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Sample records for electronic excitation effect

  1. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Thin Film Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2011-01-31

    The effect of nanosecond pulsed laser excitation on surface diffusion during growth of Ge on Si(100) at 250 degrees C was studied. In Situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was used to measure the surface diffusion coefficient while ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to probe the structure and morphology of the grown quantum dots. The results show that laser excitation of the substrate increases the surface diffusion during growth of Ge on Si(100), changes the growth morphology, improves crystalline structure of the grown quantum dots, and decreases their size distribution. A purely electronic mechanism of enhanced surface diffusion of the deposited Ge is proposed. Ge quantum dots were grown on Si(100)-(2x1) by pulsed laser deposition at various substrate temperatures using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. In-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex-situ atomic force microscopy were used to analyze the fim structure and morphology. The morphology of germanium islands on silicon was studied at differect coverages. The results show that femtosecond pulsed laser depositon reduces the minimum temperature for epitaxial growth of Ge quantum dots to ~280 degrees C, which is 120 degrees C lower then previously observed in nanosecond pulsed laser deposition and more than 200 degrees C lower than that reported for molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition.

  2. Including the Effects of Electronic Excitations and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cascade Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, Dorothy |

    2008-07-01

    Radiation damage has traditionally been modeled using cascade simulations however such simulations generally neglect the effects of electron-ion interactions, which may be significant in high energy cascades. A model has been developed which includes the effects of electronic stopping and electron-phonon coupling in Molecular Dynamics simulations by means of an inhomogeneous Langevin thermostat. The energy lost by the atoms to electronic excitations is gained by the electronic system and the energy evolution of the electronic system is modeled by the heat diffusion equation. Energy is exchanged between the electronic system and the atoms in the Molecular Dynamics simulation by means of a Langevin thermostat, the temperature of which is the local electronic temperature. The model is applied to a 10 keV cascade simulation for Fe. (authors)

  3. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs.

  4. Core excitation effects on oscillator strengths for transitions in four electron atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. N.; Luo, Yuxiang

    2007-06-01

    By including explicitly the electronic configurations with two and three simultaneously excited electronic orbital, we have extended the BSCI (B-spline based configuration interaction) method [1] to estimate directly the effect of inner shell core excitation to oscillator strengths for transitions in four-electron atomic systems. We will present explicitly the change in oscillator strengths due to core excitations, especially for transitions involving doubly excited states and those with very small oscillator strengths. The length and velocity results are typically in agreement better than 1% or less. [1] Tu-nan Chang, in Many-body Theory of Atomic Structure and Photoionization, edited by T. N. Chang (World Scientific, Singapore, 1993), p. 213-47; and T. N. Chang and T. K. Fang, Elsevier Radiation Physics and Chemistry 70, 173-190 (2004).

  5. Plasma-screening effects on the electron-impact excitation of hydrogenic ions in dense plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Young-Dae

    1993-01-01

    Plasma-screening effects are investigated on electron-impact excitation of hydrogenic ions in dense plasmas. Scaled cross sections Z(exp 4) sigma for 1s yields 2s and 1s yields 2p are obtained for a Debye-Hueckel model of the screened Coulomb interaction. Ground and excited bound wave functions are modified in the screened Coulomb potential (Debye-Hueckel model) using the Ritz variation method. The resulting atomic wave functions and their eigenenergies agree well with the numerical and high-order perturbation theory calculations for the interesting domain of the Debye length not less than 10. The Born approximation is used to describe the continuum states of the projectile electron. Plasma screening effects on the atomic electrons cannot be neglected in the high-density cases. Including these effects, the cross sections are appreciably increased for 1s yields 2s transitions and decreased for 1s yields 2p transitions.

  6. Distortion effects in electron excitation of hydrogen atoms by impact of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, C.A.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    Electron excitation from the fundamental state of hydrogen atoms by impact of bare ions is studied at intermediate and high collision velocities. Total cross sections for final {ital np} states by impact of protons, alpha particles, and He{sup +} ions are calculated using the symmetric eikonal approximation and compared with experimental data. This comparison supports the existence of distortion effects recently predicted by Bugacov and co-workers [Phys. Rev. A {bold 47}, 1052 (1993)]. The validity of scaling laws is analyzed.

  7. Radiation effects from first principles : the role of excitons in electronic-excited processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Bryan Matthew

    2009-09-01

    Electron-hole pairs, or excitons, are created within materials upon optical excitation or irradiation with X-rays/charged particles. The ability to control and predict the role of excitons in these energetically-induced processes would have a tremendous impact on understanding the effects of radiation on materials. In this report, the excitonic effects in large cycloparaphenylene carbon structures are investigated using various first-principles methods. These structures are particularly interesting since they allow a study of size-scaling properties of excitons in a prototypical semi-conducting material. In order to understand these properties, electron-hole transition density matrices and exciton binding energies were analyzed as a function of size. The transition density matrices allow a global view of electronic coherence during an electronic excitation, and the exciton binding energies give a quantitative measure of electron-hole interaction energies in these structures. Based on overall trends in exciton binding energies and their spatial delocalization, we find that excitonic effects play a vital role in understanding the unique photoinduced dynamics in these systems.

  8. Entanglement entropy of electronic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasser, Felix

    2016-05-01

    A new perspective into correlation effects in electronically excited states is provided through quantum information theory. The entanglement between the electron and hole quasiparticles is examined, and it is shown that the related entanglement entropy can be computed from the eigenvalue spectrum of the well-known natural transition orbital (NTO) decomposition. Non-vanishing entanglement is obtained whenever more than one NTO pair is involved, i.e., in the case of a multiconfigurational or collective excitation. An important implication is that in the case of entanglement it is not possible to gain a complete description of the state character from the orbitals alone, but more specific analysis methods are required to decode the mutual information between the electron and hole. Moreover, the newly introduced number of entangled states is an important property by itself giving information about excitonic structure. The utility of the formalism is illustrated in the cases of the excited states of two interacting ethylene molecules, the conjugated polymer para-phenylene vinylene, and the naphthalene molecule.

  9. Effective Collision Strengths for Electron Impact Excitation of Inelastic Transitions in S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have calculated electron collisional excitation strengths for all electric dipole forbidden, semi-forbidden, and allowed transitions among the lowest 17 LS states 3s(exp 2)3p(exp 2) P-3, D-1, S-1, 3s3p(exp 3)S-5(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), S-3(exp 0), D-1(exp 0), 3S(exp 2)3p3d D-1(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), and 3S(exp 2)3p4S P-3(exp 0), P-l(exp 0) of S III using the R-matrix method. These S m states are represented by fairly extensive configuration-interaction wave functions that yield excited state energies in close agreement with recent laboratory measurements. Rydberg series of resonances converging to the excited state thresholds are explicitly included in the scattering calculation. The effective collision strengths are determined assuming Maxwellian distribution of electron energies. These are listed over a wide temperature range ([0.5-10] x 10(exp 4) K) and compared, where possible, with other available calculations. Subject headings: atomic data - atomic processes

  10. Relativistic ponderomotive effect on the propagation of rippled laser beam and the excitation of electron plasma wave in collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyanka; Chauhan, Prashant; Purohit, Gunjan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the propagation of rippled laser beam in a collisionless plasma and its effect on and the excitation of electron plasma wave and particle acceleration, when relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities are simultaneously operative. Electron plasma wave (EPW) coupling with rippled laser beam arises on account of the relativistic change in the electron mass and the modification of the background electron density due to ponderomotive nonlinearity. When the electron plasma wave gets coupled to the rippled laser beam, a large fraction of the pump energy gets transferred to EPW and this excited EPW can accelerate the electrons. Analytical expressions for the growth rate of the laser spike in plasma, beam width of the rippled laser beam and excited electron plasma wave have been obtained using paraxial ray approximation. These coupled equations are solved analytically and numerically to study the growth of laser spike in plasma and its effect on the self focusing of rippled laser beam in plasma, amplitude of the excited electron plasma wave and particle acceleration. The result shows that the effect of including ponderomotive nonlinearity significantly affects the growth of laser spike in plasma, excitation of electron plasma wave as well as the number of energetic electrons in particle acceleration process. The results are presented for typical laser plasma parameters.

  11. Dissociative electron attachment and vibrational excitation of CF3Cl: Effect of two vibrational modes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarana, Michal; Houfek, Karel; Horáček, Jiří; Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2011-11-01

    We present a study of dissociative electron attachment and vibrational excitation processes in electron collisions with the CF3Cl molecule. The calculations are based on the two-dimensional nuclear dynamics including the C-Cl symmetric stretch coordinate and the CF3 symmetric deformation (umbrella) coordinate. The complex potential energy surfaces are calculated using the ab initio R-matrix method. The results for dissociative attachment and vibrational excitation of the umbrella mode agree quite well with experiment whereas the cross section for excitation of the C-Cl symmetric stretch vibrations is about a factor-of-three too low in comparison with experimental data.

  12. The effect of electron beams on cyclotron maser emission excited by lower-energy cutoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) is one of the most important emission mechanisms in astrophysics and can be excited efficiently by lower-energy cutoffs of power-law electrons. These non-thermal electrons probably propagate as a directed collimated beam along ambient magnetic fields. This paper investigates the ECM, in which the effect of electron beams is emphasized. Results show the dependence of emission properties of the ECM on the beam feature. The maximum growth rate of the extraordinary mode (X2) rapidly decreases as the beam momentum increases, while the growth rate of the ordinary mode (O1) changes slightly. In particular, the ordinary mode can overcome the extraordinary mode and becomes the fastest growth mode once the beam momentum is large enough. This research presents an extension of the conventional studies on ECM driven by lower-energy cutoffs and may be helpful to understand better the emission process of solar type I radio bursts, which are dominated by the ordinary mode emission.

  13. Effect of collective response on electron capture and excitation in collisions of highly charged ions with fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Kadhane, U; Misra, D; Singh, Y P; Tribedi, Lokesh C

    2003-03-07

    Projectile deexcitation Lyman x-ray emission following electron capture and K excitation has been studied in collisions of bare and Li-like sulphur ions (of energy 110 MeV) with fullerenes (C(60)/C(70)) and different gaseous targets. The intensity ratios of different Lyman x-ray lines in collisions with fullerenes are found to be substantially lower than those for the gas targets, both for capture and excitation. This has been explained in terms of a model based on "solidlike" effect, namely, wakefield induced stark mixing of the excited states populated via electron capture or K excitation: a collective phenomenon of plasmon excitation in the fullerenes under the influence of heavy, highly charged ions.

  14. Excitation of plasmonic terahertz photovoltaic effects in a periodic two-dimensional electron system by the attenuated total reflection method

    SciTech Connect

    Fateev, D. V. Mashinsky, K. V.; Bagaeva, T. Yu.; Popov, V. V.

    2015-01-15

    The problem of the rectification of terahertz radiation due to plasmonic nonlinearities in a periodic two-dimensional electron system upon the excitation of plasma oscillations by the attenuated total reflection method is solved. This model allows the independent study of different plasmonic rectification mechanisms, i.e., plasmonic electron drag and plasmonic ratchet effects.

  15. On The Effect of Electron Collisions in the Excitation of Cometary HCN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Amy J.; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Schloerb, F. Peter; Combi, Michael R.; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2004-01-01

    The electron-HCN collision rate for the excitation of rotational transitions of the HCN molecule is evaluated in comets C/1995 01 (Hale-Bopp) and C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake). Based on theoretical models of the cometary atmosphere, we show that collisions with electrons can provide a significant excitation mechanism for rotational transitions in the HCN molecule. Computed values of the cross section sigma(sub e-HCN) can be as high as 1.3 x cm2, more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than the commonly assumed HCN-H2O cross section. For the ground rotational transitions of HCN, the electron-HCN collision rate is found to exceed the HCN-H2O collision rate at distances greater than 3000 km from the cometary nucleus of Hale-Bopp and 1000 km from that of Hyakutake. Collisional excitation processes dominate over radiative excitation processes up to a distance of 160,000 km from the cometary nucleus of Hale-Bopp and 50,000 km from that of Hyakutake. Excitation models that neglect electron collisions can underestimate the HCN gas production rates by as much as a factor of 2.

  16. Theoretical description of protein field effects on electronic excitations of biological chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varsano, Daniele; Caprasecca, Stefano; Coccia, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    Photoinitiated phenomena play a crucial role in many living organisms. Plants, algae, and bacteria absorb sunlight to perform photosynthesis, and convert water and carbon dioxide into molecular oxygen and carbohydrates, thus forming the basis for life on Earth. The vision of vertebrates is accomplished in the eye by a protein called rhodopsin, which upon photon absorption performs an ultrafast isomerisation of the retinal chromophore, triggering the signal cascade. Many other biological functions start with the photoexcitation of a protein-embedded pigment, followed by complex processes comprising, for example, electron or excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes. The optical properties of chromophores in living systems are strongly dependent on the interaction with the surrounding environment (nearby protein residues, membrane, water), and the complexity of such interplay is, in most cases, at the origin of the functional diversity of the photoactive proteins. The specific interactions with the environment often lead to a significant shift of the chromophore excitation energies, compared with their absorption in solution or gas phase. The investigation of the optical response of chromophores is generally not straightforward, from both experimental and theoretical standpoints; this is due to the difficulty in understanding diverse behaviours and effects, occurring at different scales, with a single technique. In particular, the role played by ab initio calculations in assisting and guiding experiments, as well as in understanding the physics of photoactive proteins, is fundamental. At the same time, owing to the large size of the systems, more approximate strategies which take into account the environmental effects on the absorption spectra are also of paramount importance. Here we review the recent advances in the first-principle description of electronic and optical properties of biological chromophores embedded in a protein environment. We show

  17. Theoretical description of protein field effects on electronic excitations of biological chromophores.

    PubMed

    Varsano, Daniele; Caprasecca, Stefano; Coccia, Emanuele

    2017-01-11

    Photoinitiated phenomena play a crucial role in many living organisms. Plants, algae, and bacteria absorb sunlight to perform photosynthesis, and convert water and carbon dioxide into molecular oxygen and carbohydrates, thus forming the basis for life on Earth. The vision of vertebrates is accomplished in the eye by a protein called rhodopsin, which upon photon absorption performs an ultrafast isomerisation of the retinal chromophore, triggering the signal cascade. Many other biological functions start with the photoexcitation of a protein-embedded pigment, followed by complex processes comprising, for example, electron or excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes. The optical properties of chromophores in living systems are strongly dependent on the interaction with the surrounding environment (nearby protein residues, membrane, water), and the complexity of such interplay is, in most cases, at the origin of the functional diversity of the photoactive proteins. The specific interactions with the environment often lead to a significant shift of the chromophore excitation energies, compared with their absorption in solution or gas phase. The investigation of the optical response of chromophores is generally not straightforward, from both experimental and theoretical standpoints; this is due to the difficulty in understanding diverse behaviours and effects, occurring at different scales, with a single technique. In particular, the role played by ab initio calculations in assisting and guiding experiments, as well as in understanding the physics of photoactive proteins, is fundamental. At the same time, owing to the large size of the systems, more approximate strategies which take into account the environmental effects on the absorption spectra are also of paramount importance. Here we review the recent advances in the first-principle description of electronic and optical properties of biological chromophores embedded in a protein environment. We show

  18. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Hydrogen Atom Transfer (Tautomerization) Reactions for the DNA Base Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Salter, Latasha M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for four different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest single excited state potential energy surface are studied. The energetic order of the tautomers on the ground state potential surface is 9H less than 7H less than 3H less than 1H, while on the excited state surface this order is found to be different: 3H less than 1H less than 9H less than 7H. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (9 yields 3 tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic state. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic state, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. The barrier for this reaction in the excited state may become very low in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules, and therefore such tautomerization reaction may play an important role in the solution phase photochemistry of adenine.

  19. Analysis of relativistic effects in electron-impact excitation of SP transitions in heavy atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Nils; Bartschat, Klaus

    2002-05-01

    While elastic electron scattering from heavy atoms is known to be strongly affected by relativistic effects such as Mott scattering, it seems surprising that several sets of recent experimental results for electron-impact excitation of the (6s)^2S_1/2 (6p)^2P_1/2,3/2 transition [1,2] in Cs could be well reproduced by a non-relativistic ``convergent close-coupling'' (CCC) model. It is, therefore, desirable to analyze the sensitivity of currently measured observables to relativistic effects, as well as to develop new prescriptions to enhance the potential for experimental tests of sophisticated collision theories. Using the above transition as an example, we developed a new formulation to describe the collision process and the experimental investigations, based on the concept of ``generalized Stokes parameters'' [3]. [1] V. Karaganov, P.J.O. Teubner, and M.J. Brunger, in Correlations, Polarization, and Ionization in Atomic Systems, AIP (New York, 2000). [2] G. Baum and I. Bray (2002), private communication. [3] N. Andersen and K. Bartschat, Polarization, Alignment, and Orientation in Atomic Collisions, Springer (New York, 2000).

  20. Nonequilibrium solvent effects in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for ground and excited electronic states.

    PubMed

    Bjorgaard, J A; Velizhanin, K A; Tretiak, S

    2016-04-21

    The effects of solvent on molecular processes such as excited state relaxation and photochemical reaction often occurs in a nonequilibrium regime. Dynamic processes such as these can be simulated using excited statemolecular dynamics. In this work, we describe methods of simulating nonequilibrium solvent effects in excited statemolecular dynamics using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory and apparent surface charge methods. These developments include a propagation method for solvent degrees of freedom and analytical energy gradients for the calculation of forces. Molecular dynamics of acetaldehyde in water or acetonitrile are demonstrated where the solute-solvent system is out of equilibrium due to photoexcitation and emission.

  1. Nonequilibrium solvent effects in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for ground and excited electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of solvent on molecular processes such as excited state relaxation and photochemical reaction often occurs in a nonequilibrium regime. Dynamic processes such as these can be simulated using excited state molecular dynamics. In this work, we describe methods of simulating nonequilibrium solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory and apparent surface charge methods. These developments include a propagation method for solvent degrees of freedom and analytical energy gradients for the calculation of forces. Molecular dynamics of acetaldehyde in water or acetonitrile are demonstrated where the solute-solvent system is out of equilibrium due to photoexcitation and emission.

  2. Nonequilibrium solvent effects in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for ground and excited electronic states

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorgaard, Josiah August; Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Tretiak, Sergei

    2016-04-15

    The effects of solvent on molecular processes such as excited state relaxation and photochemical reaction often occurs in a nonequilibrium regime. Dynamic processes such as these can be simulated using excited state molecular dynamics. In this paper, we describe methods of simulating nonequilibrium solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory and apparent surface charge methods. These developments include a propagation method for solvent degrees of freedom and analytical energy gradients for the calculation of forces. Finally, molecular dynamics of acetaldehyde in water or acetonitrile are demonstrated where the solute-solvent system is out of equilibrium due to photoexcitation and emission.

  3. Selectivity of peptide bond dissociation on excitation of a core electron: Effects of a phenyl group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Cheng; Chen, Jien-Lian; Hu, Wei-Ping; Lin, Yi-Shiue; Lin, Huei-Ru; Lee, Tsai-Yun; Lee, Yuan T.; Ni, Chi-Kung; Liu, Chen-Lin

    2016-09-01

    The selective dissociation of a peptide bond upon excitation of a core electron in acetanilide and N-benzylacetamide was investigated. The total-ion-yield near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra were recorded and compared with the predictions from time-dependent density functional theory. The branching ratios for the dissociation of a peptide bond are observed as 16-34% which is quite significant. This study explores the core-excitation, the X-ray photodissociation pathways, and the theoretical explanation of the NEXAFS spectra of organic molecules containing both a peptide bond and a phenyl group.

  4. Conformational Changes in 5-Methoxyindole: Effects of Thermal, Vibrational and Electronic Excitations.

    PubMed

    Lopes Jesus, António Jorge; Fausto, Rui; Reva, Igor

    2017-04-14

    The molecule of 5-methoxyindole (5MOI) may adopt two conformational states, syn and anti, with respect to the relative orientation of the NH and OCH3 groups. Structure of monomeric 5MOI was characterized spectroscopically, in mid- and near-infrared domains. The conformational composition of 5MOI could be controlled in three different ways. Thermally, two conformers of 5MOI could be trapped in xenon matrixes at 16 K. Upon annealing the xenon matrix to temperatures about 30-40 K, the higher energy syn form converted to the ground state anti conformer. Vibrational excitations in the near-infrared domain, at the frequency of the first NH stretching overtone, 6853 cm-1, afforded the inverse conformational transformation, and a part of the anti conformer was upconverted to the syn form. Electronic excitations in the UV-domain, at 315-310 nm, resulted in a total consumption of the syn form again, in favor of anti. Upon further irradiations at 308 nm, a partial repopulation of the syn form, at the expense of anti, was observed. We propose a mechanistic explanation of the observed transformations, which is based on the computations of the vibrational spectra of the two conformers, and also on computations of the ground state S0 and the first excited state S1 potential energy surfaces along the coordinate for conformational isomerization. The highlights of the present work are: the first experimental observation of the minor syn conformer of 5MOI; evidence of the long-range vibrational energy transfer resulting in conformational isomerization upon excitation of the NH stretching overtone; possibility of partial conformational control of 5MOI by using electronic excitations.

  5. Nonequilibrium solvent effects in Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for ground and excited electronic states

    DOE PAGES

    Bjorgaard, Josiah August; Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Tretiak, Sergei

    2016-04-15

    The effects of solvent on molecular processes such as excited state relaxation and photochemical reaction often occurs in a nonequilibrium regime. Dynamic processes such as these can be simulated using excited state molecular dynamics. In this paper, we describe methods of simulating nonequilibrium solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory and apparent surface charge methods. These developments include a propagation method for solvent degrees of freedom and analytical energy gradients for the calculation of forces. Finally, molecular dynamics of acetaldehyde in water or acetonitrile are demonstrated where the solute-solvent system is out of equilibriummore » due to photoexcitation and emission.« less

  6. Experimental evidence of excited electron number density and temperature effects on electron-phonon coupling in gold films

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, Ashutosh; Gaskins, John T.; Foley, Brian M.; Cheaito, Ramez; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-01-28

    The electronic transport properties of metals with weak electron-phonon coupling can be influenced by non-thermal electrons. Relaxation processes involving non-thermal electrons competing with the thermalized electron system have led to inconsistencies in the understanding of how electrons scatter and relax with the less energetic lattice. Recent theoretical and computational works have shown that the rate of energy relaxation with the metallic lattice will change depending on the thermalization state of the electrons. Even though 20 years of experimental works have focused on understanding and isolating these electronic relaxation mechanisms with short pulsed irradiation, discrepancies between these existing works have not clearly answered the fundamental question of the competing effects between non-thermal and thermal electrons losing energy to the lattice. In this work, we demonstrate the ability to measure the electron relaxation for varying degrees of both electron-electron and electron-phonon thermalization. This series of measurements of electronic relaxation over a predicted effective electron temperature range up to ∼3500 K and minimum lattice temperatures of 77 K validate recent computational and theoretical works that theorize how a nonequilibrium distribution of electrons transfers energy to the lattice. Utilizing this wide temperature range during pump-probe measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, we explain discrepancies in the past two decades of literature of electronic relaxation rates. We experimentally demonstrate that the electron-phonon coupling factor in gold increases with increasing lattice temperature and laser fluences. Specifically, we show that at low laser fluences corresponding to small electron perturbations, energy relaxation between electrons and phonons is mainly governed by non-thermal electrons, while at higher laser fluences, non-thermal electron scattering with the lattice is less influential on the energy relaxation

  7. Effect of structural distortion and polarization in localization of electronic excitations in organic semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayyar, Iffat; Batista, Enrique; Tretiak, Sergei; Saxena, Avadh; Smith, Darryl; Martin, Richard

    2012-02-01

    Organic polymers find varied applications in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, light emitting diodes and lasers. Detailed understanding of charge carrier transport by polarons and excitonic energy transfer producing singlet and triplet excitations is critical to improve their efficiency. We benchmarked the ability of current functional models to describe the spatial extent of self-trapped neutral and charged excitations for MEH-PPV owing to its superior luminescence and experimental evidence. Now we are interested in distinguishing between two distinct origins leading to localization; spatial localization of the wavefunction by itself on the undistorted geometry and localization of the wavefunction assured by distortion of the structure during its relaxation. We suggest localization is produced by electronic rearrangements and character of the functional. We also observe that different functionals place the highest occupied and lowest virtual orbitals at different positions in the energy band diagram based on their ability to predict the extent of localization of these states.

  8. Wave excitation by inhomogeneous suprathermal electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Dillenburg, D.; Wu, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Wave excitation by an inhomogeneous suprathermal electron beam in a homogeneous magnetized plasma is studied. Not only is the beam density nonuniform, but the beam electrons possess a sheared bulk velocity. The general dispersion equation encompassing both electrostatic and electromagnetic effects is derived. Particular attention is given to the whistler mode. It is established that the density-gradient and velocity-shear effects are important for waves with frequencies close to the lower-hybrid resonance frequency.

  9. Solvent electronic polarization effects on a charge transfer excitation studied by the mean-field QM/MM method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Hiroshi

    2015-12-31

    Electronic polarization effects of a medium can have a significant impact on a chemical reaction in condensed phases. We discuss the effects on the charge transfer excitation of a chromophore, N,N-dimethyl-4-nitroaniline, in various solvents using the mean-field QM/MM method with a polarizable force field. The results show that the explicit consideration of the solvent electronic polarization effects is important especially for a solvent with a low dielectric constant when we study the solvatochromism of the chromophore.

  10. The effect of charge state on electron excitation by slow protons in simple metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, S.; Boudouma, Y.; Chami, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the energy and angular distributions of conduction band electrons excited by slowly moving protons. An improved method for the description of target response was developed assuming a convenient spherical symmetry of the screened potential. The velocity dependent screening parameter of the trial potential is adjusted in a self-consistent way using an extension of the Friedel sum rule. As positive projectile can be ionized or neutralized by interaction with the target, we should include the different charge states fractions of the protons to determine the doubly differential cross section (DDCS) for the secondary electron emission. A comparison of the double differential cross section using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) is presented. The energy loss of moving proton is also discussed with explicit inclusion of the different charge states and compared to the available experimental data in order to check the validity of the proposed model.

  11. Tuning Hole and Electron Transfer from Photo-excited CdSe Quantum Dot to Phenol Derivatives: Effect of Electron Donating and Withdrawing Moiety.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Hirendra Nath; Debnath, Tushar; Sebastian, Deepa; Maiti, Sourav

    2017-03-27

    Charge transfer processes from photo-excited CdSe QDs to phenol derivatives with electron donating (4-methoxy) and electron withdrawing (4-nitro) moiety have been demonstrated by using steady state and time-resolved emission and femto-second transient absorption spectroscopy. Steady state and time-resolved emission studies suggest that in presence of both 4-nitro phenol (4NP) and 4-methoxy phenol (4MP) CdSe QDs luminescence gets quenched. Stern-Volmer analysis suggests both static and dynamic mechanisms are active for both the QD/phenol composites. Cyclic volatmetric analysis recommends that photo-excited CdSe QDs can donate electron to 4NP and hole to 4MP. To reconfirm both electron and hole transfer mechanism CdSe/CdS quasi type-II and CdSe/CdTe type-II core-shell NC were synthesized and the photoluminescence quenching were monitored in absence and in presence of both 4NP and 4MP where systematically hole and electron transfer were restricted. Our studies suggest that indeed electron and hole transfer take place from photo-excited CdSe to 4NP and 4MP respectively. To monitor the charge transfer dynamics in both the systems in early time scale, we have employed femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopic techniques. Both electron and hole transfer and charge recombination dynamics have been discussed and effect of electron donating and withdrawing group has been demonstrated.

  12. High electronic excitations and ion beam mixing effects in high energy ion irradiated Fe/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, P.; Dufour, C.; Jaouen, C.; Marchal, G.; Pacaud, J.; Grilhe, J.; Jousset, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    M{umlt o}ssbauer spectroscopy ({sup 57}Fe) shows evidence for mixing effects induced by electronic energy deposition in nanoscale Fe/Si multilayers irradiated with swift heavy ions. A decrease in the mixing efficiency with electronic stopping power is reported; a threshold is found, under which iron environment modifications no longer occur. The kinetics of Fe{endash}Si phase formation after irradiation suggests the existence of three regimes: (i) for high excitation levels, a magnetic amorphous phase is formed directly in the wake of the incoming ion and an almost complete mixing is reached at low fluence (10{sup 13} U/cm{sup 2}); (ii) for low excitation levels, a paramagnetic Si-rich amorphous phase is favored at the interface while crystalline iron subsists at high fluences; (iii) for intermediate excitation levels, saturation effects are observed and the formation rate of both magnetic and paramagnetic phases points to direct mixing in the ion wake but with a reduced track length in comparison to U irradiation. The measured interfacial mixing cross section induced by electronic energy deposition suggests that a thermal diffusion process is mainly involved in addition to damage creation. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  14. Excited electronic state mixing in 7-azaindole. Quantitative measurements using the Stark effect.

    PubMed

    Young, Justin W; Pozun, Zachary D; Jordan, Kenneth D; Pratt, David W

    2013-12-12

    Stark effect measurements of the +280 cm(-1) vibronic band at ∼286 nm in the high resolution S1-S0 fluorescence excitation spectrum of 7-azaindole (7AI) in a molecular beam show that the permanent (electric) dipole moment (PDM) of the upper state vibrational level reached in this transition is 4.6 D, twice as large as the PDM of the zero-point level of the S1 state. This large difference is attributed to state mixing with a more polar state. EOM-CSSD calculations suggest that this more polar state is σπ* in nature and that it crosses the ππ* state in energy along the coordinate connecting the two potential energy minima. Such state mixing apparently provides more facile access to conical intersections with the ground state, and subsequent hydrogen atom detachment reactions, since independent studies by Sakota and Sekiya have shown that the N-H stretching frequency of 7AI is significantly reduced when it is excited to the +280 cm(-1) vibrational level of the S1 state.

  15. Dipole moment of aniline in the excited S 1 state from thermochromic effect on electronic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Kukliński, B.; Bojarski, P.

    2005-11-01

    Using the thermochromic shift method of absorption and fluorescence spectra of aniline in ethyl acetate for temperature ranging from 213 to 393 K, the change of the dipole moment Δ μ = μe - μg = 0.84 D between the ground and first excited singlet state was determined based on the Bilot and Kawski theory. This is in agreement with the result obtained by Lombardi from optical Stark effect in the rotational fine structure. For the known dipole moment in the ground state μg = 1.53 D and for α/ a3 = 0.483 ( α is the polarizability and a is the Onsager interaction radius of the solute) the average value of μe = 2.37 D and a = 2.7 Å were determined. The values obtained for aniline are compared with the experimental values determined by other authors.

  16. Theoretical study of Raman chirped adiabatic passage by X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Highly excited electronic states and rotational effects

    SciTech Connect

    Engin, Selma; Sisourat, Nicolas Selles, Patricia; Taïeb, Richard; Carniato, Stéphane

    2014-06-21

    Raman Chirped Adiabatic Passage (RCAP) is an efficient method to climb the vibrational ladder of molecules. It was shown on the example of fixed-in-space HCl molecule that selective vibrational excitation can thus be achieved by RCAP and that population transfer can be followed by X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy [S. Engin, N. Sisourat, P. Selles, R. Taïeb, and S. Carniato, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 192–195 (2012)]. Here, in a more detailed analysis of the process, we investigate the effects of highly excited electronic states and of molecular rotation on the efficiency of RCAP. Furthermore, we propose an alternative spectroscopic way to monitor the transfer by means of X-ray absorption spectra.

  17. Electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of pentafluorophenol: Effects of low-lying πσ∗ states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Shreetama; Mukhopadhyay, Deb Pratim; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2015-05-01

    Multiple fluorine atom substitution effect on photophysics of an aromatic chromophore has been investigated using phenol as the reference system. It has been noticed that the discrete vibronic structure of the S1←S0 absorption system of phenol vapor is completely washed out for pentafluorophenol (PFP), and the latter also shows very large Stokes shift in the fluorescence spectrum. For excitations beyond S1 origin, the emission yield of PFP is reduced sharply with increase in excess vibronic energy. However, in a collisional environment like liquid hydrocarbon, the underlying dynamical process that drives the non-radiative decay is hindered drastically. Electronic structure theory predicts a number of low-lying dark electronic states of πσ∗ character in the vicinity of the lowest valence ππ∗ state of this molecule. Tentatively, we have attributed the excitation energy dependent non-radiative decay of the molecule observed only in the gas phase to an interplay between the lowest ππ∗ and a nearby dissociative πσ∗ state. Measurements in different liquids reveal that some of the dark excited states light up with appreciable intensity only in protic liquids like methanol and water due to hydrogen bonding between solute and solvents. Electronic structure theory methods indeed predict that for PFP-(H2O)n clusters (n = 1-11), intensities of a number of πσ∗ states are enhanced with increase in cluster size. In contrast with emitting behavior of the molecule in the gas phase and solutions of nonpolar and polar aprotic liquids, the fluorescence is completely switched off in polar protic liquids. This behavior is a chemically significant manifestation of perfluoro effect, because a very opposite effect occurs in the case of unsubstituted phenol for which fluorescence yield undergoes a very large enhancement in protic liquids. Several dynamical mechanisms have been suggested to interpret the observed photophysical behavior.

  18. Localization of electrons and excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven

    2006-07-01

    Electrons, electron holes, or excitations in finite or infinite 'multimer systems' may be localized or delocalized. In the theory of Hush, localization depends on the ratio Δ/ λ ( Δ/2 = coupling; λ = reorganization energy). The latter theory has been extended to the infinite system [S. Larsson, A. Klimkāns, Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 355 (2000) 217]. The metal/insulator transition often takes place abruptly as a function of Δ/ λ. It is argued that localization in a system with un-filled bands cannot be determined on the basis of Mott-Hubbard U alone, but depends on the number of accessible valence states, reorganization energy λ and coupling Δ (=2t). In fact U = 0 does not necessarily imply delocalization. The analysis here shows that there are many different situations for an insulator to metal transition. Charge transfer in doped NiO is characterized by Ni 2+ - Ni 3+ exchange while charge transfer in pure NiO is characterized by a disproportionation 2Ni 2+ → Ni + + Ni 3+. In spite of the great differences between these two cases, U has been applied without discrimination to both. The relevant localization parameters appear to be Δ and λ in the first case, with only two oxidation states, and U, Δ and λ in the second case with three oxidation states. The analysis is extended to insulator-metal transitions, giant magnetic resistance (GMR) and high Tc superconductivity (SC). λ and Δ can be determined quite accurately in quantum mechanical calculations involving only one and two monomers, respectively.

  19. Investigation of effect of excitation frequency on electron energy distribution functions in low pressure radio frequency bounded plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2011-07-15

    Particle in cell (PIC) simulations are employed to investigate the effect of excitation frequency {omega} on electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) in a low pressure radio frequency (rf) discharge. The discharge is maintained over a length of 0.10 m, bounded by two infinite parallel plates, with the coherent heating field localized at the center of the discharge over a distance of 0.05 m and applied perpendicularly along the y and z directions. On varying the excitation frequency f (={omega}/2{pi}) in the range 0.01-50 MHz, it is observed that for f {<=} 5 MHz the EEDF shows a trend toward a convex (Druyvesteyn-like) distribution. For f > 5 MHz, the distribution resembles more like a Maxwellian with the familiar break energy visible in most of the distributions. A prominent ''hot tail'' is observed at f{>=} 20 MHz and the temperature of the tail is seen to decrease with further increase in frequency (e.g., at 30 MHz and 50 MHz). The mechanism for the generation of the ''hot tail'' is considered to be due to preferential transit time heating of energetic electrons as a function of {omega}, in the antenna heating field. There exists an optimum frequency for which high energy electrons are maximally heated. The occurrence of the Druyvesteyn-like distributions at lower {omega} may be explained by a balance between the heating of the electrons in the effective electric field and elastic cooling due to electron neutral collision frequency {nu}{sub en}; the transition being dictated by {omega} {approx} 2{pi}{nu}{sub en}.

  20. Effect of the Bethe surface description on the electronic excitations induced by energetic proton beams in liquid water and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, Isabel; Denton, Cristian D.; de Vera, Pablo; Kyriakou, Ioanna; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Garcia-Molina, Rafael

    2010-06-01

    The irradiation of biological systems by energetic ion beams has multiple applications in medical physics and space radiation health, such as hadrontherapy for cancer treatment or protection of astronauts against space radiation. Therefore, for a better control and understanding of the effects of radiation damage in living tissues, it is necessary to advance an accurate description of the energy loss from the ion beam to the target. In the present work we use the dielectric formalism to calculate the probability for an energetic proton to produce electronic excitations in two targets of high biological interest, namely, liquid water and DNA. Also, the mean energy of the electronic excitations in these targets is found as a function of the incident proton energy. The electronic response of the target, characterized by its energy-loss function (ELF), is described by several models that fit the available experimental optical data (at zero momentum transfer), but use different approaches to obtain the Bethe surface, that is, to extend the ELF to any energy and momentum transferred.

  1. Electron-impact excitation of Sc II: collision strengths and effective collision strengths for fine-structure transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.

    2012-08-01

    Accurate fine-structure atomic data for the Fe-peak elements are essential for interpreting astronomical spectra. There is a severe paucity of data available for Sc II, highlighted by the fact that no collision strengths are readily available for this ion. We present electron-impact excitation collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for Sc II. The collision strengths were calculated for all 3916 transitions amongst 89 jj levels (arising from the 3d4s, 3d2, 4s2, 3d4p, 4s4p, 3d5s, 3d4d, 3d5p, 4p2 and 3d4f configurations), resulting in a 944 coupled channel problem. The R-matrix package RMATRXII was utilized, along with the transformation code FINE and the external region code PSTGF, to calculate the collision strengths for a range of incident electron energies in the 0 to 8.3 Rydberg region. Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths were then produced for 27 temperatures lying within the astrophysically significant range of 30 to 105 K. The collision strengths and effective collision strengths were produced for two different target models. The purpose was to systematically examine the effect of including open 3p correlation terms into the configuration interaction expansion for the wavefunction. The first model consisted of all 36 CI terms that could be generated with the 3p core closed. The second model incorporated an additional six configurations which allowed for single-electron excitations from within the 3p core. Comparisons are made between the two models and the results of Bautista et al., obtained by private communication. It is concluded that the first model produced the most reliable set of collision and effective collision strengths for use in astrophysical and plasma applications.

  2. Effect of electronic excitation on high-temperature flows of ionized nitrogen and oxygen mixtures behind strong shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    Strongly non-equilibrium flows of reacting five-component ionized mixtures of nitrogen (N2/N2+/N /N+/e-) and oxygen (O2/O2+/O /O+/e-) behind the plane shock wave are studied taking into account electronic degrees of freedom of both neutral and ionized species. The kinetic scheme includes non-equilibrium reactions of ionization, dissociation, recombination and charge-transfer. Two test cases corresponding to the spacecraft re-entry (Hermes and Fire II experiments) are considered; fluid-dynamic variables, transport coefficients and heat flux are calculated, and different contribution to the heat flux are analyzed. The effect of electronic excitation on the heat transfer is governed by the competition of diffusion and heat conduction; it becomes weak if diffusive processes prevail. An important role of thermal diffusion in ionized flows is emphasized. The influence of dissociation rates on the heat flux is assessed.

  3. On the Electronically Excited States of Uracil

    SciTech Connect

    Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Kowalski, Karol; Fan, Peng-Dong; Valiev, Marat; Matsika, Spiridoula; Krylov, Anna

    2008-10-09

    Vertical excitation energies in uracil in the gas phase and in water solution are investigated by the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster and multi-reference configuration interaction methods. Basis set effects are found to be important for converged results. The analysis of electronic wave functions reveals that the lowest singlet states are predominantly of a singly excited character and are therefore well described by single-reference equation-of-motion methods augmented by a perturbative triples correction to account for dynamical correlation. Our best estimates for the vertical excitation energies for the lowest singlet n and are 5.0±0.1 eV and 5.3±0.1 eV, respectively. The solvent effects for these states are estimated to be +0.5 eV and ±0.1 eV, respectively. We attribute the difference between the computed vertical excitations and the maximum of the experimental absorption to strong vibronic interaction between the lowest A00 and A0 states leading to intensity borrowing by the forbidden transition.

  4. Ionization of excited xenon atoms by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Daniel A.; Kunc, Joseph A.

    2004-08-01

    Measured cross sections for electron-impact ionization of excited Xe atoms are not presently available. Therefore, we combine in this work the formalisms of the binary encounter approximation and Sommerfeld’s quantization of atomic orbits and derive from first-principles cross sections for ionization of excited atoms by electrons of low and moderate energies (up to a few hundred eV ). The approach of this work can be used to calculate the cross sections for electron-impact ionization of excited atoms and atomic ions other than xenon.

  5. Electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of pentafluorophenol: Effects of low-lying πσ{sup ∗} states

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, Shreetama; Mukhopadhyay, Deb Pratim; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2015-05-14

    Multiple fluorine atom substitution effect on photophysics of an aromatic chromophore has been investigated using phenol as the reference system. It has been noticed that the discrete vibronic structure of the S{sub 1}←S{sub 0} absorption system of phenol vapor is completely washed out for pentafluorophenol (PFP), and the latter also shows very large Stokes shift in the fluorescence spectrum. For excitations beyond S{sub 1} origin, the emission yield of PFP is reduced sharply with increase in excess vibronic energy. However, in a collisional environment like liquid hydrocarbon, the underlying dynamical process that drives the non-radiative decay is hindered drastically. Electronic structure theory predicts a number of low-lying dark electronic states of πσ{sup ∗} character in the vicinity of the lowest valence ππ{sup ∗} state of this molecule. Tentatively, we have attributed the excitation energy dependent non-radiative decay of the molecule observed only in the gas phase to an interplay between the lowest ππ{sup ∗} and a nearby dissociative πσ{sup ∗} state. Measurements in different liquids reveal that some of the dark excited states light up with appreciable intensity only in protic liquids like methanol and water due to hydrogen bonding between solute and solvents. Electronic structure theory methods indeed predict that for PFP-(H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters (n = 1-11), intensities of a number of πσ{sup ∗} states are enhanced with increase in cluster size. In contrast with emitting behavior of the molecule in the gas phase and solutions of nonpolar and polar aprotic liquids, the fluorescence is completely switched off in polar protic liquids. This behavior is a chemically significant manifestation of perfluoro effect, because a very opposite effect occurs in the case of unsubstituted phenol for which fluorescence yield undergoes a very large enhancement in protic liquids. Several dynamical mechanisms have been suggested to interpret the

  6. Electron-impact excitation of Ne4+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, D. C.; Badnell, N. R.

    2000-10-01

    We present the results of extensive close-coupling calculations of electron-impact excitation of the C-like ion, Ne4+. We first compare effective collision strengths determined from a 20-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculation with those obtained from a 20-level intermediate-coupling frame transformation (ICFT) R-matrix calculation. The ICFT method was also employed to perform two much larger calculations; we compare the effective collision strengths determined from these calculations with each other and with those obtained from the 20-level calculations in order to assess the effects of increasing both the size of the configuration-interaction expansion of the target and the size of the close-coupling expansion. Our final calculation, with 130 terms and 261 levels in the configuration-interaction expansion of the target and 66 terms and 138 levels in the close-coupling expansion, provides improved data for excitation between the levels of the 2s22p2, 2s2p3 and 2p4 configurations and the first close-coupling results for excitation to the levels of the 2s22p3ℓ configurations in Ne4+.

  7. Effect of pressure on electronic excitations in TCNQ and its complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tkacz, M.; Jurgensen, C.W.; Drickamer, H.G.

    1986-01-15

    The electronic spectra of TCNQ and TCNQ complexes has been investigated at high pressure up to 150 kbar. The observed pressure shifts are discussed in terms of intermolecular interactions. The results are also compared with available theoretical calculations.

  8. Electron impact vibrational excitation of methyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaamini, Ahmad; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha

    2016-05-01

    Low energy differential cross sections and excitation functions for vibrational excitation of CH3 Cl are presented for five vibrational features in the electron energy loss spectrum of this molecule. Electron energies range from 1 eV to 15 eV and scattering angles from 10o to 125o. Results will be compared to existing data for CH3 Cl in the literature. Funded by a NSF-AMOP-RUI Grant.

  9. Rotational and translational effects in collisions of electronically excited diatomic hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1988-01-01

    Collisional quenching and vibrational energy proceed competitively with rotational energy transfer for several excited states of the diatomic radicals OH, NH, and CH. This occurs for a wide variety of molecular collision partners. This phenomenon permits the examination of the influence of rotational motion on the collision dynamics of these theoretically tractable species. Measurements can also be made as a function of temperature, i.e., collision velocity. In OH (sup 2 sigma +), both vibrational transfer and quenching are found to decrease with an increase in rotational level, while quenching decreases with increasing temperature. This behavior indicates that for OH, anisotropic attractive forces govern the entrance channel dynamics for these collisions. The quenching of NH (sup 3 pi sub i) by many (although not all) collision partners also decreases with increasing rotational and translational energy, and NH (sup 1 pi) behaves much like OH (sup 2 sigma +). However, the quenching of CH (sup 2 delta) appears to decrease with increasing rotation but increases with increasing temperature, suggesting in this case anisotropic forces involving a barrier or repulsive wall. Such similarities and differences should furnish useful comparisons with both simple and detailed theoretical pictures of the appropriate collision dynamics.

  10. Electron-impact Excitation of Ni II: Effective Collision Strengths for Optically Allowed Fine-structure Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of Ni II. Attention is expressly concentrated on the optically allowed fine-structure transitions between the 3d 9, 3d 84s, and 3d 74s 2 even parity levels and the 3d 84p and 3d 74s 4p odd parity levels. The parallel RMATRXII R-matrix package has been recently extended to allow for the inclusion of relativistic fine-structure effects. This suite of codes has been utilized in conjunction with the parallel PSTGF and PSTGICF programs in order to compute converged total collision strengths for the allowed transitions with which this study is concerned. All 113 LS terms identified with the 3d 9, 3d 84s, 3d 74s 2, 3d 84p, and 3d 74s 4p basis configurations were included in the target wavefunction representation, giving rise to a sophisticated 295 jj-level, 1930 coupled channel scattering complex. Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths have been computed at 30 individual electron temperatures ranging from 30 to 1,000,000 K. This range comfortably encompasses all temperatures significant to astrophysical and plasma applications. The convergence of the collision strengths is exhaustively investigated and comparisons are made with previous theoretical works, where significant discrepancies exist for the majority of transitions. We conclude that intrinsic in achieving converged collision strengths and thus effective collision strengths for the allowed transitions is the combined inclusion of contributions from the (N + 1) partial waves extending to a total angular momentum value of L = 50 and further contributions from even higher partial waves accomplished by employing a "top-up" procedure.

  11. Electron Impact Excitation of Ti XVIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jia Yong; Zeng, Jiao Long; Zhao, Gang; Bari, Muhanmmud Abbas; Zhang, Jie

    2005-10-01

    Two different methods were used to calculate the collision strengths of boron-like titanium. One was a close-coupling way using the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC) of P. H. Norrington and I. P. Grant (private communication), and the other was based on a relativistic distorted-wave (RDW) approximation with a Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) by Gu (2003). For DARC, the lowest 125 fine-structure levels belonging to the (1s2) 2s22p, 2s2p2, 2p3, 2s23l, 2s2p3l, and 2p23l (l=s, p, and d) configurations were included in the calculations. The target model space encompassed the lowest 15 levels, and all 105Δn=0 transitions together with 40 partial waves were included in calculations of the collision strengths. For FAC, the configuration interactions included in the calculations of atomic structure and excitation were among the same configurations of DARC. The collision strengths for all 125 levels were calculated at 10 scattered electron energies (10-10000eV). The effective collision strengths, obtained after integrating the collision strengths of two codes over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies, were also calculated for the electron temperatures in the range (50-500eV). For application to spectral modeling or diagnostics, we report a complete set of data for the energy levels, radiative rates, and effective collision strengths (only FAC) for all transitions.

  12. Collisional excitation of electron Landau levels in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, S. H.

    1981-01-01

    The cross sections for the excitation and deexcitation of the quantized transverse energy levels of an electron in a magnetic field are calculated for electron-proton and electron-electron collisions in light of the importance of the cross sections for studies of X-ray pulsar emission. First-order matrix elements are calculated using the Dirac theory of the electron, thus taking into account relativistic effects, which are believed to be important in accreting neutron stars. Results for the collisional excitation of ground state electrons by protons are presented which demonstrate the importance of proton recoil and relativistic effects, and it is shown that electron-electron excitations may contribute 10 to 20% of the excitation rate from electron-proton scattering in a Maxwellian plasma. Finally, calculations of the cross section for electron-proton small-angle scattering are presented which lead to relaxation rates for the electron velocity distribution which are modified by the magnetic field, and to a possible increase in the value of the Coulomb logarithm.

  13. Electron-impact vibrational excitation of cyclopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Čurík, R. Čársky, P.; Allan, M.

    2015-04-14

    We report a very detailed test of the ab initio discrete momentum representation (DMR) method of calculating vibrational excitation of polyatomic molecules by electron impact, by comparison of its results with an extensive set of experimental data, covering the entire range of scattering angles from 10{sup ∘} to 180{sup ∘} and electron energies from 0.4 to 20 eV. The DMR calculations were carried out by solving the two-channel Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the momentum space, and the interaction between the scattered electron and the target molecule was described by exact static-exchange potential corrected by a density functional theory (DFT) correlation-polarization interaction that models target’s response to the field of incoming electron. The theory is found to quantitatively reproduce the measured spectra for all normal modes, even at the difficult conditions of extreme angles and at low energies, and thus provides full understanding of the excitation mechanism. It is shown that the overlap of individual vibrational bands caused by limited experimental resolution and rotational excitation must be properly taken into account for correct comparison of experiment and theory. By doing so, an apparent discrepancy between published experimental data could be reconciled. A substantial cross section is found for excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry by the 5.5 eV A{sub 2}{sup ′} resonance, surprisingly because the currently accepted selection rules predict this process to be forbidden. The DMR theory shows that the excitation is caused by an incoming electron in an f-wave of A{sub 2}{sup ′} symmetry which causes excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of the A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry and departs in p- and f-waves of A{sub 2}{sup ″} symmetry.

  14. Electronic excitations in long polyenes revisited.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Maximilian; Tavan, Paul

    2012-03-28

    We apply the valence shell model OM2 [W. Weber and W. Thiel, Theor. Chem. Acc. 103, 495, (2000)] combined with multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) to compute the vertical excitation energies and transition dipole moments of the low-energy singlet excitations in the polyenes with 4 ≤ N ≤ 22π-electrons. We find that the OM2/MRCI descriptions closely resemble those of Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) π-electron models [P. Tavan and K. Schulten, Phys. Rev. B 36, 4337, (1987)], if equivalent MRCI procedures and regularly alternating model geometries are used. OM2/MRCI optimized geometries are shown to entail improved descriptions particularly for smaller polyenes (N ≤ 12), for which sizeable deviations from the regular model geometries are found. With configuration interaction active spaces covering also the σ- in addition to the π-electrons, OM2/MRCI excitation energies turn out to become smaller by at most 0.35 eV for the ionic and 0.15 eV for the covalent excitations. The particle-hole (ph) symmetry, which in Pariser-Parr-Pople models arises from the zero-differential overlap approximation, is demonstrated to be only weakly broken in OM2 such that the oscillator strengths of the covalent 1B(u)(-) states, which artificially vanish in ph-symmetric models, are predicted to be very small. According to OM2/MRCI and experimental data the 1B(u)(-) state is the third excited singlet state for N < 12 and becomes the second for N ≥ 14. By comparisons with results of other theoretical approaches and experimental evidence we argue that deficiencies of the particular MRCI method employed by us, which show up in a poor size consistency of the covalent excitations for N > 12, are caused by its restriction to at most doubly excited references.

  15. Electronic excitations in long polyenes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maximilian; Tavan, Paul

    2012-03-01

    We apply the valence shell model OM2 [W. Weber and W. Thiel, Theor. Chem. Acc. 103, 495, (2000), 10.1007/s002149900083] combined with multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) to compute the vertical excitation energies and transition dipole moments of the low-energy singlet excitations in the polyenes with 4 ⩽ N ⩽ 22π-electrons. We find that the OM2/MRCI descriptions closely resemble those of Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) π-electron models [P. Tavan and K. Schulten, Phys. Rev. B 36, 4337, (1987)], if equivalent MRCI procedures and regularly alternating model geometries are used. OM2/MRCI optimized geometries are shown to entail improved descriptions particularly for smaller polyenes (N ⩽ 12), for which sizeable deviations from the regular model geometries are found. With configuration interaction active spaces covering also the σ- in addition to the π-electrons, OM2/MRCI excitation energies turn out to become smaller by at most 0.35 eV for the ionic and 0.15 eV for the covalent excitations. The particle-hole (ph) symmetry, which in Pariser-Parr-Pople models arises from the zero-differential overlap approximation, is demonstrated to be only weakly broken in OM2 such that the oscillator strengths of the covalent 1B_u^- states, which artificially vanish in ph-symmetric models, are predicted to be very small. According to OM2/MRCI and experimental data the 1B_u^- state is the third excited singlet state for N < 12 and becomes the second for N ⩾ 14. By comparisons with results of other theoretical approaches and experimental evidence we argue that deficiencies of the particular MRCI method employed by us, which show up in a poor size consistency of the covalent excitations for N > 12, are caused by its restriction to at most doubly excited references.

  16. Core excitation of Li by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwary, S.N.

    1985-07-01

    Cross sections for the excitation of a core electron, which leads to autoionization, in lithium (Li) atomic system by electron impact have been calculated with use of the single-configuration Hartree-Fock wave function within the asymptotic Green's-function approximation (AGFA) in the low-bombarding-energy region. Comparison is made with available results. Our investigation demonstrates that the AGFA supports the R-matrix as well as the distorted-wave Born-approximation behavior.

  17. Re-evaluation of the side effects of cytochrome b6f inhibitor dibromothymoquinone on photosystem II excitation and electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Belatik, Ahmed; Joly, David; Hotchandani, Surat; Carpentier, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Dibromothymoquinone (DBMIB) has been used as a specific inhibitor of plastoquinol oxidation at the Q0 binding site of the cytochrome b6f complex for 40 years. It is thought to suppress electron transfer between photosystem (PS) II and I, as well as cyclic electron transfer around PSI. However, DBMIB has also been reported to act as a quencher of chlorophyll excited states. In this study, we have re-evaluated the effects of DBMIB on chlorophyll excited states and PSII photochemistry. The results show that DBMIB significantly quenches the chlorophyll excited states of PSII antenna even at low concentration (from 0.1 μM), lowering the effective excitation rate of the actinic light. It also acts as a potent PSII electron acceptor retarding the reduction of the plastoquinone pool with almost maximal potency at 2 μM. Altogether, these results suggest that experiments using DBMIB can easily be misinterpreted and stress on the importance of taking into account all these side effects that occur in the same range of DBMIB concentration used for inhibition of plastoquinol oxidation (1 μM).

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of strong shock waves propagating in dense deuterium, taking into consideration effects of excited electrons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Huiling; He, X T

    2017-02-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of shock waves propagating in dense deuterium with the electron force field method [J. T. Su and W. A. Goddard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 185003 (2007)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.99.185003], which explicitly takes the excitation of electrons into consideration. Nonequilibrium features associated with the excitation of electrons are systematically investigated. We show that chemical bonds in D_{2} molecules lead to a more complicated shock wave structure near the shock front, compared with the results of classical molecular dynamics simulation. Charge separation can bring about accumulation of net charges on large scales, instead of the formation of a localized dipole layer, which might cause extra energy for the shock wave to propagate. In addition, the simulations also display that molecular dissociation at the shock front is the major factor that accounts for the "bump" structure in the principal Hugoniot. These results could help to build a more realistic picture of shock wave propagation in fuel materials commonly used in the inertial confinement fusion.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of strong shock waves propagating in dense deuterium, taking into consideration effects of excited electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Huiling; He, X. T.

    2017-02-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of shock waves propagating in dense deuterium with the electron force field method [J. T. Su and W. A. Goddard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 185003 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.185003], which explicitly takes the excitation of electrons into consideration. Nonequilibrium features associated with the excitation of electrons are systematically investigated. We show that chemical bonds in D2 molecules lead to a more complicated shock wave structure near the shock front, compared with the results of classical molecular dynamics simulation. Charge separation can bring about accumulation of net charges on large scales, instead of the formation of a localized dipole layer, which might cause extra energy for the shock wave to propagate. In addition, the simulations also display that molecular dissociation at the shock front is the major factor that accounts for the "bump" structure in the principal Hugoniot. These results could help to build a more realistic picture of shock wave propagation in fuel materials commonly used in the inertial confinement fusion.

  20. Electron-driven excitations and dissociation of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Greg; Orel, Ann E.

    2015-02-13

    This program studied how energy is interchanged in electron and photon collisions with molecules leading to ex-citation and dissociation. Modern ab initio techniques, both for the photoionization and electron scattering, and the subsequent nuclear dynamics studies, are used to accurately treat these problems. This work addresses vibrational ex-citation and dissociative attachment following electron impact, and the dynamics following inner shell photoionzation. These problems are ones for which a full multi-dimensional treatment of the nuclear dynamics is essential and where non-adiabatic effects are expected to be important.

  1. Electron Impact Excitation Of Ti XIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, F. P.

    2012-05-01

    Emission lines of Ti XIX are important for the modeling and diagnostics of lasing, fusion and astrophysical plasmas, for which atomic data are required for a variety of parameters, such as energy levels, radiative rates (A- values), and excitation rates or equivalently the effective collision strengths (Υ), which are obtained from the electron impact collision strengths (Ω). Experimentally, energy levels are available for Ti XIX on the NIST website, but there is paucity for accurate collisional atomic data. Therefore, here we report a complete set of results (namely energy levels, radiative rates, and effective collision strengths) for all transitions among the lowest 98 levels of Ti XIX. These levels belong to the (1s2) 2s2, 2s2p, 2p2, 2s3l, 2p3l, 2s4l, and 2p4l configurations. Finally, we also report the A- values for four types of transitions, namely electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2), because these are also required for plasma modeling. For our calculations of wavefunctions, we have adopted the fully relativistic GRASP code, and for the calculations of Ω, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (DARC) of PH Norrington and IP Grant. Additionally, parallel calculations have also been performed with the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) of Gu, so that all atomic parameters can be rigorously assessed for accuracy.

  2. Theory of electron-hole pair excitations in unimolecular processes at metal surfaces. I. X-ray edge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadzuk, J. W.; Metiu, H.

    1980-09-01

    A theory of the dynamics of molecular processes at solid surfaces must necessarily deal with those aspects of the solid which provide dissipative or irreversible reaction channels, thus giving the particular process a direction in time. While the heat-bath aspects of the solid are often considered from the phonon point of view, there is increasing speculation that the substrate electron-hole pair excitations may be a significant rate-determining factor, at least for metals. This belief is supported by various conclusions which have emerged from theoretical studies of time-dependent perturbations acting on extended Fermi systems, as physically realized in core-level spectroscopies of solids. We present here one phase of a study of surface reaction dynamics, focusing on the irreversible coupling of nuclear motion of an incident beam of atoms or molecules with the substrate electrons. For the cases in which the incident particle undergoes a substrate-induced diabatic transition in its internal electronic state, a sudden localized perturbation on the electrons is turned on. In analogy with the x-ray edge problem, an infrared divergent spectrum of electron-hole pairs is created which could give rise to irreversibility. Specific examples are considered and the ramifications on such observable quantities as sticking coefficients are detailed.

  3. Electronic excitation of molecular hydrogen by low-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, Leigh

    2016-09-01

    Molecular hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, particularly in interstellar plasmas such as atmospheres of gas giant planets and stars. Electron collision data for hydrogen is critical to interpreting the spectroscopy of interstellar objects, as well as being of applied value for modelling technological plasmas. Hydrogen is also fundamentally interesting, as while highly accurate wave functions for this simple molecule are available, providing an accurate, ab initio, treatment the collision dynamics has proven challenging, on account of the need to have a complete description of channel coupling and polarization effects. To date, no single theoretical approach has been able to replicate experimental results across all transitions and incident energies, while the experimental database that is available is far from complete and not all available measurements are in satisfactory agreement. In this talk, we present differential and integral cross section measurements for electronic excitation cross sections for molecular hydrogen by low-energy electron impact. The data were measured at incident energies below 20eV, using a well-tested crossed beam apparatus and employing a moveable gas source approach to ensure that background contributions to the scattering are accurately accounted for. These measurements are compared with new theoretical results employing the convergent close coupling approach.

  4. Electron-induced excitation of 93Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiara, C. J.; Carroll, J. J.; Marsh, J. C.; Matters, D. A.; Lane, G. J.; Hartley, D. J.; Polasik, M.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.

    2016-09-01

    The inverse of the internal-conversion process, whereby a free electron is captured into an atomic orbital and subsequently excites the nucleus to a higher-lying state via a virtual energy exchange, was predicted to exist 40 years ago but has yet to be demonstrated experimentally. To search for this mode of nuclear excitation by electron capture, we performed an experiment at the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The t1/2 = 6.85-h, 21/2+ state of 93Mo was populated in the 7Li(90Zr, p 3 n) reaction. The excitation mechanism was predicted to induce depopulation of this isomer as the fast-moving 93mMo recoils slowed in the target material, emitting a characteristic sequence of γ rays in the process. Results of the search for these signature γ rays using Digital Gammasphere will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the US DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. This research used resources of ANL's ATLAS facility, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  5. Solvent Effects on the Electronic Absorption and Fluorescence Spectra of HNP: Estimation of Ground and Excited State Dipole Moments.

    PubMed

    Desai, Vani R; Hunagund, Shirajahammad M; Basanagouda, Mahantesha; Kadadevarmath, Jagadish S; Sidarai, Ashok H

    2016-07-01

    We report the effect of solvents on absorption and fluorescence spectra of biologically active 3(2H)-pyridazinone namely 5-(2-hydroxy-naphthalen-1-yl)-2-phenyl-2H-pyridazin-3-one (HNP) in different solvents at room temperature. The ground and the excited state dipole moments of HNP molecule was estimated from Lippert's, Bakshiev's and Kawski-Chamma-Viallet's equations using the solvatochromic shift method. The ground state dipole moment (μ g ) was also estimated by Guggenheim and Higasi method using the dielectric constant and refractive index of solute at different concentrations, the μ g value obtained from these two methods are comparable to the μ g value obtained by the solvatochromic shift method. The excited state dipole moment (μ e ) is greater than the ground state dipole moment (μ g ), which indicates that the excited state is more polar than the ground state. Further, we have evaluated the change in dipole moment (Δμ) from the solvatochromic shift method and on the basis of molecular-microscopic solvent polarity parameter[Formula: see text], later on the values were compared.

  6. Four-electron model for singlet and triplet excitation energy transfers with inclusion of coherence memory, inelastic tunneling and nuclear quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yosuke; Ebina, Kuniyoshi; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2016-08-01

    A computational scheme to describe the coherent dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) in molecular systems is proposed on the basis of generalized master equations with memory kernels. This formalism takes into account those physical effects in electron-bath coupling system such as the spin symmetry of excitons, the inelastic electron tunneling and the quantum features of nuclear motions, thus providing a theoretical framework to perform an ab initio description of EET through molecular simulations for evaluating the spectral density and the temporal correlation function of electronic coupling. Some test calculations have then been carried out to investigate the dependence of exciton population dynamics on coherence memory, inelastic tunneling correlation time, magnitude of electronic coupling, quantum correction to temporal correlation function, reorganization energy and energy gap.

  7. Effect of the chirality of residues and γ-turns on the electronic excitation spectra, excited-state reaction paths and conical intersections of capped phenylalanine-alanine dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Dorit; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2011-07-11

    The capped dipeptides Ac-L-Phe-Xxx-NH(2) , Xxx=L-Ala, D-Ala, Aib, where Aib (aminoisobutyric acid) is a non-chiral amino acid, have been investigated by means of UV/IR double-resonance spectroscopy in supersonic jets and density functional theory calculations by Gloaguen et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2007, 9, 4491]. The UV and IR spectra of five different species were observed and their structures assigned by comparison with calculated vibrational frequencies in the NH-stretching region. The peptides with two chiral residues can form homochiral or heterochiral species. In addition, γ-turns exist as two helical forms (γ(D), γ(L)) of opposite handedness. Herein, we explore the excited-state potential-energy surfaces of these dipeptides with ab initio calculations. Vertical and adiabatic excitation energies, excited-state reaction paths and conical intersections are characterized with the ADC(2) propagator method. It is shown that electron/proton transfer along the hydrogen bond of the γ-turn gives rise to efficient radiationless deactivation of the (1)ππ* state of the chromophore via several conical intersections. While the homo/hetero chirality of the residues appears to have a negligible effect on the photophysical dynamics, we found evidence that the γ(L) conformers may have shorter excited-state lifetimes (and thus higher photostability) than the γ(D) conformers.

  8. Quantitative treatment of the solvent effects on the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of acridines and phenazines. The ground and first excited singlet-state dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Jean Jacques; Maafi, Mounir; Párkányi, Cyril; Boniface, Christian

    1995-04-01

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of four acridines (acridine, Acridine Yellow, 9-aminoacridine and proflavine) and three phenazines (phenazine, neutral Red and safranine) are determined at room temperature (298 K) in several solvents of various polarities (dioxane, chloroform, ethyl ether, ethyl acetate, 1-butanol, 2-propanol, ethanol, methanol, dimethylformamide, acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide). The effect of the solvent upon the spectral characteristics of the above compounds, is studied. In combination with the ground-state dipole moments of these compounds, the spectral data are used to evaluate their first excited singlet-state dipole moments by means of the solvatochromic shift method (Bakhshiev's and Kawski-Chamma-Viallet's correlations). The theoretical ground and excited singlet-state dipole moments for acridines and phenazines are also calculated as a vector sum of the π-component (obtained by the PPP method) and the σ-component (obtained from σ-bond moments). For most acridines and phenazines under study, the experimental excited singlet-state dipole moments are found to be higher than their ground state counterpart. The application of the Kamlet-Abboud-Taft solvatochromic parameters to the solvent effect on spectral properties of acridine and phenazine derivatives is discussed.

  9. Electronic spectra of protonated benzaldehyde clusters with Ar and N2: effect of ππ* excitation on the intermolecular potential.

    PubMed

    Patzer, Alexander; Zimmermann, Max; Alata, Ivan; Jouvet, Christophe; Dopfer, Otto

    2010-12-09

    Electronic spectra of the S(1)←S(0) transition of dimers of protonated benzaldehyde (BZH(+)) with Ar and N(2) are recorded by resonance-enhanced photodissociation in a tandem mass spectrometer. The S(1) origins observed are shifted to higher frequency upon complexation with Ar (ΔS(1) = 300 cm(-1)) and N(2) (ΔS(1) = 628 cm(-1)). Ab initio calculations at the CC2/aug-cc-pVDZ level suggest an assignment to H-bonded dimers of L = Ar and N(2) binding to the cis isomer of O-protonated BZH(+), yielding values of ΔS(1) = 242 and 588 cm(-1) for cis-BZH(+)-L(H). Electronic ππ* excitation results in a substantial increase of the proton affinity of BZH(+), which in turn destabilizes the intermolecular H-bonds to the inert ligands by 35%. The drastic effects of electronic ππ* excitation on the geometric and electronic structure as well as the strength and anisotropy of the intermolecular potential (H-bonding and π-bonding) are investigated.

  10. Effects of Mn Substitution on the Thermoelectric Properties and Thermal Excitations of the Electron-doped Perovskite Sr1-xLaxTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Tetsuji; Hata, Hiroto; Eto, Takahiro; Sobaru, Shogo; Oda, Ryosuke; Kaji, Hiroki; Nishina, Kousuke; Kuwahara, Hideki; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Kajimoto, Ryoichi

    2016-09-01

    We studied how Mn substitution affects the thermoelectric properties and thermal excitations of the electron-doped perovskite Sr1-xLaxTiO3 by measuring its electrical and thermal transport properties, magnetization, specific heat, and inelastic neutron scattering. Slight Mn substitution with the lattice defects enhanced the Seebeck coefficient, perhaps because of coupling between itinerant electrons and localized spins or between itinerant electrons and local lattice distortion around Mn3+ ions, while it enhanced anharmonic lattice vibrations, which effectively suppressed thermal conductivity in a state of high electrical conductivity. Consequently, slight Mn substitution increased the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit for Sr1-xLaxTiO3 near room temperature.

  11. The lifetime of electronic excitations in metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijada, M.; Díez Muiño, R.; Echenique, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    Density functional theory and the self-energy formalism are used to evaluate the lifetime of electronic excitations in metal clusters of nanometre size. The electronic structure of the cluster is obtained in the jellium model and spherical symmetry is assumed. Two effects that depend on the size of the clusters are discussed: the change in the number of final states to which the excitation can decay, and the modification in the screened interaction between electrons. For clusters with density parameter rs = 4 and diameter a few nanometres, a lifetime value of {\\approx }5 fs is reached for electronic excitations of {\\approx }1 eV. This value is of the same order of magnitude of that obtained in the bulk limit at the same level of approximation. For smaller clusters, a distinct non-monotonic behaviour of the lifetime as a function of the cluster size is found and the lifetime of excitations of {\\approx }1 eV can vary between 4 and 30 fs.

  12. Low Energy Electron Impact Excitation of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralphs, Kevin; Serna, Gabriela; Hargreaves, Leigh R.; Khakoo, Murtadha A.; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, B. Vincent

    2011-10-01

    We present normalized absolute differential and integral cross-section measurements for the low energy electron impact excitation of the lowest dissociative 3B1, 1B1,3A1 and 1A1 states of H2O. The DCS were taken at incident energies of 9 eV, 10 eV, 12 eV, 15 eV and 20 eV and scattering angles of 15° to 130° and normalized to the elastic electron scattering measurements of. The DCS were obtained after a sophisticated unfolding of the electron energy loss spectrum of water using photoabsorption data in the literature as investigated by Thorn et al.. Our measurements extend those of to near-threshold energies. We find both important agreements and differences between our DCS and those of. Comparison to our theory (multi-channel Schwinger) and that of earlier work will also be presented. Funded by an NSF grant # RUI-PHY 0968874.

  13. Electron impact ionization-excitation of Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancarani, Lorenzo Ugo; Gomez, A. I.; Gasaneo, G.; Mitnik, D. M.; Ambrosio, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate triple differential cross sections (TDCS) for the process of ionization-excitation of Helium by fast electron impact in which the residual ion is left in the n =2 excited state. We chose the strongly asymmetric kinematics used in the experiment performed by Dupré et al.. In a perturbative scheme, for high projectile energies the four-body problem reduces to a three-body one and, within that framework, we solve the time- independent Schrödinger equation with a Sturmian approach. The method, based on Generalized Sturmian Functions (GSF), is employed to obtain the initial ground state of Helium, the single-continuum state and the scattering wave function; for each of them, the GSF basis is constructed with the corresponding adequate asymptotic conditions. Besides, the method presents the following advantage: the scattering amplitudes can be extracted directly in the asymptotic region of the scattering solution, and thus the TDCS can be obtained without requiring a matrix element evaluation.

  14. Electron impact excitation of highly charged sodium-like ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaha, M.; Davis, J.

    1978-01-01

    Optical transition probabilities and electron collision strengths for Ca X, Fe XVI, Zn XX, Kr XXVI and Mo XXXII are calculated for transitions between n equal to 3 and n equal to 4 levels. The calculations neglect relativistic effects on the radial functions. A semi-empirical approach provides wave functions of the excited states; a distorted wave function without exchange is employed to obtain the excitation cross sections. The density dependence of the relative intensities of certain emission lines in the sodium isoelectronic sequence is also discussed.

  15. Making use of x-ray optical effects in photoelectron-, Auger electron-, and x-ray emission spectroscopies: Total reflection, standing-wave excitation, and resonant effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.-H.; Gray, A. X.; Kaiser, A. M.; Mun, B. S.; Sell, B. C.; Kortright, J. B.; Fadley, C. S.

    2013-02-21

    We present a general theoretical methodology and related open-access computer program for carrying out the calculation of photoelectron, Auger electron, and x-ray emission intensities in the presence of several x-ray optical effects, including total reflection at grazing incidence, excitation with standing-waves produced by reflection from synthetic multilayers and at core-level resonance conditions, and the use of variable polarization to produce magnetic circular dichroism. Calculations illustrating all of these effects are presented, including in some cases comparisons to experimental results. Sample types include both semi-infinite flat surfaces and arbitrary multilayer configurations, with interdiffusion/roughness at their interfaces. These x-ray optical effects can significantly alter observed photoelectron, Auger, and x-ray intensities, and in fact lead to several generally useful techniques for enhancing surface and buried-layer sensitivity, including layer-resolved densities of states and depth profiles of element-specific magnetization. The computer program used in this study should thus be useful for a broad range of studies in which x-ray optical effects are involved or are to be exploited in next-generation surface and interface studies of nanoscale systems.

  16. Electron-impact excitation of Ni II. Collision strengths and effective collision strengths for low-lying fine-structure forbidden transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.

    2010-04-01

    Context. Considerable demand exists for electron excitation data for ion{Ni}{ii}, since lines from this abundant ion are observed in a wide variety of laboratory and astrophysical spectra. The accurate theoretical determination of these data can present a significant challenge however, due to complications arising from the presence of an open 3d-shell in the description of the target ion. Aims: In this work we present collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of ion{Ni}{ii}. Attention is concentrated on the 153 forbidden fine-structure transitions between the energetically lowest 18 levels of ion{Ni}{ii}. Effective collision strengths have been evaluated at 27 individual electron temperatures ranging from 30-100 000 K. To our knowledge this is the most extensive theoretical collisional study carried out on this ion to date. Methods: The parallel R-matrix package RMATRX II has recently been extended to allow for the inclusion of relativistic effects. This suite of codes has been utilised in the present work in conjunction with PSTGF to evaluate collision strengths and effective collision strengths for all of the low-lying forbidden fine-structure transitions. The following basis configurations were included in the target model - 3d9, 3d84s, 3d84p, 3d74s2 and 3d74s4p - giving rise to a sophisticated 295 jj-level, 1930 coupled channel scattering problem. Results: Comprehensive comparisons are made between the present collisional data and those obtained from earlier theoretical evaluations. While the effective collision strengths agree well for some transitions, significant discrepancies exist for others. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/513/A55

  17. Cascade effects in the excitation of np{sup 5}(n+1)p states of krypton and xenon atoms by polarized electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.H.; Williams, J.F.; Chen, X.J.; Hayes, P.A.; Bartschat, K.; Zeman, V.

    2003-03-01

    The integrated Stokes parameters of the decay photons from the excited np{sup 5}(n+1)p[5/2]{sub 3}, np{sup 5}(n+1)p{sup '}[3/2]{sub 2}, and np{sup 5}(n+1)p{sup '}[3/2]{sub 1} (n=5 and 6) states of Kr and Xe, respectively, are measured from near threshold to 100 eV using incident polarized electrons. The effects of the cascade photons on the Stokes parameters have been investigated using a pulsed beam of polarized electrons. The cascade effects for the final excited states are more significant for the linear polarization P{sub 1} parameter than for the circular polarization P{sub 3} parameter and they do not always have depolarization effects. The integrated state multipoles, determined from the integrated Stokes parameters corrected for cascade effects, are closer to, but not in agreement with, the values from semirelativistic R matrix and relativistic distorted-wave approximation methods.

  18. Cumulant approach for electronic excitations in x-ray and electron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehr, J. J.

    A quantitative treatment of electronic excitations and other many-body effects in x-ray and electron spectra has long been challenging. Physically, electronic correlations and atomic vibrations lead to inelastic losses and damping effects that are ignored in ground state methods or approximations such as TDDFT. Quasi-particle (QP) approaches such as the GW approximation yield significant improvements, as demonstrated in real-space Green's function and GW/Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations, but still ignore multi-electron excitations. Recently such excitations have been treated with considerable success using cumulant expansion techniques and the quasi-boson approximation. In this beyond QP approach, excitations such as plasmons and electron-hole excitations appear as satellites in the spectral function. The method naturally accounts for multiple-satellites and can be extended to include extrinsic losses and interference effects. Extensions for effects of vibrations and strong correlations including charge-transfer satellites may also be possible. These advances are illustrated with a number of applications. Supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER45623.

  19. Comparison of the quadratic configuration interaction and coupled cluster approaches to electron correlation including the effect of triple excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.; Rendell, Alistair P.

    1990-01-01

    The recently proposed quadratic configuration interaction (QCI) method is compared with the more rigorous coupled cluster (CC) approach for a variety of chemical systems. Some of these systems are well represented by a single-determinant reference function and others are not. The finite order singles and doubles correlation energy, the perturbational triples correlation energy, and a recently devised diagnostic for estimating the importance of multireference effects are considered. The spectroscopic constants of CuH, the equilibrium structure of cis-(NO)2 and the binding energies of Be3, Be4, Mg3, and Mg4 were calculated using both approaches. The diagnostic for estimating multireference character clearly demonstrates that the QCI method becomes less satisfactory than the CC approach as non-dynamical correlation becomes more important, in agreement with a perturbational analysis of the two methods and the numerical estimates of the triple excitation energies they yield. The results for CuH show that the differences between the two methods become more apparent as the chemical systems under investigation becomes more multireference in nature and the QCI results consequently become less reliable. Nonetheless, when the system of interest is dominated by a single reference determinant both QCI and CC give very similar results.

  20. Excited S 1 state dipole moments of nitrobenzene and p-nitroaniline from thermochromic effect on electronic absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Kukliński, B.; Bojarski, P.

    2006-11-01

    The effect of temperature on the absorption spectra of nitrobenzene (NB) and p-nitroaniline (NA) in 1,2-dichloroethane was studied for temperature ranging from 295 K to 378 K and from 296 K to 408 K, respectively. With temperature increase the absorption bands of both compounds are blue shifted, which is caused by the decrease of permittivity ɛ and refractive index n. From the band shifts and by using the Bilot and Kawski theory [ L. Bilot, A. Kawski, Z. Naturforsch. 17a (1962) 621] the dipole moments in the excited singlet state μe = 6.59 D of NB and μe = 13.35 D of NA were determined. The influence of polarizability α, the Onsager cavity radius a and dipole moment in the ground state μg on the determined values of μe are discussed. A comparison of the obtained μe values with those of other authors is given. In the case of p-NA a strong intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) was confirmed.

  1. Excited state dipole moments of N, N-dimethylaniline from thermochromic effect on electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Kukliński, B.; Bojarski, P.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of temperature on absorption and fluorescence spectra of N, N-dimethylaniline (DMA) in ethyl acetate has been studied for temperature ranging from 293 to 388 K. The permittivity ɛ and refractive index n of the solvent decrease with temperature increase and the absorption and fluorescence bands are blue shifted (so-called "thermochromic shift"). Based on this phenomenon, the dipole moment μe in the excited singlet state and the Onsager interaction radius a for DMA were determined using the Bilot and Kawski theory [L. Bilot, A. Kawski, Z. Naturforsch. 17a (1962) 621; 18a (1963) 10, 256]. For the known dipole moment in the ground state μg = 1.61 D and for α/ a3 = 0.54 ( α is the polarizability of the solute) the average value of μe = 3.55 D and a = 3.1 Å were determined. The obtained values for DMA are compared with the experimental values determined by other authors.

  2. High temperature electronic excitation and ionization rates in gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Frederick

    1991-01-01

    The relaxation times for electronic excitation due to electron bombardment of atoms was found to be quite short, so that electron kinetic temperature (T sub e) and the electron excitation temperature (T asterisk) should equilibrate quickly whenever electrons are present. However, once equilibrium has been achieved, further energy to the excited electronic states and to the kinetic energy of free electrons must be fed in by collisions with heavy particles that cause vibrational and electronic state transitions. The rate coefficients for excitation of electronic states produced by heavy particle collision have not been well known. However, a relatively simple semi-classical theory has been developed here which is analytic up to the final integration over a Boltzmann distribution of collision energies; this integral can then be evaluated numerically by quadrature. Once the rate coefficients have been determined, the relaxation of electronic excitation energy can be evaluated and compared with the relaxation rates of vibrational excitation. Then the relative importance of these two factors, electronic excitation and vibrational excitation by heavy particle collision, on the transfer of energy to free electron motion, can be assessed.

  3. Dynamics and spectroscopy of CH₂OO excited electronic states.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Foreman, Elizabeth S; Kapnas, Kara M; Murray, Craig; Räsänen, Markku; Gerber, R Benny

    2016-04-28

    The excited states of the Criegee intermediate CH2OO are studied in molecular dynamics simulations using directly potentials from multi-reference perturbation theory (MR-PT2). The photoexcitation of the species is simulated, and trajectories are propagated in time on the excited state. Some of the photoexcitation events lead to direct fragmentation of the molecule, but other trajectories describe at least several vibrations in the excited state, that may terminate by relaxation to the ground electronic state. Limits on the role of non-adiabatic contributions to the process are estimated by two different simulations, one that forces surface-hopping at potential crossings, and another that ignores surface hopping altogether. The effect of non-adiabatic transitions is found to be small. Spectroscopic implications and consequences for the interpretation of experimental results are discussed.

  4. The mechanism of electronic excitation in the bacterial bioluminescent reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemtseva, E. V.; Kudryasheva, N. S.

    2007-01-01

    The current state of the problem of formation of the electron-excited product in the chemiluminescent reaction that underlies the bacterial luminescence is analysed. Various schemes of chemical transformations capable of producing a bacterial bioluminescence emitter are presented. The problem of excitation of secondary emitters is considered; two possible mechanisms of their excitation are analysed.

  5. Nuclear excitation by electronic transition of 235U

    DOE PAGES

    Chodash, P. A.; Norman, E. B.; Burke, J. T.; ...

    2016-03-11

    Here, nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that can occur in isotopes containing a low-lying nuclear excited state. Over the past 40 yr, several experiments have attempted to measure NEET of 235U and those experiments have yielded conflicting results.

  6. Electron-impact excitation of molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zammit, Mark C.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2017-02-01

    We report the electron impact integrated and differential cross sections for excitation to the b 3Σu+ , a 3Σg+ , c 3Πu , B 1Σu+ , E ,F 1Σg+ , C 1Πu , e 3Σu+ , h 3Σg+ , d 3Πu , B'1Σu+ , D 1Πu , B''1Σu+ , and D'1Πu states of molecular hydrogen in the energy range from 10 to 300 eV. Total scattering and total ionization cross sections are also presented. The calculations have been performed by using the convergent close-coupling method within the fixed-nuclei approximation. Detailed convergence studies have been performed with respect to the size of the close-coupling expansion and a set of recommended cross sections has been produced. Significant differences with previous calculations are found. Agreement with experiment is mixed, ranging from excellent to poor depending on the transition and incident energies.

  7. Extremely confined gap surface-plasmon modes excited by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Søren; Stenger, Nicolas; Pors, Anders; Holmgaard, Tobias; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Wagner, Jakob B.; Pedersen, Kjeld; Wubs, Martijn; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-06-01

    High-spatial and energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) can be used for detailed characterization of localized and propagating surface-plasmon excitations in metal nanostructures, giving insight into fundamental physical phenomena and various plasmonic effects. Here, applying EELS to ultra-sharp convex grooves in gold, we directly probe extremely confined gap surface-plasmon (GSP) modes excited by swift electrons in nanometre-wide gaps. We reveal the resonance behaviour associated with the excitation of the antisymmetric GSP mode for extremely small gap widths, down to ~5 nm. We argue that excitation of this mode, featuring very strong absorption, has a crucial role in experimental realizations of non-resonant light absorption by ultra-sharp convex grooves with fabrication-induced asymmetry. The occurrence of the antisymmetric GSP mode along with the fundamental GSP mode exploited in plasmonic waveguides with extreme light confinement is a very important factor that should be taken into account in the design of nanoplasmonic circuits and devices.

  8. Effects of electronic and nuclear interactions on the excited-state properties and structural dynamics of copper(I) diimine complexes.

    PubMed

    Mara, Michael W; Jackson, Nicholas E; Huang, Jier; Stickrath, Andrew B; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Gothard, Nosheen A; Ratner, Mark A; Chen, Lin X

    2013-02-14

    The effects of structural constraints on the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state structural dynamics of cuprous bis-2,9-diphenyl-phenanthroline ([Cu(I)(dpp)(2)](+)) in both coordinating acetonitrile and noncoordinating toluene were studied using X-ray transient absorption (XTA) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The phenyl groups attached to the phenanthroline ligands not only effectively shield the Cu(I) center from solvent molecules, but also force a flattened tetrahedral coordination geometry of the Cu(I) center. Consequently, the MLCT state lifetime in [Cu(I)(dpp)(2)](+) is solvent-independent, unlike the previously studied 2,9-methyl substituted bis-phenanthroline Cu(I) complex. The MLCT state of [Cu(I)(dpp)(2)](+) still undergoes a "pseudo Jahn-Teller distortion," with the angle between the two phenanthroline ligand planes decreased further by 7°. The XTA results indicate that, in the MLCT excited state of [Cu(I)(dpp)(2)](+), the phenyls at the 2, 9 positions of the phenanthroline rotate, breaking the π-π interaction with the phenanthroline ligands without ever rotating in-plane with the phenanthroline ligands. Hence, the transferred electron density from the Cu(I) center is localized on the phenanthroline moiety with no charge density present on the phenyl rings. The insight about the effect of the structural constraints on the MLCT state properties will guide the design of Cu(I) diimine complexes with suitable excited-state properties to function as earth-abundant dye sensitizers for solar electricity generation.

  9. [Excitation energy and frequency of transition spectral line of electron in an asymmetry quantum dot].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2009-03-01

    In an asymmetry quantum dot, the properties of the electron, which is strongly coupled with phonon, were investigated. The variational relations of the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot with the transverse and longituainal effective confinement length of quantum dot and the electron-phonon coupling strength were studied by using a linear combination operator and the unitary transformation methods. Numerical calculations for the variational relations of the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot with the transverse and longituainal effective confinement length of quantum dot and the electron-phonon coupling strength were performed and the results show that the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will strongly increase with decreasing the transverse and longitudinal effective confinement length. The first internal excited state energy of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will decrease with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength. The excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will increase with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength.

  10. Coincident excitation and radiative decay in electron-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubassa-Amundsen, D. H.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.

    2017-02-01

    The distorted-wave Born approximation formalism for the description of the (e ,e'γ ) reaction, in which emitted photons and scattered electrons are simultaneously detected, is outlined. Both the Coulomb and the magnetic scattering are fully taken into account. The influence of electron bremsstrahlung is estimated within the plane-wave Born approximation. Recoil effects are also discussed. The formalism is applied for the low-energy (e ,e'γ )92Zr reaction with excitation of the first collective (21+) and mixed-symmetry (22+) states. The corresponding transition charge and current densities are taken from a random-phase approximation (RPA) calculation within the quasiparticle phonon model. It is shown, by this example, in which way the magnetic subshell population of the excited state influences the angular distribution of the decay photon. For these quadrupole excitations the influence of magnetic scattering is only prominent at the backmost scattering angles, where a clear distinction of the photon pattern pertaining to the two states is predicted.

  11. Nonideal fishbone instability excited by trapped energetic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Tang, C. J.; Wang, Z. T.; Long, Y. X.; Dong, J. Q.

    2013-03-15

    It is shown that trapped energetic electrons can resonate with the collisionless m = 1 nonideal kink mode, therefore exciting the nonideal e-fishbone, which would often lead to a drop in soft x-ray emissivity and frequency chirping. The theory predictions agree well with the experimental observations of e-fishbone on HL-2A. It is also found that the effects of MHD energy of background plasma might be the reason for the observed phenomena: frequency chirping up and down, and V-font-style sweeping.

  12. Nonideal fishbone instability excited by trapped energetic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, Z. T.; Long, Y. X.; Dong, J. Q.; Tang, C. J.

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that trapped energetic electrons can resonate with the collisionless m = 1 nonideal kink mode, therefore exciting the nonideal e-fishbone, which would often lead to a drop in soft x-ray emissivity and frequency chirping. The theory predictions agree well with the experimental observations of e-fishbone on HL-2A. It is also found that the effects of MHD energy of background plasma might be the reason for the observed phenomena: frequency chirping up and down, and V-font-style sweeping.

  13. Targeting excited states in all-trans polyenes with electron-pair states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguslawski, Katharina

    2016-12-01

    Wavefunctions restricted to electron pair states are promising models for strongly correlated systems. Specifically, the pair Coupled Cluster Doubles (pCCD) ansatz allows us to accurately describe bond dissociation processes and heavy-element containing compounds with multiple quasi-degenerate single-particle states. Here, we extend the pCCD method to model excited states using the equation of motion (EOM) formalism. As the cluster operator of pCCD is restricted to electron-pair excitations, EOM-pCCD allows us to target excited electron-pair states only. To model singly excited states within EOM-pCCD, we modify the configuration interaction ansatz of EOM-pCCD to contain also single excitations. Our proposed model represents a simple and cost-effective alternative to conventional EOM-CC methods to study singly excited electronic states. The performance of the excited state models is assessed against the lowest-lying excited states of the uranyl cation and the two lowest-lying excited states of all-trans polyenes. Our numerical results suggest that EOM-pCCD including single excitations is a good starting point to target singly excited states.

  14. Targeting excited states in all-trans polyenes with electron-pair states.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina

    2016-12-21

    Wavefunctions restricted to electron pair states are promising models for strongly correlated systems. Specifically, the pair Coupled Cluster Doubles (pCCD) ansatz allows us to accurately describe bond dissociation processes and heavy-element containing compounds with multiple quasi-degenerate single-particle states. Here, we extend the pCCD method to model excited states using the equation of motion (EOM) formalism. As the cluster operator of pCCD is restricted to electron-pair excitations, EOM-pCCD allows us to target excited electron-pair states only. To model singly excited states within EOM-pCCD, we modify the configuration interaction ansatz of EOM-pCCD to contain also single excitations. Our proposed model represents a simple and cost-effective alternative to conventional EOM-CC methods to study singly excited electronic states. The performance of the excited state models is assessed against the lowest-lying excited states of the uranyl cation and the two lowest-lying excited states of all-trans polyenes. Our numerical results suggest that EOM-pCCD including single excitations is a good starting point to target singly excited states.

  15. Enhanced negative ion formation via electron attachment to electronically-excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnaduwage, L.A. |

    1995-12-31

    Recent basic studies on electron attachment to laser-excited molecules show that electron attachment to electronically-excited states can have orders of magnitude larger cross sections compared to the respective ground electronic states. Even though systematic studies have not been conducted, there are indications that electronically-excited states may play a significant role in negative ion formation in gas discharges. The high-lying Rydberg states could be of particular significance since, (i) their production efficiencies are high, and (ii) they have comparatively long lifetimes. Such states could be populated in discharge sources via direct electron impact or via excitation transfer from metastable states of inert gases.

  16. Theoretical Studies of Chemical Reactions following Electronic Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.

    2003-01-01

    The use of multi-configurational wave functions is demonstrated for several processes: tautomerization reactions in the ground and excited states of the DNA base adenine, dissociation of glycine molecule after electronic excitation, and decomposition/deformation of novel rare gas molecules HRgF. These processes involve bond brealung/formation and require multi-configurational approaches that include dynamic correlation.

  17. Resonant vibrational excitation of adsorbed molecules by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djamo, V.; Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1993-11-01

    The vibrational excitation of N2 molecules adsorbed on a silver surface by low energy electron impact is studied within the newly developed coupled angular mode method. The process involves the formation of a transient negative molecular ion. The results account well for the observations of Demuth and co-workers. They also reveal that most of the vibrational excitation corresponds to electrons scattered into the metal and thus unobservable in a scattering experiment.

  18. Experimental apparatus for measurements of electron impact excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafyatis, G. P.; Kohl, J. L.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    An ion beam apparatus for the absolute measurement of collision cross sections in singly and multiply charged ions is described. An inclined electron and ion beams arrangement is used. Emitted photons from the decay of collision produced excited states are collected by a mirror and imaged onto a photomultiplier. Absolute measurements of the electron impact excitation of the 2s-2p transition in C(3+) were used to demonstrate the reliability of the apparatus.

  19. Electronic excited states and relaxation dynamics in polymer heterojunction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramon, John Glenn Santos

    , we examine the effect of the nanoscale interfacial morphology and solvation on the electronic excited states of TFB/F8BT. Here, we employ time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to investigate the relevant excited states of two stacking configurations. We show that the calculated states agree with the excited states responsible for the experimentally observed emission peaks and that these states are blue shifted relative to those of the isolated chain. Furthermore, slight lateral shifts in the stacking orientation not only shift the excited state energies; more importantly, they alter the nature of these states altogether. Lastly, we see that solvation greatly stabilizes the charge-transfer states.

  20. Electron excitation from ground state to first excited state: Bohmian mechanics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Song; Shuang, Zhao; Fu-Ming, Guo; Yu-Jun, Yang; Su-Yu, Li

    2016-03-01

    The excitation process of electrons from the ground state to the first excited state via the resonant laser pulse is investigated by the Bohmian mechanics method. It is found that the Bohmian particles far away from the nucleus are easier to be excited and are excited firstly, while the Bohmian particles in the ground state is subject to a strong quantum force at a certain moment, being excited to the first excited state instantaneously. A detailed analysis for one of the trajectories is made, and finally we present the space and energy distribution of 2000 Bohmian particles at several typical instants and analyze their dynamical process at these moments. Project supported by the Doctoral Research Start-up Funding of Northeast Dianli University, China (Grant No. BSJXM-201332), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11547114, 11534004, 11474129, 11274141, 11447192, and 11304116), and the Graduate Innovation Fund of Jilin University, China (Grant No. 2015091).

  1. Computing electronic structures: A new multiconfiguration approach for excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancès, Éric; Galicher, Hervé; Lewin, Mathieu

    2006-02-01

    We present a new method for the computation of electronic excited states of molecular systems. This method is based upon a recent theoretical definition of multiconfiguration excited states [due to one of us, see M. Lewin, Solutions of the multiconfiguration equations in quantum chemistry, Arch. Rat. Mech. Anal. 171 (2004) 83-114]. Our algorithm, dedicated to the computation of the first excited state, always converges to a stationary state of the multiconfiguration model, which can be interpreted as an approximate excited state of the molecule. The definition of this approximate excited state is variational. An interesting feature is that it satisfies a non-linear Hylleraas-Undheim-MacDonald type principle: the energy of the approximate excited state is an upper bound to the true excited state energy of the N-body Hamiltonian. To compute the first excited state, one has to deform paths on a manifold, like this is usually done in the search for transition states between reactants and products on potential energy surfaces. We propose here a general method for the deformation of paths which could also be useful in other settings. We also compare our method to other approaches used in Quantum Chemistry and give some explanation of the unsatisfactory behaviours which are sometimes observed when using the latters. Numerical results for the special case of two-electron systems are provided: we compute the first singlet excited state potential energy surface of the H2 molecule.

  2. Computing electronic structures: A new multiconfiguration approach for excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Cances, Eric . E-mail: cances@cermics.enpc.fr; Galicher, Herve . E-mail: galicher@cermics.enpc.fr; Lewin, Mathieu . E-mail: lewin@cermic.enpc.fr

    2006-02-10

    We present a new method for the computation of electronic excited states of molecular systems. This method is based upon a recent theoretical definition of multiconfiguration excited states [due to one of us, see M. Lewin, Solutions of the multiconfiguration equations in quantum chemistry, Arch. Rat. Mech. Anal. 171 (2004) 83-114]. Our algorithm, dedicated to the computation of the first excited state, always converges to a stationary state of the multiconfiguration model, which can be interpreted as an approximate excited state of the molecule. The definition of this approximate excited state is variational. An interesting feature is that it satisfies a non-linear Hylleraas-Undheim-MacDonald type principle: the energy of the approximate excited state is an upper bound to the true excited state energy of the N-body Hamiltonian. To compute the first excited state, one has to deform paths on a manifold, like this is usually done in the search for transition states between reactants and products on potential energy surfaces. We propose here a general method for the deformation of paths which could also be useful in other settings. We also compare our method to other approaches used in Quantum Chemistry and give some explanation of the unsatisfactory behaviours which are sometimes observed when using the latter. Numerical results for the special case of two-electron systems are provided: we compute the first singlet excited state potential energy surface of the H {sub 2} molecule.

  3. Stability of sulfate complexes of electronically excited uranyl

    SciTech Connect

    Ostakhov, S.S.; Kazakov, V.P.; Afonichev, D.D.

    1995-11-01

    The complex formation of electronically excited uranyl ions with SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}anions in 0.1 M aqueous HClO{sub 4} has been studied by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. The stability constants of uranyl sulfate complexes (UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (K=870 1 mol{sup -1}) and [UO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup 2-}](K=47000 1 mol{sup -1}) in excited state have been determined; they are more than an order of magnitude greater than those reported for complex formation of uranyl ions in the ground state. The complex formation of uranyl with sulfate ions is accompanied by the increase of the quantum yield of the uranyl lumenescence. The maxima of luminescence and absorption bands of uranyl ions are shifted with increasing the total concentration of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in solution, which supports the data obtained. The shift of the maxima of luminescence bands is observed at a sulfate concentration that is considerably lower than that causing the same shift of the maxima of the absorption bands. Such effect is consistent with the calculated stability constants of sulfate complexes of excited uranyl ions.

  4. Local treatment of electron excitations in the EOM-CCSD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korona, Tatiana; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2003-02-01

    The Equation-of-Motion coupled cluster method restricted to single and double excitations (EOM-CCSD) and singlet excited states is formulated in a basis of nonorthogonal local orbitals. In the calculation of excited states only electron promotions from localized molecular orbitals into subspaces (excitation domains) of the local basis are allowed, which strongly reduces the number of EOM-CCSD amplitudes to be optimized. Furthermore, double excitations are neglected unless the excitation domains of the corresponding localized occupied orbitals are close to each other. Unlike in the local methods for the ground state, the excitation domains cannot be simply restricted to the atomic orbitals that are spatially close to the localized occupied orbitals. In the present paper the choice of the excitation domains is based on the analysis of wave functions computed by more approximate (and cheaper) methods like, e.g., configuration-interaction singles. The effect of various local approximations is investigated in detail, and it is found that a balanced description of the local configuration spaces describing the ground and excited states is essential to obtain accurate results. Using a single set of parameters for a given basis set, test calculations with the local EOM-CCSD method were performed for 14 molecules and 49 electronically excited states. The excitation energies computed by the local EOM-CCSD method reproduce the conventional EOM-CCSD excitation energies with an average error of 0.06 eV.

  5. Electronic Excitations and Metal-Insulator Transition inPoly(3-hexylthiophene) Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Sai, N.; Li, Z.Q.; Martin, M.C.; Basov, D.N.; Di Ventra, M.

    2006-11-07

    We carry out a comprehensive theoretical and experimentalstudy of charge injection in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) to determinethe most likely scenario for metal-insulator transition in this system.Wecalculate the optical-absorption frequencies corresponding to a polaronand a bipolaron lattice in P3HT. We also analyze the electronicexcitations for three possible scenarios under which a first- or asecond-order metal-insulator transition can occur in doped P3HT. Thesetheoretical scenarios are compared with data from infrared absorptionspectroscopy on P3HT thin-film field-effect transistors (FETs). Ourmeasurements and theoretical predictions suggest that charge-inducedlocalized states in P3HT FETs are bipolarons and that the highest dopinglevel achieved in our experiments approaches that required for afirst-order metal-insulator transition.

  6. Quantitative treatment of the effect of solvent on the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of substituted coumarins: Evaluation of the first excited singlet-state dipole moments.

    PubMed

    Aaron, J J; Buna, M; Parkanyi, C; Antonious, M S; Tine, A; Cisse, L

    1995-12-01

    The electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of coumarin and 11 substituted coumarins were measured in several solvents (dioxane, ethyl ether, ethyl acetate, ethanol, dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, and dimethyl sulfoxide). Ground-state dipole moments were determined in dioxane at 298 K. The results were used to obtain the first excited singlet-state dipole moments of the coumarins under study by the solvatochromic shift method (Bakhshiev, Kawski-Chamma-Viallet, McRae, and Suppan correlations). Also, the ground- and the first excited singlet-state dipole moments were calculated using a combination of the PPP method (π-contribution) and the vector sum of the σ-bond and group moments (σ-contribution). In general, the first excited singlet-state dipole moments of the coumarins are noticeably higher than the corresponding ground-state values, indicating a substantial redistribution of theπ-electron densities resulting in a more polar excited state. There is a reasonably good agreement between the calculated and the experimental dipole moments.

  7. Dynamics Of Electronic Excitation Of Solids With Ultrashort Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Nikita; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2010-10-08

    When ultrashort laser pulses irradiate a solid, photoabsorption by electrons in conduction band produces nonequilibrium highly energetic free electrons gas. We study the ionization and excitation of the electronic subsystem in a semiconductor and a metal (solid silicon and aluminum, respectively). The irradiating femtosecond laser pulse has a duration of 10 fs and a photon energy of h-bar {omega} = 38 eV. The classical Monte Carlo method is extended to take into account the electronic band structure and Pauli's principle for electrons excited to the conduction band. In the case of semiconductors this applies to the holes as well. Conduction band electrons and valence band holes induce secondary excitation and ionization processes which we simulate event by event. We discuss the transient electron dynamics with respect to the differences between semiconductors and metals. For metals the electronic distribution is split up into two branches: a low energy distribution as a slightly distorted Fermi-distribution and a long high energy tail. For the case of semiconductors it is split into two parts by the band gap. To thermalize, these excited electronic subsystems need longer times than the characteristic pulse duration. Therefore, the analysis of experimental data with femtosecond lasers must be based on non-equilibrium concepts.

  8. Atomic electron excitation probabilities during orbital electron capture by the nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crasemann, B.; Chen, M. H.; Briand, J. P.; Chevallier, P.; Chetioui, A.; Tavernier, M.

    1979-01-01

    Approximate probabilities of electron excitation (shakeup/shakeoff) from various atomic states during nuclear ns electron capture have been calculated in the sudden approximation, using Hartree-Fock wave functions. Total excitation probabilities are much lower than during inner-shell ionization by photons or electrons, and ns states are more likely to be excited than np states. This latter result is borne out by K-alpha X-ray satellite spectra.

  9. Low-energy electron attachment and detachment in vibrationally excited oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, N. L.; Anokhin, E. M.

    2009-11-01

    Three-body electron attachment to O2 molecules and electron detachment from O_{2}^{-} ions have been theoretically studied in vibrationally excited oxygen and O2-containing mixtures. Assuming that electron attachment and detachment proceed via the formation of vibrationally excited temporary O_{2}^{-} ions, the rates of these processes were determined on the basis of the statistical approach for the vibrational transfer and relaxation in collisions between O_{2}^{-} ions and O2 molecules. The calculated attachment and detachment rate constants turned out to agree well with available measurements in unexcited oxygen. This method was extended to calculate attachment and detachment rates in vibrationally excited oxygen. It was shown that the effect of vibrational excitation on electron detachment is profound, whereas attachment of low-energy electrons to vibrationally excited O2 is inefficient. The calculated vibrational distribution of stable O_{2}^{-} ions turned out to be non-equilibrium in an excited gas and the effective vibrational temperature of the ions was much lower than the vibrational temperature of molecules. An analytical method was suggested to determine this distribution and the effective vibrational temperature. The calculated rate constants were used to simulate the formation and decay of an electron-beam-generated plasma in N2 : O2 mixtures at elevated vibrational temperatures. The calculations showed that vibrational excitation of molecules leads to orders of magnitude increase in the plasma density and in the plasma lifetime, in agreement with available observations.

  10. "Delta Plots"--A New Way to Visualize Electronic Excitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Harry; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Presents procedures for obtaining and examples of delta plots (a way of illustrating electron density changes associated with electronic excitation). These plots are pedagogically useful for visualizing simple and complex transitions and provide a way of "seeing" the origin of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-dictated carbonyl…

  11. Collision rates for electron excitation of Mg V lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, S. S.; Sossah, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: Transition probabilities and electron impact excitation collision strengths and rates for astrophysically important lines in Mg V are reported. The 86 fine-structure levels of the 2s22p4, 2s2p5, 2p6, 2s22p33s, 2s22p33p and 2s22p33d configurations are included in our calculations. The effective collision strengths are presented as a function of electron temperature for solar and other astrophysical applications. Methods: The collision strengths have been calculated using the B-splineBreit-Pauli R-matrixmethod for all fine-structure transitions among the 86 levels. The one-body mass, Darwin and spin-orbit relativistic effects are included in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian in the scattering calculations. The one-body and two-body relativistic operators are included in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations of transition probabilities. Several sets of non-orthogonal spectroscopic and correlation radial orbitals are used to obtain accurate description of Mg V 86 levels and to represent the scattering functions. Results: The calculated excitation energies are in very good agreement with experiment and represents an improvement over the previous calculations. The present collision strengths show good agreement with the previously available R-matrix and distorted-wave calculations. The oscillator strengths for E1 transitions normally compare very well with previous calculations. The thermally averaged collision strengths are obtained by integrating total resonant and non-resonant collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies and these are presented over the temperature range log 10Te = 3.2-6.0 K. Tables 1-4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/574/A87

  12. Electron-impact excitation of the low-lying electronic states of formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.

    1974-01-01

    Electron-impact excitation has been observed at incident electron energies of 10.1 and 20.1 eV to the first five excited electronic states of formaldehyde lying at and below the 1B2 state at 7.10 eV. These excitations include two new transitions in the energy-loss range 5.6-6.2 eV and 6.7-7.0 eV which have been detected for the first time, either through electron-impact excitation or photon absorption. The differential cross sections of these new excitations are given at scattering angles between 15 and 135 deg. These cross-section ratios peak at large scattering angles - a characteristic of triplet - singlet excitations. The design and performance of the electron-impact spectrometer used in the above observations is outlined and discussed.

  13. Electron-hole excitations and optical spectra from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlfing, Michael; Louie, Steven G.

    2000-08-15

    We present a recently developed approach to calculate electron-hole excitations and the optical spectra of condensed matter from first principles. The key concept is to describe the excitations of the electronic system by the corresponding one- and two-particle Green's function. The method combines three computational techniques. First, the electronic ground state is treated within density-functional theory. Second, the single-particle spectrum of the electrons and holes is obtained within the GW approximation to the electron self-energy operator. Finally, the electron-hole interaction is calculated and a Bethe-Salpeter equation is solved, yielding the coupled electron-hole excitations. The resulting solutions allow the calculation of the entire optical spectrum. This holds both for bound excitonic states below the band gap, as well as for the resonant spectrum above the band gap. We discuss a number of technical developments needed for the application of the method to real systems. To illustrate the approach, we discuss the excitations and optical spectra of spatially isolated systems (atoms, molecules, and semiconductor clusters) and of extended, periodic crystals (semiconductors and insulators). (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Resonant excitation of whistler waves by a helical electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, X.; Van Compernolle, B.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Chen, L.; Li, W.

    2016-03-01

    Chorus-like whistler mode waves that are known to play a fundamental role in driving radiation belt dynamics are excited on the Large Plasma Device by the injection of a helical electron beam into a cold plasma. The mode structure of the excited whistler wave is identified using a phase correlation technique showing that the waves are excited through a combination of Landau resonance, cyclotron resonance, and anomalous cyclotron resonance. The dominant wave mode excited through cyclotron resonance is quasi-parallel propagating, whereas wave modes excited through Landau resonance and anomalous cyclotron resonance propagate at oblique angles that are close to the resonance cone. An analysis of the linear wave growth rates captures the major observations in the experiment. The results have important implications for the generation process of whistler waves in the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  15. Excitation spectra of circular, few-electron quantum dots

    PubMed

    Kouwenhoven; Oosterkamp; Danoesastro; Eto; Austing; Honda; Tarucha

    1997-12-05

    Studies of the ground and excited states in semiconductor quantum dots containing 1 to 12 electrons showed that the quantum numbers of the states in the excitation spectra can be identified and compared with exact calculations. A magnetic field induces transitions between the ground and excited states. These transitions were analyzed in terms of crossings between single-particle states, singlet-triplet transitions, spin polarization, and Hund's rule. These impurity-free quantum dots allow "atomic physics" experiments to be performed in magnetic field regimes not accessible for atoms.

  16. Dissociative Electron Attachment to Rovibrationally Excited Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-31

    scatt,,;ng by argon have been - present calculations of elastic scattering of electrons and performed by Walker35 and by Fink and Yates %3 using the...A. C. Yates , At. Data 1, 385 (1970). 66p. G. Coleman and J. D. McNutt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 1130 37D. G. Thompson, Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 294...final I bound state, Ps. The reduced masses are gj +O, (rj)= E -H , +i i ’ (16) Pr=mMT/(m +Mr)=am Upon operating on both sides of Eq. (16) by (HI)-E

  17. Electronic excitation and isentropic coefficients of high temperature planetary atmosphere plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Colonna, Gianpiero; Capitelli, Mario

    2012-07-15

    In this paper, we have discussed the effects of electronically excited states of atomic species in affecting the isentropic coefficients of plasmas, focusing on mixtures representing the atmospheres of Jupiter, Mars, and Earth. General behaviors have been rationalized on the basis of simplified approaches. The contribution of the electronically excited states has been evidenced by comparing results obtained considering only the ground state and those obtained using either Fermi or Griem cutoff criteria.

  18. Resonant vibrational excitation of CO by low-energy electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Poparic, G. B.; Belic, D. S.; Vicic, M. D.

    2006-06-15

    Electron impact vibrational excitation of the CO molecule, via the {sup 2}{pi} resonance, in the 0-4 eV energy region has been investigated. The energy dependence of the resonant excitation of the first ten vibrational levels, v=1 to v=10, has been measured by use of a crossed-beams double trochoidal electron spectrometer. Obtained relative differential cross sections are normalized to the absolute values. Integral cross sections are determined by using our recent results on scattered electrons angular distributions, which demonstrate clear p-partial wave character of this resonance. Substructures appear in the {sup 2}{pi} resonant excitation of the CO molecule which have not been previously observed.

  19. Internal conversion from excited electronic states of 229Th ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilous, Pavlo V.; Kazakov, Georgy A.; Moore, Iain D.; Schumm, Thorsten; Pálffy, Adriana

    2017-03-01

    The process of internal conversion from excited electronic states is investigated theoretically for the case of the vacuum-ultraviolet nuclear transition of 229Th. Due to the very low transition energy, the 229Th nucleus offers the unique possibility to open the otherwise forbidden internal conversion nuclear decay channel for thorium ions via optical laser excitation of the electronic shell. We show that this feature can be exploited to investigate the isomeric state properties via observation of internal conversion from excited electronic configurations of +Th and Th+2 ions. A possible experimental realization of the proposed scenario at the nuclear laser spectroscopy facility IGISOL in Jyväskylä, Finland, is discussed.

  20. First-principles calculations of heat capacities of ultrafast laser-excited electrons in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bévillon, E.; Colombier, J. P.; Recoules, V.; Stoian, R.

    2015-05-01

    Ultrafast laser excitation can induce fast increases of the electronic subsystem temperature. The subsequent electronic evolutions in terms of band structure and energy distribution can determine the change of several thermodynamic properties, including one essential for energy deposition; the electronic heat capacity. Using density functional calculations performed at finite electronic temperatures, the electronic heat capacities dependent on electronic temperatures are obtained for a series of metals, including free electron like, transition and noble metals. The effect of exchange and correlation functionals and the presence of semicore electrons on electronic heat capacities are first evaluated and found to be negligible in most cases. Then, we tested the validity of the free electron approaches, varying the number of free electrons per atom. This shows that only simple metals can be correctly fitted with these approaches. For transition metals, the presence of localized d electrons produces a strong deviation toward high energies of the electronic heat capacities, implying that more energy is needed to thermally excite them, compared to free sp electrons. This is attributed to collective excitation effects strengthened by a change of the electronic screening at high temperature.

  1. Axial- and radial-resolved electron density and excitation temperature of aluminum plasma induced by nanosecond laser: Effect of the ambient gas composition and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dawood, Mahmoud S.; Hamdan, Ahmad E-mail: Joelle.margot@umontreal.ca; Margot, Joëlle E-mail: Joelle.margot@umontreal.ca

    2015-11-15

    The spatial variation of the characteristics of an aluminum plasma induced by a pulsed nanosecond XeCl laser is studied in this paper. The electron density and the excitation temperature are deduced from time- and space- resolved Stark broadening of an ion line and from a Boltzmann diagram, respectively. The influence of the gas pressure (from vacuum up to atmospheric pressure) and compositions (argon, nitrogen and helium) on these characteristics is investigated. It is observed that the highest electron density occurs near the laser spot and decreases by moving away both from the target surface and from the plume center to its edge. The electron density increases with the gas pressure, the highest values being occurred at atmospheric pressure when the ambient gas has the highest mass, i.e. in argon. The excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot of line intensities of iron impurities present in the aluminum target. The highest temperature is observed close to the laser spot location for argon at atmospheric pressure. It decreases by moving away from the target surface in the axial direction. However, no significant variation of temperature occurs along the radial direction. The differences observed between the axial and radial direction are mainly due to the different plasma kinetics in both directions.

  2. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron; Yang, Zeng-hui; Ullrich, Carsten A.; Trail, John R.; Needs, Richard J.

    2014-05-14

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two-electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange, is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble.

  3. Excited State Electronic Properties of Sodium Iodide and Cesium Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei

    2013-05-01

    We compute from first principles the dielectric function, loss function, lifetime and scattering rate of quasiparticles due to electronic losses, and secondary particle spectrum due to plasmon decay in two scintillating alkali halides, sodium iodide and cesium iodide. Particular emphasis is placed on quasiparticles within several multiples of the band gap from the band edges. A theory for the decay spectra of plasmons and other electronic excitations in crystals is presented. Applications to Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are discussed.

  4. Electron impact excitation coefficients for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J.; Kepple, P. C.; Blaha, M.

    1976-01-01

    Electron impact excitation rate coefficients have been obtained for a number of transitions in highly ionized ions of interest to astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The calculations were done using the method of distorted waves. Results are presented for various transitions in highly ionized Ne, Na, Al, Si, A, Ca, Ni and Fe.

  5. Excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fomichev, V. V.; Fainshtein, S. M.; Chernov, G. P.

    2013-05-15

    An alternative mechanism for the excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics as a result of the development of explosive instability in a weakly relativistic beam-plasma system in the solar atmosphere is proposed. The efficiency of the new mechanism as compared to the previously discussed ones is analyzed.

  6. Tuning ground states and excitations in complex electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.R.

    1996-09-01

    Modern electronic materials are characterized by a great variety of broken-symmetry ground states and excitations. Their control requires understanding and tuning underlying driving forces of spin-charge-lattice coupling, critical to macroscopic properties and applications. We report representative model calculations which demonstrate some of the richness of the phenomena and the challenges for successful microscopic modeling.

  7. An incompressible state of a photo-excited electron gas

    PubMed Central

    Chepelianskii, Alexei D.; Watanabe, Masamitsu; Nasyedkin, Kostyantyn; Kono, Kimitoshi; Konstantinov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrons in a magnetic field can form new states of matter characterized by topological properties and strong electronic correlations as displayed in the integer and fractional quantum Hall states. In these states, the electron liquid displays several spectacular characteristics, which manifest themselves in transport experiments with the quantization of the Hall resistance and a vanishing longitudinal conductivity or in thermodynamic equilibrium when the electron fluid becomes incompressible. Several experiments have reported that dissipationless transport can be achieved even at weak, non-quantizing magnetic fields when the electrons absorb photons at specific energies related to their cyclotron frequency. Here we perform compressibility measurements on electrons on liquid helium demonstrating the formation of an incompressible electronic state under these resonant excitation conditions. This new state provides a striking example of irradiation-induced self-organization in a quantum system. PMID:26007282

  8. Collective π -electronic excitations in BN double-walled nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Vl. A.; Muryumin, E. E.; Gaiduk, E. A.

    2008-07-01

    We report a systematic theoretical study of the collective π -electronic excitations in boron nitride double-walled nanotubes (BN-DWNTs). For simplicity, it is assumed that both shells (inner and outer) of such tubes have a zigzag achiral structure. Taking into account intershell Coulomb coupling and neglecting intershell electron tunneling, we introduce the effective dynamic-dielectric-response function of the BN-DWNTs, which depends on frequency ω , wave number q , and angular momentum L . An explicit expression for this function is derived within the random-phase approximation using standard many-body techniques based on the Green’s function method. Numerical results are presented for the wave-number dispersion and damping of the π -plasmon modes with different L ’s, demonstrating a unified picture of the π -plasmon-energy variation with q for the BN-DWNTs of different diameters. According to this picture, the spectrum of the π plasmons, which are shown to be long lived and hence well-defined collective electronic excitations in the BN-DWNTs, consists of a set of nonintersecting upward-dispersed branches, which are well separated in their energies at small values of q , but which tend to merge with increasing q . Each of the branches corresponds to one and only one value of the angular momentum L=0,1,2,… and none of the branches starts from q=0 . The present calculations also show that the π plasmons in the BN-DWNTs can exist even at those q values at which the π -plasmon modes are not supported by either of the nanotube shells alone. It is found that the threshold value of the wavelength, at which the L=0 π -plasmon dispersion curve in the BN-DWNTs makes its start, is redshifted as compared to that in the inner and outer nanotube shells if they are considered separately. The most important features of our calculated results seem to be consistent, more or less reasonable, with those derived from the recent electron

  9. Electron excitation after plasmon decay in proton-aluminum collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bocan, G.; Miraglia, J.E.

    2003-03-01

    When a projectile travels inside a metal, it interacts with the electron gas, producing both binary and collective excitations (plasmons). Within the nearly-free-electron-gas scheme, Roesler and co-workers showed that plasmons decay in first order and a conduction electron is emitted (interband transition). Working within the frame of atomic collisions, we develop a simple model to describe this decay. The first-order Born expansion is used to approximate the electron wave functions. The influence of the lattice potential on the excited electron is considered in the calculations in order to balance the momentum-conservation equation. It gives contributions associated with sites of the reciprocal lattice. The potential expansion coefficients are obtained following Animalu and co-workers [Philos. Mag. 9, 451 (1964)]. First- and second-differential spectra (in energy and angle) are analyzed discriminating contributions due to different lattice momenta. In all cases, contributions due to binary excitations of the valence electrons and inner-shell ionization are presented to establish a comparison.

  10. State-to-state kinetics and transport properties of electronically excited N and O atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    A theoretical model of transport properties in electronically excited atomic gases in the state-to-state approach is developed. Different models for the collision diameters of atoms in excited states are discussed, and it is shown that the Slater-like models can be applied for the state-resolved transport coefficient calculations. The influence of collision diameters of N and O atoms with electronic degrees of freedom on the transport properties is evaluated. Different distributions on the electronic energy are considered for the calculation of transport coefficients. For the Boltzmann-like distributions at temperatures greater than 15000 K, an important effect of electronic excitation on the thermal conductivity and viscosity coefficients is found; the coefficients decrease significantly when many electronic states are taken into account. It is shown that under hypersonic reentry conditions the impact of collision diameters on the transport properties is not really important since the populations of high levels behind the shock waves are low.

  11. Improvement of electron capture efficiency by resonant excitation.

    PubMed

    Mormann, Michael; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna

    2003-01-01

    A novel pulse sequence improving the efficiency for electron capture dissociation (ECD) of an unmodified Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer by more than an order of magnitude is presented. Commercially available FTICR instruments are usually equipped with a filament-based electron source producing an electron beam that has a rather small cross section. An ideal overlap between the rotating ion cloud and the electron beam appears to be a prerequisite for a high ECD efficiency. A reduced interception of the ion cloud and the electron beam is probably due to the contribution of the magnetron motion to the trajectory of the ions, resulting in a precession about the z-axis of the instrument. By increasing the kinetic energy and therefore increasing the cyclotron radii of the precursor ions by resonant excitation, the overlap of the rotating ion cloud with the electron beam is improved. By use of this protocol the efficiency of electron capture is substantially increased and consequently the acquisition time of ECD spectra is reduced significantly. The capability of resonant excitation of the precursor ions during the irradiation with electrons is demonstrated for standard peptides. This approach is particularly valuable for analysis and characterization of O-glycosylated peptides. In addition to amino acid sequence information, the attachment site of the labile glycan moiety is determined, and also radical-site-induced fragmentations of the glycosidic bonds are observed.

  12. Excitation of phonons in medium-energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M. A. Vicente; Ascolani, H.; Zampieri, G.

    1996-03-01

    The ``elastic'' backscattering of electrons from crystalline surfaces presents two regimes: a low-energy regime, in which the characteristic low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) pattern is observed, and a medium-energy regime, in which the diffraction pattern is similar to those observed in x-ray photoemission diffraction (XPD) and Auger electron diffraction (AED) experiments. We present a model for the electron scattering which, including the vibrational degrees of freedom of the crystal, contains both regimes and explains the passage from one regime to the other. Our model is based on a separation of the electron and atomic motions (adiabatic approximation) and on a cluster-type formulation of the multiple scattering of the electron. The inelastic scattering events (excitation and/or absorption of phonons) are treated as coherent processes and no break of the phase relation between the incident and the exit paths of the electron is assumed. The LEED and the medium-energy electron diffraction regimes appear naturally in this model as the limit cases of completely elastic scattering and of inelastic scattering with excitation and/or absorption of multiple phonons. Intensity patterns calculated with this model are in very good agreement with recent experiments of electron scattering on Cu(001) at low and medium energies. We show that there is a correspondence between the type of intensity pattern and the mean number of phonons excited and/or absorbed during the scattering: a LEED-like pattern is observed when this mean number is less than 2, LEED-like and XPD/AED-like features coexist when this number is 3-4, and a XPD/AED-like pattern is observed when this number is greater than 5-6.

  13. Excitation of the surface flute waves in electron cyclotron frequency range by internal rotating electron beam in a coaxial waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blednov, O.; Girka, I.; Girka, V.; Pavlenko, I.; Sydora, R.

    2014-12-01

    The initial stage of interaction between a gyrating beam of electrons, which move along Larmor orbits in a narrow gap between a cylindrical plasma layer and an internal screen of a metal coaxial waveguide and electromagnetic eigen waves, is studied theoretically. These waves are extraordinary polarized ones; they propagate along the azimuthal angle across an axial external steady magnetic field in the electron cyclotron frequency range. The numerical analysis shows that the excitation process is stable enough in respect to changing plasma waveguide parameters. The wider the plasma layer, the broader the range of plasma waveguide parameters within which effective wave excitation takes place. The main influence on the excitation of these modes is performed by the applied axial magnetic field, namely: its increase leads to an increase of growth rate and a broadening of the range of the waveguide parameters within which wave excitation is effective.

  14. Electron-driven excitation and dissociation of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orel, Ann

    2009-10-01

    Due to the large difference in mass between the electron and the nuclei, when an electron collides with a molecule or molecular ion, there is inefficient transfer of energy from the electron into the motion of the nuclei, leading to little vibrational excitation or dissociation. However, in certain special cases, the electron can temporarily attach to the molecule and change the forces felt between its atoms for a period of time comparable to a vibrational period. This can lead to resonant vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment, for neutral targets, or dissociative recombination in the case of ions. Studies of dissociative recombination and attachment in several polyatomic systems have shown that simple one-dimensional models can fail to capture the correct dissociation dynamics. In our treatment of these processes we first carry out ab initio electron scattering calculations at fixed internuclear geometries to determine the resonant energy surfaces and the corresponding surface of autoionization widths using the Complex Kohn variational method. These resonance positions and widths are then used as input to a dynamics study to determine the cross-section and product distributions for the dissociation or excitation process. We will present results on a number of systems, including HCCH, HCN/HNC and HCCCN as examples of dissociative attachment and N2H^+ and H2O^+ for dissociative recombination.

  15. Dynamics of two-electron excitations in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, C.D.; Menzel, A.; Frigo, S.P.

    1997-04-01

    Excitation of both electrons in helium offers a unique window for studying electron correlation at the most basic level in an atom in which these two electrons and the nucleus form a three-body system. The authors utilized the first light available at the U-8 undulator-SGM monochromator beamline to investigate the dynamic parameters, partial cross sections, differential cross sections, and photoelectron angular distribution parameters ({beta}), with a high resolving power for the photon beam and at the highly differential level afforded by the use of their electron spectrometer. In parallel, they carried out detailed calculations of the relevant properties by a theoretical approach that is based on the hyperspherical close-coupling method. Partial photoionization cross sections {sigma}{sub n}, and photoelectron angular distributions {beta}{sub n} were measured for all possible final ionic states He{sup +}(n) in the region of the double excitations N(K,T){sup A} up to the N=5 threshold. At a photon energy bandpass of 12 meV below the thresholds N=3, 4, and 5, this level of differentiation offers the most critical assessment of the dynamics of the two-electron excitations to date. The experimental data were seen to be very well described by the most advanced theoretical calculations.

  16. Electron-driven excitation and dissociation of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourou, S.; Larson, Å.; Orel, A. E.

    2010-01-01

    In the collision of electrons with molecules and molecular ions, excitation and dissociation are dominated by resonant processes, where the electron becomes temporarily trapped, changing the forces felt by the nuclei. In this paper, we will outline our method for treating these collision processes, where one or more resonant states exist. We separate the problem into two steps. First we carry out ab initio electron scattering calculations at fixed internuclear geometries to determine the resonant energy surfaces and the corresponding surface of autoionization widths, using the Complex Kohn variational method. These resonance positions and widths are then used as input to a dynamics study to determine the cross section and product distributions for the dissociation or excitation process. We will present results on a number of systems, including HCCH, HCN/HNC and HCCCN as examples of dissociative attachment, and H2O+ for dissociative recombination.

  17. Quantum mechanical methods applied to excitation energy transfer: a comparative analysis on excitation energies and electronic couplings.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Losa, A; Curutchet, C; Fdez Galván, I; Mennucci, B

    2008-07-21

    We present a comparative study on the influence of the quantum mechanical (QM) method (including basis set) on the evaluation of transition energies, transition densities and dipoles, and excitation energy transfer (EET) electronic couplings for a series of chromophores (and the corresponding pairs) typically found in organic electro-optical devices and photosynthetic systems. On these systems we have applied five different QM levels of description of increasing accuracy (ZINDO, CIS, TD-DFT, CASSCF, and SAC-CI). In addition, we have tested the effects of a surrounding environment (either mimicking a solvent or a protein matrix) on excitation energies, transition dipoles, and electronic couplings through the polarizable continuum model (PCM) description. Overall, the results obtained suggest that the choice of the QM level of theory affects the electronic couplings much less than it affects excitation energies. We conclude that reasonable estimates can be obtained using moderate basis sets and inexpensive methods such as configuration interaction of single excitations or time-dependent density functional theory when appropriately coupled to realistic solvation models such as PCM.

  18. Absolute Emission Spectroscopy of Electronically Excited Products of Dissociative Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypkowski, M. P.; Gougousi, T.; Golde, M. F.; Johnsen, R.

    1997-10-01

    We have employed spatially-resolved optical emission spectroscopy in a flowing afterglow plasma to investigate radiations in the 200-400 nm range resulting from electron-ion dissociative recombination. Calibrated emission data combined with Langmuir probe electron-density measurements are analyzed to obtain branching ratios for electronically excited recombination products. In particular, we will report absolute yields of CO(a^3Π) resulting from recombining CO_2^+ ions, NO(B^2Π) from N_2O^+, OH(A^2Σ^+) from HCO_2^+, as well as NH(A^3Π_i), and OH(A^2Σ^+) from the recombination of N_2OH^+ ions.

  19. Electron scattering by laser-excited barium atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.; Jensen, S. W.; Poe, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    Inelastic and superelastic scattering of 30- and 100-eV electrons by laser-excited 6s 6p 1P and subsequent cascade-populated 6s 6p 3P, 6s 5d 1D, and 6s 5d 3D Ba atoms have been observed. Absolute differential cross sections for the singlet and relative scattering intensities for the triplet species have been determined in the 5 to 20 deg angular region. Under the present conditions excitations dominate over deexcitations.

  20. Electron-impact excitation and ionization cross sections for ground state and excited helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ralchenko, Yu. Janev, R.K.; Kato, T.; Fursa, D.V.; Bray, I.; Heer, F.J. de

    2008-07-15

    Comprehensive and critically assessed cross sections for the electron-impact excitation and ionization of ground state and excited helium atoms are presented. All states (atomic terms) with n{<=}4 are treated individually, while the states with n{>=}5 are considered degenerate. For the processes involving transitions to and from n{>=}5 levels, suitable cross section scaling relations are presented. For a large number of transitions, from both ground and excited states, convergent close coupling calculations were performed to achieve a high accuracy of the data. The evaluated/recommended cross section data are presented by analytic fit functions, which preserve the correct asymptotic behavior of the cross sections. The cross sections are also displayed in graphical form.

  1. Interchannel interactions following shape resonant excitation of core electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliakoff, E. D.; Kelly, L. A.; Duffy, L. M.; Space, B.; Roy, P.; Southworth, S. H.; White, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    Interchannel coupling of a core electron shape resonance with a valence-hole ionic continuum is studied with vibrational resolution. A core-hole shape resonance is created via N 2 (1s→continuum e -) photoabsorption, and this complex decays to form the N 2+ (B 2Σ u+) state via continuum interchannel coupling. The vibrational branching ratios for the N 2+ (B 2Σ u+) state are then determined from N 2+ (B 2Σ u+→ 2Σ g+) fluorescence. The molecular motion provides excellent sensitivity to the resonant excitation, as underscored by two observations. First, the vibrational branching ratios for resonant and nonresonant excitation are qualitatively different. Secondly, the rotational motion of the ion is affected by the resonant excitation. These measurements demonstrate that continuum interchannel coupling can be probed precisely via dispersed fluorescence.

  2. Effect of defect accumulation on ion-beam damage morphology by electronic excitation in lithium niobate: A MonteCarlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, A.; Crespillo, M. L.; Olivares, J.; García, G.; Agulló-López, F.

    2010-07-01

    We present a MonteCarlo approach to the non-radiative exciton-decay model recently proposed to describe ion-beam damage in LiNbO 3 produced in the electronic excitation regime. It takes into account the statistical (random) spatial distribution of ion impacts on the crystal surface. The MonteCarlo approach is necessary to simulate the evolution of the damage morphology with irradiation fluence from the single track regime to the overlapping track regime. A detailed comparison between the morphologies found for sub-threshold and above threshold irradiations is presented. Moreover, a good representation of the Avrami's type kinetics for amorphization has been achieved and it is in fair accordance with experiment. For moderate fluences where homogeneous amorphous layers are generated, the new approach predicts that the amorphous and crystalline layers are separated by a diffuse (thick) boundary that includes a mixed amorphous-crystalline composition.

  3. Controlling autoionization in strontium two-electron-excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Robert; Zhang, Xinyue; Dunning, F. Barry; Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    One challenge in engineering long-lived two-electron-excited states, i.e., so-called planetary atoms, is autoionization. Autoionization, however, can be suppressed if the outermost electron is placed in a high- n, n ~ 300 - 600 , high- L state because such states have only a very small overlap with the inner electron, even when this is also excited to a state of relatively high n and hence of relatively long lifetime. Here the L-dependence of the autoionization rate for high- n strontium Rydberg atoms is examined during excitation of the core ion 5 s 2S1 / 2 - 5 p 2P3 / 2 transition. Measurements in which the angular momentum of the Rydberg electron is controlled using a pulsed electric field show that the autoionization rate decreases rapidly with increasing L and becomes very small for values larger than ~ 20 . The data are analyzed with the aid of calculations undertaken using complex scaling. Research supported by the NSF and Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  4. Electronic Excitation Dynamics in Liquid Water under Proton Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Kyle G.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    Molecular behaviour of liquid water under proton irradiation is of great importance to a number of technological and medical applications. The highly energetic proton generates a time-varying field that is highly localized and heterogeneous at the molecular scale, and massive electronic excitations are produced as a result of the field-matter interaction. Using first-principles quantum dynamics simulations, we reveal details of how electrons are dynamically excited through non-equilibrium energy transfer from highly energetic protons in liquid water on the atto/femto-second time scale. Water molecules along the path of the energetic proton undergo ionization at individual molecular level, and the excitation primarily derives from lone pair electrons on the oxygen atom of water molecules. A reduced charge state on the energetic proton in the condensed phase of water results in the strongly suppressed electronic response when compared to water molecules in the gas phase. These molecular-level findings provide important insights into understanding the water radiolysis process under proton irradiation. PMID:28084420

  5. Electronic Excitation Dynamics in Liquid Water under Proton Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Kyle G.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    Molecular behaviour of liquid water under proton irradiation is of great importance to a number of technological and medical applications. The highly energetic proton generates a time-varying field that is highly localized and heterogeneous at the molecular scale, and massive electronic excitations are produced as a result of the field-matter interaction. Using first-principles quantum dynamics simulations, we reveal details of how electrons are dynamically excited through non-equilibrium energy transfer from highly energetic protons in liquid water on the atto/femto-second time scale. Water molecules along the path of the energetic proton undergo ionization at individual molecular level, and the excitation primarily derives from lone pair electrons on the oxygen atom of water molecules. A reduced charge state on the energetic proton in the condensed phase of water results in the strongly suppressed electronic response when compared to water molecules in the gas phase. These molecular-level findings provide important insights into understanding the water radiolysis process under proton irradiation.

  6. Transport coefficients and heat fluxes in non-equilibrium high-temperature flows with electronic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of electronic excitation on transport processes in non-equilibrium high-temperature ionized mixture flows is studied. Two five-component mixtures, N 2 / N2 + / N / N + / e - and O 2 / O2 + / O / O + / e - , are considered taking into account the electronic degrees of freedom for atomic species as well as the rotational-vibrational-electronic degrees of freedom for molecular species, both neutral and ionized. Using the modified Chapman-Enskog method, the transport coefficients (thermal conductivity, shear viscosity and bulk viscosity, diffusion and thermal diffusion) are calculated in the temperature range 500-50 000 K. Thermal conductivity and bulk viscosity coefficients are strongly affected by electronic states, especially for neutral atomic species. Shear viscosity, diffusion, and thermal diffusion coefficients are not sensible to electronic excitation if the size of excited states is assumed to be constant. The limits of applicability for the Stokes relation are discussed; at high temperatures, this relation is violated not only for molecular species but also for electronically excited atomic gases. Two test cases of strongly non-equilibrium flows behind plane shock waves corresponding to the spacecraft re-entry (Hermes and Fire II) are simulated numerically. Fluid-dynamic variables and heat fluxes are evaluated in gases with electronic excitation. In inviscid flows without chemical-radiative coupling, the flow-field is weakly affected by electronic states; however, in viscous flows, their influence can be more important, in particular, on the convective heat flux. The contribution of different dissipative processes to the heat transfer is evaluated as well as the effect of reaction rate coefficients. The competition of diffusion and heat conduction processes reduces the overall effect of electronic excitation on the convective heating, especially for the Fire II test case. It is shown that reliable models of chemical reaction rates are of great

  7. Electron impact excitation of Si II and Fe XIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-01-01

    Energy levels, radiative rates, lifetimes, collision strengths and effective collision strengths are calculated for two important Al-like ions, namely Si II and Fe XIV. For Si II, the lowest 56 levels of the 3s23p, 3s3p2 3p3 3s23d, 3s3p3d, 3s24l and 3s25l configurations are included, whereas for Fe XIV additional 80 levels of 3p23d, 3s3d2 and 3p3d2 are considered, but not of 3s2 5l. For the determination of atomic structure GRASP has been adopted and radiative rates are calculated for all E1, E2, Ml and M2 transitions. Electron impact excitation collision strengths are calculated with the DARC code, over a wide energy range, and resonances are resolved in a fine energy mesh to determine effective collision strengths over a wide range of temperatures. Extensive comparisons are made for all atomic parameters with available theoretical and experimental data, and the accuracy of the present results is assessed. Energy levels are estimated to be accurate to ~1% and all other parameters to be better than 20%.

  8. The role of electron-impact vibrational excitation in electron transport through gaseous tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, H. V.; Do, T. P. T.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    In this paper, we report newly derived integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact vibrational excitation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) at intermediate impact energies. These cross sections extend the currently available data from 20 to 50 eV. Further, they indicate that the previously recommended THF ICS set [Garland et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 062712 (2013)] underestimated the strength of the electron-impact vibrational excitation processes. Thus, that recommended vibrational cross section set is revised to address those deficiencies. Electron swarm transport properties were calculated with the amended vibrational cross section set, to quantify the role of electron-driven vibrational excitation in describing the macroscopic swarm phenomena. Here, significant differences of up to 17% in the transport coefficients were observed between the calculations performed using the original and revised cross section sets for vibrational excitation.

  9. Excitation of Ion Acoustic Waves by Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydorenko, Dmytro; Tokluoglu, Erinc; Kaganovich, Igor; Startsev, Edward; Davidson, Ronald

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of electron beams with plasmas is of considerable importance particularly for hybrid DC/RF coupled plasma sources used in plasma processing [1]. An electron beam is formed by emission from one surface, is accelerated through a dc bias electric field and enters the bulk plasma. Emitted electrons excite electron plasma (Langmuir) waves through the two-stream instability. Due to the high localized plasmon pressure, ion acoustic waves are excited parametrically. The plasma waves saturate by non-linear wave trapping. Eventually coupling between electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves deteriorates the Langmuir waves, which leads to a bursting behavior. The two-stream instability and the consequent ion fluctuations are studied over a wide range of system parameters using the particle-in-cell codes EDIPIC and LSP. The influenceof these instabilities on collisionless electron heating are presented for a hybrid RF-DC plasma source.[4pt] [1] Lin Xu, et al, Appl. Phys. Lett., 93, 261502 (2008).

  10. Electronically excited rubidium atom in helium clusters and films. II. Second excited state and absorption spectrum.

    PubMed

    Leino, Markku; Viel, Alexandra; Zillich, Robert E

    2011-01-14

    Following our work on the study of helium droplets and film doped with one electronically excited rubidium atom Rb(∗) ((2)P) [M. Leino, A. Viel, and R. E. Zillich, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 184308 (2008)], we focus in this paper on the second excited state. We present theoretical studies of such droplets and films using quantum Monte Carlo approaches. Diffusion and path integral Monte Carlo algorithms combined with a diatomics-in-molecule scheme to model the nonpair additive potential energy surface are used to investigate the energetics and the structure of Rb(∗)He(n) clusters. Helium films as a model for the limit of large clusters are also considered. As in our work on the first electronic excited state, our present calculations find stable Rb(∗)He(n) clusters. The structures obtained are however different with a He-Rb(∗)-He exciplex core to which more helium atoms are weakly attached, preferentially on one end of the core exciplex. The electronic absorption spectrum is also presented for increasing cluster sizes as well as for the film.

  11. Electronic excitations in γ -Li2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Winter, Stephen M.; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the electronic properties of the three-dimensional stripyhoneycomb γ -Li2IrO3 via relativistic density functional theory calculations as well as exact diagonalization of finite clusters and explore the details of the optical conductivity. Our analysis of this quantity reveals the microscopic origin of the experimentally observed (i) optical transitions and (ii) anisotropic behavior along the various polarization directions. In particular, we find that the optical excitations are overall dominated by transitions between jeff=1 /2 and 3/2 states and the weight of transitions between jeff=1 /2 states at low frequencies can be correlated to deviations from a pure Kitaev description. We furthermore reanalyze within this approach the electronic excitations in the known two-dimensional honeycomb systems α -Li2IrO3 and Na2IrO3 and discuss the results in comparison to γ -Li2IrO3 .

  12. Electron densities and the excitation of CN in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, John H.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    1991-01-01

    In molecular clouds of modest density and relatively high fractional ionization, the rotational excitation of CN is controlled by a competition among electron impact, neutral impact and the interaction with the cosmic background radiation. The degree of excitation can be measured through optical absorption lines and millimeter-wave emission lines. The available, accurate data on CN in diffuse and translucent molecular clouds are assembled and used to determine electron densities. The derived values, n(e) = roughly 0.02 - 0.5/cu cm, imply modest neutral densities, which generally agree well with determinations by other techniques. The absorption- and emission-line measurements of CN both exclude densities higher than n(H2) = roughly 10 exp 3.5/cu cm on scales varying from 0.001 to 60 arcsec in these clouds.

  13. Electron doping evolution of the magnetic excitations in NaFe1-xCoxAs

    DOE PAGES

    Carr, Scott V.; Zhang, Chenglin; Song, Yu; ...

    2016-06-13

    We use time-of-flight (TOF) inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy to investigate the doping dependence of magnetic excitations across the phase diagram of NaFe1-xCoxAs with x = 0, 0.0175, 0.0215, 0.05, and 0.11. The effect of electron-doping by partially substituting Fe by Co is to form resonances that couple with superconductivity, broaden and suppress low energy (E 80 meV) spin excitations compared with spin waves in undoped NaFeAs. However, high energy (E > 80 meV) spin excitations are weakly Co-doping dependent. Integration of the local spin dynamic susceptibility "(!) of NaFe1-xCoxAs reveals a total fluctuating moment of 3.6 μ2 B/Fe andmore » a small but systematic reduction with electron doping. The presence of a large spin gap in the Cooverdoped nonsuperconducting NaFe0.89Co0.11As suggests that Fermi surface nesting is responsible for low-energy spin excitations. These results parallel Ni-doping evolution of spin excitations in BaFe2-xNixAs2, confirming the notion that low-energy spin excitations coupling with itinerant electrons are important for superconductivity, while weakly doping dependent high-energy spin excitations result from localized moments.« less

  14. Multi-pair excitations in an electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, M. E.; Holas, A.; Böhm, H. M.; Schinner, A.

    1996-07-01

    Single (particle-hole)-pair excitations, as described in the well-known Lindhard function, are restricted to a strip in the ( q, ω) plane — the so-called particle-hole continuum. We present a perturbational analysis of the dynamic dielectric function allowing a generalization of this property for n-pair contributions. Consequences for the electron energy-loss function and related quantities are discussed.

  15. Measurement of electron-impact excitation in boronlike carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafyatis, G. P.; Kohl, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    The cross section for the electron-impact excitation of C(+) (2s2 2p 2P0)-(2s2p2 2D) is measured in a colliding-beams apparatus for several collision energies near the threshold for the process. A cross section of (1.1 + or - 0.3) x 10 to the -16th sq cm at threshold is found. Reasonable agreement is found with close-coupling calculations.

  16. Electron acceleration by parametrically excited Langmuir waves. [in ionospheric modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, J. A.; Graham, K. N.

    1974-01-01

    Simple physical arguments are used to estimate the downward-going energetic electron flux due to parametrically excited Langmuir waves in ionospheric modification experiments. The acceleration mechanism is a single velocity reversal as seen in the frame of the Langmuir wave. The flux is sufficient to produce the observed ionospheric airglow if focusing-type instabilities are invoked to produce moderate local enhancements of the pump field.

  17. Intense electron-beam excitation of organic dye vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Marowsky, G.; Tittel, F.K.; Wilson, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental studies of electron-beam excitation of organic dye vapors of p-phenylene-bis-(5-phenyl-2-oxazole) POPOP and p-quaterphenyl have demonstrated short-duration high-gain and super-radiant laser behavior accompanied by severe fluorescence quenching due to dye fragmentation. This has been analyzed quantitatively by evaluation of the nitrogen fluorescence, originating from the complete breakdown of the POPOP structure.

  18. Excitation of whistler waves by reflected auroral electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Dillenburg, D.; Ziebell, L. F.; Freund, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    Excitation of electron waves and whistlers by reflected auroral electrons which possess a loss-cone distribution is investigated. Based on a given magnetic field and density model, the instability problem is studied over a broad region along the auroral field lines. This region covers altitudes ranging from one quarter of an earth radius to five earth radii. It is found that the growth rate is significant only in the region of low altitude, say below the source region of the auroral kilometric radiation. In the high altitude region the instability is insignificant either because of low refractive indices or because of small loss cone angles.

  19. Electron-Hole Excitations in Semiconductors and Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlfing, M.; Louie, S.G. |

    1998-09-01

    We present a new {ital abthinspthinspinitio} approach to calculate the interaction between electrons and holes in periodic crystals and to evaluate the resulting coupled electron-hole excitations. This involves a novel interpolation scheme in reciprocal space in solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the two-particle Green{close_quote}s function. We apply this approach to the calculation of the entire optical absorption spectrum, as well as of the energies and wave functions of bound exciton states in GaAs and LiF. Very good agreement with experiment is observed. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Electron Impact Vibrational Excitation of H2O Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hidetoshi; Kajita, Rina; Tanaka, Takahiro; Makochekanwa, Casten; Kimura, Mineo; Cho, Hyuck; Kitajima, Masashi; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2004-09-01

    Electron impact interaction studies with water have invited a lot experimental and theoretical attention for more than half century because it falls into the unique group of polar molecules whose dipole moments are above the critical dipole moments, thus enabling studies of dipole-related threshold peaks [1]. However, because of the experimental difficulties encountered in separating the three fundamental modes of vibration, for instance, there remained controversies about the existence of resonance effects in the vibrational excitation. In this report, the H2O vibrational exciation into modes (100) and (001) investigated at energy losses of 0.43, 0.46, 0.49 and 0.51 eV, where peaks for these two modes closely overlap, while sweeping the impact energies from 1.6 to 10 eV, at angles 60º and 90º, using a cross-beam method [2]. The continuum multiple scattering (CMS) [4] calculations have also been performed for the theoretical analysis of the experimental results. We have observed distinct resonance enhancement only in the symmetric stretching (100) mode, but not in the antisymmetric (001) and bending (010) modes. The theoretical interpretation is provided. [1] K. Rohr and F. Linder, J. Phys. B 9, 2521 (1976). [2] H. Tanaka, L. Boesten, D. Matsunaga and T. Kudo, J. Phys. B 21, 1255 (1988). [3] M. Kimura and H. Sato, Comments At. Mol. Phys. 26, 333 (1991).

  1. Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition of U-235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodash, Perry

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that is theorized to exist in numerous isotopes. NEET is the inverse of bound internal conversion and occurs when an electronic transition couples to a nuclear transition causing the nucleus to enter an excited state. This process can only occur for isotopes with low-lying nuclear levels due to the requirement that the electronic and nuclear transitions have similar energies. One of the candidate isotopes for NEET, 235U, has been studied several times over the past 40 years and NEET of 235U has never been conclusively observed. These past experiments generated conflicting results with some experiments claiming to observe NEET of 235U and others setting limits for the NEET rate. If NEET of 235U were to occur, the uranium would be excited to its first excited nuclear state. The first excited nuclear state in 235U is only 76 eV, the second lowest known nuclear state. Additionally, the 76 eV state is a nuclear isomer that decays by internal conversion with a half-life of 26 minutes. In order to measure whether NEET occurs in 235U and at what rate, a uranium plasma was required. The plasma was generated using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser outputting 789 mJ pulses of 1064 nm light. The laser light was focused onto uranium targets generating an intensity on target of order 1012 W/cm2. The resulting plasma was captured on a catcher plate and electrons emitted from the catcher plate were accelerated and focused onto a microchannel plate detector. Measurements performed using a variety of uranium targets spanning depleted uranium up to 99.4% enriched uranium did not observe a 26 minute decay. An upper limit for the NEET rate of 235U was determined. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. The U.S. DHS, UC Berkeley, the NNIS fellowship and the NSSC further supported this work.

  2. Resonance effects in near-threshold electron-impact excitation of the 143.4 nm line in the Pb++ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomonai, Anna N.; Hutych, Yuriy I.; Gomonai, Aleksandr I.

    2017-02-01

    Electron-impact excitation of the resonance transition 6 s 26 d 2 D 3/2 → 6 s 26 p 2 P o 1/2 (143.4 nm) in the Pb+ ion within the (6-100) eV energy range is studied spectroscopically using a crossed-beam technique. The observed distinct structure in the energy dependence of the effective excitation cross section (including the energy region above the ion ionization potential) is primarily due to the decay of atomic and ionic autoionizing states, produced mainly by excitation of an electron from the subvalence 5 d 10 shell, to the resonance levels (directly or via the cascade transitions). The absolute cross section value for the line under investigation was determined by normalizing the experimental curve at the electron beam energy of 100 eV to the theoretical data obtained by the Van-Regemorter formula and found to be (0.5 ± 0.3) × 10-16 cm2.

  3. Nature of ground and electronic excited states of higher acenes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2016-01-01

    Higher acenes have drawn much attention as promising organic semiconductors with versatile electronic properties. However, the nature of their ground state and electronic excited states is still not fully clear. Their unusual chemical reactivity and instability are the main obstacles for experimental studies, and the potentially prominent diradical character, which might require a multireference description in such large systems, hinders theoretical investigations. Here, we provide a detailed answer with the particle–particle random-phase approximation calculation. The 1Ag ground states of acenes up to decacene are on the closed-shell side of the diradical continuum, whereas the ground state of undecacene and dodecacene tilts more to the open-shell side with a growing polyradical character. The ground state of all acenes has covalent nature with respect to both short and long axes. The lowest triplet state 3B2u is always above the singlet ground state even though the energy gap could be vanishingly small in the polyacene limit. The bright singlet excited state 1B2u is a zwitterionic state to the short axis. The excited 1Ag state gradually switches from a double-excitation state to another zwitterionic state to the short axis, but always keeps its covalent nature to the long axis. An energy crossing between the 1B2u and excited 1Ag states happens between hexacene and heptacene. Further energetic consideration suggests that higher acenes are likely to undergo singlet fission with a low photovoltaic efficiency; however, the efficiency might be improved if a singlet fission into multiple triplets could be achieved. PMID:27528690

  4. Saturation Effect of Projectile Excitation in Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukoyama, Takeshi; Lin, Chii-Dong

    Calculations of projectile K-shell electron excitation cross sections for He-like ions during ion-atom collisions have been performed in the distortion approximation by the use of Herman-Skillman wave functions. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data for several targets. The excitation cross sections deviate from the first-Born approximation and show the saturation effect as a function of target atomic number. This effect can be explained as the distortion of the projectile electronic states by the target nucleus.

  5. Quantitative Measurements of Electronically Excited CH Concentration in Normal Gravity and Microgravity Coflow Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giassi, D.; Cao, S.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Smooke, M. D.; Long, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    With the conclusion of the SLICE campaign aboard the ISS in 2012, a large amount of data was made available for the analysis of the effect of microgravity on laminar coflow diffusion flames. Previous work focused on the study of sooty flames in microgravity as well as the ability of numerical models to predict its formation in a simplified buoyancy-free environment. The current work shifts the investigation to soot-free flames, putting an emphasis on the chemiluminescence emission from electronically excited CH (CH*). This radical species is of significant interest in combustion studies: it has been shown that the electronically excited CH spatial distribution is indicative of the flame front position and, given the relatively simple diagnostic involved with its measurement, several works have been done trying to understand the ability of electronically excited CH chemiluminescence to predict the total and local flame heat release rate. In this work, a subset of the SLICE nitrogen-diluted methane flames has been considered, and the effect of fuel and coflow velocity on electronically excited CH concentration is discussed and compared with both normal gravity results and numerical simulations. Experimentally, the spectral characterization of the DSLR color camera used to acquire the flame images allowed the signal collected by the blue channel to be considered representative of the electronically excited CH emission centered around 431 nm. Due to the axisymmetric flame structure, an Abel deconvolution of the line-of-sight chemiluminescence was used to obtain the radial intensity profile and, thanks to an absolute light intensity calibration, a quantification of the electronically excited CH concentration was possible. Results show that, in microgravity, the maximum flame electronically excited CH concentration increases with the coflow velocity, but it is weakly dependent on the fuel velocity; normal gravity flames, if not lifted, tend to follow the same trend

  6. Complete solution of electronic excitation and ionization in electron-hydrogen molecule scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Zammit, Mark C.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; ...

    2016-06-08

    The convergent close-coupling method has been used to solve the electron-hydrogen molecule scattering problem in the fixed-nuclei approximation. Excellent agreement with experiment is found for the grand total, elastic, electronic-excitation, and total ionization cross sections from the very low to the very high energies. This shows that for the electronic degrees of freedom the method provides a complete treatment of electron scattering on molecules as it does for atoms.

  7. Excitation and ionization of 4He clusters by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchenau, H.; Toennies, J. P.; Northby, J. A.

    1991-12-01

    Clusters are produced by expanding high pressure (P0≤20 bar), low temperature (T0≥5 K) helium gas through a 5 μm nozzle into a vacuum. The neutral beam time-of-flight distribution has three peaks which we associate with distinct groups of large and small clusters, and atoms. The beam is ionized by electron impact and the resulting time resolved charged fragment mass distribution reveals in addition to previously observed anomalies (``magic numbers'') a new strong He+4 signal at high source pressures and low temperatures. The dependence of the various charged and neutral metastable fragment currents on the bombarding electron energy reveals that each has a unique appearance potential. A comparison with the calculated energy required for an electron to create various electronic excitations in the interior of a large cluster indicates that the production and dynamical evolution of metastable 3S1 atomic and a 3Σ+u molecular excitations plays a significant role in the formation of charged fragments from large clusters, but that the production of detectable metastable cluster fragments apparently proceeds via decay of high lying excitonic states. The strong He+4 signal does not appear until the incident electron has about enough energy to create two metastable 3S1 excitations in a cluster. Thus we propose that this ion signal results from the recombination of a pair of a 3Σ+u molecular excitons in or on a large cluster, or possibly from the dynamical evolution of a metastable spin quartet bound hole-exciton pair.

  8. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of pyrimidine by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael; Mašín, Zdeněk; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.

    2016-01-14

    We measured differential cross sections for electron-impact electronic excitation of pyrimidine, both as a function of electron energy up to 18 eV, and of scattering angle up to 180°. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. The differential cross sections were summed to obtain integral cross sections. These are compared to results of R-matrix calculations, which successfully reproduce both the magnitude of the cross section and the major resonant features. Comparison of the experiment to the calculated contributions of different symmetries to the integral cross section permitted assignment of several features to specific core-excited resonances. Comparison of the resonant structure of pyrimidine with that of benzene revealed pronounced similarities and thus a dominant role of π–π{sup ∗} excited states and resonances. Electron energy loss spectra were measured as a preparation for the cross section measurements and vibrational structure was observed for some of the triplet states. A detailed analysis of the electronic excited states of pyrimidine is also presented.

  9. Review of electron impact excitation cross sections for copper atom

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, N.W.; Hazi, A.U.

    1982-02-01

    Excitation of atomic copper by electron impact plays an important role in the copper vapor laser and accurate cross sections are needed for understanding and modeling laser performance. During the past seven years, there have been several attempts to normalize the relative elastic and inelastic cross sections measured by Trajmar and coworkers. However, each of these efforts have yielded different cross sections, and the uncertainty in the correct normalization of the data has been a source of confusion and concern for the kinetic modeling efforts. This difficulty has motivated us to review previous work on the electron impact excitation of copper atom and to perform new calculations of the inelastic cross sections using the impact parameter method. In this memorandum we review the previous attempts to normalize the experimental data and provide a critical assessment of the accuracy of the resulting cross sections. We also present new theoretical cross sections for the electron impact excitation of the /sup 2/S ..-->.. /sup 2/P/sup 0/ and /sup 2/S ..-->.. /sup 2/D transitions in copper. When the experimental cross sections are renormalized to the results of the impact parameter calculations, they are a factor of three smaller than those published in the latest paper of Trajmar et. al. At impact energies above 60 eV the excitation cross sections obtained with the impact parameter method agree well with the results of the very recent, unpublished, close-coupling calculations of Henry. This agreement suggests that the present normalization of the experimental cross sections is probably the most reliable one obtained to date.

  10. A quantitative study of the effect of solvent on the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of substituted phenothiazines: evaluation of their ground and excited singlet-state dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Párkányi, C.; Boniface, C.; Aaron, J. J.; Maafi, M.

    1993-11-01

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of five phenothiazines (phenothiazine, promethazine, thionine, methylene blue and Azure A) were determined at room temperature (293 K) in several solvents of various polarities (cyclohexane, dioxane, ethyl ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, 1-butanol, 2-propanol, ethanol, methanol, acetonitrile, dimethylformamide and dimethyl sulfoxide). The effect of the solvents upon the spectral characteristics was studied. In combination with the ground state dipole moments of these phenothiazines, the spectral data were used to evaluate their first excited singlet-state dipole moments by means of the solvatochromic shift method (Bakhshiev's and Kawski—Chamma—Viallet correlations). The theoretical ground and excited singlet-state dipole moments for phenothiazines were calculated as a vector sum of the π component (obtained by the Pariser—Parr—Pople method) and the σ component (obtained from σ-bond moments). A reasonable agreement was found with the experimental values. For most phenothiazines under study, excited singlet-state dipole moments were found to be significantly higher than their ground-state counterparts. The application of the Kamlet—Abboud—Taft solvatochromic parameters to the solvent effect on spectral properties of phenothiazines is discussed.

  11. Validation of local hybrid functionals for TDDFT calculations of electronic excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Toni M.; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The first systematic evaluation of local hybrid functionals for the calculation of electronic excitation energies within linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is reported. Using our recent efficient semi-numerical TDDFT implementation [T. M. Maier et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4226 (2015)], four simple, thermochemically optimized one-parameter local hybrid functionals based on local spin-density exchange are evaluated against a database of singlet and triplet valence excitations of organic molecules, and against a mixed database including also Rydberg, intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) and core excitations. The four local hybrids exhibit comparable performance to standard global or range-separated hybrid functionals for common singlet valence excitations, but several local hybrids outperform all other functionals tested for the triplet excitations of the first test set, as well as for relative energies of excited states. Evaluation for the combined second test set shows that local hybrids can also provide excellent Rydberg and core excitations, in the latter case rivaling specialized functionals optimized specifically for such excitations. This good performance of local hybrids for different excitation types could be traced to relatively large exact-exchange (EXX) admixtures in a spatial region intermediate between valence and asymptotics, as well as close to the nucleus, and lower EXX admixtures in the valence region. In contrast, the tested local hybrids cannot compete with the best range-separated hybrids for intra- and intermolecular CT excitation energies. Possible directions for improvement in the latter category are discussed. As the used efficient TDDFT implementation requires essentially the same computational effort for global and local hybrids, applications of local hybrid functionals to excited-state problems appear promising in a wide range of fields. Influences of current-density dependence of local kinetic

  12. Electric dipole excitation of 208Pb by polarized electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubassa-Amundsen, D. H.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    The cross sections and spin asymmetries for the excitation of 1- states in 208Pb by transversely polarized electrons with collision energy of 30-180MeV have been examined within the DWBA scattering formalism. As examples, we have considered a low-lying 1- state and also states belonging to the pygmy dipole and giant dipole resonances. The structure of these states and their corresponding transition charge and current densities have been taken from an RPA calculation within the quasiparticle phonon model. The complex-plane rotation method has been applied to achieve the convergence of the radial DWBA integrals for backward scattering. We have studied the behaviour of the cross sections and spin asymmetries as a function of electron energy and scattering angle. The role of the longitudinal and transversal contributions to the excitation has been thoroughly studied. We conclude that the spin asymmetry S, related to unpolarized outgoing electrons, is mostly well below 1% even at the backward scattering angles and its measurement provides a challenge for future experiments with polarized electrons.

  13. Excitation of plasmonic nanoantennas by nonresonant and resonant electron tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Protsenko, Igor E.; Smetanin, Igor V.; Bouhelier, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    A rigorous theory of photon emission generated by inelastic electron tunnelling inside the gap of plasmonic nanoantennas is developed. The disappointingly low efficiency of the electrical excitation of surface plasmon polaritons in these structures can be increased by orders of magnitude when a resonant tunnelling structure is incorporated inside the gap. A resonant tunnelling assisted surface plasmon emitter may become a key element in future electrically-driven plasmonic nanocircuits.A rigorous theory of photon emission generated by inelastic electron tunnelling inside the gap of plasmonic nanoantennas is developed. The disappointingly low efficiency of the electrical excitation of surface plasmon polaritons in these structures can be increased by orders of magnitude when a resonant tunnelling structure is incorporated inside the gap. A resonant tunnelling assisted surface plasmon emitter may become a key element in future electrically-driven plasmonic nanocircuits. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Plasmonic mode in nanowires, the probability of stimulated emission in tunnelling through the Fermi's Golden Rule and electron wave functions in tunnelling structures with nonresonant and resonant tunnelling. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01931e

  14. Effects of core turbulence on jet excitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Reda R.; Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of varying freestream core turbulence on the evolution of a circular jet with and without tonal excitation are examined. Measurements are made on an 8.8 cm diameter jet at a Mach number of 0.3. The jet is excitated by plane waves at Strouhal number 0.5. For the excited and unexcited cases the turbulence level is varied by screens and grids placed upstream of the nozzle exit. The experiment results are compared with a theoretical model which incorporates a variable core turbulence and considers the energy interactions between the mean flow, the turbulence and the forced component. Both data and theory indicate that increasing the freestream turbulence diminishes the excitability of the jet and reduces the effect of excitation on the spreading rate of the jet.

  15. Electronic excited states of CO/sub 2/: An electron impact investigation

    SciTech Connect

    McDiarmid, R.; Doering, J.P.

    1984-01-15

    The electronic excited states of CO/sub 2/ were restudied by variable incident energy, variable angle electron impact spectroscopy. In this study, valence states of mixed configurations were distinguished from pure Rydberg states. Our results are incompatible with the theoretical description of CO/sub 2/, in which only two valence singlet states are located.

  16. High-energy collective electronic excitations in free-standing single-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachsmuth, P.; Hambach, R.; Kinyanjui, M. K.; Guzzo, M.; Benner, G.; Kaiser, U.

    2013-08-01

    In this joint experimental and theoretical work, we investigate collective electronic excitations (plasmons) in free-standing, single-layer graphene. The energy- and momentum-dependent electron energy-loss function was measured up to 50eV along two independent in-plane symmetry directions (ΓM and ΓK) over the first Brillouin zone by momentum-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope. We compare our experimental results with corresponding time-dependent density-functional theory calculations. For finite momentum transfers, good agreement with experiments is found if crystal local-field effects are taken into account. In the limit of small and vanishing momentum transfers, we discuss differences between calculations and the experimentally obtained electron energy-loss functions of graphene due to a finite momentum resolution and out-of-plane excitations.

  17. Optically Induced Nuclear Spin Polarization in the Quantum Hall Regime: The Effect of Electron Spin Polarization through Exciton and Trion Excitations.

    PubMed

    Akiba, K; Kanasugi, S; Yuge, T; Nagase, K; Hirayama, Y

    2015-07-10

    We study nuclear spin polarization in the quantum Hall regime through the optically pumped electron spin polarization in the lowest Landau level. The nuclear spin polarization is measured as a nuclear magnetic field B(N) by means of the sensitive resistive detection. We find the dependence of B(N) on the filling factor nonmonotonic. The comprehensive measurements of B(N) with the help of the circularly polarized photoluminescence measurements indicate the participation of the photoexcited complexes, i.e., the exciton and trion (charged exciton), in nuclear spin polarization. On the basis of a novel estimation method of the equilibrium electron spin polarization, we analyze the experimental data and conclude that the filling factor dependence of B(N) is understood by the effect of electron spin polarization through excitons and trions.

  18. Electronically excited rubidium atom in a helium cluster or film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leino, Markku; Viel, Alexandra; Zillich, Robert E.

    2008-11-01

    We present theoretical studies of helium droplets and films doped with one electronically excited rubidium atom Rb∗ (P2). Diffusion and path integral Monte Carlo approaches are used to investigate the energetics and the structure of clusters containing up to 14 helium atoms. The surface of large clusters is approximated by a helium film. The nonpair additive potential energy surface is modeled using a diatomic in molecule scheme. Calculations show that the stable structure of Rb∗Hen consists of a seven helium atom ring centered at the rubidium, surrounded by a tirelike second solvation shell. A very different structure is obtained when performing a "vertical Monte Carlo transition." In this approach, a path integral Monte Carlo equilibration starts from the stable configuration of a rubidium atom in the electronic ground state adsorbed to the helium surface after switching to the electronically excited surface. In this case, Rb∗Hen relaxes to a weakly bound metastable state in which Rb∗ sits in a shallow dimple. The interpretation of the results is consistent with the recent experimental observations [G. Auböck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 035301 (2008)].

  19. Reactive scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Mestdagh, J.M.; Balko, B.A.; Covinsky, M.H.; Weiss, P.S.; Vernon, M.F.; Schmidt, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1987-06-01

    Representative families of excited alkali atom reactions have been studied using a crossed beam apparatus. For those alkali-molecule systems in which reactions are also known for ground state alkali and involve an early electron transfer step, no large differences are observed in the reactivity as Na is excited. More interesting are the reactions with hydrogen halides (HCl): it was found that adding electronic energy into Na changes the reaction mechanism. Early electron transfer is responsible of Na(5S, 4D) reactions, but not of Na(3P) reactions. Moreover, the NaCl product scattering is dominated by the HCl/sup -/ repulsion in Na(5S, 4D) reactions, and by the NaCl-H repulsion in the case of Na(3P). The reaction of Na with O/sub 2/ is of particular interest since it was found to be state specific. Only Na(4D) reacts, and the reaction requires restrictive constraints on the impact parameter and the reactants' relative orientation. The reaction with NO/sub 2/ is even more complex since Na(4D) leads to the formation of NaO by two different pathways. It must be mentioned however, that the identification of NaO as product in these reactions has yet to be confirmed.

  20. Effect of Bridge Alteration on Ground- and Excited-State Properties of Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Electron-Donor-Substituted Dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine Ligands.

    PubMed

    Shillito, Georgina E; Larsen, Christopher B; McLay, James R W; Lucas, Nigel T; Gordon, Keith C

    2016-11-07

    A series of Ru(II) 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) complexes with an electron-accepting dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz) ligand coupled to an electron-donating triarylamine (TAA) group have been investigated. Systematic alteration of a bridging unit between the dppz and TAA allowed exploration into how communication between the donor and acceptor is perturbed by distance, as well as by steric and electronic effects. The effect of the bridging group on the electronic properties of the systems was characterized using a variety of spectroscopic methods, including Fourier transform-Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and transient resonance Raman (TR(2)) spectroscopy. These methods were used in conjunction with ground- and excited-state absorption spectroscopy, electrochemical studies, and DFT calculations. The ground-state electronic absorption spectra show distinct variation with the bridging group, with the wavelength observed for the lowest energy electronic transition ranging from 449 nm to 522 nm, accompanied by large changes in the molar absorptivity. The lowest-energy Franck-Condon state was determined to be intra-ligand charge transfer (ILCT) in nature for most compounds. The presence of higher-energy metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) Ru(II) → bpy and Ru(II) → dppz transitions was also confirmed via resonance Raman spectroscopy. The TR(2) spectra showed characteristic dppz(• -) and TAA(• +) vibrations, indicating that the THEXI state formed was also ILCT in nature. Excited-state lifetime measurements reveal that the rate of decay is in accordance with the energy gap law and is not otherwise affected by the nature of the bridging unit.

  1. Excitation of surface modes by electron beam in semi-bounded quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, B. F.; Elbasha, N. M.

    2015-10-15

    The excitation of the TM surface modes due to the interaction of electron beam with a semi-bounded quantum magnetized plasma is investigated. The generated current and the perturbed densities of the electron beam and plasma are obtained. The wave equation that describes the excited fields has been solved to obtain the dispersion relation for these modes. It is found that the quantum effects play important role for frequencies less and bigger than plasma frequency such that the phase velocity of modes increases with increasing the quantum effects compared to the classical case. It has also been displayed that in the absence of external magnetic field, the surface modes appear in the all regions of the wavelength while they have been only excited for high wavenumber in the presence of the magnetic field. Besides, it has been shown that the dispersion curves of the modes depend essentially on the density ratio of beam and plasma.

  2. Experimental investigation of the ionospheric hysteresis effect on the threshold excitation level of the Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samimi, A.; Scales, W.; Cruz, M.; Isham, B.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent experimental observations of the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) spectrum during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic show structures ordered by ion gyro-frequency. The proposed generation mechanism considers parametric decay of a pump upper hybrid/electron Bernstein (UH/EB) wave into another UH/EB and a group of neutralized ion Bernstein waves. The presumption of the proposed mechanism is that the pump electromagnetic wave is converted into the UH/EB wave. This conversion process generates field aligned irregularity which exhibits hysteresis effect. The predicted ionospheric hysteresis effect is studied during the PARS 2012 at HAARP. The preliminary results are presented for the first time. Also, experimental study of the effects of 1) the transmitter beam angle and 2) the transmitter frequency offset relative to the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency on the ion gyro-harmonic structures in the SEE spectrum are provided. The aforementioned observations are compared to the predictions of the analytical model. Possible connection of the SEE spectral features and artificially generated ionospheric descending layer is also discussed

  3. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Delocalized Excited States of the Hydrated Electron

    SciTech Connect

    Paul F. Barbara

    2005-09-28

    Research under support of this grant has been focused on the understanding of highly delocalized ''conduction-band-like'' excited states of solvated electrons in bulk water, in water trapped in the core of reverse micelles, and in alkane solvents. We have strived in this work to probe conduction-band-like states by a variety of ultrafast spectroscopy techniques. (Most of which were developed under DOE support in a previous funding cycle.) We have recorded the optical spectrum of the hydrated electron for the first time. This was accomplished by applying a photo-detrapping technique that we had developed in a previous funding cycle, but had not yet been applied to characterize the actual spectrum. In the cases of reverse micelles, we have been investigating the potential role of conduction bands in the electron attachment process and the photoinduced detrapping, and have published two papers on this topic. Finally, we have been exploring solvated electrons in isooctane from various perspectives. All of these results strongly support the conclusion that optically accessible, highly delocalized electronic states exist in these various media.

  4. State-specific transport properties of partially ionized flows of electronically excited atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2017-03-01

    State-to-state approach for theoretical study of transport properties in atomic gases with excited electronic degrees of freedom of both neutral and ionized species is developed. The dependence of atomic radius on the electronic configuration of excited atoms is taken into account in the transport algorithm. Different cutoff criteria for increasing atomic radius are discussed and the limits of applicability for these criteria are evaluated. The validity of a Slater-like model for the calculation of state-resolved transport coefficients in neutral and ionized atomic gases is shown. For ionized flows, a method of evaluation for effective cross-sections of resonant charge-transfer collisions is suggested. Accurate kinetic theory algorithms for modelling the state-specific transport properties are applied for the prediction of transport coefficients in shock heated flows. Based on the numerical observations, different distributions over electronic states behind the shock front are considered. For the Boltzmann-like distributions at temperatures greater than 14,000 K, an important effect of electronic excitation on the partial thermal conductivity and viscosity coefficients is found for both neutral and ionized atomic gases: increasing radius of excited atoms causes a strong decrease in these transport coefficients. Similarly, the presence of electronically excited states with increased atomic radii leads to reduced diffusion coefficients. Nevertheless the overall impact of increasing effective cross-sections on the transport properties just behind the shock front under hypersonic reentry conditions is found to be minor since the populations of high-lying electronic energy levels behind the shock waves are low.

  5. Lowest ^{2}S Electronic Excitations of the Boron Atom.

    PubMed

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2017-01-27

    A theoretical ab initio approach for calculating bound states of small atoms is developed and implemented. The approach is based on finite-nuclear-mass [non-Born-Oppenheimer (non-BO)] nonrelativistic variational calculations performed with all-particle explicitly correlated Gaussian functions and includes the leading relativistic and quantum electrodynamics energy corrections determined using the non-BO wave functions. The approach is applied to determine the total and transition energies for the lowest four ^{2}S electronic excitations of the boron atom. The transition energies agree with the available experimental values within 0.2-0.3  cm^{-1}. Previously, such accuracy was achieved for three- and four-electron systems.

  6. Lowest 2S Electronic Excitations of the Boron Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical ab initio approach for calculating bound states of small atoms is developed and implemented. The approach is based on finite-nuclear-mass [non-Born-Oppenheimer (non-BO)] nonrelativistic variational calculations performed with all-particle explicitly correlated Gaussian functions and includes the leading relativistic and quantum electrodynamics energy corrections determined using the non-BO wave functions. The approach is applied to determine the total and transition energies for the lowest four 2S electronic excitations of the boron atom. The transition energies agree with the available experimental values within 0.2 - 0.3 cm-1 . Previously, such accuracy was achieved for three- and four-electron systems.

  7. Electron-impact ionization excitation of helium in the quasiphoton regime

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoko Djiokap, J. M.; Foumouo, E.; Urbain, X.; Piraux, B.; Kwato Njock, M. G.

    2010-04-15

    The triply differential cross section of ionization excitation of helium, leaving the residual ion in the n=2 excited states, is evaluated for the kinematics considered experimentally by Dupreet al. [J. Phys. B 25, 259 (1992)]. The interaction of the incident electron with the target is described at the first order, while the interaction of the ejected electron with the residual ion is treated very accurately within the formalism of the Jacobi matrix method. In the quasiphoton limit and for low ejected electron energies, the presence of series of doubly excited states, mainly below the n=3 single ionization threshold in helium, makes the triply differential cross sections extremely sensitive to both the energy and the emission angle of the ejected electron. We show that the convolution of our results with a Gaussian energy profile, in which the full width at half-maximum corresponds to the energy resolution in the experiment, has a significant effect. Our results suggest that it is also important to account for the finite resolution on the measurement of the scattering angle when the experimental data are compared to the theoretical predictions. Comparison of our theoretical results convoluted both in energy and in angle with the experimental data demonstrates the importance of an accurate description of the helium spectrum. A possible two-step mechanism involving single ionization of the target followed by excitation of the core electron is proposed to explain the remaining discrepancies.

  8. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gunst, Jonas; Wu, Yuanbin Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2015-11-15

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic theoretical model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of {sup 93}Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV Mössbauer transition in {sup 57}Fe. These findings are most relevant for future nuclear quantum optics experiments at x-ray free electron laser facilities.

  9. Electron-impact ionization excitation of helium in the quasiphoton regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngoko Djiokap, J. M.; Foumouo, E.; Kwato Njock, M. G.; Urbain, X.; Piraux, B.

    2010-04-01

    The triply differential cross section of ionization excitation of helium, leaving the residual ion in the n=2 excited states, is evaluated for the kinematics considered experimentally by Dupré [J. Phys. B 25, 259 (1992)]. The interaction of the incident electron with the target is described at the first order, while the interaction of the ejected electron with the residual ion is treated very accurately within the formalism of the Jacobi matrix method. In the quasiphoton limit and for low ejected electron energies, the presence of series of doubly excited states, mainly below the n=3 single ionization threshold in helium, makes the triply differential cross sections extremely sensitive to both the energy and the emission angle of the ejected electron. We show that the convolution of our results with a Gaussian energy profile, in which the full width at half-maximum corresponds to the energy resolution in the experiment, has a significant effect. Our results suggest that it is also important to account for the finite resolution on the measurement of the scattering angle when the experimental data are compared to the theoretical predictions. Comparison of our theoretical results convoluted both in energy and in angle with the experimental data demonstrates the importance of an accurate description of the helium spectrum. A possible two-step mechanism involving single ionization of the target followed by excitation of the core electron is proposed to explain the remaining discrepancies.

  10. Real-time observation of interference between atomic one-electron and two-electron excitations.

    PubMed

    Geiseler, Henning; Rottke, Horst; Zhavoronkov, Nickolai; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2012-03-23

    We present results of real-time tracking of atomic two-electron dynamics in an autoionizing transient wave packet in krypton. A coherent superposition of two Fano resonances is excited with a femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulse. The evolution of the corresponding wave packet is subsequently probed with a delayed infrared pulse. In our specific case, we get access to the interference between one- and two-electron excitation channels in the launched wave packet, which is superimposed on its decay through autoionization. A simple model is able to account for the observed dynamical evolution of this wave packet.

  11. Cold chemistry with electronically excited Ca{sup +} Coulomb crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gingell, Alexander D.; Bell, Martin T.; Oldham, James M.; Softley, Timothy P.; Harvey, Jeremy N.

    2010-11-21

    Rate constants for chemical reactions of laser-cooled Ca{sup +} ions and neutral polar molecules (CH{sub 3}F, CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, or CH{sub 3}Cl) have been measured at low collision energies (/k{sub B}=5-243 K). Low kinetic energy ensembles of {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions are prepared through Doppler laser cooling to form ''Coulomb crystals'' in which the ions form a latticelike arrangement in the trapping potential. The trapped ions react with translationally cold beams of polar molecules produced by a quadrupole guide velocity selector or with room-temperature gas admitted into the vacuum chamber. Imaging of the Ca{sup +} ion fluorescence allows the progress of the reaction to be monitored. Product ions are sympathetically cooled into the crystal structure and are unambiguously identified through resonance-excitation mass spectrometry using just two trapped ions. Variations of the laser-cooling parameters are shown to result in different steady-state populations of the electronic states of {sup 40}Ca{sup +} involved in the laser-cooling cycle, and these are modeled by solving the optical Bloch equations for the eight-level system. Systematic variation of the steady-state populations over a series of reaction experiments allows the extraction of bimolecular rate constants for reactions of the ground state ({sup 2}S{sub 1/2}) and the combined excited states ({sup 2}D{sub 3/2} and {sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) of {sup 40}Ca{sup +}. These results are analyzed in the context of capture theories and ab initio electronic structure calculations of the reaction profiles. In each case, suppression of the ground state rate constant is explained by the presence of a submerged or real barrier on the ground state potential surface. Rate constants for the excited states are generally found to be in line with capture theories.

  12. Theoretical resonant electron-impact vibrational excitation, dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation cross sections of ro-vibrationally excited BeH+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, V.; Chakrabarti, K.; Celiberto, R.; Janev, R. K.; Mezei, J. Zs; Niyonzima, S.; Tennyson, J.; Schneider, I. F.

    2017-02-01

    A theoretical study of resonant vibrational excitation, dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation processes of the beryllium monohydride cation, BeH+, induced by electron impact, is reported. Full sets of ro-vibrationally-resolved cross sections and of the corresponding Maxwellian rate coefficients are presented for the three processes. Particular emphasis is given to the high-energy behaviour. Potential curves of {}2{{{Σ }}}+, {}2{{\\Pi }} and {}2{{Δ }} symmetries and the corresponding resonance widths, obtained from R-matrix calculations, provide the input for calculations which use a local complex-potential model for resonant collisions in each of the three symmetries. Rotational motion of nuclei and isotopic effects are also discussed. The relevant results are compared with those obtained using a multichannel quantum defect theory method. Full results are available from the Phys4Entry database.

  13. Excited-State Energies and Electronic Couplings of DNA Base Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, Christopher R.; Kistler, Kurt A.; Lu, Zhen; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2010-02-04

    The singlet excited electronic states of two π-stacked thymine molecules and their splittings due to electronic coupling have been investigated with a variety of computational methods. Focus has been given on the effect of intermolecular distance on these energies and couplings. Single-reference methods, CIS, CIS(2), EOMCCSD, TDDFT, and the multireference method CASSCF, have been used, and their performance has been compared. It is found that the excited-state energies are very sensitive to the applied method but the couplings are not as sensitive. Inclusion of diffuse functions in the basis set also affects the excitation energies significantly but not the couplings. TDDFT is inadequate in describing the states and their coupling, while CIS(2) gives results very similar to EOM-CCSD. Excited states of cytosine and adenine π-stacked dimers were also obtained and compared with those of thymine dimers to gain a more general picture of excited states in π-stacked DNA base dimers. The coupling is very sensitive to the relative position and orientation of the bases, indicating great variation in the degree of delocalization of the excited states between stacked bases in natural DNA as it fluctuates.

  14. Controlling multipolar surface plasmon excitation through the azimuthal phase structure of electron vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte, Daniel; Ducati, Caterina

    2016-05-01

    We have theoretically studied how the azimuthal phase structure of an electron vortex beam excites surface plasmons on metal particles of different geometries as observed in electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We have developed a semiclassical approximation combining a ring-shaped beam and the dielectric formalism. Our results indicate that for the case of total orbital angular momentum transfer, we can manipulate surface plasmon multipole excitation and even attain an enhancement factor of several orders of magnitude. Since electron vortex beams interact with particles mostly through effects due to azimuthal symmetry, i.e., in the plane perpendicular to the electron beam, anisotropy information (longitudinal and transversal) of the sample may be derived in EELS studies by comparing nonvortex and vortex beam measurements.

  15. Excitation of surface plasmon polaritons by electron beam with graphene ribbon arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2017-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as an alternative material to support surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with its excellent properties such as the tight electromagnetic field localization, low dissipative loss, and versatile tunability. Thus, graphene surface plasmon polaritons (GSPs) provide an exciting platform to develop a series of novel devices and systems from the optical band to the terahertz (THz) band. In this paper, theoretical and simulated studies about the excitation of SPPs by an injected electron beam with periodic graphene ribbon arrays deposited on a dielectric medium are presented. The analytical dispersion expression of the GSP mode on the graphene ribbon arrays is obtained by using a modal expansion method along with periodic boundary conditions in the structure. With this result, the dispersion relation, propagation loss, and field pattern of the propagating GSPs for both periodic graphene microribbon arrays and the complete graphene sheet are investigated and analyzed in the THz band. It is shown that the electromagnetic field with a better concentration on the interface can be realized with graphene ribbon arrays compared with the graphene sheet for a given frequency. Besides, the excitation of GSPs by an injected electron beam with graphene ribbon arrays is modeled and implemented by the particle-in-cell simulation based on the finite difference time domain algorithm. GSPs can be excited effectively when the dispersion line of the electron beam and SPPs on the graphene ribbon arrays is matched with each other well. Besides, the dependences of output power on electron beam parameters such as the distance of the electron beam above the graphene ribbon surface and beam voltage are studied and analyzed. Finally, the tunability of graphene conductivity via biased voltage with a ground metal is considered and the tunable excitation of GSPs on the structure with biased drive voltage by the injected electron beam is also realized. The present work can find a

  16. Electron-impact excitation of diatomic hydride cations - I. HeH+, CH+, ArH+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, James R.; Faure, Alexandre; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    R-matrix calculations combined with the adiabatic nuclei approximation are used to compute electron-impact rotational excitation rates for three closed-shell diatomic cations, HeH+, CH+, ArH+. Comparisons with previous studies show that an improved treatment of threshold effects leads to significant changes in the low temperature rates; furthermore the new calculations suggest that excitation of CH+ is dominated by ΔJ = 1 transitions as is expected for cations with a large dipole moment. A model for ArH+ excitation in the Crab nebula is presented which gives results consistent with the observations for electron densities in the range 2-3 × 103 cm-3.

  17. Excitation of Plasma Waves in Aurora by Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    daSilva, C. E.; Vinas, A. F.; deAssis, A. S.; deAzevedo, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we study numerically the excitation of plasma waves by electron beams, in the auroral region above 2000 km of altitude. We have solved the fully kinetic dispersion relation, using numerical method and found the real frequency and the growth rate of the plasma wave modes. We have examined the instability properties of low-frequency waves such as the Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) wave as well as Lower-Hybrid (LH) wave in the range of high-frequency. In all cases, the source of free energy are electron beams propagating parallel to the geomagnetic field. We present some features of the growth rate modes, when the cold plasma parameters are changed, such as background electrons and ions species (H(+) and O(+)) temperature, density or the electron beam density and/or drift velocity. These results can be used in a test-particle simulation code, to investigate the ion acceleration and their implication in the auroral acceleration processes, by wave-particle interaction.

  18. Vertical and adiabatic excitations in anthracene from quantum Monte Carlo: Constrained energy minimization for structural and electronic excited-state properties in the JAGP ansatz.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Nicolas; Bouaouli, Samira; Mauri, Francesco; Sorella, Sandro; Casula, Michele

    2015-06-07

    We study the ionization energy, electron affinity, and the π → π(∗) ((1)La) excitation energy of the anthracene molecule, by means of variational quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods based on a Jastrow correlated antisymmetrized geminal power (JAGP) wave function, developed on molecular orbitals (MOs). The MO-based JAGP ansatz allows one to rigorously treat electron transitions, such as the HOMO → LUMO one, which underlies the (1)La excited state. We present a QMC optimization scheme able to preserve the rank of the antisymmetrized geminal power matrix, thanks to a constrained minimization with projectors built upon symmetry selected MOs. We show that this approach leads to stable energy minimization and geometry relaxation of both ground and excited states, performed consistently within the correlated QMC framework. Geometry optimization of excited states is needed to make a reliable and direct comparison with experimental adiabatic excitation energies. This is particularly important in π-conjugated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, where there is a strong interplay between low-lying energy excitations and structural modifications, playing a functional role in many photochemical processes. Anthracene is an ideal benchmark to test these effects. Its geometry relaxation energies upon electron excitation are of up to 0.3 eV in the neutral (1)La excited state, while they are of the order of 0.1 eV in electron addition and removal processes. Significant modifications of the ground state bond length alternation are revealed in the QMC excited state geometry optimizations. Our QMC study yields benchmark results for both geometries and energies, with values below chemical accuracy if compared to experiments, once zero point energy effects are taken into account.

  19. Vertical and adiabatic excitations in anthracene from quantum Monte Carlo: Constrained energy minimization for structural and electronic excited-state properties in the JAGP ansatz

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, Nicolas; Bouaouli, Samira; Mauri, Francesco Casula, Michele; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-06-07

    We study the ionization energy, electron affinity, and the π → π{sup ∗} ({sup 1}L{sub a}) excitation energy of the anthracene molecule, by means of variational quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods based on a Jastrow correlated antisymmetrized geminal power (JAGP) wave function, developed on molecular orbitals (MOs). The MO-based JAGP ansatz allows one to rigorously treat electron transitions, such as the HOMO → LUMO one, which underlies the {sup 1}L{sub a} excited state. We present a QMC optimization scheme able to preserve the rank of the antisymmetrized geminal power matrix, thanks to a constrained minimization with projectors built upon symmetry selected MOs. We show that this approach leads to stable energy minimization and geometry relaxation of both ground and excited states, performed consistently within the correlated QMC framework. Geometry optimization of excited states is needed to make a reliable and direct comparison with experimental adiabatic excitation energies. This is particularly important in π-conjugated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, where there is a strong interplay between low-lying energy excitations and structural modifications, playing a functional role in many photochemical processes. Anthracene is an ideal benchmark to test these effects. Its geometry relaxation energies upon electron excitation are of up to 0.3 eV in the neutral {sup 1}L{sub a} excited state, while they are of the order of 0.1 eV in electron addition and removal processes. Significant modifications of the ground state bond length alternation are revealed in the QMC excited state geometry optimizations. Our QMC study yields benchmark results for both geometries and energies, with values below chemical accuracy if compared to experiments, once zero point energy effects are taken into account.

  20. Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation of vibrational and electronic states in phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Neves, R. F. C.; Jones, D. B.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Ratnavelu, K.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-05-21

    We report on measurements of integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of composite vibrational modes and electronic-states in phenol, where the energy range of those experiments was 15–250 eV. There are currently no other results against which we can directly compare those measured data. We also report results from our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction computations, namely, for the inelastic ICS (all discrete electronic states and neutral dissociation) and the total ionisation ICS. In addition, for the relevant dipole-allowed excited electronic states, we also report f-scaled Born-level and energy-corrected and f-scaled Born-level (BEf-scaled) ICS. Where possible, our measured and calculated ICSs are compared against one another with the general level of accord between them being satisfactory to within the measurement uncertainties.

  1. Glycine in an electronically excited state: ab initio electronic structure and dynamical calculations.

    PubMed

    Muchová, Eva; Slavícek, Petr; Sobolewski, Andrzej L; Hobza, Pavel

    2007-06-21

    The goal of this study is to explore the photochemical processes following optical excitation of the glycine molecule into its two low-lying excited states. We employed electronic structure methods at various levels to map the PES of the ground state and the two low-lying excited states of glycine. It follows from our calculations that the photochemistry of glycine can be regarded as a combination of photochemical behavior of amines and carboxylic acid. The first channel (connected to the presence of amino group) results in ultrafast decay, while the channels characteristic for the carboxylic group occur on a longer time scale. Dynamical calculations provided the branching ratio for these channels. We also addressed the question whether conformationally dependent photochemistry can be observed for glycine. While electronic structure calculations favor this possibility, the ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) calculations showed only minor relevance of the reaction path resulting in conformationally dependent dynamics.

  2. Electronic excitations in molecular solids: bridging theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Jonathan M; da Silva, E Lora; Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Hatcher, Lauren E; Raithby, Paul R; Parker, Stephen C; Walsh, Aron

    2015-01-01

    As the spatial and temporal resolution accessible to experiment and theory converge, computational chemistry is an increasingly powerful tool for modelling and interpreting spectroscopic data. However, the study of molecular processes, in particular those related to electronic excitations (e.g. photochemistry), frequently pushes quantum-chemical techniques to their limit. The disparity in the level of theory accessible to periodic and molecular calculations presents a significant challenge when modelling molecular crystals, since accurate calculations require a high level of theory to describe the molecular species, but must also take into account the influence of the crystalline environment on their properties. In this article, we briefly review the different classes of quantum-chemical techniques, and present an overview of methods that account for environmental influences with varying levels of approximation. Using a combination of solid-state and molecular calculations, we quantitatively evaluate the performance of implicit-solvent models for the [Ni(Et4dien)(η2-O,ON)(η1-NO2)] linkage-isomer system as a test case. We focus particularly on the accurate reproduction of the energetics of the isomerisation, and on predicting spectroscopic properties to compare with experimental results. This work illustrates how the synergy between periodic and molecular calculations can be exploited for the study of molecular crystals, and forms a basis for the investigation of more challenging phenomena, such as excited-state dynamics, and for further methodological developments.

  3. Vibrational excitations in molecular layers probed by ballistic electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivasayan Kajen, Rasanayagam; Chandrasekhar, Natarajan; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Su, Haibin

    2011-10-01

    We demonstrate the information on molecular vibrational modes via the second derivative (d2IB/dV2) of the ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES) current. The proposed method does not create huge fields as in the case of conventional derivative spectroscopy and maintains a zero bias across the device. BEES studies carried out on three different types of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecular layers show that the d2IB/dV2 spectra consist of uniformly spaced peaks corresponding to vibronic excitations. The peak spacing is found to be identical for molecules within the same PAH family though the BEES onset voltage varies for different molecules. In addition, injection into a particular orbital appears to correspond to a specific vibrational mode as the manifestation of the symmetry principle.

  4. Ultrafast modulation of electronic structure by coherent phonon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisshaupt, J.; Rouzée, A.; Woerner, M.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Elsaesser, T.; Shirley, E. L.; Borgschulte, A.

    2017-02-01

    Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a laser-driven high-harmonic source is used to map ultrafast changes of x-ray absorption by femtometer-scale coherent phonon displacements. In LiBH4, displacements along an Ag phonon mode at 10 THz are induced by impulsive Raman excitation and give rise to oscillatory changes of x-ray absorption at the Li K edge. Electron density maps from femtosecond x-ray diffraction data show that the electric field of the pump pulse induces a charge transfer from the BH4- to neighboring Li+ ions, resulting in a differential Coulomb force that drives lattice vibrations in this virtual transition state.

  5. Electron-hole interaction and optical excitations in solids, surfaces, and polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, S.G.

    2001-03-31

    The optical properties of a variety of materials have been calculated using a recently developed ab initio method based on solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation of the two-particle Green's functions. Relevant self-energy and electron-hole interaction effects are included from first-principles. Results on selected semiconductors, insulators, surfaces, and conjugated polymers are discussed. In many of these systems, excitonic effects are shown to dramatically alter the excitation energies and the optical spectra.

  6. Cumulative HOM Excitation and Transition Effects in LCLS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrikov, A.; Sukhanov, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Solyak, N.

    LCLS-II is a proposed upgrade of the most powerful X-ray laser in the world built at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. When complete, multiple free electron laser (FEL) sections will be powered by a continuous wave superconducting radio frequency (SRF) electron linac. The vital parameters for FEL radiation quality are beam emittance and beam transverse position stability. Excitation of high order modes (HOM) in SRF niobium cavities leads to additional beam power dissipation through incoherent and coherent losses. Energy stored in HOM may cause cumulative effects - transverse and longitudinal position displacement of the center of bunches, which leads to transverse and longitudinal emittance dilution. Cumulative effects due to dipole HOM excitation in LCLS-II are analyzed. Transition HOM effects are caused by sudden changes (periodic or single case) in the beam bunch structure. Bunch center position disturbance due to transition HOM effects is estimated.

  7. Electronic excitation of ground state atoms by collision with heavy gas particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1993-01-01

    Most of the important chemical reactions which occur in the very high temperature air produced around space vehicles as they enter the atmosphere were investigated both experimentally and theoretically, to some extent at least. One remaining reaction about which little is known, and which could be quite important at the extremely high temperatures that will be produced by the class of space vehicles now contemplated - such as the AOTV - is the excitation of bound electron states due to collisions between heavy gas particles. Rates of electronic excitation due to free electron collisions are known to be very rapid, but because these collisions quickly equilibrate the free and bound electron energy, the approach to full equilibrium with the heavy particle kinetic energy will depend primarily on the much slower process of bound electron excitation in heavy particle collisions and the subsequent rapid transfer to free electron energy. This may be the dominant mechanism leading to full equilibrium in the gas once the dissociation process has depleted the molecular states so the transfer between molecular vibrational energy and free electron energy is no longer available as a channel for equilibration of free electron and heavy particle kinetic energies. Two mechanisms seem probable in electronic excitation by heavy particle impact. One of these is the collision excitation and deexcitation of higher electronic states which are Rydberg like. A report, entitled 'Semi-Classical Theory of Electronic Excitation Rates', was submitted previously. This presented analytic expressions for the transition probabilities, assuming that the interaction potential is an exponential repulsion with a perturbation ripple due to the dipole-induced dipole effect in the case of neutral-neutral collisions, and to the ion-dipole interaction in the case of ion-neutral collisions. However the above may be, there is little doubt that excitation of ground state species by collision occurs at the

  8. Electron-impact excitation of the low-lying electronic states of HCN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Tanaka, H.; Srivastava, S. K.; Wicke, B. G.

    1977-01-01

    The first study of the low-energy electron-impact excitation of low-lying electronic transitions in the HCN molecule is reported. Measurements were made at incident electron energies of 11.6 and 21.6 eV in the energy-loss range of 3-10 eV, and at scattering angles of 20-130 deg. Inelastic scattering spectra were placed on the absolute cross-section scale by determining first the ratio of inelastic-to-elastic scattering cross sections, and then separately measuring the absolute elastic scattering cross section. Several new electronic transitions are observed which are intrinsically overlapped in the molecule itself. Assignments of these electronic transitions are suggested. These assignments are based on present spectroscopic and cross-sections measurements, high-energy electron scattering spectra, optical absorption spectra, and ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

  9. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Hexachloroplatinate-Nucleobase Complexes: Nucleobase Excited State Decay Observed via Delayed Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue B.; Dessent, Caroline

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ~1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl6 2- dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl6 2-∙thymine and PtCl6 2-∙adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes [Sen et al, J. Phys. Chem. B, 119, 11626, 2015]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl6 2-∙nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes, is attributed to onephoton excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a timescale long enough to allow autodetachment.

  10. Investigation of Multiconfigurational Short-Range Density Functional Theory for Electronic Excitations in Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Mickaël; Hedegård, Erik D; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2016-05-10

    Computational methods that can accurately and effectively predict all types of electronic excitations for any molecular system are missing in the toolbox of the computational chemist. Although various Kohn-Sham density-functional methods (KS-DFT) fulfill this aim in some cases, they become inadequate when the molecule has near-degeneracies and/or low-lying double-excited states. To address these issues we have recently proposed multiconfiguration short-range density-functional theory-MC-srDFT-as a new tool in the toolbox. While initial applications for systems with multireference character and double excitations have been promising, it is nevertheless important that the accuracy of MC-srDFT is at least comparable to the best KS-DFT methods also for organic molecules that are typically of single-reference character. In this paper we therefore systematically investigate the performance of MC-srDFT for a selected benchmark set of electronic excitations of organic molecules, covering the most common types of organic chromophores. This investigation confirms the expectation that the MC-srDFT method is accurate for a broad range of excitations and comparable to accurate wave function methods such as CASPT2, NEVPT2, and the coupled cluster based CC2 and CC3.

  11. Cross Sections for Electron Impact Excitation of Astrophysically Abundant Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    Electron collisional excitation rates and transition probabilities are important for computing electron temperatures and densities, ionization equilibria, and for deriving elemental abundances from emission lines formed in the collisional and photoionized astrophysical plasmas. Accurate representation of target wave functions that properly account for the important correlation and relaxation effects and inclusion of coupling effects including coupling to the continuum are essential components of a reliable collision calculation. Non-orthogonal orbitals technique in multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities. The effect of coupling to the continuum spectrum is included through the use of pseudostates which are chosen to account for most of the dipole polarizabilities of target states. The B-spline basis is used in the R-matrix approach to calculate electron excitation collision strengths and rates. Results for oscillator strengths and electron excitation collision strengths for transitions in N I, O I, O II, O IV, S X and Fe XIV have been produced

  12. Measurement of electron impact collisional excitation cross sections of Ni to Ge-like gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Jordan, N.; Scofield, J. H.; Reed, K. J.; Brown, G. V.; Hansen, S. B.; Porter, F. S.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Boyce, K. R.

    2017-03-01

    We have measured the collisional excitation cross sections for the 3d→4f and 3d→5f excitations in Au ions near the Ni-like charge state by using beam plasmas created in the Livermore electron beam ion trap EBIT-I. The cross sections have been experimentally determined at approximately 1, 2 and 3 keV above the threshold energy, ET, for the 3d→4f excitations (ET ˜ 2.5 keV) and at approximately 0.1, 1 and 2 keV above the threshold energy for the 3d→5f excitations (ET ˜ 3.3 keV). The cross section measurements were made possible by using the GSFC x-ray microcalorimeter at the Livermore EBIT facility. The absolute cross sections are determined from the ratio of the intensity of the collisionally excited bound-bound transitions to the intensity of the radiative recombination lines produced in EBIT-I plasmas. The effects of polarization and Auger decay channels are accounted for in the cross section determination. Measured cross sections are compared with those from HULLAC, DWS and FAC calculations. The measurements demonstrate that some errors exist in the calculated excitation cross sections.

  13. Ge Quantum Dot Formation on Si (100)-2x1 with Surface Electronic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguzer, Ali

    2009-03-01

    The effect of laser-induced electronic excitations on the self-assembly of Ge quantum dots on Si (100)-2x1 grown by pulsed laser deposition is studied. The samples were first cleaned by using modified Shiraki method and then transferred into the deposition chamber. The vacuum system was then pumped down, baked for at least 12 hours, and the sample was then flashed to 1100 C in order for the 2x1 reconstruction to form. The experiment was conducted under a pressure ˜1x10-10 Torr. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (wavelength λ = 1064 nm, 10 Hz repetition rate) was used to ablate a Ge target. In-situ RHEED and STM and ex-situ AFM were used to study the morphology of the grown QD. The dependence of the QD morphology on substrate temperature and ablation and excitation laser energy density was studied. Electronic excitation is shown to affect the surface morphology. Laser irradiation of the Si substrate is shown to decrease the roughness of films grown at a substrate temperature of ˜450 ^oC. Electronic excitation also affected surface coverage ratio and cluster density and decreased the temperature required to form 3-dimensional quantum dots. Possible mechanisms involved will be discussed.

  14. Similarity criteria in vibrationally and electronically excited gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustova, E. V.; Mekhonoshina, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    Similarity criteria related to heat conduction and diffusion (Prandtl and Schmidt numbers) are studied in strongly non-equilibrium reacting flows on the basis of the Chapman-Enskog method. A one-temperature flow description is applied to study high-temperature gas mixtures with slow chemical reactions and excited rovibrational and electronic degrees of freedom of molecules and electronic states of atomic species. Essentially non-monotonic dependence of the Prandtl number on the mixture composition is emphasized; the Schmidt numbers vary weakly with temperature and decrease monotonically with increasing molecular molar fraction. For vibrationally non-equilibrium flows, we consider the detailed state-to-state model. In this case the Prandtl number is determined by translational and rotational energies; the Schmidt numbers are introduced for each vibrational state. The developed models are used to study Prandtl and Schmidt numbers in shock heated and supersonic expanding flows of N2/N and O2/O mixtures. Peculiar features of these similarity criteria in strongly non-equilibrium flows are discussed.

  15. Electron-impact excitation and ionization of boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kedong; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    We present a comprehensive study of electron collisions with neutral boron atoms. The calculations were performed with the B-Spline R-matrix (close-coupling) method, by employing a parallelized version of the associated computer code. Elastic, momentum-transfer, excitation, and ionization cross sections were obtained for all transitions involving the lowest 11 states of boron, for incident electron energies ranging from threshold to 100 eV. A multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method with non-orthogonal term-dependent orbitals was used to generate accurate wavefunctions for the target states. Close-coupling expansions including 13, 51, and 999 physical and pseudo-states were set up to check the sensitivity of the predictions to variations in the theoretical model. The cross-section dataset generated in this work is expected to be the most accurate one available today and should be sufficiently comprehensive for most modeling applications involving neutral boron. Work supported by the China Scholarship Council and the United States National Science Foundation under grants PHY-1403245 and PHY-1520970, and by the XSEDE allocation PHY-090031.

  16. Calculations for electron-impact excitation and ionization of beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2016-12-01

    The B-spline R-matrix and the convergent close-coupling methods are used to study electron collisions with neutral beryllium over an energy range from threshold to 100 eV. Coupling to the target continuum significantly affects the results for transitions from the ground state, but to a lesser extent the strong transitions between excited states. Cross sections are presented for selected transitions between low-lying physical bound states of beryllium, as well as for elastic scattering, momentum transfer, and ionization. The present cross sections for transitions from the ground state from the two methods are in excellent agreement with each other, and also with other available results based on nonperturbative convergent pseudostate and time-dependent close-coupling models. The elastic cross section at low energies is dominated by a prominent shape resonance. The ionization from the {(2s2p)}3P and {(2s2p)}1P states strongly depends on the respective term. The current predictions represent an extensive set of electron scattering data for neutral beryllium, which should be sufficient for most modeling applications.

  17. Electron impact excitation collision strengths for extreme ultraviolet lines of Fe VII

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O. E-mail: oleg.zatsarinny@drake.edu

    2014-06-10

    Extensive calculations have been performed for electron impact excitation collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the Fe VII extreme ultraviolet lines of astrophysical importance. The collision strengths for fine-structure transitions are calculated in the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach. The target wavefunctions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The close-coupling expansion includes 189 fine-structure levels of Fe VII belonging to terms of the ground 3p {sup 6}3d {sup 2} and excited 3p {sup 5}3d {sup 3}, 3p {sup 6}3d4l, 3p {sup 6}3d5s, and 3p {sup 6}3d5p configurations. The effective collision strengths are determined from the electron excitation collision strengths by integration over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. The effective collision strengths are provided for 17766 fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} K. Our results normally agree with the previous R-matrix frame-transformation calculations by Witthoeft and Badnell. However, there are important differences for some transitions with the previous calculations. The corrections to the previous results are mainly due to more extensive expansions for the Fe VII target states.

  18. Electron Impact Excitation Collision Strengths for Extreme Ultraviolet Lines of Fe VII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2014-06-01

    Extensive calculations have been performed for electron impact excitation collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the Fe VII extreme ultraviolet lines of astrophysical importance. The collision strengths for fine-structure transitions are calculated in the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach. The target wavefunctions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The close-coupling expansion includes 189 fine-structure levels of Fe VII belonging to terms of the ground 3p 63d 2 and excited 3p 53d 3, 3p 63d4l, 3p 63d5s, and 3p 63d5p configurations. The effective collision strengths are determined from the electron excitation collision strengths by integration over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. The effective collision strengths are provided for 17766 fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures from 104 to 107 K. Our results normally agree with the previous R-matrix frame-transformation calculations by Witthoeft & Badnell. However, there are important differences for some transitions with the previous calculations. The corrections to the previous results are mainly due to more extensive expansions for the Fe VII target states.

  19. Energy shift of collective electron excitations in highly corrugated graphitic nanostructures: Experimental and theoretical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Sedelnikova, O. V. Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Asanov, I. P.; Yushina, I. V.

    2014-04-21

    Effect of corrugation of hexagonal carbon network on the collective electron excitations has been studied using optical absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in conjunction with density functional theory calculations. Onion-like carbon (OLC) was taken as a material, where graphitic mantle enveloping agglomerates of multi-shell fullerenes is strongly curved. Experiments showed that positions of π and π + σ plasmon modes as well as π → π* absorption peak are substantially redshifted for OLC as compared with those of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and thermally exfoliated graphite consisted of planar sheets. This effect was reproduced in behavior of dielectric functions of rippled graphite models calculated within the random phase approximation. We conclude that the energy of electron excitations in graphitic materials could be precisely tuned by a simple bending of hexagonal network without change of topology. Moreover, our investigation suggests that in such materials optical exciton can transfer energy to plasmon non-radiatively.

  20. Collision Strengths for Electron Collisional Excitation of S II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    Electron collisional excitation strengths for inelastic transitions in S II are calculated using the R-matrix method in a 19-state (3s(sup 2)3p(sup 3)(sup 4)S(sup o), (sup 2)D(sup o), (sup 2)p(sup o), 3s3p(sup 4)(sup 4)P, (sup 2)D, (sup 2)S, 3S(sup 2)3p(sup 2)3d(sup 2)P, (sup 4)F, (sup 4)D, (sup 2)F, (sup 4)P, 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2)4s(sup 4)P, (sup 2)P, 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2)4p(sup 2)S(s o), (sup 4)D(sup o), (sup 4)P(sup o), (sup 2)D(sup o), (sup 4)S(sup o), (sup 2)P(sup o)) close-coupling approximation. These target states are represented by extensive configuration-interaction wave functions that give excitation energies and oscillator strengths that are usually in good agreement with the experimental values and the available accurate calculations. The present results for collision strengths are in very good agreement with the recent merged beams energy loss measurement of Liao et al. and agree reasonably well with the 18-state R-matrix calculation of Ramsbottom, Bell, & Stafford, but show significant differences from the 12-state R-matrix calculation of Cai & Pradhan.

  1. Excitation of plasmons in Ag/Fe/W structure by spin-polarized electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Samarin, Sergey N.; Kostylev, Mikhail; Williams, J. F.; Artamonov, Oleg M.; Baraban, Alexander P.; Guagliardo, Paul

    2015-09-07

    Using Spin-polarized Electron-Energy Loss Spectroscopy (SPEELS), the plasmon excitations were probed in a few atomic layers thick Ag film deposited on an Fe layer or on a single crystal of W(110). The measurements were performed at two specular geometries with either a 25° or 72° angle of incidence. On a clean Fe layer (10 atomic layers thick), Stoner excitation asymmetry was observed, as expected. Deposition of a silver film on top of the Fe layer dramatically changed the asymmetry of the SPEELS spectra. The spin-effect depends on the kinematics of the scattering: angles of incidence and detection. The spin-dependence of the plasmon excitations in the silver film on the W(110) surface and on the ferromagnetic Fe film is suggested to arise from the spin-active Ag/W or Ag/Fe interfaces.

  2. Electronic excitation and quenching of atoms at insulator surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaminathan, P. K.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Murthy, C. S.

    1988-01-01

    A trajectory-based semiclassical method is used to study electronically inelastic collisions of gas atoms with insulator surfaces. The method provides for quantum-mechanical treatment of the internal electronic dynamics of a localized region involving the gas/surface collision, and a classical treatment of all the nuclear degrees of freedom (self-consistently and in terms of stochastic trajectories), and includes accurate simulation of the bath-temperature effects. The method is easy to implement and has a generality that holds promise for many practical applications. The problem of electronically inelastic dynamics is solved by computing a set of stochastic trajectories that on thermal averaging directly provide electronic transition probabilities at a given temperature. The theory is illustrated by a simple model of a two-state gas/surface interaction.

  3. Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition of U-235

    SciTech Connect

    Chodash, Perry Adam

    2015-07-14

    Nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that is theorized to occur in numerous isotopes. One isotope in particular, 235U, has been studied several times over the past 40 years and NEET of 235U has never been conclusively observed. These past experiments generated con icting results with some experiments claiming to observe NEET of 235U and others setting limits for the NEET rate. This dissertation discusses the latest attempt to measure NEET of 235U. If NEET of 235U were to occur, 235mU would be created. 235mU decays by internal conversion with a decay energy of 76 eV and a half-life of 26 minutes. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with a pulse energy of 789 mJ and a pulse width of 9 ns was used to generate a uranium plasma. The plasma was captured on a catcher plate and electrons emitted from the catcher plate were accelerated and focused onto a microchannel plate detector. A decay of 26 minutes would suggest the creation of 235mU and the possibility that NEET occurred. However, measurements performed using a variety of uranium targets spanning depleted uranium up to 99.4% enriched uranium did not observe a 26 minute decay. Numerous other decays were observed with half-lives ranging from minutes up to hundreds of minutes. While NEET of 235U was not observed during this experiment, an upper limit for the NEET rate of 235U was determined. In addition, explanations for the con icting results from previous experiments are given. Based on the results of this experiment and the previous experiments looking for NEET of 235U, it is likely that NEET of 235U has never been observed.

  4. Effect of frequency on microplasmas driven by microwave excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-07-28

    The effect of excitation frequency on the breakdown voltage of a microwave (mw) microdischarge and its steady-state plasma parameters is studied by the self-consistent one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo collisions model. It is found that for microdischarges in which the electron wall losses are significant, an increase in the mw frequency results in a decrease in the breakdown voltage. For conditions in which the electron wall losses become negligible, an increase in the frequency does not influence significantly the breakdown voltage. At the same time, for both regimes, the increase in the frequency results in an increase in the steady-state plasma density. The analysis of the steady-state plasma parameters have shown that the dominant electron heating mechanism is the Joule heating while the stochastic heating is negligible. Also, it is found that the electron energy distribution function consists of two electron groups, namely, slow and fast electrons. The presence of fast electrons in the plasma bulk indicates the non-local nature of microwave excited microdischarges.

  5. Coherence, Energy and Charge Transfers in De-Excitation Pathways of Electronic Excited State of Biomolecules in Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Henrik G.; Malik, F. Bary

    2013-11-01

    The observed multiple de-excitation pathways of photo-absorbed electronic excited state in the peridinin-chlorophyll complex, involving both energy and charge transfers among its constituents, are analyzed using the bio-Auger (B-A) theory. It is also shown that the usually used Förster-Dexter theory, which does not allow for charge transfer, is a special case of B-A theory. The latter could, under appropriate circumstances, lead to excimers.

  6. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Egidi, Franco Segado, Mireia; Barone, Vincenzo; Koch, Henrik; Cappelli, Chiara

    2014-12-14

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π{sup *}, π-π{sup *}, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  7. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egidi, Franco; Segado, Mireia; Koch, Henrik; Cappelli, Chiara; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π*, π-π*, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  8. Projection of excited orbitals into kinetic energies of emitted electrons in resonant Si KLL Auger decays of SiF{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, I. H.; Kono, Y.; Ikeda, A.; Nagaoka, S.; Ouchi, T.; Ueda, K.; Takahashi, O.; Higuchi, I.; Tamenori, Y.

    2010-10-15

    Spectator resonant Auger-electron spectra have been measured in the Si 1s photoexcitation region of SiF{sub 4} using an electron spectroscopic technique combined with undulator radiation. A transition with the highest intensity in the total ion yield spectrum, which comes from excitation of a 1s electron into the 6t{sub 2} valence orbital, generates resonant Auger decays in which the excited electron remains predominantly in the valence orbital or is partly shaken up into a high-lying Rydberg orbital. The higher-lying peak generated through excitation into Rydberg orbitals induces resonant Auger decays in which the excited Rydberg electron is partly shaken up to a higher-lying Rydberg orbital or shaken down to a lower-lying valence molecular orbital. These findings exhibit a clear disentanglement effect among excited orbitals which are smeared out in the 1s electron excitation spectrum.

  9. Nuclear excitation by electronic transition of 235U

    SciTech Connect

    Chodash, P. A.; Norman, E. B.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Fisher, S. E.; Holliday, K. S.; Jeffries, J. R.; Wakeling, M. A.; Wilks, S. C.

    2016-03-11

    Here, nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that can occur in isotopes containing a low-lying nuclear excited state. Over the past 40 yr, several experiments have attempted to measure NEET of 235U and those experiments have yielded conflicting results.

  10. Adsorbate-induced absorption redshift in an organic-inorganic cluster conjugate: Electronic effects of surfactants and organic adsorbates on the lowest excited states of a methanethiol-CdSe conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Christopher; Chung, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Sungyul; Weiss, Shimon; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    Bioconjugated CdSe quantum dots are promising reagents for bioimaging applications. Experimentally, the binding of a short peptide has been found to redshift the optical absorption of nanoclusters [J. Tsay et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 1669 (2005)]. This study examines this issue by performing density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent-DFT calculations to study the ground state and low-lying excited states of (CdSe)6[SCH3]-, a transition metal complex built by binding methanethiolate to a CdSe molecular cluster. Natural bond orbital results show that the redshift is caused by ligand-inorganic cluster orbital interaction. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of (CdSe)6 is dominated by selenium 4p orbitals; in contrast, the HOMO of (CdSe)6[SCH3]- is dominated by sulfur 3p orbitals. This difference shows that [SCH3]- binding effectively introduces filled sulfur orbitals above the selenium 4p orbitals of (CdSe)6. The resulting smaller HOMO-LUMO gap of (CdSe)6[SCH3]- indeed leads to redshifts in its excitation energies compared to (CdSe)6. In contrast, binding of multiple NH3 destabilizes cadmium 5p orbitals, which contribute significantly to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of (CdSe)6, while leaving the selenium 4p orbitals near the HOMO relatively unaffected. This has the effect of widening the HOMO-LUMO gap of (CdSe)6ṡ6NH3 compared to (CdSe)6. As expected, the excitation energies of the passivated (CdSe)6ṡ6NH3 are also blueshifted compared to (CdSe)6. As far as NH3 is a faithful representation of a surfactant, the results clearly illustrate the differences between the electronic effects of an alkylthiolate versus those of surfactant molecules. Surface passivation of (CdSe)6[SCH3]- is then simulated by coating it with multiple NH3 molecules. The results suggest that the [SCH3]- adsorption induces a redshift in the excitation energies in a surfactant environment.

  11. Adsorbate-induced absorption redshift in an organic-inorganic cluster conjugate: Electronic effects of surfactants and organic adsorbates on the lowest excited states of a methanethiol-CdSe conjugate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Christopher; Chung, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Sungyul; Weiss, Shimon; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2009-11-07

    Bioconjugated CdSe quantum dots are promising reagents for bioimaging applications. Experimentally, the binding of a short peptide has been found to redshift the optical absorption of nanoclusters [J. Tsay et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 1669 (2005)]. This study examines this issue by performing density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent-DFT calculations to study the ground state and low-lying excited states of (CdSe)(6)[SCH(3)](-), a transition metal complex built by binding methanethiolate to a CdSe molecular cluster. Natural bond orbital results show that the redshift is caused by ligand-inorganic cluster orbital interaction. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of (CdSe)(6) is dominated by selenium 4p orbitals; in contrast, the HOMO of (CdSe)(6)[SCH(3)](-) is dominated by sulfur 3p orbitals. This difference shows that [SCH(3)](-) binding effectively introduces filled sulfur orbitals above the selenium 4p orbitals of (CdSe)(6). The resulting smaller HOMO-LUMO gap of (CdSe)(6)[SCH(3)](-) indeed leads to redshifts in its excitation energies compared to (CdSe)(6). In contrast, binding of multiple NH(3) destabilizes cadmium 5p orbitals, which contribute significantly to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of (CdSe)(6), while leaving the selenium 4p orbitals near the HOMO relatively unaffected. This has the effect of widening the HOMO-LUMO gap of (CdSe)(6)6NH(3) compared to (CdSe)(6). As expected, the excitation energies of the passivated (CdSe)(6)6NH(3) are also blueshifted compared to (CdSe)(6). As far as NH(3) is a faithful representation of a surfactant, the results clearly illustrate the differences between the electronic effects of an alkylthiolate versus those of surfactant molecules. Surface passivation of (CdSe)(6)[SCH(3)](-) is then simulated by coating it with multiple NH(3) molecules. The results suggest that the [SCH(3)](-) adsorption induces a redshift in the excitation energies in a surfactant environment.

  12. Electron impact excitation with the cascade population of the 4 p 5 5 s levels of the krypton atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mityureva, A. A.; Smirnov, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    Data are presented on the direct and effective, i.e., including the cascade population, electronic excitation cross sections of the 4 p 55 s levels of the krypton atom from its ground state by the electron impact. The data are made up of the results available in the literature on this process and the results of the measurements performed by the authors.

  13. Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging for aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, Nathan David

    This thesis presents applications of Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) to a variety of aerodynamic and thermodynamic measurements. FLEET tagged line characteristics such as intensity, width and spectral features are investigated in various flow conditions (pressure, temperature, velocity, steadiness, etc.) and environments (gas composition) for both temporally and spatially instantaneous and averaged data. Special attention is drawn to the nature of first and second positive systems of molecular nitrogen and the ramifications on FLEET measurements. Existing laser-based diagnostic techniques are summarized and FLEET is directly compared with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in various low speed flows. Multidimensional velocity, acceleration, vorticity and other flow parameters are extracted in supersonic free jets and within an enclosed in-draft tunnel test section. Probability distribution functions of the mean and standard deviation of critical flow parameters are unveiled by utilizing a Bayesian statistical framework wherein likelihood functions are established from prior and posterior distributions. Advanced image processing techniques based on fuzzy logic are applied to single-shot FLEET images with low signal-to-noise ratio to improve image quality and reduce uncertainty in data processing algorithms. Lastly, FLEET second positive and first negative emission are considered at a wide range of pressures to correct for changes in select rovibrational peak magnitude and shape due to density from which bulk gas temperature may be extracted.

  14. Excited electronic states and spectroscopy of unsymmetrically substituted polyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Takao

    2013-09-01

    α-Methyl-ω-phenylpolyenes, Me-(CH=CH)N-Ph, (MPPNs) with N = 2, 3, and 4 were synthesized. Fluorescence, absorption, and excitation spectra of MPPNs have been measured under different conditions along with those of β-methylstyrene. It is shown that there is a forbidden singlet (π, π*) excited state located at energies below the absorbing state for MPPNs with N = 3 and 4. Excitation energies of these polyenes are determined as a function of N. Quantitative analysis of the temperature dependence of the relative intensity of the fluorescence spectrum and its solvent shift behavior extract estimates of the various physical parameters that characterize excitation energies and excited-state dynamical behavior of MPPN with N = 3. The singlet excited states of the MPPNs were compared with those of the α,ω-diphenylpolyenes and α,ω-dimethylpolyenes.

  15. Excited electronic states and spectroscopy of unsymmetrically substituted polyenes.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takao

    2013-09-07

    α-Methyl-ω-phenylpolyenes, Me-(CH=CH)N-Ph, (MPPNs) with N = 2, 3, and 4 were synthesized. Fluorescence, absorption, and excitation spectra of MPPNs have been measured under different conditions along with those of β-methylstyrene. It is shown that there is a forbidden singlet (π, π∗) excited state located at energies below the absorbing state for MPPNs with N = 3 and 4. Excitation energies of these polyenes are determined as a function of N. Quantitative analysis of the temperature dependence of the relative intensity of the fluorescence spectrum and its solvent shift behavior extract estimates of the various physical parameters that characterize excitation energies and excited-state dynamical behavior of MPPN with N = 3. The singlet excited states of the MPPNs were compared with those of the α,ω-diphenylpolyenes and α,ω-dimethylpolyenes.

  16. Effects of Ultrasound Pulsing on Neural Excitability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    to alter the - excitability of myelinated fibers within the frog sciatic nerve. The magnitude and direction of these changes are critically dependent...on the timing of the burst relative to the electrical stimulus and are different for various fiber types and frog species. These effects cannot be...the ganglion-microelectrode approach in favor of using a compound nerve trunk (the frog sciatic nerve) which cold be stimulated and recorded from

  17. Persistent order due to transiently enhanced nesting in an electronically excited charge density wave

    PubMed Central

    Rettig, L.; Cortés, R.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I. R.; Schmitt, F.; Moore, R. G.; Shen, Z.-X.; Kirchmann, P. S.; Wolf, M.; Bovensiepen, U.

    2016-01-01

    Non-equilibrium conditions may lead to novel properties of materials with broken symmetry ground states not accessible in equilibrium as vividly demonstrated by non-linearly driven mid-infrared active phonon excitation. Potential energy surfaces of electronically excited states also allow to direct nuclear motion, but relaxation of the excess energy typically excites fluctuations leading to a reduced or even vanishing order parameter as characterized by an electronic energy gap. Here, using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate a tendency towards transient stabilization of a charge density wave after near-infrared excitation, counteracting the suppression of order in the non-equilibrium state. Analysis of the dynamic electronic structure reveals a remaining energy gap in a highly excited transient state. Our observation can be explained by a competition between fluctuations in the electronically excited state, which tend to reduce order, and transiently enhanced Fermi surface nesting stabilizing the order. PMID:26804717

  18. Persistent order due to transiently enhanced nesting in an electronically excited charge density wave

    SciTech Connect

    Rettig, L.; Cortés, R.; Chu, J. -H.; Fisher, I. R.; Schmitt, F.; Moore, R. G.; Shen, Z. -X.; Kirchmann, P. S.; Wolf, M.; Bovensiepen, U.

    2016-01-25

    Non-equilibrium conditions may lead to novel properties of materials with broken symmetry ground states not accessible in equilibrium as vividly demonstrated by non-linearly driven mid-infrared active phonon excitation. Potential energy surfaces of electronically excited states also allow to direct nuclear motion, but relaxation of the excess energy typically excites fluctuations leading to a reduced or even vanishing order parameter as characterized by an electronic energy gap. Here, using femtosecond time-and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate a tendency towards transient stabilization of a charge density wave after near-infrared excitation, counteracting the suppression of order in the non-equilibrium state. Analysis of the dynamic electronic structure reveals a remaining energy gap in a highly excited transient state. In conclusion, our observation can be explained by a competition between fluctuations in the electronically excited state, which tend to reduce order, and transiently enhanced Fermi surface nesting stabilizing the order.

  19. Electrostatic ion cyclotron, beam-plasma, and lower hybrid waves excited by an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J.R.; Schunk, R.W.

    1985-06-01

    It is pointed out that electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves have been extensively investigated in connection with both space and laboratory plasmas. The present investigation has the objective to study the excitation of low-frequency waves in a multiion plasma by electron beams. The frequencies considered range from below the lowest gyrofrequency of the heaviest ion to about the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that electron-beam instabilities can produce peaks in the growth rate below the cyclotron frequency of each ion species if nonzero perpendicular wave number effects are included in the ion dynamics. The dispersion relations for neutralized ion Bernstein (NIB) and pure ion Bernstein (PIB) waves are considered along with an instability analysis for a cold plasma and warm electron beam, the electron beam-plasma mode, banded ion cyclotron (EIC) waves with small perpendicular wavelengths, and the growth lengths of the waves. 39 references.

  20. Electrostatic ion cyclotron, beam-plasma, and lower hybrid waves excited by an electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves have been extensively investigated in connection with both space and laboratory plasmas. The present investigation has the objective to study the excitation of low-frequency waves in a multiion plasma by electron beams. The frequencies considered range from below the lowest gyrofrequency of the heaviest ion to about the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that electron-beam instabilities can produce peaks in the growth rate below the cyclotron frequency of each ion species if nonzero perpendicular wave number effects are included in the ion dynamics. The dispersion relations for neutralized ion Bernstein (NIB) and pure ion Bernstein (PIB) waves are considered along with an instability analysis for a cold plasma and warm electron beam, the electron beam-plasma mode, banded ion cyclotron (EIC) waves with small perpendicular wavelengths, and the growth lengths of the waves.

  1. Dynamics of the Chemistry of Electronically Excited Atoms in Defined Quantum States.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-15

    excited atom concentration by atomic absorption spectroscopy in the vacuum ultraviolet (6). Relatively efficient electronic to vibrational energy transfer...by the use of atomic absorption spectroscopy , permitted observation of both ground and electronically excited state bromine atoms. The deactivation of

  2. Linewidths of collective excitations of the inhomogeneous electron gas: Application to two-dimensional quantum strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, C. A.; Vignale, G.

    1998-09-01

    It is well known that high-frequency collective excitations in electronic systems are not Landau damped, i.e., they cannot decay effectively into single particle-hole pairs. The leading damping mechanism in this regime is instead provided by dynamical exchange and correlation effects, such as multipair production. These effects are not captured by the widely used adiabatic local-density approximation (ALDA), which accounts for Landau damping only. In the recently developed time-dependent current density-functional formalism [G. Vignale, C. A. Ullrich, and S. Conti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 4878 (1997)], exchange and correlation enter as viscoelastic stresses in the electron fluid, causing an additional damping that is not contained in the ALDA. We use this theory to derive an explicit formula for the linewidth of collective electronic excitations that are not Landau damped. The formula is then applied to calculate the linewidth of collective modes in two-dimensional (2D) quantum strips. In comparison with the corresponding modes in the homogeneous 2D electron gas, we find an order-of-magnitude enhancement of the linewidth due to the nonuniformity of the system.

  3. New tools for the systematic analysis and visualization of electronic excitations. II. Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Plasser, Felix Bäppler, Stefanie A.; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2014-07-14

    The excited states of a diverse set of molecules are examined using a collection of newly implemented analysis methods. These examples expose the particular power of three of these tools: (i) natural difference orbitals (the eigenvectors of the difference density matrix) for the description of orbital relaxation effects, (ii) analysis of the one-electron transition density matrix in terms of an electron-hole picture to identify charge resonance and excitonic correlation effects, and (iii) state-averaged natural transition orbitals for a compact simultaneous representation of several states. Furthermore, the utility of a wide array of additional analysis methods is highlighted. Five molecules with diverse excited state characteristics are chosen for these tasks: pyridine as a prototypical small heteroaromatic molecule, a model system of six neon atoms to study charge resonance effects, hexatriene in its neutral and radical cation forms to exemplify the cases of double excitations and spin-polarization, respectively, and a model iridium complex as a representative metal organic compound. Using these examples a number of phenomena, which are at first sight unexpected, are highlighted and their physical significance is discussed. Moreover, the generality of the conclusions of this paper is verified by a comparison of single- and multireference ab initio methods.

  4. Influence of a polarizable surrounding on the electronically excited states of aggregated perylene materials.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Daniel; Settels, Volker; Liu, Wenlan; Fink, Reinhold F; Engels, Bernd

    2016-06-30

    To tune the efficiency of organic semiconductor devices it is important to understand limiting factors as trapping mechanisms for excitons or charges. An understanding of such mechanisms deserves an accurate description of the involved electronical states in the given environment. In this study, we investigate how a polarizable surrounding influences the relative positions of electronically excited states of dimers of different perylene dyes. Polarization effects are particularly interesting for these systems, because gas phase computations predict that the CT states lie slightly above the corresponding Frenkel states. A polarizable environment may change this energy order because CT states are thought to be more sensitive to a polarizable surrounding than Frenkel states. A first insight we got via a TD-HF approach in combination with a polarizable continuum model (PCM). These give limited insights because TD-HF overestimates excitation energies of CT states. However, SCS-CC2 approaches, which are sufficiently accurate, cannot easily be used in combination with continuum solvent models. Hence, we developed two approaches to combine gas phase SCS-CC2 results with solvent effects based on TD-HF computations. Their accuracies were finally checked via ADC(2)//COSMO computations. The results show that for perylene dyes a polarizable surrounding alone does not influence the energetic ordering of CT and Frenkel states. Variations in the energy order of the states only result from nuclear relaxation effects after the excitation process. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Excitation of hydrogen atoms in collisions with helium atoms: the role of electron–electron interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frémont, F.; Belyaev, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    Cross sections for producing H(nl) excited state atoms in H(1s) + He(1s2) collisions are calculated using the CTMC method, at impact energies ranging from 20 eV to 100 keV. The role of the electron correlation is studied. In the first step, the interactions between each pair of the three electrons are neglected. This leads to disagreement of the calculated total cross section for producing H(2l) atoms with previous experimental and theoretical results. In a second step, the electron–electron interaction is taken into account in a rigorous way, that is, in the form of the pure Coulomb potential. To make sure that the He target is stable before the collision, phenomenological potentials for the electron–helium-nucleus interactions that simulate the Heisenberg principle are included in addition to the Coulomb potential. The excitation cross section calculated in the frame of this model is in remarkable agreement with previous data in the range between 200 eV and 5 keV. At other energies, discrepancies are revealed, but only by a factor of less than 2 at high energies. The present results show the decisive role of the electron–electron interaction during collisions. In addition, they demonstrate the ability of classical mechanics to take into account the effects of the electron correlation.

  6. Intermediate energy cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D. B.; Ellis-Gibbings, L.; García, G.; Nixon, K. L.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-09-07

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) and integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine, at incident electron energies in the range 15–50 eV. The scattered electron angular range for the DCS measurements was 15°–90°. The measurements at the DCS-level are the first to be reported for vibrational-excitation in pyrimidine via electron impact, while for the ICS we extend the results from the only previous condensed-phase study [P. L. Levesque, M. Michaud, and L. Sanche, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094701 (2005)], for electron energies ⩽12 eV, to higher energies. Interestingly, the trend in the magnitude of the lower energy condensed-phase ICSs is much smaller when compared to the corresponding gas phase results. As there is no evidence for the existence of any shape-resonances, in the available pyrimidine total cross sections [Baek et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 032702 (2013); Fuss et al., ibid. 88, 042702 (2013)], between 10 and 20 eV, this mismatch in absolute magnitude between the condensed-phase and gas-phase ICSs might be indicative for collective-behaviour effects in the condensed-phase results.

  7. Hyperfast time-resolved spectroscopy of electron correlation in excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2007-06-01

    As a consequence of continuing developments in the science and technology of techniques that produce and control electromagnetic pulses with frequencies that are found in a broad part of the spectrum, from the ir to the soft X-rays, it is possible to have hyperfast pump-probe time delay spectroscopic techniques capable of time resolving the dynamics of various atomic and molecular systems involving excited states. In this context, it has been demonstrated via first principles solution of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation (TDSE), that effects which are caused by strong electron correlations in excited states, including the process of autoionization and the formation of resonances, can be time-resolved on a time scale of attoseconds [1-3]. By extending the investigations to polyelectronic atoms, we have obtained new results for various time resolved processes associated with the photo-ejection of inner (2s) electrons and of two electrons (LM) from the thirteen electron atom of Aluminum and with the electron correlation beats in bound and autoionizind states of N^+3 and Al. The theory and computations account for the interference of direct double ionization, inner hole states and Auger decay [4]. [1] C. A. Nicolaides et al, J. Phys. B 35, L271 (2002). [2] Th. Mercouris et al, Phys. Rev. A 69, 032502 (2004). [3] Th. Mercouris, et al, Phys. Rev. A 75, 013407 (2007). [4] Th. Mercouris, Y. Komninos and C. A. Nicolaides, unpublished.

  8. Cross Sections for Electron Impact Excitation of Ions Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, Swaraj S.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research grant was to calculate accurate oscillator strengths and electron collisional excitation strengths for inelastic transitions in atomic species of relevance to Planetary Atmospheres. Large scale configuration-interaction atomic structure calculations have been performed to obtain oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for transitions among the fine-structure levels and R-matrix method has been used in the calculations of electron-ion collision cross sections of C II, S I, S II, S III, and Ar II. A number of strong features due to ions of sulfur have been detected in the spectra of Jupiter satellite Io. The electron excitation cross sections for the C II and S II transitions are studied in collaboration with the experimental atomic physics group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. There is excellent agreement between experiment and theory which provide an accurate and broad-base test of the ability of theoretical methods used in the calculation of atomic processes. Specifically, research problems have been investigated for: electron impact excitation cross sections of C II: electron impact excitation cross sections of S III; energy levels and oscillator strengths for transitions in S III; collision strengths for electron collisional excitation of S II; electron impact excitation of inelastic transitions in Ar II; oscillator strengths of fine-structure transitions in neutral sulfur; cross sections for inelastic scattering of electrons from atomic nitrogen; and excitation of atomic ions by electron impact.

  9. On the Performances of the M06 Family of Density Functionals for Electronic Excitation Energies.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Denis; Perpète, Eric A; Ciofini, Ilaria; Adamo, Carlo; Valero, Rosendo; Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G

    2010-07-13

    We assessed the accuracy of the four members of the M06 family of functionals (M06-L, M06, M06-2X, and M06-HF) for the prediction of electronic excitation energies of main-group compounds by time-dependent density functional theory. This is accomplished by comparing the predictions both to high-level theoretical benchmark calculations and some experimental data for gas-phase excitation energies of small molecules and to experimental data for midsize and large chromogens in liquid-phase solutions. The latter comparisons are carried out using implicit solvation models to include the electrostatic effects of solvation. We find that M06-L is one of the most accurate local functionals for evaluating electronic excitation energies, that M06-2X outperforms BHHLYP, and that M06-HF outperforms HF, although in each case, the compared functionals have the same or a similar amount of Hartree-Fock exchange. For the majority of investigated excited states, M06 emerges as the most accurate functional among the four tested, and it provides an accuracy similar to the best of the other global hybrids such as B3LYP, B98, and PBE0. For 190 valence excited states, 20 Rydberg states, and 16 charge transfer states, we try to provide an overall assessment by comparing the quality of the predictions to those of time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory and nine other density functionals. For the valence excited states, M06 yields a mean absolute deviation (MAD) of 0.23 eV, whereas B3LYP, B98, and PBE0 have MADs in the range 0.19-0.22 eV. Of the functionals tested, M05-2X, M06-2X, and BMK are found to perform best for Rydberg states, and M06-HF performs best for charge transfer states, but no single functional performs satisfactorily for all three kinds of excitation. The performance of functionals with no Hartree-Fock exchange is of great practical interest because of their high computational efficiency, and we find that M06-L predicts more accurate excitation energies than other such functionals.

  10. Peroxyacetyl radical: Electronic excitation energies, fundamental vibrational frequencies, and symmetry breaking in the first excited state

    SciTech Connect

    Copan, Andreas V.; Wiens, Avery E.; Nowara, Ewa M.; Schaefer, Henry F.; Agarwal, Jay

    2015-02-07

    Peroxyacetyl radical [CH{sub 3}C(O)O{sub 2}] is among the most abundant peroxy radicals in the atmosphere and is involved in OH-radical recycling along with peroxyacetyl nitrate formation. Herein, the ground (X{sup ~}) and first (A{sup ~}) excited state surfaces of cis and trans peroxyacetyl radical are characterized using high-level ab initio methods. Geometries, anharmonic vibrational frequencies, and adiabatic excitation energies extrapolated to the complete basis-set limit are reported from computations with coupled-cluster theory. Excitation of the trans conformer is found to induce a symmetry-breaking conformational change due to second-order Jahn-Teller interactions with higher-lying excited states. Additional benchmark computations are provided to aid future theoretical work on peroxy radicals.

  11. Sub-excitation electron interactions in rare gases: I, Evidence for the time evolution of the sub-excitation spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.; Sauer, M.C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The production of the '2p' electronic excited states of the rare gases neon, argon, krypton and xenon has been studied using picosecond pulse radiolysis techniques. At pressures below about 5 torr, the emission from these excited states shows a pressure dependent growth-decay pattern. Kinetic analysis of the growth-decay curves reveal formation rate constants which are all greater than 10/sup 12/M/sup /minus/1/sec/sup /minus/1/. These observations preclude atom-atom collisional processes and support an excitation mechanism involving collisional energy loss from electrons. It is thus concluded that the secondary electron spectrum in pure rare gases at pressures below a few torr takes a few nanoseconds to degrade to energies below that of the lowest excited state. This time scale therefore (by definition) corresponds to the time needed to form subexcitation electrons. In 1 atmosphere of rare gas the time taken would be of the order of 20--30 picoseconds. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Decoherence dynamics of coherent electronic excited states in the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xian-Ting; Zhang, Wei-Min; Zhuo, Yi-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical description to the quantum coherence and decoherence phenomena of energy transfer in photosynthesis observed in a recent experiment [Science 316, 1462 (2007)]. As a successive two-color laser pulses with selected frequencies cast on a sample of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rb. sphaeroides two resonant excitations of electrons in chromophores can be generated. However, this effective two-level subsystem will interact with its protein environment and decoherence is inevitable. We describe this subsystem coupled with its environment as a dynamical spin-boson model. The non-Markovian decoherence dynamics is described using a quasiadiabatic propagator path integral (QUAPI) approach. With the photon-induced effective time-dependent level splitting energy and level flip coupling coefficient between the two excited states and the environment-induced non-Markovian decoherence dynamics, our theoretical result is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Vibronic structure and coupling of higher excited electronic states in carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Stanisław; Luchowski, Rafał

    2013-03-01

    Absorption spectra of all-trans carotenoids (lycopene, violaxanthin, ζ-carotene) at low temperature exhibit peculiar features in the UV range. The transition to the 11Ag+ state ('cis-band') weakens on cooling, indicating that it is induced by thermal deformations of the conjugated chain. The higher energy band has unique vibrational structure indicating the vibronic coupling of nBu with another electronic state. The electroabsorption spectra point to the electric field-induced mixing of the nBu state with the vibrational continuum of a lower-lying excited state (Fano effect). These observations widen the basis for elucidation of the vibronic coupling effects in the lower excited states.

  14. Mitigation of electron attachment to oxygen in high pressure air plasmas by vibrational excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederickson, K.; Lee, W.; Palm, P.; Adamovich, I. V.; Rich, J. W.; Lempert, W. R.

    2007-05-01

    A series of time resolved microwave attenuation measurements are performed of the electron number density of an electron beam generated, CO laser excited nonequilibrium O2/N2 plasma. Resonant absorption of infrared radiation from the CO laser produces the nonequilibrium state, in which the heavy species vibrational modes are disproportionately excited, compared to the rotational and translational modes (Tvib≈2000-3000K vs TR /T≈300K). It is shown that this results in an increase in the plasma free electron lifetime by two orders of magnitude compared to the unexcited cold gas, an effect which is ascribed to complete mitigation of rapid three-body electron attachment to molecular oxygen. A series of heavy species filtered pure rotational Raman scattering measurements are also presented, which exhibit minimal temperature change (+50K), indicating that the observed lifetime increase cannot be due to heavy-species thermal effects. Finally, computational modeling results infer an increase in the rate of O2- detachment by four to five orders of magnitude, compared to the equilibrium value.

  15. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitations of cytosine by low energy electron impact

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, M.; Michaud, M.; Sanche, L.

    2013-01-01

    The absolute cross sections (CS) for electronic excitations of cytosine by electron impact between 5 and 18 eV were measured by electron-energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy of the molecule deposited at low coverage on an inert Ar substrate. The lowest EEL features found at 3.55 and 4.02 eV are ascribed to transitions from the ground state to the two lowest triplet 1 3A′(π→π*) and 2 3A′(π→π*) valence states of the molecule. Their energy dependent CS exhibit essentially a common maximum at about 6 eV with a value of 1.84 × 10−17 cm2 for the former and 4.94 × 10−17 cm2 for the latter. In contrast, the CS for the next EEL feature at 4.65 eV, which is ascribed to the optically allowed transition to the 2 1A′(π→π*) valence state, shows only a steep rise to about 1.04 × 10−16 cm2 followed by a monotonous decrease with the incident electron energy. The higher EEL features at 5.39, 6.18, 6.83, and 7.55 eV are assigned to the excitations of the 3 3, 1A′(π→π*), 4 1A′(π→π*), 5 1A′(π→π*), and 6 1A′(π→π*) valence states, respectively. The CS for the 3 3, 1A′ and 4 1A′ states exhibit a common enhancement at about 10 eV superimposed on a more or less a steep rise, reaching respectively a maximum of 1.27 and 1.79 × 10−16 cm2, followed by a monotonous decrease. This latter enhancement and the maximum seen at about 6 eV in the lowest triplet states correspond to the core-excited electron resonances that have been found by dissociative electron attachment experiments with cytosine in the gas phase. The weak EEL feature found at 5.01 eV with a maximum CS of 3.8 × 10−18 cm2 near its excitation threshold is attributed to transitions from the ground state to the 1 3, 1A″(n→π*) states. The monotonous rise of the EEL signal above 8 eV is attributed to the ionization of the molecule. It is partitioned into four excitation energy regions at about 8.55, 9.21, 9.83, and 11.53 eV, which correspond closely to the ionization energies of

  16. Electron impact excitation and dissociation of N2 via the b 1Pi(u) state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratliff, J. M.; James, G. K.; Trajmar, S.; Ajello, J. M.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    Electron impact excitation of the b 1Pi(u) state in N2 plays a prominent role in the dissociation of the molecule and thus in the production of atomic nitrogen in planetary atmospheres. Electron impact excitation cross sections combined with electron-impact-induced fluorescence measurements can yield the corresponding dissociation cross sections. Serious discrepancies exist among excitation cross sections reported in the literature. To clarify the situation, these cross sections were measured at two impact energies using electron energy loss spectroscopy. The new results are in agreement with recent values deduced from optical measurements and fall midway between previous results which are too high or low by factors of 2.

  17. Enhanced charge excitations in electron-doped cuprates by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohyama, Takami; Tsutsui, Kenji; Mori, Michiyasu; Sota, Shigetoshi; Yunoki, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) tuned for the Cu L edge is a possible tool to detect charge excitations in cuprate superconductors. We theoretically investigate the possibility for observing a collective charge excitation by the RIXS. The RIXS process via the intermediate state inevitably makes the spectral weight of charge excitation stronger in electron doping than in hole doping. Electron-hole asymmetry also appears in the dynamical charge structure factor, showing a new enhanced small-momentum low-energy mode in electron doping. These facts indicate a possibility of detecting the new charge mode by RIXS in electron-doped systems.

  18. Dirac R-matrix calculation for electron-impact excitation of S xiii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Liang, G. Y.; Bari, M. A.; Zhao, G.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Sulfur emission lines in the soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet regions are observed in a variety of laboratory and astrophysical spectra. But accurate electron impact excitation data for S xiii for state-of-the-art NLTE spectral models are scarce. Aims: We calculated electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths of S xiii for transitions among the lowest-lying 98 fine-structure states 1s22lnl' corresponding to principal quantum numbers n = 2,3,4. The effective collision strengths for these transitions were computed over a wide temperature range (log 10Te (K) = 4.53-7.53) for various astrophysical plasma conditions. Methods: We used the fully-relativistic parallel Dirac R-matrix code to calculate collision strengths. To generate target wavefunctions and energy levels for scattering calculations, we employed the GRASP0 multi-configuration Dirac-Fock code for states up to n = 5. Results: The wavefunctions are generated from 27 configurations - 1s22lnl'(n = 2,3,4,5) - giving rise to 166 jj energy levels. The collision and effective collision strengths among the lowest 98 fine-structure levels are compared with the previous theoretical calculations. The collision strengths for most transitions agree well at higher incident electron energies. Conclusions: The resonant contributions to effective collision strengths are most dominant at lower temperatures.

  19. Electron impact excitation and assignment of the low-lying electronic states of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. I.; Trajmar, S.

    1973-01-01

    Electron scattering spectra of CO2 are reported in the 7 to 10 eV energy-loss range, at energies of 0.2, 0.35, 0.6, 0.7, and 7.0 eV above threshold, and at a scattering angle of 90 deg. Several new distinct overlapping continua with weak, diffuse bands superimposed are observed to lie in this energy-loss range. The experimental spectra are discussed in the light of recent ab initio configuration-interaction calculations of the vertical transition energies of CO2. The experimental spectra are shown to be consistent with the excitation states of CO2.

  20. Nuclear fission fragment excitation of electronic transition laser media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorents, D. C.; Mccusker, M. V.; Rhodes, C. K.

    1976-01-01

    Specific characteristics of the media including density, excitation rates, wavelength, kinetics, fissile material, scale size, and medium uniformity are assessed. The use of epithermal neutrons, homogeneously mixed fissile material, and special high cross section nuclear isotopes to optimize coupling of the energy to the medium are shown to be important considerations maximizing the scale size, energy deposition, and medium uniformity. It is demonstrated that e-beam excitation can be used to simulate nuclear pumping conditions to facilitate the search for candidate media.

  1. Low-rank spectral expansions of two electron excitations for the acceleration of quantum chemistry calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2012-12-01

    Treatment of two-electron excitations is a fundamental but computationally expensive part of ab initio calculations of many-electron correlation. In this paper we develop a low-rank spectral expansion of two-electron excitations for accelerated electronic-structure calculations. The spectral expansion differs from previous approaches by relying upon both (i) a sum of three expansions to increase the rank reduction of the tensor and (ii) a factorization of the tensor into geminal (rank-two) tensors rather than orbital (rank-one) tensors. We combine three spectral expansions from the three distinct forms of the two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM), (i) the two-particle 2D, (ii) the two-hole 2Q, and the (iii) particle-hole 2G matrices, to produce a single spectral expansion with significantly accelerated convergence. While the resulting expansion is applicable to any quantum-chemistry calculation with two-particle excitation amplitudes, it is employed here in the parametric 2-RDM method [D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 253002 (2008)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.253002. The low-rank parametric 2-RDM method scales quartically with the basis-set size, but like its full-rank version it can capture multi-reference correlation effects that are difficult to treat efficiently by traditional single-reference wavefunction methods. Applications are made to computing potential energy curves of HF and triplet OH+, equilibrium bond distances and frequencies, the HCN-HNC isomerization, and the energies of hydrocarbon chains. Computed 2-RDMs nearly satisfy necessary N-representability conditions. The low-rank spectral expansion has the potential to expand the applicability of the parametric 2-RDM method as well as other ab initio methods to large-scale molecular systems that are often only treatable by mean-field or density functional theories.

  2. Probing core-electron orbitals by scanning transmission electron microscopy and measuring the delocalization of core-level excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jong Seok; Odlyzko, Michael L.; Xu, Peng; Jalan, Bharat; Mkhoyan, K. Andre

    2016-04-01

    By recording low-noise energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy maps from crystalline specimens using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is possible to probe core-level electron orbitals in real space. Both the 1 s and 2 p orbitals of Sr and Ti atoms in SrTi O3 are probed, and their projected excitation potentials are determined. This paper also demonstrates experimental measurement of the electronic excitation impact parameter and the delocalization of an excitation due to Coulombic beam-orbital interaction.

  3. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Dessent, Caroline E. H. E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ∼1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ thymine and PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to

  4. Terahertz and Microwave Devices Based on the Photo-Excited Low Dimensional Electronic System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-11

    condition that is realized by photo-exciting the system with electromagnetic waves in the microwave and THz parts of the radiation spectrum, in the...electron system. This research aimed to advance the understanding of such radiation -induced phenomena in the two-dimensional electron system, while helping...exciting a high mobility low dimensional electron system. This research aimed to advance the understanding of such radiation -induced phenomena in the two

  5. Doppler effect in fragment autoionization following core-to-valence excitation in O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemin, Renaud; Simon, Marc; Shigemasa, Eiji

    2010-11-15

    Atomic autoionization following O 1s resonant excitation in O{sub 2} is studied using high-resolution electron spectroscopy. The resonant Auger spectrum showing evidence of ultrafast dissociation as well as the autoionization of oxygen atoms is measured and discussed. Evidence of the electronic Doppler effect is observed in both electronic decay mechanisms.

  6. Coherent excitation of Xe(3/2) sub 1 sup 0 6 s by 30-eV electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Corr, J.J.; Plessis, P.; McConkey, J.W. )

    1990-11-01

    Electron-impact excitation of the (3/2){sub 1}{sup 0} 6{ital s} state of xenon has been studied at 30 eV and over a range of scattering angles up to 50{degree}. Linear and circular polarization correlation measurements show very good agreement with distorted-wave Born-approximation calculations. For the experimental parameters under consideration, the excitation is demonstrated to be completely coherent. Hyperfine depolarization of the excited-state charge cloud is found to be an important effect.

  7. Retrapping and solvation dynamics after femtosecond UV excitation of the solvated electron in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assel, M.; Laenen, R.; Laubereau, A.

    1999-10-01

    We report on a novel investigation of the solvated electron with excitation into the continuum band. The subsequent localization process of quasifree electrons in neat water is studied by femtosecond probe spectroscopy in the spectral range between 580 nm and 990 nm. Excitation is achieved by a pump pulse at 310 nm promoting equilibrated solvated electrons to well-defined levels in the continuum band approximately 0.7 eV above the band edge. The subsequent retrapping and solvation of the electron occurs via two observed intermediates with time constants of τ2=300±50 fs and τs=1.0±0.2 ps. The absorption bands of the two intermediates are derived by the help of a 4-level energy scheme. Comparison with investigations of the solvated electron after excitation with 2 eV visible pulses gives strong evidence that the second intermediate in the UV-excitation experiment is identical to the modified ground state s″ occupied after excitation in the visible. The present study with excitation of the solvated electrons to continuum states sheds also new light on the generation process of localized electrons in neat water. Our data present strong evidence that the so-called "wet electron" is the solvated electron in a modified, hot ground state.

  8. Probing electron transfer processes in YPO(4):Ce, Sm by combined synchrotron-laser excitation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Poolton, N R J; Bos, A J J; Jones, G O; Dorenbos, P

    2010-05-12

    Yttrium phosphate co-doped with cerium and samarium acts as a charge storage phosphor, but in highly doped material (0.5% co-doping levels), the proximity of defects leads to the uncontrolled non-radiative loss of stored charge through tunnelling. In order to characterize these defects, their mutual interactions and intra-pair charge transfer routes, experiments have been undertaken in which a laser probe is deployed during luminescence excitation using a synchrotron. Two modes of operation are described; in each case, the laser (2.8 eV) probes only Sm(2+) ions, and the detection is set to monitor exclusively Ce(3+) 5d-4f emission. Mode 1: the sample is pumped with monochromatic synchrotron photons in the range 4.5-12 eV, and the resultant charge populations probed with the laser 30 s later; this has the effect of sampling electrons trapped at Sm(2+) that are in quasi-equilibrium. Here, a clear transition between a sub-bandgap Urbach tail region and excitations above the mobility edge is especially apparent, enabling an accurate value of the conduction band energy of YPO(4) to be determined, 9.20 eV. Furthermore, the Sm(2+) and Ce(3+) ground state energies can be positioned within the bandgap (6.8 eV and 3.85 eV above the top of the valence band, respectively). Mode 2: the sample is pumped with monochromatic synchrotron photons in the range 4.5-12 eV and, during this pumping process, the laser probe is activated. This more dynamic process probes direct electron transfer excitation processes between spatially correlated Sm-Ce defect pairs, via their excited states; the laser probe enhances the Ce(3+) emission if direct electron transfer from the Ce(3+) ground state to the excited states of Sm(2+) is being pumped, or quenches the luminescence if the Ce(3+) excited states are pumped. The experiments allow for a precise measure of the difference in energy between the Sm(2+) and Ce(3+) ground states (2.98 eV).

  9. Metallic bond effects on mean excitation energies for stopping powers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    Mean excitation energies for first row metals are evaluated by means of the local plasma approximation. Particle corrections based on Pines' (1953) procedure and the Wigner Seitz (1934) model of the metallic state are included. The agreement with experimental values is remarkably good. In contrast to previous work, the calculations given here estimate shifts in the plasma frequency according to the theory for plane wave states in an extended plasma as calculated by Pines. It is demonstrated that the effects of the metallic bond in lithium and beryllium are quite large and that they appear mainly as a result of collective oscillations in the 'free' electron gas formed from the valence electrons. The usefulness of the plasma frequency shift derived for a degenerate electron gas in predicting the plasma frequency shift within the ion core is considered surprising.

  10. Hydrogen bonding in electronically excited states: a comparison between formic acid dimer and its mono-substituted thioderivatives.

    PubMed

    Cimas, Alvaro; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel; Martín, Nazario; Corral, Inés

    2010-10-28

    A multi-state complete active space second order perturbation theory (MS-CASPT2) study on the valence singlet electronic excited states of formic acid dimer is presented. The electronic spectrum of this dihydrogen bonded system is dominated by nπ* and ππ* intramonomer and charge transfer excitations and consists of a very intense ππ* transition at 8.25 eV and three weaker nπ*(2×) and ππ*(1×) electronic excitations at 6.21 eV, 9.13 eV, and 9.93 eV, respectively. The characteristic nπ*-nπ*-ππ*-ππ*… pattern found in the formic acid dimer electronic spectrum is altered when a sulfur atom is introduced in the molecule. Furthermore, carbonyl-by-thiocarbonyl or hydroxyl-by-thiohydroxyl substitution is predicted to strongly affect the intensity of the above electronic transitions. The effect of oxygen-by-sulfur substitution on the geometry of the first excited state (S(1)) has been investigated at the CC2 and CASSCF levels of theory. Although the two methods qualitatively predict the same geometrical changes upon nπ* excitation, the geometries of the S(1) state are found to differ considerably between the two levels.

  11. Lowest optical excitations in molecular crystals: bound excitons versus free electron-hole pairs in anthracene.

    PubMed

    Hummer, Kerstin; Puschnig, Peter; Ambrosch-Draxl, Claudia

    2004-04-09

    By solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the electron-hole Green function for crystalline anthracene we find the lowest absorption peak generated by strongly bound excitons or by a free electron-hole pair, depending on the polarization direction being parallel to the short or the long molecular axis, respectively. Both excitations are shifted to lower energies by pressure. The physical difference of these excitations is apparent from the electron-hole wave functions. Our findings are a major contribution to solve the long-standing puzzle about the nature of the lowest optical excitations in organic materials.

  12. Impact excitation of neon atoms by heated seed electrons in filamentary plasma gratings.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liping; Li, Wenxue; Zhou, Hui; Ding, Liang'en; Zeng, Heping

    2013-02-15

    We demonstrate impact ionization and dissociative recombination of neon (Ne) atoms by means of seeded-electron heating and subsequent electron-atom collisions in an ultraviolet plasma grating, allowing for a substantial fraction of the neutral Ne atomic population to reside in high-lying excited states. A buffer gas with relatively low ionization potential (nitrogen or argon) was used to provide high-density seed electrons. A three-step excitation model is verified by the fluorescence emission from the impact excitation of Ne atoms.

  13. Activity of upper electron-excited states in bioluminescence of coelenterates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogurova, N. V.; Alieva, R. R.; Kudryasheva, N. S.

    2009-04-01

    The involvement of upper electron-excited states as the primary excited states into bioluminescence of coelenterates was experimentally verified. A series of fluorescent molecules was used as foreign energy acceptors in this bioluminescent reaction. The fluorescent aromatic compounds - pyrene, 2-methoxy-naphtalene, naphthalene, and 1,4-diphenylbutadiene - were selected, with fluorescent state energies ranging from 26,700 to 32,500 cm -1. Excitation of these molecules by Forster singlet-singlet energy transfer from S of bioluminescence emitter and by light absorption were excluded. The weak sensitized fluorescence of three compounds was found in the course of bioluminescent reaction. Energy of the upper electron-excited states of the bioluminescent emitter was located around 31,000 cm -1. Localization of the primary excitation on a carbonyl group of coelenteramide molecule is discussed. Comparison of the primary excitation in bioluminescent processes of coelenterates and bacteria is provided.

  14. Properties of atoms in electronically excited molecules within the formalism of TDDFT.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Flores, Eric Iván; Chávez-Calvillo, Rodrigo; Keith, Todd A; Cuevas, Gabriel; Rocha-Rinza, Tomás; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando

    2014-04-15

    The topological analysis of the electron density for electronic excited states under the formalism of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is presented. Relaxed electron densities for electronic excited states are computed by solving a Z-vector equation which is obtained by means of the Sternheimer interchange method. This is in contrast to previous work in which the electron density for excited states is obtained using DFT instead of TDDFT, that is, through the imposition of molecular occupancies in accordance with the electron configuration of the excited state under consideration. Once the electron density of the excited state is computed, its topological characterization and the properties of the atoms in molecules are obtained in the same manner that for the ground state. The analysis of the low-lying π→π* singlet and triplet vertical excitations of CO and C6H6 are used as representative examples of the application of this methodology. Altogether, it is shown how this procedure provides insights on the changes of the electron density following photoexcitation and it is our hope that it will be useful in the study of different photophysical and photochemical processes.

  15. Differential cross sections for electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunger, Michael; Jones, Darryl; Bellm, Susan

    2012-06-01

    Pyrimidine (C4N2H4) is an important molecule, as it forms the basis of larger biomolecules, such as the DNA bases thymine, cytosine and uracil. There is a pressing demand for low-energy electron scattering data from such biological analogs in order to model radiation induced damage [1]. We therefore present the first measurements for absolute differential cross section data for low-energy electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of pyrimidine. The present measurements were performed using a crossed-beam apparatus [2] for incident electron energies ranging between 15 to 50eV while covering a 10 to 90^o angular range. Here the absolute scale has been determined through a normalisation to the recently measured elastic scattering differential cross section data for pyrimidine [3]. [1] F. Ferreira da Silva, D. Almeida, G. Martins, A. R. Milosavljevic, B. P. Marinkovic, S. V. Hoffmann, N. J. Mason, Y. Nunes, G. Garcia and P. Limao-Vieira, Phys Chem Chem Phys 12, 6717 (2010). [2] M. J. Brunger and P. J. O. Teubner, Phys Rev A 41, 1413 (1990). [3] P. Palihawadana, J. Sullivan, M. Brunger, C. Winstead, V. McKoy, G. Garcia, F. Blanco and S. Buckman, Phys Rev A 84, 062702 (2011).

  16. First generation TREN dendrimers functionalized with naphthyl and/or dansyl units. Ground and excited state electronic interactions and protonation effects.

    PubMed

    Passaniti, Paolo; Maestri, Mauro; Ceroni, Paola; Bergamini, Giacomo; Vögtle, Fritz; Fakhrnabavi, Hassan; Lukin, Oleg

    2007-04-01

    We report the photophysical properties (absorption and emission spectra, quantum yield, and lifetime) of five dendrimers of first generation based on a TREN (tris(2-aminoethyl)amine) skeleton functionalized at the periphery with naphthyl and/or 5-dimethylamino-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (hereafter called dansyl) chromophores. Each dendrimer comprises one tertiary amine unit in the core and three branches carrying a sulfonimido unit at the periphery, each one substituted by two identical or different moieties. In particular, TD6 and TN6 contain dansyl (D) or naphthyl (N) units, respectively, while TD3B3, TN3B3 and TN3D3 contain dansyl, naphthyl or benzyl (B) units at the periphery. The spectroscopic behaviour of these dendrimers has been investigated in acetonitrile solution and compared with that of reference compounds. For all dendrimers the absorption bands are red shifted compared to those of monomeric naphthyl and dansyl reference compounds. Moreover, the intense naphthyl and dansyl fluorescence is greatly quenched because of strong interactions between the two aromatic moieties linked by a sulfonimido unit. Protonation of the amine units of the dendrimers by addition of CF(3)SO(3)H (triflic) acid causes a decrease in intensity of the luminescence and a change in the shape of the emission bands. The shapes of the titration curves depend on the dendrimer, but in any case the effect of acid can be fully reversed by successive addition of base (tributylamine). The obtained results reveal that among the intradendrimer interactions the most important one is that taking place (via mesomeric interaction) between the various chromophores and a pair of sulfonimido groups.

  17. Challenges for first-principles methods in theoretical and computational physics: multiple excitations in many-electrons systems and the Aharonov-Bohm effect in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Daipayan

    The objective of this research is to understand the temperature variation in dielectric materials of different geometry. The work is divided into three major segments. The Thermal Wave model has been taken into consideration as the classical Fourier law of heat conduction breaks down when a dielectric material of sub-micron geometry is heated rapidly. The first part of the work discusses primarily about the temperature distribution in a semi-infinite dielectric material, followed by the temperature profile in a finite body (plate) and finally mathematical formulation is presented for a two-layered body. The thermal wave equation is used because in dielectric materials the lag time due to temperature (taut) is much less than the lag time due to heat flux (tauq), ( taut <effects of taut in the governing equation used for expressing the phenomena of Hyperbolic Heat Conduction in a material can be neglected. Boundary conditions of first and second kind are applied to the thermal wave equation for all three cases that are discussed later in the study. The classical Laplace Transform method has been used as a tool to analyze the mathematical models for all the illustrations presented in the study. Analytical solutions are obtained for semi-infinite and finite bodies for different boundary conditions and a mathematical formulation has been presented to calculate the heat flux at the interface for a two-layered dielectric body. Due to large complexity of the problem and intense use of algebra several Mathematica subroutines are developed to compute and examine the thermal behavior of dielectric materials during rapid heating.

  18. Electron delocalization and aromaticity in low-lying excited states of archetypal organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Feixas, Ferran; Vandenbussche, Jelle; Bultinck, Patrick; Matito, Eduard; Solà, Miquel

    2011-12-14

    Aromaticity is a property usually linked to the ground state of stable molecules. Although it is well-known that certain excited states are unquestionably aromatic, the aromaticity of excited states remains rather unexplored. To move one step forward in the comprehension of aromaticity in excited states, in this work we analyze the electron delocalization and aromaticity of a series of low-lying excited states of cyclobutadiene, benzene, and cyclooctatetraene with different multiplicities at the CASSCF level by means of electron delocalization measures. While our results are in agreement with Baird's rule for the aromaticity of the lowest-lying triplet excited state in annulenes having 4nπ-electrons, they do not support Soncini and Fowler's generalization of Baird's rule pointing out that the lowest-lying quintet state of benzene and septet state of cyclooctatetraene are not aromatic.

  19. Electron-impact excitation of Fe-peak ions for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.

    2009-11-01

    This paper discusses one of the major outstanding problems in atomic collision physics, namely the accurate theoretical treatment of electron scattering from open d-shell systems, and explores how this issue has been addressed over recent years with the development of the new parallel R-matrix suite of codes. It focuses on one code in particular - the new parallel R-matrix package PRMAT, which has recently been extended to account for relativistic fine-structure effects. This program facilitates the determination of accurate electron-impact excitation rates for complex open 3d-shell systems including the astrophysically important Fe-peak ions such as Ni II, Fe II and Fe III. Results are presented for collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the optically forbidden fine-structure transitions of Ni II. To our knowledge this is the most extensive calculation completed to date for this ion.

  20. Electronic excitation of H{sub 2} by {ital e}{sup +} impact using adiabatic nuclear rotation model

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, T.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1996-06-01

    The adiabatic nuclear rotation (ANR) model has been employed to obtain rotational excitation cross sections for electronically elastic and electronic excitation processes in {ital e}{sup +}-H{sub 2} scattering. The present results are compared with the more accurate laboratory-frame rotational close-coupling approximation (LFCCA) predictions. The electronically inelastic rotational excitation results using the ANR model differ from the corresponding LFCCA results near the electronic excitation threshold energies. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Electron spectroscopy studies of argon K-shell excitation and vacancy cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, S.H.; MacDonald, M.A.; LeBrun, T.; Azuma, Y.; Cooper, J.W.

    1995-02-01

    Electron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used for studies of Ar K-shell excitation and vacancy decay processes. In addition, electrons and fluorescent X-rays have been recorded in coincidence to select subsets of the ejected electron spectra. Examples are presented for Ar 1s photoelectrons and KLL and LMM Auger spectra.

  2. Quantum chemical calculations of tryptophan → heme electron and excitation energy transfer rates in myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Suess, Christian J; Hirst, Jonathan D; Besley, Nicholas A

    2017-04-01

    The development of optical multidimensional spectroscopic techniques has opened up new possibilities for the study of biological processes. Recently, ultrafast two-dimensional ultraviolet spectroscopy experiments have determined the rates of tryptophan → heme electron transfer and excitation energy transfer for the two tryptophan residues in myoglobin (Consani et al., Science, 2013, 339, 1586). Here, we show that accurate prediction of these rates can be achieved using Marcus theory in conjunction with time-dependent density functional theory. Key intermediate residues between the donor and acceptor are identified, and in particular the residues Val68 and Ile75 play a critical role in calculations of the electron coupling matrix elements. Our calculations demonstrate how small changes in structure can have a large effect on the rates, and show that the different rates of electron transfer are dictated by the distance between the heme and tryptophan residues, while for excitation energy transfer the orientation of the tryptophan residues relative to the heme is important. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Direct Electron Impact Excitation of Rydberg-Valence States of Molecular Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, C. P.; Johnson, P. V.; Liu, X.; Ajdari, B.; Muleady, S.; Kanik, I.; Khakoo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Collisions between electrons and neutral N2 molecules result in emissions that provide an important diagnostic probe for understanding the ionospheric energy balance and the effects of space weather in upper atmospheres. Also, transitions to singlet ungerade states cause N2 to be a strong absorber of solar radiation in the EUV spectral range where many ro-vibrational levels of these Rydberg-valence (RV) states are predissociative. Thus, their respective excitation and emission cross sections are important parameters for understanding the [N]/[N2] ratio in the thermosphere of nitrogen dominated atmospheres. The following work provides improved constraints on absolute and relative excitation cross sections of numerous RV states of N2, enabling more physically accurate atmospheric modeling. Here, we present recent integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of RV states of N2 [6], which were based on the differential cross sections (DCSs) derived from electron energy-loss (EEL) spectra of [5]. This work resulted in electronic excitation cross sections over the following measured vibrational levels: b 1Πu (v‧=0-14), c3 1Πu (v‧=0-3), o3 1Πu (v‧=0-3), b‧ 1Σu+ (v‧=0-10), c‧4 1Σu+ (v‧=0-3), G 3Πu (v‧=0-3), and F 3Πu (v‧=0-3). We further adjusted the cross sections of the RV states by extending the vibronic contributions to unmeasured v‧-levels via the relative excitation probabilities (REPs) as discussed in [6]. This resulted in REP-scaled ICSs over the following vibrational levels for the singlet ungerade states: b(0-19), c3(0-4), o3(0-4), b‧(0-16), and c‧4(0-8). Comparison of the ICSs of [6] with available EEL based measurements, theoretical calculations, and emission based work generally shows good agreement within error estimations, except with the recent reevaluation provided by [1]. Further, we have extended these results, using the recent EEL data of [3], to include the unfolding of better resolved features above ~13

  4. Ultrafast excited state relaxation dynamics of electron deficient porphyrins: Conformational and electronic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okhrimenko, Albert N.

    Metallo-tetrapyrroles (MTP) are highly stable macrocyclic pi-systems that display interesting properties that make them potential candidates for various applications. Among these applications are optoelectronics, magnetic materials, photoconductive materials, non-linear optical materials and photo tumor therapeutic drugs. These applications are generally related to their high stability and efficient light absorption ability in the visible and near-infrared region of the optical spectrum. Metallo porphyrins are well known and widely studied representatives of metallotetrapyrroles. Electron deficient substituents in the meso positions are well known to greatly influence the interaction between the metal d-orbitals and the nitrogen orbitals of the tetrapyrrole macrocycle. In this work, a series of electron deficient porphyrins has been studied to gain some knowledge about the change in the excited state dynamics with structural and electronic modifications. Among these porphyrins is nickel and iron modified species bearing perfluoro-, perprotio-, p-nitrophenyl- and perfluorophenyl-meso substituents. Ultrafast transient absorption spectrometry has been used as the main research instrument along with other spectroscopic and electrochemical methods. A new technique has been employed to study the photophysical properties of zinc (II) tetraphenylporphine cation radical. It employs a combination of controlled potential coulometry and femtosecond absorption spectrometry. The fast transient lifetime of 17 ps of the pi-cation species originates in very efficient mixing of the a2u HOMO cation orbital that places electronic density mainly on pyrrolic nitrogens and metal d-orbitals. That explains the lack of any emission of the cationic species. This non-radiative decay process might elucidate the processes taking place in photosynthetic systems when electron is removed from porphyrinic moiety and the hole is produced. In this work zinc(II) meso-tetraphenylporphine radial cation

  5. Benchmarking electronic-state excitation cross sections for electron-N{sub 2} collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ohkawa, Mizuha; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Campbell, Laurence; Brunger, Michael J.

    2010-04-15

    We report differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the a {sup 1{Pi}}{sub g}, C {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}, E {sup 3{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +}, a{sup ''} {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +}, b {sup 1{Pi}}{sub u}, c{sub 3} {sup 1{Pi}}{sub u}, o{sub 3} {sup 1{Pi}}{sub u}, b{sup '} {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +}, c{sub 4}{sup '} {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +}, G {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}, and F {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u} electronic states in N{sub 2}. The incident electron energies are 20, 30, and 40 eV, while the scattered electron angles are 10 deg. and 20 deg. These kinematic conditions were specifically targeted in order to try and shed new light on the worrying discrepancies that exist in the literature for the a {sup 1{Pi}}{sub g}, C {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}, E {sup 3{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +}, and a{sup ''} {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +} cross sections, and in general the present measurements confirm that those from the more recent results of the University of California, Fullerton, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory [M. A. Khakoo, P. V. Johnson, I. Ozkay, P. Yan, S. Trajmar, and I. Kanik, Phys. Rev. A 71, 062703 (2005); C. P. Malone, P. V. Johnson, I. Kanik, B. Ajdari, and M. A. Khakoo, Phys. Rev. A 79, 032704 (2009)] are reliable. In addition, we provide a rigorous cross-check for the remaining seven electronic states, where the only recent comprehensive study is from Khakoo and colleagues [Phys. Rev. A 77, 012704 (2008)]. Here, however, some of those cross sections are confirmed and others are not, suggesting that further work is still needed.

  6. Feature-rich electronic excitations of silicene in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jhao-Ying; Chen, Szu-Chao; Gumbs, Godfrey; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2016-11-01

    We develop a generalized tight-binding model to investigate the Coulomb excitations in monolayer silicene. The atomic interactions, spin-orbit coupling, magnetic and electric fields, as well as the Coulomb interactions are simultaneously included in our calculations. The magnetic field induces interband plasmons with discrete frequency dispersions restricted to quantized energy states. An intraband plasmon, with a higher intensity and continuous dispersion relation, exists in the presence of free carriers. This mode is dramatically transformed into an interband plasma excitation when the magnetic field is increased, leading to abrupt changes in the value of the plasma frequency and its intensity. Specifically, an electric field may separate the spin and valley polarizations and create additional plasmon modes, a unique feature arising from the buckled structure and the existence of noteworthy spin-orbit coupling.

  7. Electron impact excitation of helium in Debye plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, S.; Gomis, L.; Faye, I. G.; Tall, M. S.; Diédhiou, I.; Diatta, C. S.; Zammit, M.

    2015-03-15

    The probability, differential, and integral scattering cross sections of the 1{sup 1}S→2{sup 1}S and 1{sup 1}S→2{sup 1}P transitions of helium have been calculated in the first Born approximation. The projectile-target interactions depending on the temperature and the density of plasma are described by the Debye-Hückel model. Wave functions of the target before and after collision were modeled by non orthogonal Hartree-Fock orbitals. The wave functions parameters are calculated with the Ritz variational method. We improve our unscreened first Born approximation integral cross sections by using the BE-scaled (B stands for binding energy and E excitation energy) method. The second Born approximation has also been used to calculate the excitation cross sections in Debye plasma. Our calculations are compared to other theoretical and experimental results where applicable.

  8. Electron impact excitation and assignment of the low-lying electronic states of N2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. I.; Chutjian, A.; Trajmar, S.

    1973-01-01

    Electron scattering spectra of nitrous oxide are reported in the 5- to 10-eV energy-loss range at scattering angles of 20, 30, 90, and 130 deg at a residual energy of 7.0 eV; and at residual energies of 10.0, 2.0, 1.0, 0.6, and 0.2 eV at a scattering angle of 90 deg. Several new distinct and overlapping continua are observed to lie in this energy-loss range. The experimental spectra are discussed in the light of semiempirical INDO calculations of Chutjian and Segal (1972) of the vertical transition energies of N2O. An assignment of the symmetries of the observed excitations consistent with the experimental and theoretical data is suggested.

  9. Analytic energy gradient of excited electronic state within TDDFT/MMpol framework: Benchmark tests and parallel implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Qiao; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-10-07

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the most popular method to calculate the electronic excitation energies, describe the excited-state properties, and perform the excited-state geometric optimization of medium and large-size molecules due to the implementation of analytic excited-state energy gradient and Hessian in many electronic structure software packages. To describe the molecules in condensed phase, one usually adopts the computationally efficient hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) models. Here, we extend our previous work on the energy gradient of TDDFT/MM excited state to account for the mutual polarization effects between QM and MM regions, which is believed to hold a crucial position in the potential energy surface of molecular systems when the photoexcitation-induced charge rearrangement in the QM region is drastic. The implementation of a simple polarizable TDDFT/MM (TDDFT/MMpol) model in Q-Chem/CHARMM interface with both the linear response and the state-specific features has been realized. Several benchmark tests and preliminary applications are exhibited to confirm our implementation and assess the effects of different treatment of environmental polarization on the excited-state properties, and the efficiency of parallel implementation is demonstrated as well.

  10. Differential cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran at intermediate impact energies

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T. P. T.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran, at intermediate incident electron energies (15-50 eV) and over the 10°-90° scattered electron angular range. These measurements extend the available DCS data for vibrational excitation for this species, which have previously been obtained at lower incident electron energies (≤20 eV). Where possible, our data are compared to the earlier measurements in the overlapping energy ranges. Here, quite good agreement was generally observed where the measurements overlapped.

  11. Theory of ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer: Contributions of direct charge transfer excitations to the absorbance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Luxia; Willig, Frank; May, Volkhard

    2007-04-07

    Absorption spectra related to heterogeneous electron transfer are analyzed with the focus on direct charge transfer transition from the surface attached molecule into the semiconductor band states. The computations are based on a model of reduced dimensionality with a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate but a complete account for the continuum of conduction band states. The applicability of this model to perylene on TiO{sub 2} has been demonstrated in a series of earlier papers. Here, based on a time-dependent formulation, the absorbance is calculated with the inclusion of charge transfer excitations. A broad parameter set inspired by the perylene TiO{sub 2} systems is considered. In particular, the description generalizes the Fano effect to heterogeneous electron transfer reactions. Preliminary simulations of measured spectra are presented for perylene-catechol attached to TiO{sub 2}.

  12. Ultrafast-electron-diffraction studies of predamaged tungsten excited by femtosecond optical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, M.; Chen, Z.; Li, R.; Wang, Y.; Shen, X.; Dunning, M.; Weathersby, S.; Makasyuk, I.; Coffee, R.; Zhen, Q.; Kim, J.; Reid, A.; Jobe, K.; Hast, C.; Tsui, Y.; Wang, X.; Glenzer, S.

    2016-10-01

    Tungsten is considered as the main candidate material for use in the divertor of magnetic confinement fusion reactors. However, radiation damage is expected to occur because of its direct exposure to the high flux of hot plasma and energetic neutrons in fusion environment. Hence, understanding the material behaviors of W under these adverse conditions is central to the design of magnetic fusion reactors. To do that, we have recently developed an MeV ultrafast electron diffraction probe to resolve the structural evolution of optically excited tungsten. To simulate the radiation damage effect, the tungsten samples were bombarded with 500 keV Cu ions. The pre-damaged and pristine W's were excited by 130fs, 400nm laser pulses, and the subsequent heated system was probed with 3.2MeV electrons. The pump probe measurement shows that the ion bombardment to the W leads to larger decay in Bragg peak intensities as compared to pristine W, which may be due to a phonon softening effect. The measurement also shows that pre-damaged W transitions into complete liquid phase for conditions where pristine W stays solid. Our new capability is able to test the theories of structural dynamics of W under conditions relevant to fusion reactor environment. The research was funded by DOE Fusion Energy Science under FWP #100182.

  13. Excitation of Electron Cyclotron Harmonic Waves in Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaojia

    This dissertation investigates the generation mechanism, spatial distribution and characteristics of electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves under different plasma sheet conditions, and quantifies the role of these waves in producing the diffuse aurora. THEMIS observations from five magnetotail seasons, along with ray-tracing, and electron diffusion codes have been utilized towards that goal. By modeling the wave growth and quasi-linear pitch-angle diffusion of electrons with realistic parameters for the magnetic field, loss-cone distribution and wave intensity (obtained from observations as a function of magnetotail location), we estimate the loss-cone fill ratio and the contribution of auroral energy flux from wave-induced electron precipitation. We conclude that ECH waves are the dominant driver of electron precipitation in the middle to outer magnetotail.

  14. Femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy of coherent vibrational and electronic excitations in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams*, Leah Ruby; Nelson, Keith A.

    1986-08-01

    ``Impulsive'' stimulated scattering (ISS) of femtosecond laser pulses was used to coherently excite and probe a low-lying (61-cm-1) electronic excitation in the cooperative Jahn-Teller crystal, terbium vanadate. Coherent terahertz oscillations and their dephasing were observed in the time domain. ISS is a general aspect of ultrashort-pulse interactions with matter, through which coherent excitations are produced whenever a sufficiently short laser pulse enters a Raman-active medium. Its use for measurement of vibrational and electronic dephasing and lifetimes, and for time-resolved spectroscopy of vibrationally distorted crystals and molecules, is discussed.

  15. Spin Excitation Under Electron Delocalization of Side Radicals in Quasi-One-Dimensional Organic Ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hong; Hu, Xue-Ning; Zhao, Yin-chang; Zhang, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Spin excitation in poly(1,4-bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxy-piperidyl-1-oxyl)-butadiin) (poly-BIPO), a quasi-one-dimensional organic ferromagnet, was investigated based on the extended Su-Schriffer-Heeger model by considering electron hopping and the spin correlation between the main chain and side radicals. The lattice, charge density, and spin density configurations of the single spin as well as spin domain excited states of the organic ferromagnet poly-BIPO were systematically studied. The side radical spin excitation gives rise to lattice distortion, charge density localization, and a spin density defect on the main chain. A peak induced by spin excitation is predicted to appear in the density of states of the organic ferromagnet poly-BIPO based on calculations for different spin electron states. These results expand knowledge on elementary excitation in organic materials and have significant implications for the design of spintronic devices.

  16. Theoretical Study of Tautomerization Reactions for the Ground and First Excited Electronic States of Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salter, Latasha M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest singlet excited state potential energy surfaces are studied. Four tautomeric forms are considered, and their energetic order is found to be different on the ground and the excited state potential energy surfaces. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic states. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic states, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. This tautomerization process should become possible in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules and should play an important role in the photochemistry of adenine.

  17. Electronically excited states of membrane fluorescent probe 4-dimethylaminochalcone. Results of quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Alexey N; Gularyan, Samvel K; Polyak, Boris M; Sakovich, Ruslan A; Dobretsov, Gennady E; Sarkisov, Oleg M

    2011-05-28

    Quantum-chemical calculations of ground and excited states for membrane fluorescent probe 4-dimethylaminochalcone (DMAC) in vacuum were performed. Optimized geometries and dipole moments for lowest-lying singlet and triplet states were obtained. The nature of these electronic transitions and the relaxation path in the excited states were determined; changes in geometry and charge distribution were assessed. It was shown that in vacuum the lowest existed level is of (n, π*) nature, and the closest to it is the level of (π, π*) nature; the energy gap between them is narrow. This led to an effective (1)(π, π*) →(1)(n, π*) relaxation. After photoexcitation the molecule undergoes significant transformations, including changes in bond orders, pyramidalization angle of the dimethylamino group, and planarity of the molecule. Its dipole moment rises from 5.5 Debye in the ground state to 17.1 Debye in the (1)(π, π*) state, and then falls to 2 Debye in the (1)(n, π*) state. The excited (1)(n, π*) state is a short living state; it has a high probability of intersystem crossing into the (3)(π, π*) triplet state. This relaxation path explains the low quantum yield of DMAC fluorescence in non-polar media. It is possible that (3)(π, π*) is responsible for observed DMAC phosphorescence.

  18. Ab Initio Investigations of the Excited Electronic States of CaOCa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawzy, Wafaa M.; Heaven, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Chemical bonding in alkaline earth hypermetalic oxides is of fundamental interest. Previous Ab initio studies of CaOCa predicted a centrosymmetric linear geometry for both the 1Σg^+ ground state and the low lying triplet 3Σu^+ state. However, there have been no reports concerning the higher energy singlet and triplet states. The present work is focused on characterization of the potential energy surface (PES) of the excited 1Σu^+ state (assuming a centrosymmetric linear geometry) and obtaining predictions for the 1Σu^+←1Σg^+ vibronic transitions. We employed the multireference configuration interaction (MRCISD) method with state-averaged, full-valence complete active space self-consistent field (SA-FV-CASSCF) wavefunctions. In these calculations, the active space consisted of ten valence electrons in twelve orbitals, where all the valence electrons were correlated. Contributions of higher excitation and relativistic effects were taken into account using the Davidson correction and the Douglas-Kroll (DK) Hamiltonian, respectively. The correlation-consistent polarized weighed core-valence quadruple zeta basis set (cc-pwCVQZ-DK) was used for all three atoms. The full level of theory is abbreviated as SA-FV-CASSCF (10,12)-MRCISD-Q/cc-pwCVQZ-DK. The calculations were carried out using the MOLPRO2012 suite of programs. For the centrosymmetric linear geometry in all states, initial investigations of one-dimensional radial cuts provided equilibrium bond distances of 2.034 {Å}, 2.034 {Å}, and 1.999 {Å} for the 1Σg^+ , 3Σu^+ , and 1Σu^+ states, respectively. The vertical excitation frequency of the 1Σu^+←1Σg^+ optical transition was calculated to occur at 14801 wn. These predictions were followed by spectroscopic searches by Heaven et al. Indeed, rotationally resolved vibronic progressions were recorded in the vicinity of the predicted electronic band origin. Calculation of the three-dimensional PES showed that the potential minimum in the 1Σu^+ corresponds

  19. Concerted electron-proton transfer in the optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes.

    PubMed

    Westlake, Brittany C; Brennaman, M Kyle; Concepcion, Javier J; Paul, Jared J; Bettis, Stephanie E; Hampton, Shaun D; Miller, Stephen A; Lebedeva, Natalia V; Forbes, Malcolm D E; Moran, Andrew M; Meyer, Thomas J; Papanikolas, John M

    2011-05-24

    The simultaneous, concerted transfer of electrons and protons--electron-proton transfer (EPT)--is an important mechanism utilized in chemistry and biology to avoid high energy intermediates. There are many examples of thermally activated EPT in ground-state reactions and in excited states following photoexcitation and thermal relaxation. Here we report application of ultrafast excitation with absorption and Raman monitoring to detect a photochemically driven EPT process (photo-EPT). In this process, both electrons and protons are transferred during the absorption of a photon. Photo-EPT is induced by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation of hydrogen-bonded-base adducts with either a coumarin dye or 4-nitro-4'-biphenylphenol. Femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements following ICT excitation reveal the appearance of two spectroscopically distinct states having different dynamical signatures. One of these states corresponds to a conventional ICT excited state in which the transferring H(+) is initially associated with the proton donor. Proton transfer to the base (B) then occurs on the picosecond time scale. The other state is an ICT-EPT photoproduct. Upon excitation it forms initially in the nuclear configuration of the ground state by application of the Franck-Condon principle. However, due to the change in electronic configuration induced by the transition, excitation is accompanied by proton transfer with the protonated base formed with a highly elongated (+)H ─ B bond. Coherent Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of a vibrational mode corresponding to the protonated base in the optically prepared state.

  20. Back-action-induced excitation of electrons in a silicon quantum dot with a single-electron transistor charge sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Horibe, Kosuke; Oda, Shunri; Kodera, Tetsuo

    2015-02-02

    Back-action in the readout of quantum bits is an area that requires a great deal of attention in electron spin based-quantum bit architecture. We report here back-action measurements in a silicon device with quantum dots and a single-electron transistor (SET) charge sensor. We observe the back-action-induced excitation of electrons from the ground state to an excited state in a quantum dot. Our measurements and theoretical fitting to the data reveal conditions under which both suitable SET charge sensor sensitivity for qubit readout and low back-action-induced transition rates (less than 1 kHz) can be achieved.

  1. An amorphous phase formation at palladium / silicon oxide (Pd/SiO{sub x}) interface through electron irradiation - electronic excitation process

    SciTech Connect

    Nagase, Takeshi; Yamashita, Ryo; Yabuuchi, Atsushi; Lee, Jung-Goo

    2015-11-15

    A Pd-Si amorphous phase was formed at a palladium/silicon oxide (Pd/SiO{sub x}) interface at room temperature by electron irradiation at acceleration voltages ranging between 25 kV and 200 kV. Solid-state amorphization was stimulated without the electron knock-on effects. The total dose required for the solid-state amorphization decreases with decreasing acceleration voltage. This is the first report on electron irradiation induced metallic amorphous formation caused by the electronic excitation at metal/silicon oxide interface.

  2. [Long-range electron transfer in globular proteins by polaron excitation].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V L; Chuev, G N

    1997-01-01

    Considering polaron model, we have calculated an electron state localized in the protein heme. Using these calculations: the electron density and electron energy, we estimated the self-exchange rate constant for cyt c (horse heart), its reorganization energy, matrix element, and dependence of this rate on the distance between hemes. The results are compared with the experimental data and other theoretical estimations. We discuss the role of polaron excitations in the long-range electron transfer in globular proteins.

  3. Calculation of Ground State Rotational Populations for Kinetic Gas Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules including Electron-Impact Excitation and Wall Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Farley

    2010-08-19

    A model has been developed to calculate the ground-state rotational populations of homonuclear diatomic molecules in kinetic gases, including the effects of electron-impact excitation, wall collisions, and gas feed rate. The equations are exact within the accuracy of the cross sections used and of the assumed equilibrating effect of wall collisions. It is found that the inflow of feed gas and equilibrating wall collisions can significantly affect the rotational distribution in competition with non-equilibrating electron-impact effects. The resulting steady-state rotational distributions are generally Boltzmann for N≥3, with a rotational temperature between the wall and feed gas temperatures. The N=0,1,2 rotational level populations depend sensitively on the relative rates of electron-impact excitation versus wall collision and gas feed rates.

  4. Electronic Excitation Modeling in Chemically Reacting Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    Transport properties of gases with internal degrees of freedom are widely studied in the kinetic theory [1, 2, 3]. However, for a long time the contribution of electronic degrees of freedom to the transport coefficients for both weak and strong deviations from thermal equilibrium was out of consideration. Atomic species are commonly considered as structure-less particles, without internal energy, and for molecular species, the internal energy does not include the electronic mode.

  5. Helicon wave excitation to produce energetic electrons for manufacturing semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Molvik, A.W.; Ellingboe, A.R.

    1998-10-20

    A helicon plasma source is controlled by varying the axial magnetic field or rf power controlling the formation of the helicon wave. An energetic electron current is carried on the wave when the magnetic field is 90 G; but there is minimal energetic electron current when the magnetic field is 100 G in one particular plasma source. Similar performance can be expected from other helicon sources by properly adjusting the magnetic field and power to the particular geometry. This control for adjusting the production of energetic electrons can be used in the semiconductor and thin-film manufacture process. By applying energetic electrons to the insulator layer, such as silicon oxide, etching ions are attracted to the insulator layer and bombard the insulator layer at higher energy than areas that have not accumulated the energetic electrons. Thus, silicon and metal layers, which can neutralize the energetic electron currents will etch at a slower or non-existent rate. This procedure is especially advantageous in the multilayer semiconductor manufacturing because trenches can be formed that are in the range of 0.18--0.35 mm or less. 16 figs.

  6. Helicon wave excitation to produce energetic electrons for manufacturing semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Molvik, Arthur W.; Ellingboe, Albert R.

    1998-01-01

    A helicon plasma source is controlled by varying the axial magnetic field or rf power controlling the formation of the helicon wave. An energetic electron current is carried on the wave when the magnetic field is 90 G; but there is minimal energetic electron current when the magnetic field is 100 G in one particular plasma source. Similar performance can be expected from other helicon sources by properly adjusting the magnetic field and power to the particular geometry. This control for adjusting the production of energetic electrons can be used in the semiconductor and thin-film manufacture process. By applying energetic electrons to the insulator layer, such as silicon oxide, etching ions are attracted to the insulator layer and bombard the insulator layer at higher energy than areas that have not accumulated the energetic electrons. Thus, silicon and metal layers, which can neutralize the energetic electron currents will etch at a slower or non-existent rate. This procedure is especially advantageous in the multilayer semiconductor manufacturing because trenches can be formed that are in the range of 0.18-0.35 mm or less.

  7. Prevention of electron beam transmittance for biological cell imaging using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrated the high-spatial-resolution imaging of label-free biological cells using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope without irradiation damage by the electron beam. An EXA microscope can be used to observe a specimen with a nanometric light source excited in the Si3N4 membrane by an electron beam. The incident electron beam penetrates the Si3N4 membrane and damages the specimen. To suppress the irradiation damage of the specimen, we prevented the transmittance of the electron beam by coating the Si3N4 membrane with a gold thin film. To obtain an electron beam transmittance through the Si3N4 of 0%, a gold film of 15 nm thickness was required. By adding the gold layer, a label-free cellular structure was observed with 135-nm spatial resolution.

  8. Transport properties of copper with excited electron subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yu V.; Migdal, K. P.; Knyazev, D. V.; Inogamov, N. A.; Levashov, P. R.

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated transport properties of an electron subsystem of copper heated by a femtosecond laser pulse. These properties change greatly in comparison with the room temperature solid metal. The electron temperature and pressure profiles significantly depend on these properties in bulk laser targets according to the two-temperature (2T) model. These profiles at the 2T stage are responsible for shock and rarefaction waves' formation. We have developed the analytical model of electroconductivity and heat conductivity of copper which takes into account changes of density, electron and ion temperatures. The model is based on the solution of the Boltzmann equation in the relaxation time approximation for consideration of electron collisions. Also we have carried out the first-principles calculations using the Kubo-Greenwood theory, methods of pseudopotential and linear augmented plane waves which are necessary to evaluate electron wavefunctions. We have provided the check of convergence of all parameters of our first-principles calculations. The results of our analytical model for electro- and heat conductivities are in good agreement with the data obtained using the linearized augmented plane wave (LAPW) method.

  9. The electronic excited states of green fluorescent protein chromophore models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Seth Carlton

    We explore the properties of quantum chemical approximations to the excited states of model chromophores of the green fluorescent protein of A. victoria. We calculate several low-lying states by several methods of quantum chemical calculation, including state-averaged complete active space SCF (CASSCF) methods, time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), equation-of motion coupled cluster (EOM-CCSD) and multireference perturbation theory (MRPT). Amongst the low-lying states we identify the optically bright pipi* state of the molecules and examine its properties. We demonstrate that the state is dominated by a single configuration function. We calculate zero-time approximations to the resonance Raman spectrum of GFP chromophore models, and assign published spectra based upon these.

  10. Exploring the vibrational fingerprint of the electronic excitation energy via molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Deyne, Andy Van Yperen-De; Pauwels, Ewald; Ghysels, An; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Hemelsoet, Karen; De Meyer, Thierry; De Clerck, Karen

    2014-04-07

    A Fourier-based method is presented to relate changes of the molecular structure during a molecular dynamics simulation with fluctuations in the electronic excitation energy. The method implies sampling of the ground state potential energy surface. Subsequently, the power spectrum of the velocities is compared with the power spectrum of the excitation energy computed using time-dependent density functional theory. Peaks in both spectra are compared, and motions exhibiting a linear or quadratic behavior can be distinguished. The quadratically active motions are mainly responsible for the changes in the excitation energy and hence cause shifts between the dynamic and static values of the spectral property. Moreover, information about the potential energy surface of various excited states can be obtained. The procedure is illustrated with three case studies. The first electronic excitation is explored in detail and dominant vibrational motions responsible for changes in the excitation energy are identified for ethylene, biphenyl, and hexamethylbenzene. The proposed method is also extended to other low-energy excitations. Finally, the vibrational fingerprint of the excitation energy of a more complex molecule, in particular the azo dye ethyl orange in a water environment, is analyzed.

  11. Excited state X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Probing both electronic and structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Simon P.; Averbukh, Vitali; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectra, simulated using a general method, to properties of molecular excited states. Recently, Averbukh and co-workers [M. Ruberti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 184107 (2014)] introduced an efficient and accurate L 2 method for the calculation of excited state valence photoionization cross-sections based on the application of Stieltjes imaging to the Lanczos pseudo-spectrum of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) representation of the electronic Hamiltonian. In this paper, we report an extension of this method to the calculation of excited state core photoionization cross-sections. We demonstrate that, at the ADC(2)x level of theory, ground state X-ray absorption spectra may be accurately reproduced, validating the method. Significantly, the calculated X-ray absorption spectra of the excited states are found to be sensitive to both geometric distortions (structural dynamics) and the electronic character (electronic dynamics) of the initial state, suggesting that core excitation spectroscopies will be useful probes of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics. We anticipate that the method presented here can be combined with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to simulate the time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of excited state molecular wavepacket dynamics.

  12. Excited state X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Probing both electronic and structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Neville, Simon P; Averbukh, Vitali; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S

    2016-10-14

    We investigate the sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectra, simulated using a general method, to properties of molecular excited states. Recently, Averbukh and co-workers [M. Ruberti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 184107 (2014)] introduced an efficient and accurate L(2) method for the calculation of excited state valence photoionization cross-sections based on the application of Stieltjes imaging to the Lanczos pseudo-spectrum of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) representation of the electronic Hamiltonian. In this paper, we report an extension of this method to the calculation of excited state core photoionization cross-sections. We demonstrate that, at the ADC(2)x level of theory, ground state X-ray absorption spectra may be accurately reproduced, validating the method. Significantly, the calculated X-ray absorption spectra of the excited states are found to be sensitive to both geometric distortions (structural dynamics) and the electronic character (electronic dynamics) of the initial state, suggesting that core excitation spectroscopies will be useful probes of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics. We anticipate that the method presented here can be combined with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to simulate the time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of excited state molecular wavepacket dynamics.

  13. Electron impact excitation for He-like ions with Z = 20-42

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, R.; Li, S.; Wang, K.; Guo, X. L.; Chen, Z. B.; Yan, J.; Chen, C. Y.; Brage, T.; Zou, Y. M.

    2017-04-01

    Aims: Spectral lines of He-like ions are among the most prominent features in X-ray spectra from a large variety of astrophysical and high-temperature fusion plasmas. A reliable plasma modeling and interpretation of the spectra require a large amount of accurate atomic data related to various physical processes. In this paper, we focus on the electron-impact excitation (EIE) process. Methods: We adopted the independent process and isolated resonances approximation using distorted waves (IPIRDW). Resonant stabilizing transitions and decays to lower-lying autoionizing levels from the resonances are included as radiative damping. To verify the applicability of the IPIRDW approximation, an independent Dirac R-matrix calculation was also performed. The two sets of results show excellent agreement. Results: We report electron impact excitation collision strengths for transitions among the lowest 49 levels of the 1snl(n ≤ 5,l ≤ (n-1)) configurations in He-like ions with 20 ≤ Z ≤ 42. The line ratios R and G are calculated for Fe XXV and Kr XXXV. Conclusions: Compared to previous theoretical calculations, our IPIRDW calculation treats resonance excitation and radiative damping effects more comprehensively, and the resulting line emission cross sections show good agreement with the experimental observations. Our results should facilitate the modeling and diagnostics of various astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/A85

  14. Quantum effects in the hot electron microbolometer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, A.; Richards, P.L.

    1994-10-01

    The theory of the hot electron microbolometer proposed by Nahum et al. assumed that the photon energy is thermalized in the electrons in the Cu absorber before relaxing to the lattice. Since the photons initially excite individual electrons to K{omega}>>k{sub B}T, however, direct relaxation of these hot electrons to phonons must also be considered. Theoretical estimates suggest that this extra relaxation channel increases the effective thermal conductance for K{omega}>>k{sub B}T and influences bolometer noise. Calculations of these effects are presented which predict very useful performance both for ground-based and spacebased astronomical photometry at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths.

  15. Positron-electron decay of 28Si at an excitation energy of 50 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buda, A.; Bacelar, J. C.; Balanda, A.; van der Ploeg, H.; Sujkowski, Z.; van der Woude, A.

    1993-03-01

    The electron-position pair decay of 28Si at 50 MeV excitation produced by the isospin T=0 (α + 24Mg) and the mixed isospin T=0,1 (3He + 25Mg) reactions has been studied using a special designed Positron-Electron pair spectrometer PEPSI.

  16. Calculated low-energy electron-impact vibrational excitation cross sections for CO2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, V.; Tennyson, J.; Celiberto, R.

    2016-12-01

    Vibrational-excitation cross sections of ground electronic states of a carbon dioxide molecule by electron-impact through CO2-≤ft({{}2}{{\\Pi}u}\\right) shape resonance is considered in the separation of the normal modes approximation. Resonance curves and widths are computed for each vibrational mode. The calculations assume a decoupling between normal modes and employ the local complex potential model for the treatment of nuclear dynamics, usually adopted for electron-scattering involving diatomic molecules. Results are presented for excitation up to 10 vibrational levels in each mode and a comparison with data present in the literature is discussed.

  17. Measurements of Electron Impact Excitation Cross Sections at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, L. D.; Kohl, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of absolute spectral line intensities and intensity ratios with spectroscopic diagnostic techniques provides empirical determinations of chemical abundances, electron densities and temperatures in astrophysical objects. Since spectral line intensities and their ratios are controlled by the excitation rate coefficients for the electron temperature of the observed astrophysical structure, it is imperative that one have accurate values for the relevant rate coefficients. Here at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, we have been carrying out measurements of electron impact excitation (EIE) for more than 25 years.

  18. Beat wave excitation of electron plasma wave by relativistic cross focusing of cosh-Gaussian laser beams in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arvinder; Gupta, Naveen

    2015-06-01

    A scheme for beat wave excitation of electron plasma wave (EPW) is proposed by relativistic cross-focusing of two coaxial Cosh-Gaussian (ChG) laser beams in an under dense plasma. The plasma wave is generated on account of beating of two coaxial laser beams of frequencies ω1 and ω2 . The mechanism for laser produced nonlinearity is assumed to be relativistic nonlinearity in electron mass. Following moment theory approach in Wentzel Kramers Brillouin (W.K.B) approximation, the coupled differential equations governing the evolution of spot size of laser beams with distance of propagation have been derived. The relativistic nonlinearity depends not only on the intensity of first laser beam but also on the intensity of second laser beam. Therefore, propagation dynamics of one laser beam affect that of second beam and hence cross-focusing of the two laser beams takes place. Due to non uniform intensity distribution of pump laser beams, the background electron concentration gets modified. The amplitude of EPW, which depends on the background electron concentration, thus gets nonlinearly coupled with the laser beams. The effects of relativistic electron mass nonlinearity and the cross-focusing of pump beams on excitation of EPW have been incorporated. Numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the effect of laser as well as plasma parameters on cross-focusing of laser beams and further its effect on power of excited EPW.

  19. R-matrix electron-impact excitation data for the B-like iso-electronic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, G. Y.; Badnell, N. R.; Zhao, G.

    2012-11-01

    We have carried-out parallel intermediate-coupling frame transformation R-matrix calculations for electron-impact excitation amongst the 204 close-coupling levels of the 2sx2py (x + y = 3), 2s2{3,4}l, 2s2p{3,4}l, and 2p23l configurations for all boron-like ions from C+ to Kr31+. We have also included the configuration interaction due to the 2p24l, 2s3l3l' and 2p3s3l configurations. A detailed comparison has been made of the target structure and excitation data for four specific ions (viz., Ne5+, Ar13+, Fe21+ and Kr31+) that span the sequence, so as to assess the accuracy over the entire sequence. Effective collision strengths (Υs) are presented at temperatures ranging from 2 × 102(z + 1)2 K to 2 × 106(z + 1)2 K (where z is the residual charge of the ions, i.e. Z - 5). Detailed comparisons for the (effective) collision strengths (Υs) Ω are made with the results of previous calculations for the four representative ions. Furthermore, we examine the iso-electronic trends of the effective collision strengths as a function of temperature. These data are made available in the archives of APAP via http://www.apap-network.org, OPEN-ADAS via http://open.adas.ac.uk as well as at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/547/A87

  20. Ultrafast Electron Dynamics in Gold in the Presence of Laser Excited Surface Plasma Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, M.

    2010-02-02

    Surface plasmon excitation with ultrashort intense laser pulses enhances efficiently laser absorption in metals and creates local high fields and non-equilibrium hot electrons population that have attractivity for numerous applications such as the development of intense sources of high-energy particles or photons and in the fast ignitor scheme in the framework of inertial fusion. In this context, the knowledge of the dynamics of relaxation of the collective electrons behavior is of importance. Using gold grating, we have investigated electrons relaxation in the presence of laser excited surface plasmon waves using a multiple-wavelengh femtosecond pump-probe technique. The results yield evidence of longer relaxation time in the presence of the collective excitation than that of individual electronic states.

  1. Electronic excitation induced amorphization in titanate pyrochlores: an ab initio molecular dynamics study

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen; ...

    2015-02-09

    In this study, the response of titanate pyrochlores (A2Ti2O7, A = Y, Gd and Sm) to electronic excitation is investigated utilizing an ab initio molecular dynamics method. All the titanate pyrochlores are found to undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous structural transition under a low concentration of electronic excitations. The transition temperature at which structural amorphization starts to occur depends on the concentration of electronic excitations. During the structural transition, O2-like molecules are formed, and this anion disorder further drives cation disorder that leads to an amorphous state. This study provides new insights into the mechanisms of amorphization in titanate pyrochlores under laser,more » electron and ion irradiations.« less

  2. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of excited states of the pyridine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linert, Ireneusz; Zubek, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra of the pyridine, C5H5N, molecules in the gas phase have been measured to investigate electronic excitation in the energy range 3.5-10 eV. The applied wide range of residual electron energy and the scattering angle range from 10° to 180° enabled to differentiate between optically-allowed and -forbidden transitions. These measurements have allowed vertical excitation energies of the triplet excited states of pyridine to be determined and tentative assignments of these states to be proposed. Some of these states have not been identified in the previous works. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  3. Low-energy electron elastic scattering cross sections for excited Au and Pt atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Zineb; Eure, Amanda R.; Msezane, Alfred Z.; Sokolovski, Dmitri

    2010-05-01

    Electron elastic total cross sections (TCSs) and differential cross sections (DCSs) in both impact energy and scattering angle for the excited Au and Pt atoms are calculated in the electron impact energy range 0 ⩽ E ⩽ 4.0 eV. The cross sections are found to be characterized by very sharp long-lived resonances whose positions are identified with the binding energies of the excited anions formed during the collisions. The recent novel Regge-pole methodology wherein is embedded through the Mulholland formula the electron-electron correlations is used together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential incorporating the crucial core-polarization interaction for the calculations of the TCSs. The DCSs are evaluated using a partial wave expansion. The Ramsauer-Townsend minima, the shape resonances and the binding energies of the excited Au - and Pt - anions are extracted from the cross sections, while the critical minima are determined from the DCSs.

  4. Persistent order due to transiently enhanced nesting in an electronically excited charge density wave

    DOE PAGES

    Rettig, L.; Cortés, R.; Chu, J. -H.; ...

    2016-01-25

    Non-equilibrium conditions may lead to novel properties of materials with broken symmetry ground states not accessible in equilibrium as vividly demonstrated by non-linearly driven mid-infrared active phonon excitation. Potential energy surfaces of electronically excited states also allow to direct nuclear motion, but relaxation of the excess energy typically excites fluctuations leading to a reduced or even vanishing order parameter as characterized by an electronic energy gap. Here, using femtosecond time-and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate a tendency towards transient stabilization of a charge density wave after near-infrared excitation, counteracting the suppression of order in the non-equilibrium state. Analysis of themore » dynamic electronic structure reveals a remaining energy gap in a highly excited transient state. In conclusion, our observation can be explained by a competition between fluctuations in the electronically excited state, which tend to reduce order, and transiently enhanced Fermi surface nesting stabilizing the order.« less

  5. Electron Spectroscopy: Ultraviolet and X-Ray Excitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, A. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent growth in electron spectroscopy (54 papers cited). Emphasizes advances in instrumentation and interpretation (52); photoionization, cross-sections and angular distributions (22); studies of atoms and small molecules (35); transition, lanthanide and actinide metal complexes (50); organometallic (12) and inorganic compounds (2);…

  6. Electronic Excitation in Air and Carbon Dioxide Gas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    processes in nonequilibrium low-temperature plasma of chemical compositions (air and carbon dioxide mixtures) frequently occurring in different aerospace...presents the problem of data processing automation. This problem is considered on the example of prediction of oscillator strengths of atomic species...elementary processes including into RC models .................................... 8 3.1 Ionization at collision of atoms and molecules with electrons

  7. Scalable Methods for Electronic Excitations and Optical Responses of Nanostructures: Mathematics to Algorithms to Observables

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Emily A

    2013-02-02

    Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) is a powerful, well-established tool for the study of condensed phase electronic structure. However, there are still a number of situations where its applicability is limited. The basic theme of our research is the development of first principles electronic structure approaches for condensed matter that goes beyond what can currently be done with standard implementations ofKohn-Sham DFT. Our efforts to this end have focused on two classes or' methods. The first addresses the well-lmown inability of DFT to handle strong, many-body electron correlation effects. Our approach is a DFT -based embedding theory, to treat localized features (e.g. impurity, adsorbate, vacancy, etc.) embedded in a periodic, metallic crystal. A description for the embedded region is provided by explicitly correlated, ab initio wave function methods. DFT, as a fo1n1ally ground state theory, does not give a good description of excited states; an additional feature of our approach is the ability to obtain excitations localized in this region. We apply our method to a first-principles study of the adsorption of a single magnetic Co ada tom on non-magnetic Cu( 111 ), a known Kondo system whose behavior is governed by strong electron correlation. The second class of methods that we are developing is an orbital-free density functional theory (OFDFT), which addresses the speed limitations ofKohn-Sham DFT. OFDFT is a powerful, O(N) scaling method for electronic structure calculations. Unlike Kohn-Sham DFT, OFDFT goes back to the original Hohenberg-Kohn idea of directly optimizing an energy functional which is an explicit functional of the density, without invoking an orbital description. This eliminates the need to manipulate orbitals, which leads to O(N{sup 3}) scaling in the Kahn-Sham approach. The speed of OFDFT allows direct electronic structure calculations on large systems on the order of thousands to tens of thousands of atoms, an expensive feat within

  8. Excited-State Effective Masses in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    George Fleming, Saul Cohen, Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-10-01

    We apply black-box methods, i.e. where the performance of the method does not depend upon initial guesses, to extract excited-state energies from Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions. In particular, we extend the widely used effective-mass method to incorporate multiple correlation functions and produce effective mass estimates for multiple excited states. In general, these excited-state effective masses will be determined by finding the roots of some polynomial. We demonstrate the method using sample lattice data to determine excited-state energies of the nucleon and compare the results to other energy-level finding techniques.

  9. Excited-State Effective Masses in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, George; Cohen, Saul; Lin, Huey-Wen

    2009-01-01

    We apply black-box methods, i.e. where the performance of the method does not depend upon initial guesses, to extract excited-state energies from Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions. In particular, we extend the widely used effective-mass method to incorporate multiple correlation functions and produce effective mass estimates for multiple excited states. In general, these excited-state effective masses will be determined by finding the roots of some polynomial. We demonstrate the method using sample lattice data to determine excited-state energies of the nucleon and compare the results to other energy-level finding techniques.

  10. Electron impact excitation of autoionising states of krypton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Trajmar, S.

    1978-01-01

    Energy-loss spectra of krypton in the region between 21 and 29 eV have been obtained at electron impact energies of 30, 60 and 100 eV. For each energy, the angular distribution of intensities has been measured at 5, 10 and 15 deg scattering angles. Assignments of spectral features found in this region are suggested and a comparison is made with previous measurements.

  11. Spectroscopy of Argon Excited in an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2005-04-18

    Argon is one of the gases best investigated and most widely used in plasma discharge devices for a multitude of applications that range from wavelength reference standards to controlled fusion experiments. Reviewing atomic physics and spectroscopic problems in various ionization stages of Ar, the past use and future options of employing an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) for better and more complete Ar data in the x-ray, EUV and visible spectral ranges are discussed.

  12. Electronically Excited States in Poly(p-phenylenevinylene): Vertical Excitations and Torsional Potentials from High-Level Ab Initio Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ab initio second-order algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC(2)) calculations using the resolution of the identity (RI) method have been performed on poly-(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV) oligomers with chain lengths up to eight phenyl rings. Vertical excitation energies for the four lowest π–π* excitations and geometry relaxation effects for the lowest excited state (S1) are reported. Extrapolation to infinite chain length shows good agreement with analogous data derived from experiment. Analysis of the bond length alternation (BLA) based on the optimized S1 geometry provides conclusive evidence for the localization of the defect in the center of the oligomer chain. Torsional potentials have been computed for the four excited states investigated and the transition densities divided into fragment contributions have been used to identify excitonic interactions. The present investigation provides benchmark results, which can be used (i) as reference for lower level methods and (ii) give the possibility to parametrize an effective Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian for quantum dynamical simulations of ultrafast exciton transfer dynamics in PPV type systems. PMID:23427902

  13. Final Technical Report [Scalable methods for electronic excitations and optical responses of nanostructures: mathematics to algorithms to observables

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, Yousef

    2014-03-19

    The master project under which this work is funded had as its main objective to develop computational methods for modeling electronic excited-state and optical properties of various nanostructures. The specific goals of the computer science group were primarily to develop effective numerical algorithms in Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT). There were essentially four distinct stated objectives. The first objective was to study and develop effective numerical algorithms for solving large eigenvalue problems such as those that arise in Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. The second objective was to explore so-called linear scaling methods or Methods that avoid diagonalization. The third was to develop effective approaches for Time-Dependent DFT (TDDFT). Our fourth and final objective was to examine effective solution strategies for other problems in electronic excitations, such as the GW/Bethe-Salpeter method, and quantum transport problems.

  14. An accurate and efficient method to predict the electronic excitation energies of BODIPY fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Nan; Jin, Jun-Ling; Geng, Yun; Sun, Shi-Ling; Xu, Hong-Liang; Lu, Ying-Hua; Su, Zhong-Min

    2013-03-15

    Recently, the extreme learning machine neural network (ELMNN) as a valid computing method has been proposed to predict the nonlinear optical property successfully (Wang et al., J. Comput. Chem. 2012, 33, 231). In this work, first, we follow this line of work to predict the electronic excitation energies using the ELMNN method. Significantly, the root mean square deviation of the predicted electronic excitation energies of 90 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY) derivatives between the predicted and experimental values has been reduced to 0.13 eV. Second, four groups of molecule descriptors are considered when building the computing models. The results show that the quantum chemical descriptions have the closest intrinsic relation with the electronic excitation energy values. Finally, a user-friendly web server (EEEBPre: Prediction of electronic excitation energies for BODIPY dyes), which is freely accessible to public at the web site: http://202.198.129.218, has been built for prediction. This web server can return the predicted electronic excitation energy values of BODIPY dyes that are high consistent with the experimental values. We hope that this web server would be helpful to theoretical and experimental chemists in related research.

  15. Momentum and Doping Dependence of Spin Excitations in Electron-Doped Cuprate Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Pengfei; Zhao, Huaisong; Kuang, Lülin; Lan, Yu; Feng, Shiping

    2017-01-01

    Superconductivity in copper oxides emerges on doping holes or electrons into their Mott-insulating parent compounds. The spin excitations are thought to be the mediating glue for the pairing in superconductivity. Here the momentum and doping dependence of the dynamical spin response in the electron-doped cuprate superconductors is studied based on the kinetic-energy-driven superconducting mechanism. It is shown that the dispersion of the low-energy spin excitations changes strongly upon electron doping; however, the hour-glass-shaped dispersion of the low-energy spin excitations appeared in the hole-doped case is absent on the electron-doped side due to the electron-hole asymmetry. In particular, the commensurate resonance appears in the superconducting state with the resonance energy that correlates with the dome-shaped doping dependence of the superconducting gap. Moreover, the spectral weight and dispersion of the high-energy spin excitations in the superconducting state are comparable with those in the corresponding normal state, indicating that the high-energy spin excitations do not play an important part in the pair formation.

  16. Determination of ground and excited state dipole moments via electronic Stark spectroscopy: 5-methoxyindole.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Josefin; Wilke, Martin; Meerts, W Leo; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-01-28

    The dipole moments of the ground and lowest electronically excited singlet state of 5-methoxyindole have been determined by means of optical Stark spectroscopy in a molecular beam. The resulting spectra arise from a superposition of different field configurations, one with the static electric field almost parallel to the polarization of the exciting laser radiation, the other nearly perpendicular. Each field configuration leads to different intensities in the rovibronic spectrum. With an automated evolutionary algorithm approach, the spectra can be fit and the ratio of both field configurations can be determined. A simultaneous fit of two spectra with both field configurations improved the precision of the dipole moment determination by a factor of two. We find a reduction of the absolute dipole moment from 1.59(3) D to 1.14(6) D upon electronic excitation to the lowest electronically excited singlet state. At the same time, the dipole moment orientation rotates by 54(∘) showing the importance of the determination of the dipole moment components. The dipole moment in the electronic ground state can approximately be obtained from a vector addition of the indole and the methoxy group dipole moments. However, in the electronically excited state, vector addition completely fails to describe the observed dipole moment. Several reasons for this behavior are discussed.

  17. Characterizing the Locality of Diabatic States for Electronic Excitation Transfer by Decomposing the Diabatic Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Vura-Weis, Josh; Newton, M. D.; Wasielewski, Michael R; Subotnik, J.E.

    2010-12-09

    A common strategy to calculate electronic coupling matrix elements for charge or energy transfer is to take the adiabatic states generated by electronic structure computations and rotate them to form localized diabatic states. In this paper, we show that, for intermolecular transfer of singlet electronic excitation, usually we cannot fully localize the electronic excitations in this way. Instead, we calculate putative initial and final states with small excitation tails caused by weak interactions with high energy excited states in the electronic manifold. These tails do not lead to substantial changes in the total diabatic coupling between states, but they do lead to a different partitioning of the total coupling between Coulomb (Förster), exchange (Dexter), and one-electron components. The tails may be reduced by using a multistate diabatic model or eliminated entirely by truncation (denoted as “chopping”). Without more information, we are unable to conclude with certainty whether the observed diabatic tails are a physical reality or a computational artifact. This research suggests that decomposition of the diabatic coupling between chromophores into Coulomb, exchange, and one-electron components may depend strongly on the number of states considered, and such results should be treated with caution.

  18. Mode-selective phonon excitation in gallium nitride using mid-infrared free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagaya, Muneyuki; Yoshida, Kyohei; Zen, Heishun; Hachiya, Kan; Sagawa, Takashi; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2017-02-01

    The single-phonon mode was selectively excited in a solid-state sample. A mid-infrared free-electron laser, which was tuned to the target phonon mode, was irradiated onto a crystal cooled to a cryogenic temperature, where modes other than the intended excitation were suppressed. An A 1(LO) vibrational mode excitation on GaN(0001) face was demonstrated. Anti-Stokes Raman scattering was used to observe the excited vibrational mode, and the appearance and disappearance of the scattering band at the target wavenumber were confirmed to correspond to on and off switching of the pump free-electron laser and were fixed to the sample vibrational mode. The sum-frequency generation signals of the pump and probe lasers overlapped the Raman signals and followed the wavenumber shift of the pump laser.

  19. Anisotropic softening of magnetic excitations in lightly electron-doped Sr2IrO4

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Meng, Z. Y.; ...

    2016-06-10

    The magnetic excitations in electron doped (Sr1-xLax)2IrO4 with x = 0:03 were measured using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at the Ir L3-edge. Although much broadened, well defined dispersive magnetic excitations were observed. Comparing with the magnetic dispersion from the undoped compound, the evolution of the magnetic excitations upon doping is highly anisotropic. Along the anti-nodal direction, the dispersion is almost intact. On the other hand, the magnetic excitations along the nodal direction show significant softening. These results establish the presence of strong magnetic correlations in electron doped (Sr1-xLax)2IrO4 with close analogies to the hole doped cuprates, further motivating the searchmore » for high temperature superconductivity in this system.« less

  20. Anisotropic softening of magnetic excitations in lightly electron-doped Sr2IrO4

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Meng, Z. Y.; Upton, M. H.; Qi, T.; Gog, T.; Cao, Y.; Lin, J. Q.; Meyers, D.; Ding, H.; Cao, G.; Hill, J. P.

    2016-06-10

    The magnetic excitations in electron doped (Sr1-xLax)2IrO4 with x = 0:03 were measured using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at the Ir L3-edge. Although much broadened, well defined dispersive magnetic excitations were observed. Comparing with the magnetic dispersion from the undoped compound, the evolution of the magnetic excitations upon doping is highly anisotropic. Along the anti-nodal direction, the dispersion is almost intact. On the other hand, the magnetic excitations along the nodal direction show significant softening. These results establish the presence of strong magnetic correlations in electron doped (Sr1-xLax)2IrO4 with close analogies to the hole doped cuprates, further motivating the search for high temperature superconductivity in this system.

  1. Absolute angle-differential vibrational excitation cross sections for electron collisions with diacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.; May, O.; Fedor, J.; Ibanescu, B. C.; Andric, L.

    2011-05-15

    Absolute vibrational excitation cross sections were measured for diacetylene (1,3-butadiyne). The selectivity of vibrational excitation reveals detailed information about the shape resonances. Excitation of the C{identical_to}C stretch and of double quanta of the C-H bend vibrations reveals a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub u} resonance at 1 eV (autodetachment width {approx}30 meV) and a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub g} resonance at 6.2 eV (autodetachment width 1-2 eV). There is a strong preference for excitation of even quanta of the bending vibration. Excitation of the C-H stretch vibration reveals {sigma}* resonances at 4.3, 6.8, and 9.8 eV, with autodetachment widths of {approx}2 eV. Detailed information about resonances permits conclusions about the mechanism of the dissociative electron attachment.

  2. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. Final report, August 4, 1986--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1997-12-31

    The techniques of continuous photolysis and pulsed laser flash photolysis, continuous and pulse radiolysis, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, and time-resolved fluorimetry have been used to examine intramolecular electron transfer within the solvent quenching cage, photodynamics of quenching of the excited states of transition-metal photosensitizers, the properties of excites states and one-electron reduced forms, ground- and excited-state interactions with solutes, and photoinduced oxidations of organic solutes in aqueous solution. The following specific areas were examined: (1) the parameters that govern the yields of redox products from excited-state electron-transfer quenching reactions; (2) the mediation of the properties of excited states and one-electron reduced forms by the ligands and the solution medium; (3) the effect of the interactions between the ground state of the complex and the solution components on the behavior of the excited state; (4) the yields of singlet oxygen from excited-state energy-transfer quenching by O{sub 2}; and (5) the oxidations of solutes by singlet oxygen, excited-state electron-transfer quenching, and free radicals. This report contains the abstracts of 50 publications describing the studies.

  3. Strongly Enhanced Laser Absorption and Electron Acceleration via Resonant Excitation of Surface Plasma Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynaud, M.; Riconda, C.; Adam, J. C.; Heron, A.

    2010-02-01

    The possibility of creating enhanced fast electron bunches via the excitation of surface plasma waves (SPW) in laser overdense plasma interaction has been investigated by mean of relativistic one dimension motion of a test electron in the field of the surface plasma wave study and with two-dimensional (2D) Particle-In-Cell (PIC) numerical simulations. Strong electron acceleration together with a dramatic increase, up to 70%, of light absorption by the plasma is observed.

  4. Generation of THz Radiation by Excitation of InAs with a Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mashiko Tani; Shunsuke Kono; Ping Gu; Kiyomi Sakai; Mamoru Usami; Michelle D. Shinn; Joseph F. Gubeli; George Neil; Jingzhou Xu; Roland Kersting; X.-C. Zhang

    2001-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is generated by exciting an un-doped InAs wafer with a femtosecond free-electron laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A microwatt level of THz radiation is detected from the unbiased InAs emitter when it is excited with the femtosecond FEL pulses operated at a wavelength of 1.06 {mu}-m and 10 W average power.

  5. Method and apparatus for secondary laser pumping by electron beam excitation

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Krupke, William F.; Murray, John R.; Powell, Howard T.; Swingle, James C.; Turner, Jr., Charles E.; Rhodes, Charles K.

    1978-01-01

    An electron beam of energy typically 100 keV excites a fluorescer gas which emits ultraviolet radiation. This radiation excites and drives an adjacent laser gas by optical pumping or photolytic dissociation to produce high efficiency pulses. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, United States Energy Research and Development Administration Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48 with the University of California.

  6. Matrix photochemistry of small molecules: Influencing reaction dynamics on electronically excited hypersurfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of chemical reactions on electronically excited reaction surfaces are presented. The role of excited-surface multiplicity is of particular interest, as are chemical reactivity and energy transfer in systems in which photochemistry is initiated through a metal atom sensitizer.'' Two approaches are employed: A heavy-atom matrix affords access to forbidden triplet reaction surfaces, eliminating the need for a potentially reactive sensitizer. Later, the role of the metal atom in the photosensitization process is examined directly.

  7. Electron Impact Excitation of Xenon from the Ground State and the Metastable State to the 5p57p Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhan-Bin; Dong, Chen-Zhong; Xie, Lu-You; Jiang, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Electron impact excitation cross sections from the ground state and the lowest metastable state 5p56s J = 2 to the excited states of the 5p57p configuration of xenon are calculated systematically using the fully relativistic distorted wave method. Special attention is paid to the configuration interaction effects in the wave-function expansion of target states. The results are in good agreement with the recent experimental data by Jung et al. [Phys. Rev. A 80 (2009) 062708] over the measured energy range. These accurate theoretical results can be used in the modeling and diagnosis of plasmas containing xenon.

  8. TRANSITION PROBABILITIES AND COLLISION STRENGTHS FOR ELECTRON-IMPACT EXCITATION OF Cl III

    SciTech Connect

    Sossah, A. M.; Tayal, S. S.

    2012-10-15

    We report transition probabilities and effective collision strengths for electron-impact excitation of the astrophysically important Cl III ion. The collision strengths are calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method. The multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals is employed for an accurate description of the target wave functions. The 68 fine-structure levels belonging to the 32 LS states of 3s {sup 2}3p{sup 3}, 3s3p{sup 4}, 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}3d, 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}4s, and 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}4p configurations are included in the close-coupling expansion. The effective collision strengths are obtained by averaging the electron collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of velocities, and those are tabulated for all 2278 possible fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures in the range from 5000 to 1,000,000 K. Our results are compared with previous theoretical results and available experimental data. Overall, we reached a good agreement with the 23 state calculation of Ramsbottom et al., but some discrepancies are seen for some transitions.

  9. High-energy electron-impact excitation process: The generalized oscillator strengths of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao-Ying; Li, Jia-Ming

    2006-12-01

    The high-energy electron impact excitation cross sections are directly proportional to the generalized oscillator strengths (GOSs) of the target (an atom or molecule). In the present work, the GOSs of helium from the ground state to nS1 , nP1 , nD1 (n→∞) and adjacent continuum excited states are calculated by a modified R -matrix code within the first Born approximation. In order to treat the bound-bound and bound-continuum transitions in a unified manner, the GOS density (GOSD) is defined based on the quantum defect theory. The GOSD surfaces of S1 , P1 , and D1 channels are calculated and tested stringently by the recent experiments. With the recommended GOSD surfaces with sufficient accuracy, the GOSDs (i.e., GOSs) from the ground state into all nS1 , nP1 , and nD1 excited states of helium can be obtained by interpolation. Thus, the high-energy electron impact excitation cross sections of all these excited states can be readily obtained. In addition to the high-energy electron impact excitation cross sections, a scheme to calculate the cross sections in the entire incident energy range is discussed.

  10. A QM/MM Approach Using the AMOEBA Polarizable Embedding: From Ground State Energies to Electronic Excitations.

    PubMed

    Loco, Daniele; Polack, Étienne; Caprasecca, Stefano; Lagardère, Louis; Lipparini, Filippo; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-08-09

    A fully polarizable implementation of the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach is presented, where the classical environment is described through the AMOEBA polarizable force field. A variational formalism, offering a self-consistent relaxation of both the MM induced dipoles and the QM electronic density, is used for ground state energies and extended to electronic excitations in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory combined with a state specific response of the classical part. An application to the calculation of the solvatochromism of the pyridinium N-phenolate betaine dye used to define the solvent ET(30) scale is presented. The results show that the QM/AMOEBA model not only properly describes specific and bulk effects in the ground state but it also correctly responds to the large change in the solute electronic charge distribution upon excitation.

  11. Theorectical Studies of Excitation in Low-Energy Electron-Polyatomic Molecule Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, T N; McCurdy, C W; Isaacs, W A; Orel, A E; Meyer, H D

    2001-08-13

    This paper focuses on the channeling of energy from electronic to nuclear degrees of freedom in electron-polyatomic molecule collisions. We examine the feasibility of attacking the full scattering problem, both the fixed-nuclei electronic problem and the post-collision nuclear dynamics, entirely from first principles. The electron-CO{sub 2} system is presented as an example. We study resonant vibrational excitation, showing how a6 initio, fixed-nuclei electronic cross sections can provide the necessary input for a multi-dimensional treatment of the nuclear vibrational dynamics.

  12. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  13. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Frisch, Michael J; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2016-12-28

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A. F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Becke's atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1- naphthyl)- methyl)- anthracene and 4-((2- naphthyl)- methyl)- benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that is not accessible using a simple density difference analysis.

  14. Hedgehog excitations in double-exchange magnetism: Energetics and electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, David; Goldbart, Paul; Salamon, Myron; Abanov, Alexander

    2004-03-01

    Topological hedgehog excitations of the magnetic state are believed to play an important role in the three-dimensional ferromagnet-to-paramagnet phase transition. This is true not only in Heisenberg magnets but also in double-exchange magnets, for which the transition is accompanied by a metal-insulator transition. The energetics and electronic structure of hedgehog excitations in double-exchange systems are investigated using a model in which the electrons move through a lattice of classical spins, to which they are coupled via Hund's Rule interactions. The core energy of hedgehog excitations is determined, as is the extent to which charge is expelled from the hedgehog cores. In settings involving pairs of hedgehogs, the manner in which the electronic energetics determines the magnetic structure is explored variationally, especially in the region between the hedgehogs.

  15. Asymmetry of collective excitations in electron- and hole-doped cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. S.; Lee, J. J.; Nowadnick, E. A.; Gerber, S.; Tabis, W.; Huang, S. W.; Strocov, V. N.; Motoyama, E. M.; Yu, G.; Moritz, B.; Huang, H. Y.; Wang, R. P.; Huang, Y. B.; Wu, W. B.; Chen, C. T.; Huang, D. J.; Greven, M.; Schmitt, T.; Shen, Z. X.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2014-11-01

    High-temperature superconductivity emerges on doping holes or electrons into antiferromagnetic copper oxides. The large energy scale of magnetic excitations, for example, compared with phonon energies, is thought to drive superconductivity with high transition temperatures (Tc). Comparing high-energy magnetic excitations of hole- and electron-doped superconductors provides an opportunity to test this hypothesis. Here, we use resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at the Cu L3-edge to reveal collective excitations in the electron-doped cuprate Nd2-xCexCuO4. Surprisingly, magnetic excitations harden significantly across the antiferromagnetic high-temperature superconductivity phase boundary despite short-ranged antiferromagnetic correlations, in contrast to the hole-doped cuprates. Furthermore, we find an unexpected branch of collective modes in superconducting compounds, absent in hole-doped cuprates. These modes emanate from the zone centre and possess a higher temperature scale than Tc, signalling a distinct quantum phase. Despite their differences, the persistence of magnetic excitations and the existence of a distinct quantum phase are apparently universal in both hole- and electron-doped cuprates.

  16. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  17. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Edward M.; Rosen, Mordecai D.

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  18. Electron impact vibrational excitation of carbon monoxide in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, L.; Allan, M.; Brunger, M. J.

    2011-09-01

    Infrared emission from CO in the upper atmospheres of Mars, Venus and several other planets is a subject of current theoretical and experimental interest. Electron impact excitation makes a contribution that has not been included in previous studies. Given this, and recent new measurements of absolute cross sections for low-energy electron impact excitation of the vibrational levels of the ground state of CO, results from calculations are presented showing the contribution of electron impact relative to emissions by other mechanisms. It is demonstrated that emissions due to the impact of thermal, photo- and auroral electrons are generally small compared to sunlight-driven (fluorescence and photolysis) emissions, but with some exceptions. It is also shown that thermal-electron emissions may dominate over other processes at nighttime at Mars and that auroral emissions certainly do so. While measurements and other calculations do not appear to be available for Venus, the volume emission rates presented should be valuable in planning such measurements.

  19. Characterization of adsorption and electronic excited states of quercetin on titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdyb, Agata; Krawczyk, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of quercetin on colloidal titanium dioxide nanoparticles in ethanol and its excited-state electronic structure were investigated by means of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies. The changes in electronic charge redistribution as reflected by the dipole moment difference, ∆μ, between the ground and excited electronic states were measured with electroabsorption spectroscopy and analyzed using results of TD DFT computations. Adsorption of quercetin causes a red shift of its absorption spectrum. Raman spectra of quercetin analyzed with reference to analogous data for morin indicate binding of quercetin through the hydroxy groups of the catechol moiety. The difference dipole moment, which is 5.5 D in free quercetin, increases to 11.8 D in opposite direction in adsorbed quercetin, and is associated with charge-transfer to the Ti atom. The computed transition energy, intensity, vector Δμ and molecular orbitals involved in the electronic transition at different molecular configurations indicate a bidentate chelating mode of binding of quercetin.

  20. Synthesis of metal silicide at metal/silicon oxide interface by electronic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.-G.; Nagase, T.; Yasuda, H.; Mori, H.

    2015-05-21

    The synthesis of metal silicide at the metal/silicon oxide interface by electronic excitation was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. A platinum silicide, α-Pt{sub 2}Si, was successfully formed at the platinum/silicon oxide interface under 25–200 keV electron irradiation. This is of interest since any platinum silicide was not formed at the platinum/silicon oxide interface by simple thermal annealing under no-electron-irradiation conditions. From the electron energy dependence of the cross section for the initiation of the silicide formation, it is clarified that the silicide formation under electron irradiation was not due to a knock-on atom-displacement process, but a process induced by electronic excitation. It is suggested that a mechanism related to the Knotek and Feibelman mechanism may play an important role in silicide formation within the solid. Similar silicide formation was also observed at the palladium/silicon oxide and nickel/silicon oxide interfaces, indicating a wide generality of the silicide formation by electronic excitation.

  1. Electron impact excitation of Fe-peak ions for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Hudson, C. E.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate determination of electron excitation rates for the Fe-peak elements is complicated by the presence of an open 3d-shell in the description of the target ion, which can lead to hundreds of target state energy levels. Furthermore, the low energy scattering region is dominated by series of Rydberg resonances, which require a very fine energy mesh for their delineation. These problems have prompted the development of a suite of parallel R-matrix codes. In this work we report recent applications of these codes to the study of electron impact excitation from astrophysically important ions of Fe and Ni.

  2. Ultrafast spatiotemporal relaxation dynamics of excited electrons in a metal nanostructure detected by femtosecond-SNOM.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Yue, Song; Chen, Jianjun; Gong, Qihuang

    2010-06-21

    Ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved pump-probe signal near a gold nano-slit is detected by femtosecond-SNOM. By employing two-color pump-probe configuration and probing at the interband transition wavelength of the gold, signal contributed by surface plasmon polariton is avoided and spatiotemporal evolvement of excited electrons is successfully observed. From the contrast decaying of the periodical distribution of the pump-probe signal, ultrafast diffusion of excited electrons with a time scale of a few hundred femtoseconds is clearly identified. For comparison, such phenomenon cannot be observed by the one-color pump-probe configuration.

  3. Light efficiency of cathodoluminescent screens excited by a runaway electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Belostotsky, S. G.; Lopaev, D. V.; Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Muratov, E. A.; Rakhimov, A. T.; Saenko, V. B.; Timofeev, M. A.

    2008-11-15

    A technique employing electron beams generated by an open gas discharge is proposed for measuring the light efficiency of phosphor coatings of cathodoluminescent screens. The total light efficiencies of various phosphor coatings in the medium excitation energy range ({epsilon} < 7 keV) are estimated with allowance for both the direct radiation flux outgoing from the phosphor screen and the backward radiation flux propagating along the exciting electron beam. The possibility is demonstrated of creating a high-luminance ({approx}20000 cd/m{sup 2}) cathodoluminescent source with a light efficiency of {approx}60 lm/W.

  4. Validity of Eucken formula and Stokes’ viscosity relation in high-temperature electronically excited gases

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.; Mekhonoshina, M. A.

    2014-12-09

    In the present work we evaluate the accuracy of the Eucken formula and Stokes’ viscosity relation in high temperature non-equilibrium air species with electronic excitation. The thermal conductivity coefficient calculated using the exact kinetic theory methods is compared with that obtained applying approximate formulas in the temperature range 200–20000 K. A modification of the Eucken formula providing a good agreement with exact calculations is proposed. It is shown that the Stokes viscosity relation is not valid in electronically excited monoatomic gases at temperatures higher than 2000 K.

  5. Nature of sonoluminescence: noble gas radiation excited by hot electrons in cold water

    PubMed

    Garcia; Levanyuk; Osipov

    2000-08-01

    It was proposed before that single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) may be caused by strong electric fields occurring in water near the surface of collapsing gas bubbles because of the flexoelectric effect involving polarization resulting from a gradient of pressure. Here we show that these fields can indeed provoke dynamic electric breakdown in a micron-size region near the bubble and consider the scenario of the SBSL. The scenario is (i) at the last stage of incomplete collapse of the bubble, the gradient of pressure in water near the bubble surface has such a value and a sign that the electric field arising from the flexoelectric effect exceeds the threshold field of the dynamic electrical breakdown of water and is directed to the bubble center; (ii) mobile electrons are generated because of thermal ionization of water molecules near the bubble surface; (iii) these electrons are accelerated in "cold" water by the strong electric fields; (iv) these hot electrons transfer noble gas atoms dissolved in water to high-energy excited states and optical transitions between these states produce SBSL UV flashes in the transparency window of water; (v) the breakdown can be repeated several times and the power and duration of the UV flash are determined by the multiplicity of the breakdowns. The SBSL spectrum is found to resemble a black-body spectrum where temperature is given by the effective temperature of the hot electrons. The pulse energy and some other characteristics of the SBSL are found to be in agreement with the experimental data when realistic estimates are made.

  6. Excited state electron transfer after visible light absorption by the Co(I) state of vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Achey, Darren; Brigham, Erinn C; DiMarco, Brian N; Meyer, Gerald J

    2014-11-11

    The first example of excited state electron transfer from cob(I)alamin is reported herein. Vitamin B12 was anchored to a mesoporous TiO2 thin film and electrochemically reduced to the cob(I)alamin form. Pulsed laser excitation resulted in rapid excited state electron transfer, ket > 10(8) s(-1), followed by microsecond interfacial charge recombination to re-form cob(I)alamin. The supernucleophilic cob(I)alamin was found to be a potent photoreductant. The yield of excited state electron transfer was found to be excitation wavelength dependent. The implications of this dependence are discussed.

  7. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths and theoretical line intensities for transitions in S III

    SciTech Connect

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log T{sub e} (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}, 3s3p {sup 3}, 3s {sup 2}3p3d, 3s {sup 2}3p4s, 3s {sup 2}3p4p, and 3s {sup 2}3p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  8. Surface excitations in electron spectroscopy. Part I: dielectric formalism and Monte Carlo algorithm.

    PubMed

    Salvat-Pujol, F; Werner, W S M

    2013-05-01

    The theory describing energy losses of charged non-relativistic projectiles crossing a planar interface is derived on the basis of the Maxwell equations, outlining the physical assumptions of the model in great detail. The employed approach is very general in that various common models for surface excitations (such as the specular reflection model) can be obtained by an appropriate choice of parameter values. The dynamics of charged projectiles near surfaces is examined by calculations of the induced surface charge and the depth- and direction-dependent differential inelastic inverse mean free path (DIIMFP) and stopping power. The effect of several simplifications frequently encountered in the literature is investigated: differences of up to 100% are found in heights, widths, and positions of peaks in the DIIMFP. The presented model is implemented in a Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the electron transport relevant for surface electron spectroscopy. Simulated reflection electron energy loss spectra are in good agreement with experiment on an absolute scale. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Surface excitations in electron spectroscopy. Part I: dielectric formalism and Monte Carlo algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Salvat-Pujol, F; Werner, W S M

    2013-01-01

    The theory describing energy losses of charged non-relativistic projectiles crossing a planar interface is derived on the basis of the Maxwell equations, outlining the physical assumptions of the model in great detail. The employed approach is very general in that various common models for surface excitations (such as the specular reflection model) can be obtained by an appropriate choice of parameter values. The dynamics of charged projectiles near surfaces is examined by calculations of the induced surface charge and the depth- and direction-dependent differential inelastic inverse mean free path (DIIMFP) and stopping power. The effect of several simplifications frequently encountered in the literature is investigated: differences of up to 100% are found in heights, widths, and positions of peaks in the DIIMFP. The presented model is implemented in a Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the electron transport relevant for surface electron spectroscopy. Simulated reflection electron energy loss spectra are in good agreement with experiment on an absolute scale. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23794766

  10. Electronic structure and excitations in oxygen deficient CeO2-δ from DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarlborg, T.; Barbiellini, B.; Lane, C.; Wang, Yung Jui; Markiewicz, R. S.; Liu, Zhi; Hussain, Zahid; Bansil, A.

    2014-04-01

    The electronic structures of supercells of CeO2-δ have been calculated within the density functional theory (DFT). The equilibrium properties such as lattice constants, bulk moduli, and magnetic moments are well reproduced by the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Electronic excitations are simulated by robust total-energy calculations for constrained states with atomic core holes or valence holes. Pristine ceria CeO2 is found to be a nonmagnetic insulator with magnetism setting in as soon as oxygens are removed from the structure. In the ground state of defective ceria, the Ce-f majority band resides near the Fermi level but appears at about 2 eV below the Fermi level in photoemission spectroscopy experiments due to final-state effects. We also tested our computational method by calculating threshold energies in Ce-M5 and O-K x-ray absorption spectroscopy and comparing theoretical predictions with the corresponding measurements. Our result that f electrons reside near the Fermi level in the ground state of oxygen-deficient ceria is crucial for understanding the catalytic properties of CeO2 and related materials.

  11. Electron-impact Excitation Collision Strengths and Theoretical Line Intensities for Transitions in S III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log Te (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s 23p 2, 3s3p 3, 3s 23p3d, 3s 23p4s, 3s 23p4p, and 3s 23p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  12. Concerted electron-proton transfer in the optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Westlake, Brittany C.; Brennaman, Kyle M.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Paul, Jared J.; Bettis, Stephanie E.; Hampton, Shaun D.; Miller, Stephen A.; Lebedeva, Natalia V.; Forbes, Malcolm D. E.; Moran, Andrew M.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Papanikolas, John M.

    2011-05-24

    The simultaneous, concerted transfer of electrons and protons—electron-proton transfer (EPT)—is an important mechanism utilized in chemistry and biology to avoid high energy intermediates. There are many examples of thermally activated EPT in ground-state reactions and in excited states following photoexcitation and thermal relaxation. Here we report application of ultrafast excitation with absorption and Raman monitoring to detect a photochemically driven EPT process (photo-EPT). In this process, both electrons and protons are transferred during the absorption of a photon. Photo-EPT is induced by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation of hydrogen-bonded-base adducts with either a coumarin dye or 4-nitro-4'-biphenylphenol. Femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements following ICT excitation reveal the appearance of two spectroscopically distinct states having different dynamical signatures. One of these states corresponds to a conventional ICT excited state in which the transferring H⁺ is initially associated with the proton donor. Proton transfer to the base (B) then occurs on the picosecond time scale. The other state is an ICT-EPT photoproduct. Upon excitation it forms initially in the nuclear configuration of the ground state by application of the Franck–Condon principle. However, due to the change in electronic configuration induced by the transition, excitation is accompanied by proton transfer with the protonated base formed with a highly elongated ⁺H–B bond. Coherent Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of a vibrational mode corresponding to the protonated base in the optically prepared state.

  13. Electronic and structural properties of low-lying excited states of vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Lodowski, Piotr; Jaworska, Maria; Kornobis, Karina; Andruniów, Tadeusz; Kozlowski, Pawel M

    2011-11-17

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) has been applied to explore electronically excited states of vitamin B(12) (cyanocobalamin or CNCbl). To explain why the Co-C bond in CNCbl does not undergo photodissociation under conditions of simple photon excitation, electronically excited states have been computed along the Co-C(CN) stretched coordinate. It was found that the repulsive (3)(σ(Co-C) → σ*(Co-C)) triplet state drops in energy as the Co-C(CN) bond lengthens, but it does not become dissociative. Low-lying excited states were also computed as function of two axial bond lengths. Two energy minima have been located on the S(1)/CNCbl, as well as T(1)/CNCbl, surfaces. The full geometry optimization was carried out for each minimum and electronic properties associated with each optimized structure were analyzed in details. One minimum was described as excitation having mixed ππ*/MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer) character, while the second as ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) transition. Neither of them, however, can be viewed as pure MLCT or LMCT transitions since additional excitation to or from σ-bonds (SB) of N-Co-C unit have also noticeable contributions. Inclusion of solvent altered the character of one of the excitations from ππ*/MLCT/SBLCT to ππ*/LMCT/LSBCT-type, and therefore, both of them gained significant contribution from LMCT/LSBCT transition. Finally, the nature of S(1) electronic state has been comparatively analyzed in CNCbl and MeCbl cobalamins.

  14. Electronic excitations and metallization of dense solid hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, R. E.; Naumov, Ivan I.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and an assessment of recent experimental results for dense solid hydrogen lead to a unique scenario for the metallization of hydrogen under pressure. The existence of layered structures based on graphene sheets gives rise to an electronic structure related to unique features found in graphene that are well studied in the carbon phase. The honeycombed layered structure for hydrogen at high density, first predicted in molecular calculations, produces a complex optical response. The metallization of hydrogen is very different from that originally proposed via a phase transition to a close-packed monoatomic structure, and different from simple metallization recently used to interpret recent experimental data. These different mechanisms for metallization have very different experimental signatures. We show that the shift of the main visible absorption edge does not constrain the point of band gap closure, in contrast with recent claims. This conclusion is confirmed by measured optical spectra, including spectra obtained to low photon energies in the infrared region for phases III and IV of hydrogen. PMID:23904476

  15. exciting: a full-potential all-electron package implementing density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulans, Andris; Kontur, Stefan; Meisenbichler, Christian; Nabok, Dmitrii; Pavone, Pasquale; Rigamonti, Santiago; Sagmeister, Stephan; Werner, Ute; Draxl, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Linearized augmented planewave methods are known as the most precise numerical schemes for solving the Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory (DFT). In this review, we describe how this method is realized in the all-electron full-potential computer package, exciting. We emphasize the variety of different related basis sets, subsumed as (linearized) augmented planewave plus local orbital methods, discussing their pros and cons and we show that extremely high accuracy (microhartrees) can be achieved if the basis is chosen carefully. As the name of the code suggests, exciting is not restricted to ground-state calculations, but has a major focus on excited-state properties. It includes time-dependent DFT in the linear-response regime with various static and dynamical exchange-correlation kernels. These are preferably used to compute optical and electron-loss spectra for metals, molecules and semiconductors with weak electron-hole interactions. exciting makes use of many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral excitations. To obtain the quasi-particle band structure, the GW approach is implemented in the single-shot approximation, known as G0W0. Optical absorption spectra for valence and core excitations are handled by the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, which allows for the description of strongly bound excitons. Besides these aspects concerning methodology, we demonstrate the broad range of possible applications by prototypical examples, comprising elastic properties, phonons, thermal-expansion coefficients, dielectric tensors and loss functions, magneto-optical Kerr effect, core-level spectra and more.

  16. Exciting: a full-potential all-electron package implementing density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Gulans, Andris; Kontur, Stefan; Meisenbichler, Christian; Nabok, Dmitrii; Pavone, Pasquale; Rigamonti, Santiago; Sagmeister, Stephan; Werner, Ute; Draxl, Claudia

    2014-09-10

    Linearized augmented planewave methods are known as the most precise numerical schemes for solving the Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory (DFT). In this review, we describe how this method is realized in the all-electron full-potential computer package, exciting. We emphasize the variety of different related basis sets, subsumed as (linearized) augmented planewave plus local orbital methods, discussing their pros and cons and we show that extremely high accuracy (microhartrees) can be achieved if the basis is chosen carefully. As the name of the code suggests, exciting is not restricted to ground-state calculations, but has a major focus on excited-state properties. It includes time-dependent DFT in the linear-response regime with various static and dynamical exchange-correlation kernels. These are preferably used to compute optical and electron-loss spectra for metals, molecules and semiconductors with weak electron-hole interactions. exciting makes use of many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral excitations. To obtain the quasi-particle band structure, the GW approach is implemented in the single-shot approximation, known as G(0)W(0). Optical absorption spectra for valence and core excitations are handled by the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, which allows for the description of strongly bound excitons. Besides these aspects concerning methodology, we demonstrate the broad range of possible applications by prototypical examples, comprising elastic properties, phonons, thermal-expansion coefficients, dielectric tensors and loss functions, magneto-optical Kerr effect, core-level spectra and more.

  17. Effects of abnormal excitation on the dynamics of spiral waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min-Yi, Deng; Xue-Liang, Zhang; Jing-Yu, Dai

    2016-01-01

    The effect of physiological and pathological abnormal excitation of a myocyte on the spiral waves is investigated based on the cellular automaton model. When the excitability of the medium is high enough, the physiological abnormal excitation causes the spiral wave to meander irregularly and slowly. When the excitability of the medium is low enough, the physiological abnormal excitation leads to a new stable spiral wave. On the other hand, the pathological abnormal excitation destroys the spiral wave and results in the spatiotemporal chaos, which agrees with the clinical conclusion that the early after depolarization is the pro-arrhythmic mechanism of some anti-arrhythmic drugs. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11365003 and 11165004).

  18. On the nature of excited electronic states in cyanine dyes: implications for visual pigment spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinur, Uri; Honig, Barry; Schulten, Klaus

    1980-06-01

    CNDO/S CI calculations are carried out on polyenes and on cyanine dyes. In contrast to polyenes, doubly excited configurations have a strong effect on the first optically allowed excited state in cyanines. Protonated Schiff bases of retinal are closely related to cyanine dyes, with important consequences for models of visual pigment spectra and photochemistry.

  19. Electron-impact ionization-excitation of helium in the quasi-photon regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcel Ngoko Djiokap, Jean; Foumouo, Emmanuel; Njock, Moise Godfroy Kwato; Urbain, Xavier; Piraux, Bernard

    2010-03-01

    The triply differential cross section (TDCS) for ionization and excitation of helium (leaving the residual ion in the n=2 excited states) is evaluated for the kinematics considered experimentally by Dupr'e et al. [J. Phys. B 25, 259 (1992)]. The interaction of the incident electron with the target is described in first order, while that of the ejected electron with the residual ion is treated accurately within the Jacobi matrix method formalism. In the quasi-photon limit and for small ejected electron energies, the presence of series of doubly excited states below the n=3 single ionization threshold in helium makes the TDCS extremely sensitive to both the energy and angle of the ejected electron. Comparison of our theoretical results (convoluted both in energy and angle) with the experimental data demonstrates the importance of an accurate description of the He spectrum. A possible two-step mechanism involving single ionization of the target followed by excitation of the core electron is proposed in order to explain the remaining discrepancies.

  20. Excitation threshold of Stimulated Electromagnetic Emissions SEEs generated at pump frequency near the third electron gyroharmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Scales, W.

    2012-12-01

    The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaska provides effective radiated powers in the megawatt range that have allowed researchers to study many non-linear effects of wave-plasma interactions. Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) is of interest to the ionospheric community for its diagnostic purposes. In recent HAARP heating experiments, it has been shown that during the Magnetized Stimulated Brillouin Scattering MSBS instability, the pumped electromagnetic wave may decay into an electromagnetic wave and a low frequency electrostatic wave (either ion acoustic IA wave or electrostatic ion cyclotron EIC wave). Using Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) spectral features, side bands which extend above and below the pump frequency can yield significant diagnostics for the modified ionosphere. It has been shown that the IA wave frequency offsets can be used to measure electron temperature in the heated ionosphere and EIC wave offsets can be used as a sensitive method to determine the ion species by measuring ion mass using the ion gyro-frequency offset. The threshold of each emission line has been measured by changing the amplitude of pump wave. The experimental results aimed to show the threshold for transmitter power to excite IA wave propagating along the magnetic field lines as well as for EIC wave excited at an oblique angle relative to the background magnetic field. Another parametric decay instability studied is the ion Bernstein decay instability that has been attributed to the simultaneous parametric decay of electron Bernstein waves into multiple electron Bernstein and ion Bernstein waves. The SIB process is thought to involve mode conversion from EM to EB waves followed by parametric decay of the EB wave to multiple EB and IB waves. The parametric decay instability of ion Bernstein modes has been observed simultaneously for the first time at the third electron gyroharmonics during 2011 Summer Student Research

  1. Breit-Pauli oscillator strengths and electron excitation collision strengths for Si VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2012-05-01

    Aims: Oscillator strengths and electron impact excitation collision strengths for transitions between the 68 fine-structure levels of the 2s22p3, 2s2p4, 2p5, 2s22p23s, 2s22p23p, 2s22p23d and 2s2p33s configurations in Si VIII are calculated. Thermally averaged collision strengths are presented as a function of electron temperature for application to solar and other astrophysical plasmas. Methods: The collision strengths have been calculated using the B-splineBreit-Pauli R-matrixmethod for allowed and forbidden transitions in Si VIII. The relativistic effects have been incorporated through mass, Darwin and spin-orbit one-body operators in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian in the scattering calculation, while in the calculation of oscillator strengths the one-body and two-body relativistic operators are included. Flexible non-orthogonal sets of spectroscopic and correlation radial functions are used to obtain accurate description of Si VIII levels and to represent the scattering functions. The 68 fine-structure levels of the 2s22p3, 2s2p4, 2p5, 2s22p23s, 2s22p23p, 2s22p23d and 2s2p33s configurations have been considered in both the radiative and scattering calculations. The present scattering calculations are more extensive than previous ones, leading to a total 2278 transitions between fine-structure levels. Results: The calculated excitation energies are in excellent agreement with experiment and represent an improvement over the previous calculations. The present collision strengths show reasonable agreement with the previously available R-matrix and distorted-wave calculations. The oscillator strengths for E1 transitions normally compare very well with previous calculations. The effective collision strengths are obtained by integrating total resonant and non-resonant collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies and these are presented over a wide temperature range from 104 to 4.0 × 106 K. Tables 1-4 are only available in electronic form at

  2. Doubly excited states of molecular nitrogen by scattered electron-ion coincidence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Karin; Hasegawa, Toru; Sakai, Yasuhiro

    2017-03-01

    Scattered electron-ion coincidence measurements were performed on molecular nitrogen (N2) to study the relaxation dynamics of doubly excited states. Doubly excited states are typically so unstable that they result in either auto-ionization or a neutral dissociation. In auto-ionization, ionization and dissociation typically occur. Using a mixed-gas method, we determined the absolute values of the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) distributions using an incident electron energy of 200 eV and a scattering angle of 6°. The GOS distributions of N2+ and N+ were determined by combining the coincidence ion signals, which revealed some doubly excited states of N2. Since electron impact experiments can provide information on optically forbidden transitions, the contribution of optically forbidden states appears in the GOS distributions of both N2+ and N+. We observed auto-ionization and dissociative auto-ionization induced by excitation to the optically forbidden doubly excited states in the range of 30-40 eV.

  3. Vibrational excitation of adsorbed molecules by low-energy photon-emitted electrons: A dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Ureña, A.; Telle, H. H.; Tornero, J.

    2013-01-01

    A simple, inelastic electron-scattering dynamical model is presented to account for vibrational excitation in molecular adsorbates. The basic two ingredients of the theoretical model are: (i) the conservation of the total angular momentum, and (ii) the requirement of a critical time to allow for the intra-molecular energy re-arrangement of the transient negative-ion complex. The model is applied to the vibrational excitation dynamics of molecules chemisorbed at sub-monolayer conditions on ordered metal surfaces. This was exemplified for Acrylonitrile adsorbed on Cu(1 0 0), whose vibrational excitation was studied via energy loss spectra of low-energy two-photon photoemission (2PPE) electrons, and for ammonia (NH3 and ND3) adsorbed on Cu(1 0 0), being probed in a STM experiment. Fits of the model to the data allowed for deducing the energy threshold of the vibrational excitation of the Cdbnd C and Ctbnd N bonds of the ACN adsorbate molecules, and the threshold for the symmetric ν1-stretch mode excitation of adsorbed NH3/ND3. Also, information about the temporal dynamics underlying the inelastic electron scattering was gained.

  4. R-matrix electron-impact excitation data for the Mg-like iso-electronic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Menchero, L.; Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Emission lines from ions in the Mg-like iso-electronic sequence can be used as reliable diagnostics of temperature and density of astrophysical and fusion plasmas over a wide range of parameters. Data in the literature are quite lacking, there are no calculations for many of the ions in the sequence. Methods: We have carried-out intermediate coupling frame transformation R-matrix calculations which include a total of 283 fine-structure levels in both the configuration interaction target and close-coupling collision expansions. These arise from the configurations 1s2 2s2 2p6 3 {s,p,d} nl with n = 4,5, and for l = 0-4. Results: We obtain ordinary collision strengths and Maxwell-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of all the ions of the Mg-like sequence, from Al+ to Zn18 +. We compare our results with those from previous R-matrix and distorted waves calculations, where available, for some benchmark ions. We find good agreement with the results of previous calculations for the transitions n = 3-3. We also find good agreement for the most intense transitions n = 3-4. These transitions are important for populating the upper levels of the main diagnostic lines. These data are made available in the APAP archive via http://www.apap-network.org, CHIANTI via http://www.chiantidatabase.org and open-ADAS via http://open.adas.ac.uk

  5. Electron density measurements in a photoinitiated, impulse-enhanced, electrically excited laser gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, V. A.; Seguin, H. J. J.; Capjack, C. E.; Nikumb, S. K.

    1986-11-01

    Measurements of the electron density within a photo-initiated, impulse-enhanced, electrically excited (PIE) laser gas discharge are presented. Ion current measurements were made using a single Langmuir electrostatic probe positioned within the laser discharge volume. Calculations of the electron density were made utilizing a thick-sheath analysis. The results indicate that the electron density increases by two orders of magnitude as the pulser power level is increased. In addition, the electron density was observed to decrease markedly as the dc discharge current was increased.

  6. Electron transfer, excitation, and ionization in {alpha}-H collisions studied with a Sturmian basis

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Thomas G.

    2007-12-15

    Cross sections have been determined for electron transfer, direct excitation, and ionization in collisions between {alpha} particles and H(1s) atoms at {alpha} energies 3 keV-38.4 MeV, extending earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 25, 697 (1982)] restricted to total transfer at 20-200 keV. Transfer as well as excitation cross sections into individual states up to 3d have been determined with several coupled-Sturmian pseudostate bases, and tests of basis sensitivity have been carried out. These and ionization cross sections have been compared with existing experimental and other coupled-state results. Structure is observed in the lower-energy excitation cross sections, which is believed not to be an artifact of the bases used. Ionization and excitation cross sections have also been compared with corresponding Born results at higher energies.

  7. Sub-nanometre resolution of atomic motion during electronic excitation in phase-change materials

    DOE PAGES

    Mitrofanov, Kirill V.; Fons, Paul; Makino, Kotaro; ...

    2016-02-12

    Phase-change materials based on Ge-Sb-Te alloys are widely used in industrial applications such as nonvolatile memories, but reaction pathways for crystalline-to-amorphous phase-change on picosecond timescales remain unknown. Femtosecond laser excitation and an ultrashort x-ray probe is used to show the temporal separation of electronic and thermal effects in a long-lived (>100 ps) transient metastable state of Ge2Sb2Te5 with muted interatomic interaction induced by a weakening of resonant bonding. Due to a specific electronic state, the lattice undergoes a reversible nondestructive modification over a nanoscale region, remaining cold for 4 ps. An independent time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure experiment confirms themore » existence of an intermediate state with disordered bonds. Furthermore, this newly unveiled effect allows the utilization of non-thermal ultra-fast pathways enabling artificial manipulation of the switching process, ultimately leading to a redefined speed limit, and improved energy efficiency and reliability of phase-change memory technologies.« less

  8. Sub-nanometre resolution of atomic motion during electronic excitation in phase-change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrofanov, Kirill V.; Fons, Paul; Makino, Kotaro; Terashima, Ryo; Shimada, Toru; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Tominaga, Junji; Bragaglia, Valeria; Giussani, Alessandro; Calarco, Raffaella; Riechert, Henning; Sato, Takahiro; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Yabashi, Makina; Wall, Simon; Brewe, Dale; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-02-12

    Phase-change materials based on Ge-Sb-Te alloys are widely used in industrial applications such as nonvolatile memories, but reaction pathways for crystalline-to-amorphous phase-change on picosecond timescales remain unknown. Femtosecond laser excitation and an ultrashort x-ray probe is used to show the temporal separation of electronic and thermal effects in a long-lived (>100 ps) transient metastable state of Ge2Sb2Te5 with muted interatomic interaction induced by a weakening of resonant bonding. Due to a specific electronic state, the lattice undergoes a reversible nondestructive modification over a nanoscale region, remaining cold for 4 ps. An independent time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure experiment confirms the existence of an intermediate state with disordered bonds. Furthermore, this newly unveiled effect allows the utilization of non-thermal ultra-fast pathways enabling artificial manipulation of the switching process, ultimately leading to a redefined speed limit, and improved energy efficiency and reliability of phase-change memory technologies.

  9. Sub-nanometre resolution of atomic motion during electronic excitation in phase-change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Kirill V.; Fons, Paul; Makino, Kotaro; Terashima, Ryo; Shimada, Toru; Kolobov, Alexander V.; Tominaga, Junji; Bragaglia, Valeria; Giussani, Alessandro; Calarco, Raffaella; Riechert, Henning; Sato, Takahiro; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Yabashi, Makina; Wall, Simon; Brewe, Dale; Hase, Muneaki

    2016-02-01

    Phase-change materials based on Ge-Sb-Te alloys are widely used in industrial applications such as nonvolatile memories, but reaction pathways for crystalline-to-amorphous phase-change on picosecond timescales remain unknown. Femtosecond laser excitation and an ultrashort x-ray probe is used to show the temporal separation of electronic and thermal effects in a long-lived (>100 ps) transient metastable state of Ge2Sb2Te5 with muted interatomic interaction induced by a weakening of resonant bonding. Due to a specific electronic state, the lattice undergoes a reversible nondestructive modification over a nanoscale region, remaining cold for 4 ps. An independent time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure experiment confirms the existence of an intermediate state with disordered bonds. This newly unveiled effect allows the utilization of non-thermal ultra-fast pathways enabling artificial manipulation of the switching process, ultimately leading to a redefined speed limit, and improved energy efficiency and reliability of phase-change memory technologies.

  10. Intermediate energy electron impact excitation of composite vibrational modes in phenol.

    PubMed

    Neves, R F C; Jones, D B; Lopes, M C A; Nixon, K L; de Oliveira, E M; da Costa, R F; Varella, M T do N; Bettega, M H F; Lima, M A P; da Silva, G B; Brunger, M J

    2015-05-21

    We report differential cross section results from an experimental investigation into the electron impact excitation of a number of the low-lying composite (unresolved) vibrational modes in phenol (C6H5OH). The measurements were carried out at incident electron energies in the range 15-40 eV and for scattered-electron angles in the range 10-90°. The energy resolution of those measurements was typically ∼80 meV. Calculations, using the GAMESS code, were also undertaken with a B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level model chemistry, in order to enable us to assign vibrational modes to the features observed in our energy loss spectra. To the best of our knowledge, the present cross sections are the first to be reported for vibrational excitation of the C6H5OH molecule by electron impact.

  11. Electron-impact excitation of the n 1P levels of helium - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, David C.; Csanak, George; Trajmar, Sandor; Register, D. F.

    1992-01-01

    New experimental electron-energy-loss data have been used to extract differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the 2 1P level, and for the overlapping (3 1P, 3 1D, 3 3D) levels of helium, at 30-, 50-, and 100-eV incident electron energies. First-order many-body theory (FOMBT) has been used to calculate the differential and integral cross sections for excitation of the n 1P (n = 2,...,6) levels of helium by electron impact, for incident electron energies from threshold to 500 eV. Detailed comparisons between these two new sets of data are made as well as comparisons with appropriate published experimental and theoretical results. A simple scaling relationship is derived from the FOMBT results for n = 2,...,6 that provides differential and integral cross sections for all symmetry final levels of helium with n = 6 or greater.

  12. Direct Delta-MBPT(2) method for ionization potentials, electron affinities, and excitation energies using fractional occupation numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Ortiz, J. Vincent

    2013-01-01

    A direct method (D-Delta-MBPT(2)) to calculate second-order ionization potentials (IPs), electron affinities (EAs), and excitation energies is developed. The Delta-MBPT(2) method is defined as the correlated extension of the Delta-HF method. Energy differences are obtained by integrating the energy derivative with respect to occupation numbers over the appropriate parameter range. This is made possible by writing the second-order energy as a function of the occupation numbers. Relaxation effects are fully included at the SCF level. This is in contrast to linear response theory, which makes the D-Delta-MBPT(2) applicable not only to single excited but also higher excited states. We show the relationship of the D-Delta-MBPT(2) method for IPs and EAs to a second-order approximation of the effective Fock-space coupled-cluster Hamiltonian and a second-order electron propagator method. We also discuss the connection between the D-Delta-MBPT(2) method for excitation energies and the CIS-MP2 method. Finally, as a proof of principle, we apply our method to calculate ionization potentials and excitation energies of some small molecules. For IPs, the Delta-MBPT(2) results compare well to the second-order solution of the Dyson equation. For excitation energies, the deviation from EOM-CCSD increases when correlation becomes more important. When using the numerical integration technique, we encounter difficulties that prevented us from reaching the Delta-MBPT(2) values. Most importantly, relaxation beyond the Hartree Fock level is significant and needs to be included in future research.

  13. Injection locking of an electronic maser in the hard excitation mode

    SciTech Connect

    Yakunina, K. A.; Kuznetsov, A. P.; Ryskin, N. M.

    2015-11-15

    The phenomenon of hard excitation is natural for many electronic oscillators. In particular, in a gyrotron, a maximal efficiency is often attained in the hard excitation regime. In this paper, we study the injection-locking phenomena using two models of an electronic maser in the hard excitation mode. First, bifurcation analysis is performed for the quasilinear model described by ordinary differential equations for the slow amplitude and phase. Two main scenarios of transition to the injection-locked mode are described, which are generalizations of the well-known phase-locking and suppression mechanisms. The results obtained for the quasilinear model are confirmed by numerical simulations of a gyrotron with fixed Gaussian structure of the RF field.

  14. Current status of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1973-01-01

    A survey is presented of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants for rocket engines. Nascent or atomic forms of diatomic gases are considered free radicals as well as the highly reactive diatomic triatomic molecules that posess unpaired electrons. Manufacturing and storage problems are described, and a review of current experimental work related to the manufacture of atomic hydrogen propellants is presented.

  15. Dynamics of the Chemistry of Electronically Excited Atoms in Defined Quantum States.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    laser development . In essence, this research concerns itself with the elucidation of the role of electronic energy in affecting the chemistry or photochemistry of excited halogen atoms and molecules. While much is known about the dynamics of chemical and physical processes which are carried out on the lowest potential energy hypersurface correlating with reactants and products in their electronic ground state, relatively little is known about the dynamics of such phenomena as energy transfer and chemical reactivity on higher-lying potential

  16. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky; Kas, J. J.; Sponza, Lorenzo; Reshetnyak, Igor; Guzzo, Matteo; Giorgetti, Christine; Gatti, Matteo; Sottile, Francesco; Rehr, J. J.; Reining, Lucia

    2015-11-01

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green's function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green's function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  17. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky Reshetnyak, Igor; Giorgetti, Christine; Sottile, Francesco; Reining, Lucia; Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Sponza, Lorenzo; Guzzo, Matteo; Gatti, Matteo

    2015-11-14

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green’s function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green’s function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  18. Status in calculating electronic excited states in transition metal oxides from first principles.

    PubMed

    Bendavid, Leah Isseroff; Carter, Emily Ann

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of excitations in transition metal oxides is a crucial step in the development of these materials for photonic and optoelectronic applications. However, many transition metal oxides are considered to be strongly correlated materials, and their complex electronic structure is challenging to model with many established quantum mechanical techniques. We review state-of-the-art first-principles methods to calculate charged and neutral excited states in extended materials, and discuss their application to transition metal oxides. We briefly discuss developments in density functional theory (DFT) to calculate fundamental band gaps, and introduce time-dependent DFT, which can model neutral excitations. Charged excitations can be described within the framework of many-body perturbation theory based on Green's functions techniques, which predominantly employs the GW approximation to the self-energy to facilitate a feasible solution to the quasiparticle equations. We review the various implementations of the GW approximation and evaluate each approach in its calculation of fundamental band gaps of many transition metal oxides. We also briefly review the related Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE), which introduces an electron-hole interaction between GW-derived quasiparticles to describe accurately neutral excitations. Embedded correlated wavefunction theory is another framework used to model localized neutral or charged excitations in extended materials. Here, the electronic structure of a small cluster is modeled within correlated wavefunction theory, while its coupling to its environment is represented by an embedding potential. We review a number of techniques to represent this background potential, including electrostatic representations and electron density-based methods, and evaluate their application to transition metal oxides.

  19. First-Principles Investigation of Electronic Excitation Dynamics in Water under Proton Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Kyle; Kanai, Yosuke

    2015-03-01

    A predictive and quantitative understanding of electronic excitation dynamics in water under proton irradiation is of great importance in many technological areas ranging from utilizing proton beam therapy to preventing nuclear reactor damages. Despite its importance, an atomistic description of the excitation mechanism has yet to be fully understood. Identifying how a high-energy proton dissipates its kinetic energy into the electronic excitation is crucial for predicting atomistic damages, later resulting in the formation of different chemical species. In this work, we use our new, large-scale first-principles Ehrenfest dynamics method based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory to simulate the electronic response of bulk water to a fast-moving proton. In particular, we will discuss the topological nature of the electronic excitation as a function of the proton velocity. We will employ maximally-localized functions to bridge our quantitative findings from first-principles simulations to a conceptual understanding in the field of water radiolysis.

  20. Application of non-self-adjoint operators for description of electronic excitations in metallic lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A. V.

    2016-01-15

    Metallic lithium is used to demonstrate the possibilities of applying non-self-adjoint operators for quantitative description of orbital excitations of electrons in crystals. It is shown that, the nonequilibrium distribution function can be calculated when solving the spectral problem; therefore, the kinetic properties of a material can also be described with the unified band theory.

  1. Implications of electron attachment to highly-excited states in pulsed-power discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnaduwage, L.A. |

    1997-08-01

    The author points out the possible implications of electron attachment to highly-excited states of molecules in two pulsed power technologies. One involves the pulsed H{sub 2} discharges used for the generation of H ion beams for magnetic fusion energy and particle accelerators. The other is the power modulated plasma discharges used for material processing.

  2. Enhanced Electron Attachment to Highly-Excited Molecules and Its Applications in Pulsed Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W.X.; Ma, C.Y.; McCorkle, D.L.; Pinnaduwage, L.A.

    1999-06-27

    Studies conducted over the past several years have shown that electron attachment to highly-excited states of molecules have extremely large cross sections. We will discuss the implications of this for pulsed discharges used for H- generation, material processing, and plasma remediation.

  3. Relativistic atomic structure calculations and electron impact excitations of Fe23+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Maaref, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Relativistic calculations using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method for energy levels, oscillator strengths, and electronic dipole transition probabilities of Li-like iron (Fe23+) are presented. A configuration state list with the quantum numbers nl, where n = 2 - 7 and l = s , p , d , f , g , h , i has been considered. Excitations up to three electrons and correlation contributions from higher orbitals up to 7 l have been included. Contributions from core levels have been taken into account, EOL (extended optimal level) type calculations have been applied, and doubly excited levels are considered. The calculations have been executed by using the fully relativistic atomic structure package GRASP2K. The present calculations have been compared with the available experimental and theoretical sources, the comparisons show a good agreement between the present results of energy levels and oscillator strengths with the literature. In the second part of the present study, the atomic data (energy levels, and radiative parameters) have been used to calculate the excitation and deexcitation rates of allowed transitions by electron impact, as well as the population densities of some excited levels at different electron temperatures.

  4. Coherent Terahertz Radiation from Multiple Electron Beams Excitation within a Plasmonic Crystal-like structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaxin; Zhou, Yucong; Gang, Yin; Jiang, Guili; Yang, Ziqiang

    2017-01-01

    Coherent terahertz radiation from multiple electron beams excitation within a plasmonic crystal-like structure (a three-dimensional holes array) which is composed of multiple stacked layers with 3 × 3 subwavelength holes array has been proposed in this paper. It has been found that in the structure the electromagnetic fields in each hole can be coupled with one another to construct a composite mode with strong field intensity. Therefore, the multiple electron beams injection can excite and efficiently interact with such mode. Meanwhile, the coupling among the electron beams is taken place during the interaction so that a very strong coherent terahertz radiation with high electron conversion efficiency can be generated. Furthermore, due to the coupling, the starting current density of this mechanism is much lower than that of traditional electron beam-driven terahertz sources. This multi-beam radiation system may provide a favorable way to combine photonics structure with electronics excitation to generate middle, high power terahertz radiation.

  5. Coherent Terahertz Radiation from Multiple Electron Beams Excitation within a Plasmonic Crystal-like structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaxin; Zhou, Yucong; Gang, Yin; Jiang, Guili; Yang, Ziqiang

    2017-01-01

    Coherent terahertz radiation from multiple electron beams excitation within a plasmonic crystal-like structure (a three-dimensional holes array) which is composed of multiple stacked layers with 3 × 3 subwavelength holes array has been proposed in this paper. It has been found that in the structure the electromagnetic fields in each hole can be coupled with one another to construct a composite mode with strong field intensity. Therefore, the multiple electron beams injection can excite and efficiently interact with such mode. Meanwhile, the coupling among the electron beams is taken place during the interaction so that a very strong coherent terahertz radiation with high electron conversion efficiency can be generated. Furthermore, due to the coupling, the starting current density of this mechanism is much lower than that of traditional electron beam-driven terahertz sources. This multi-beam radiation system may provide a favorable way to combine photonics structure with electronics excitation to generate middle, high power terahertz radiation. PMID:28112234

  6. Differential effect of visual motion adaption upon visual cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Lubeck, Astrid J A; Van Ombergen, Angelique; Ahmad, Hena; Bos, Jelte E; Wuyts, Floris L; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Arshad, Qadeer

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to probe the effects of visual motion adaptation on early visual and V5/MT cortical excitability and 2) to investigate whether changes in cortical excitability following visual motion adaptation are related to the degree of visual dependency, i.e., an overreliance on visual cues compared with vestibular or proprioceptive cues. Participants were exposed to a roll motion visual stimulus before, during, and after visual motion adaptation. At these stages, 20 transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses at phosphene threshold values were applied over early visual and V5/MT cortical areas from which the probability of eliciting a phosphene was calculated. Before and after adaptation, participants aligned the subjective visual vertical in front of the roll motion stimulus as a marker of visual dependency. During adaptation, early visual cortex excitability decreased whereas V5/MT excitability increased. After adaptation, both early visual and V5/MT excitability were increased. The roll motion-induced tilt of the subjective visual vertical (visual dependence) was not influenced by visual motion adaptation and did not correlate with phosphene threshold or visual cortex excitability. We conclude that early visual and V5/MT cortical excitability is differentially affected by visual motion adaptation. Furthermore, excitability in the early or late visual cortex is not associated with an increase in visual reliance during spatial orientation. Our findings complement earlier studies that have probed visual cortical excitability following motion adaptation and highlight the differential role of the early visual cortex and V5/MT in visual motion processing.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We examined the influence of visual motion adaptation on visual cortex excitability and found a differential effect in V1/V2 compared with V5/MT. Changes in visual excitability following motion adaptation were not related to the degree of an individual's visual dependency.

  7. Collision Strengths for Electron Impact Excitation of Inelastic Transitions in Ar II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.; Henry, Ronald J. W.

    1996-01-01

    We have calculated collision strengths for electron impact excitation of inelastic transitions in Ar II using the R-matrix method in two independent nine- and 19-state close-coupling approximations. In the nine-state calculation the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 5)2p(sup 0), 3S(sup 3)p(sup 6)S-2, 3p(sup 4)(P-3)4s(sup 2)P, 3p(sup 4)(P-3)3d(sup 2)P, 3p(sup 4)(D-1)4s(sup 2)D, 3p(sup 4)(P-3)3d(sup 2)D, 3p(sup 4)(S-1)4s(sup 2)S, 3p(sup 4)(D-1)3d(sup 2)S and 3p(sup 4)(D-1)4d(sup 2)S states are included, while in the 19-state calculation these states plus an additional ten states 3p(sup 4)(P-3)3d(sup 2)F, 3p(sup 4)(P-3)4p(sup 2)D(sup 0), 2p(sup 0), 2S(sup 0), 3p(sup 4)(D-1)4p(sup 2)P(sup 0), 2D(sup O), 2F(sup 0), 3p(sup 4)(D-1)3d(sup 2)D, p-2 and 3p(sup 4)(S-1)4p(sup 2)P(sup 0) are considered. These target states are represented by fairly extensive configuration-interaction wavefunctions which yield excitation energies and oscillator strengths that are generally in good agreement with the available most accurate calculations and the experimental values. Rydberg series of resonances converging to the excited state thresholds are included in the calculation. The effective collision strengths are obtained assuming a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies which are tabulated over the temperature range (0.5-20) x 10(exp 4) K.

  8. A Doubles Correction to Electronic Excited States from Configuration Interaction in the Space of Single Substitutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head-Gordon, Martin; Rico, Rudolph J.; Lee, Timothy J.; Oumi, Manabu

    1994-01-01

    A perturbative correction to the method of configuration interaction with single substitutions (CIS) is presented. This CIS(D) correction approximately introduces the effect of double substitutions which are absent in CIS excited states. CIS(D) is a second-order perturbation expansion of the coupled-cluster excited state method, restricted to single and double substitutions, in a series in which CIS is zeroth order, and the first-order correction vanishes. CIS (D) excitation energies are size consistent and the calculational complexity scales with the fifth power of molecular size, akin to second-order Moller-Plesset theory for the ground state. Calculations on singlet excited states of ethylene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, butadiene and benzene show that CIS (D) is a uniform improvement over CIS. CIS(D) appears to be a promising method for examining excited states of large molecules, where more accurate methods are not feasible.

  9. Quantum propagation of electronic excitations in macromolecules: A computationally efficient multiscale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, E.; a Beccara, S.; Mascherpa, F.; Faccioli, P.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a theoretical approach to study the quantum-dissipative dynamics of electronic excitations in macromolecules, which enables to perform calculations in large systems and cover long-time intervals. All the parameters of the underlying microscopic Hamiltonian are obtained from ab initio electronic structure calculations, ensuring chemical detail. In the short-time regime, the theory is solvable using a diagrammatic perturbation theory, enabling analytic insight. To compute the time evolution of the density matrix at intermediate times, typically ≲ps , we develop a Monte Carlo algorithm free from any sign or phase problem, hence computationally efficient. Finally, the dynamics in the long-time and large-distance limit can be studied combining the microscopic calculations with renormalization group techniques to define a rigorous low-resolution effective theory. We benchmark our Monte Carlo algorithm against the results obtained in perturbation theory and using a semiclassical nonperturbative scheme. Then, we apply it to compute the intrachain charge mobility in a realistic conjugated polymer.

  10. Role of thermal excitation in ultrafast energy transfer in chlorosomes revealed by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jun, Sunhong; Yang, Cheolhee; Kim, Tae Wu; Isaji, Megumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Jeongho

    2015-07-21

    Chlorosomes are the largest light harvesting complexes in nature and consist of many bacteriochlorophyll pigments forming self-assembled J-aggregates. In this work, we use two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) to investigate ultrafast dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) in chlorosomes and their temperature dependence. From time evolution of the measured 2D electronic spectra of chlorosomes, we directly map out the distribution of the EET rate among the manifold of exciton states in a 2D energy space. In particular, it is found that the EET rate varies gradually depending on the energies of energy-donor and energy-acceptor states. In addition, from comparative 2D-ES measurements at 77 K and room temperature, we show that the EET rate exhibits subtle dependence on both the exciton energy and temperature, demonstrating the effect of thermal excitation on the EET rate. This observation suggests that active thermal excitation at room temperature prevents the excitation trapping at low-energy states and thus promotes efficient exciton diffusion in chlorosomes at ambient temperature.

  11. Electronic Relaxation after Resonant Laser Excitation of Cr in Superfluid Helium Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) atoms embedded into helium nanodroplets (HeN) are ejected from the droplets upon photoexcitation. During ejection they undergo electronic relaxation resulting in bare Cr atoms in various excited states. In a study of the relaxation process we present absorption spectra observed via laser induced fluorescence and beam depletion as well as dispersed fluorescence spectra and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Broad and shifted absorption structures were found for the strong z7P° ← a7S3 and y7P° ← a7S3 excitations from the ground state. Emission lines are, in contrast, very narrow, which indicates that fluorescence is obtained from bare excited Cr atoms after ejection. Upon excitation into the y7P2,3,4° states we observed fluorescence from y7P2°, z5P1,2,3°, and z7P2,3,4°, indicating that these states are populated by electronic relaxation during the ejection processes. Relative population ratios are obtained from the intensities of individual spectral lines. Excitation into the z7P2,3,4° states resulted in fluorescence only from z7P2°. Estimates of the time duration of the ejection process are obtained from time-resolved measurements. PMID:23410146

  12. Electron-loss and excitation cross sections for a He+ ion colliding with various atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Toshiaki

    1985-10-01

    A unitarized impact-parameter method is applied to calculate the electron-loss and excitation cross sections for He+ ions colliding with atoms. The projectile ionization and excitation are dominantly caused by the average potential field of the target atom (atomic number Z2). The inelastic process of exciting the target atom contributes negligibly except for light target elements. We adopt the Molière potential to describe this average potential field. The energy dependences of the electron-loss cross sections in He, N2, and Ar targets are in good agreement with the reported data. In the case of the Kr target, the present theory yields larger cross sections than the data, especially below 1 MeV impact energy of a He+ projectile. The calculated loss cross sections at impact velocity ranging from 2v0 to 6v0 (v0=2.18×108 cm/s) show a weaker Z2 dependence in the large Z2 region than that given by the Bohr formula. As for the cross section for exciting the ground state of a projectile to the first excited state, a similar weak Z2 dependence can be found. The recent experimental results using 40-MeV F8+ ions colliding with He, Ne, Ar, and Kr targets have supported this tendency.

  13. Analysis of fishbone instability excited by trapped energetic electrons on HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hongda; Dong, J. Q.; Zhao, K.; He, Zhixiong; Chen, W.; Jiang, H. B.

    2014-11-01

    A generalized dispersion relation for fishbone instability is obtained by considering Gaussian distributions of spatial density and pitch angle of energetic electrons (EEs). The fishbone modes excited by trapped EEs are analysed in detail based on the HL-2A tokamak electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) experiment. Numerical results show that the calculated time evolution of the mode real frequency is in reasonable agreement with the observations in ECRH experiment. Density gradient of the EEs plays an important role in excitation of the modes via resonant interaction between the modes and EEs. The modes are excited at the positions of maximum EE density gradient. The frequency of the mode in the case of on-axis heating is higher than that in the case of off-axis heating. The background plasma tends to prohibit excitation of the fishbone instabilities. The numerical results show that there is a cut-off background plasma density (or background plasma-β) for the fishbone instabilities. In addition, the toroidal magnetic field Bt has to be higher than a critical value in order to excite the mode, and the real frequency of the modes decreases with increasing Bt.

  14. Electron Impact Excitation of Forbidden and Allowed Transitions in O(II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    The B-spline R-matrix method is used to investigate the electron impact excitation of forbidden and allowed transitions in singly ionized oxygen. The relativistic effects have been incorporated in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. Flexible non-orthogonal sets of radial functions are used to obtain accurate target description and to represent the scattering functions. The 47 fine-structure levels of the 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3), 2s2p(sup 4), 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3p and 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3d configurations have been included in the scattering calculation. A calculation with 62 levels in the close-coupling expansion using the Breit-Pauli R-matrix (BPRM) method with orthogonal radial functions has also been carried out to check electron correlation, relativistic and channel coupling effects. The present results are in good agreement with the previous 16-level BPRM calculation by Montenegro et a1 (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1863-77) for the forbidden transitions, but differ from the 21-level BPRM calculation by McLaughlin and Bell (1998 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 31 4317-29). Our cross sections for the first forbidden (sup 4)S(sup o)-(sup 2)D(sup o)and resonance (sup 4)S(sup o)-2s(sup 2)p(sup 4) (sup 4)P transitions are in reasonably good agreement with the electron energy-loss and merged-beams experiment.

  15. Electronically excited dipole moment of 4-aminobenzonitrile from thermochromic absorption and fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Kukliński, B.; Bojarski, P.

    2006-07-01

    The effect of temperature on absorption and fluorescence spectra of 4-aminobenzonitrile (ABN) in 1,2-dichloroethane is studied for temperature ranging from 296 K to 343 K. The analysis of absorption and fluorescence band shift on the basis of Bilot and Kawski theory [L. Bilot, A. Kawski, Z. Naturforsch. 17a (1962) 621], for the known dipole moment in the ground state μg = 5.92 D, and α/ a3 = 0.5 ( α is the polarizability and a is the Onsager interaction radius of the solute) yields for ABN: (1) the empirical Onsager interaction radius a = 3.3 Å, (2) the dipole moment in the excited S 1 state μe = 7.14 D which agrees very well with the value of μe = 7.20 D obtained by Borst et al. [D.R. Borst, T.M. Korter, D.W. Pratt, Chem. Phys. Lett. 350 (2001) 485] from Stark effect studies. Both values of μe concern free ABN molecule and differ significantly from the values of μg (8.0 D, 8.5 D and 8.3 D in cyclohexane, benzene and 1,4-dioxane, respectively) obtained by Schuddeboom et al. [W. Schuddeboom, S.A. Jonker, J.M. Warman, U. Leinhos, W. Kühnle, K.A. Zachariasse, J. Phys. Chem. 96 (1992) 10809] from the time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements which are solvent-dependent. The group moment additivity law in the case of ABN molecule is approximately applicable, both in the ground and in the excited electronic state.

  16. Core excitation effects in the breakup of halo nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A. M.; Diego, R. de; Lay, J. A.; Crespo, R.; Johnson, R. C.; Arias, J. M.; Gomez-Camacho, J.

    2012-10-20

    The role of core excitation in the structure and dynamics of two-body halo nuclei is investigated. We present calculations for the resonant breakup of {sup 11}Be on protons at an incident energy of 63.7 MeV/nucleon, where core excitation effects were shown to be important. To describe the reaction, we use a recently developed extension of the DWBA formalism which incorporates these core excitation effects within the no-recoil approximation. The validity of the no-recoil approximation is also examined by comparing with DWBA calculations which take into account core recoil. In addition, calculations with two different continuum representations are presented and compared.

  17. Benchmarks for electronically excited states: CASPT2, CC2, CCSD, and CC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Marko; Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Thiel, Walter

    2008-04-01

    A benchmark set of 28 medium-sized organic molecules is assembled that covers the most important classes of chromophores including polyenes and other unsaturated aliphatic compounds, aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocycles, carbonyl compounds, and nucleobases. Vertical excitation energies and one-electron properties are computed for the valence excited states of these molecules using both multiconfigurational second-order perturbation theory, CASPT2, and a hierarchy of coupled cluster methods, CC2, CCSD, and CC3. The calculations are done at identical geometries (MP2/6-31G*) and with the same basis set (TZVP). In most cases, the CC3 results are very close to the CASPT2 results, whereas there are larger deviations with CC2 and CCSD, especially in singlet excited states that are not dominated by single excitations. Statistical evaluations of the calculated vertical excitation energies for 223 states are presented and discussed in order to assess the relative merits of the applied methods. CC2 reproduces the CC3 reference data for the singlets better than CCSD. On the basis of the current computational results and an extensive survey of the literature, we propose best estimates for the energies of 104 singlet and 63 triplet excited states.

  18. Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-impact dissociation involving vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laporta, V.; Celiberto, R.; Tennyson, J.

    2014-12-09

    Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation processes, involving vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.

  19. Multiplasmon excitations in electron spectra of small systems irradiated by swift charged projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Phuong Mai; Reinhard, Paul-Gerhard; Suraud, Eric; Wopperer, Philipp

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetic-energy spectrum of electrons emitted from an excited many-electron system, often called photo-electron spectrum (PES). We are particularly interested on the impact of resonant modes of the system on PES. To this end, we consider three systems with strong resonances, a Mg atom, the small alkaline cluster K9+, and the small carbon chain C3. To avoid dominant frequencies in the excitation process, we consider a collision with a fast ion which is realized by an instantaneous boost of the valence electrons, a process which excites all frequencies with equal weight. The electron dynamics is investigated from a theoretical perspective using time-dependent density-functional theory augmented by an average-density self-interaction correction. We observe patterns which are similar to PES usually obtained after irradiation by a laser pulse, in particular the appearance of clear peaks. We show that these patterns are driven by strong resonance modes of the system. Resonances are thus found to be another source of peaks in the PES, besides photons (when present) with definite frequencies.

  20. Multiplasmon excitations in electron spectra of small systems irradiated by swift charged projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Phuong Mai; Reinhard, Paul-Gerhard; Suraud, Eric; Wopperer, Philipp

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetic-energy spectrum of electrons emitted from an excited many-electron system, often called photo-electron spectrum (PES). We are particularly interested on the impact of resonant modes of the system on PES. To this end, we consider three systems with strong resonances, a Mg atom, the small alkaline cluster K9 +, and the small carbon chain C3. To avoid dominant frequencies in the excitation process, we consider a collision with a fast ion which is realized by an instantaneous boost of the valence electrons, a process which excites all frequencies with equal weight. The electron dynamics is investigated from a theoretical perspective using time-dependent density-functional theory augmented by an average-density self-interaction correction. We observe patterns which are similar to PES usually obtained after irradiation by a laser pulse, in particular the appearance of clear peaks. We show that these patterns are driven by strong resonance modes of the system. Resonances are thus found to be another source of peaks in the PES, besides photons (when present) with definite frequencies.

  1. Doubly excited states of ammonia by scattered electron-ion coincidence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Karin; Sakai, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-01

    To obtain information on the optically forbidden doubly excited states of ammonia (NH3), we performed scattered electron-ion coincidence measurements. First, we observed scattered electrons using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and determined the generalized oscillator strength distribution (GOSD) under 200 eV incident electron energy at a scattering angle of 8°. Ionic GOSDs were also determined by combination with the coincidence signal, which was observed by the time-of-flight mass spectrometer at each energy-loss value, for each ion. The total and partial ionic GOSDs were compared with the experimental results of both photon and fast electron impact. Moreover, the neutral GOSD determined by subtracting the total ionic GOSD from the total was compared with previous results. In addition to the optically forbidden doubly excited states, which were identified by Kato et al (2003 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 36 3541) and Ishikawa et al (2008 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 41 195204), we found a new optically forbidden doubly excited state at around 35 eV.

  2. X-ray scattering study of pyrochlore iridates: Crystal structure, electronic, and magnetic excitations

    DOE PAGES

    Clancy, J. P.; Gretarsson, H.; Lee, E. K. H.; ...

    2016-07-06

    We have investigated the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of the pyrochlore iridates Eu2Ir2O7 and Pr2Ir2O7 using a combination of resonant elastic x-ray scattering, x-ray powder diffraction, and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). The structural parameters of Eu2Ir2O7 have been examined as a function of temperature and applied pressure, with a particular emphasis on regions of the phase diagram where electronic and magnetic phase transitions have been reported. We find no evidence of crystal symmetry change over the range of temperatures (~6 to 300 K) and pressures (~0.1 to 17 GPa) studied. We have also investigated the electronic and magneticmore » excitations in single-crystal samples of Eu2Ir2O7 and Pr2Ir2O7 using high-resolution Ir L-3-edge RIXS. In spite of very different ground state properties, we find that these materials exhibit qualitatively similar excitation spectra, with crystal field excitations at ~3-5 eV, spin-orbit excitations at ~ 0.5-1 eV, and broad low-lying excitations below ~0.15 eV. In single-crystal samples of "Eu-rich" Eu2Ir2O7 (found to possess an actual stoichiometry of Eu2.18Ir1.82O7.06) we observe highly damped magnetic excitations at ~45 meV, which display significant momentum dependence. Here, we compare these results with recent dynamical structure factor calculations« less

  3. X-ray scattering study of pyrochlore iridates: Crystal structure, electronic, and magnetic excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, J. P.; Gretarsson, H.; Lee, E. K. H.; Tian, Di; Kim, J.; Upton, M. H.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.; Islam, Z.; Jeon, Byung -Gu; Kim, Kee Hoon; Desgreniers, S.; Kim, Yong Baek; Julian, S. J.; Kim, Young -June

    2016-07-06

    We have investigated the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of the pyrochlore iridates Eu2Ir2O7 and Pr2Ir2O7 using a combination of resonant elastic x-ray scattering, x-ray powder diffraction, and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). The structural parameters of Eu2Ir2O7 have been examined as a function of temperature and applied pressure, with a particular emphasis on regions of the phase diagram where electronic and magnetic phase transitions have been reported. We find no evidence of crystal symmetry change over the range of temperatures (~6 to 300 K) and pressures (~0.1 to 17 GPa) studied. We have also investigated the electronic and magnetic excitations in single-crystal samples of Eu2Ir2O7 and Pr2Ir2O7 using high-resolution Ir L-3-edge RIXS. In spite of very different ground state properties, we find that these materials exhibit qualitatively similar excitation spectra, with crystal field excitations at ~3-5 eV, spin-orbit excitations at ~ 0.5-1 eV, and broad low-lying excitations below ~0.15 eV. In single-crystal samples of "Eu-rich" Eu2Ir2O7 (found to possess an actual stoichiometry of Eu2.18Ir1.82O7.06) we observe highly damped magnetic excitations at ~45 meV, which display significant momentum dependence. Here, we compare these results with recent dynamical structure factor calculations

  4. Analysis and simulation for a model of electron impact excitation/deexcitation and ionization/recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bokai; Caflisch, Russel E.; Barekat, Farzin; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-15

    This paper describes a kinetic model and a corresponding Monte Carlo simulation method for excitation/deexcitation and ionization/recombination by electron impact in a plasma free of external fields. The atoms and ions in the plasma are represented by continuum densities and the electrons by a particle distribution. A Boltzmann-type equation is formulated and a corresponding H-theorem is formally derived. An efficient Monte Carlo method is developed for an idealized analytic model of the excitation and ionization collision cross sections. To accelerate the simulation, the reduced rejection method and binary search method are used to overcome the singular rate in the recombination process. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the method on spatially homogeneous problems. The evolution of the electron distribution function and atomic states is studied, revealing the possibility under certain circumstances of system relaxation towards stationary states that are not the equilibrium states, a potential non-ergodic behavior.

  5. Scattering angle dependence of electron impact excitation: Intensity variation within a vibrational progression

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, M.; Kimura, M. ); Buenker, R.J.; Hirsch, G.; Li, Y.; Chantranupong, L. )

    1995-01-22

    Intensity distributions of electronic transitions in O[sub 2] and CO within a vibrational progression resulting from electron impact excitation are studied theoretically and experimentally. The [ital multireference] [ital single]- [ital and] [ital double]-[ital excitation] [ital configuration] [ital interaction] (MRD-CI) method is used to elucidate details of selected electronic transitions. In particular, the adiabatic MRD-CI approach can account for the variation of the Franck--Condon envelope with scattering angle that has been reported for the [ital B] [sup 1][Sigma][sup +][l arrow][ital X] [sup 1][Sigma][sup +] transition in CO and also was recently observed in the [ital B][prime] [sup 3][Sigma][sup [minus

  6. Electronic excitations of bulk LiCl from many-body perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun-Feng; Wang, Neng-Ping; Rohlfing, Michael

    2013-12-07

    We present the quasiparticle band structure and the optical excitation spectrum of bulk LiCl, using many-body perturbation theory. Density-functional theory is used to calculate the ground-state geometry of the system. The quasiparticle band structure is calculated within the GW approximation. Taking the electron-hole interaction into consideration, electron-hole pair states and optical excitations are obtained by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the electron-hole two-particle Green function. The calculated band gap is 9.5 eV, which is in good agreement with the experimental result of 9.4 eV. And the calculated optical absorption spectrum, which contains an exciton peak at 8.8 eV and a resonant-exciton peak at 9.8 eV, is also in good agreement with experimental data.

  7. Electronic excitations of bulk LiCl from many-body perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yun-Feng; Wang, Neng-Ping; Rohlfing, Michael

    2013-12-07

    We present the quasiparticle band structure and the optical excitation spectrum of bulk LiCl, using many-body perturbation theory. Density-functional theory is used to calculate the ground-state geometry of the system. The quasiparticle band structure is calculated within the GW approximation. Taking the electron-hole interaction into consideration, electron-hole pair states and optical excitations are obtained by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the electron-hole two-particle Green function. The calculated band gap is 9.5 eV, which is in good agreement with the experimental result of 9.4 eV. And the calculated optical absorption spectrum, which contains an exciton peak at 8.8 eV and a resonant-exciton peak at 9.8 eV, is also in good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Jones, D B; Neves, R F C; Lopes, M C A; da Costa, R F; Varella, M T do N; Bettega, M H F; Lima, M A P; García, G; Blanco, F; Brunger, M J

    2015-12-14

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°-90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  9. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.; and others

    2015-12-14

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°–90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  10. The repopulation of electronic states upon vibrational excitation of niobium carbide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyy, V.; Logemann, R.; Bakker, J. M.; Kirilyuk, A.

    2016-07-01

    We study the infrared (IR) resonant heating of neutral niobium carbide clusters probed through ultraviolet photoionization spectroscopy. The IR excitation not only changes the photoionization spectra for the photon energies above the ionization threshold, but also modulates ion yield for energies significantly below it. An attempt to describe the experimental spectra using either Fowler's theory or thermally populated vibrational states was not successful. However, the data can be fully modeled by vibrationally and rotationally broadened discrete electronic levels obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The application of this method to spectra with different IR pulse energies not only yields information about the excited electronic states in the vicinity of the HOMO level, populated by manipulation of the vibrational coordinates of a cluster, but also can serve as an extra indicator for the cluster isomeric structure and corresponding DFT-calculated electronic levels.

  11. Study of the plasma and runaway electrons during inductionless current excitation in the V-20 torsatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bocharov, V.K.; Volkov, Y.F.; Dyatlov, V.G.; Kornienko, V.P.; Mitina, N.I.

    1982-05-01

    Inductionless current excitation has been studied in the V-20 torsatron with the plasma parameters n = 10/sup 12/--10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ and T/sub e/ = 40--60 eV. Since the plasma current was excited only in the initial stage of the discharge, it was possible to study the events in the plasma both with and without current flow. The plasma conductivity determined from measurements of the current and the voltage is an order of magnitude below the classical value calculated from the measured electron temperature. The discharge conditions under which a large number (Nroughly-equal(2--3)x10/sup 11/) of runaway electrons appear were studied. It is shown that the runaway occurs continuously throughout the discharge. When a certain limiting energy is reached (this energy depends on the confining properties of the confinement system), the runaway electrons escape from the confinement volume.

  12. Infrared/ultraviolet quadruple resonance spectroscopy to investigate structures of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, M.; Bartl, K.; Gerhards, M.

    2012-03-21

    Molecular beam investigations in combination with IR/UV spectroscopy offer the possibility to obtain structural information on isolated molecules and clusters. One of the demanding tasks is the discrimination of different isomers, e.g., by the use of isomer specific UV excitations. If this discrimination fails due to overlaying UV spectra of different isomers, IR/IR methods offer another possibility. Here, we present a new IR/UV/IR/UV quadruple resonance technique to distinguish between different isomers especially in the electronically excited state. Due to the IR spectra, structural changes and photochemical pathways in excited states can be assigned and identified. The method is applied to the dihydrated cluster of 3-hydroxyflavone which has been investigated as photochemically relevant system and proton wire model in the S{sub 1} state. By applying the new IR/UV/IR/UV technique, we are able to show experimentally that both in the electronic ground (S{sub 0}) and the electronically excited state (S{sub 1}) two isomers have to be assigned.

  13. Superexchange coupling and electron transfer in globular proteins via polaron excitations.

    PubMed

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D; Ustitnin, M N

    2000-06-01

    The polaron approach is used to treat long-range electron transfersbetween globular proteins. A rate expression for the polaron transfer model is given along with a description of appropriate conditions forits use. Assuming that electrons transfer via a superexchange couplingdue to a polaron excitation, we have estimated the distance dependenceof the rate constant for the self-exchange reactions between globularproteins in solutions. The distance dependence of the polaron coupling andsolvent reorganization energy are provided as a basis forunderstanding and interpreting a long-range electron transfer experiment.The difficulties and problems of the polaron treatment of long-rangeelectron transfers are discussed, and suggestions for new experimentsare made.

  14. Ultrahigh-gradient acceleration of injected eletrons by laser-excited relativistic electron plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, C. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Dyson, A.; Everett, M.; Lal, A.; Leemans, W. P.; Williams, R.; Joshi, C.

    1993-01-01

    High-gradient acceleration of externally injected 2.1-MeV electrons by a laser beat wave driven relativistic plasma wave has been demonstrated for the first time. Electrons with energies up to the detection limit of 9.1 MeV were detected when such a plasma wave was resonantly excited using a two-frequency laser. This implies a gradient of 0.7 GeV/m, corresponding to a plasma-wave amplitude of more than 8%. The electron signal was below detection threshold without injection or when the laser was operated on a single frequency.

  15. Structure and conformational dynamics of molecules in the excited electronic states: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godunov, I. A.; Bataev, V. A.; Maslov, D. V.; Yakovlev, N. N.

    2016-12-01

    The structure of conformational non-rigid molecules in the excited electronic states are investigated by joint theoretical and experimental methods. The theoretical part of work consist of two stages. In first stage the ab initio quantum-chemical calculations are carried out using high level methods. In second stage the vibrational problems of the various dimensions are solved by variational method for vibrations of large amplitude. In experimental part of work the vibronic spectra are investigated: gas-phase absorption and also, fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled molecules. Some examples are considered.

  16. A search for excited fermions in electron-proton collisions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Thron, J.; Arzarello, F.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Romeo, G. Cara; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Ciralli, F.; Contin, A.; D'Auria, S.; Frasconi, F.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Garcia, Y. Zamora; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckart, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mari, S. M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, Ch.; Schattevoy, R.; Schneider, J.-L.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Morgado, C. J. S.; Norman, D. J. P.; O'Mara, J. A.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R. R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Eskreys, K.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajac, J.; Kedzierski, T.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Bienlein, J. K.; Böttcher, S.; Coldewey, C.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Göttlicher, P.; Gutjahr, B.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Heßling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Köpke, L.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kroger, W.; Krüger, J.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mańczak, O.; Ng, J. S. T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Grabosch, H. J.; Leich, A.; Meyer, A.; Rethfeldt, C.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Maccarrone, G.; de Pasquale, S.; Qian, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Freidhof, A.; Poser, T.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Schroeder, J.; Theisen, G.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Fleck, I.; Jamieson, V. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Kammerlocher, H.; Krebs, B.; Neumann, T.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Badura, E.; Burow, B. D.; Fürtjes, A.; Hagge, L.; Lohrmann, E.; Mainusch, J.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Terron, J.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Beuselinck, R.; Butterworth, I.; Gallo, E.; Harris, V. L.; Hung, B. H.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Morawitz, P. P. O.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Hong, S. M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Suh, M. H.; Yon, S. H.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; Del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Ikraiam, F.; Mayer, J. K.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; St. Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Zacek, G.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Bentvelsen, S.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Jong, P.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; O'Dell, V.; Tenner, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Honscheid, K.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Blair, G. A.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Daniels, D.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Luffman, P. E.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J.; Nath, C.; Quadt, A.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Abbiendi, G.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; de Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Iori, M.; Marini, G.; Mattioli, M.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Prytz, K.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; van Hook, M.; Hubbard, B.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Biltzinger, J.; Seifert, R. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nagira, T.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Nagayama, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Crombie, M. B.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Sampson, C. R.; Teuscher, R. J.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Kochocki, J.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Charchula, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprazak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Eisenberg, Y.; Glasman, C.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Shapira, A.; Ali, I.; Behrens, B.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Loveless, R. J.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Tsurugai, T.; Bhadra, S.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.

    1995-12-01

    A search for excited states of the standard model fermions was performed using the ZEUS detector at the HERA electron-proton collider, operating at a centre of mass energy of 296 GeV. In a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.55 pb-1, no evidence was found for any resonant state decaying into final states composed of a fermion and a gauge boson. Limits on the coupling strength times branching ratio of excited fermions are presented for masses between 50 GeV and 250 GeV, extending previous search regions significantly.

  17. Metal-enhanced chemiluminescence: Radiating plasmons generated from chemically induced electronic excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Mustafa H.; Aslan, Kadir; Malyn, Stuart N.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2006-04-01

    In this letter, we report the observation of metal-enhanced chemiluminescence. Silver Island films, in close proximity to chemiluminescence species, can significantly enhance luminescence intensities; a 20-fold increase in chemiluminescence intensity was observed as compared to an identical control sample containing no silver. This suggests the use of silver nanostructures in the chemiluminescence-based immunoassays used in the biosciences today, to improve signal and therefore analyte detectability. In addition, this finding suggests that surface plasmons can be directly excited by chemically induced electronically excited luminophores, a significant finding toward our understanding of fluorophore-metal interactions and the generation of surface plasmons.

  18. Cross Sections for Electron-impact Excitation of Electronic States in Atoms and Molecules -Application Examples of the BEf-scaling model in Optically-allowed Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hidetoshi

    2012-10-01

    The differential cross section (DCS) and integral cross section (ICS) measurements of electron-impact electronic excitation for noble gases were reported by many groups. Unfortunately, despite all these endeavours, if we were to characterize the level of agreement between these studies, then we could only conclude that it remains ``patchy'' at best. Hence, we report measurements of DCS and ICS for electron-impact excitation of the lowest electronic states in noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe), and compare with results from a scaled Born cross section (BEf-scaling). We have previously found for the He atom and a number of molecules, including H2, O2, CO, H2O, CO2, N2O and C6H6 that the BEf-scaling approach, for calculating ICSs for dipole-allowed electronic-state transitions, can lead to a very accurate description of the various scattering processes from threshold to 2000 eV [1]. Exceptions to this general statement have only been found in those cases where resonance effects due to the temporary capture of the incident electron by the target and contamination from an accidentally degenerate or near-degenerate triplet state have arisen. Our results for noble gases will be presented in detail at the conference.[4pt] [1] H. Kato et al., NIFS Research Report, NIFS-DATA-108, 1 (2009).

  19. Influence of environment induced correlated fluctuations in electronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer dynamics in model photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F.

    2012-03-01

    Two-dimensional photon-echo experiments indicate that excitation energy transfer between chromophores near the reaction center of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides occurs coherently with decoherence times of hundreds of femtoseconds, comparable to the energy transfer time scale in these systems. The original explanation of this observation suggested that correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies, driven by large scale protein motions could result in long lived coherent energy transfer dynamics. However, no significant site energy correlation has been found in recent molecular dynamics simulations of several model light harvesting systems. Instead, there is evidence of correlated fluctuations in site energy-electronic coupling and electronic coupling-electronic coupling. The roles of these different types of correlations in excitation energy transfer dynamics are not yet thoroughly understood, though the effects of site energy correlations have been well studied. In this paper, we introduce several general models that can realistically describe the effects of various types of correlated fluctuations in chromophore properties and systematically study the behavior of these models using general methods for treating dissipative quantum dynamics in complex multi-chromophore systems. The effects of correlation between site energy and inter-site electronic couplings are explored in a two state model of excitation energy transfer between the accessory bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in a reaction center system and we find that these types of correlated fluctuations can enhance or suppress coherence and transfer rate simultaneously. In contrast, models for correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies show enhanced coherent dynamics but necessarily show decrease in excitation energy transfer rate accompanying such coherence enhancement. Finally, for a three state model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen light

  20. Nonadiabtic electron dynamics in densely quasidegenerate states in highly excited boron cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    Following the previous study on nonadiabatic reaction dynamics including boron clusters [T. Yonehara and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A520 (2012)], we explore deep into highly excited electronic states of the singlet boron cluster (B12) to find the characteristic features of the densely quasi-degenerate electronic state manifold, which undergo very frequent nonadiabatic transitions and thereby intensive electronic state mixing among very many of the relevant states. So much so, isolating the individual adiabatic states and tracking the expected potential energy surfaces both lose the physical sense. This domain of molecular situation is far beyond the realm of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. To survey such a violent electronic state-mixing, we apply a method of nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics, the semiclassical Ehrenfest method. We have tracked those electron wavepackets and found the electronic state mixing looks like an ultrafast diffusion in the Hilbert space, which results in huge fluctuation. Furthermore, due to such a violent mixing, the quantum phases associated with the electronic states are swiftly randomized, and consequently the coherence among the electronic states are lost quickly. Besides, these highly excited states are mostly of highly poly-radical nature, even in the spin singlet manifold and the number of radicals amounts up to 10 electrons in the sense of unpaired electrons. Thus the electronic states are summarized to be poly-radical and decoherent with huge fluctuation in shorter time scales of vibrational motions. The present numerical study sets a theoretical foundation for unknown molecular properties and chemical reactivity of such densely quasi-degenerate chemical species.

  1. Electron Attachment in Low-Energy Electron Elastic Collisions with Au and Pt Atoms: Identification of Excited Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Eure, A.; Felfli, Z.; Sokolovski, D.

    2009-11-01

    The recent Regge-pole methodology has been benchmarked [1] on the accurately measured binding energies of the excited Ge= and Sn= anions [2] through the binding energies (BEs) extracted from the Regge-pole calculated elastic total cross sections (TCSs). Here the methodology is applied together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential that incorporates the vital core polarization interaction to investigate the possibility of forming excited Au= and Pt= anions in low-energy electron elastic collisions with Au and Pt atoms. From the positions of the characteristic extremely narrow resonances in the total cross sections, we extract the binding energies of the excited Au= and Pt= anions formed as Regge resonances during the collisions. The angular life of the complexes thus formed is used to differentiate the stable excited bound states of the anions from the shape resonances [3]. The BEs for the excited Au= and Pt= anions are found to be 0.475eVand 0.543eV, respectively, challenging both theory and experiment to verify. [1] A. Msezane et al, Phys. Rev. A, Submitted (2009) [2] M. Scheer et al, Phys. Rev. A 58, 2844 (1998) [3] Z. Felfli et al, Phys. Rev. A 79, 012714 (2009)

  2. Scalable Methods for Electronic Excitations and Optical Responses in Nanostructures: Mathematics to Algorithms to Observables

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Chelikowsky

    2009-03-31

    The work reported here took place at the University of Minnesota from September 15, 2003 to November 14, 2005. This funding resulted in 10 invited articles or book chapters, 37 articles in refereed journals and 13 invited talks. The funding helped train 5 PhD students. The research supported by this grant focused on developing theoretical methods for predicting and understanding the properties of matter at the nanoscale. Within this regime, new phenomena occur that are characteristic of neither the atomic limit, nor the crystalline limit. Moreover, this regime is crucial for understanding the emergence of macroscopic properties such as ferromagnetism. For example, elemental Fe clusters possess magnetic moments that reside between the atomic and crystalline limits, but the transition from the atomic to the crystalline limit is not a simple interpolation between the two size regimes. To capitalize properly on predicting such phenomena in this transition regime, a deeper understanding of the electronic, magnetic and structural properties of matter is required, e.g., electron correlation effects are enhanced within this size regime and the surface of a confined system must be explicitly included. A key element of our research involved the construction of new algorithms to address problems peculiar to the nanoscale. Typically, one would like to consider systems with thousands of atoms or more, e.g., a silicon nanocrystal that is 7 nm in diameter would contain over 10,000 atoms. Previous ab initio methods could address systems with hundreds of atoms whereas empirical methods can routinely handle hundreds of thousands of atoms (or more). However, these empirical methods often rely on ad hoc assumptions and lack incorporation of structural and electronic degrees of freedom. The key theoretical ingredients in our work involved the use of ab initio pseudopotentials and density functional approaches. The key numerical ingredients involved the implementation of algorithms for

  3. Addressing the electronic properties of III-V nanowires by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, M.

    2017-02-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been attracting an increasing interest in the scientific community. This is due to their peculiar filamentary shape and nanoscale diameter, which renders them versatile and cost-effective components of novel technological devices and also makes them an ideal platform for the investigation of a variety of fascinating physical effects. Absorption spectroscopy is a powerful and non-destructive technique able to provide information on the physical properties of the NWs. However, standard absorption spectroscopy is hard to perform in NWs, because of their small volume and the presence of opaque substrates. Here, we demonstrate that absorption can be successfully replaced by photoluminescence excitation (PLE). First, the use of polarization-resolved PLE to address the complex and highly-debated electronic band structure of wurtzite GaAs and InP NWs is shown. Then, PLE is used as a statistically-relevant method to localize the presence of separate wurtzite and zincblende NWs in the same InP sample. Finally, a variety of resonant exotic effects in the density of states of In x Ga1-x As/GaAs core/shell NWs are highlighted by high-resolution PLE. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. D. This project is part of the Journal of Physics’ series 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Marta De Luca was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. D as a Leader.

  4. Photoionization of Co+ and electron-impact excitation of Co2 + using the Dirac R-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyndall, N. B.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Ballance, C. P.; Hibbert, A.

    2016-11-01

    Modelling of massive stars and supernovae (SNe) plays a crucial role in understanding galaxies. From this modelling we can derive fundamental constraints on stellar evolution, mass-loss processes, mixing, and the products of nucleosynthesis. Proper account must be taken of all important processes that populate and depopulate the levels (collisional excitation, de-excitation, ionization, recombination, photoionization, bound-bound processes). For the analysis of Type Ia SNe and core collapse SNe (Types Ib, Ic and II) Fe group elements are particularly important. Unfortunately little data is currently available and most noticeably absent are the photoionization cross-sections for the Fe-peaks which have high abundances in SNe. Important interactions for both photoionization and electron-impact excitation are calculated using the relativistic Dirac atomic R-matrix codes (DARC) for low-ionization stages of Cobalt. All results are calculated up to photon energies of 45 eV and electron energies up to 20 eV. The wavefunction representation of Co III has been generated using GRASP0 by including the dominant 3d7, 3d6[4s, 4p], 3p43d9 and 3p63d9 configurations, resulting in 292 fine structure levels. Electron-impact collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths across a wide range of astrophysically relevant temperatures are computed for Co III. In addition, statistically weighted level-resolved ground and metastable photoionization cross-sections are presented for Co II and compared directly with existing work.

  5. Excitation energies and potential energy curves for the 19 excited electronic terms of CH: Efficiency examination of the multireference first-order polarization propagator approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, Alexey O.; Khrustov, Vladimir F.; Stepanov, Nikolay F.

    2013-11-01

    The attainability of a uniform precision level for estimates of electronic transition characteristics through the multireference first-order polarization propagator approximation (MR-FOPPA) was examined under extension of a basis set, using the CH ion as an example. The transitions from the ground electronic state to the 19 excited electronic terms were considered. Balanced approximations for (i) transition energies to the studied excited states and (ii) forms and relative dispositions of their potential energy curves were attained in the 3-21G and 6-311G (d,p) basis sets. In both the basis sets, a balanced approximation for the corresponding transition moments was not achieved.

  6. Inelastic electron and Raman scattering from the collective excitations in quantum wires: Zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2013-04-01

    The nanofabrication technology has taught us that an m-dimensional confining potential imposed upon an n-dimensional electron gas paves the way to a quasi-(n-m)-dimensional electron gas, with m ⩽ n and 1 ⩽ n, m ⩽ 3. This is the road to the (semiconducting) quasi-n dimensional electron gas systems we have been happily traversing on now for almost two decades. Achieving quasi-one dimensional electron gas (Q-1DEG) [or quantum wire(s) for more practical purposes] led us to some mixed moments in this journey: while the reduced phase space for the scattering led us believe in the route to the faster electron devices, the proximity to the 1D systems left us in the dilemma of describing it as a Fermi liquid or as a Luttinger liquid. No one had ever suspected the potential of the former, but it took quite a while for some to convince the others on the latter. A realistic Q-1DEG system at the low temperatures is best describable as a Fermi liquid rather than as a Luttinger liquid. In the language of condensed matter physics, a critical scrutiny of Q-1DEG systems has provided us with a host of exotic (electronic, optical, and transport) phenomena unseen in their higher- or lower-dimensional counterparts. This has motivated us to undertake a systematic investigation of the inelastic electron scattering (IES) and the inelastic light scattering (ILS) from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wires. We begin with the Kubo's correlation functions to derive the generalized dielectric function, the inverse dielectric function, and the Dyson equation for the dynamic screened potential in the framework of Bohm-Pines' random-phase approximation. These fundamental tools then lead us to develop methodically the theory of IES and ILS for the Q-1DEG systems. As an application of the general formal results, which know no bounds regarding the subband occupancy, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum [comprised of intrasubband and

  7. Electron-impact ionization cross sections out of the ground and excited states of cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Lukomski, M.; Sutton, S.; Kedzierski, W.; Reddish, T. J.; Bartschat, K.; Bartlett, P. L.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.; McConkey, J. W.

    2006-09-15

    An atom trapping technique for determining absolute, total ionization cross sections (TICS) out of an excited atom is presented. The unique feature of our method is in utilizing Doppler cooling of neutral atoms to determine ionization cross sections. This fluorescence-monitoring experiment, which is a variant of the 'trap loss' technique, has enabled us to obtain the experimental electron impact ionization cross sections out of the Cs state between 7 eV and 400 eV. CCC, RMPS, and Born theoretical results are also presented for both the ground and excited states of cesium and rubidium. In the low energy region (<11 eV) where best agreement between these excited state measurements and theory might be expected, a discrepancy of approximately a factor of five is observed. Above this energy there are significant contributions to the TICS from both autoionization and multiple ionization.

  8. Monitoring coherent electron wave packet excitation dynamics by two-color attosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a method to monitor coherent electron wave packet (CEWP) excitation dynamics with two-color attosecond laser pulses. Simulations are performed on aligned H2+ by numerically solving the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation with combinations of a resonant linearly polarized λl= 100/70 nm pump pulse and a circularly polarized λc=5 nm attosecond probe pulse. It is found that time dependent diffraction patterns in molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions (MFPADs) produced by the circular probe pulse exhibit sensitivity to the molecular alignments and time-dependent geometry of the CEWPs during and after the coherent excitation between the ground and excited states induced by the linear pump pulse. The time dependent MFPADs are described by an ultrafast diffraction model for the ionization of the bound CEWPs.

  9. Search for nuclear excitation by electronic transition in {sup 235}U

    SciTech Connect

    Claverie, G.; Aleonard, M.M.; Chemin, J.F.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Harston, M.R.; Malka, G.; Scheurer, J.N.; Morel, P.; Meot, V.

    2004-10-01

    We have searched for the nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) of the isomeric level at 76 eV in {sup 235}U in a plasma induced by a YAG laser with an energy of 1 Joule and a full width at half maximum time distribution of 5 ns, operating at an intensity of 10{sup 13} W cm{sup -2}. We present a thorough description of the experimental conditions and analysis of our data. In this experimental situation we do not detect any excitation of the isomeric level, a result that is at variance with a previously reported one. An upper limit of 6x10{sup -6} per atom and per second averaged over the laser-pulse width has been set on the nuclear excitation rate. This value is compared with results obtained in previous experimental and theoretical works.

  10. Electron impact excitation of atomic oxygen - Revised cross sections. [in thermosphere and auroral substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipf, E. C.; Erdman, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Revised cross-section values for the excitation of three O I resonance transitions at 1304, 1027, and 989 A, by electron impact on atomic oxygen are presented from threshold to 300 eV. These results are smaller than the excitation cross sections used in some airglow models by a factor of about 2.8. The revised values are in good agreement with recent quantum-scattering calculations. The downward revision is required by new laboratory studies in which the direct and dissociative cross sections for 1304 A excitation were normalized with small probable error to the O and O2 ionization cross sections. The results also reflect new advances in VUV optical calibration techniques. A number of outstanding airglow problems are simplified by these revisions.

  11. Coherent and Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Graphene Surface Plasmon Polarirons Excited by Cyclotron Electron Beam

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tao; Gong, Sen; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Liu, Diwei; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinran; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Peiheng; Liu, Shenggang

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation can revolutionize modern science and technology. To this date, it remains big challenges to develop intense, coherent and tunable THz radiation sources that can cover the whole THz frequency region either by means of only electronics (both vacuum electronics and semiconductor electronics) or of only photonics (lasers, for example, quantum cascade laser). Here we present a mechanism which can overcome these difficulties in THz radiation generation. Due to the natural periodicity of 2π of both the circular cylindrical graphene structure and cyclotron electron beam (CEB), the surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) dispersion can cross the light line of dielectric, making transformation of SPPs into radiation immediately possible. The dual natural periodicity also brings significant excellences to the excitation and the transformation. The fundamental and hybrid SPPs modes can be excited and transformed into radiation. The excited SPPs propagate along the cyclotron trajectory together with the beam and gain energy from the beam continuously. The radiation density is enhanced over 300 times, up to 105 W/cm2. The radiation frequency can be widely tuned by adjusting the beam energy or chemical potential. This mechanism opens a way for developing desired THz radiation sources to cover the whole THz frequency regime. PMID:26525516

  12. Coherent and Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Graphene Surface Plasmon Polarirons Excited by Cyclotron Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tao; Gong, Sen; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Liu, Diwei; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinran; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Peiheng; Liu, Shenggang

    2015-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation can revolutionize modern science and technology. To this date, it remains big challenges to develop intense, coherent and tunable THz radiation sources that can cover the whole THz frequency region either by means of only electronics (both vacuum electronics and semiconductor electronics) or of only photonics (lasers, for example, quantum cascade laser). Here we present a mechanism which can overcome these difficulties in THz radiation generation. Due to the natural periodicity of 2π of both the circular cylindrical graphene structure and cyclotron electron beam (CEB), the surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) dispersion can cross the light line of dielectric, making transformation of SPPs into radiation immediately possible. The dual natural periodicity also brings significant excellences to the excitation and the transformation. The fundamental and hybrid SPPs modes can be excited and transformed into radiation. The excited SPPs propagate along the cyclotron trajectory together with the beam and gain energy from the beam continuously. The radiation density is enhanced over 300 times, up to 105 W/cm2. The radiation frequency can be widely tuned by adjusting the beam energy or chemical potential. This mechanism opens a way for developing desired THz radiation sources to cover the whole THz frequency regime.

  13. R-matrix electron-impact excitation data for the Be-like iso-electronic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Menchero, L.; Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2014-06-01

    Aims: Emission lines from ions in the Be-like isoelectronic sequence can be used for reliable diagnostics of temperature and density of astrophysical and fusion plasmas over a wide range of temperatures. Surprisingly, interpolated data is all that is available for a number of astrophysically important ions. Methods: We have carried out intermediate coupling frame transformation R-matrix calculations which include a total of 238 fine-structure levels in both the configuration interaction target and close-coupling collision expansions. These arise from the configurations 1s2 2 {s, p} nl with n = 3-7, and l = 0-4 for n ≤ 5 and l = 0-2 for n = 6,7. Results: We obtain ordinary collision strengths and Maxwell-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of all the ions of the Be-like sequence, from B+ to Zn26+. We compare with previous R-matrix calculations and interpolated values for some benchmark ions. We find good agreement for transitions n = 2-2 with previous R-matrix calculations but some disagreements with interpolated values. We also find good agreement for the most intense transitions n = 2-3 which contribute via cascade to the (n = 2) diagnostic radiating levels. These data are made available in the archives of APAP via http://www.apap-network.org and OPEN-ADAS via http://open.adas.ac.uk

  14. Electron cloud density measurements in accelerator beam-pipe using resonant microwave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, John P.; Carlson, Benjamin T.; Duggins, Danielle O.; Hammond, Kenneth C.; De Santis, Stefano; Tencate, Alister J.

    2014-08-01

    An accelerator beam can generate low energy electrons in the beam-pipe, generally called electron cloud, that can produce instabilities in a positively charged beam. One method of measuring the electron cloud density is by coupling microwaves into and out of the beam-pipe and observing the response of the microwaves to the presence of the electron cloud. In the original technique, microwaves are transmitted through a section of beam-pipe and a change in EC density produces a change in the phase of the transmitted signal. This paper describes a variation on this technique in which the beam-pipe is resonantly excited with microwaves and the electron cloud density calculated from the change that it produces in the resonant frequency of the beam-pipe. The resonant technique has the advantage that measurements can be localized to sections of beam-pipe that are a meter or less in length with a greatly improved signal to noise ratio.

  15. Electronic excitation of molecules in solution calculated using the symmetry-adapted cluster–configuration interaction method in the polarizable continuum model

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Ryoichi Ehara, Masahiro

    2015-12-31

    The effects from solvent environment are specific to the electronic states; therefore, a computational scheme for solvent effects consistent with the electronic states is necessary to discuss electronic excitation of molecules in solution. The PCM (polarizable continuum model) SAC (symmetry-adapted cluster) and SAC-CI (configuration interaction) methods are developed for such purposes. The PCM SAC-CI adopts the state-specific (SS) solvation scheme where solvent effects are self-consistently considered for every ground and excited states. For efficient computations of many excited states, we develop a perturbative approximation for the PCM SAC-CI method, which is called corrected linear response (cLR) scheme. Our test calculations show that the cLR PCM SAC-CI is a very good approximation of the SS PCM SAC-CI method for polar and nonpolar solvents.

  16. Experimental and computational studies on the electronic excited states of nitrobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnakumar, Sunanda; Das, Asim Kumar; Singh, Param Jeet; Shastri, Aparna; Rajasekhar, B. N.

    2016-11-01

    The gas phase electronic absorption spectrum of nitrobenzene (C6H5NO2) in the 4.5-11.2 eV region is recorded using synchrotron radiation with a view to comprehend the nature of the excited states. Electronic excited states of nitrobenzene are mainly classified as local excitations within the benzene ring or nitro group and charge transfer excitations between the benzene and nitro group, with some transitions showing percentage from both. The nature of molecular orbitals, their orderings and energies are obtained from density functional theory calculations which help in assigning partially assigned/unassigned features in earlier photoelectron spectroscopy studies. Optimized geometry of ionic nitrobenzene predicts redistribution of charge density in the benzene ring rather than the nitro group resulting in stabilization of the benzene ring π orbitals in comparison to the neutral molecule. Time dependent density functional theory computations are found to describe the experimental spectra well with respect to energies, relative intensities and nature of the observed transitions in terms of valence, Rydberg or charge transfer type. New insights into the interpretation of 1B2u←1A1g and 1B1u←1A1g shifted benzene transitions in light of the present computational calculations are presented. The first few members of the ns, np and nd type Rydberg series in nitrobenzene, converging to the first six ionization potentials, identified in the spectra as weak but sharp peaks are reported for the first time. In general, transitions to the lowest three unoccupied molecular orbitals 4b1, 3a2 and 5b1 are valence or charge transfer in nature, while excitations to higher orbitals are predominantly Rydberg in nature. This work presents a consolidated experimental study and theoretical interpretation of the electronic absorption spectrum of nitrobenzene.

  17. Ultrafast nonradiative dynamics in electronically excited hexafluorobenzene by femtosecond time-resolved mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studzinski, Harald; Zhang, Song; Wang, Yanmei; Temps, Friedrich

    2008-04-01

    The fast nonradiative decay dynamics of the lowest two excited ππ * electronic states (S2 and S3) of hexafluorobenzene have been investigated by using femtosecond time-resolved time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The molecules were excited at wavelengths between 265nm⩾λpump⩾217nm and probed by four- and three-photon ionization at λprobe=775nm. The observed temporal profiles exhibit two exponential decay times (τ1=0.54-0.1ps and τ2=493-4.67ps, depending on the excitation wavelength) and a superimposed coherent oscillation with vibrational frequency νosc=97cm-1 and damping time τD that is two to three times longer than the respective τ1. The first decay component (τ1) is assigned to rapid radiationless transfer from the excited optically bright ππ * electronic state (S2 or S3, respectively) through a conical intersection (CI) to the lower-lying optically dark πσ * state (S1) of the molecule; the second component (τ2) is attributed to the subsequent slower relaxation from the S1 state back to the electronic ground state (S0). τ2 dramatically decreases with increasing vibronic excitation energy up to the CI connecting the πσ * with the S0 state. The coherent oscillation is identified as nuclear motion along the out-of-plane vibration ν16a (notation as for benzene), which has e2u symmetry and acts as coupling mode between the ππ * and πσ * states.

  18. Crossover of Feshbach Resonances to Shape-Type Resonances in Electron-Hydrogen Atom Excitation with a Screened Coulomb Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Songbin; Wang Jianguo; Janev, R. K.

    2010-01-15

    The effects of Coulomb interaction screening on electron-hydrogen atom excitation in the n=2 threshold region are investigated by using the R-matrix method with pseudostates. The interaction screening lifts the l degeneracy of n=2 Coulomb energy level, producing two distinct thresholds for 2s and 2p states. The phenomenon of transformation of {sup 1,3}P and {sup 1}D Feshbach resonances into shape-type resonances is observed when they pass across the 2s and 2p threshold, respectively, as the interaction screening increases. It is shown that this resonance transformation leads to dramatic effects in the 1s->2s and 1s->2p excitation collision strengths in the n=2 threshold collision energy region.

  19. Control of the electronic phase of a manganite by mode-selective vibrational excitation.

    PubMed

    Rini, Matteo; Tobey, Ra'anan; Dean, Nicky; Itatani, Jiro; Tomioka, Yasuhide; Tokura, Yoshinori; Schoenlein, Robert W; Cavalleri, Andrea

    2007-09-06

    Controlling a phase of matter by coherently manipulating specific vibrational modes has long been an attractive (yet elusive) goal for ultrafast science. Solids with strongly correlated electrons, in which even subtle crystallographic distortions can result in colossal changes of the electronic and magnetic properties, could be directed between competing phases by such selective vibrational excitation. In this way, the dynamics of the electronic ground state of the system become accessible, and new insight into the underlying physics might be gained. Here we report the ultrafast switching of the electronic phase of a magnetoresistive manganite via direct excitation of a phonon mode at 71 meV (17 THz). A prompt, five-order-of-magnitude drop in resistivity is observed, associated with a non-equilibrium transition from the stable insulating phase to a metastable metallic phase. In contrast with light-induced and current-driven phase transitions, the vibrationally driven bandgap collapse observed here is not related to hot-carrier injection and is uniquely attributed to a large-amplitude Mn-O distortion. This corresponds to a perturbation of the perovskite-structure tolerance factor, which in turn controls the electronic bandwidth via inter-site orbital overlap. Phase control by coherent manipulation of selected metal-oxygen phonons should find extensive application in other complex solids--notably in copper oxide superconductors, in which the role of Cu-O vibrations on the electronic properties is currently controversial.

  20. The Particle-Hole Map: A Computational Tool To Visualize Electronic Excitations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghui; Ullrich, Carsten A

    2015-12-08

    We introduce the particle-hole map (PHM), which is a visualization tool to analyze electronic excitations in molecules in the time or frequency domain, to be used in conjunction with time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) or other ab initio methods. The purpose of the PHM is to give detailed insight into electronic excitation processes that is not obtainable from local visualization methods, such as transition densities, density differences, or natural transition orbitals. The PHM is defined as a nonlocal function of two spatial variables and provides information about the origins, destinations, and connections of charge fluctuations during an excitation process; it is particularly valuable to analyze charge-transfer excitonic processes. In contrast with the transition density matrix, the PHM has a statistical interpretation involving joint probabilities of individual states and their transitions; it satisfies several sum rules and exact conditions, and it is easier to read and interpret. We discuss and illustrate the properties of the PHM and give several examples and applications to excitations in one-dimensional model systems, in a hydrogen chain, and in a benzothiadiazole (BT)-based molecule.

  1. Triplet excited states of cyclic disulfides and related compounds: electronic structures, geometries, energies, and decay.

    PubMed

    Ginagunta, Saroja; Bucher, Götz

    2011-02-03

    We have performed a computational study on the properties of a series of heterocycles bearing two adjacent heteroatoms, focusing on the structures and electronic properties of their first excited triplet states. If the heteroatoms are both heavy chalcogens (S, Se, or Te) or isoelectronic species, then the lowest excited triplet state usually has (π*, σ*) character. The triplet energies are fairly low (30-50 kcal mol(-1)). The (π*, σ*) triplet states are characterized by a significantly lengthened bond between the two heteroatoms. Thus, in 1,2-dithiolane (1b), the S-S bond length is calculated to be 2.088 Å in the singlet ground state and 2.568 Å in the first triplet excited state. The spin density is predicted to be localized almost exclusively on the sulfur atoms. Replacing one heavy chalcogen atom by an oxygen atom or an NR group results in a significant destabilization of the (π*, σ*) triplet excited state, which then no longer is lower in energy than an open-chain biradical. The size of the heterocyclic ring also contributes to the stability of the (π*, σ*) triplet state, with five-membered rings being more favorable than six-membered rings. Benzoannulation, finally, usually lowers the energy of the (π*, σ*) triplet excited states. If one of the heteroatoms is an oxygen or nitrogen atom, however, the corresponding lowest triplet states are better described as σ,π-biradicals.

  2. Two-Photon Study on the Electronic Interactions between the First Excited Singlet States in Carotenoid-Tetrapyrrole Dyads

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Pen-Nan; Pillai, Smitha; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; Walla, Peter J.

    2011-03-22

    Electronic interactions between the first excited states (S1) of carotenoids (Car) of different conjugation lengths (8-11 double bonds) and phthalocyanines (Pc) in different Car-Pc dyad molecules were investigated by two-photon spectroscopy and compared with Car S1-chlorophyll (Chl) interactions in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes (LHCs). The observation of Chl/Pc fluorescence after selective two-photon excitation of the Car S1 state allowed sensitive monitoring of the flow of energy between Car S1 and Pc or Chl. It is found that two-photon excitation excites to about 80% to 100% exclusively the carotenoid state Car S1 and that only a small fraction of direct tetrapyrrole two-photon excitation occurs. Amide-linked Car-Pc dyads in tetrahydrofuran demonstrate a molecular gear shift mechanism in that effective Car S1 → Pc energy transfer is observed in a dyad with 9 double bonds in the carotenoid, whereas in similar dyads with 11 double bonds in the carotenoid, the Pc fluorescence is strongly quenched by Pc → Car S1 energy transfer. In phenylamino-linked Car-Pc dyads in toluene extremely large electronic interactions between the Car S1 state and Pc were observed, particularly in the case of a dyad in which the carotenoid contained 10 double bonds. This observation together with previous findings in the same system provides strong evidence for excitonic Car S1-Pc Qy interactions. Very similar results were observed with photosynthetic LHC II complexes in the past, supporting an important role of such interactions in photosynthetic down-regulation.

  3. The contribution of electron collisions to rotational excitations of cometary water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Xingfa; Mumma, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The e-H2O collisional rate for exciting rotational transitions in cometary water is evaluated for conditions found in comet Halley during the Giotto spacecraft encounter. In the case of the O(sub 00) yields 1(sub 11) rotational transition, the e-H2O collisional rate exceeds that for excitation by neutral-neutral collisions at distances exceeding 3000 km from the cometary nucleus. Thus, the rotational temperature of the water molecule in the intermediate coma may be controlled by collisions with electrons rather than with neutral collisions, and the rotational temperature retrieved from high resolution infrared spectra of water in comet Halley may reflect electron temperatures rather than neutral gas temperature in the intermediate coma.

  4. On large amplitude motions of simplest amides in the ground and excited electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukachev, N. V.; Bataev, V. A.; Godunov, I. A.

    2016-12-01

    For the formamide, acetamide, N-methylformamide and N-methylacetamide molecules in the ground (S0) and lowest excited singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) electronic states equilibrium geometry parameters, harmonic vibrational frequencies, barriers to conformational transitions and conformer energy differences were estimated by means of MP2, CCSD(T), CASSCF, CASPT2 and MRCI ab initio methods. One-, two- and three-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) sections corresponding to different large amplitude motions (LAM) were calculated by means of MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ (S0) and CASPT2/cc-pVTZ (S1,T1). For these molecules, in each excited electronic state six minima were found on 2D PES sections. Using PES sections, different anharmonic vibrational problems were solved and the frequencies of large amplitude vibrations were determined.

  5. Electron doping evolution of the magnetic excitations in NaFe1-xCoxAs

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Scott V.; Zhang, Chenglin; Song, Yu; Tan, Guotai; Li, Yu; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Perring, T. G.; Dai, Pengcheng

    2016-06-13

    We use time-of-flight (TOF) inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy to investigate the doping dependence of magnetic excitations across the phase diagram of NaFe1-xCoxAs with x = 0, 0.0175, 0.0215, 0.05, and 0.11. The effect of electron-doping by partially substituting Fe by Co is to form resonances that couple with superconductivity, broaden and suppress low energy (E 80 meV) spin excitations compared with spin waves in undoped NaFeAs. However, high energy (E > 80 meV) spin excitations are weakly Co-doping dependent. Integration of the local spin dynamic susceptibility "(!) of NaFe1-xCoxAs reveals a total fluctuating moment of 3.6 μ2 B/Fe and a small but systematic reduction with electron doping. The presence of a large spin gap in the Cooverdoped nonsuperconducting NaFe0.89Co0.11As suggests that Fermi surface nesting is responsible for low-energy spin excitations. These results parallel Ni-doping evolution of spin excitations in BaFe2-xNixAs2, confirming the notion that low-energy spin excitations coupling with itinerant electrons are important for superconductivity, while weakly doping dependent high-energy spin excitations result from localized moments.

  6. Excitation, ionization, and electron capture cross sections for collisions of Li{sup 3+} with ground state and excited hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, I. Yan, J.; Sato, H.; Kimura, M.; Janev, R.K.; Kato, T.

    2008-03-15

    Using the available experimental and theoretical data, as well as the established cross section scaling relationships, a comprehensive cross section database for excitation, ionization and electron capture in collisions of Li{sup 3+} ions with ground state and excited hydrogen atoms has been generated. The critically assessed cross sections are represented by analytic fit functions that have the correct asymptotic behavior both at low and high collision energies. The derived cross sections are also presented in graphical form.

  7. Role of higher excited electronic states on high harmonic generation in H2(+)--a time-independent Hermitian Floquet approach.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Chitrakshya; Bhattacharyya, S S; Saha, Samir

    2011-01-14

    We have theoretically studied the role of high-lying molecular electronic states on the high harmonic generation (HHG) in H(2)(+) within the framework of a time-independent Hermitian nonperturbative three-dimensional Floquet technique for continuous wave monochromatic lasers of intensities of 2.59 × 10(13), 4.0 × 10(13), and 5.6 × 10(13) W∕cm(2), and wavelengths of 1064, 532, and 355 nm. To evaluate the HHG spectra, the resonance Floquet quasienergy and the Fourier components of the Floquet state corresponding to the initial vibrational-rotational level v = 0, J = 0 have been computed by solving the time-independent close-coupled Schrödinger equation following the Floquet method. The calculations include seven molecular electronic states in the basis set expansion of the Floquet state. The electronic states considered, apart from the two lowest 1sσ(g) and 2pσ(u) states, are 2pπ(u), 2sσ(g), 3pσ(u), 3dσ(g), and 4fσ(u). All the concerned higher excited molecular electronic states asymptotically degenerate into the atomic state H(2 l) with l = 0, 1. The computations reveal signature of significant oscillations in the HHG spectra due to the interference effect of the higher molecular electronic states for all the considered laser intensities and wavelengths. We have attempted to explain, without invoking any ionization, the dynamics of HHG in H(2)(+) within the framework of electronic transitions due to the electric dipole moments and the nuclear motions on the field coupled ground, the first and the higher excited electronic states of this one-electron molecular ion.

  8. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds.

  9. Polarized pump--probe spectroscopy of electronic excitation transport in photosynthetic antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, W.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Polarized pump--probe spectroscopy was performed with 1.5--2 psec resolution on the bacteriochlorophyll a protein antenna complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii and on native and enriched photosystem I particles from spinach. The resulting photobleaching profiles reflect the details of singlet electronic-excitation transport in these photosynthetic antennas, in which the pigments are complexed by proteins into clusters of five or more chromophores.

  10. Differential effects of plasma membrane electric excitation on H+ fluxes and photosynthesis in characean cells.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Kamzolkina, Natalia A

    2006-10-01

    Cells of characean algae exposed to illumination arrange plasma-membrane H(+) fluxes and photosynthesis in coordinated spatial patterns (bands). This study reveals that H(+) transport and photosynthesis patterns in these excitable cells are affected not only by light conditions but also by electric excitation of the plasma membrane. It is shown that generation of action potential (AP) temporally eliminates alkaline bands, suppresses O(2) evolution, and differentially affects primary reactions of photosystem II (PSII) in different cell regions. The quantum yield of PSII electron transport decreased after AP in the alkaline but not in acidic cell regions. The effects of electric excitation on fluorescence and the PSII electron flow were most pronounced at light-limiting conditions. Evidence was obtained that the shift in chlorophyll fluorescence after AP is due to the increase in DeltapH at thylakoid membranes. It is concluded that the AP-triggered pathways affecting ion transport and photosynthetic energy conversion are linked but not identical.

  11. Initial mechanisms for the unimolecular decomposition of electronically excited bisfuroxan based energetic materials.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bing; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2017-01-07

    Unimolecular decomposition of energetic molecules, 3,3'-diamino-4,4'-bisfuroxan (labeled as A) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-bisfuroxan (labeled as B), has been explored via 226/236 nm single photon laser excitation/decomposition. These two energetic molecules, subsequent to UV excitation, create NO as an initial decomposition product at the nanosecond excitation energies (5.0-5.5 eV) with warm vibrational temperature (1170 ± 50 K for A, 1400 ± 50 K for B) and cold rotational temperature (<55 K). Initial decomposition mechanisms for these two electronically excited, isolated molecules are explored at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF(12,12)/6-31G(d)) level with and without MP2 correction. Potential energy surface calculations illustrate that conical intersections play an essential role in the calculated decomposition mechanisms. Based on experimental observations and theoretical calculations, NO product is released through opening of the furoxan ring: ring opening can occur either on the S1 excited or S0 ground electronic state. The reaction path with the lowest energetic barrier is that for which the furoxan ring opens on the S1 state via the breaking of the N1-O1 bond. Subsequently, the molecule moves to the ground S0 state through related ring-opening conical intersections, and an NO product is formed on the ground state surface with little rotational excitation at the last NO dissociation step. For the ground state ring opening decomposition mechanism, the N-O bond and C-N bond break together in order to generate dissociated NO. With the MP2 correction for the CASSCF(12,12) surface, the potential energies of molecules with dissociated NO product are in the range from 2.04 to 3.14 eV, close to the theoretical result for the density functional theory (B3LYP) and MP2 methods. The CASMP2(12,12) corrected approach is essential in order to obtain a reasonable potential energy surface that corresponds to the observed decomposition behavior of these

  12. The electronic structure of VO in its ground and electronically excited states: A combined matrix isolation and quantum chemical (MRCI) study

    SciTech Connect

    Hübner, Olaf; Hornung, Julius; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2015-07-14

    The electronic ground and excited states of the vanadium monoxide (VO) molecule were studied in detail. Electronic absorption spectra for the molecule isolated in Ne matrices complement the previous gas-phase spectra. A thorough quantum chemical (multi-reference configuration interaction) study essentially confirms the assignment and characterization of the electronic excitations observed for VO in the gas-phase and in Ne matrices and allows the clarification of open issues. It provides a complete overview over the electronically excited states up to about 3 eV of this archetypical compound.

  13. Production of O2 on icy satellites by electronic excitation of low-temperature water ice.

    PubMed

    Sieger, M T; Simpson, W C; Orlando, T M

    1998-08-06

    The signature of condensed molecular oxygen has been reported in recent optical-reflectance measurements of the jovian moon Ganymede, and a tenuous oxygen atmosphere has been observed on Europa. The surfaces of these moons contain large amounts of water ice, and it is thought that O2 is formed by the sputtering of ice by energetic particles from the jovian magnetosphere. Understanding how O2 might be formed from low-temperature ice is crucial for theoretical and experimental simulations of the surfaces and atmospheres of icy bodies in the Solar System. Here we report laboratory measurements of the threshold energy, cross-section and temperature dependence of O2 production by electronic excitation of ice in vacuum, following electron-beam irradiation. Molecular oxygen is formed by direct excitation and dissociation of a stable precursor molecule, rather than (as has been previously thought) by diffusion and chemical recombination of precursor fragments. The large cross-section for O2 production suggests that electronic excitation plays an important part in the formation of O2 on Ganymede and Europa.

  14. Calculations of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEET) in nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, P.; Meot, V.; Gosselin, G.; Faussurier, G.; Blancard, C.

    2010-03-15

    The nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEET) process may occur when the energy differences between two nuclear levels and between two electronic states are nearly equal, provided the quantum selection rules are fulfilled. These resonant conditions drastically limit the number of possible candidates, even though thermodynamic conditions encountered in hot dense plasmas do modify the orbital electronic binding energy and the resonance conditions. {sup 201}Hg, with a low-lying isomeric state located at 1.565 keV, can be excited by NEET process in a laser-created plasma. However, its correct calculation requires nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) atomic physics treatment because current laser-created plasmas do not reach high-enough temperature in the area at LTE. In this article, we describe the calculation leading to an estimated excitation rate and discuss the influence of LTE/non-LTE physics with an average-atom model and the use of a Gaussian variance calculation to estimate the broadening around the mean energy mismatch.

  15. Nonlocal electron kinetics and densities of excited atoms in S and P striations

    PubMed

    Golubovskii; Kozakov; Maiorov; Behnke; Behnke

    2000-08-01

    A numerical solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation involving elastic and inelastic collisions as well as spatial gradients along the electric field is obtained for the experimentally measured fields in S and P striations. The peculiarities of formation of the distribution function are analyzed. They are connected with the displacements of one distinctive peak in the electron distribution function (EDF) for S striations or two peaks for P striations in accordance with the resonance trajectories. A descriptive model is constructed for the processes of excitation of neon 2p(5)3s and 2p(5)3p atomic states and ionization in striations. The presence of phase shifts between ionization rate and electron density is shown, which can cause ionization wave propagation. Measurements and calculations of the excited state densities are carried out for different striation phases. Comparison of theory and spectroscopic measurements shows a good description of fast electrons by the distribution function in striations. Comparison of theory and probe measurements of the distribution function shows that the main features of the EDF in an energy range below the excitation threshold are experimentally observed.

  16. Differential cross sections for intermediate-energy electron scattering from α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol: Excitation of electronic-states

    SciTech Connect

    Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Thorn, P. A.; Pettifer, Z.; Duque, H. V.; Silva, G. B. da; Limão-Vieira, P.; Duflot, D.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; and others

    2014-07-14

    We report on measurements of differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of Rydberg electronic-states in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). The energy range of these experiments was 20–50 eV, while the scattered electron was detected in the 10°–90° angular range. There are currently no other experimental data or theoretical computations against which we can directly compare the present measured results. Nonetheless, we are able to compare our THFA DCSs with earlier cross section measurements for Rydberg-state electronic excitation for tetrahydrofuran, a similar cyclic ether, from Do et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144302 (2011)]. In addition, “rotationally averaged” elastic DCSs, calculated using our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction approach are also reported. Those latter results give integral cross sections consistent with the optical theorem, and supercede those from the only previous study of Milosavljević et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 40, 107 (2006)].

  17. Electronic excitations of the H:Si(001)-(2x1) monohydride surface: First-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Nengping; Rohlfing, Michael; Krueger, Peter; Pollmann, Johannes

    2006-10-15

    We investigate electronic excitations of the H:Si(001)-(2x1) monohydride surface using first-principles approaches. Density-functional theory is used to calculate the ground-state geometry of the system. The quasiparticle band structure is calculated within the GW approximation. Taking the electron-hole interaction into account, electron-hole pair states and optical excitations are obtained from the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the electron-hole two-particle Green's function. In this work we focus, in particular, on localized excitations of the silicon-hydrogen bonds at the surface layer. These excitations give rise to an outward-directed force on the hydrogen atoms, which may well explain their optically induced desorption from the surface as observed in recent experiments. The localization of the excitation is described by an artificial confinement potential in addition to standard many-body perturbation theory.

  18. Electron-induced excitation of vibrations of Ce atoms inside a C80 cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stróżecka, A.; Muthukumar, K.; Larsson, J. A.; Dybek, A.; Dennis, T. J. S.; Mysliveček, J.; Voigtländer, B.

    2011-04-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of Ce2@C80 dimetallofullerenes reveals a low-energy inelastic excitation that is interpreted using ab initio calculations and associated with the movements of encapsulated Ce atoms inside the C80 cage. The electron-vibration interaction in Ce2@C80 is unusually high, inducing a pronounced zero-bias anomaly in differential conductance of Ce2@C80. Our observations show that the atoms encapsulated in fullerene cages can actively participate in determining the properties of molecular junctions.

  19. Surface waves of high amplitude excited by relativistic electron beam on plasma boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanova, S. N.; Reshetnikova, K. A.; Dankov, P. I.; Ivanov, S. T.

    1984-06-01

    The equilibrium state of a relativistic electron beam and a surface EM-wave of large amplitude on the beam-plasma boundary is analysed in hydrodynamic approximation. Taking into consideration the law of conversion of energy, the phase velocity, the wave amplitude, the efficiency of transformation of the kinetic energy into the energy of electromagnetic field and the distribution of the energy of a beam transferred to a system have been obtained. This energy is expended both on excitation of a surface wave and on plasma electrons oscillations.

  20. Enhancement of Curie temperature of barium hexaferrite by dense electronic excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manju; Kashyap, Subhash C.; Gupta, Hem C.; Dimri, Mukesh C.; Asokan, K.

    2014-07-15

    Curie temperature of polycrystalline barium hexaferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}), prepared by conventional solid state technique, is anomalously and significantly enhanced (by nearly 15%) by energetic heavy ion irradiation (150 MeV, Ag{sup 12+}) at ambient temperature due to dense electronic excitations Moderate fluence (1 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) induces structural defects giving rise to above enhancement. As established by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman studies, higher fluence (1 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}) has structurally transformed the sample to amorphous phase with marginal change in magnetization and Curie temperature.

  1. Dissociative attachment of electrons to vibronically excited SO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.V.K.; Ashoka, V.S.; Krishnakumar, E.

    2004-11-01

    Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to vibronically excited SO{sub 2} in the Clements' band in the 288 to 298 nm region has been studied. The O{sup -} ion yield, to a first approximation, follows the photo absorption spectrum in this range indicating the DEA process to be independent of the vibrational levels in this band. This is in contrast to what is generally observed for vibrational level dependence from the electronic ground state. The current measurements also do not show any qualitative change in the dissociative attachment process due to change of symmetry as one moves from the peaks to the valleys of the Clements band.

  2. Exotic radiation from a photonic crystal excited by an ultrarelativistic electron beam.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, N; Ochiai, T; Inoue, J; Segawa, Y; Shibata, Y; Ishi, K; Kondo, Y; Kanbe, M; Miyazaki, H; Hinode, F; Yamaguti, S; Ohtaka, K

    2006-11-01

    We report the observation of an exotic radiation (unconventional Smith-Purcell radiation) from a one-dimensional photonic crystal. The physical origin of the exotic radiation is direct excitation of the photonic bands by an ultrarelativistic electron beam. The spectrum of the exotic radiation follows photonic bands of a certain parity, in striking contrast to the conventional Smith-Purcell radiation, which shows solely a linear dispersion. Key ingredients for the observation are the facts that the electron beam is in an ultrarelativistic region and that the photonic crystal is finite. The origin of the radiation was identified by comparison of experimental and theoretical results.

  3. Detecting excitation and magnetization of individual dopants in a semiconductor two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Jens

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic atoms doped into a semiconductor are the building blocks for bottom up spintronic and quantum logic devices. They also provide model systems for the investigation of fundamental effects. In order to correlate the dopant's atomic structure with its magnetism magnetically sensitive techniques with atomic resolution are a prerequisite. Here, I show electrical excitation and read-out [ 1 ] of single magnetic dopant associated spins in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) confined to a semiconductor surface [ 2 ] using spin-resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy [ 3 ] . I will review our real-space study of the quantum Hall transition in the 2DEG [ 2 ] and of the magnetic properties of the dopants [ 1 ] . Finally, I will demonstrate that the dopant serves as an atomic scale probe for local magnetometry of the 2DEG. This work was done in collaboration with A. A. Khajetoorians, B. Chillian, S. Schuwalow, F. Lechermann, K. Hashimoto, C. Sohrmann, T. Inaoka, F. Meier, Y. Hirayama, R. A. Römer, M. Morgenstern, and R. Wiesendanger. [ 1 ] A. A. Khajetoorians et al., Nature 467, 1084 (2010). [ 2 ] K. Hashimoto et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 256802 (2008). [ 3 ] J. Wiebe et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 4871 (2004). We acknowledge financial support from ERC Advanced Grant ``FURORE'', by the DFG via SFB668 and GrK1286, and by the city of Hamburg via the cluster of excellence ``Nanospintronics''.

  4. R-matrix electron-impact excitation data for astrophysically abundant sulphur ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, G. Y.; Badnell, N. R.; Zhao, G.; Zhong, J. Y.; Wang, F. L.

    2011-09-01

    We present results for the electron-impact excitation of highly-charged sulphur ions (S8+-S11+) obtained using the intermediate-coupling frame transformation R-matrix approach. A detailed comparison of the target structure has been made for the four ions to assess the uncertainty on collision strengths from the target structure. Effective collision strengths (Υs) are presented at temperatures ranging from 2 × 102(z + 1)2 K to 2 × 106(z + 1)2 K (where z is the residual charge of ions). Detailed comparisons for the Υs are made with the results of previous calculations for these ions, which will pose insight on the uncertainty in their usage by astrophysical and fusion modelling codes. Data are available in the archives of APAP via http://www.apap-network.org, and OPEN-ADAS via http://open.adas.ac.uk. Data and full Tables 5 and 6 are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/533/A87

  5. Resonant electron emission of silver spheroids induced by laser surface plasmon excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monchicourt, P.; Raynaud, M.; Saringar, H.; Kupersztych, J.

    1997-07-01

    Laser excitation of surface plasmons on a silver granular surface has been studied as a function of light frequency. Both light absorption and electron emission have been measured by varying continuously the wavelength between 275 and 700 nm. Resonance effects at the Fröhlich frequencies of the silver spheroids are displayed and a correlation between absorption and emission is clearly exhibited. The lux - ampere characteristics performed at selected increasing wavelengths display slopes with integer orders, indicating that the emission process remains a photoeffect even in the presence of a surface-plasmon resonance. The photoemission process shows net switches of these slopes that turn from linear into quadratic and then cubic integer values. The position of the first switch yields 0953-8984/9/27/008/img1 eV for the work function of the granular surface. The position of the second switch defines the threshold energy for the two-photon emission process, which is found to differ significantly from the expected photon minimum energy 0953-8984/9/27/008/img2.

  6. Electron-hydrogen-atom elastic and inelastic scattering with screened Coulomb interaction around the n=2 excitation threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Songbin; Wang Jianguo; Janev, R. K.

    2010-03-15

    The effects of Coulomb interaction screening on electron-hydrogen-atom elastic and excitation scattering around the n=2 threshold have been investigated by using the R-matrix method with pseudostates. The elastic and excitation collision strengths show dramatic changes when the interaction screening length D varies from {infinity} to 3.8 a.u., as a result of the convergence of {sup 1,3}S Feshbach resonances to the varying 2s threshold and of the transformation of {sup 1,3}P and {sup 1}D Feshbach resonances into shape-type resonances when they pass across the 2s and 2p threshold at certain critical value of D, respectively [S. B. Zhang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 023203 (2010)]. The resonance parameters for a large number of D in the range D={infinity}-3.8 a.u. are presented. It is observed that the {sup 1,3}P and {sup 1}D resonance contributions to the elastic and excitation collision strengths decrease rapidly with decreasing D after the resonance passes the critical D value. The contribution of a {sup 1}S{sup e} Feshbach resonance to the elastic or excitation collision strength changes into a cusp after the resonance merges into its parent 2s state and immerses into the background with the further decrease of D.

  7. Superexchange coupling and electron transfer in globular proteins via polaron excitations.

    PubMed

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D; Ustitnin, M N

    1999-06-01

    The polaron approach is used to treat long-range electron transfers between globular proteins. A rate expression for the polaron transfer model is given along with a description of appropriate conditions for its use. Assuming that electrons transfer via a superexchange coupling due to a polaron excitation, we have estimated the distance dependence of the rate constant for the self-exchange reactions between globular proteins in solutions. The distance dependence of the polaron coupling and solvent reorganization energy are provided as a basis for understanding and interpreting a long-range electron transfer experiment. The difficulties and problems of the polaron treatment of long-range electron transfers are discussed, and suggestions for new experiments are made.

  8. Probing electron-phonon excitations in molecular junctions by quantum interference

    PubMed Central

    Bessis, C.; Della Rocca, M. L.; Barraud, C.; Martin, P.; Lacroix, J. C.; Markussen, T.; Lafarge, P.

    2016-01-01

    Electron-phonon coupling is a fundamental inelastic interaction in condensed matter and in molecules. Here we probe phonon excitations using quantum interference in electron transport occurring in short chains of anthraquinone based molecular junctions. By studying the dependence of molecular junction’s conductance as a function of bias voltage and temperature, we show that inelastic scattering of electrons by phonons can be detected as features in conductance resulting from quenching of quantum interference. Our results are in agreement with density functional theory calculations and are well described by a generic two-site model in the framework of non-equilibrium Green’s functions formalism. The importance of the observed inelastic contribution to the current opens up new ways for exploring coherent electron transport through molecular devices. PMID:26864735

  9. Runaway electron beams in the gas discharge for UV nitrogen laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Khomich, V. Yu.; Yamschikov, V. A.

    2011-12-15

    The review of the methods for obtaining the runaway electron beams in the gas discharge is performed. The new method is offered, using which the beam is first formed in a narrow gap ({approx}1 mm) between the cathode and the grid and then it is accelerated by the field of the plasma column of the anomalous self-sustained discharge in the main gap (10-20 mm long). The electron beams with an energy of about 10 keV and current density of 10{sup 3} A/cm{sup 2} at a molecular nitrogen pressure of up to 100 Torr have been obtained experimentally. The results of research of the UV nitrogen laser with an excitation via runaway electron beam and radiation of energy of {approx}1 mJ are given. The UV nitrogen laser generation with the energy of {approx}1 mJ has been obtained by the runaway electron beams.

  10. A TDDFT study on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT): excited-state equilibrium induced by electron density swing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Yang, Dapeng; Ren, Baiping; Wang, Dandan

    2013-07-01

    One important issue of current interest is the excited-state equilibrium for some ESITP dyes. However, so far, the information about the driving forces for excited-state equilibrium is very limited. In this work, the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method was employed to investigate the nature of the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The geometric structures, vibrational frequencies, frontier molecular orbitals (MOs) and the potential-energy curves for 1-hydroxy-11H-benzo[b]fluoren-11-one (HHBF) in the ground and the first singlet excited state were calculated. Analysis of the results shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond of HHBF is strengthened from E to E*. Moreover, it is found that electron density swing between the proton acceptor and donor provides the driving forces for the forward and backward ESIPT, enabling the excited-state equilibrium to be established. Furthermore, we proposed that the photoexcitation and the interchange of position for electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups are the main reasons for the electron density swing. The potential-energy curves suggest that the forward ESIPT and backward ESIPT may happen on the similar timescale, which is faster than the fluorescence decay of both E* and K* forms.

  11. Rotational and vibrational dynamics in the excited electronic state of deprotonated and protonated fluorescein studied by time-resolved photofragmentation in an ion trap

    PubMed Central

    Imanbaew, Dimitri; Gelin, Maxim F.; Riehn, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Excited state dynamics of deprotonated and protonated fluorescein were investigated by polarization dependent femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe photofragmentation in a 3D ion trap. Transients of deprotonated fluorescein exhibit vibrational wavepacket dynamics with weak polarization dependence. Transients of protonated fluorescein show only effects of molecular alignment and rotational dephasing. The time resolved rotational anisotropy of protonated fluorescein is simulated by the calculated orientational correlation function. The observed differences between deprotonated and protonated fluorescein are ascribed to their different higher lying electronically excited states and corresponding structures. This is partially supported by time-dependent density functional theory calculations of the excited state structures. PMID:27376104

  12. Energy loss in gas-surface dynamics: Electron-hole pair and phonon excitation upon adsorbate relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novko, D.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Juaristi, J. I.; Alducin, M.

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of electron and phonon degrees of freedom on the relaxation dynamics of adsorption processes in gas-surface systems by using ab initio molecular dynamics that incorporates an electronic friction force (AIMDEF). As representative cases we have chosen three systems with different adsorption energies and adsorbate-to-surface atom mass ratios: H on Pd(1 0 0), N on Ag(1 1 1), and N2 on Fe(1 1 0). We show, through inspection of the total energies and trajectories of the hot adsorbates on the surface, that electron-hole (e-h) pair excitations dominate relaxation of the light gas species, while the phonon channel is dominant for the heavy species. In the latter case e-h pairs become more important at the final thermalization stages.

  13. Effect of Turbulence Modeling on an Excited Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Hixon, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The flow dynamics in a high-speed jet are dominated by unsteady turbulent flow structures in the plume. Jet excitation seeks to control these flow structures through the natural instabilities present in the initial shear layer of the jet. Understanding and optimizing the excitation input, for jet noise reduction or plume mixing enhancement, requires many trials that may be done experimentally or computationally at a significant cost savings. Numerical simulations, which model various parts of the unsteady dynamics to reduce the computational expense of the simulation, must adequately capture the unsteady flow dynamics in the excited jet for the results are to be used. Four CFD methods are considered for use in an excited jet problem, including two turbulence models with an Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver, one Large Eddy Simulation (LES) solver, and one URANS/LES hybrid method. Each method is used to simulate a simplified excited jet and the results are evaluated based on the flow data, computation time, and numerical stability. The knowledge gained about the effect of turbulence modeling and CFD methods from these basic simulations will guide and assist future three-dimensional (3-D) simulations that will be used to understand and optimize a realistic excited jet for a particular application.

  14. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The research program of Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom, ion-ion, and ion-molecule collisions. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-core interaction can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. Winter has focussed on intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), in which many electron states are strongly coupled during the collision and a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. Alston has concentrated on higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies), or asymmetric collision systems, for which the coupling of the projectile is weaker with, however, many more target states being coupled together so that high-order perturbation theory is essential. Several calculations by Winter and Alston are described, as set forth in the original proposal.

  15. Dynamics of electron solvation in methanol: Excited state relaxation and generation by charge-transfer-to-solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2015-06-21

    The charge-transfer-to-solvent dynamics (CTTS) and excited state relaxation mechanism of the solvated electron in methanol are studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on a liquid methanol microjet by means of two-pulse and three-pulse experiments. In the two-pulse experiment, CTTS excitation is followed by a probe photoejection pulse. The resulting time-evolving photoelectron spectrum reveals multiple time scales characteristic of relaxation and geminate recombination of the initially generated electron which are consistent with prior results from transient absorption. In the three-pulse experiment, the relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron following electronic excitation are measured. The internal conversion lifetime of the excited electron is found to be 130 ± 40 fs, in agreement with extrapolated results from clusters and the non-adiabatic relaxation mechanism.

  16. Evaluating Electronic Couplings for Excited State Charge Transfer Based on Maximum Occupation Method ΔSCF Quasi-Adiabatic States.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junzi; Zhang, Yong; Bao, Peng; Yi, Yuanping

    2017-02-14

    Electronic couplings of charge-transfer states with the ground state and localized excited states at the donor/acceptor interface are crucial parameters for controlling the dynamics of exciton dissociation and charge recombination processes in organic solar cells. Here we propose a quasi-adiabatic state approach to evaluate electronic couplings through combining maximum occupation method (mom)-ΔSCF and state diabatization schemes. Compared with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using global hybrid functional, mom-ΔSCF is superior to estimate the excitation energies of charge-transfer states; moreover it can also provide good excited electronic state for property calculation. Our approach is hence reliable to evaluate electronic couplings for excited state electron transfer processes, which is demonstrated by calculations on a typical organic photovoltaic system, oligothiophene/perylenediimide complex.

  17. Electronic Excited States in Amorphous MEH-PPV Polymers from Large-Scale First Principles Calculations.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haibo; Qin, Ting; Troisi, Alessandro

    2014-03-11

    The electronic excited states of amorphous polymeric semiconductor MEH-PPV are investigated by first principles quantum chemical calculations based on trajectories from classical molecular dynamics simulations. We inferred an average conjugation length of ∼5-7 monomers for lowest vertical excitations of amorphous MEH-PPV at room temperature and verified that the normal definition of a chromophore in a polymer based on purely geometric "conjugation breaks" is not always valid in amorphous polymers and a rigorous definition can be only on the basis of the evaluation of the polymer excited state wave function. The charge transfer character is observed to be nearly invariant for all excited states in low energy window while the exciton delocalization extent is found to increase with energy. The interchain excitonic couplings for amorphous MEH-PPV are shown to be usually smaller than 10 meV suggesting that the transport mechanism across chain can be described by incoherent hopping. All these observations about the energetic and spatial distribution of the excitons in polymer as well as their couplings provide important qualitative insights and useful quantitative information for constructing a realistic model for exciton migration dynamics in amorphous polymer materials.

  18. Resonant Transfer Excitation Followed by Auger-Electron Emission for Ne-like Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, G.; Moussa, Ali H.; Ramadan, H.

    2005-03-17

    In ion-atom (I/A) collision, resonant transfer excitation followed by Auger emission (RTEA) is a complementary process to resonant transfer excitation followed by X-rays (RTEX). In both processes positive ions are assumed to collide with molecular H2-target or atomic He-targets. RTEA and RTEX are related to the resonance excitation (RE) and dielectronic recombination (DR) in electron-ion collisions. The cross sections of RTEA and RE are related under the validity of the conditions of impulse approximation, in which the ionic projectiles must move with very high velocity. RTEA are calculated for Ne-like ions with L-shell excitation. The database generated for Auger and radiative decay rates in LS coupling scheme. RTEA processes proceed through formation of resonance R states. These R-states have a general form 2p5n1 l 1n2 l 2 ; n1 = 3, 4 and n2 {>=} 4. It is found that RTEA cross sections exhibit a one-peak behavior with a peak value 1.6 x 10-18 cm2 when it collides with H2 as a target. This peak value decreases to 0.488x10-18 cm2 in case of Se24+.

  19. Fast Nitrogen Atoms from Dissociative Excitation of N2 by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, Joseph M.; Ciocca, Marco

    1996-01-01

    The Doppler profiles of one of the fine structure lines of the N I (1200 A) g (sup 4)S(sup 0)-(sup 4)P multiplet and of the N II (1085 A) g (sup 3)p(sup O)-(sup 3)D multiplet have been measured. Excitation of the multiplets is produced by electron impact dissociative excitation of N2. The experimental line profiles are evaluated by fast Fourier transform (FFT) techniques and analysis of the profiles yields the kinetic energy distribution of fragments. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of N I (1200 A) increases from 27+/-6 mA at 30 eV to 37+/-4 mA at 100 eV as the emission cross section of the dissociative ionization excitation process becomes more important relative to the dissociative excitation process. The FWHM of the N II (1085 A) line is 36+/-4 mA at 100 eV. For each multiplet the kinetic energy distribution function of each of the two fragment N atoms (ions) is much broader than thermal with a mean energy above 1.0 eV. The dissociation process with the largest cross section is predissociation and predominantly produces N atoms with kinetic energy distributions having mean energies above 0.5 eV. Dissociative processes can lead to a substantial escape flux of N I atoms from the satellites, Titan and Triton of the outer planets.

  20. Electron-impact rotational and hyperfine excitation of HCN, HNC, DCN and DNC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Alexandre; Varambhia, Hemal N.; Stoecklin, Thierry; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2007-12-01

    Rotational excitation of isotopologues of HCN and HNC by thermal electron-impact is studied using the molecular R-matrix method combined with the adiabatic-nuclei-rotation approximation. Rate coefficients are obtained for electron temperatures in the range 5-6000 K and for transitions among all levels up to J = 8. Hyperfine rates are also derived using the infinite-order-sudden scaling method. It is shown that the dominant rotational transitions are dipole-allowed, that is, those for which ΔJ = 1. The hyperfine propensity rule ΔJ = ΔF is found to be stronger than that in the case of He-HCN collisions. For dipole-allowed transitions, electron-impact rates are shown to exceed those for excitation of HCN by He atoms by six orders of magnitude. As a result, the present rates should be included in any detailed population model of isotopologues of HCN and HNC in sources where the electron fraction is larger than 10-6, for example, in interstellar shocks and comets.