excitations. During the structural transition, O2-like molecules are formed, and this anion disorder further drives cation disorder that leads to an amorphous state. This study provides new insights into the mechanisms of amorphization in titanate pyrochlores under laser,more » electron and ion irradiations.« less

  14. Low-energy electron elastic scattering cross sections for excited Au and Pt atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Zineb; Eure, Amanda R.; Msezane, Alfred Z.; Sokolovski, Dmitri

    2010-05-01

    Electron elastic total cross sections (TCSs) and differential cross sections (DCSs) in both impact energy and scattering angle for the excited Au and Pt atoms are calculated in the electron impact energy range 0 ⩽ E ⩽ 4.0 eV. The cross sections are found to be characterized by very sharp long-lived resonances whose positions are identified with the binding energies of the excited anions formed during the collisions. The recent novel Regge-pole methodology wherein is embedded through the Mulholland formula the electron-electron correlations is used together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential incorporating the crucial core-polarization interaction for the calculations of the TCSs. The DCSs are evaluated using a partial wave expansion. The Ramsauer-Townsend minima, the shape resonances and the binding energies of the excited Au - and Pt - anions are extracted from the cross sections, while the critical minima are determined from the DCSs.

  15. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of excited states of the pyridine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linert, Ireneusz; Zubek, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra of the pyridine, C5H5N, molecules in the gas phase have been measured to investigate electronic excitation in the energy range 3.5-10 eV. The applied wide range of residual electron energy and the scattering angle range from 10° to 180° enabled to differentiate between optically-allowed and -forbidden transitions. These measurements have allowed vertical excitation energies of the triplet excited states of pyridine to be determined and tentative assignments of these states to be proposed. Some of these states have not been identified in the previous works. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  16. R-matrix electron-impact excitation data for the B-like iso-electronic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, G. Y.; Badnell, N. R.; Zhao, G.

    2012-11-01

    We have carried-out parallel intermediate-coupling frame transformation R-matrix calculations for electron-impact excitation amongst the 204 close-coupling levels of the 2sx2py (x + y = 3), 2s2{3,4}l, 2s2p{3,4}l, and 2p23l configurations for all boron-like ions from C+ to Kr31+. We have also included the configuration interaction due to the 2p24l, 2s3l3l' and 2p3s3l configurations. A detailed comparison has been made of the target structure and excitation data for four specific ions (viz., Ne5+, Ar13+, Fe21+ and Kr31+) that span the sequence, so as to assess the accuracy over the entire sequence. Effective collision strengths (Υs) are presented at temperatures ranging from 2 × 102(z + 1)2 K to 2 × 106(z + 1)2 K (where z is the residual charge of the ions, i.e. Z - 5). Detailed comparisons for the (effective) collision strengths (Υs) Ω are made with the results of previous calculations for the four representative ions. Furthermore, we examine the iso-electronic trends of the effective collision strengths as a function of temperature. These data are made available in the archives of APAP via http://www.apap-network.org, OPEN-ADAS via http://open.adas.ac.uk as well as at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/547/A87

  17. Electronically Excited States in Poly(p-phenylenevinylene): Vertical Excitations and Torsional Potentials from High-Level Ab Initio Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ab initio second-order algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC(2)) calculations using the resolution of the identity (RI) method have been performed on poly-(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV) oligomers with chain lengths up to eight phenyl rings. Vertical excitation energies for the four lowest π–π* excitations and geometry relaxation effects for the lowest excited state (S1) are reported. Extrapolation to infinite chain length shows good agreement with analogous data derived from experiment. Analysis of the bond length alternation (BLA) based on the optimized S1 geometry provides conclusive evidence for the localization of the defect in the center of the oligomer chain. Torsional potentials have been computed for the four excited states investigated and the transition densities divided into fragment contributions have been used to identify excitonic interactions. The present investigation provides benchmark results, which can be used (i) as reference for lower level methods and (ii) give the possibility to parametrize an effective Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian for quantum dynamical simulations of ultrafast exciton transfer dynamics in PPV type systems. PMID:23427902

  18. Autoionization Resonances in Orientation and Alignment Parameters for Excited Ions after Electron Impact Ionization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashov, Vselovod; Bartschat, Klaus; Marchalant, Pascale

    1997-04-01

    We have extended previous work for alignment and orientation parameters in simultaneous ionization-excitation [1] to include the effect of autoionizing resonances. The expected effect is similar to that suggested for photoionization via autoionizing states [2]. Special emphasis is given to the process e + He --> e_scattered+e_ejected +He^+(2p), followed by He^+(2p) --> He^+(1s) + γ where the scattered electron and the emitted photon are detected in coincidence. 1. R. Schwienhorst, A. Raeker, K. Bartschat and K. Blum (1996), 1. J. Phys. B 29, 2305 2. V.V. Balashov, N.M. Kabachnik and V.S. Senashenko (1983), 2. Book of Abstracts ICPEAC XIII, 23 permanent address: Moscow State University

  19. Structure of electron tracks in water. 2. Distribution of primary ionizations and excitations in water radiolysis. [accelerated electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pimblott, S.M.; Mozumder, A. )

    1991-09-19

    A procedure for the calculation of entity-specific ionization and excitation probabilities for water radiolysis at low linear energy transfer (LET) has been developed. The technique pays due attention to the effects of the ionization threshold and the energy dependence of the ionization efficiency. The numbers of primary ionizations and excitations are not directly proportional to the spur energy. At a given spur energy, ionization follows a binomial distribution subject to an energetically possible maximum. The excitation distribution for a spur of given energy and with a given number of ionizations is given by a geometric series. The occurrence probabilities depend upon the cross sections of ionization, excitation, and other inferior processes. Following the low-LET radiolysis of liquid water the most probable spurs contain one ionization, two ionizations, or one ionization and one excitation, while in water vapor they contain either one ionization or one excitation. In liquid water the most probable outcomes for spurs corresponding to the most probable energy loss (22 eV) and to the mean energy loss (38 eV) are one ionization and one excitation, and two ionizations and one excitation, respectively. In the vapor, the most probable energy loss is 14 eV which results in one ionization or one excitation and the mean energy loss is 34 eV for which the spur of maximum probability contains one ionization and two excitations. The total calculated primary yields for low-LET radiolysis are in approximate agreement with experiment in both phases.

  20. Scalable Methods for Electronic Excitations and Optical Responses of Nanostructures: Mathematics to Algorithms to Observables

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Emily A

    2013-02-02

    Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) is a powerful, well-established tool for the study of condensed phase electronic structure. However, there are still a number of situations where its applicability is limited. The basic theme of our research is the development of first principles electronic structure approaches for condensed matter that goes beyond what can currently be done with standard implementations ofKohn-Sham DFT. Our efforts to this end have focused on two classes or' methods. The first addresses the well-lmown inability of DFT to handle strong, many-body electron correlation effects. Our approach is a DFT -based embedding theory, to treat localized features (e.g. impurity, adsorbate, vacancy, etc.) embedded in a periodic, metallic crystal. A description for the embedded region is provided by explicitly correlated, ab initio wave function methods. DFT, as a fo1n1ally ground state theory, does not give a good description of excited states; an additional feature of our approach is the ability to obtain excitations localized in this region. We apply our method to a first-principles study of the adsorption of a single magnetic Co ada tom on non-magnetic Cu( 111 ), a known Kondo system whose behavior is governed by strong electron correlation. The second class of methods that we are developing is an orbital-free density functional theory (OFDFT), which addresses the speed limitations ofKohn-Sham DFT. OFDFT is a powerful, O(N) scaling method for electronic structure calculations. Unlike Kohn-Sham DFT, OFDFT goes back to the original Hohenberg-Kohn idea of directly optimizing an energy functional which is an explicit functional of the density, without invoking an orbital description. This eliminates the need to manipulate orbitals, which leads to O(N{sup 3}) scaling in the Kahn-Sham approach. The speed of OFDFT allows direct electronic structure calculations on large systems on the order of thousands to tens of thousands of atoms, an expensive feat within

  1. Spectroscopy of Argon Excited in an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2005-04-18

    Argon is one of the gases best investigated and most widely used in plasma discharge devices for a multitude of applications that range from wavelength reference standards to controlled fusion experiments. Reviewing atomic physics and spectroscopic problems in various ionization stages of Ar, the past use and future options of employing an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) for better and more complete Ar data in the x-ray, EUV and visible spectral ranges are discussed.

  2. Electron impact excitation of autoionising states of krypton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Trajmar, S.

    1978-01-01

    Energy-loss spectra of krypton in the region between 21 and 29 eV have been obtained at electron impact energies of 30, 60 and 100 eV. For each energy, the angular distribution of intensities has been measured at 5, 10 and 15 deg scattering angles. Assignments of spectral features found in this region are suggested and a comparison is made with previous measurements.

  3. Absolute angle-differential vibrational excitation cross sections for electron collisions with diacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.; May, O.; Fedor, J.; Ibanescu, B. C.; Andric, L.

    2011-05-15

    Absolute vibrational excitation cross sections were measured for diacetylene (1,3-butadiyne). The selectivity of vibrational excitation reveals detailed information about the shape resonances. Excitation of the C{identical_to}C stretch and of double quanta of the C-H bend vibrations reveals a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub u} resonance at 1 eV (autodetachment width {approx}30 meV) and a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub g} resonance at 6.2 eV (autodetachment width 1-2 eV). There is a strong preference for excitation of even quanta of the bending vibration. Excitation of the C-H stretch vibration reveals {sigma}* resonances at 4.3, 6.8, and 9.8 eV, with autodetachment widths of {approx}2 eV. Detailed information about resonances permits conclusions about the mechanism of the dissociative electron attachment.

  4. Final Technical Report [Scalable methods for electronic excitations and optical responses of nanostructures: mathematics to algorithms to observables

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, Yousef

    2014-03-19

    The master project under which this work is funded had as its main objective to develop computational methods for modeling electronic excited-state and optical properties of various nanostructures. The specific goals of the computer science group were primarily to develop effective numerical algorithms in Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT). There were essentially four distinct stated objectives. The first objective was to study and develop effective numerical algorithms for solving large eigenvalue problems such as those that arise in Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. The second objective was to explore so-called linear scaling methods or Methods that avoid diagonalization. The third was to develop effective approaches for Time-Dependent DFT (TDDFT). Our fourth and final objective was to examine effective solution strategies for other problems in electronic excitations, such as the GW/Bethe-Salpeter method, and quantum transport problems.

  5. Anisotropic softening of magnetic excitations in lightly electron-doped Sr2IrO4

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Meng, Z. Y.; Upton, M. H.; Qi, T.; Gog, T.; Cao, Y.; Lin, J. Q.; Meyers, D.; Ding, H.; et al

    2016-06-10

    The magnetic excitations in electron doped (Sr1-xLax)2IrO4 with x = 0:03 were measured using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at the Ir L3-edge. Although much broadened, well defined dispersive magnetic excitations were observed. Comparing with the magnetic dispersion from the undoped compound, the evolution of the magnetic excitations upon doping is highly anisotropic. Along the anti-nodal direction, the dispersion is almost intact. On the other hand, the magnetic excitations along the nodal direction show significant softening. These results establish the presence of strong magnetic correlations in electron doped (Sr1-xLax)2IrO4 with close analogies to the hole doped cuprates, further motivating the searchmore » for high temperature superconductivity in this system.« less

  6. Comparison of Electronically Excited Photodissociation between Nitramine Energetic Materials and Model Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuanqing; Greenfield, Margo; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Bernstein, Elliot

    2007-03-01

    Nitramine energetic materials (RDX, HMX and CL20) have broad applications as explosives and fuels. Model systems (1,4-dinitropiperazine, nitropiperidine, nitropyrrolidine and DMNA) have similar molecular structures, but they are unable to be used as fuels and explosives. To elucidate the difference between them, both nanosecond and femtosecond mass resolved excitation spectroscopy have been employed to investigate the mechanisms and dynamics of the electronically excited photodissociation of these materials. NO is a dominant dissociation product. Based upon the experimental observation and calculations of potential energy surfaces for these systems, we suggest that energetic materials dissociate from their ground electronic states after relaxing from the first excited states, and that the model systems dissociate from their excited state. In both cases a nitro-nitrite isomerization is part of the reaction mechanism. Parent ions of DMNA and nitropyrrolidine are observed in fs experiments. All the other molecules generate NO as a product even in fs time regime.

  7. Enhanced coherent terahertz Smith-Purcell superradiation excited by two electron-beams.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaxin; Dong, Liang

    2012-09-24

    This paper presents the studies on the enhanced coherent THz Smith-Purcell superradiation excited by two pre-bunched electron beams that pass through the 1-D sub-wavelength holes array. The Smith-Purcell superradiation has been clearly observed. The radiation emitting out from the system has the radiation angle matching the 2nd harmonic frequency component of the pre-bunched electron beams. The results show that the two electron beams can be coupled with each other through the holes array so that the intensity of the radiated field has been enhanced about twice higher than that excited by one electron beam. Consequently superradiation at the frequency of 0.62 THz can be generated with 20A/cm(2) current density of electron beam based on above mechanism. The advantages of low injection current density and 2nd harmonic radiation promise the potential applications in the development of electron-beam driven THz sources. PMID:23037412

  8. Method and apparatus for secondary laser pumping by electron beam excitation

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Krupke, William F.; Murray, John R.; Powell, Howard T.; Swingle, James C.; Turner, Jr., Charles E.; Rhodes, Charles K.

    1978-01-01

    An electron beam of energy typically 100 keV excites a fluorescer gas which emits ultraviolet radiation. This radiation excites and drives an adjacent laser gas by optical pumping or photolytic dissociation to produce high efficiency pulses. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, United States Energy Research and Development Administration Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48 with the University of California.

  9. Matrix photochemistry of small molecules: Influencing reaction dynamics on electronically excited hypersurfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of chemical reactions on electronically excited reaction surfaces are presented. The role of excited-surface multiplicity is of particular interest, as are chemical reactivity and energy transfer in systems in which photochemistry is initiated through a metal atom sensitizer.'' Two approaches are employed: A heavy-atom matrix affords access to forbidden triplet reaction surfaces, eliminating the need for a potentially reactive sensitizer. Later, the role of the metal atom in the photosensitization process is examined directly.

  10. Electron beam excitation of left-handed surface electromagnetic waves at artificial interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Averkov, Yu. O.; Kats, A. V.; Yakovenko, V. M.

    2009-05-15

    In this Brief Report we present the theoretical analysis of excitation of the surface plasmon polaritons by a thin electron beam propagating in the vacuum gap separating a plasmalike medium (metal) from an artificial dielectric with negative magnetic permeability. We have obtained and discussed the dispersion relation for the vacuum-gap-localized waves for an arbitrary vacuum-gap width. We have shown that the interface-localized waves with the negative total energy flux can be excited.

  11. Electron Impact Excitation of Xenon from the Ground State and the Metastable State to the 5p57p Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhan-Bin; Dong, Chen-Zhong; Xie, Lu-You; Jiang, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Electron impact excitation cross sections from the ground state and the lowest metastable state 5p56s J = 2 to the excited states of the 5p57p configuration of xenon are calculated systematically using the fully relativistic distorted wave method. Special attention is paid to the configuration interaction effects in the wave-function expansion of target states. The results are in good agreement with the recent experimental data by Jung et al. [Phys. Rev. A 80 (2009) 062708] over the measured energy range. These accurate theoretical results can be used in the modeling and diagnosis of plasmas containing xenon.

  12. Reactions of ground-state and electronically excited sodium atoms with methyl bromide and molecular chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.S.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Schmidt, H.; Covinsky, M.H.; Lee, Y.T. )

    1991-04-18

    The reactions of ground- and excited-state Na atoms with methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) have been studied by using the crossed molecular beams method. For both reactions, the cross sections increase with increasing electronic energy. The product recoil energies change little with increasing Na electronic energy, implying that the product internal energies increase substantially. For Na + CH{sub 3}Br, the steric angle of acceptance opens with increasing electronic energy.

  13. Nature of Electronically Excited States of Organic Compounds and Processes of Nonradiative Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, G. V.; Plotnikov, V. G.; Artyukhov, V. Ya.

    2016-08-01

    Models of quantum-chemical calculation of rate constants for internal processes and intersystem crossing in polyatomic molecules are considered. The influence of the nature of electronically excited states in organic compounds is investigated. It is shown that the explicit allowance for the nature of wave functions of electronic states for estimation of electronic matrix elements of nonadiabaticity operators and spin-orbit interaction allows photophysical processes in organic compounds to be considered in detail.

  14. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. Final report, August 4, 1986--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1997-12-31

    The techniques of continuous photolysis and pulsed laser flash photolysis, continuous and pulse radiolysis, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, and time-resolved fluorimetry have been used to examine intramolecular electron transfer within the solvent quenching cage, photodynamics of quenching of the excited states of transition-metal photosensitizers, the properties of excites states and one-electron reduced forms, ground- and excited-state interactions with solutes, and photoinduced oxidations of organic solutes in aqueous solution. The following specific areas were examined: (1) the parameters that govern the yields of redox products from excited-state electron-transfer quenching reactions; (2) the mediation of the properties of excited states and one-electron reduced forms by the ligands and the solution medium; (3) the effect of the interactions between the ground state of the complex and the solution components on the behavior of the excited state; (4) the yields of singlet oxygen from excited-state energy-transfer quenching by O{sub 2}; and (5) the oxidations of solutes by singlet oxygen, excited-state electron-transfer quenching, and free radicals. This report contains the abstracts of 50 publications describing the studies.

  15. Effects of abnormal excitation on the dynamics of spiral waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min-Yi, Deng; Xue-Liang, Zhang; Jing-Yu, Dai

    2016-01-01

    The effect of physiological and pathological abnormal excitation of a myocyte on the spiral waves is investigated based on the cellular automaton model. When the excitability of the medium is high enough, the physiological abnormal excitation causes the spiral wave to meander irregularly and slowly. When the excitability of the medium is low enough, the physiological abnormal excitation leads to a new stable spiral wave. On the other hand, the pathological abnormal excitation destroys the spiral wave and results in the spatiotemporal chaos, which agrees with the clinical conclusion that the early after depolarization is the pro-arrhythmic mechanism of some anti-arrhythmic drugs. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11365003 and 11165004).

  16. Luminescence of crystals excited by a KrCl laser and a subnanosecond electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatov, E I; Tarasenko, Viktor F; Orlovskii, Viktor M; Alekseev, S B

    2005-08-31

    Luminescence of crystals of natural spodumene and natural diamond of the type IIa is studied upon excitation by a laser at a wavelength of 222 nm and by a subnanosecond avalanche electron beam (SAEB) formed in air at the atmospheric pressure. The photoluminescence spectra of spodumene and diamond are shown to exhibit additional bands, which are absent upon SAEB excitation. It is demonstrated that SAEB excitation allows one to analyse various crystals under normal conditions without using any vacuum equipment. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  17. Role of electronic friction during the scattering of vibrationally excited nitric oxide molecules from Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monturet, Serge; Saalfrank, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Some time ago, it has been observed that vibrationally highly excited NO(v) molecules (with typical vibrational quantum numbers v≈15 ) lose substantial amounts of vibrational energy when scattering off a Au(111) surface [H. Huang, C. Rettner, D. Auerbach, and A. Wodtke, Science 290, 111 (2000)10.1126/science.290.5489.111]. This has been interpreted as a sign for the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation due to vibration-electron coupling. It has been argued that this process cannot be understood on the basis of single-quantum transitions which are typical for “electronic friction” models based on a perturbative treatment of weak vibration-electron couplings. Rather, multiple-quanta transitions characteristic for strong nonadiabatic effects are needed according to recent classical surface hopping calculations involving multiple potential-energy surfaces and model Hamiltonians [N. Shenvi, S. Roy, and J. C. Tully, Science 326, 829 (2009)10.1126/science.1179240]. Here we address the importance and magnitude of electronic friction for NO@Au(111) by using fully quantum-mechanical, parameter-free first-principles theories in reduced dimensions. Periodic density-functional theory calculations are performed to obtain a ground-state potential-energy surface along the desorption and NO-vibration coordinates, and coordinate-resolved, finite NO vibrational lifetimes due to vibration-electron coupling. Using this input, the scattering event is modeled by open-system density-matrix theory in the frame of the coupled-channel-density-matrix method, which allows for the inclusion of energy relaxation of the scattering NO molecules. It is found that within this model at least, electronic friction accounts for the observed vibrational deactivation of NO scattering from gold.

  18. A QM/MM Approach Using the AMOEBA Polarizable Embedding: From Ground State Energies to Electronic Excitations.

    PubMed

    Loco, Daniele; Polack, Étienne; Caprasecca, Stefano; Lagardère, Louis; Lipparini, Filippo; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-08-01

    A fully polarizable implementation of the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach is presented, where the classical environment is described through the AMOEBA polarizable force field. A variational formalism, offering a self-consistent relaxation of both the MM induced dipoles and the QM electronic density, is used for ground state energies and extended to electronic excitations in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory combined with a state specific response of the classical part. An application to the calculation of the solvatochromism of the pyridinium N-phenolate betaine dye used to define the solvent ET(30) scale is presented. The results show that the QM/AMOEBA model not only properly describes specific and bulk effects in the ground state but it also correctly responds to the large change in the solute electronic charge distribution upon excitation.

  19. A QM/MM Approach Using the AMOEBA Polarizable Embedding: From Ground State Energies to Electronic Excitations.

    PubMed

    Loco, Daniele; Polack, Étienne; Caprasecca, Stefano; Lagardère, Louis; Lipparini, Filippo; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-08-01

    A fully polarizable implementation of the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach is presented, where the classical environment is described through the AMOEBA polarizable force field. A variational formalism, offering a self-consistent relaxation of both the MM induced dipoles and the QM electronic density, is used for ground state energies and extended to electronic excitations in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory combined with a state specific response of the classical part. An application to the calculation of the solvatochromism of the pyridinium N-phenolate betaine dye used to define the solvent ET(30) scale is presented. The results show that the QM/AMOEBA model not only properly describes specific and bulk effects in the ground state but it also correctly responds to the large change in the solute electronic charge distribution upon excitation. PMID:27340904

  20. Relaxation and interaction of electronic excitations induced by intense ultra short light pulses in BaF2 scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirm, M.; Nagirnyi, V.; Vielhauer, S.; Feldbach, E.

    2011-06-01

    Excitation density effects have a pronounced influence on relaxation processes in solids. They come into play in scintillating and dosimetric materials exposed to ionizing radiation or in laser materials operating in intense ultraviolet light fields. The scientific understanding of the underlying process is poor, mainly because most of the studies of light emitting materials under short wavelength excitation have been performed at weak and moderate excitation intensities due to limited availability of powerful light sources. Disembodied data on excitation density effects have been reported for wide-gap dielectrics studied by luminescence spectroscopy, by using such excitation sources as powerful ion beams,1,2pulsed electron beams,2,3 and wide-band hard X-ray synchrotron radiation.4 It is obvious that such non-selective excitation is a good tool for revealing density-related phenomena in these materials in general, but for investigating specific features of relaxation processes in insulators, light sources with well defined parameters are necessary. Since the shortwavelength free electron laser (FEL) technology has been devised by an international consortium at HASYLAB of DESY, resulting in the development of TESLA Test facility (TTF)5 and later in the construction of a dedicated FEL source FLASH in Hamburg,6 more advanced studies became possible. The range of interests towards this light source covers the fields from material science and various other branches of physics to structural biology. The pioneering luminescence study revealed excitation density effects in the decay of Ce3+ 5d-4f luminescence in Y3Al5O12 crystals and luminescence of BaF2 crystals in UV-visible range.7 These results motivated systematic investigations of excitation density effects in wide gap crystals using FEL8,9 and high-harmonic-generated VUV radiation,10 and, at lower energies, femtosecond laser pulses in the UV.11,12 The main goal of the present work is to analyze the same phenomenon

  1. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  2. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation. PMID:27472379

  3. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  4. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Edward M.; Rosen, Mordecai D.

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  5. Electronic density fluctuation associated to coherent plasmon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervasoni, Juana; Segui, Silvina; Arista, Nestor

    2011-10-01

    In this work we analyze, in the frame of the coherent states, the fluctuation of the electronic collective modes associated with the wake potential generated by an external particle of charge Ze. This perturbation is described as coherent states of plasmons spatially localized in an average distance of the order of the velocity of the projectile divided by the plasmon frequency of the material. One of the most important features is that in all the cases, for different trajectories of the external particle, and for different structures of the material, the fluctuations are not negligible. In particular, we observe that due to the importance of the surface in nanostructured materials, the fluctuation of density is very sensitive to their geometry and composition, fact that must have taken into account for the nanodevices designs. In this work we analyze, in the frame of the coherent states, the fluctuation of the electronic collective modes associated with the wake potential generated by an external particle of charge Ze. This perturbation is described as coherent states of plasmons spatially localized in an average distance of the order of the velocity of the projectile divided by the plasmon frequency of the material. One of the most important features is that in all the cases, for different trajectories of the external particle, and for different structures of the material, the fluctuations are not negligible. In particular, we observe that due to the importance of the surface in nanostructured materials, the fluctuation of density is very sensitive to their geometry and composition, fact that must have taken into account for the nanodevices designs. Acknowledgements to CNEA and CONICET, Argentina.

  6. Electron impact excitation of the Ne II and Ne III fine structure levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.; Cumbee, R.; Stancil, P. C.; Ballance, C. P.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Electron impact excitation cross sections and rate coefficients of the low lying levels of the Ne II and Ne III ions are of great interest in cool molecular environments including young stellar objects, photodissociation regions, active galactic nuclei, and X-ray dominated regions. We have carried out details computations for cross sections and rate coefficients using the Dirac R-matrix codes (DARC), the Breit-Pauli R-matrix codes (BP) and the Intermediate Coupling Frame Transformation (ICFT) codes, for both Ne II and Ne III. We also compare our results with previous calculations. We are primarily interested in rate coefficients in the temperature range below 1000 K, and the focus is on obtaining the most accurate rate coefficients for those temperatures. We present both a recommended set of effective collision strengths and an indication of the uncertainties on these values. Work at Auburn University and UGA partly supported by NASA Grant NNX15AE47G.

  7. Excitation of surface and volume plasmons in a metal nanosphere by fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildenburg, V. B.; Kostin, V. A.; Pavlichenko, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    Collective multipole oscillations (surface and volume plasmons) excited in a metal nanosphere by moving electron and corresponding inelastic scattering spectra are studied based on the hydrodynamic approach. Along with the bulk (dielectric) losses traditionally taken into account, the surface and radiative ones are also considered as the physical mechanisms responsible for the plasmon damping. The second and third mechanisms are found to be essential for the surface plasmons (at small or large cluster radii, respectively) and depend very differently on the multipole mode order. The differential equations are obtained which describe the temporal evolution of every particular mode as that one of a linear oscillator excited by the given external force, and the electron energy loss spectra are calculated. The changes in spectrum shape with the impact parameter and with the electron passage time are analyzed; the first of them is found to be in good enough agreement with the data of scanning transmission electron microscopy experiments. It is shown that, in the general case, a pronounced contribution to the formation of the loss spectrum is given by the both surface and volume plasmons with low and high multipole indices. In particular, at long electron passage time, the integral (averaged over the impact parameter) loss spectrum which is calculated for the free-electron cluster model contains two main peaks: a broad peak from merging of many high-order multipole resonances of the surface plasmons and a narrower peak of nearly the same height from merged volume plasmons excited by the electrons that travel through the central region of the cluster. Comparatively complex dependences of the calculated excitation coefficients and damping constants of various plasmons on the order of the excited multipole result in wide diversity of possible types of the loss spectrum even for the same cluster material and should be taken into account in interpretation of corresponding

  8. Tuning of superfine electron-nuclear interaction in structure of the ground states and the characteristics of the full systems electronic excited states for formation of effective phothophysics and spectral-energy of properties in the series of multinuclear compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, A. E.

    2012-06-01

    The help of the measurements (the methods are the NMR 1H and 13C, infrared (IR) and the UV-absorption, Raman scattering of light, the fluorescence and the phosphorescence, the pumping of the lasers and lamps, the low-temperature of the spectroscopy in the solutions (77 K) and the Jet-spectroscopy of vapor (2,6 K) and others) and the calculations with application of the developed new complex of the computer of the programs realizing of the quantum-chemical LCAO-MO SCF extended-CI INDO / S of methods are investigated of the photophysical properties of some news and also some known the organic compounds for variations of the electronic and the spatial structures in the series is the mono-, bi-, three, penta- and quincli-cyclic and the bi- and the bis- phenyl, furyl- and tienyl- oxazoles and - oxadiazoles have been studied of the spectroscopy properties in the wavelength range max λ max abs,osc = 208 ÷ 760 nm.

  9. Characterization of adsorption and electronic excited states of quercetin on titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdyb, Agata; Krawczyk, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of quercetin on colloidal titanium dioxide nanoparticles in ethanol and its excited-state electronic structure were investigated by means of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies. The changes in electronic charge redistribution as reflected by the dipole moment difference, ∆μ, between the ground and excited electronic states were measured with electroabsorption spectroscopy and analyzed using results of TD DFT computations. Adsorption of quercetin causes a red shift of its absorption spectrum. Raman spectra of quercetin analyzed with reference to analogous data for morin indicate binding of quercetin through the hydroxy groups of the catechol moiety. The difference dipole moment, which is 5.5 D in free quercetin, increases to 11.8 D in opposite direction in adsorbed quercetin, and is associated with charge-transfer to the Ti atom. The computed transition energy, intensity, vector Δμ and molecular orbitals involved in the electronic transition at different molecular configurations indicate a bidentate chelating mode of binding of quercetin.

  10. Synthesis of metal silicide at metal/silicon oxide interface by electronic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.-G.; Nagase, T.; Yasuda, H.; Mori, H.

    2015-05-21

    The synthesis of metal silicide at the metal/silicon oxide interface by electronic excitation was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. A platinum silicide, α-Pt{sub 2}Si, was successfully formed at the platinum/silicon oxide interface under 25–200 keV electron irradiation. This is of interest since any platinum silicide was not formed at the platinum/silicon oxide interface by simple thermal annealing under no-electron-irradiation conditions. From the electron energy dependence of the cross section for the initiation of the silicide formation, it is clarified that the silicide formation under electron irradiation was not due to a knock-on atom-displacement process, but a process induced by electronic excitation. It is suggested that a mechanism related to the Knotek and Feibelman mechanism may play an important role in silicide formation within the solid. Similar silicide formation was also observed at the palladium/silicon oxide and nickel/silicon oxide interfaces, indicating a wide generality of the silicide formation by electronic excitation.

  11. Quantum-chemical study of electronically excited states of protolytic forms of vanillic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vusovich, O. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.; Vasil'eva, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The paper describes an analysis of possible ways of deactivation of electronically excited states of 4-hydroxy- 3-methoxy-benzoic acid (vanillic acid) and its protolytic forms with the use of quantum-chemical methods INDO/S (intermediate neglect of differential overlap with a spectroscopic parameterization) and MEP (molecular electrostatic potential). The ratio of radiative and non-radiative deactivation channels of the electronic excitation energy is established. The rate constants of photophysical processes (internal and intercombination conversions) occurring after the absorption of light in these forms are evaluated.

  12. Nonlinear response of metal nanoparticles: Double plasmon excitation and electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shiwu

    2015-06-21

    We investigate the dynamical response of a metal nanoparticle and the electron transfer to a molecule near its surface using time-dependent density functional theory. In addition to the linear response of the Mie resonance, double plasmon excitations and a low-frequency charge transfer band emerge and become prominent at high laser intensities. Both modes are nonlinear processes, which are derived from the re-excitation and decay of the primary plasmon mode, respectively. Our results shed light on the localised characters of the plasmon-molecule coupling and hot electron distributions. These findings have general implications to photoinduced phenomena in nanosystems. PMID:26093567

  13. Nonlinear response of metal nanoparticles: Double plasmon excitation and electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shiwu

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the dynamical response of a metal nanoparticle and the electron transfer to a molecule near its surface using time-dependent density functional theory. In addition to the linear response of the Mie resonance, double plasmon excitations and a low-frequency charge transfer band emerge and become prominent at high laser intensities. Both modes are nonlinear processes, which are derived from the re-excitation and decay of the primary plasmon mode, respectively. Our results shed light on the localised characters of the plasmon-molecule coupling and hot electron distributions. These findings have general implications to photoinduced phenomena in nanosystems.

  14. Nonlinear response of metal nanoparticles: Double plasmon excitation and electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Shiwu

    2015-06-21

    We investigate the dynamical response of a metal nanoparticle and the electron transfer to a molecule near its surface using time-dependent density functional theory. In addition to the linear response of the Mie resonance, double plasmon excitations and a low-frequency charge transfer band emerge and become prominent at high laser intensities. Both modes are nonlinear processes, which are derived from the re-excitation and decay of the primary plasmon mode, respectively. Our results shed light on the localised characters of the plasmon-molecule coupling and hot electron distributions. These findings have general implications to photoinduced phenomena in nanosystems.

  15. Light-emitting nanostructures formed by intense, ultrafast electronic excitation in silicon (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Alex V.; Newman, Micheal W.; Thielen, Peter A.; Lee, Howard W. H.; Schenkel, Thomas; McDonald, Joseph W.; Schneider, Dieter H.

    2001-10-01

    The intense, ultrafast electronic excitation of clean silicon (100)-(2×1) surfaces leads to the formation of silicon nanostructures embedded in silicon, which photoluminescence at ˜560 nm wavelength (˜2 eV band gap). The silicon surfaces were irradiated with slow, highly charged ions (e.g., Xe44+ and Au53+) to produce the electronic excitation. The observation of excitonic features in the luminescence is particularly unusual for silicon nanostructures. The temperature dependence and the measurement of the triplet-singlet splitting of the emission strongly support the excitonic assignment.

  16. Validity of Eucken formula and Stokes’ viscosity relation in high-temperature electronically excited gases

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.; Mekhonoshina, M. A.

    2014-12-09

    In the present work we evaluate the accuracy of the Eucken formula and Stokes’ viscosity relation in high temperature non-equilibrium air species with electronic excitation. The thermal conductivity coefficient calculated using the exact kinetic theory methods is compared with that obtained applying approximate formulas in the temperature range 200–20000 K. A modification of the Eucken formula providing a good agreement with exact calculations is proposed. It is shown that the Stokes viscosity relation is not valid in electronically excited monoatomic gases at temperatures higher than 2000 K.

  17. Controlling electronic access to the spin excitations of a single molecule in a tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.; Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Prueser, Henning; Ajibade, Afolabi; Gill, Tobias G.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Persson, Mats

    Spintronic phenomena can be utilized to create new devices with applications in data storage and sensing. Scaling these down to the single molecule level requires controlling the properties of the current-carrying orbitals to enable access to spin states through phenomena such as inelastic electron tunneling. Here we show that the spintronic properties of a tunnel junction containing a single molecule can be controlled by their coupling to the local environment. For tunneling through iron phthalocyanine (FePc) on an insulating copper nitride (Cu2N) monolayer above Cu(001), we find that spin transitions may be strongly excited depending on the binding site of the central Fe atom. Different interactions between the Fe and the underlying Cu or N atoms shift the Fe d-orbitals with respect to the Fermi energy, and control the relative strength of the spin excitations, an effect that can described in a simple co-tunneling model. This work demonstrates the importance of the atomic-scale environment in the development of single molecule spintronic devices.

  18. Envelope excitations in electronegative plasmas with electrons featuring the Tsallis distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bains, A. S.; Li, Bo; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2013-09-15

    We examine the modulational instability (MI) of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) in an electronegative plasma containing positive and negative ions as well as electrons that follow the nonextensive statistics proposed by Tsallis [J. Stat. Phys. 52, 479 (1988)]. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that governs the modulational instability of the IAWs is obtained. Inspired by the experimental work of Ichiki et al.[Phys. Plasmas 8, 4275 (2001)], three types of electronegative plasmas are investigated. The effects of various parameters on the propagation of IAWs are discussed in detail numerically. We find that the plasma supports both bright and dark solutions. The presence of the non-extensively distributed electrons is found to play a crucial role in the formation of envelope excitations. The region in the parameter space where the MI exists depends sensitively on the positive to negative ion mass ratio (M) and negative to positive ion density ratio (ν). An extensive range of the nonextensive q-parameters (−1electrons.

  19. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths and theoretical line intensities for transitions in S III

    SciTech Connect

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log T{sub e} (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}, 3s3p {sup 3}, 3s {sup 2}3p3d, 3s {sup 2}3p4s, 3s {sup 2}3p4p, and 3s {sup 2}3p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  20. Surface excitations in electron spectroscopy. Part I: dielectric formalism and Monte Carlo algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Salvat-Pujol, F; Werner, W S M

    2013-01-01

    The theory describing energy losses of charged non-relativistic projectiles crossing a planar interface is derived on the basis of the Maxwell equations, outlining the physical assumptions of the model in great detail. The employed approach is very general in that various common models for surface excitations (such as the specular reflection model) can be obtained by an appropriate choice of parameter values. The dynamics of charged projectiles near surfaces is examined by calculations of the induced surface charge and the depth- and direction-dependent differential inelastic inverse mean free path (DIIMFP) and stopping power. The effect of several simplifications frequently encountered in the literature is investigated: differences of up to 100% are found in heights, widths, and positions of peaks in the DIIMFP. The presented model is implemented in a Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the electron transport relevant for surface electron spectroscopy. Simulated reflection electron energy loss spectra are in good agreement with experiment on an absolute scale. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23794766

  1. Surface excitations in electron spectroscopy. Part I: dielectric formalism and Monte Carlo algorithm.

    PubMed

    Salvat-Pujol, F; Werner, W S M

    2013-05-01

    The theory describing energy losses of charged non-relativistic projectiles crossing a planar interface is derived on the basis of the Maxwell equations, outlining the physical assumptions of the model in great detail. The employed approach is very general in that various common models for surface excitations (such as the specular reflection model) can be obtained by an appropriate choice of parameter values. The dynamics of charged projectiles near surfaces is examined by calculations of the induced surface charge and the depth- and direction-dependent differential inelastic inverse mean free path (DIIMFP) and stopping power. The effect of several simplifications frequently encountered in the literature is investigated: differences of up to 100% are found in heights, widths, and positions of peaks in the DIIMFP. The presented model is implemented in a Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the electron transport relevant for surface electron spectroscopy. Simulated reflection electron energy loss spectra are in good agreement with experiment on an absolute scale. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23794766

  2. Concerted electron-proton transfer in the optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Westlake, Brittany C.; Brennaman, Kyle M.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Paul, Jared J.; Bettis, Stephanie E.; Hampton, Shaun D.; Miller, Stephen A.; Lebedeva, Natalia V.; Forbes, Malcolm D. E.; Moran, Andrew M.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Papanikolas, John M.

    2011-05-24

    The simultaneous, concerted transfer of electrons and protons—electron-proton transfer (EPT)—is an important mechanism utilized in chemistry and biology to avoid high energy intermediates. There are many examples of thermally activated EPT in ground-state reactions and in excited states following photoexcitation and thermal relaxation. Here we report application of ultrafast excitation with absorption and Raman monitoring to detect a photochemically driven EPT process (photo-EPT). In this process, both electrons and protons are transferred during the absorption of a photon. Photo-EPT is induced by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation of hydrogen-bonded-base adducts with either a coumarin dye or 4-nitro-4'-biphenylphenol. Femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements following ICT excitation reveal the appearance of two spectroscopically distinct states having different dynamical signatures. One of these states corresponds to a conventional ICT excited state in which the transferring H⁺ is initially associated with the proton donor. Proton transfer to the base (B) then occurs on the picosecond time scale. The other state is an ICT-EPT photoproduct. Upon excitation it forms initially in the nuclear configuration of the ground state by application of the Franck–Condon principle. However, due to the change in electronic configuration induced by the transition, excitation is accompanied by proton transfer with the protonated base formed with a highly elongated ⁺H–B bond. Coherent Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of a vibrational mode corresponding to the protonated base in the optically prepared state.

  3. exciting: a full-potential all-electron package implementing density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulans, Andris; Kontur, Stefan; Meisenbichler, Christian; Nabok, Dmitrii; Pavone, Pasquale; Rigamonti, Santiago; Sagmeister, Stephan; Werner, Ute; Draxl, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Linearized augmented planewave methods are known as the most precise numerical schemes for solving the Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory (DFT). In this review, we describe how this method is realized in the all-electron full-potential computer package, exciting. We emphasize the variety of different related basis sets, subsumed as (linearized) augmented planewave plus local orbital methods, discussing their pros and cons and we show that extremely high accuracy (microhartrees) can be achieved if the basis is chosen carefully. As the name of the code suggests, exciting is not restricted to ground-state calculations, but has a major focus on excited-state properties. It includes time-dependent DFT in the linear-response regime with various static and dynamical exchange-correlation kernels. These are preferably used to compute optical and electron-loss spectra for metals, molecules and semiconductors with weak electron-hole interactions. exciting makes use of many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral excitations. To obtain the quasi-particle band structure, the GW approach is implemented in the single-shot approximation, known as G0W0. Optical absorption spectra for valence and core excitations are handled by the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, which allows for the description of strongly bound excitons. Besides these aspects concerning methodology, we demonstrate the broad range of possible applications by prototypical examples, comprising elastic properties, phonons, thermal-expansion coefficients, dielectric tensors and loss functions, magneto-optical Kerr effect, core-level spectra and more.

  4. Exciting: a full-potential all-electron package implementing density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Gulans, Andris; Kontur, Stefan; Meisenbichler, Christian; Nabok, Dmitrii; Pavone, Pasquale; Rigamonti, Santiago; Sagmeister, Stephan; Werner, Ute; Draxl, Claudia

    2014-09-10

    Linearized augmented planewave methods are known as the most precise numerical schemes for solving the Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory (DFT). In this review, we describe how this method is realized in the all-electron full-potential computer package, exciting. We emphasize the variety of different related basis sets, subsumed as (linearized) augmented planewave plus local orbital methods, discussing their pros and cons and we show that extremely high accuracy (microhartrees) can be achieved if the basis is chosen carefully. As the name of the code suggests, exciting is not restricted to ground-state calculations, but has a major focus on excited-state properties. It includes time-dependent DFT in the linear-response regime with various static and dynamical exchange-correlation kernels. These are preferably used to compute optical and electron-loss spectra for metals, molecules and semiconductors with weak electron-hole interactions. exciting makes use of many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral excitations. To obtain the quasi-particle band structure, the GW approach is implemented in the single-shot approximation, known as G(0)W(0). Optical absorption spectra for valence and core excitations are handled by the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, which allows for the description of strongly bound excitons. Besides these aspects concerning methodology, we demonstrate the broad range of possible applications by prototypical examples, comprising elastic properties, phonons, thermal-expansion coefficients, dielectric tensors and loss functions, magneto-optical Kerr effect, core-level spectra and more. PMID:25135665

  5. Internal waves excited by the marangoni effect

    PubMed

    Wierschem; Linde; Velarde

    2000-11-01

    Traveling periodic internal wave trains are generated in liquid layers during the absorption process of a miscible surface-active substance out of the vapor phase. In our nonstationary experimental runs, internal waves are excited by surface waves, which had been previously generated by a surface-tension-gradient-driven instability. The internal wave trains adjust their wave number by an Eckhaus instability. Close to the instability threshold narrow and extended pulses are observed. Furthermore, the wave trains can alter their traveling direction, i.e., one wave train traveling in one direction yields to another train, in general of different wave number, traveling in the opposite direction. PMID:11101989

  6. Microwave-Excited Microplasma Thrusters Using Surface Wave and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Daisuke; Kawanabe, Tetsuo; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2012-10-01

    Downsizing spacecrafts has recently been focused on to decrease mission costs and to increase launch rates, and missions with small satellites would bring a great advantage of reducing their risks. Such a concept supports a new approach to developing precise, reliable, and low-cost micropropulsion systems. We have studied two types of microwave-excited microplasma thrusters, using surface wave-excited and electron cyclotron resonance-excited discharges. Microwaves of S-band (4 GHz) and X-band (11 GHz) were employed to excite the plasma in these experiments, with the feed or propellant gases of Ar and He. A microplasma thruster of electrothermal type consisted of a surface wave-excited microplasma source, and a converging-diverging micronozzle to obtain the thrust. For 11-GHz microwaves at a power of 6 W, a thrust of 1.1 mN and a specific impulse of 90 s were obtained at an Ar gas flow rate of 40 sccm, where the plasma electron density was 1.2x10^20 m-3, and the gas temperature was 1.5x10^3 K; under the same conditions for 4-GHz microwaves, the thrust, specific impulse, electron density, and gas temperature were 0.93 mN, 80 s, 7.0x10^19 m-3, and 8.0x10^2 K, respectively. A microplasma thruster of electromagnetic type had a microplasma source excited by electron cyclotron resonance with external magnetic fields, to obtain the thrust through accelerating ions by ambipolar electric fields. Optical emission spectrum was dominated by Ar^+ ion lines in the microplasma thruster of electromagnetic type, owing to higher electron temperatures at lower feed-gas pressures.

  7. Excitation threshold of Stimulated Electromagnetic Emissions SEEs generated at pump frequency near the third electron gyroharmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Scales, W.

    2012-12-01

    The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaska provides effective radiated powers in the megawatt range that have allowed researchers to study many non-linear effects of wave-plasma interactions. Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) is of interest to the ionospheric community for its diagnostic purposes. In recent HAARP heating experiments, it has been shown that during the Magnetized Stimulated Brillouin Scattering MSBS instability, the pumped electromagnetic wave may decay into an electromagnetic wave and a low frequency electrostatic wave (either ion acoustic IA wave or electrostatic ion cyclotron EIC wave). Using Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) spectral features, side bands which extend above and below the pump frequency can yield significant diagnostics for the modified ionosphere. It has been shown that the IA wave frequency offsets can be used to measure electron temperature in the heated ionosphere and EIC wave offsets can be used as a sensitive method to determine the ion species by measuring ion mass using the ion gyro-frequency offset. The threshold of each emission line has been measured by changing the amplitude of pump wave. The experimental results aimed to show the threshold for transmitter power to excite IA wave propagating along the magnetic field lines as well as for EIC wave excited at an oblique angle relative to the background magnetic field. Another parametric decay instability studied is the ion Bernstein decay instability that has been attributed to the simultaneous parametric decay of electron Bernstein waves into multiple electron Bernstein and ion Bernstein waves. The SIB process is thought to involve mode conversion from EM to EB waves followed by parametric decay of the EB wave to multiple EB and IB waves. The parametric decay instability of ion Bernstein modes has been observed simultaneously for the first time at the third electron gyroharmonics during 2011 Summer Student Research

  8. Convergent-close-coupling calculations for excitation and ionization processes of electron-hydrogen collisions in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zammit, Mark C.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2010-11-15

    Electron-hydrogen scattering in weakly coupled hot-dense plasmas has been investigated using the convergent-close-coupling method. The Yukawa-type Debye-Hueckel potential has been used to describe the plasma screening effects. The target structure, excitation dynamics, and ionization process change dramatically as the screening is increased. Excitation cross sections for the 1s{yields}2s,2p,3s,3p,3d and 2s{yields}2p,3s,3p,3d transitions and total and total ionization cross sections for the scattering from the 1s and 2s states are presented. Calculations cover the energy range from thresholds to high energies (250 eV) for various Debye lengths. We find that as the screening increases, the excitation and total cross sections decrease, while the total ionization cross sections increase.

  9. UV-induced DNA Damage: The Role of Electronic Excited States.

    PubMed

    Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the fundamental processes induced by the direct absorption of UV radiation by DNA allows extrapolating conclusions drawn from in vitro studies to the in-vivo DNA photoreactivity. In this respect, the characterization of the DNA electronic excited states plays a key role. For a long time, the mechanisms of DNA lesion formation were discussed in terms of generic "singlet" and "triplet" excited state reactivity. However, since the beginning of the 21(st) century, both experimental and theoretical studies revealed the existence of "collective" excited states, i.e. excited states delocalized over at least two bases. Two limiting cases are distinguished: Frenkel excitons (delocalized ππ* states) and charge-transfer states in which positive and negative charges are located on different bases. The importance of collective excited states in photon absorption (in particular in the UVA spectral domain), the redistribution of the excitation energy within DNA, and the formation of dimeric pyrimidine photoproducts is discussed. The dependence of the behavior of the collective excited states on conformational motions of the nucleic acids is highlighted.

  10. Rate-coefficients and polarization results for the electron-impact excitation of Ar+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Rajesh; Dipti, Dipti

    2016-05-01

    A fully relativistic distorted wave theory has been employed to study the electron impact excitation in Ar+ ion. Results have been obtained for the excitation cross-sections and rate-coefficients for the transitions from the ground state 3p5 (J = 3/2) to fine-structure levels of excited states 3p4 4 s, 3p4 4 p , 3p4 5 s, 3p4 5 p, 3p4 3 d and 3p4 4 d. Polarization of the radiation following the excitation has been calculated using the obtained magnetic sub-level cross-sections. Comparison of the present rate-coefficients is also done with the previously reported theoretical results for some unresolved fine structure transitions. Work is supported by DAE-BRNS Mumbai and CSIR, New Delhi.

  11. Electron-impact excitation rate-coefficients and polarization of subsequent emission for Ar+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipti; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Electron impact excitation in Ar+ ions has been studied by using fully relativistic distorted wave theory. Calculations are performed to obtain the excitation cross-sections and rate-coefficients for the transitions from the ground state 3p5 (J=3/2) to fine-structure levels of excited states 3p44s, 3p44p, 3p45s, 3p45p, 3p43d and 3p44d. Polarization of the radiation following the excitation has been calculated using the obtained magnetic sub-level cross-sections. Comparison of the present rate-coefficients is also done with the previously reported theoretical results for some unresolved fine structure transitions.

  12. Sub-nanometre resolution of atomic motion during electronic excitation in phase-change materials

    DOE PAGES

    Mitrofanov, Kirill V.; Fons, Paul; Makino, Kotaro; Terashima, Ryo; Shimada, Toru; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Tominaga, Junji; Bragaglia, Valeria; Giussani, Alessandro; Calarco, Raffaella; et al

    2016-02-12

    Phase-change materials based on Ge-Sb-Te alloys are widely used in industrial applications such as nonvolatile memories, but reaction pathways for crystalline-to-amorphous phase-change on picosecond timescales remain unknown. Femtosecond laser excitation and an ultrashort x-ray probe is used to show the temporal separation of electronic and thermal effects in a long-lived (>100 ps) transient metastable state of Ge2Sb2Te5 with muted interatomic interaction induced by a weakening of resonant bonding. Due to a specific electronic state, the lattice undergoes a reversible nondestructive modification over a nanoscale region, remaining cold for 4 ps. An independent time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure experiment confirms themore » existence of an intermediate state with disordered bonds. Furthermore, this newly unveiled effect allows the utilization of non-thermal ultra-fast pathways enabling artificial manipulation of the switching process, ultimately leading to a redefined speed limit, and improved energy efficiency and reliability of phase-change memory technologies.« less

  13. Sub-nanometre resolution of atomic motion during electronic excitation in phase-change materials

    PubMed Central

    Mitrofanov, Kirill V.; Fons, Paul; Makino, Kotaro; Terashima, Ryo; Shimada, Toru; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Tominaga, Junji; Bragaglia, Valeria; Giussani, Alessandro; Calarco, Raffaella; Riechert, Henning; Sato, Takahiro; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Yabashi, Makina; Wall, Simon; Brewe, Dale; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change materials based on Ge-Sb-Te alloys are widely used in industrial applications such as nonvolatile memories, but reaction pathways for crystalline-to-amorphous phase-change on picosecond timescales remain unknown. Femtosecond laser excitation and an ultrashort x-ray probe is used to show the temporal separation of electronic and thermal effects in a long-lived (>100 ps) transient metastable state of Ge2Sb2Te5 with muted interatomic interaction induced by a weakening of resonant bonding. Due to a specific electronic state, the lattice undergoes a reversible nondestructive modification over a nanoscale region, remaining cold for 4 ps. An independent time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure experiment confirms the existence of an intermediate state with disordered bonds. This newly unveiled effect allows the utilization of non-thermal ultra-fast pathways enabling artificial manipulation of the switching process, ultimately leading to a redefined speed limit, and improved energy efficiency and reliability of phase-change memory technologies. PMID:26868451

  14. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: High order correlation-polarization potential for vibrational excitation scattering of diatomic molecules by low-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Hao; Sun, Wei-Guo; Zeng, Yang-Yang

    2009-11-01

    This paper introduces a correlation-polarization potential with high order terms for vibrational excitation in electron-molecule scattering. The new polarization potential generalizes the two-term approximation so that it can better reflect the dependence of correlation and polarization effects on the position coordinate of the scattering electron. It applies the new potential on the vibrational excitation scattering from N2 in an energy range which includes the 2Πg shape resonance. The good agreement of theoretical resonant peaks with experiments shows that polarization potentials with high order terms are important and should be included in vibrational excitation scattering.

  15. Electronic noise in high electron-mobility transistors under photo-excitation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Marinchio, H.; Sabatini, G.; Varani, L.; Palermo, C.; Shiktorov, P.; Starikov, E.; Gruzinskis, V.; Ziade, P.; Kallassy, Z.

    2009-04-23

    The hydrodynamic approach based on the carrier concentration and velocity conservation equations is used to investigate the influence of photo-excitation of plasma waves at the beating frequency of two lasers on the intrinsic extra noise in InGaAs HEMTs caused by thermally-induced plasma oscillations. It is found that, by increasing the amplitude of the photo-excitation, a significant supression of the intrinsic excess noise is observed at the beating frequency as well as at all the frequencies where plasma waves can be excited.

  16. Direct Delta-MBPT(2) method for ionization potentials, electron affinities, and excitation energies using fractional occupation numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Ortiz, J. Vincent

    2013-01-01

    A direct method (D-Delta-MBPT(2)) to calculate second-order ionization potentials (IPs), electron affinities (EAs), and excitation energies is developed. The Delta-MBPT(2) method is defined as the correlated extension of the Delta-HF method. Energy differences are obtained by integrating the energy derivative with respect to occupation numbers over the appropriate parameter range. This is made possible by writing the second-order energy as a function of the occupation numbers. Relaxation effects are fully included at the SCF level. This is in contrast to linear response theory, which makes the D-Delta-MBPT(2) applicable not only to single excited but also higher excited states. We show the relationship of the D-Delta-MBPT(2) method for IPs and EAs to a second-order approximation of the effective Fock-space coupled-cluster Hamiltonian and a second-order electron propagator method. We also discuss the connection between the D-Delta-MBPT(2) method for excitation energies and the CIS-MP2 method. Finally, as a proof of principle, we apply our method to calculate ionization potentials and excitation energies of some small molecules. For IPs, the Delta-MBPT(2) results compare well to the second-order solution of the Dyson equation. For excitation energies, the deviation from EOM-CCSD increases when correlation becomes more important. When using the numerical integration technique, we encounter difficulties that prevented us from reaching the Delta-MBPT(2) values. Most importantly, relaxation beyond the Hartree Fock level is significant and needs to be included in future research.

  17. Intermediate energy electron impact excitation of composite vibrational modes in phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Neves, R. F. C.; Jones, D. B.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Nixon, K. L.; Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Silva, G. B. da; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-05-21

    We report differential cross section results from an experimental investigation into the electron impact excitation of a number of the low-lying composite (unresolved) vibrational modes in phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). The measurements were carried out at incident electron energies in the range 15–40 eV and for scattered-electron angles in the range 10–90°. The energy resolution of those measurements was typically ∼80 meV. Calculations, using the GAMESS code, were also undertaken with a B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level model chemistry, in order to enable us to assign vibrational modes to the features observed in our energy loss spectra. To the best of our knowledge, the present cross sections are the first to be reported for vibrational excitation of the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH molecule by electron impact.

  18. Electron-impact excitation of the n 1P levels of helium - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, David C.; Csanak, George; Trajmar, Sandor; Register, D. F.

    1992-01-01

    New experimental electron-energy-loss data have been used to extract differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the 2 1P level, and for the overlapping (3 1P, 3 1D, 3 3D) levels of helium, at 30-, 50-, and 100-eV incident electron energies. First-order many-body theory (FOMBT) has been used to calculate the differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the n 1P (n = 2,...,6) levels of helium by electron impact, for incident electron energies from threshold to 500 eV. Detailed comparisons between these two new sets of data are made as well as comparisons with appropriate published experimental and theoretical results. A simple scaling relationship is derived from the FOMBT results for n = 2,...,6 that provides differential and integral cross sections for all symmetry final levels of helium with n = 6 or greater.

  19. Symmetric eikonal model for projectile-electron excitation and loss in relativistic ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Voitkiv, A. B.; Najjari, B.; Shevelko, V. P.

    2010-08-15

    At impact energies > or approx. 1 GeV/u the projectile-electron excitation and loss occurring in collisions between highly charged ions and neutral atoms is already strongly influenced by the presence of atomic electrons. To treat these processes in collisions with heavy atoms we generalize the symmetric eikonal model, used earlier for considerations of electron transitions in ion-atom collisions within the scope of a three-body Coulomb problem. We show that at asymptotically high collision energies this model leads to an exact transition amplitude and is very well suited to describe the projectile-electron excitation and loss at energies above a few GeV/u. In particular, by considering a number of examples we demonstrate advantages of this model over the first Born approximation at impact energies of {approx}1-30 GeV/u, which are of special interest for atomic physics experiments at the future GSI facilities.

  20. R-matrix electron-impact excitation data for the Mg-like iso-electronic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Menchero, L.; Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Emission lines from ions in the Mg-like iso-electronic sequence can be used as reliable diagnostics of temperature and density of astrophysical and fusion plasmas over a wide range of parameters. Data in the literature are quite lacking, there are no calculations for many of the ions in the sequence. Methods: We have carried-out intermediate coupling frame transformation R-matrix calculations which include a total of 283 fine-structure levels in both the configuration interaction target and close-coupling collision expansions. These arise from the configurations 1s2 2s2 2p6 3 {s,p,d} nl with n = 4,5, and for l = 0-4. Results: We obtain ordinary collision strengths and Maxwell-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of all the ions of the Mg-like sequence, from Al+ to Zn18 +. We compare our results with those from previous R-matrix and distorted waves calculations, where available, for some benchmark ions. We find good agreement with the results of previous calculations for the transitions n = 3-3. We also find good agreement for the most intense transitions n = 3-4. These transitions are important for populating the upper levels of the main diagnostic lines. These data are made available in the APAP archive via http://www.apap-network.org, CHIANTI via http://www.chiantidatabase.org and open-ADAS via http://open.adas.ac.uk

  1. Electron-impact ionization of moderately charged atomic ions in excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Pindzola, M. S.; Ballance, C. P.; Loch, S. D.

    2011-06-15

    Nonperturbative R-matrix and perturbative distorted-wave methods are used to calculate electron-impact ionization cross sections for C{sup 3+} in excited states. Convergence studies for the cross sections of the 1s{sup 2}5s excited configuration reveal that both the R-matrix and distorted-wave methods need fairly high ejected electron angular momenta. Reasonable agreement is found between the converged R-matrix and distorted-wave cross sections. Thus, the use of the computationally less demanding distorted-wave method as a tool for the n scaling of excited-state ionization cross sections appears to be reasonable for atomic ions with charge q{>=}3.

  2. Injection locking of an electronic maser in the hard excitation mode

    SciTech Connect

    Yakunina, K. A.; Kuznetsov, A. P.; Ryskin, N. M.

    2015-11-15

    The phenomenon of hard excitation is natural for many electronic oscillators. In particular, in a gyrotron, a maximal efficiency is often attained in the hard excitation regime. In this paper, we study the injection-locking phenomena using two models of an electronic maser in the hard excitation mode. First, bifurcation analysis is performed for the quasilinear model described by ordinary differential equations for the slow amplitude and phase. Two main scenarios of transition to the injection-locked mode are described, which are generalizations of the well-known phase-locking and suppression mechanisms. The results obtained for the quasilinear model are confirmed by numerical simulations of a gyrotron with fixed Gaussian structure of the RF field.

  3. Current status of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1973-01-01

    A survey is presented of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants for rocket engines. Nascent or atomic forms of diatomic gases are considered free radicals as well as the highly reactive diatomic triatomic molecules that posess unpaired electrons. Manufacturing and storage problems are described, and a review of current experimental work related to the manufacture of atomic hydrogen propellants is presented.

  4. Electronic excitation induced modification in fullerene C70 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Pooja; Singhal, R.; Banerjee, M. K.; Vishnoi, R.; Kaushik, R.; Singh, F.

    2016-07-01

    Fullerene C70 thin films were deposited by resistive heating on glass substrates and the thickness were approximated to be 150 nm. The effect of energy deposition by 55 MeV Si ions on the optical and structural properties of the prepared thin film samples is investigated. The samples were irradiated with 55 MeV Si ions within fluence range from 1 × 1012 to 3 × 1013 ions/cm2. For optical studies, the pristine and the Si ion irradiated samples are examined by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. UV-visible absorption studies reveal that the absorption peaks of irradiated samples decrease with a decrease in the band gap of the thin films. The damage cross-section (σ) and radius of damaged cylindrical zone (r) are determined as ∼0.6 × 10-13 cm2 and ∼1.41 nm, respectively from the Raman spectra. Raman studies also suggest that at higher fluence (up to 3 × 1013 ions/cm2), the damage caused by the SHI results in partial amorphization of fullerene C70 thin film. Modification in the surface properties has been investigated by atomic force microscopy; it has revealed that the roughness decreases and average particle size increases with the increase in fluences.

  5. Excitation of the a {sup 3{Pi}} state of CO by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ristic, M. M.; Poparic, G. B.; Belic, D. S.

    2011-04-15

    Electron impact excitation of the a {sup 3{Pi}} valence state of the carbon-monoxide molecule has been studied in the energy region from threshold to 10 eV. Excitation functions for spin forbidden transitions from the {nu}=0 level of the ground X {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} state of CO to the {nu}{sup '}=0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 levels of the a {sup 3{Pi}} state are measured. A crossed beam double trochoidal electron spectrometer is used. Forward and backward scattered electrons from the {nu}{sup '}=0 excitation channel are separated by electron beam modulation and a time-of-flight detection technique. The present results are normalized to the ground state {sup 2{Pi}} resonance vibrational excitation cross sections and absolute values of the differential cross sections at the border angles of 0 deg. and 180 deg. are determined. In this way the differential cross section measurements are completed in the full angular range from 0 deg. to 180 deg. The present results are compared to the existing literature data.

  6. First-Principles Investigation of Electronic Excitation Dynamics in Water under Proton Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Kyle; Kanai, Yosuke

    2015-03-01

    A predictive and quantitative understanding of electronic excitation dynamics in water under proton irradiation is of great importance in many technological areas ranging from utilizing proton beam therapy to preventing nuclear reactor damages. Despite its importance, an atomistic description of the excitation mechanism has yet to be fully understood. Identifying how a high-energy proton dissipates its kinetic energy into the electronic excitation is crucial for predicting atomistic damages, later resulting in the formation of different chemical species. In this work, we use our new, large-scale first-principles Ehrenfest dynamics method based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory to simulate the electronic response of bulk water to a fast-moving proton. In particular, we will discuss the topological nature of the electronic excitation as a function of the proton velocity. We will employ maximally-localized functions to bridge our quantitative findings from first-principles simulations to a conceptual understanding in the field of water radiolysis.

  7. Femtosecond-pulse-driven, electron-excited XUV lasers in eight-times-ionized noble gases.

    PubMed

    Lemoff, B E; Barty, C P; Harris, S E

    1994-04-15

    We propose three XUV laser schemes in the 30-50-nm wavelength region that can be driven by 10-Hz ultrashort-pulse terawatt laser systems. Tunneling ionization by circularly polarized radiation produces both the ions and hot electrons necessary to excite the upper laser level.

  8. a Study of Quasi-One Systems: Excitation of the Active Electron to its First Excited State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redd, Emmett Richter

    Experimental angular differential cross sections (ADCS) of four Quasi-One-Electron (QOE) scattering systems (Li('+), Na('+) + H and Be('+), Mg('+) + He) are reported. These ADCS are determined for exciting the 'active' electron to its first excited state. The angular range of the ADCS is from 0 to (TURN)3 mrad(,lab) with an angular resolution of (TURN)120 (mu)rad(,lab). The energy range is from 19.4 to 150 keV with an energy-loss resolution of (TURN)1 eV. The ADCS are compared to the available theories. The agreement between experiment and theory ranges from very poor to fair. No experiments exist which allow direct comparison to the present results. Integration of the present ADCS gives results which are compared to the experimental and theoretical total He targets cross section results. The agreement changes from energy to energy. Theoretical total cross section results exist in the cases involving H targets and are in very poor to fair agreement with the present results. No experimental total cross sections exist in the H target case for comparison with the present results. The most striking feature occurs in the Na('+) + H ADCS. Here the value of the ADCS at zero angle changes by 2 1/2 orders of magnitude from (3.96 (+OR-) 2.00) x 10('-15) cm('2)/sr at 35.9 keV (v = 1/4 a.u.) to (1.03 (+OR-) 0.25) x 10('-12) cm('2)/sr at 143.8 keV (v = 1/2 a.u.). This steep rise in the ADCS at zero angle is interpreted as showing the onset of a direct excitation mechanism (mechanism ii in the QOE literature). Qualitative agreement between previous QOE results (at lower energy using He targets) and the present Na('+) + H results is shown. Massey parameter scaling is shown to supply relatively little information on the ADCS. Finally, the results are probed to show the similarities of the underlying scattering mechanisms. For systems with the same target, the ADCS show quantitatively comparable results implying considerable similarities. Although all the systems are shown to be

  9. Computational simulation and interpretation of the low-lying excited electronic states and electronic spectrum of thioanisole.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaohong L; Xu, Xuefei; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-08-21

    Three singlet states, namely a closed-shell ground state and two excited states with (1)ππ* and (1)nσ* character, have been suggested to be responsible for the radiationless decay or photochemical reaction of photoexcited thioanisole. The correct interpretation of the electronic spectrum is critical for understanding the character of these low-lying excited states, but the experimental spectrum is yet to be fully interpreted. In the work reported here, we investigated the nature of those three states and a fourth singlet state of thioanisole using electronic structure calculations by multireference perturbation theory, by completely-renormalized equation-of-motion coupled cluster theory with single and double excitations and noniterative inclusion of connected triples (CR-EOM-CCSD(T)), and by linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). We clarified the assignment of the electronic spectrum by simulating it using a normal-mode sampling approach combined with TDDFT in the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The understanding of the electronic states and of the accuracy of the electronic structure methods lays the foundation of our future work of constructing potential energy surfaces. PMID:26088195

  10. A Doubles Correction to Electronic Excited States from Configuration Interaction in the Space of Single Substitutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head-Gordon, Martin; Rico, Rudolph J.; Lee, Timothy J.; Oumi, Manabu

    1994-01-01

    A perturbative correction to the method of configuration interaction with single substitutions (CIS) is presented. This CIS(D) correction approximately introduces the effect of double substitutions which are absent in CIS excited states. CIS(D) is a second-order perturbation expansion of the coupled-cluster excited state method, restricted to single and double substitutions, in a series in which CIS is zeroth order, and the first-order correction vanishes. CIS (D) excitation energies are size consistent and the calculational complexity scales with the fifth power of molecular size, akin to second-order Moller-Plesset theory for the ground state. Calculations on singlet excited states of ethylene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, butadiene and benzene show that CIS (D) is a uniform improvement over CIS. CIS(D) appears to be a promising method for examining excited states of large molecules, where more accurate methods are not feasible.

  11. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky; Kas, J. J.; Sponza, Lorenzo; Reshetnyak, Igor; Guzzo, Matteo; Giorgetti, Christine; Gatti, Matteo; Sottile, Francesco; Rehr, J. J.; Reining, Lucia

    2015-11-01

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green's function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green's function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  12. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky Reshetnyak, Igor; Giorgetti, Christine; Sottile, Francesco; Reining, Lucia; Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Sponza, Lorenzo; Guzzo, Matteo; Gatti, Matteo

    2015-11-14

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green’s function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green’s function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  13. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky; Kas, J J; Sponza, Lorenzo; Reshetnyak, Igor; Guzzo, Matteo; Giorgetti, Christine; Gatti, Matteo; Sottile, Francesco; Rehr, J J; Reining, Lucia

    2015-11-14

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green's function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green's function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case. PMID:26567648

  14. Quantum propagation of electronic excitations in macromolecules: A computationally efficient multiscale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, E.; a Beccara, S.; Mascherpa, F.; Faccioli, P.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a theoretical approach to study the quantum-dissipative dynamics of electronic excitations in macromolecules, which enables to perform calculations in large systems and cover long-time intervals. All the parameters of the underlying microscopic Hamiltonian are obtained from ab initio electronic structure calculations, ensuring chemical detail. In the short-time regime, the theory is solvable using a diagrammatic perturbation theory, enabling analytic insight. To compute the time evolution of the density matrix at intermediate times, typically ≲ps , we develop a Monte Carlo algorithm free from any sign or phase problem, hence computationally efficient. Finally, the dynamics in the long-time and large-distance limit can be studied combining the microscopic calculations with renormalization group techniques to define a rigorous low-resolution effective theory. We benchmark our Monte Carlo algorithm against the results obtained in perturbation theory and using a semiclassical nonperturbative scheme. Then, we apply it to compute the intrachain charge mobility in a realistic conjugated polymer.

  15. Minimal-excitation states for electron quan-tum optics using levitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roulleau, Preden; Jullien, Thibaut; Dubois, Julie; Portier, Fabien; Roche, Patrice; Cavanna, Antonella; Jin, Yong; Wegscheider, Werner; Glattli, D. Christian

    2014-03-01

    The on-demand generation of pure quantum excitations is important for the operation of quantum systems, but it is particularly difficult for a system of fermions. This is because any perturbation affects all states below the Fermi energy, resulting in a complex superposition of particle and hole excitations. However, it was predicted nearly 20 years ago that a Lorentzian time-dependent potential with quantized flux generates a minimal excitation with only one particle and no hole. Here we report that such quasiparticles (hereafter termed levitons) can be generated on demand in a conductor by applying voltage pulses to a contact. Partitioning the excitations with an electronic beam splitter generates a current noise that we use to measure their number. Minimal-excitation states are observed for Lorentzian pulses, whereas for other pulse shapes there are significant contributions from holes. Further identification of levitons is provided in the energy domain with shot-noise spectroscopy, and in the time domain with electronic Hong-Ou-Mandel noise correlations.

  16. Electronic Relaxation after Resonant Laser Excitation of Cr in Superfluid Helium Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) atoms embedded into helium nanodroplets (HeN) are ejected from the droplets upon photoexcitation. During ejection they undergo electronic relaxation resulting in bare Cr atoms in various excited states. In a study of the relaxation process we present absorption spectra observed via laser induced fluorescence and beam depletion as well as dispersed fluorescence spectra and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Broad and shifted absorption structures were found for the strong z7P° ← a7S3 and y7P° ← a7S3 excitations from the ground state. Emission lines are, in contrast, very narrow, which indicates that fluorescence is obtained from bare excited Cr atoms after ejection. Upon excitation into the y7P2,3,4° states we observed fluorescence from y7P2°, z5P1,2,3°, and z7P2,3,4°, indicating that these states are populated by electronic relaxation during the ejection processes. Relative population ratios are obtained from the intensities of individual spectral lines. Excitation into the z7P2,3,4° states resulted in fluorescence only from z7P2°. Estimates of the time duration of the ejection process are obtained from time-resolved measurements. PMID:23410146

  17. Fluorescence excitation and ultraviolet absorption spectra and theoretical calculations for benzocyclobutane: Vibrations and structure of its excited S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) electronic state

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Hee Won; Ocola, Esther J.; Laane, Jaan; Kim, Sunghwan

    2014-01-21

    The fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled benzocyclobutane have been recorded and together with its ultraviolet absorption spectra have been used to assign the vibrational frequencies for this molecule in its S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) electronic excited state. Theoretical calculations at the CASSCF(6,6)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory were carried out to compute the structure of the molecule in its excited state. The calculated structure was compared to that of the molecule in its electronic ground state as well as to the structures of related molecules in their S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) electronic states. In each case the decreased π bonding in the electronic excited states results in longer carbon-carbon bonds in the benzene ring. The skeletal vibrational frequencies in the electronic excited state were readily assigned and these were compared to the ground state and to the frequencies of five similar molecules. The vibrational levels in both S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) states were remarkably harmonic in contrast to the other bicyclic molecules. The decreases in the frequencies of the out-of-plane skeletal modes reflect the increased floppiness of these bicyclic molecules in their S{sub 1}(π,π{sup *}) excited state.

  18. Electronic Structure and Dynamics of Higher-Lying Excited States in Light Harvesting Complex 1 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Peter D; Ting, Po-Chieh; Massey, Sara C; Martin, Elizabeth C; Hunter, C Neil; Engel, Gregory S

    2016-06-23

    Light harvesting in photosynthetic organisms involves efficient transfer of energy from peripheral antenna complexes to core antenna complexes, and ultimately to the reaction center where charge separation drives downstream photosynthetic processes. Antenna complexes contain many strongly coupled chromophores, which complicates analysis of their electronic structure. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) provides information on energetic coupling and ultrafast energy transfer dynamics, making the technique well suited for the study of photosynthetic antennae. Here, we present 2DES results on excited state properties and dynamics of a core antenna complex, light harvesting complex 1 (LH1), embedded in the photosynthetic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The experiment reveals weakly allowed higher-lying excited states in LH1 at 770 nm, which transfer energy to the strongly allowed states at 875 nm with a lifetime of 40 fs. The presence of higher-lying excited states is in agreement with effective Hamiltonians constructed using parameters from crystal structures and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies. The energy transfer dynamics between the higher- and lower-lying excited states agree with Redfield theory calculations.

  19. Electronically excited dipole moment of 4-aminobenzonitrile from thermochromic absorption and fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Kukliński, B.; Bojarski, P.

    2006-07-01

    The effect of temperature on absorption and fluorescence spectra of 4-aminobenzonitrile (ABN) in 1,2-dichloroethane is studied for temperature ranging from 296 K to 343 K. The analysis of absorption and fluorescence band shift on the basis of Bilot and Kawski theory [L. Bilot, A. Kawski, Z. Naturforsch. 17a (1962) 621], for the known dipole moment in the ground state μg = 5.92 D, and α/ a3 = 0.5 ( α is the polarizability and a is the Onsager interaction radius of the solute) yields for ABN: (1) the empirical Onsager interaction radius a = 3.3 Å, (2) the dipole moment in the excited S 1 state μe = 7.14 D which agrees very well with the value of μe = 7.20 D obtained by Borst et al. [D.R. Borst, T.M. Korter, D.W. Pratt, Chem. Phys. Lett. 350 (2001) 485] from Stark effect studies. Both values of μe concern free ABN molecule and differ significantly from the values of μg (8.0 D, 8.5 D and 8.3 D in cyclohexane, benzene and 1,4-dioxane, respectively) obtained by Schuddeboom et al. [W. Schuddeboom, S.A. Jonker, J.M. Warman, U. Leinhos, W. Kühnle, K.A. Zachariasse, J. Phys. Chem. 96 (1992) 10809] from the time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements which are solvent-dependent. The group moment additivity law in the case of ABN molecule is approximately applicable, both in the ground and in the excited electronic state.

  20. Structural relaxation dynamics of electronically excited XeArN clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Alexander; Jortner, Joshua

    1997-12-01

    In this article we explore the structural, dynamic, and spectroscopic implications of large local configurational changes in electronically excited Xe*ArN (N=12,54,146,199) heteroclusters, where the Xe* [≡Xe(3P1)] atom is excited to the lowest dipole-allowed extravalence Rydberg excitation. The ultrafast femtosecond and picosecond dynamics driven by the short-range repulsive interaction between the vertically excited Xe* Rydberg and the cluster Ar atoms was studied by molecular dynamics simulations. From the analysis of the time dependence of the structural parameters for site-specific Xe excitations in medium-sized (N=54) and large (N=146,199) clusters, two general configurational relaxation phenomena were established: a "bubble" formation (i.e., a large configurational dilation around Xe*) for Xe interior sites and a "spring" formation (i.e., the stretching of Xe* outside the cluster) for Xe surface sites. General Xe site-specific features of both bubble and spring formation involve ultrashort (Gaussian) energy transfer to the cluster (˜50-100 fs characteristic times τET) inducing configurational relaxation, which manifests a multimodal time solution. The initial (Gaussian) temporal mode (˜150-300 fs characteristic times τ0>τET) is followed by an exponential mode (ps lifetime τ1), with subsequent impact induced, damped vibrational coherence effects with frequencies (ω2,ω3), and exponential decay (ps lifetimes τ2,τ3). The bubble formation for the central site of Xe*Ar146 or Xe*Ar54 is induced by energy transfer of τET≅60 fs followed by subsequent multimodal dilation with τ0≅170 fs and τ1≅2 ps, and a subsequent expansion with coherent motion of vibrational wave packets with ω2,ω3≅20, 40 cm-1 and τ2,τ3≅2, 6 ps. The bubble reaches an equilibrium configuration after ˜10 ps with asymptotic spatial expansion of ΔRb*=0.7-0.8 Å. The spring formation for an exterior surface site of Xe*Ar146 is τET≅80 fs and τ0≅210 fs, which is followed

  1. Doubly excited states of ammonia by scattered electron-ion coincidence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Karin; Sakai, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-01

    To obtain information on the optically forbidden doubly excited states of ammonia (NH3), we performed scattered electron-ion coincidence measurements. First, we observed scattered electrons using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and determined the generalized oscillator strength distribution (GOSD) under 200 eV incident electron energy at a scattering angle of 8°. Ionic GOSDs were also determined by combination with the coincidence signal, which was observed by the time-of-flight mass spectrometer at each energy-loss value, for each ion. The total and partial ionic GOSDs were compared with the experimental results of both photon and fast electron impact. Moreover, the neutral GOSD determined by subtracting the total ionic GOSD from the total was compared with previous results. In addition to the optically forbidden doubly excited states, which were identified by Kato et al (2003 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 36 3541) and Ishikawa et al (2008 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 41 195204), we found a new optically forbidden doubly excited state at around 35 eV.

  2. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.; and others

    2015-12-14

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°–90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  3. Two-dimensional electronic excitations in self-assembled conjugated polymer nanocrystals

    PubMed

    Osterbacka; An; Jiang; Vardeny

    2000-02-01

    Several spectroscopic methods were applied to study the characteristic properties of the electronic excitations in thin films of regioregular and regiorandom polythiophene polymers. In the regioregular polymers, which form two-dimensional lamellar structures, increased interchain coupling strongly influences the traditional one-dimensional electronic properties of the polymer chains. The photogenerated charge excitations (polarons) show two-dimensional delocalization that results in a relatively small polaronic energy, multiple absorption bands in the gap where the lowest energy band becomes dominant, and associated infrared active vibrations with reverse absorption bands caused by electron-vibration interferences. The relatively weak absorption bands of the delocalized polaron in the visible and near-infrared spectral ranges may help to achieve laser action in nanocrystalline polymer devices using current injection.

  4. Two-Dimensional Electronic Excitations in Self-Assembled Conjugated Polymer Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Österbacka, R.; An, C. P.; Jiang, X. M.; Vardeny, Z. V.

    2000-02-01

    Several spectroscopic methods were applied to study the characteristic properties of the electronic excitations in thin films of regioregular and regiorandom polythiophene polymers. In the regioregular polymers, which form two-dimensional lamellar structures, increased interchain coupling strongly influences the traditional one-dimensional electronic properties of the polymer chains. The photogenerated charge excitations (polarons) show two-dimensional delocalization that results in a relatively small polaronic energy, multiple absorption bands in the gap where the lowest energy band becomes dominant, and associated infrared active vibrations with reverse absorption bands caused by electron-vibration interferences. The relatively weak absorption bands of the delocalized polaron in the visible and near-infrared spectral ranges may help to achieve laser action in nanocrystalline polymer devices using current injection.

  5. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.; Blanco, F.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°-90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  6. The repopulation of electronic states upon vibrational excitation of niobium carbide clusters.

    PubMed

    Chernyy, V; Logemann, R; Bakker, J M; Kirilyuk, A

    2016-07-14

    We study the infrared (IR) resonant heating of neutral niobium carbide clusters probed through ultraviolet photoionization spectroscopy. The IR excitation not only changes the photoionization spectra for the photon energies above the ionization threshold, but also modulates ion yield for energies significantly below it. An attempt to describe the experimental spectra using either Fowler's theory or thermally populated vibrational states was not successful. However, the data can be fully modeled by vibrationally and rotationally broadened discrete electronic levels obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The application of this method to spectra with different IR pulse energies not only yields information about the excited electronic states in the vicinity of the HOMO level, populated by manipulation of the vibrational coordinates of a cluster, but also can serve as an extra indicator for the cluster isomeric structure and corresponding DFT-calculated electronic levels.

  7. A plastic scintillator film for an electron beam-excitation assisted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Wataru; Fukuta, Masahiro; Masuda, Yuriko; Nawa, Yasunori; Ono, Atsushi; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-04-01

    A plastic scintillator film for use in an electron beam excitation-assisted (EXA) optical microscope is characterized. The thin film scatters an incident electron beam weakly and generates high intensity nanoscale luminescence excited by the beam spot. For high spatial resolution and signal to noise, an EXA microscope requires a thin high-efficiency scintillator film. Homogeneous plastic scintillators with thicknesses ranging from 60 to 2800 nm were fabricated on silicon nitride via spin coating. The emission intensity was examined as a function of film thickness and the accelerating voltage of the incident electron beam. The emission wavelength can be tuned by changing scintillator materials in the film matrix. To demonstrate a plastic scintillator film performance with an EXA microscope, time-lapse images of yeast cells were acquired.

  8. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1991-12-31

    During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  9. Electronic excitations of bulk LiCl from many-body perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yun-Feng; Wang, Neng-Ping; Rohlfing, Michael

    2013-12-07

    We present the quasiparticle band structure and the optical excitation spectrum of bulk LiCl, using many-body perturbation theory. Density-functional theory is used to calculate the ground-state geometry of the system. The quasiparticle band structure is calculated within the GW approximation. Taking the electron-hole interaction into consideration, electron-hole pair states and optical excitations are obtained by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the electron-hole two-particle Green function. The calculated band gap is 9.5 eV, which is in good agreement with the experimental result of 9.4 eV. And the calculated optical absorption spectrum, which contains an exciton peak at 8.8 eV and a resonant-exciton peak at 9.8 eV, is also in good agreement with experimental data.

  10. Analysis and simulation for a model of electron impact excitation/deexcitation and ionization/recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bokai; Caflisch, Russel E.; Barekat, Farzin; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-15

    This paper describes a kinetic model and a corresponding Monte Carlo simulation method for excitation/deexcitation and ionization/recombination by electron impact in a plasma free of external fields. The atoms and ions in the plasma are represented by continuum densities and the electrons by a particle distribution. A Boltzmann-type equation is formulated and a corresponding H-theorem is formally derived. An efficient Monte Carlo method is developed for an idealized analytic model of the excitation and ionization collision cross sections. To accelerate the simulation, the reduced rejection method and binary search method are used to overcome the singular rate in the recombination process. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the method on spatially homogeneous problems. The evolution of the electron distribution function and atomic states is studied, revealing the possibility under certain circumstances of system relaxation towards stationary states that are not the equilibrium states, a potential non-ergodic behavior.

  11. The repopulation of electronic states upon vibrational excitation of niobium carbide clusters.

    PubMed

    Chernyy, V; Logemann, R; Bakker, J M; Kirilyuk, A

    2016-07-14

    We study the infrared (IR) resonant heating of neutral niobium carbide clusters probed through ultraviolet photoionization spectroscopy. The IR excitation not only changes the photoionization spectra for the photon energies above the ionization threshold, but also modulates ion yield for energies significantly below it. An attempt to describe the experimental spectra using either Fowler's theory or thermally populated vibrational states was not successful. However, the data can be fully modeled by vibrationally and rotationally broadened discrete electronic levels obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The application of this method to spectra with different IR pulse energies not only yields information about the excited electronic states in the vicinity of the HOMO level, populated by manipulation of the vibrational coordinates of a cluster, but also can serve as an extra indicator for the cluster isomeric structure and corresponding DFT-calculated electronic levels. PMID:27421411

  12. The repopulation of electronic states upon vibrational excitation of niobium carbide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyy, V.; Logemann, R.; Bakker, J. M.; Kirilyuk, A.

    2016-07-01

    We study the infrared (IR) resonant heating of neutral niobium carbide clusters probed through ultraviolet photoionization spectroscopy. The IR excitation not only changes the photoionization spectra for the photon energies above the ionization threshold, but also modulates ion yield for energies significantly below it. An attempt to describe the experimental spectra using either Fowler's theory or thermally populated vibrational states was not successful. However, the data can be fully modeled by vibrationally and rotationally broadened discrete electronic levels obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The application of this method to spectra with different IR pulse energies not only yields information about the excited electronic states in the vicinity of the HOMO level, populated by manipulation of the vibrational coordinates of a cluster, but also can serve as an extra indicator for the cluster isomeric structure and corresponding DFT-calculated electronic levels.

  13. Influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function in low-pressure microwave argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yanguas-Gil, A.; Cotrino, J.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

    2005-07-01

    In this work the influence of the excited states on the electron-energy distribution function has been determined for an argon microwave discharge at low pressure. A collisional-radiative model of argon has been developed taking into account the most recent experimental and theoretical values of argon-electron-impact excitation cross sections. The model has been solved along with the electron Boltzmann equation in order to study the influence of the inelastic collisions from the argon excited states on the electron-energy distribution function. Results show that under certain conditions the excited states can play an important role in determining the shape of the distribution function and the mean kinetic energy of the electrons, deplecting the high-energy tail due to inelastic processes from the excited states, especially from the 4s excited configuration. It has been found that from the populations of the excited states an excitation temperature can be defined. This excitation temperature, which can be experimentally determined by optical emission spectroscopy, is lower than the electron kinetic temperature obtained from the electron-energy distribution function.

  14. Wakefield Excitation by a Sequence of Electron Bunches in a Rectangular Waveguide Lined with Dielectric Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, V. A.; Linnik, A. F.; Marshall, T. C.; Onishchenko, I. N.; Onishchenko, N. I.; Sotnikov, G. V.; Uskov, V. V.

    2006-11-01

    A rectangular dielectric-lined metallic structure was studied that has an advantage over a cylindrical structure from the possibility of exciting by a sequence of bunches many equally-spaced modes, thereby building up a larger mode-locked wakefield. A rectangular vacuum copper waveguide was lined with two dielectric slabs, the size of which was calculated to provide resonant excitation of the fundamental LSM mode by a sequence of bunches with repetition frequency f0=2805 MHz, produced by linear resonant electron accelerator (4.5 MeV, number of bunches 6.103, diameter 1cm, duration 60 ps each, distance between bunches 300 ps, number of electrons in each bunch 109). The waveguide has cross section 85 mm × 180 mm, and Teflon (ɛ = 2.1) plates were placed along the smaller sides of the waveguide, their thickness from the calculation being 22 mm. In experiments, the length of the resonator was 535mm. We found that the total wakefield is three times larger than the fundamental mode; thus a greater number of excited modes was excited compared with the cylindrical case, for which this ratio was only 1.5. We found considerably more energy loss of electron bunches for the resonator case compared with the waveguide case.

  15. A proposal for fs-electron microscopy experiments on high-energy excitations in solids.

    PubMed

    Piazza, L; Musumeci, P; Luiten, O J; Carbone, Fabrizio

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in ultrafast technology enable both the study and the control of materials properties thanks to the ability to record high temporal resolution movies of their transformations, or the ability to generate new states of matter by selecting ad hoc an excitation to drive the system out of equilibrium. The holy grail of this type of experiments is to combine a high tuneability of the excitation with a wide observation window. For example, this is achieved in multidimensional optical spectroscopy where the response to several excitation energies is monitored in a broad energy range by a large bandwidth optical pulse. In this article, the possibility to combine the chemical sensitivity of intense tuneable X-rays pulses from a free electron laser, with the wide range of observables available in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope is discussed. The requirements for such experiments are quantified via estimates based on state of the art experiments and simulations, and it is proposed that ultrafast electron imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy experiments can be performed in combination with a chemically selective X-ray excitation of materials. PMID:24631423

  16. Infrared/ultraviolet quadruple resonance spectroscopy to investigate structures of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, M.; Bartl, K.; Gerhards, M.

    2012-03-21

    Molecular beam investigations in combination with IR/UV spectroscopy offer the possibility to obtain structural information on isolated molecules and clusters. One of the demanding tasks is the discrimination of different isomers, e.g., by the use of isomer specific UV excitations. If this discrimination fails due to overlaying UV spectra of different isomers, IR/IR methods offer another possibility. Here, we present a new IR/UV/IR/UV quadruple resonance technique to distinguish between different isomers especially in the electronically excited state. Due to the IR spectra, structural changes and photochemical pathways in excited states can be assigned and identified. The method is applied to the dihydrated cluster of 3-hydroxyflavone which has been investigated as photochemically relevant system and proton wire model in the S{sub 1} state. By applying the new IR/UV/IR/UV technique, we are able to show experimentally that both in the electronic ground (S{sub 0}) and the electronically excited state (S{sub 1}) two isomers have to be assigned.

  17. The electronic origin and vibrational levels of the first excited singlet state of isocyanic acid (HNCO)

    SciTech Connect

    Berghout, H. Laine; Crim, F. Fleming; Zyrianov, Mikhail; Reisler, Hanna

    2000-04-15

    The combination of vibrationally mediated photofragment yield spectroscopy, which excites molecules prepared in single vibrational states, and multiphoton fluorescence spectroscopy, which excites molecules cooled in a supersonic expansion, provides detailed information on the energetics and vibrational structure of the first excited singlet state (S{sub 1}) of isocyanic acid (HNCO). Dissociation of molecules prepared in individual vibrational states by stimulated Raman excitation probes vibrational levels near the origin of the electronically excited state. Detection of fluorescence from dissociation products formed by multiphoton excitation through S{sub 1} of molecules cooled in a supersonic expansion reveals the vibrational structure at higher energies. Both types of spectra show long, prominent progressions in the N-C-O bending vibration built on states with different amounts of N-C stretching excitation and H-N-C bending excitation. Analyzing the spectra locates the origin of the S{sub 1} state at 32 449{+-}20 cm{sup -1} and determines the harmonic vibrational frequencies of the N-C stretch ({omega}{sub 3}=1034{+-}20 cm{sup -1}), the H-N-C bend ({omega}{sub 4}=1192{+-}19 cm{sup -1}), and the N-C-O bend ({omega}{sub 5}=599{+-}7 cm{sup -1}), values that are consistent with several ab initio calculations. The assigned spectra strongly suggest that the N-C stretching vibration is a promoting mode for internal conversion from S{sub 1} to S{sub 0}. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Dissociative recombination and vibrational excitation of BF+ in low energy electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezei, J. Zs; Colboc, F.; Pop, N.; Ilie, S.; Chakrabarti, K.; Niyonzima, S.; Lepers, M.; Bultel, A.; Dulieu, O.; Motapon, O.; Tennyson, J.; Hassouni, K.; Schneider, I. F.

    2016-10-01

    The latest molecular data—potential energy curves and Rydberg-valence interactions—characterising the super-excited electronic states of BF are reviewed in order to provide the input for the study of their fragmentation dynamics. Starting from this input, the main paths and mechanisms of BF+ dissociative recombination and vibrational excitation are analysed. Their cross sections are computed for the first time using a method based on the multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT), and Maxwellian rate-coefficients are calculated and displayed in ready-to-be-used format for low temperature plasma kinetics simulations.

  19. Observation of a Rydberg series of CO in the two-electron excited region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.

    1982-01-01

    Using synchrotron radiation as a continuum background, the absorption spectrum of CO in the 380-470 A range was taken by using a double ion chamber. A Rydberg series in the 450 A (27.5 eV) region has been observed to converge to the F 2Pi, a two-electron excited state of CO(+). The series limit determined at 28.11 eV is in excellent agreement with the vertical ionization potential of the F 2Pi state measured by the high resolution photoelectron spectroscopy. A few dissociation processes leading to the productions of atomic ions and excited atomic fragments are also discussed.

  20. Unusual angular momentum transfer in electron-impact excitation of neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, L. R.; Campbell, C.; Khakoo, M. A.; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2012-05-01

    We report results from a joint experimental and theoretical study of the angular momentum transfer in electron-impact excitation of the (2p6)1S0→(2p53s)1P1 resonance transition in Ne. Both the measured and calculated data show the circular light polarization P3 to be positive for an incident energy of 25 eV at scattering angles below 40∘. This observation implies a negative angular momentum transfer L⊥, which is the opposite sign of orientation expected from a well-known propensity rule for S→P excitation at small scattering angles.

  1. Superexchange coupling and electron transfer in globular proteins via polaron excitations.

    PubMed

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D; Ustitnin, M N

    2000-06-01

    The polaron approach is used to treat long-range electron transfersbetween globular proteins. A rate expression for the polaron transfer model is given along with a description of appropriate conditions forits use. Assuming that electrons transfer via a superexchange couplingdue to a polaron excitation, we have estimated the distance dependenceof the rate constant for the self-exchange reactions between globularproteins in solutions. The distance dependence of the polaron coupling andsolvent reorganization energy are provided as a basis forunderstanding and interpreting a long-range electron transfer experiment.The difficulties and problems of the polaron treatment of long-rangeelectron transfers are discussed, and suggestions for new experimentsare made.

  2. Excitation density distribution in electron-beam-pumped ZnSe semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Donskoi, E N; Zalyalov, A N; Petrushin, O N; Savel'ev, Yu A; Tarasov, M D; Shigaev, Yu S; Zhdanova, E V; Zverev, M M; Peregudov, D V; Ivanov, S V; Sedova, I V; Sorokin, S V

    2008-12-31

    The spatial density distribution of the absorbed energy in ZnSe semiconductor lasers excited by electrons with energies from 2 keV to 1 MeV is calculated by the Monte-Carlo method. Approximate analytic expressions determining the absorbed energy of electrons in ZnSe are presented. The pump power threshold in a semiconductor quantum-well ZnSe structure is experimentally determined. The lasing threshold in such structures is estimated as a function of the electron energy. (active media)

  3. Spatial distribution of fluorescent light emitted from neon and nitrogen excited by low energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A.; Kruecken, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wieser, J.

    2006-11-01

    Side-view intensity profiles of fluorescent light were measured for neon and nitrogen excited with 12 keV electron beams at gas pressures from 250 to 1400 hPa. The intensity profiles were compared with theoretical profiles calculated using the CASINO program which performs Monte Carlo simulations of electron scattering. It was assumed that the spatial distribution of fluorescent intensity is directly proportional to the spatial distribution of energy loss by primary electrons. The comparison shows good correlation of experimental data and the results of numeric simulations.

  4. Influence of environment induced correlated fluctuations in electronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer dynamics in model photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F.

    2012-03-01

    Two-dimensional photon-echo experiments indicate that excitation energy transfer between chromophores near the reaction center of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides occurs coherently with decoherence times of hundreds of femtoseconds, comparable to the energy transfer time scale in these systems. The original explanation of this observation suggested that correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies, driven by large scale protein motions could result in long lived coherent energy transfer dynamics. However, no significant site energy correlation has been found in recent molecular dynamics simulations of several model light harvesting systems. Instead, there is evidence of correlated fluctuations in site energy-electronic coupling and electronic coupling-electronic coupling. The roles of these different types of correlations in excitation energy transfer dynamics are not yet thoroughly understood, though the effects of site energy correlations have been well studied. In this paper, we introduce several general models that can realistically describe the effects of various types of correlated fluctuations in chromophore properties and systematically study the behavior of these models using general methods for treating dissipative quantum dynamics in complex multi-chromophore systems. The effects of correlation between site energy and inter-site electronic couplings are explored in a two state model of excitation energy transfer between the accessory bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in a reaction center system and we find that these types of correlated fluctuations can enhance or suppress coherence and transfer rate simultaneously. In contrast, models for correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies show enhanced coherent dynamics but necessarily show decrease in excitation energy transfer rate accompanying such coherence enhancement. Finally, for a three state model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen light

  5. Nonadiabtic electron dynamics in densely quasidegenerate states in highly excited boron cluster.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2016-04-28

    Following the previous study on nonadiabatic reaction dynamics including boron clusters [T. Yonehara and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A520 (2012)], we explore deep into highly excited electronic states of the singlet boron cluster (B12) to find the characteristic features of the densely quasi-degenerate electronic state manifold, which undergo very frequent nonadiabatic transitions and thereby intensive electronic state mixing among very many of the relevant states. So much so, isolating the individual adiabatic states and tracking the expected potential energy surfaces both lose the physical sense. This domain of molecular situation is far beyond the realm of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. To survey such a violent electronic state-mixing, we apply a method of nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics, the semiclassical Ehrenfest method. We have tracked those electron wavepackets and found the electronic state mixing looks like an ultrafast diffusion in the Hilbert space, which results in huge fluctuation. Furthermore, due to such a violent mixing, the quantum phases associated with the electronic states are swiftly randomized, and consequently the coherence among the electronic states are lost quickly. Besides, these highly excited states are mostly of highly poly-radical nature, even in the spin singlet manifold and the number of radicals amounts up to 10 electrons in the sense of unpaired electrons. Thus the electronic states are summarized to be poly-radical and decoherent with huge fluctuation in shorter time scales of vibrational motions. The present numerical study sets a theoretical foundation for unknown molecular properties and chemical reactivity of such densely quasi-degenerate chemical species. PMID:27131547

  6. Nonadiabtic electron dynamics in densely quasidegenerate states in highly excited boron cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    Following the previous study on nonadiabatic reaction dynamics including boron clusters [T. Yonehara and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A520 (2012)], we explore deep into highly excited electronic states of the singlet boron cluster (B12) to find the characteristic features of the densely quasi-degenerate electronic state manifold, which undergo very frequent nonadiabatic transitions and thereby intensive electronic state mixing among very many of the relevant states. So much so, isolating the individual adiabatic states and tracking the expected potential energy surfaces both lose the physical sense. This domain of molecular situation is far beyond the realm of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. To survey such a violent electronic state-mixing, we apply a method of nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics, the semiclassical Ehrenfest method. We have tracked those electron wavepackets and found the electronic state mixing looks like an ultrafast diffusion in the Hilbert space, which results in huge fluctuation. Furthermore, due to such a violent mixing, the quantum phases associated with the electronic states are swiftly randomized, and consequently the coherence among the electronic states are lost quickly. Besides, these highly excited states are mostly of highly poly-radical nature, even in the spin singlet manifold and the number of radicals amounts up to 10 electrons in the sense of unpaired electrons. Thus the electronic states are summarized to be poly-radical and decoherent with huge fluctuation in shorter time scales of vibrational motions. The present numerical study sets a theoretical foundation for unknown molecular properties and chemical reactivity of such densely quasi-degenerate chemical species.

  7. Scalable Methods for Electronic Excitations and Optical Responses in Nanostructures: Mathematics to Algorithms to Observables

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Chelikowsky

    2009-03-31

    The work reported here took place at the University of Minnesota from September 15, 2003 to November 14, 2005. This funding resulted in 10 invited articles or book chapters, 37 articles in refereed journals and 13 invited talks. The funding helped train 5 PhD students. The research supported by this grant focused on developing theoretical methods for predicting and understanding the properties of matter at the nanoscale. Within this regime, new phenomena occur that are characteristic of neither the atomic limit, nor the crystalline limit. Moreover, this regime is crucial for understanding the emergence of macroscopic properties such as ferromagnetism. For example, elemental Fe clusters possess magnetic moments that reside between the atomic and crystalline limits, but the transition from the atomic to the crystalline limit is not a simple interpolation between the two size regimes. To capitalize properly on predicting such phenomena in this transition regime, a deeper understanding of the electronic, magnetic and structural properties of matter is required, e.g., electron correlation effects are enhanced within this size regime and the surface of a confined system must be explicitly included. A key element of our research involved the construction of new algorithms to address problems peculiar to the nanoscale. Typically, one would like to consider systems with thousands of atoms or more, e.g., a silicon nanocrystal that is 7 nm in diameter would contain over 10,000 atoms. Previous ab initio methods could address systems with hundreds of atoms whereas empirical methods can routinely handle hundreds of thousands of atoms (or more). However, these empirical methods often rely on ad hoc assumptions and lack incorporation of structural and electronic degrees of freedom. The key theoretical ingredients in our work involved the use of ab initio pseudopotentials and density functional approaches. The key numerical ingredients involved the implementation of algorithms for

  8. Electron Attachment in Low-Energy Electron Elastic Collisions with Au and Pt Atoms: Identification of Excited Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Eure, A.; Felfli, Z.; Sokolovski, D.

    2009-11-01

    The recent Regge-pole methodology has been benchmarked [1] on the accurately measured binding energies of the excited Ge= and Sn= anions [2] through the binding energies (BEs) extracted from the Regge-pole calculated elastic total cross sections (TCSs). Here the methodology is applied together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential that incorporates the vital core polarization interaction to investigate the possibility of forming excited Au= and Pt= anions in low-energy electron elastic collisions with Au and Pt atoms. From the positions of the characteristic extremely narrow resonances in the total cross sections, we extract the binding energies of the excited Au= and Pt= anions formed as Regge resonances during the collisions. The angular life of the complexes thus formed is used to differentiate the stable excited bound states of the anions from the shape resonances [3]. The BEs for the excited Au= and Pt= anions are found to be 0.475eVand 0.543eV, respectively, challenging both theory and experiment to verify. [1] A. Msezane et al, Phys. Rev. A, Submitted (2009) [2] M. Scheer et al, Phys. Rev. A 58, 2844 (1998) [3] Z. Felfli et al, Phys. Rev. A 79, 012714 (2009)

  9. Multidirectional Angular Electronic Flux during Adiabatic Attosecond Charge Migration in Excited Benzene.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Gunter; Liu, ChunMei; Manz, Jörn; Paulus, Beate; Pérez-Torres, Jhon Fredy; Pohl, Vincent; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-07-14

    Recently, adiabatic attosecond charge migration (AACM) has been monitored and simulated for the first time, with application to the oriented iodoacetylene cation where AACM starts from the initial superposition of the ground state (φ0) and an electronic excited state (φ1). Here, we develop the theory for electronic fluxes during AACM in ring-shaped molecules, with application to oriented benzene prepared in the superposition of the ground and first excited singlet states. The initial state and its time evolution are analogous to coherent tunneling where φ0 and φ1 have different meanings; however, they denote the wave functions of the lowest tunneling doublet. This analogy suggests to transfer the theory of electronic fluxes during coherent tunneling to AACM, with suitable modifications which account for (i) the different time scales and (ii) the different electronic states, and which make use of (iii) the preparation of the initial state for AACM by a linearly polarized laser pulse. Application to benzene yields the multidirectional angular electronic flux with a pincer-motion type pattern during AACM: this unequivocal result confirms a previous working hypothesis. Moreover, the theory of AACM allows quantification of the electronic flux; that is, the maximum number of electrons (out of 42) which flow concertedly during AACM in benzene is 6 × 0.08 = 0.48.

  10. Fast electronic relaxation in metal nanoclusters via excitation of coherent shape deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresin, Vitaly V.; Ovchinnikov, Yu. N.

    2006-03-01

    Electron-phonon relaxation in size-quantized systems may become inhibited when the spacing of discrete electron energy levels exceeds the magnitude of the phonon frequency. We show, however, that nanoclusters can support a fast nonradiative relaxation channel which derives from their distinctive ability to undergo Jahn-Teller shape deformations. Such a deformation represents a collective and coherent vibrational excitation and enables electronic transitions to occur without a multiphonon bottleneck. We analyze this mechanism for a metal cluster within the analytical framework of a three-dimensional potential well undergoing a spheroidal distortion. An expression for the time evolution of the distortion parameter is derived, the electronic level crossing condition formulated, and the probability of electronic transition at a level crossing is evaluated. An application to electron-hole recombination in a closed-shell aluminum cluster with 40 electrons shows that the short (˜250fs) excitation lifetime observed in recent pump-probe experiments can be explained by the proposed mechanism.

  11. Excited state intramolecular proton transfer in electron-rich and electron-poor derivatives of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline.

    PubMed

    Piechowska, Joanna; Huttunen, Kirsi; Wróbel, Zbigniew; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Gryko, Daniel T

    2012-10-01

    Eight previously inaccessible derivatives of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline were prepared via a straightforward strategy comprising formation of the benzo[h]quinoline skeleton followed by C-H acetoxylation at position 10. The occurrence of excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) was detected in all cases since emission was observed only from the excited keto-tautomer. Studies on derivatives bearing both electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups adjacent to the pyridine ring allowed us to identify some design patterns giving rise to NIR emission and large Stokes shifts. For a derivative of 10-hydroxybenzo[c]acridine, emission at 745 nm was observed, one of the lowest energy fluorescence ever reported for ESIPT system. On the basis of time-resolved measurements, proton transfer was found to be extremely fast with time constants in the range (0.08-0.45 ps). PMID:22946783

  12. Photoionization of Co+ and electron-impact excitation of Co2 + using the Dirac R-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyndall, N. B.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Ballance, C. P.; Hibbert, A.

    2016-11-01

    Modelling of massive stars and supernovae (SNe) plays a crucial role in understanding galaxies. From this modelling we can derive fundamental constraints on stellar evolution, mass-loss processes, mixing, and the products of nucleosynthesis. Proper account must be taken of all important processes that populate and depopulate the levels (collisional excitation, de-excitation, ionization, recombination, photoionization, bound-bound processes). For the analysis of Type Ia SNe and core collapse SNe (Types Ib, Ic and II) Fe group elements are particularly important. Unfortunately little data is currently available and most noticeably absent are the photoionization cross-sections for the Fe-peaks which have high abundances in SNe. Important interactions for both photoionization and electron-impact excitation are calculated using the relativistic Dirac atomic R-matrix codes (DARC) for low-ionization stages of Cobalt. All results are calculated up to photon energies of 45 eV and electron energies up to 20 eV. The wavefunction representation of Co III has been generated using GRASP0 by including the dominant 3d7, 3d6[4s, 4p], 3p43d9 and 3p63d9 configurations, resulting in 292 fine structure levels. Electron-impact collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths across a wide range of astrophysically relevant temperatures are computed for Co III. In addition, statistically weighted level-resolved ground and metastable photoionization cross-sections are presented for Co II and compared directly with existing work.

  13. The effect of excitation wavelength on dynamics of laser-produced tin plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.; Campos, D.; Sizyuk, V.; Hough, P.

    2011-03-15

    We investigated the effect of the excitation wavelength on the density evolution of laser-produced tin plasmas, both experimentally and numerically. For producing plasmas, Sn targets were excited with either 10.6 {mu}m CO{sub 2} laser or 1.06 {mu}m Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet laser; both are considered to be potential excitation lasers for extreme ultraviolet lithography laser-produced plasma light sources. The electron density of the plasma during the isothermal expansion regime was estimated using an interferometric technique. The Stark broadening of isolated singly-ionized emission was employed for deducing the density during the plasma adiabatic expansion regime. Our results indicate that the excitation source wavelength determines the initial density of the plasma, as well the plume expansion dynamics. Numerical simulation using HEIGHTS simulation package agrees well with the experimentally measured density profile.

  14. Inelastic electron and Raman scattering from the collective excitations in quantum wires: Zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2013-04-01

    The nanofabrication technology has taught us that an m-dimensional confining potential imposed upon an n-dimensional electron gas paves the way to a quasi-(n-m)-dimensional electron gas, with m ⩽ n and 1 ⩽ n, m ⩽ 3. This is the road to the (semiconducting) quasi-n dimensional electron gas systems we have been happily traversing on now for almost two decades. Achieving quasi-one dimensional electron gas (Q-1DEG) [or quantum wire(s) for more practical purposes] led us to some mixed moments in this journey: while the reduced phase space for the scattering led us believe in the route to the faster electron devices, the proximity to the 1D systems left us in the dilemma of describing it as a Fermi liquid or as a Luttinger liquid. No one had ever suspected the potential of the former, but it took quite a while for some to convince the others on the latter. A realistic Q-1DEG system at the low temperatures is best describable as a Fermi liquid rather than as a Luttinger liquid. In the language of condensed matter physics, a critical scrutiny of Q-1DEG systems has provided us with a host of exotic (electronic, optical, and transport) phenomena unseen in their higher- or lower-dimensional counterparts. This has motivated us to undertake a systematic investigation of the inelastic electron scattering (IES) and the inelastic light scattering (ILS) from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wires. We begin with the Kubo's correlation functions to derive the generalized dielectric function, the inverse dielectric function, and the Dyson equation for the dynamic screened potential in the framework of Bohm-Pines' random-phase approximation. These fundamental tools then lead us to develop methodically the theory of IES and ILS for the Q-1DEG systems. As an application of the general formal results, which know no bounds regarding the subband occupancy, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum [comprised of intrasubband and

  15. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Is as Accurate as CASPT2 for Electronic Excitation.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Chad E; Ghosh, Soumen; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2016-02-01

    A correct description of electronically excited states is critical to the interpretation of visible-ultraviolet spectra, photochemical reactions, and excited-state charge-transfer processes in chemical systems. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory and a new kind of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here, we show that MC-PDFT with a first-generation on-top density functional performs as well as CASPT2 for an organic chemistry database including valence, Rydberg, and charge-transfer excitations. The results are very encouraging for practical applications. PMID:26794241

  16. Electron-impact ionization cross sections out of the ground and excited states of cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Lukomski, M.; Sutton, S.; Kedzierski, W.; Reddish, T. J.; Bartschat, K.; Bartlett, P. L.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.; McConkey, J. W.

    2006-09-15

    An atom trapping technique for determining absolute, total ionization cross sections (TICS) out of an excited atom is presented. The unique feature of our method is in utilizing Doppler cooling of neutral atoms to determine ionization cross sections. This fluorescence-monitoring experiment, which is a variant of the 'trap loss' technique, has enabled us to obtain the experimental electron impact ionization cross sections out of the Cs state between 7 eV and 400 eV. CCC, RMPS, and Born theoretical results are also presented for both the ground and excited states of cesium and rubidium. In the low energy region (<11 eV) where best agreement between these excited state measurements and theory might be expected, a discrepancy of approximately a factor of five is observed. Above this energy there are significant contributions to the TICS from both autoionization and multiple ionization.

  17. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J.

    2012-11-15

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  18. Low-Energy Electron Impact Excitation of the (010) Bending Mode of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Low-energy electron impact excitation of the fundamental modes of CO2 has been extensively studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Much attention has been paid to the virtual state feature in the the (100) mode excitation and the (sup 2)II(sub upsilon) resonance feature around 3.8 eV, which is observable in all three fundamental modes. For the excitation of the (010) mode away from the resonance region, the Born dipole approximation was generally considered adequate. The present study employs the Born dipole approximation to treat the long range interaction and the Schwinger multichannel method for the short range interaction. The roles of the two interaction potentials will be compared.

  19. Gapped excitations of unconventional fractional quantum Hall effect states in the second Landau level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurstbauer, U.; Levy, A. L.; Pinczuk, A.; West, K. W.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; Manfra, M. J.; Gardner, G. C.; Watson, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    We report the observation of low-lying collective charge and spin excitations in the second Landau level at ν =2 +1 /3 and also for the very fragile states at ν =2 +2 /5 and 2 +3 /8 in inelastic light scattering experiments. These modes exhibit a clear dependence on filling factor and temperature substantiating the unique access to the characteristic neutral excitation spectra of the incompressible fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) states. A detailed mode analysis reveals low-energy modes at around 70 μ eV and a sharp mode slightly below the Zeeman energy interpreted as gap and spin-wave excitation, respectively. The lowest-energy collective charge excitation spectrum at ν =2 +1 /3 exhibits significant qualitative similarities with its cousin state in the lowest Landau level at ν =1 /3 suggesting similar magnetoroton minima in the neutral excitations. The mode energies differ by a scaling of 0.15 indicating different interaction physics in the N =0 and N =1 Landau levels. The striking polarization dependence in elastic and inelastic light scattering is discussed in the framework of anisotropic electron phases that allow for the stabilization of nematic FQHE states. The observed excitation spectra provide new insights by accessing quantum phases in the bulk of electron systems and facilitate comparison with different theoretical descriptions of those enigmatic FQHE states.

  20. Coherent and Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Graphene Surface Plasmon Polarirons Excited by Cyclotron Electron Beam.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tao; Gong, Sen; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Liu, Diwei; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinran; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Peiheng; Liu, Shenggang

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation can revolutionize modern science and technology. To this date, it remains big challenges to develop intense, coherent and tunable THz radiation sources that can cover the whole THz frequency region either by means of only electronics (both vacuum electronics and semiconductor electronics) or of only photonics (lasers, for example, quantum cascade laser). Here we present a mechanism which can overcome these difficulties in THz radiation generation. Due to the natural periodicity of 2π of both the circular cylindrical graphene structure and cyclotron electron beam (CEB), the surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) dispersion can cross the light line of dielectric, making transformation of SPPs into radiation immediately possible. The dual natural periodicity also brings significant excellences to the excitation and the transformation. The fundamental and hybrid SPPs modes can be excited and transformed into radiation. The excited SPPs propagate along the cyclotron trajectory together with the beam and gain energy from the beam continuously. The radiation density is enhanced over 300 times, up to 10(5) W/cm(2). The radiation frequency can be widely tuned by adjusting the beam energy or chemical potential. This mechanism opens a way for developing desired THz radiation sources to cover the whole THz frequency regime. PMID:26525516

  1. Coherent and Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Graphene Surface Plasmon Polarirons Excited by Cyclotron Electron Beam

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tao; Gong, Sen; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Liu, Diwei; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinran; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Peiheng; Liu, Shenggang

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation can revolutionize modern science and technology. To this date, it remains big challenges to develop intense, coherent and tunable THz radiation sources that can cover the whole THz frequency region either by means of only electronics (both vacuum electronics and semiconductor electronics) or of only photonics (lasers, for example, quantum cascade laser). Here we present a mechanism which can overcome these difficulties in THz radiation generation. Due to the natural periodicity of 2π of both the circular cylindrical graphene structure and cyclotron electron beam (CEB), the surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) dispersion can cross the light line of dielectric, making transformation of SPPs into radiation immediately possible. The dual natural periodicity also brings significant excellences to the excitation and the transformation. The fundamental and hybrid SPPs modes can be excited and transformed into radiation. The excited SPPs propagate along the cyclotron trajectory together with the beam and gain energy from the beam continuously. The radiation density is enhanced over 300 times, up to 105 W/cm2. The radiation frequency can be widely tuned by adjusting the beam energy or chemical potential. This mechanism opens a way for developing desired THz radiation sources to cover the whole THz frequency regime. PMID:26525516

  2. Coherent and Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Graphene Surface Plasmon Polarirons Excited by Cyclotron Electron Beam.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tao; Gong, Sen; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Liu, Diwei; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinran; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Peiheng; Liu, Shenggang

    2015-11-03

    Terahertz (THz) radiation can revolutionize modern science and technology. To this date, it remains big challenges to develop intense, coherent and tunable THz radiation sources that can cover the whole THz frequency region either by means of only electronics (both vacuum electronics and semiconductor electronics) or of only photonics (lasers, for example, quantum cascade laser). Here we present a mechanism which can overcome these difficulties in THz radiation generation. Due to the natural periodicity of 2π of both the circular cylindrical graphene structure and cyclotron electron beam (CEB), the surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) dispersion can cross the light line of dielectric, making transformation of SPPs into radiation immediately possible. The dual natural periodicity also brings significant excellences to the excitation and the transformation. The fundamental and hybrid SPPs modes can be excited and transformed into radiation. The excited SPPs propagate along the cyclotron trajectory together with the beam and gain energy from the beam continuously. The radiation density is enhanced over 300 times, up to 10(5) W/cm(2). The radiation frequency can be widely tuned by adjusting the beam energy or chemical potential. This mechanism opens a way for developing desired THz radiation sources to cover the whole THz frequency regime.

  3. Angular momentum and orientation effects in excitation-ionization collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. L.; Esposito, T. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present theoretical fully differential cross sections (FDCS) for electron-impact excitation-ionization of helium in which the final state He+ ion is oriented in a particular direction. Specifically, we study the process for He+ ions in the 2p0 state. Using our 4-body distorted wave model, we show a strong dependence of the FDCS on the ion’s orientation and trace some unexpected structures in the FDCS to the L = 2 term in the partial wave expansion for the ionized electron. A comparison is drawn to the ionization of oriented Mg (3p0) atoms, and unlike that process, we find that for excitation-ionization angular momentum must be transferred from either the projectile or the target atom.

  4. Tracking the charge and spin dynamics of electronic excited states in inorganic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, Kelly

    2015-03-01

    Inorganic complexes have many advantageous properties for solar energy applications, including strong visible absorption and photocatalytic activity. Whether used as a photocatalyst or a photosensitizer, the lifetime of electronic excited states and the earth abundance of the molecular components represent a key property for solar energy applications. These dual needs have undermined the usefulness of many coordination compounds. Isoelectronic iron and ruthenium based complexes represent a clear example. Ru-polypyridal based molecules have been the workhorse of solar energy related research and dye sensitized solar cells for decades, but the replacement of low abundance Ru with Fe leads to million-fold reductions in metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state lifetimes. Understanding the origin of this million-fold reduction in lifetime and how to control excited state relaxation in 3d-metal complexes motivates the work I will discuss. We have used the spin sensitivity of hard x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and the intense femtosecond duration pulses generated by the LCLS x-ray laser to probe the spin dynamics in a series of electronically excited [Fe(CN)6-2N(2,2'-bipyridine)N]2 N - 4 complexes, with N = 1-3. These femtosecond resolution measurements demonstrate that modification of the solvent and ligand environment can lengthen the MLCT excited state lifetime by more than two orders of magnitude. They also verify the role of triplet ligand field excited states in the spin crossover dynamics from singlet to quintet spin configurations. Work supported by the AMOS program within the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Differential effects of plasma membrane electric excitation on H+ fluxes and photosynthesis in characean cells.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Kamzolkina, Natalia A

    2006-10-01

    Cells of characean algae exposed to illumination arrange plasma-membrane H(+) fluxes and photosynthesis in coordinated spatial patterns (bands). This study reveals that H(+) transport and photosynthesis patterns in these excitable cells are affected not only by light conditions but also by electric excitation of the plasma membrane. It is shown that generation of action potential (AP) temporally eliminates alkaline bands, suppresses O(2) evolution, and differentially affects primary reactions of photosystem II (PSII) in different cell regions. The quantum yield of PSII electron transport decreased after AP in the alkaline but not in acidic cell regions. The effects of electric excitation on fluorescence and the PSII electron flow were most pronounced at light-limiting conditions. Evidence was obtained that the shift in chlorophyll fluorescence after AP is due to the increase in DeltapH at thylakoid membranes. It is concluded that the AP-triggered pathways affecting ion transport and photosynthetic energy conversion are linked but not identical.

  6. R-matrix electron-impact excitation data for the Be-like iso-electronic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Menchero, L.; Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2014-06-01

    Aims: Emission lines from ions in the Be-like isoelectronic sequence can be used for reliable diagnostics of temperature and density of astrophysical and fusion plasmas over a wide range of temperatures. Surprisingly, interpolated data is all that is available for a number of astrophysically important ions. Methods: We have carried out intermediate coupling frame transformation R-matrix calculations which include a total of 238 fine-structure levels in both the configuration interaction target and close-coupling collision expansions. These arise from the configurations 1s2 2 {s, p} nl with n = 3-7, and l = 0-4 for n ≤ 5 and l = 0-2 for n = 6,7. Results: We obtain ordinary collision strengths and Maxwell-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of all the ions of the Be-like sequence, from B+ to Zn26+. We compare with previous R-matrix calculations and interpolated values for some benchmark ions. We find good agreement for transitions n = 2-2 with previous R-matrix calculations but some disagreements with interpolated values. We also find good agreement for the most intense transitions n = 2-3 which contribute via cascade to the (n = 2) diagnostic radiating levels. These data are made available in the archives of APAP via http://www.apap-network.org and OPEN-ADAS via http://open.adas.ac.uk

  7. Level-resolved R-matrix calculations for the electron-impact excitation of Ne3+ and Ne6+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlow, J. A.; Lee, T. G.; Ballance, C. P.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2011-08-01

    Large-scale R-matrix calculations are carried out for the electron-impact excitation of Ne3+ and Ne6+. For Ne3+, a 581-LSJ-level R-matrix intermediate coupling frame transformation calculation is made for excitations up to the n=4 shell. For some transitions, large effective collision strength differences are found with current 23-jKJ-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix and earlier 22-LSJ-level R-matrix jj omega (JAJOM) calculations. For Ne6+, a 171-jKJ-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculation is made for excitations up to the n=5 shell. For some transitions, large effective collision strength differences are found with current 46-jKJ-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix and earlier 46-LSJ-level R-matrix JAJOM calculations. Together with existing R-matrix calculations for other ion stages, high-quality excitation data are now available for astrophysical and laboratory plasma modeling along the entire Ne isonuclear sequence.

  8. Effects of vortex excitation on the response of flexible risers

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Takashi; Hobbs, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    A new approach to vortex shedding, incorporating lift forces by a quasi-steady model, is used to evaluate the effects of vortex excitation. The modeled lift forces are used directly as a part of the external forces in the equations of motion. The effects of the vortex excitation on the flexible riser are presented by comparing the results derived in analyses with and without lift forces. Lift forces produce small lateral vibrations of the riser, and cause larger displacements under current and wave loading because of the larger effective drag coefficient. Even though the vibration amplitudes are modest, the associated bending stresses are not insignificant in the context of fatigue.

  9. Experimental and computational studies on the electronic excited states of nitrobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnakumar, Sunanda; Das, Asim Kumar; Singh, Param Jeet; Shastri, Aparna; Rajasekhar, B. N.

    2016-11-01

    The gas phase electronic absorption spectrum of nitrobenzene (C6H5NO2) in the 4.5-11.2 eV region is recorded using synchrotron radiation with a view to comprehend the nature of the excited states. Electronic excited states of nitrobenzene are mainly classified as local excitations within the benzene ring or nitro group and charge transfer excitations between the benzene and nitro group, with some transitions showing percentage from both. The nature of molecular orbitals, their orderings and energies are obtained from density functional theory calculations which help in assigning partially assigned/unassigned features in earlier photoelectron spectroscopy studies. Optimized geometry of ionic nitrobenzene predicts redistribution of charge density in the benzene ring rather than the nitro group resulting in stabilization of the benzene ring π orbitals in comparison to the neutral molecule. Time dependent density functional theory computations are found to describe the experimental spectra well with respect to energies, relative intensities and nature of the observed transitions in terms of valence, Rydberg or charge transfer type. New insights into the interpretation of 1B2u←1A1g and 1B1u←1A1g shifted benzene transitions in light of the present computational calculations are presented. The first few members of the ns, np and nd type Rydberg series in nitrobenzene, converging to the first six ionization potentials, identified in the spectra as weak but sharp peaks are reported for the first time. In general, transitions to the lowest three unoccupied molecular orbitals 4b1, 3a2 and 5b1 are valence or charge transfer in nature, while excitations to higher orbitals are predominantly Rydberg in nature. This work presents a consolidated experimental study and theoretical interpretation of the electronic absorption spectrum of nitrobenzene.

  10. Contribution of electronically excited states to the radiation chemistry of organic systems. Progress report, July 1, 1985-February 28, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Lipsky, S.

    1986-01-01

    The attachment of thermal electrons by cyclic perfluorocarbons has been shown to enhance the photocurrent from TMPD in solvents in which the electron thermalization range is low. The effect has been studied with perfluorodecalin and perfluoromethylcyclohexane in n-pentane and n-hexane as a function of scavenger concentration, excitation energy and applied electric field strength. The mechanism of the effect suggests a technique for separating epithermal from thermal electron scavenging processes. Contact charge transfer absorption maxima have been located in six hydrocarbon-cyclic perfluorocarbon systems, and correlate well with the known gas-phase ionization potentials of the hydrocarbon. Concentration studies indicate one to one complexes when the hydrocarbon is dissolved in a perfluorocarbon solvent. Fluorescence quantum yields and fluorescence spectra have been obtained for cyclopentane, cycloheptane, cyclooctane, cyclodecane and a number of their alkyl derivatives.

  11. Electronic excitation of molecules in solution calculated using the symmetry-adapted cluster–configuration interaction method in the polarizable continuum model

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Ryoichi Ehara, Masahiro

    2015-12-31

    The effects from solvent environment are specific to the electronic states; therefore, a computational scheme for solvent effects consistent with the electronic states is necessary to discuss electronic excitation of molecules in solution. The PCM (polarizable continuum model) SAC (symmetry-adapted cluster) and SAC-CI (configuration interaction) methods are developed for such purposes. The PCM SAC-CI adopts the state-specific (SS) solvation scheme where solvent effects are self-consistently considered for every ground and excited states. For efficient computations of many excited states, we develop a perturbative approximation for the PCM SAC-CI method, which is called corrected linear response (cLR) scheme. Our test calculations show that the cLR PCM SAC-CI is a very good approximation of the SS PCM SAC-CI method for polar and nonpolar solvents.

  12. Electronically Excited States of Anisotropically Extended Singly-Deprotonated PAH Anions.

    PubMed

    Theis, Mallory L; Candian, Alessandra; Tielens, Alexander G G M; Lee, Timothy J; Fortenberry, Ryan C

    2015-12-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) play a significant role in the chemistry of the interstellar medium (ISM) as well as in hydrocarbon combustion. These molecules can have high levels of diversity with the inclusion of heteroatoms and the addition or removal of hydrogens to form charged or radical species. There is an abundance of data on the cationic forms of these molecules, but there have been many fewer studies on the anionic species. The present study focuses on the anionic forms of deprotonated PAHs. It has been shown in previous work that PAHs containing nitrogen heteroatoms (PANHs) have the ability to form valence excited states giving anions electronic absorption features. This work analyzes how the isoelectronic pure PAHs behave under similar structural constructions. Singly deprotonated forms of benzene, naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene classes are examined. None of the neutral-radicals possess dipole moments large enough to support dipole-bound excited states in their corresponding closed-shell anions. Even though the PANH anion derivatives support valence excited states for three-ringed structures, it is not until four-ringed structures of the pure PAH anion derivatives that valence excited states are exhibited. However, anisotropically extended PAHs larger than tetracene will likely exhibit valence excited states. The relative energies for the anion isomers are very small for all of the systems in this study.

  13. Influence of peculiarities of electronic excitation relaxation on luminescent properties of MgWO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutyak, N. R.; Spassky, D. A.; Tupitsyna, I. A.; Dubovik, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Luminescent properties of magnesium tungstate monocrystals grown by two different methods are studied. Only the exciton luminescence of these crystals themselves is observed. Temperature dependence of the low-energy range in the luminescence excitation spectra is described by the Urbach rule. Slope coefficient σ0 = 0.74 obtained from this dependence implies autolocalization of the excitons in MgWO4. The processes of electronic excitations relaxation are considered depending on the structure of valence band in MgWO4 and in other wolframites, ZnWO4 and CdWO4. In contrast to ZnWO4 and CdWO4, the d-states of the cation do not participate in formation of the MgWO4 valence band. Using the excitation spectra measured in the range of the fundamental absorption (4-20 eV), it is shown that this difference manifests itself in relaxation of electronic excitations and may be the cause of the relatively low light yield of MgWO4.

  14. Recombination and Electron Impact Excitation Rate Coefficients for S XV and S XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, S.; Ali, S.; Orban, I.; Tashenov, S.; Lindroth, E.; Schuch, R.

    2012-08-01

    Recombination and electron impact excitation of S14+ and S15+ ions was measured at the Stockholm refrigerated electron beam ion trap. The collision energy range was 1.4-3 keV, in which we covered the KLL, KLM, KLN, and KLO dielectronic recombination resonances resulting in S13+ and S14+ ions. The recombination rates were obtained by detecting the charge state distribution with a newly developed time-of-flight technique. Resonance energies and cross-sections calculated within the relativistic many-body perturbation theory for S15+ agree well with the experimental data. The temperature-dependent rate coefficients were extracted from the measured rates and compared with calculations from the literature used for studies of collisionally ionized astrophysical plasmas. Good agreement for S15+ was obtained, while the plasma rates for S14+ were 23% lower than the current published values. In addition to the time-of-flight spectra, the X-ray spectra, produced mainly by photo-recombination and excitation, were also collected. The combination of these two measurements allowed us to separate the photo-recombination and the excitation spectra, and the excitation rate coefficients for summed intensities with known fractions of S14+ and S15+ ions were extracted.

  15. Transition from three-dimensional anisotropic spin excitations to two-dimensional spin excitations by electron doping the FeAs-based BaFe1.96Ni0.04As2 superconductor.

    PubMed

    Harriger, Leland W; Schneidewind, Astrid; Li, Shiliang; Zhao, Jun; Li, Zhengcai; Lu, Wei; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhou, Fang; Zhao, Zhongxian; Hu, Jiangping; Dai, Pengcheng

    2009-08-21

    We use neutron scattering to study the effect of electron doping on the structural or magnetic order in BaFe2As2. In the undoped state, BaFe2As2 exhibits simultaneous structural and magnetic phase transitions below 143 K. Upon electron doping to form BaFe1.96Ni0.04As2, the system first displays the lattice distortion near approximately 97 K, and then orders antiferromagnetically at 91 K before developing weak superconductivity below approximately 15 K. The effect of electron doping is to reduce the c-axis exchange coupling in BaFe2As2 and induce quasi-two-dimensional (2D) spin excitations. These results suggest that the transition from 3D spin waves to quasi-2D spin excitations by electron doping is important for the separated structural and magnetic phase transitions in iron arsenides.

  16. Electron dynamics and prompt ablation of aluminum surface excited by intense femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Makarov, S. V.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Thin aluminum film homogeneously heated by intense IR femtosecond laser pulses exhibits on the excitation timescale consequent fluence-dependent rise and drop of the IR-pump self-reflectivity, followed by its final saturation at higher fluences F > 0.3 J/cm2. This prompt optical dynamics correlates with the initial monotonic increase in the accompanying laser-induced electron emission, which is succeeded by its non-linear (three-photon) increase for F > 0.3 J/cm2. The underlying electronic dynamics is related to the initial saturation of IR resonant interband transitions in this material, followed by its strong instantaneous electronic heating via intraband transitions during the pump pulse resulting in thermionic emission. Above the threshold fluence of 0.3 J/cm2, the surface electronic heating is balanced during the pump pulse by simultaneous cooling via intense plasma removal (prompt ablation). The relationship between the deposited volume energy density in the film and its prompt electronic temperature derived from the self-reflection measurements using a Drude model, demonstrates a kind of electron "liquid-vapor" phase transition, driven by strong cubic optical non-linearity of the photo-excited aluminum.

  17. Multiple-Auger electron ejection after inner-shell ionization and excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Viefhaus, Jens

    2003-01-24

    Results on the Auger decay of core-ionized and core-exited Ar atoms above the Ar 2p threshold and at the Ar 2p3/2 {yields}3d resonance leading to double and triple ionization states are presented. Using a multiple time-of-flight analyzer arrangement for electron-electron coincidences, we directly observe for the first time a double Auger continuum following core electron ionization. Our results show clear evidence for continuously distributed Auger electron intensity over a 160 eV range of kinetic energies. This double Auger decay represents roughly 10 % of the normal single Auger channels. In the case of the resonant Auger decay we also observe a two-electron continuum of the same order of magnitude as in the non-resonant case which can be explained due to the existence of excited states of the doubly charged ion in the vicinity or just above the triple ionization threshold. In the latter case these states can further decay via emission of a low kinetic energy electron, which makes it possible to study the electron emission characteristics of the triple electron process. Both double- and triple-electron emission Auger processes will make it possible to study electron correlations undisturbed by the symmetry properties of the photoabsorption process.

  18. Effect of Turbulence Modeling on an Excited Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Hixon, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The flow dynamics in a high-speed jet are dominated by unsteady turbulent flow structures in the plume. Jet excitation seeks to control these flow structures through the natural instabilities present in the initial shear layer of the jet. Understanding and optimizing the excitation input, for jet noise reduction or plume mixing enhancement, requires many trials that may be done experimentally or computationally at a significant cost savings. Numerical simulations, which model various parts of the unsteady dynamics to reduce the computational expense of the simulation, must adequately capture the unsteady flow dynamics in the excited jet for the results are to be used. Four CFD methods are considered for use in an excited jet problem, including two turbulence models with an Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver, one Large Eddy Simulation (LES) solver, and one URANS/LES hybrid method. Each method is used to simulate a simplified excited jet and the results are evaluated based on the flow data, computation time, and numerical stability. The knowledge gained about the effect of turbulence modeling and CFD methods from these basic simulations will guide and assist future three-dimensional (3-D) simulations that will be used to understand and optimize a realistic excited jet for a particular application.

  19. Two-Photon Study on the Electronic Interactions between the First Excited Singlet States in Carotenoid-Tetrapyrrole Dyads

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Pen-Nan; Pillai, Smitha; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; Walla, Peter J.

    2011-03-22

    Electronic interactions between the first excited states (S1) of carotenoids (Car) of different conjugation lengths (8-11 double bonds) and phthalocyanines (Pc) in different Car-Pc dyad molecules were investigated by two-photon spectroscopy and compared with Car S1-chlorophyll (Chl) interactions in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes (LHCs). The observation of Chl/Pc fluorescence after selective two-photon excitation of the Car S1 state allowed sensitive monitoring of the flow of energy between Car S1 and Pc or Chl. It is found that two-photon excitation excites to about 80% to 100% exclusively the carotenoid state Car S1 and that only a small fraction of direct tetrapyrrole two-photon excitation occurs. Amide-linked Car-Pc dyads in tetrahydrofuran demonstrate a molecular gear shift mechanism in that effective Car S1 → Pc energy transfer is observed in a dyad with 9 double bonds in the carotenoid, whereas in similar dyads with 11 double bonds in the carotenoid, the Pc fluorescence is strongly quenched by Pc → Car S1 energy transfer. In phenylamino-linked Car-Pc dyads in toluene extremely large electronic interactions between the Car S1 state and Pc were observed, particularly in the case of a dyad in which the carotenoid contained 10 double bonds. This observation together with previous findings in the same system provides strong evidence for excitonic Car S1-Pc Qy interactions. Very similar results were observed with photosynthetic LHC II complexes in the past, supporting an important role of such interactions in photosynthetic down-regulation.

  20. Hot-electron-mediated desorption rates calculated from excited-state potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Thomas; Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for desorption induced by (multiple) electronic transitions [DIET (DIMET)] based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on various transition-metal surfaces and show that classical nuclear dynamics does not suffice for propagation in the excited state. We present a simple Hamiltonian describing the system with parameters obtained from the excited-state potential energy surface and show that this model can describe desorption dynamics in both the DIET and DIMET regimes and reproduce the power-law behavior observed experimentally. We observe that the internal stretch degree of freedom in the molecules is crucial for the energy transfer between the hot electrons and the molecule when the coupling to the surface is strong.

  1. Excited states of the high-frequency vibrational modes and kinetics of ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barykov, V. Yu.; Ivanov, A. I.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the carrier frequency of the exciting laser pulse on the kinetics of intramolecular photoinduced charge transfer in the multi-channel stochastic model is studied. It is shown that the population of different states of high-frequency intramolecular modes upon varying the frequency of the excitation pulse can considerably alter the rate constant of ultrafast charge transfer. It is found that a negative vibrational spectral effect is expected in the vicinity of a barrier-free area (the rate constant of photoinduced charge transfer decreases along with the carrier frequency of the excitation pulse), while a positive effect is predicted in areas of high and low exergonicity (an inverse dependence). It is concluded that the value of the spectral effect falls along with the time of vibrational relaxation. For ultrafast photo-induced charge transfer, however, it remains considerable up to relaxation times of 100 fs.

  2. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds. PMID:21141866

  3. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds.

  4. Polarized pump--probe spectroscopy of electronic excitation transport in photosynthetic antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, W.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Polarized pump--probe spectroscopy was performed with 1.5--2 psec resolution on the bacteriochlorophyll a protein antenna complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii and on native and enriched photosystem I particles from spinach. The resulting photobleaching profiles reflect the details of singlet electronic-excitation transport in these photosynthetic antennas, in which the pigments are complexed by proteins into clusters of five or more chromophores.

  5. Search for resonant electron transfer and double excitation in Kr{sup 34+} + H{sub 2} collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zaharakis, K.E.; Haar, R.R.; Tanis, J.A.; Clark, M.W.; Plano, V.L.

    1992-12-31

    Resonant electron transfer and double excitation (RME) is a correlated electron process which is expected to occur in an ion-atom collision when electron capture is accompanied by the simultaneous excitation of two inner-shell electrons. RT2 is similar to resonant transfer excitation (RTE) in which only a single electron is excited. RT2E was investigated experimentally for 38--42 MeV/u Kr{sup 34} + H{sub 2} collisions by observing x-ray emission associated with single-electron capture. No events associated with Kr K x rays (near 13 keV were observed; however, events do occur at about twice (> 22 keV) the Kr K x-ray energy. Several possible sources of these latter x rays have been considered.

  6. Comparison of Magnetic Field-Modified Electronic Excitations in Ni(II) Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Virginia; Schundler, E. C.; Makumbe, P. O.; Wei, X.; Landry, B. R.; Maxcy, K. R.; Turnbull, M. M.; Landee, C. P.

    2006-03-01

    NTDN (Ni[tn]2[NO2]2) can be considered a paramagnetic analog material to the Haldane compounds NENP and NENB (Ni[en]2NO2ClO4 and Ni[en]2NO2BF4; where en = C2N2H8 and tn = C2N3H10). Except for the different bonding of one NO2 group and the absence or presence of spin chains, NTDN and the Haldane compounds have nearly identical electronic coordination around the Ni^2+ ions. Here, we report and compare the magnetic field (H)-dependent polarized optical transmittance of the three materials in the range 9,000 to 22,000 cm-1. The H dependence is manifest in the varying intensities of certain electronic absorptions with applied field. Although all three materials possess similar H- sensitive excitations, the details of the H dependence differ with the magnetic ground states. In NTDN, the intensity changes commence at H = 0 and saturate at 10 T, whereas in the Haldane compounds, the onset of changes is at the gap- closing critical field, HC, above which the intensity is linearly modified with field. The mechanism of the H- dependence is yet to be clarified and probably depends on the nature of the electronic excitation. Intensity variations with applied field are observed in both Ni^2+-to-NO2^- charge transfer transitions and Ni^2+ d-d spin forbidden excitations.

  7. Production of O2 on icy satellites by electronic excitation of low-temperature water ice.

    PubMed

    Sieger, M T; Simpson, W C; Orlando, T M

    1998-08-01

    The signature of condensed molecular oxygen has been reported in recent optical-reflectance measurements of the jovian moon Ganymede, and a tenuous oxygen atmosphere has been observed on Europa. The surfaces of these moons contain large amounts of water ice, and it is thought that O2 is formed by the sputtering of ice by energetic particles from the jovian magnetosphere. Understanding how O2 might be formed from low-temperature ice is crucial for theoretical and experimental simulations of the surfaces and atmospheres of icy bodies in the Solar System. Here we report laboratory measurements of the threshold energy, cross-section and temperature dependence of O2 production by electronic excitation of ice in vacuum, following electron-beam irradiation. Molecular oxygen is formed by direct excitation and dissociation of a stable precursor molecule, rather than (as has been previously thought) by diffusion and chemical recombination of precursor fragments. The large cross-section for O2 production suggests that electronic excitation plays an important part in the formation of O2 on Ganymede and Europa. PMID:9707116

  8. The formation of electronically excited species in the human multiple myeloma cell suspension

    PubMed Central

    Rác, Marek; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, evidence is provided on the formation of electronically excited species in human multiple myeloma cells U266 in the growth medium exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Two-dimensional imaging of ultra-weak photon emission using highly sensitive charge coupled device camera revealed that the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension caused the formation of triplet excited carbonyls 3(R = O)*. The kinetics of 3(R = O)* formation in the real time, as measured by one-dimensional ultra-weak photon emission using low-noise photomultiplier, showed immediate enhancement followed by a slow decay. In parallel to the formation of 3(R = O)*, the formation of singlet oxygen (1O2) in U266 cells caused by the addition of H2O2 was visualized by the imaging of 1O2 using the green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Additionally, the formation of 1O2 after the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension was detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy using 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone. Presented results indicate that the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension results in the formation of 3(R = O)* and 1O2 in U266 cell suspension. The contribution of the cell-free medium to the formation of electronically excited species was discussed. PMID:25744165

  9. Proton coupled electron transfer from the excited state of a ruthenium(II) pyridylimidazole complex.

    PubMed

    Pannwitz, Andrea; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-04-28

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) from the excited state of [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; pyimH = 2-(2'-pyridyl)imidazole) to N-methyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (monoquat, MQ(+)) was studied. While this complex has been investigated previously, our study is the first to show that the formal bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of the imidazole-N-H bond decreases from (91 ± 1) kcal mol(-1) in the electronic ground state to (43 ± 5) kcal mol(-1) in the lowest-energetic (3)MLCT excited state. This makes the [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) complex a very strong (formal) hydrogen atom donor even when compared to metal hydride complexes, and this is interesting for light-driven (formal) hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions with a variety of different substrates. Mechanistically, formal HAT between (3)MLCT excited [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) and monoquat in buffered 1 : 1 (v : v) CH3CN/H2O was found to occur via a sequence of reaction steps involving electron transfer from Ru(ii) to MQ(+) coupled to release of the N-H proton to buffer base, followed by protonation of reduced MQ(+) by buffer acid. Our study is relevant in the larger contexts of photoredox catalysis and light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:27094541

  10. Quantum mechanical study of the coupling of plasmon excitations to atomic-scale electron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Song Peng; Nordlander, Peter; Gao Shiwu

    2011-02-21

    The coupling of optical excitation and electron transport through a sodium atom in a plasmonic dimer junction is investigated using time-dependent density functional theory. The optical absorption and dynamic conductance is determined as a function of gap size. Surface plasmons are found to couple to atomic-scale transport through several different channels including dipolar, multipolar, and charge transfer plasmon modes. These findings provide insight into subnanoscale couplings of plasmons and atoms, a subject of general interest in plasmonics and molecular electronics.

  11. Dissociative attachment of electrons to vibronically excited SO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.V.K.; Ashoka, V.S.; Krishnakumar, E.

    2004-11-01

    Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to vibronically excited SO{sub 2} in the Clements' band in the 288 to 298 nm region has been studied. The O{sup -} ion yield, to a first approximation, follows the photo absorption spectrum in this range indicating the DEA process to be independent of the vibrational levels in this band. This is in contrast to what is generally observed for vibrational level dependence from the electronic ground state. The current measurements also do not show any qualitative change in the dissociative attachment process due to change of symmetry as one moves from the peaks to the valleys of the Clements band.

  12. Enhancement of Curie temperature of barium hexaferrite by dense electronic excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manju; Kashyap, Subhash C.; Gupta, Hem C.; Dimri, Mukesh C.; Asokan, K.

    2014-07-15

    Curie temperature of polycrystalline barium hexaferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}), prepared by conventional solid state technique, is anomalously and significantly enhanced (by nearly 15%) by energetic heavy ion irradiation (150 MeV, Ag{sup 12+}) at ambient temperature due to dense electronic excitations Moderate fluence (1 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) induces structural defects giving rise to above enhancement. As established by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman studies, higher fluence (1 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}) has structurally transformed the sample to amorphous phase with marginal change in magnetization and Curie temperature.

  13. Electromagnetic diffraction radiation of a subwavelength-hole array excited by an electron beam.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shenggang; Hu, Min; Zhang, Yaxin; Li, Yuebao; Zhong, Renbin

    2009-09-01

    This paper explores the physics of the electromagnetic diffraction radiation of a subwavelength holes array excited by a set of evanescent waves generated by a line charge of electron beam moving parallel to the array. Activated by a uniformly moving line charge, numerous physical phenomena occur such as the diffraction radiation on both sides of the array as well as the electromagnetic penetration or transmission below or above the cut-off through the holes. As a result the subwavelength holes array becomes a radiation array. Making use of the integral equation with relevant Green's functions, an analytical theory for such a radiation system is built up. The results of the numerical calculations based on the theory agree well with that obtained by the computer simulation. The relation among the effective surface plasmon wave, the electromagnetic penetration or transmission of the holes and the diffraction radiation is revealed. The energy dependence of and the influence of the hole thickness on the diffraction radiation and the electromagnetic penetration or transmission are investigated in detail. Therefore, a distinct diffraction radiation phenomenon is discovered.

  14. Excitations in a spin-polarized two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreil, Dominik; Hobbiger, Raphael; Drachta, Jürgen T.; Böhm, Helga M.

    2015-11-01

    A remarkably long-lived spin plasmon may exist in two-dimensional electron liquids with imbalanced spin-up and spin-down population. The predictions for this interesting mode by Agarwal et al. [Phys. Rev. B 90, 155409 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.155409] are based on the random phase approximation. Here, we show how to account for spin-dependent correlations from known ground-state pair correlation functions and study the consequences on the various spin-dependent longitudinal response functions. The spin-plasmon dispersion relation and its critical wave vector for Landau damping by minority spins turn out to be significantly lower. We further demonstrate that spin-dependent effective interactions imply a rich structure in the excitation spectrum of the partially spin-polarized system. Most notably, we find a "magnetic antiresonance," where the imaginary part of both, the spin-spin as well as the density-spin response function vanish. The resulting minimum in the double-differential cross section is awaiting experimental confirmation.

  15. Detecting excitation and magnetization of individual dopants in a semiconductor two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Jens

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic atoms doped into a semiconductor are the building blocks for bottom up spintronic and quantum logic devices. They also provide model systems for the investigation of fundamental effects. In order to correlate the dopant's atomic structure with its magnetism magnetically sensitive techniques with atomic resolution are a prerequisite. Here, I show electrical excitation and read-out [ 1 ] of single magnetic dopant associated spins in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) confined to a semiconductor surface [ 2 ] using spin-resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy [ 3 ] . I will review our real-space study of the quantum Hall transition in the 2DEG [ 2 ] and of the magnetic properties of the dopants [ 1 ] . Finally, I will demonstrate that the dopant serves as an atomic scale probe for local magnetometry of the 2DEG. This work was done in collaboration with A. A. Khajetoorians, B. Chillian, S. Schuwalow, F. Lechermann, K. Hashimoto, C. Sohrmann, T. Inaoka, F. Meier, Y. Hirayama, R. A. Römer, M. Morgenstern, and R. Wiesendanger. [ 1 ] A. A. Khajetoorians et al., Nature 467, 1084 (2010). [ 2 ] K. Hashimoto et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 256802 (2008). [ 3 ] J. Wiebe et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 4871 (2004). We acknowledge financial support from ERC Advanced Grant ``FURORE'', by the DFG via SFB668 and GrK1286, and by the city of Hamburg via the cluster of excellence ``Nanospintronics''.

  16. R-matrix electron-impact excitation data for astrophysically abundant sulphur ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, G. Y.; Badnell, N. R.; Zhao, G.; Zhong, J. Y.; Wang, F. L.

    2011-09-01

    We present results for the electron-impact excitation of highly-charged sulphur ions (S8+-S11+) obtained using the intermediate-coupling frame transformation R-matrix approach. A detailed comparison of the target structure has been made for the four ions to assess the uncertainty on collision strengths from the target structure. Effective collision strengths (Υs) are presented at temperatures ranging from 2 × 102(z + 1)2 K to 2 × 106(z + 1)2 K (where z is the residual charge of ions). Detailed comparisons for the Υs are made with the results of previous calculations for these ions, which will pose insight on the uncertainty in their usage by astrophysical and fusion modelling codes. Data are available in the archives of APAP via http://www.apap-network.org, and OPEN-ADAS via http://open.adas.ac.uk. Data and full Tables 5 and 6 are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/533/A87

  17. Differential cross sections for intermediate-energy electron scattering from α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol: Excitation of electronic-states

    SciTech Connect

    Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Thorn, P. A.; Pettifer, Z.; Duque, H. V.; Silva, G. B. da; Limão-Vieira, P.; Duflot, D.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; and others

    2014-07-14

    We report on measurements of differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of Rydberg electronic-states in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). The energy range of these experiments was 20–50 eV, while the scattered electron was detected in the 10°–90° angular range. There are currently no other experimental data or theoretical computations against which we can directly compare the present measured results. Nonetheless, we are able to compare our THFA DCSs with earlier cross section measurements for Rydberg-state electronic excitation for tetrahydrofuran, a similar cyclic ether, from Do et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144302 (2011)]. In addition, “rotationally averaged” elastic DCSs, calculated using our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction approach are also reported. Those latter results give integral cross sections consistent with the optical theorem, and supercede those from the only previous study of Milosavljević et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 40, 107 (2006)].

  18. Three-dimensional simulation of whistler mode excited by the Spacelab 2 electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, L. A.; Huang, C. Y.

    1989-01-01

    During the Spacelab 2 mission, while an electron beam was being ejected from the Shuttle, the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) detected a clear funnel-shaped emission that is believed to be caused by whistler-mode emission from the electron beam. In order to understand the mechanism of this emission, simulations with a three-dimensional partially magnetostatic code have been performed. The simulation results show that whistler-mode and lower hybrid waves are excited by the electron beam, which is initially localized in the column in the three-dimensional simulation system, and that they propagate away from the beam. The wave spectra of the electric and magnetic fields diagnosed at some points show several peaks due to the waves excited by the electron beam. The frequency range of these spectra is in qualitative agreement with the PDP data. The intense narrowband electrostatic emission near the electron plasma frequency is observed by the simulations. The simulation results show that the beam instability is responsible for the generation mechanism of these emissions.

  19. The speeds of electrons that excite solar radio bursts of type III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Goldman, M. V.; Steinberg, J. L.; Hoang, S.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence is presented that solar type III radio bursts at kilometric wavelengths are excited by electrons with average speeds of 0.14 c; i.e., in good agreement with in situ measurements by Lin et al. (1981; 1986), but considerably lower than the generally accepted values of 0.3 to 0.5 c. A set of 28 bursts for which electrons and/or plasma waves were observed at ISEE-3 is examined, and it is found that the initial parts of all bursts were due to plasma radiation at the fundamental, and that the fastest electrons that produce radio emission range from 0.25 c down to 0.07 c (average 0.14 c). The slower electrons, those that produce fundamental radiation at approximately the time of burst peak, have an average speed of 0.06 c and a range from about 0.10 c down to 0.03 c.There is no evidence in the data for a systematic increase or decrease of exciting electron speed with distance from the sun.

  20. An experimental and theoretical investigation into the excited electronic states of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D. B.; Chiari, L.; Silva, G. B. da; Neves, R. F. C.; Duque, H. V.; Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; and others

    2014-08-21

    We present experimental electron-energy loss spectra (EELS) that were measured at impact energies of 20 and 30 eV and at angles of 90° and 10°, respectively, with energy resolution ∼70 meV. EELS for 250 eV incident electron energy over a range of angles between 3° and 50° have also been measured at a moderate energy resolution (∼0.9 eV). The latter spectra were used to derive differential cross sections and generalised oscillator strengths (GOS) for the dipole-allowed electronic transitions, through normalization to data for elastic electron scattering from benzene. Theoretical calculations were performed using time-dependent density functional theory and single-excitation configuration interaction methods. These calculations were used to assign the experimentally measured spectra. Calculated optical oscillator strengths were also compared to those derived from the GOS data. This provides the first investigation of all singlet and triplet excited electronic states of phenol up to the first ionization potential.

  1. The electronic structure of VO in its ground and electronically excited states: A combined matrix isolation and quantum chemical (MRCI) study

    SciTech Connect

    Hübner, Olaf; Hornung, Julius; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2015-07-14

    The electronic ground and excited states of the vanadium monoxide (VO) molecule were studied in detail. Electronic absorption spectra for the molecule isolated in Ne matrices complement the previous gas-phase spectra. A thorough quantum chemical (multi-reference configuration interaction) study essentially confirms the assignment and characterization of the electronic excitations observed for VO in the gas-phase and in Ne matrices and allows the clarification of open issues. It provides a complete overview over the electronically excited states up to about 3 eV of this archetypical compound.

  2. R-matrix electron-impact excitation data for the Li-like iso-electronic sequence including Auger and radiation damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, G. Y.; Badnell, N. R.

    2011-04-01

    We present results for the electron-impact excitation of all Li-like ions from Be+ to Kr33+ which we obtained using the radiation- and Auger-damped intermediate-coupling frame transformation R-matrix approach. We have included both valence- and core-electron excitations up to the 1s25l and 1s2l4l' levels, respectively. A detailed comparison of the target structure and collision data has been made for four specific ions (O5+, Ar15+, Fe23+ and Kr33+) spanning the sequence so as to assess the accuracy for the entire sequence. Effective collision strengths (Υs) are presented at temperatures ranging from 2 × 102(z + 1)2 K to 2 × 106(z + 1)2 K (where z is the residual charge of the ions, i.e. Z - 3). Detailed comparisons for the Υs are made with the results of previous calculations for several ions which span the sequence. The radiation and Auger damping effects were explored for core-excitations along the iso-electronic sequence. Furthermore, we examined the iso-electronic trends of effective collision strengths as a function of temperature. These data are made available in the archives of APAP via http://www.apap-network.org, OPEN-ADAS via http://open.adas.ac.uk, as well as anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/528/A69

  3. Rotational and vibrational dynamics in the excited electronic state of deprotonated and protonated fluorescein studied by time-resolved photofragmentation in an ion trap

    PubMed Central

    Imanbaew, Dimitri; Gelin, Maxim F.; Riehn, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Excited state dynamics of deprotonated and protonated fluorescein were investigated by polarization dependent femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe photofragmentation in a 3D ion trap. Transients of deprotonated fluorescein exhibit vibrational wavepacket dynamics with weak polarization dependence. Transients of protonated fluorescein show only effects of molecular alignment and rotational dephasing. The time resolved rotational anisotropy of protonated fluorescein is simulated by the calculated orientational correlation function. The observed differences between deprotonated and protonated fluorescein are ascribed to their different higher lying electronically excited states and corresponding structures. This is partially supported by time-dependent density functional theory calculations of the excited state structures. PMID:27376104

  4. Rotational and vibrational dynamics in the excited electronic state of deprotonated and protonated fluorescein studied by time-resolved photofragmentation in an ion trap.

    PubMed

    Imanbaew, Dimitri; Gelin, Maxim F; Riehn, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Excited state dynamics of deprotonated and protonated fluorescein were investigated by polarization dependent femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe photofragmentation in a 3D ion trap. Transients of deprotonated fluorescein exhibit vibrational wavepacket dynamics with weak polarization dependence. Transients of protonated fluorescein show only effects of molecular alignment and rotational dephasing. The time resolved rotational anisotropy of protonated fluorescein is simulated by the calculated orientational correlation function. The observed differences between deprotonated and protonated fluorescein are ascribed to their different higher lying electronically excited states and corresponding structures. This is partially supported by time-dependent density functional theory calculations of the excited state structures. PMID:27376104

  5. Superexchange coupling and electron transfer in globular proteins via polaron excitations.

    PubMed

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D; Ustitnin, M N

    1999-06-01

    The polaron approach is used to treat long-range electron transfers between globular proteins. A rate expression for the polaron transfer model is given along with a description of appropriate conditions for its use. Assuming that electrons transfer via a superexchange coupling due to a polaron excitation, we have estimated the distance dependence of the rate constant for the self-exchange reactions between globular proteins in solutions. The distance dependence of the polaron coupling and solvent reorganization energy are provided as a basis for understanding and interpreting a long-range electron transfer experiment. The difficulties and problems of the polaron treatment of long-range electron transfers are discussed, and suggestions for new experiments are made.

  6. Probing electron-phonon excitations in molecular junctions by quantum interference.

    PubMed

    Bessis, C; Della Rocca, M L; Barraud, C; Martin, P; Lacroix, J C; Markussen, T; Lafarge, P

    2016-02-11

    Electron-phonon coupling is a fundamental inelastic interaction in condensed matter and in molecules. Here we probe phonon excitations using quantum interference in electron transport occurring in short chains of anthraquinone based molecular junctions. By studying the dependence of molecular junction's conductance as a function of bias voltage and temperature, we show that inelastic scattering of electrons by phonons can be detected as features in conductance resulting from quenching of quantum interference. Our results are in agreement with density functional theory calculations and are well described by a generic two-site model in the framework of non-equilibrium Green's functions formalism. The importance of the observed inelastic contribution to the current opens up new ways for exploring coherent electron transport through molecular devices.

  7. Chiral Enhanced Phonon Excitations in Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natterer, Fabian Donat

    2015-03-01

    In graphene, phonons are important agents for a wide range of phenomena; they mediate relaxation rates for hot carriers, they lead to van-Hove singularities, and they induce a renormalization of the Fermi velocity due to electron-phonon coupling and many-body interactions. The previous observations of phonons by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) have been expandable in terms of detail and resolution, due to weak signals and other spectral features which inhibit a clear distinction between phonons and miscellaneous excitations. We find that utilizing a back gated graphene device, where the graphene charge carrier density can be varied in magnitude and sign, allows all the critical point graphene phonons with large density of states to be sampled by IETS with the scanning tunneling microscope, and in good agreement with density functional calculations. In addition, a strong overtone excitation at 360 meV is observed. Quite surprisingly, we observe all the graphene excitations are resonantly enhanced when the charge carrier type is switched, indicating that this amplification occurs whenever the inelastic transition allows a change in the graphene chirality. The chiral enhancement is observed to follow a linear trend with energy and reaches almost an order of magnitude for the highest transition. Our averaging technique suppresses charge carrier dependent excitations, while it improves the signal for inelastic transitions. This approach can be employed as a guide in advanced studies that are relying on gate tunable graphene devices, such as for the detection of spin, vibrational, or rotational excitations in adsorbates. Collaborators: Y. Zhao* , J. Wyrick* , W. Y. Ruan** , Y-H. Chan** , M-Y. Chou** , N. B. Zhitenev* , J. A. Stroscio* : * NIST/CNST, ** Georgia Tech, FDN appreciates funding from the SNF foundation under Project No. 148891.

  8. Desorption Induced by Excited Electrons from Semiconductor Surfaces (I)
    —Desorption Induced by Electron-/hole-injection into Halogen-adsorbed Silicon Surfaces—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shudo, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masatoshi

    We review excited-electron-induced desorption from halogen-adsorbed semiconductor surfaces, focusing on desorption processes associated with electron-beam irradiation using an electron gun and hole-injection using a scanning tunneling microscope. Recent studies on halogen-adsorbed silicon surfaces, i.e., typical etching systems, are described from the viewpoint of desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET).

  9. Energy loss in gas-surface dynamics: Electron-hole pair and phonon excitation upon adsorbate relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novko, D.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Juaristi, J. I.; Alducin, M.

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of electron and phonon degrees of freedom on the relaxation dynamics of adsorption processes in gas-surface systems by using ab initio molecular dynamics that incorporates an electronic friction force (AIMDEF). As representative cases we have chosen three systems with different adsorption energies and adsorbate-to-surface atom mass ratios: H on Pd(1 0 0), N on Ag(1 1 1), and N2 on Fe(1 1 0). We show, through inspection of the total energies and trajectories of the hot adsorbates on the surface, that electron-hole (e-h) pair excitations dominate relaxation of the light gas species, while the phonon channel is dominant for the heavy species. In the latter case e-h pairs become more important at the final thermalization stages.

  10. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The research program of Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom, ion-ion, and ion-molecule collisions. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-core interaction can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. Winter has focussed on intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), in which many electron states are strongly coupled during the collision and a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. Alston has concentrated on higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies), or asymmetric collision systems, for which the coupling of the projectile is weaker with, however, many more target states being coupled together so that high-order perturbation theory is essential. Several calculations by Winter and Alston are described, as set forth in the original proposal.

  11. Change in electronic structure upon optical excitation of 8-vinyladenosine: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Kodali, Goutham; Kistler, Kurt A; Narayanan, Madhavan; Matsika, Spiridoula; Stanley, Robert J

    2010-01-14

    8-Vinyladenosine (8VA) is an adenosine analog, like 2-aminopurine (2AP), that has a red-shifted absorption and high fluorescence quantum yield. When introduced into double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), its base-pairing and base-stacking properties are similar to those of adenine. Of particular interest, the fluorescence quantum yield of 8VA is sensitive to base stacking, making it a very useful real-time probe of DNA structure. The fundamental photophysics underlying this fluorescence quenching by base stacking is not well understood, and thus exploring the excited state electronic structure of the analog is warranted. In this study, we report on changes in the electronic structure of 8VA upon optical excitation. Stark spectroscopy was performed on 8VA monomer in frozen ethanol glass at 77 K to obtain the direction and degree of charge redistribution in the form of the difference dipole moment, Deltamu(01) = 4.7 +/- 0.3 D, and difference static polarizability, tr(Delta(alpha)01) = 21 +/- 11 A(3), for the S(0)-->S(1) transition. In addition, solvatochromism experiments were performed on 8VA in various solvents and analyzed using Bakhshiev's model. High level ab initio methods were employed to calculate transition energies, oscillator strengths, and dipole moments of the ground and excited states of 8VA. The direction of Deltamu(01) was assigned in the molecular frame for the lowest optically accessible state. Our study shows that the angle between ground and excited state dipole moment plays a critical role in understanding the change in electronic structure upon optical excitation. Compared to 2AP, 8VA has a larger difference dipole moment which, with twice the extinction coefficient, suggests that 8VA is superior as a two-photon probe for microscopy studies. To this end, we have measured the ratio of the two-photon fluorescence yields of the two analogs by excitation at the respective monomer absorption maxima. We show that 8VA is indeed a significantly brighter two

  12. Fast Nitrogen Atoms from Dissociative Excitation of N2 by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, Joseph M.; Ciocca, Marco

    1996-01-01

    The Doppler profiles of one of the fine structure lines of the N I (1200 A) g (sup 4)S(sup 0)-(sup 4)P multiplet and of the N II (1085 A) g (sup 3)p(sup O)-(sup 3)D multiplet have been measured. Excitation of the multiplets is produced by electron impact dissociative excitation of N2. The experimental line profiles are evaluated by fast Fourier transform (FFT) techniques and analysis of the profiles yields the kinetic energy distribution of fragments. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of N I (1200 A) increases from 27+/-6 mA at 30 eV to 37+/-4 mA at 100 eV as the emission cross section of the dissociative ionization excitation process becomes more important relative to the dissociative excitation process. The FWHM of the N II (1085 A) line is 36+/-4 mA at 100 eV. For each multiplet the kinetic energy distribution function of each of the two fragment N atoms (ions) is much broader than thermal with a mean energy above 1.0 eV. The dissociation process with the largest cross section is predissociation and predominantly produces N atoms with kinetic energy distributions having mean energies above 0.5 eV. Dissociative processes can lead to a substantial escape flux of N I atoms from the satellites, Titan and Triton of the outer planets.

  13. Dynamics of electron solvation in methanol: Excited state relaxation and generation by charge-transfer-to-solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2015-06-21

    The charge-transfer-to-solvent dynamics (CTTS) and excited state relaxation mechanism of the solvated electron in methanol are studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on a liquid methanol microjet by means of two-pulse and three-pulse experiments. In the two-pulse experiment, CTTS excitation is followed by a probe photoejection pulse. The resulting time-evolving photoelectron spectrum reveals multiple time scales characteristic of relaxation and geminate recombination of the initially generated electron which are consistent with prior results from transient absorption. In the three-pulse experiment, the relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron following electronic excitation are measured. The internal conversion lifetime of the excited electron is found to be 130 ± 40 fs, in agreement with extrapolated results from clusters and the non-adiabatic relaxation mechanism.

  14. Excited state electron transfer from aminopyrene to graphene: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Himadri; Bramhaiah, Kommula; John, Neena Susan; Pal, Suman Kalyan

    2013-12-01

    The quenching of the fluorescence of 1-aminopyrene (1-Ap) by reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has been investigated using spectroscopic techniques. In spite of the upward curvature in the Stern-Volmer plot, the unchanged spectral signature of the absorption of 1-Ap in the presence of rGO and the decrease in fluorescence lifetime with increasing rGO concentration point toward the dynamic nature of the quenching. Detailed analysis of steady state and time-resolved spectroscopic data has shown that the quenching arises due to the photoinduced electron transfer from 1-Ap to rGO. This is again supported by estimating the Gibb's free energy change for the ground as well as excited state electron transfer. Ab initio calculations under the density functional theory (DFT) formalism reveal that the possibility of π-π stacking is very slim in the 1-Ap-rGO system and the electron density resides completely on 1-Ap in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and on graphene in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), supporting the experimental findings of the intermolecular electron transfer between 1-Ap and rGO in the excited state.

  15. Ultrafast Control of the electronic phase of a manganite viamode-selective vibrational excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Rini, Matteo; Tobey, Ra'anan I.; Dean, Nicky; Tokura, Yoshinori; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Cavalleri, Andrea

    2007-05-01

    Controlling a phase of matter by coherently manipulatingspecific vibrational modes has long been an attractive (yet elusive) goalfor ultrafast science. Solids with strongly correlated electrons, inwhich even subtle crystallographic distortions can result in colossalchanges of the electronic and magnetic properties, could be directedbetween competing phases by such selective vibrational excitation. Inthis way, the dynamics of the electronic ground state of the systembecome accessible, and new insight into the underlying physics might begained. Here we report the ultrafast switching of the electronic phase ofa magnetoresistive manganite via direct excitation of a phonon mode at 71meV (17 THz). A prompt, five-order-of-magnitude drop in resistivity isobserved, associated with a non-equilibrium transition from the stableinsulating phase to a metastable metallic phase. In contrast withlight-induced, and current-driven phase transitions, the vibrationallydriven bandgap collapse observed here is not related to hot-carrierinjection and is uniquely attributed to a large-amplitude Mn-Odistortion. This corresponds to a perturbation of theperovskite-structure tolerance factor, which in turn controls theelectronic bandwidth via inter-site orbital overlap. Phase control bycoherent manipulation of selected metal--oxygen phonons should findextensive application in other complex solids--notably in copper oxidesuperconductors, in which the role of Cu-O vibrations on the electronicproperties is currently controversial.

  16. Contribution of electronically excited states to the radiation chemistry of organic systems. Progress report, September 1, 1980-November 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lipsky, S.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of a perfluorocarbon to quench the photoionization current of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) in a non-polar liquid has been studied as a function of temperature, excitation energy and the nature and composition of the solution. A model is developed to explain the results on the basis of an interaction of the quencher with an epithermal electron. Contact charge-transfer bands involving saturated hydrocarbons and perfluorocycloalkanes have been discovered. Similar bands are not observed for hydrocarbon contact with perfluoro-n-alkanes. Also, perfluorocycloalkanes are found to have very strong quenching effect on saturated hydrocarbon fluorescence. Analysis of the quenching behavior indicates unusually large (approx. = 14 A) encounter radii for this quenching interaction. A long-range charge transfer appears to be implicated. The fluorescence quantum yield of liquid cyclohexane has been determined for excitation wavelengths from 165 nm to 178 nm. This data together with new measurements on the intensity of fluorescence of cyclohexane liquid excited by /sup 85/Kr beta particles confirms that G(S/sub 1/) = 1.45. The ratio of excimer to monomer fluorescence of dilute solutions of polystyrene in various solvents has been observed to increase with increasing polymer molecular weight and decreasing thermodynamic quality of the solvent. The effects are demonstrated to be not attributable to excimer formation via non-adjacent sites.

  17. Diocotron modulation in an electron plasma through continuous radio-frequency excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Paroli, B. Maero, G.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M.

    2014-12-15

    The application of a radio-frequency (RF) excitation to any electrode of a Penning-Malmberg trap may result in significant electron heating and ionization of the residual gas with the formation of a plasma column when the RF frequency is of the order or larger than the typical axial bounce frequencies of few-eV electrons. The use of a quadrupolar excitation can induce additional phenomena, like formation of dense, narrow-cross section columns which exhibit an m{sub θ}=1 diocotron mode, i.e., a rotation of their center around the trap axis. A series of experiments is presented and discussed showing that the continuous application of such excitation causes a dramatic perturbation of the plasma equilibrium also involving continuous production and loss of particles in the trapping region. In particular, the growth of the first diocotron mode is suppressed even in the presence of ion resonance and resistive instability and the mode exhibits steady-state or underdamped amplitude and frequency modulations, typically in the Hertz range.

  18. Intensities of the Martian N2 electron-impact excited dayglow emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Jane L.; Hać, Nicholas E. F.

    2013-06-01

    The first N2 emissions in the Martian dayglow were detected by the SPICAM UV spectrograph on board the Mars Express spacecraft. Intensities of the (0,5) and (0,6) Vegard-Kaplan bands were found to be about one third of those predicted more than 35 years ago. The Vegard-Kaplan band system arises from the transition from the lowest N2 triplet state (A3Σu+;v') to the electronic ground state (X1Σg+;v″). It is excited in the Martian dayglow by direct electron-impact excitation of the ground N2(X) state to the A state and by excitation to higher triplet states that populate the A state by cascading. Using revised data, we compute here updated intensities of several of the bands in the N2 triplet systems and those involving the a1Πg state, the upper state of the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands. We find that the predicted limb intensities for the (0,5) and (0,6) Vegard-Kaplan bands are consistent with the measured values.

  19. Electronic excitation-induced semiconductor-to-metal transition in monolayer MoTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, A. V.; Fons, P.; Tominaga, J.

    2016-09-01

    Reversible polymorphism of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) has currently attracted much attention from both academic and applied perspectives. Of special interest is MoTe2, where the stable semiconducting 2 H and metastable (semi)metallic 1 T' phases have a rather small energy difference implying the low-energy cost of such a transition. In this work, using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that there exists a previously unknown phase of MoTe2, namely a distorted trigonal prismatic phase with alternating shorter and longer bonds and bond angles, that is formed in the electronically excited state due to population inversion. This phase, which is unstable and decays to the ground 2 H state after cessation of the excitation, is metallic and can act to lower the energy barrier on the way to the metastable 1 T' phase. Our findings indicate that there exists a previously unexplored route of ultrafast local and selective band-structure control in monolayer TMDC using electronic excitation, which will significantly broaden the application spectrum of these materials.

  20. A general ansatz for constructing quasi-diabatic states in electronically excited aggregated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenlan; Köhn, Andreas; Lunkenheimer, Bernd; Settels, Volker; Engels, Bernd; Fink, Reinhold F.

    2015-08-28

    We present a general method for analyzing the character of singly excited states in terms of charge transfer (CT) and locally excited (LE) configurations. The analysis is formulated for configuration interaction singles (CIS) singly excited wave functions of aggregate systems. It also approximately works for the second-order approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles and the second-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction methods [CC2 and ADC(2)]. The analysis method not only generates a weight of each character for an excited state, but also allows to define the related quasi-diabatic states and corresponding coupling matrix elements. In the character analysis approach, we divide the target system into domains and use a modified Pipek-Mezey algorithm to localize the canonical MOs on each domain, respectively. The CIS wavefunction is then transformed into the localized basis, which allows us to partition the wavefunction into LE configurations within domains and CT configuration between pairs of different domains. Quasi-diabatic states are then obtained by mixing excited states subject to the condition of maximizing the weight of one single LE or CT configuration (localization in configuration space). Different aims of such a procedure are discussed, either the construction of pure LE and CT states for analysis purposes (by including a large number of excited states) or the construction of effective models for dynamics calculations (by including a restricted number of excited states). Applications are given to LE/CT mixing in π-stacked systems, charge-recombination matrix elements in a hetero-dimer, and excitonic couplings in multi-chromophoric systems.