Science.gov

Sample records for electronic navigation

  1. Structure and navigation for electronic publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillinghast, John; Beretta, Giordano B.

    1998-01-01

    The sudden explosion of the World Wide Web as a new publication medium has given a dramatic boost to the electronic publishing industry, which previously was a limited market centered around CD-ROMs and on-line databases. While the phenomenon has parallels to the advent of the tabloid press in the middle of last century, the electronic nature of the medium brings with it the typical characteristic of 4th wave media, namely the acceleration in its propagation speed and the volume of information. Consequently, e-publications are even flatter than print media; Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet share the same computer screen with a home-made plagiarized copy of Deep Throat. The most touted tool for locating useful information on the World Wide Web is the search engine. However, due to the medium's flatness, sought information is drowned in a sea of useless information. A better solution is to build tools that allow authors to structure information so that it can easily be navigated. We experimented with the use of ontologies as a tool to formulate structures for information about a specific topic, so that related concepts are placed in adjacent locations and can easily be navigated using simple and ergonomic user models. We describe our effort in building a World Wide Web based photo album that is shared among a small network of people.

  2. The Development of an Electronic Aircraft Taxi Navigation Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andre, Anthony D.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an electronic aircraft taxi navigation display as part of NASA's Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Program. The impetus for the development of this specific display, and the TAP program as a whole, is the current bottleneck in surface operations experienced during low-visibility operations. Simply stated, while modern aircraft are equipped to fly and land in low-visibility conditions, they lack the related technology required to allow them to efficiently and safely navigation from the runway to the gate. Pilots under such conditions consequently taxi slower, sometimes get lost and have to stop, and occasionally collide with other aircraft. Based on a review of available display and navigation sensor technologies, and a one-year information requirements study conducted aboard several commercial aircraft flights, it was determined that an electronic aircraft taxi navigation display was the most viable option for improving the efficiency of low-visibility taxi operations. Based on flight deck observations and pilot interviews, previous map display research, other taxi map display efforts, and part-task taxi map research, an advanced taxi navigation display has been developed and is currently being tested. The taxi navigation display is presented as a head-down cockpit display and includes a track-up perspective airport surface view, taxiway, gate and runway labels, ownship position, traffic icons and collision annunciation, graphical route guidance, heading indicator, rotating compass, RVR wedge, stop bars, zoom control, and datalink message window. The development and support for each of the features will be discussed in detail. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Navigating the airport surface: Electronic vs. paper maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, Vernon M.; Harris, Randall L., Sr.; Hunt, Patricia J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advances in the Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) and ground/aircraft data-links provide a basis for the generation of an accurate cockpit navigational map display including data-linked ATC-cleared ground routes. Such an electronic map may have the potential to improve pilots' situation awareness and taxi performance and thereby lessen runway incursions. The objective of this simulator study was to assess the potential improvements in these areas when using an advanced electronic map (compared to using today's paper map) under two outside scene visibility levels. Results showed average taxi speed increased under both good and poor visibilities, by as much as 24 percent, due in part to eliminating the time used for orientation with the paper map. Pilots made only one-third as many errors as well and commented that they believed that the electronic map gave them better awareness.

  4. Digital waterway construction based on inland electronic navigation chart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue; Pan, Junfeng; Zhu, Weiwei

    2015-12-01

    With advantages of large capacity, long distance, low energy consumption, low cost, less land occupation and light pollution, inland waterway transportation becomes one of the most important constituents of the comprehensive transportation system and comprehensive water resources utilization in China. As one of "three elements" of navigation, waterway is the important basis for the development of water transportation and plays a key supporting role in shipping economic. The paper discuss how to realize the informatization and digitization of waterway management based on constructing an integrated system of standard inland electronic navigation chart production, waterway maintenance, navigation mark remote sensing and control, ship dynamic management, and water level remote sensing and report, which can also be the foundation of the intelligent waterway construction. Digital waterway construction is an information project and also has a practical meaning for waterway. It can not only meet the growing high assurance and security requirements for waterway, but also play a significant advantage in improving transport efficiency, reducing costs, promoting energy conservation and so on. This study lays a solid foundation on realizing intelligent waterway and building a smooth, efficient, safe, green modern inland waterway system, and must be considered as an unavoidable problem for the coordinated development between "low carbon" transportation and social economic.

  5. Study Navigator: An Algorithmically Generated Aid for Learning from Electronic Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Rakesh; Gollapudi, Sreenivas; Kannan, Anitha; Kenthapadi, Krishnaram

    2014-01-01

    We present "study navigator," an algorithmically-generated aid for enhancing the experience of studying from electronic textbooks. The study navigator for a section of the book consists of helpful "concept references" for understanding this section. Each concept reference is a pair consisting of a concept phrase explained…

  6. Electronic Literacies and TESOL Graduate Students from Korea: New Channels for Navigating Cultures of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skilton-Sylvester, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Drawing on the ethnography of communication, addresses the role of electronic channels for meaning making among Korean students in graduate TESOL classes in the United States. Looks at the ways that these electronic literacies provide opportunities for navigating Korean and U.S. cultures of learning. (Author/VWL)

  7. Users' Evaluations of Four Electronic Travel Aids Aimed at Navigation for Persons Who Are Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roentgen, Uta R.; Gelderblom, Gert Jan; de Witte, Luc P.

    2011-01-01

    Eighteen persons with visual impairments evaluated four systematically selected navigation systems. Their performance on 11 tasks, provided ratings, satisfaction on seven aspects of the assistive devices, and explanatory comments show generally valuable functionality and usability, as well as individual marked preferences for various features of…

  8. Incidental memory and navigation in panoramic virtual reality for electronic commerce.

    PubMed

    Howes, A; Miles, G E; Payne, S J; Mitchell, C D; Davies, A J

    2001-01-01

    Recently much effort has been dedicated to designing and implementing World Wide Web sites for virtual shopping and e-commerce. Despite this effort, relatively little empirical work has been done to determine the effectiveness with which different site designs sell products. We report three experiments in which participants were asked to search for products in various experimental e-commerce sites. Across the experiments participants were asked to search in either QTVR (QuickTime Virtual Reality), hypertext, or pictorially rich hypertext environments; they were then tested for their ability to recall the products seen and to recognize product locations. The experiments demonstrated that when using QTVR (Experiments 1, 2, and 3) or pictorial environments (Experiment 2), participants retained more information about products that were incidental to their goals. In two of the experiments it was shown that participants navigated more efficiently when using a QTVR environment. The costs and benefits of using 3D virtual environments for on-line shops are discussed. Actual or potential applications of this research include support for the development of e-commerce design guidelines. PMID:11592665

  9. Incidental memory and navigation in panoramic virtual reality for electronic commerce.

    PubMed

    Howes, A; Miles, G E; Payne, S J; Mitchell, C D; Davies, A J

    2001-01-01

    Recently much effort has been dedicated to designing and implementing World Wide Web sites for virtual shopping and e-commerce. Despite this effort, relatively little empirical work has been done to determine the effectiveness with which different site designs sell products. We report three experiments in which participants were asked to search for products in various experimental e-commerce sites. Across the experiments participants were asked to search in either QTVR (QuickTime Virtual Reality), hypertext, or pictorially rich hypertext environments; they were then tested for their ability to recall the products seen and to recognize product locations. The experiments demonstrated that when using QTVR (Experiments 1, 2, and 3) or pictorial environments (Experiment 2), participants retained more information about products that were incidental to their goals. In two of the experiments it was shown that participants navigated more efficiently when using a QTVR environment. The costs and benefits of using 3D virtual environments for on-line shops are discussed. Actual or potential applications of this research include support for the development of e-commerce design guidelines.

  10. Elin@: Electronic Library Information Navigator--Towards the "One Stop Shop" Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwerud, Anna; Jorgensen, Lotte

    2005-01-01

    Libraries subscribe to thousands of electronic journals and they are difficult for end-users to find. Journal and publisher interfaces and functionalities differ considerably. The recent development in e-media calls for central management of the resources. Lund University Libraries' Head Office has developed a service for presentation and…

  11. Finding One's Way in Electronic Space: The Relative Importance of Navigational Cues and Mental Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Stephen T.

    This examination of the effectiveness of various methods of cuing users to their location in a videotex information system used five different versions of an electronic edition of a college catalog: "simple" (no cues), "headers" (textual cues), "color" (color cues), "icons" (graphic cues), and "fancy" (textual, color, and graphic cues). The 99…

  12. Intraoperative Localization of Tantalum Markers for Proton Beam Radiation of Choroidal Melanoma by an Opto-Electronic Navigation System: A Novel Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Amstutz, Christoph A.; Bechrakis, Nikolaos E.; Foerster, Michael H.; Heufelder, Jens; Kowal, Jens H.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: External beam proton radiation therapy has been used since 1975 to treat choroidal melanoma. For tumor location determination during proton radiation treatment, surgical tantalum clips are registered with image data. This report introduces the intraoperative application of an opto-electronic navigation system to determine with high precision the position of the tantalum markers and their spatial relationship to the tumor and anatomical landmarks. The application of the technique in the first 4 patients is described. Methods and Materials: A navigated reference base was attached noninvasively to the eye, and a navigated pointer device was used to record the spatial position of the tantalum markers, the tumor, and anatomical landmarks. Measurement accuracy was assessed on ex vivo porcine eye specimen by repetitive recording of the tantalum marker positions. The method was applied intraoperatively on 4 patients undergoing routine tantalum clip surgery. The spatial position information delivered by the navigation system was compared to the geometric data generated by the EYEPLAN software. Results: In the ex vivo experiments, the maximum repetition error was 0.34 mm. For the intraoperative application, the root mean square error of paired-points matching of the marker positions from the navigation system and from the EYEPLAN software was 0.701-1.25 mm. Conclusions: Navigation systems are a feasible tool for accurate localization of tantalum markers and anatomic landmarks. They can provide additional geometric information, and therefore have the potential to increase the reliability and accuracy of external beam proton radiation therapy for choroidal melanoma.

  13. [Psychophysiological aspects of the color coding of pilot navigational information on onboard electronic displays].

    PubMed

    Oboznov, A A; Boiarskiĭ, A N; Buturlin, A I

    1986-01-01

    Psychophysiological characteristics of pilots were compared when they used a color or a black-and-white electronic indicator in simulating a landing approach on a pilot trainer. No significant differences were seen in the objective evaluations of the visual function or in the precision with which the prescribed flight profile was maintained. However, subjective preferences were given to the color indicator. When the task was more complex (simulation of the deviated landing course), the time spent on looking for significant symbols and on recovering the necessary course decreased, if the pilots used a color indicator. It is concluded that the use of a color indicator can be redundant in performing simple tasks and therefore indifferent for pilot activities but it can be useful in performing complicated tasks when the pilot has to make a precise and quick assessment of the situation.

  14. Navigating ethical issues with electronic health records in developmental-behavioral pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Britt A; Baum, Rebecca A; Soares, Neelkamal S

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of electronic health records (EHRs) allows for sharing of information across clinicians, quick access to laboratory results, and supports for documentation. However, this environment raises new issues of ethics and privacy, and it magnifies other issues that existed with paper records. In developmental-behavioral pediatrics (DBP) practice, which relies heavily on a team approach to blend pediatrics, mental health, and allied health, these issues are even more complicated. In this review, we highlight the ethical and privacy issues in DBP practice related to EHR use. Case examples illustrate the potential risks related to EHR access, confidentiality, and interprofessional collaboration. Suggestions to mitigate some of the ethical and privacy issues associated with EHRs at both an administrative level and a clinician level are included. With the expected increase in the adoption of EHRs by DBP clinicians in the near future, professional standards will need to be defined, and novel technological solutions may offer additional safeguards. Until then, professionals and organizations are responsible to uphold the standards of ethical practice while promoting effective information exchange to facilitate clinical care. PMID:23275058

  15. Coastal Piloting & Charting: Navigation 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osinski, Alison

    This curriculum guide for a beginning course on marine navigation describes marine navigation (the art of and science of determining position of a ship and its movement from one position to another in order to keep track of where the ship is and where it is going) and defines dead reckoning, piloting, electronic navigation, and celestial…

  16. Viking navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneil, W. J.; Rudd, R. P.; Farless, D. L.; Hildebrand, C. E.; Mitchell, R. T.; Rourke, K. H.; Euler, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the navigation of the Viking spacecraft throughout their flight from Earth launch to Mars landing is given. The flight path design, actual inflight control, and postflight reconstruction are discussed in detail. The preflight analyses upon which the operational strategies and performance predictions were based are discussed. The inflight results are then discussed and compared with the preflight predictions and, finally, the results of any postflight analyses are presented.

  17. INL Autonomous Navigation System

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-30

    The INL Autonomous Navigation System provides instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The system permits high-speed autonomous navigation including obstacle avoidance, waypoing navigation and path planning in both indoor and outdoor environments.

  18. The navigation of space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fliegel, H. F.; Ohandley, D. A.; Zielenbach, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A new navigational method combining electronic measurement procedures and celestial mechanics makes it possible to conduct a space probe very close to a desired point in the neighborhood of a remote planet. Approaches for the determination of the position of the space probe in space are discussed, giving attention to the effects of errors in the employed data. The application of the navigational methods in a number of space missions is also considered.

  19. Almanac services for celestial navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelmes, S.; Whittaker, J.

    2015-08-01

    Celestial navigation remains a vitally important back up to Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and relies on the use of almanac services. HM Nautical Almanac Office (HMNAO) provides a number of these services. The printed book, The Nautical Almanac, produced yearly and now available as an electronic publication, is continuously being improved, making use of the latest ideas and ephemerides to provide the user with their required data. HMNAO also produces NavPac, a software package that assists the user in calculating their position as well as providing additional navigational and astronomical tools. A new version of NavPac will be released in 2015 that will improve the user experience. The development of applications for mobile devices is also being considered. HMNAO continues to combine the latest improvements and theories of astrometry with the creation of books and software that best meet the needs of celestial navigation users.

  20. Evaluation of STOL navigation avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, W. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Research projects, including work on a vector magnetometer for aircraft attitude measurement, are summarized. The earth's electric field phenomena was investigated in its application to aircraft control and navigation. Research on electronic aircraft cabin noise suppression is reviewed and strapdown inertial reference unit technical support is outlined.

  1. Apollo Onboard Navigation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews basic navigation concepts, describes coordinate systems and identifies attitude determination techniques including Primary Guidance, Navigation and Control System (PGNCS) IMU management and Command and Service Module Stabilization and Control System/Lunar Module (LM) Abort Guidance System (AGS) attitude management. The presentation also identifies state vector determination techniques, including PGNCS coasting flight navigation, PGNCS powered flight navigation and LM AGS navigation.

  2. Dynamic Transportation Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Jidong

    Miniaturization of computing devices, and advances in wireless communication and sensor technology are some of the forces that are propagating computing from the stationary desktop to the mobile outdoors. Some important classes of new applications that will be enabled by this revolutionary development include intelligent traffic management, location-based services, tourist services, mobile electronic commerce, and digital battlefield. Some existing application classes that will benefit from the development include transportation and air traffic control, weather forecasting, emergency response, mobile resource management, and mobile workforce. Location management, i.e., the management of transient location information, is an enabling technology for all these applications. In this chapter, we present the applications of moving objects management and their functionalities, in particular, the application of dynamic traffic navigation, which is a challenge due to the highly variable traffic state and the requirement of fast, on-line computations.

  3. Microcomputers and astronomical navigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin-Jouan, Y.

    1996-04-01

    Experienced navigators remember ancient astronomical navigation and its limitations. Using microcomputers in small packages and selecting up-to-date efficient methods will overcome many of these limitations. Both features lead to focus on observations, and encourage an increase in their numbers. With no intention of competing with satellite navigation, sextant navigation in the open sea can then be accessed again by anybody. It can be considered for demonstrative use or as a complement to the GPS.

  4. 14 CFR 91.511 - Communication and navigation equipment for overwater operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Communication and navigation equipment for... Communication and navigation equipment for overwater operations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d... electronic navigation units capable of providing the pilot with the information necessary to navigate...

  5. 14 CFR 91.511 - Communication and navigation equipment for overwater operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Communication and navigation equipment for... Communication and navigation equipment for overwater operations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d... electronic navigation units capable of providing the pilot with the information necessary to navigate...

  6. 14 CFR 91.511 - Communication and navigation equipment for overwater operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Communication and navigation equipment for... Communication and navigation equipment for overwater operations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d... electronic navigation units capable of providing the pilot with the information necessary to navigate...

  7. 14 CFR 91.511 - Communication and navigation equipment for overwater operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Communication and navigation equipment for... Communication and navigation equipment for overwater operations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d... electronic navigation units capable of providing the pilot with the information necessary to navigate...

  8. 14 CFR 91.511 - Communication and navigation equipment for overwater operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Communication and navigation equipment for... Communication and navigation equipment for overwater operations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d... electronic navigation units capable of providing the pilot with the information necessary to navigate...

  9. Maps and navigation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, A

    1922-01-01

    Different maps and scales are discussed with particular emphasis on their use in aviation. The author makes the observation that current navigation methods are slow and dangerous and should be replaced by scientific methods of navigation based on loxodromy and the use of the compass.

  10. Navigator program risk management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessen, Randii R.; Padilla, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, program risk management as applied to the Navigator Program: In Search of New Worlds will be discussed. The Navigator Program's goals are to learn how planetary systems form and to search for those worlds that could or do harbor life.

  11. Celestial Navigation for the Novice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    What kinds of astronomical lab activities can introductory astronomy students carry out easily in daytime? The most impressive is the determination of their latitude and longitude from observations of the sun. The "shooting of a noon sight” and its "reduction to a position” is a technique still practiced by navigators in this age of GPS. Indeed, the U.S. Coast Guard exams for ocean-going licenses and include celestial navigation. These techniques continue to be used by the military and by private sailors as a backup to electronic navigation systems. We present a method to establish one's latitude and longitude to better than 30 miles from measurements of the sun's altitude that is easily within the capability non-science majors. This is a practical application of astronomy in use the world over. The streamlined method used is based on an easy-to-build protractor and string quadrant. Participants will leave with all materials to conduct this activity in their own classroom.

  12. Navigation lights color study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Jose G.; Alberg, Matthew T.

    2015-05-01

    The chromaticity of navigation lights are defined by areas on the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) 1931 chromaticity diagram. The corner coordinates for these areas are specified in the International Regulations for Prevention of Collisions at Sea, 1972 (72 COLREGS). The navigation light's color of white, red, green, and yellow are bounded by these areas. The chromaticity values specified by the COLREGS for navigation lights were intended for the human visual system (HVS). The HVS can determine the colors of these lights easily under various conditions. For digital color camera imaging systems the colors of these lights are dependent on the camera's color spectral sensitivity, settings, and color correction. At night the color of these lights are used to quickly determine the relative course of vessels. If these lights are incorrectly identified or there is a delay in identifying them this could be a potential safety of ship concern. Vessels that use camera imaging systems exclusively for sight, at night, need to detect, identify, and discriminate navigation lights for navigation and collision avoidance. The introduction of light emitting diode (LED) lights and lights with different spectral signatures have the potential to be imaged very differently with an RGB color filter array (CFA) color camera than with the human eye. It has been found that some green navigation lights' images appear blue verse green. This has an impact on vessels that use camera imaging systems exclusively for navigation. This paper will characterize color cameras ability to properly reproducing navigation lights' color and survey a set of navigation light to determine if they conform to the COLREGS.

  13. Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springford, Michael

    1997-03-01

    1. J. J. Thomson and the discovery of the electron A. B. P. Pippard; 2. The isolated electron W. N. Cottingham; 3. The relativistic electron D. I. Olive; 4. The electron glue B. L. Gyorffy; 5. The electron fluid P. Coleman; 6. The magnetic electron G. G. Lonzarich; 7. The paired electron A. J. Leggett; 8. The heavy electron M. Springford; 9. The coherent electron Y. Imry and M. Peskin; 10. The composite electron R. Nicholas; 11. The electron in the cosmos M. S. Longair.

  14. Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springford, Michael

    2008-12-01

    1. J. J. Thomson and the discovery of the electron A. B. P. Pippard; 2. The isolated electron W. N. Cottingham; 3. The relativistic electron D. I. Olive; 4. The electron glue B. L. Gyorffy; 5. The electron fluid P. Coleman; 6. The magnetic electron G. G. Lonzarich; 7. The paired electron A. J. Leggett; 8. The heavy electron M. Springford; 9. The coherent electron Y. Imry and M. Peskin; 10. The composite electron R. Nicholas; 11. The electron in the cosmos M. S. Longair.

  15. Navigation Systems for Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, B. J.; Kruecker, J.; Abi-Jaoudeh, N; Locklin, J.; Levy, E.; Xu, S.; Solbiati, L.; Kapoor, A.; Amalou, H.; Venkatesan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Navigation systems, devices and intra-procedural software are changing the way we practice interventional oncology. Prior to the development of precision navigation tools integrated with imaging systems, thermal ablation of hard-to-image lesions was highly dependent upon operator experience, spatial skills, and estimation of positron emission tomography-avid or arterial-phase targets. Numerous navigation systems for ablation bring the opportunity for standardization and accuracy that extends our ability to use imaging feedback during procedures. Existing systems and techniques are reviewed, and specific clinical applications for ablation are discussed to better define how these novel technologies address specific clinical needs, and fit into clinical practice. PMID:20656236

  16. Space shuttle navigation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, H. L.; Luders, G.; Matchett, G. A.; Sciabarrasi, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed analysis of space shuttle navigation for each of the major mission phases is presented. A covariance analysis program for prelaunch IMU calibration and alignment for the orbital flight tests (OFT) is described, and a partial error budget is presented. The ascent, orbital operations and deorbit maneuver study considered GPS-aided inertial navigation in the Phase III GPS (1984+) time frame. The entry and landing study evaluated navigation performance for the OFT baseline system. Detailed error budgets and sensitivity analyses are provided for both the ascent and entry studies.

  17. Spatial cognition and navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretz, Anthony J.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment that provides data for the development of a cognitive model of pilot flight navigation is described. The experiment characterizes navigational awareness as the mental alignment of two frames of reference: (1) the ego centered reference frame that is established by the forward view out of the cockpit and (2) the world centered reference frame that is established by the aircraft's location on a map. The data support a model involving at least two components: (1) the perceptual encoding of the navigational landmarks and (2) the mental rotation of the map's world reference frame into alignment with the ego centered reference frame. The quantitative relationships of these two factors are provided as possible inputs for a computational model of spatial cognition during flight navigation.

  18. Onboard Navigation Systems Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The space shuttle onboard navigation systems characteristics are described. A standard source of equations and numerical data for use in error analyses and mission simulations related to space shuttle development is reported. The sensor characteristics described are used for shuttle onboard navigation performance assessment. The use of complete models in the studies depend on the analyses to be performed, the capabilities of the computer programs, and the availability of computer resources.

  19. Testing Microwave Landing Systems With Satellite Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiriazes, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Less time and equipment needed to perform tests. Satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measures accuracy of microwave scanning-beam landing system (MSBLS) at airports used to support Shuttle landings. Provides time and three-dimensional information on position and velocity with unprecedented accuracy. Useful for testing other electronic navigation aids like LORAN, TACAN and microwave landing systems (MLS).

  20. Development of visual-display aid to air navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matcovich, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    The developments are discussed in the design of a liquid-crystal, visual display, air navigation aid, which uses two VOR signals to locate the aircraft. The system concepts, liquid crystal materials, stability tests, and the electronic system are described. It is concluded that a navigational aid of this type is technically feasible, but not at the projected low cost.

  1. 33 CFR 164.41 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 164.41 Section 164.41 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.41 Electronic...

  2. 33 CFR 164.41 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 164.41 Section 164.41 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.41 Electronic...

  3. 33 CFR 164.41 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 164.41 Section 164.41 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.41 Electronic...

  4. 33 CFR 164.41 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 164.41 Section 164.41 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.41 Electronic...

  5. Voyager navigation strategy and accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. B.; Mcdanell, J. P.; Bantell, M. H., Jr.; Chadwick, C.; Jacobson, R. A.; Miller, L. J.; Synnott, S. P.; Van Allen, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the prelaunch navigation studies conducted for the Mariner spacecraft launched toward encounters with the giant planets. The navigation system and the strategy for using this system are described. The requirements on the navigation system demanded by the goals of the project are mentioned, and the predicted navigational capability relative to each of the requirements is discussed. Baseline navigation results for three possible trajectories are analyzed.

  6. Aerocapture navigation at Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haw, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    A proposed Neptune orbiter Aerocapture mission will use solar electric propulsion to send an orbiter to Neptune. Navigation feasibility of direct-entry aerocapture for orbit insertion at Neptune is shown. The navigation strategy baselines optical imaging and (delta)VLBI measurement in order to satisfy the flight system's atmosphere entry flight path angle, which is targeted to enter Neptune with an entry flight path angle of -11.6 . Error bars on the entry flight path angle of plus/minus0.55 (3(sigma)) are proposed. This requirement can be satisfied with a data cutoff 3.2 days prior to arrival. There is some margin in the arrival template to tighten (i.e. reduce) the entry corridor either by scheduling a data cutoff closer to Neptune or alternatively, reducing uncertainties by increasing the fidelity of the optical navigation camera.

  7. Electromagnetically navigated laparoscopic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wilheim, Dirk; Feussner, Hubertus; Schneider, Armin; Harms, Jens

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) representation of laparoscopic ultrasound examinations could be helpful in diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy, but has not yet been realised with flexible laparoscopic ultrasound probes. Therefore, an electromagnetic navigation system was integrated into the tip of a conventional laparoscopic ultrasound probe. Navigated 3D laparoscopic ultrasound was compared with the imaging data of 3D navigated transcutaneous ultrasound and 3D computed tomography (CT) scan. The 3D CT scan served as the "gold standard". Clinical applicability in standardized operating room (OR) settings, imaging quality, diagnostic potential, and accuracy in volumetric assessment of various well-defined hepatic lesions were analyzed. Navigated 3D laparoscopic ultrasound facilitates exact definition of tumor location and margins. As compared with the "gold standard" of the 3D CT scans, 3D laparoscopic ultrasound has a tendency to underestimate the volume of the region of interest (ROI) (Delta3.1%). A comparison of 3D laparoscopy and transcutaneous 3D ultrasonography demonstrated clearly that the former is more accurate for volumetric assessment of the ROI and facilitates a more detailed display of the lesions. 3D laparoscopic ultrasound imaging with a navigated probe is technically feasible. The technique facilitates detailed ultrasound evaluation of laparoscopic procedures that involve visual, in-depth, and volumetric perception of complex liver pathologies. Navigated 3D laparoscopic ultrasound may have the potential to promote the practical role of laparoscopic ultrasonography, and become a valuable tool for local ablative therapy. In this article, our clinical experiences with a certified prototype of a 3D laparoscopic ultrasound probe, as well as its in vitro and in vivo evaluation, is reported.

  8. Methods of Optical Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, William M., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Optical navigation is the use of onboard imaging to aid in the determination of the spacecraft trajectory and of the targets' ephemerides. Opnav techniques provide a direct measurement of the direction from a spacecraft to target bodies. Opnav data thus complement both radiometric tracking data (for instance, Doppler and range) and the groundbased astrometry which is used to determine the a priori ephemeris of the targets. We present the geometry and camera models which form the mathematical basis for optical navigation and some of the image processing techniques by which one can extract the optical observables--that is, the sample and line coordinates of images--from pictures.

  9. Mariner 9 navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neil, W. J.; Jordan, J. F.; Zielenbach, J. W.; Wong, S. K.; Mitchell, R. T.; Webb, W. A.; Koskela, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    A final, comprehensive description of the navigation of Mariner 9-the first U.S. spacecraft to orbit another planet is provided. The Mariner 9 navigation function included not only precision flight path control but also pointing of the spacecraft's scientific instruments mounted on a two degree of freedom scan platform. To the extent appropriate, each section describes the perflight analyses on which the operational strategies and performance predictions were based. Inflight results are then discussed and compared with the preflight predictions. Postflight analyses, which were primarily concerned with developing a thorough understanding of unexpected in-flight results, are also presented.

  10. Navigation for everyday life

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, D.D.; Hammond, K.J.; Swain, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Past work in navigation has worked toward the goal of producing an accurate map of the environment. While no one can deny the usefulness of such a map, the ideal of producing a complete map becomes unrealistic when an agent is faced with performing real tasks. And yet an agent accomplishing recurring tasks should navigate more efficiently as time goes by. We present a system which integrates navigation, planning, and vision. In this view, navigation supports the needs of a larger system as opposed to being a task in its own right. Whereas previous approaches assume an unknown and unstructured environment, we assume a structured environment whose organization is known, but whose specifics are unknown. The system is endowed with a wide range of visual capabilities as well as search plans for informed exploration of a simulated store constructed from real visual data. We demonstrate the agent finding items while mapping the world. In repeatedly retrieving items, the agent`s performance improves as the learned map becomes more useful.

  11. Navigating between the Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleron, Julian F.; Ecke, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Generations have been inspired by Edwin A. Abbott's profound tour of the dimensions in his novella "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions" (1884). This well-known satire is the story of a flat land inhabited by geometric shapes trying to navigate the subtleties of their geometric, social, and political positions. In this article, the authors…

  12. Learning for autonomous navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Autonomous off-road navigation of robotic ground vehicles has important applications on Earth and in space exploration. Progress in this domain has been retarded by the limited lookahead range of 3-D sensors and by the difficulty of preprogramming systems to understand the traversability of the wide variety of terrain they can encounter.

  13. Galileo asteroid encounter navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, D. W.; Chodas, P. W.; Kallemeyn, P. H.

    1990-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft will be targeted to encounter one or more asteroids during its cruise to Jupiter. Accurate navigation will maximize science return from these asteroid flyby opportunities. Navigation errors for these encounters are dominated by uncertainties in the asteroid ephemeris, which is obtained from fits to ground-based observations. As the spacecraft approaches, on-board optical navigation dramatically improves knowledge of the spacecraft-relative asteroid position normal to the line of sight, while correlations in the asteroid ephemeris provide moderate improvement along the approach direction. The remaining uncertainty in encounter time can be further reduced only by improving the ground-based asteroid ephemeris. Uncertainties perpendicular to the line of sight can be reduced by improving the timing of optical navigation images and their placement with respect to the star background. At the closest approach to the asteroid Gaspra, the one-sigma errors in knowledge of the spacecraft position are less than 10 km in position and 25 seconds in encounter time.

  14. Nonlinear trajectory navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang H.

    Trajectory navigation entails the solution of many different problems that arise due to uncertain knowledge of the spacecraft state, including orbit prediction, correction maneuver design, and trajectory estimation. In practice, these problems are usually solved based on an assumption that linear dynamical models sufficiently approximate the local trajectory dynamics and their associated statistics. However, astrodynamics problems are nonlinear in general and linear spacecraft dynamics models can fail to characterize the true trajectory dynamics when the system is subject to a highly unstable environment or when mapped over a long time period. This limits the performance of traditional navigation techniques and can make it difficult to perform precision analysis or robust navigation. This dissertation presents an alternate method for spacecraft trajectory navigation based on a nonlinear local trajectory model and their statistics in an analytic framework. For a given reference trajectory, we first solve for the higher order Taylor series terms that describe the localized nonlinear motion and develop an analytic expression for the relative solution flow. We then discuss the nonlinear dynamical mapping of a spacecraft's probability density function by solving the Fokker-Planck equation for a deterministic system. From this result we derive an analytic method for orbit uncertainty propagation which can replicate Monte-Carlo simulations with the benefit of added flexibility in initial orbit statistics. Using this approach, we introduce the concept of the statistically correct trajectory where we directly incorporate statistical information about an orbit state into the trajectory design process. As an extension of this concept, we define a nonlinear statistical targeting method where we solve for a correction maneuver which intercepts the desired target on average. Then we apply our results to a Bayesian filtering problem to obtain a general filtering algorithm for

  15. Designing Navigation Support in Hypertext Systems Based on Navigation Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puntambekar, Sadhana; Stylianou, Agni

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present two studies designed to help students navigate effectively and learn from a hypertext system, CoMPASS. Our first study ("N" = 74) involved an analysis of students' navigation patterns to group them into clusters, using a "k"-means clustering technique. Based on this analysis, navigation patterns were grouped into four…

  16. Navigating the Library and Electronic Research Maze.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolums, Jill L.

    Despite increasing and widespread access to more information, finding published research, studies, and literature in the field of education and psychology has become more complex. This paper demonstrates how to access published literature in various formats, including books, journal articles, conference proceedings, lesson plans, media, Web sites,…

  17. Terrain-Adaptive Navigation Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmick, Daniel M.; Angelova, Anelia; Matthies, Larry H.; Helmick, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    A navigation system designed for a Mars rover has been designed to deal with rough terrain and/or potential slip when evaluating and executing paths. The system also can be used for any off-road, autonomous vehicles. The system enables vehicles to autonomously navigate different terrain challenges including dry river channel systems, putative shorelines, and gullies emanating from canyon walls. Several of the technologies within this innovation increase the navigation system s capabilities compared to earlier rover navigation algorithms.

  18. Self-navigating robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    Rangefinding equipment and onboard navigation system determine best route from point to point. Research robot has two TV cameras and laser for scanning and mapping its environment. Path planner finds most direct, unobstructed route that requires minimum expenditure of energy. Distance is used as measure of energy expense, although other measures such as time or power consumption (which would depend on the topography of the path) may be used.

  19. 33 CFR 2.36 - Navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial waters. 2.36 Section 2.36 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL JURISDICTION Jurisdictional Terms § 2.36 Navigable waters of the United States, navigable...

  20. Multisensor robot navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persa, Stelian; Jonker, Pieter P.

    2002-02-01

    Almost all robot navigation systems work indoors. Outdoor robot navigation systems offer the potential for new application areas. The biggest single obstacle to building effective robot navigation systems is the lack of accurate wide-area sensors for trackers that report the locations and orientations of objects in an environment. Active (sensor-emitter) tracking technologies require powered-device installation, limiting their use to prepared areas that are relative free of natural or man-made interference sources. The hybrid tracker combines rate gyros and accelerometers with compass and tilt orientation sensor and DGPS system. Sensor distortions, delays and drift required compensation to achieve good results. The measurements from sensors are fused together to compensate for each other's limitations. Analysis and experimental results demonstrate the system effectiveness. The paper presents a field experiment for a low-cost strapdown-IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit)/DGPS combination, with data processing for the determination of 2-D components of position (trajectory), velocity and heading. In the present approach we have neglected earth rotation and gravity variations, because of the poor gyroscope sensitivities of our low-cost ISA (Inertial Sensor Assembly) and because of the relatively small area of the trajectory. The scope of this experiment was to test the feasibility of an integrated DGPS/IMU system of this type and to develop a field evaluation procedure for such a combination.

  1. A randomised controlled trial of a consumer-focused e-health strategy for cardiovascular risk management in primary care: the Consumer Navigation of Electronic Cardiovascular Tools (CONNECT) study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Redfern, Julie; Usherwood, T; Harris, M F; Rodgers, A; Hayman, N; Panaretto, K; Chow, C; Lau, A Y S; Neubeck, L; Coorey, G; Hersch, F; Heeley, E; Patel, A; Jan, S; Zwar, N; Peiris, D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Fewer than half of all people at highest risk of a cardiovascular event are receiving and adhering to best practice recommendations to lower their risk. In this project, we examine the role of an e-health-assisted consumer-focused strategy as a means of overcoming these gaps between evidence and practice. Consumer Navigation of Electronic Cardiovascular Tools (CONNECT) aims to test whether a consumer-focused e-health strategy provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-indigenous adults, recruited through primary care, at moderate-to-high risk of a cardiovascular disease event will improve risk factor control when compared with usual care. Methods and analysis Randomised controlled trial of 2000 participants with an average of 18 months of follow-up to evaluate the effectiveness of an integrated consumer-directed e-health portal on cardiovascular risk compared with usual care in patients with cardiovascular disease or who are at moderate-to-high cardiovascular disease risk. The trial will be augmented by formal economic and process evaluations to assess acceptability, equity and cost-effectiveness of the intervention. The intervention group will participate in a consumer-directed e-health strategy for cardiovascular risk management. The programme is electronically integrated with the primary care provider's software and will include interactive smart phone and Internet platforms. The primary outcome is a composite endpoint of the proportion of people meeting the Australian guideline-recommended blood pressure (BP) and cholesterol targets. Secondary outcomes include change in mean BP and fasting cholesterol levels, proportion meeting BP and cholesterol targets separately, self-efficacy, health literacy, self-reported point prevalence abstinence in smoking, body mass index and waist circumference, self-reported physical activity and self-reported medication adherence. Ethics and dissemination Primary ethics approval was received from the

  2. 33 CFR 209.325 - Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data policy, practices and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navigation lights, aids to... ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.325 Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data... procedure to be used by all Corps of Engineers installations and activities in connection with aids...

  3. 33 CFR 209.325 - Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data policy, practices and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Navigation lights, aids to... ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.325 Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data... procedure to be used by all Corps of Engineers installations and activities in connection with aids...

  4. Integrated navigation method based on inertial navigation system and Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyue; Shi, Haitao; Pan, Jianye; Zhang, Chunxi

    2016-04-01

    An integrated navigation method based on the inertial navigational system (INS) and Lidar was proposed for land navigation. Compared with the traditional integrated navigational method and dead reckoning (DR) method, the influence of the inertial measurement unit (IMU) scale factor and misalignment was considered in the new method. First, the influence of the IMU scale factor and misalignment on navigation accuracy was analyzed. Based on the analysis, the integrated system error model of INS and Lidar was established, in which the IMU scale factor and misalignment error states were included. Then the observability of IMU error states was analyzed. According to the results of the observability analysis, the integrated system was optimized. Finally, numerical simulation and a vehicle test were carried out to validate the availability and utility of the proposed INS/Lidar integrated navigational method. Compared with the test result of a traditional integrated navigation method and DR method, the proposed integrated navigational method could result in a higher navigation precision. Consequently, the IMU scale factor and misalignment error were effectively compensated by the proposed method and the new integrated navigational method is valid.

  5. 33 CFR 401.53 - Obstructing navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Obstructing navigation. 401.53 Section 401.53 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.53...

  6. 33 CFR 401.53 - Obstructing navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Obstructing navigation. 401.53 Section 401.53 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.53...

  7. 33 CFR 401.35 - Navigation underway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Navigation underway. 401.35 Section 401.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.35...

  8. 33 CFR 401.35 - Navigation underway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navigation underway. 401.35 Section 401.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.35...

  9. 33 CFR 401.35 - Navigation underway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Navigation underway. 401.35 Section 401.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.35...

  10. 33 CFR 401.35 - Navigation underway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Navigation underway. 401.35 Section 401.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.35...

  11. 33 CFR 401.53 - Obstructing navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Obstructing navigation. 401.53 Section 401.53 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.53...

  12. 33 CFR 401.35 - Navigation underway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Navigation underway. 401.35 Section 401.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.35...

  13. 33 CFR 401.53 - Obstructing navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Obstructing navigation. 401.53 Section 401.53 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.53...

  14. 33 CFR 401.53 - Obstructing navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Obstructing navigation. 401.53 Section 401.53 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.53...

  15. Control algorithms for autonomous robot navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, C.C.

    1985-09-20

    This paper examines control algorithm requirements for autonomous robot navigation outside laboratory environments. Three aspects of navigation are considered: navigation control in explored terrain, environment interactions with robot sensors, and navigation control in unanticipated situations. Major navigation methods are presented and relevance of traditional human learning theory is discussed. A new navigation technique linking graph theory and incidental learning is introduced.

  16. Fundamentals of satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, A. H.

    The basic operating principles and capabilities of conventional and satellite-based navigation systems for air, sea, and land vehicles are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams. Consideration is given to autonomous onboard systems; systems based on visible or radio beacons; the Transit, Cicada, Navstar-GPS, and Glonass satellite systems; the physical laws and parameters of satellite motion; the definition of time in satellite systems; and the content of the demodulated GPS data signal. The GPS and Glonass data format frames are presented graphically, and tables listing the GPS and Glonass satellites, their technical characteristics, and the (past or scheduled) launch dates are provided.

  17. Addressing the Influence of Space Weather on Airline Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The advent of satellite-based augmentation systems has made it possible to navigate aircraft safely using radio signals emitted by global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) such as the Global Positioning System. As a signal propagates through the earth's ionosphere, it suffers delay that is proportional to the total electron content encountered along the raypath. Since the magnitude of this total electron content is strongly influenced by space weather, the safety and reliability of GNSS for airline navigation requires continual monitoring of the state of the ionosphere and calibration of ionospheric delay. This paper examines the impact of space weather on GNSS-based navigation and provides an overview of how the Wide Area Augmentation System protects its users from positioning error due to ionospheric disturbances

  18. National aerospace meeting of the Institute of Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fell, Patrick

    The program for this year's aerospace meeting of The Institute of Navigation addressed developments in the evolving Global Positioning System (GPS) of navigation satellites, inertial navigation systems, and other electronic navigation systems and their applications. Also included in the program were a limited number of papers addressing the geodetic use of the GPS system.The Global Positioning System is a constellation of 18 navigation satellites being developed by the Department of Defense to provide instantaneous worldwide navigation. The system will support a multitude of military applications. The first paper by Jacobson reviewed the engineering development of GPS navigation receivers stressing the use of common hardware and software modules. A later paper by Ould described the mechanization of a digital receiver for GPS applications designed for faster acquisition of the spread spectrum satellite transmissions than analog receivers. The paper by Brady discussed the worldwide coverage that is provided by the limited number of satellites that will constitute the GPS constellation through 1983. The capability provided by the satellites presently on orbit would support a variety of experiments at almost any location. Tables of multiple satellite availability are provided for numerous worldwide locations. For civil aviation applications, Vogel addressed the satellite geometry considerations for low cost GPS user equipment, Esposito described the Federal Aviation Administration acceptance tests of a GPS navigation receiver, and Hopkins discussed the design and capability of an integrated GPS strapdown attitude and heading reference system for avionics.

  19. IEEE PLANS '90 - Position Location and Navigation Symposium, Las Vegas, NV, Mar. 20-23, 1990, Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Various papers on position, location, and navigation are presented. The general topics addressed include: space-based navigation systems; inertial sensor development; other radio navigation system technologies; surveying, mapping, and digital electronics technology; positioning, pointing, and stabilization of space systems; inertial systems development and applications; integrated communicaiton/navigration systems and standard avionics; application of statistical filtering to navigation technology; GPS applications and equipment in civil, governmental, and commercial areas. Also discussed are: integrated navigation and targeting systems; civil aviation and marine navigation/traffic control; geodesy, gravity measurement, and earth reference systems; GPS military applications and equipment; integrated aircraft navigation and flight control; land vehicle navigation, positioning, and information systems; differential GPS; GPS/inertial navigation; terrain aided air vehicle navigation.

  20. Aeronautic Instruments. Section VI : Aerial Navigation and Navigating Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, H N

    1923-01-01

    This report outlines briefly the methods of aerial navigation which have been developed during the past few years, with a description of the different instruments used. Dead reckoning, the most universal method of aerial navigation, is first discussed. Then follows an outline of the principles of navigation by astronomical observation; a discussion of the practical use of natural horizons, such as sea, land, and cloud, in making extant observations; the use of artificial horizons, including the bubble, pendulum, and gyroscopic types. A description is given of the recent development of the radio direction finder and its application to navigation.

  1. Learning for Autonomous Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Robotic ground vehicles for outdoor applications have achieved some remarkable successes, notably in autonomous highway following (Dickmanns, 1987), planetary exploration (1), and off-road navigation on Earth (1). Nevertheless, major challenges remain to enable reliable, high-speed, autonomous navigation in a wide variety of complex, off-road terrain. 3-D perception of terrain geometry with imaging range sensors is the mainstay of off-road driving systems. However, the stopping distance at high speed exceeds the effective lookahead distance of existing range sensors. Prospects for extending the range of 3-D sensors is strongly limited by sensor physics, eye safety of lasers, and related issues. Range sensor limitations also allow vehicles to enter large cul-de-sacs even at low speed, leading to long detours. Moreover, sensing only terrain geometry fails to reveal mechanical properties of terrain that are critical to assessing its traversability, such as potential for slippage, sinkage, and the degree of compliance of potential obstacles. Rovers in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission have got stuck in sand dunes and experienced significant downhill slippage in the vicinity of large rock hazards. Earth-based off-road robots today have very limited ability to discriminate traversable vegetation from non-traversable vegetation or rough ground. It is impossible today to preprogram a system with knowledge of these properties for all types of terrain and weather conditions that might be encountered.

  2. Space Shuttle Orbiter descent navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montez, M. N.; Madden, M. F.

    1982-01-01

    The entry operational sequence (OPS 3) begins approximately 2 hours prior to the deorbit maneuver and continues through atmospheric entry, terminal area energy management (TAEM), approach and landing, and rollout. During this flight phase, the navigation state vector is estimated by the Space Shuttle Orbiter onboard navigation system. This estimate is computed using a six-element sequential Kalman filter, which blends inertial measurement unit (IMU) delta-velocity data with external navaid data. The external navaids available to the filter are tactical air navigation (TACAN), barometric altimeter, and microwave scan beam landing system (MSBLS). Attention is given to the functional design of the Orbiter navigation system, the descent navigation sensors and measurement processing, predicted Kalman gains, correlation coefficients, and current flights navigation performance.

  3. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  4. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  5. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  6. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  7. 33 CFR 207.185 - Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Taylors Bayou, Tex., Beaumont Navigation District Lock; use, administration, and navigation. 207.185 Section 207.185 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  8. Space shuttle navigation analysis. Volume 1: GPS aided navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matchett, G. A.; Vogel, M. A.; Macdonald, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical studies related to space shuttle navigation are presented. Studies related to the addition of NAVSTAR Global Positioning System user equipment to the shuttle avionics suite are presented. The GPS studies center about navigation accuracy covariance analyses for both developmental and operational phases of GPS, as well as for various orbiter mission phases.

  9. Automatic document navigation for digital content remastering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaofan; Simske, Steven J.

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method of automatically adding navigation capabilities to re-mastered electronic books. We first analyze the need for a generic and robust system to automatically construct navigation links into re-mastered books. We then introduce the core algorithm based on text matching for building the links. The proposed method utilizes the tree-structured dictionary and directional graph of the table of contents to efficiently conduct the text matching. Information fusion further increases the robustness of the algorithm. The experimental results on the MIT Press digital library project are discussed and the key functional features of the system are illustrated. We have also investigated how the quality of the OCR engine affects the linking algorithm. In addition, the analogy between this work and Web link mining has been pointed out.

  10. Comprehension of Navigation Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, Alice F.; Schneider, Vivian I.

    2002-01-01

    Subjects were shown navigation instructions varying in length directing them to move in a space represented by grids on a computer screen. They followed the instructions by clicking on the grids in the locations specified. Some subjects repeated back the instructions before following them, some did not, and others repeated back the instructions in reduced form, including only the critical words. The commands in each message were presented simultaneously for half of the subjects and sequentially for the others. For the longest messages, performance was better on the initial commands and worse on the final commands with simultaneous than with sequential presentation. Instruction repetition depressed performance, but reduced repetition removed this disadvantage. Effects of presentation format were attributed to visual scanning strategies. The advantage for reduced repetition was attributable either to enhanced visual scanning or to reduced output interference. A follow-up study with auditory presentation supported the visual scanning explanation.

  11. Stardust Navigation Covariance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Premkumar R.

    2000-01-01

    The Stardust spacecraft was launched on February 7, 1999 aboard a Boeing Delta-II rocket. Mission participants include the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Lockheed Martin Astronautics (LMA) and the University of Washington. The primary objective of the mission is to collect in-situ samples of the coma of comet Wild-2 and return those samples to the Earth for analysis. Mission design and operational navigation for Stardust is performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). This paper will describe the extensive JPL effort in support of the Stardust pre-launch analysis of the orbit determination component of the mission covariance study. A description of the mission and it's trajectory will be provided first, followed by a discussion of the covariance procedure and models. Predicted accuracy's will be examined as they relate to navigation delivery requirements for specific critical events during the mission. Stardust was launched into a heliocentric trajectory in early 1999. It will perform an Earth Gravity Assist (EGA) on January 15, 2001 to acquire an orbit for the eventual rendezvous with comet Wild-2. The spacecraft will fly through the coma (atmosphere) on the dayside of Wild-2 on January 2, 2004. At that time samples will be obtained using an aerogel collector. After the comet encounter Stardust will return to Earth when the Sample Return Capsule (SRC) will separate and land at the Utah Test Site (UTTR) on January 15, 2006. The spacecraft will however be deflected off into a heliocentric orbit. The mission is divided into three phases for the covariance analysis. They are 1) Launch to EGA, 2) EGA to Wild-2 encounter and 3) Wild-2 encounter to Earth reentry. Orbit determination assumptions for each phase are provided. These include estimated and consider parameters and their associated a-priori uncertainties. Major perturbations to the trajectory include 19 deterministic and statistical maneuvers

  12. Navigation: Traveling the Water Highways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Marion; Lane, Jack

    1995-01-01

    One of the most important yet often overlooked uses of water is as a method of transportation or, navigation. Presents an activity to help students understand the importance of water as a critical, renewable, and natural resource for navigational use. Lists the learning objective, materials, and procedure for the activity. Also includes a foldout.…

  13. Navigating the Seas of Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Stephanie; Kennedy, Steve; McAlonan, Susan; Hotchkiss, Heather

    As the sun, moon, and stars helped sea captains to navigate, policy (defined as a formalized idea to encourage change) indicates general direction and speed but does not establish a specific approach to achieve implementation. Formal and informal policies have advantages and disadvantages. These are steps in navigating policy formation: identify…

  14. Introductory Course on Satellite Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giger, Kaspar; Knogl, J. Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Satellite navigation is widely used for personal navigation and more and more in precise and safety-critical applications. Thus, the subject is suited for attracting the interest of young people in science and engineering. The practical applications allow catching the students' attention for the theoretical background. Educational material on the…

  15. The real-world navigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balabanovic, Marko; Becker, Craig; Morse, Sarah K.; Nourbakhsh, Illah R.

    1994-01-01

    The success of every mobile robot application hinges on the ability to navigate robustly in the real world. The problem of robust navigation is separable from the challenges faced by any particular robot application. We offer the Real-World Navigator as a solution architecture that includes a path planner, a map-based localizer, and a motion control loop that combines reactive avoidance modules with deliberate goal-based motion. Our architecture achieves a high degree of reliability by maintaining and reasoning about an explicit description of positional uncertainty. We provide two implementations of real-world robot systems that incorporate the Real-World Navigator. The Vagabond Project culminated in a robot that successfully navigated a portion of the Stanford University campus. The Scimmer project developed successful entries for the AIAA 1993 Robotics Competition, placing first in one of the two contests entered.

  16. The navigation of homing pigeons: Do they use sun Navigation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walcott, C.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments to determine the dependence of homing pigeons on the sun as a navigational cue are discussed. Various methods were employed to interrupt the circadian rhythms of the pigeons prior to release. It was determined that the sun may serve as a compass, but that topographic features are more important for navigation. The effects of a magnetic field produced by electric equipment carried by the bird were also investigated. It was concluded that magnetic fields may have a small effect on the homing ability. The exact nature of the homing pigeon's navigational ability is still unknown after years of elaborate experimentation.

  17. The navigation toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, William F.; Strom, Stephen W.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the experience of the authors in managing, designing, and implementing an object-oriented applications framework for orbital navigation analysis for the Flight Design and Dynamics Department of the Rockwell Space Operations Company in Houston, in support of the Mission Operations Directorate of NASA's Johnson Space Center. The 8 person year project spanned 1.5 years and produced 30,000 lines of C++ code, replacing 150,000 lines of Fortran/C. We believe that our experience is important because it represents a 'second project' experience and generated real production-quality code - it was not a pilot. The project successfully demonstrated the use of 'continuous development' or rapid prototyping techniques. Use of formal methods and executable models contributed to the quality of the code. Keys to the success of the project were a strong architectural vision and highly skilled workers. This report focuses on process and methodology, and not on a detailed design description of the product. But the true importance of the object-oriented paradigm is its liberation of the developer to focus on the problem rather than the means used to solve the problem.

  18. 14 CFR 121.389 - Flight navigator and specialized navigation equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight navigator and specialized navigation....389 Flight navigator and specialized navigation equipment. (a) No certificate holder may operate an... flight navigator certificate; or (2) Specialized means of navigation approved in accordance with §...

  19. 14 CFR 121.389 - Flight navigator and specialized navigation equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight navigator and specialized navigation....389 Flight navigator and specialized navigation equipment. (a) No certificate holder may operate an... flight navigator certificate; or (2) Specialized means of navigation approved in accordance with §...

  20. 14 CFR 121.389 - Flight navigator and specialized navigation equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight navigator and specialized navigation....389 Flight navigator and specialized navigation equipment. (a) No certificate holder may operate an... flight navigator certificate; or (2) Specialized means of navigation approved in accordance with §...

  1. 14 CFR 121.389 - Flight navigator and specialized navigation equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight navigator and specialized navigation....389 Flight navigator and specialized navigation equipment. (a) No certificate holder may operate an... flight navigator certificate; or (2) Specialized means of navigation approved in accordance with §...

  2. 14 CFR 121.389 - Flight navigator and specialized navigation equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight navigator and specialized navigation....389 Flight navigator and specialized navigation equipment. (a) No certificate holder may operate an... flight navigator certificate; or (2) Specialized means of navigation approved in accordance with §...

  3. Lunar Navigation Architecture Design Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Christopher; Getchius, Joel; Holt, Greg; Moreau, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program is aiming to establish a long-term presence on the lunar surface. The Constellation elements (Orion, Altair, Earth Departure Stage, and Ares launch vehicles) will require a lunar navigation architecture for navigation state updates during lunar-class missions. Orion in particular has baselined earth-based ground direct tracking as the primary source for much of its absolute navigation needs. However, due to the uncertainty in the lunar navigation architecture, the Orion program has had to make certain assumptions on the capabilities of such architectures in order to adequately scale the vehicle design trade space. The following paper outlines lunar navigation requirements, the Orion program assumptions, and the impacts of these assumptions to the lunar navigation architecture design. The selection of potential sites was based upon geometric baselines, logistical feasibility, redundancy, and abort support capability. Simulated navigation covariances mapped to entry interface flightpath- angle uncertainties were used to evaluate knowledge errors. A minimum ground station architecture was identified consisting of Goldstone, Madrid, Canberra, Santiago, Hartebeeshoek, Dongora, Hawaii, Guam, and Ascension Island (or the geometric equivalent).

  4. Navigable networks as Nash equilibria of navigation games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyás, András; Bíró, József J.; Kőrösi, Attila; Rétvári, Gábor; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-07-01

    Common sense suggests that networks are not random mazes of purposeless connections, but that these connections are organized so that networks can perform their functions well. One function common to many networks is targeted transport or navigation. Here, using game theory, we show that minimalistic networks designed to maximize the navigation efficiency at minimal cost share basic structural properties with real networks. These idealistic networks are Nash equilibria of a network construction game whose purpose is to find an optimal trade-off between the network cost and navigability. We show that these skeletons are present in the Internet, metabolic, English word, US airport, Hungarian road networks, and in a structural network of the human brain. The knowledge of these skeletons allows one to identify the minimal number of edges, by altering which one can efficiently improve or paralyse navigation in the network.

  5. Navigable networks as Nash equilibria of navigation games.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, András; Bíró, József J; Kőrösi, Attila; Rétvári, Gábor; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-07-03

    Common sense suggests that networks are not random mazes of purposeless connections, but that these connections are organized so that networks can perform their functions well. One function common to many networks is targeted transport or navigation. Here, using game theory, we show that minimalistic networks designed to maximize the navigation efficiency at minimal cost share basic structural properties with real networks. These idealistic networks are Nash equilibria of a network construction game whose purpose is to find an optimal trade-off between the network cost and navigability. We show that these skeletons are present in the Internet, metabolic, English word, US airport, Hungarian road networks, and in a structural network of the human brain. The knowledge of these skeletons allows one to identify the minimal number of edges, by altering which one can efficiently improve or paralyse navigation in the network.

  6. NASA tracking ship navigation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenna, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The ship position and attitude measurement system that was installed aboard the tracking ship Vanguard is described. An overview of the entire system is given along with a description of how precise time and frequency is utilized. The instrumentation is broken down into its basic components. Particular emphasis is given to the inertial navigation system. Each navigation system used, a mariner star tracker, navigation satellite system, Loran C and OMEGA in conjunction with the inertial system is described. The accuracy of each system is compared along with their limitations.

  7. Navigation/Prop Software Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruchmiller, Tomas; Tran, Sanh; Lee, Mathew; Bucker, Scott; Bupane, Catherine; Bennett, Charles; Cantu, Sergio; Kwong, Ping; Propst, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Navigation (Nav)/Prop software is used to support shuttle mission analysis, production, and some operations tasks. The Nav/Prop suite containing configuration items (CIs) resides on IPS/Linux workstations. It features lifecycle documents, and data files used for shuttle navigation and propellant analysis for all flight segments. This suite also includes trajectory server, archive server, and RAT software residing on MCC/Linux workstations. Navigation/Prop represents tool versions established during or after IPS Equipment Rehost-3 or after the MCC Rehost.

  8. Experiment D009: Simple navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, R. M.; Jorris, T. R.; Vallerie, E. M., III

    1971-01-01

    Space position-fixing techniques have been investigated by collecting data on the observable phenomena of space flight that could be used to solve the problem of autonomous navigation by the use of optical data and manual computations to calculate the position of a spacecraft. After completion of the developmental and test phases, the product of the experiment would be a manual-optical technique of orbital space navigation that could be used as a backup to onboard and ground-based spacecraft-navigation systems.

  9. Daytime Celestial Navigation for the Novice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Philip M.; Night, Christopher

    2010-03-01

    What kinds of astronomical lab activities can high school and college astronomy students carry out easily in daytime? The most impressive is the determination of latitude and longitude from observations of the Sun. The ``shooting of a noon sight'' and its ``reduction to a position'' grew to become a daily practice at the start of the 19th century1 following the perfection of the marine chronometer by John Harrison and its mass production.2 This technique is still practiced by navigators in this age of GPS. Indeed, the U.S. Coast Guard exams for ocean-going licenses include celestial navigation.3 These techniques continue to be used by the military and by private sailors as a backup to all-too-fallible and jammable electronic navigation systems. A sextant, a nautical almanac,4 special sight reduction tables,5 and involved calculations are needed to determine position to the nearest mile using the Sun, Moon, stars, or planets. Yet, finding latitude and longitude to better than 30 miles from measurements of the Sun's altitude is easily within the capability of those taking astronomy or physics for the first time by applying certain basic principles. Moreover, it shows a practical application of astronomy in use the world over. The streamlined method described here takes advantage of the similar level of accuracy of its three components: 1.Observations using a homemade quadrant6 (instead of a sextant), 2. Student-made graphs of the altitude of the Sun over a day7 (replacing lengthy calculation using sight reduction tables), and 3. An averaged 20-year analemma used to find the Sun's navigational coordinates8,9 (rather than the 300+ page Nautical Almanac updated yearly).

  10. NES: How to Navigate the Virtual Campus

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video describes how to navigate the NASA Explorer Schools public website. Information includes descriptions of the left navigation, using the breadcrumbs, understanding the various announcemen...

  11. Navigating "Assisted Dying".

    PubMed

    Schipper, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Carter is a bellwether decision, an adjudication on a narrow point of law whose implications are vast across society, and whose impact may not be realized for years. Coupled with Quebec's Act Respecting End-of-life Care it has sharply changed the legal landscape with respect to actively ending a person's life. "Medically assisted dying" will be permitted under circumstances, and through processes, which have yet to be operationally defined. This decision carries with it moral assumptions, which mean that it will be difficult to reach a unifying consensus. For some, the decision and Act reflect a modern acknowledgement of individual autonomy. For others, allowing such acts is morally unspeakable. Having opened the Pandora's Box, the question becomes one of navigating a tolerable societal path. I believe it is possible to achieve a workable solution based on the core principle that "medically assisted dying" should be a very rarely employed last option, subject to transparent ongoing review, specifically as to why it was deemed necessary. My analysis is based on 1. The societal conditions in which have fostered demand for "assisted dying", 2. Actions in other jurisdictions, 3. Carter and Quebec Bill 52, 4. Political considerations, 5. Current medical practice. Leading to a series of recommendations regarding. 1. Legislation and regulation, 2. The role of professional regulatory agencies, 3. Medical professions education and practice, 4. Public education, 5. Health care delivery and palliative care. Given the burden of public opinion, and the legal steps already taken, a process for assisted-dying is required. However, those legal and regulatory steps should only be considered a necessary and defensive first step in a two stage process. The larger goal, the second step, is to drive the improvement of care, and thus minimize assisted-dying. PMID:27169205

  12. Bore hole navigator

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, G.J.

    1987-09-29

    A bore hole navigator is described comprising a two axis platform for lowering down a bore hole on a cable with its longitudinal axis parallel to the local bore hole direction. The two axis platform has an outer gimbal, bearing supported on the outer gimbal axis for rotation about the longitudinal axis of the platform, and an inner gimbal axis orthogonal the the outer gimbal axis. The inner gimbal axis has multiple axis segments spaced along the longitudinal axis of the platform and each bearing supported on the outer gimbal. The inner gimbal axis segment has a two axis gyro mounted thereon with its spin axis orthogonal to the respective inner gimbal axis segment, a first gyro sensitive axis parallel to the respective inner gimbal axis segment and a second gyro sensitive axis orthogonal to the spin axis. The second inner gimbal axis segment has a pitch torquer thereon operative to provide a controllable torque about the respective inner gimbal axis segment. The third inner gimbal axis segment has a pitch resolver thereon operative to measure rotation of the respective inner gimbal axis segment with respect to the outer gimbal. The first, second and third inner gimbal axis segments are coupled to rotate together. The outer gimbal has a yaw torquer thereon to provide a controllable torque about the outer gimbal axis, and a yaw resolver thereon to measure rotation of the outer gimbal about the outer gimbal axis. The outer gimbal also has a single axis accelerometer therein having its sensitive axis orthogonal to the outer gimbal axis and the inner gimbal axis segments.

  13. Navigating the Rockets Educator Guide

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this brief video overview, learn how to navigate the Rockets Educator Guide. Get a glimpse of the resources available in the guide, including a pictorial history, an overview of the physics cont...

  14. Potential applications of satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaenzer, G.

    The applicability of Navstar GPS to civil air navigation is discussed. The accuracy of current air-navigation systems is reviewed; the basic principle and accuracy of GPS navigation are characterized; the relatively low cost of GPS receiving equipment is pointed out; and particular attention is given to hybrid systems combining GPS with inertial navigation. It is predicted that CAT III landings will be possible using such hybrid systems when the GPS satellites are fully deployed, even without access to the military GPS code. Techniques for GPS-based precision landings, reduced-noise landings, landings on parallel runways, control of taxiing maneuvers, and aircraft-based geodetic measurements are briefly described and illustrated with diagrams.

  15. Autonomous navigation using lunar beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, A. R.; Ellis, J.; French, J.; Null, G.; Yunck, T.; Wu, S.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of using lunar beacon signal transmission for on-board navigation for earth satellites and near-earth spacecraft is described. The system would require powerful transmitters on the earth-side of the moon's surface and black box receivers with antennae and microprocessors placed on board spacecraft for autonomous navigation. Spacecraft navigation requires three position and three velocity elements to establish location coordinates. Two beacons could be soft-landed on the lunar surface at the limits of allowable separation and each would transmit a wide-beam signal with cones reaching GEO heights and be strong enough to be received by small antennae in near-earth orbit. The black box processor would perform on-board computation with one-way Doppler/range data and dynamical models. Alternatively, GEO satellites such as the GPS or TDRSS spacecraft can be used with interferometric techniques to provide decimeter-level accuracy for aircraft navigation.

  16. SEXTANT: Navigating by Cosmic Beacon

    NASA Video Gallery

    Imagine a technology that would allow space travelers to transmit gigabytes of data per second over interplanetary distances or to navigate to Mars and beyond using powerful beams of light emanatin...

  17. Navigator program: exploring new worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Navigator Program is a series of interrelated missions to explore and characterize new worlds. Each successive mission provides an essential step toward the ultimate goal of discovering habitable planets and life around nearby stars.

  18. Autonomous Navigation Using Celestial Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Gramling, Cheryl; Leung, Dominic; Belur, Sheela; Long, Anne

    1999-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Enterprises envision frequent low-cost missions to explore the solar system, observe the universe, and study our planet. Satellite autonomy is a key technology required to reduce satellite operating costs. The Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center (GNCC) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) currently sponsors several initiatives associated with the development of advanced spacecraft systems to provide autonomous navigation and control. Autonomous navigation has the potential both to increase spacecraft navigation system performance and to reduce total mission cost. By eliminating the need for routine ground-based orbit determination and special tracking services, autonomous navigation can streamline spacecraft ground systems. Autonomous navigation products can be included in the science telemetry and forwarded directly to the scientific investigators. In addition, autonomous navigation products are available onboard to enable other autonomous capabilities, such as attitude control, maneuver planning and orbit control, and communications signal acquisition. Autonomous navigation is required to support advanced mission concepts such as satellite formation flying. GNCC has successfully developed high-accuracy autonomous navigation systems for near-Earth spacecraft using NASA's space and ground communications systems and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Recently, GNCC has expanded its autonomous navigation initiative to include satellite orbits that are beyond the regime in which use of GPS is possible. Currently, GNCC is assessing the feasibility of using standard spacecraft attitude sensors and communication components to provide autonomous navigation for missions including: libration point, gravity assist, high-Earth, and interplanetary orbits. The concept being evaluated uses a combination of star, Sun, and Earth sensor measurements along with forward-link Doppler

  19. Visual Navigation in Nocturnal Insects.

    PubMed

    Warrant, Eric; Dacke, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Despite their tiny eyes and brains, nocturnal insects have evolved a remarkable capacity to visually navigate at night. Whereas some use moonlight or the stars as celestial compass cues to maintain a straight-line course, others use visual landmarks to navigate to and from their nest. These impressive abilities rely on highly sensitive compound eyes and specialized visual processing strategies in the brain. PMID:27053732

  20. FLASH LIDAR Based Relative Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazzel, Jack; Clark, Fred; Milenkovic, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Relative navigation remains the most challenging part of spacecraft rendezvous and docking. In recent years, flash LIDARs, have been increasingly selected as the go-to sensors for proximity operations and docking. Flash LIDARS are generally lighter and require less power that scanning Lidars. Flash LIDARs do not have moving parts, and they are capable of tracking multiple targets as well as generating a 3D map of a given target. However, there are some significant drawbacks of Flash Lidars that must be resolved if their use is to be of long-term significance. Overcoming the challenges of Flash LIDARs for navigation-namely, low technology readiness level, lack of historical performance data, target identification, existence of false positives, and performance of vision processing algorithms as intermediaries between the raw sensor data and the Kalman filter-requires a world-class testing facility, such as the Lockheed Martin Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC). Ground-based testing is a critical step for maturing the next-generation flash LIDAR-based spacecraft relative navigation. This paper will focus on the tests of an integrated relative navigation system conducted at the SOSC in January 2014. The intent of the tests was to characterize and then improve the performance of relative navigation, while addressing many of the flash LIDAR challenges mentioned above. A section on navigation performance and future recommendation completes the discussion.

  1. Development of a GPS/INS/MAG navigation system and waypoint navigator for a VTOL UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Oliver; Mönikes, Ralf; Wendel, Jan; Frietsch, Natalie; Schlaile, Christian; Trommer, Gert F.

    2007-04-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) can be used for versatile surveillance and reconnaissance missions. If a UAV is capable of flying automatically on a predefined path the range of possible applications is widened significantly. This paper addresses the development of the integrated GPS/INS/MAG navigation system and a waypoint navigator for a small vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) unmanned four-rotor helicopter with a take-off weight below 1 kg. The core of the navigation system consists of low cost inertial sensors which are continuously aided with GPS, magnetometer compass, and a barometric height information. Due to the fact, that the yaw angle becomes unobservable during hovering flight, the integration with a magnetic compass is mandatory. This integration must be robust with respect to errors caused by the terrestrial magnetic field deviation and interferences from surrounding electronic devices as well as ferrite metals. The described integration concept with a Kalman filter overcomes the problem that erroneous magnetic measurements yield to an attitude error in the roll and pitch axis. The algorithm provides long-term stable navigation information even during GPS outages which is mandatory for the flight control of the UAV. In the second part of the paper the guidance algorithms are discussed in detail. These algorithms allow the UAV to operate in a semi-autonomous mode position hold as well an complete autonomous waypoint mode. In the position hold mode the helicopter maintains its position regardless of wind disturbances which ease the pilot job during hold-and-stare missions. The autonomous waypoint navigator enable the flight outside the range of vision and beyond the range of the radio link. Flight test results of the implemented modes of operation are shown.

  2. Taux: A System for Evaluating Sound Feedback in Navigational Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents the design and development of an evaluation system for generating audio displays that provide feedback to persons performing navigation tasks. It first develops the need for such a system by describing existing wayfinding solutions, investigating new electronic location-based methods that have the potential of changing these…

  3. 46 CFR 120.420 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Navigation lights. 120.420 Section 120.420 Shipping... Systems § 120.420 Navigation lights. All vessels must have navigation lights that are in compliance with... than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must also have navigation lights that meet UL 1104,...

  4. 46 CFR 183.420 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Navigation lights. 183.420 Section 183.420 Shipping...) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Lighting Systems § 183.420 Navigation lights. All vessels must have navigation lights..., except that a vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must also have navigation lights...

  5. 46 CFR 183.420 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Navigation lights. 183.420 Section 183.420 Shipping...) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Lighting Systems § 183.420 Navigation lights. All vessels must have navigation lights..., except that a vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must also have navigation lights...

  6. 46 CFR 120.420 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Navigation lights. 120.420 Section 120.420 Shipping... Systems § 120.420 Navigation lights. All vessels must have navigation lights that are in compliance with... than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must also have navigation lights that meet UL 1104,...

  7. 32 CFR 644.3 - Navigation projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Navigation projects. 644.3 Section 644.3... ESTATE HANDBOOK Project Planning Civil Works § 644.3 Navigation projects. (a) Land to be acquired in fee... for channel improvements, navigation pools, navigation aids, and spoil disposal areas for...

  8. 32 CFR 644.3 - Navigation projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Navigation projects. 644.3 Section 644.3 National... HANDBOOK Project Planning Civil Works § 644.3 Navigation projects. (a) Land to be acquired in fee. All... channel improvements, navigation pools, navigation aids, and spoil disposal areas for future...

  9. 32 CFR 644.3 - Navigation projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Navigation projects. 644.3 Section 644.3 National... HANDBOOK Project Planning Civil Works § 644.3 Navigation projects. (a) Land to be acquired in fee. All... channel improvements, navigation pools, navigation aids, and spoil disposal areas for future...

  10. 46 CFR 183.420 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Navigation lights. 183.420 Section 183.420 Shipping...) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Lighting Systems § 183.420 Navigation lights. All vessels must have navigation lights..., except that a vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must also have navigation lights...

  11. 46 CFR 120.420 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Navigation lights. 120.420 Section 120.420 Shipping... Systems § 120.420 Navigation lights. All vessels must have navigation lights that are in compliance with... than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must also have navigation lights that meet UL 1104,...

  12. 46 CFR 120.420 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Navigation lights. 120.420 Section 120.420 Shipping... Systems § 120.420 Navigation lights. All vessels must have navigation lights that are in compliance with... than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must also have navigation lights that meet UL 1104,...

  13. 46 CFR 183.420 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Navigation lights. 183.420 Section 183.420 Shipping...) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Lighting Systems § 183.420 Navigation lights. All vessels must have navigation lights..., except that a vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must also have navigation lights...

  14. 46 CFR 120.420 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Navigation lights. 120.420 Section 120.420 Shipping... Systems § 120.420 Navigation lights. All vessels must have navigation lights that are in compliance with... than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must also have navigation lights that meet UL 1104,...

  15. 46 CFR 183.420 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Navigation lights. 183.420 Section 183.420 Shipping...) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Lighting Systems § 183.420 Navigation lights. All vessels must have navigation lights..., except that a vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must also have navigation lights...

  16. 33 CFR 66.10-15 - Aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aids to navigation. 66.10-15 Section 66.10-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System § 66.10-15 Aids to navigation....

  17. 33 CFR 66.10-15 - Aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aids to navigation. 66.10-15 Section 66.10-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System § 66.10-15 Aids to navigation....

  18. 33 CFR 66.10-15 - Aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aids to navigation. 66.10-15 Section 66.10-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System § 66.10-15 Aids to navigation....

  19. 33 CFR 66.10-15 - Aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aids to navigation. 66.10-15 Section 66.10-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System § 66.10-15 Aids to navigation....

  20. 33 CFR 66.10-15 - Aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aids to navigation. 66.10-15 Section 66.10-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System § 66.10-15 Aids to navigation....

  1. Navigating the internet maze.

    PubMed

    Singer, K P; Tan, B K

    2000-08-01

    The 'internet-driven information age' is a term in common usage, implying that everyone can access all the information they need, when they need it. The purpose of this brief paper is to outline some web sources that highlight the possibilities and potential for accessing web-based knowledge. From this the clinician will be encouraged to follow leads along the labyrinth of links to a greater appreciation of how this resource can be used to shape their practice. Examples of web links are provided for: search engines; library-based sources, including medical databases and electronic journals; evidence-based practice databases, mail-groups; electronic conferences; research centres; and general health sources. Importantly, this review does not aspire to be all-inclusive, for the web changes, chameleon-like, to the seasons. The web is here to stay. It will provide the framework for much education and will guide clients to a greater appreciation of their disease or disability than ever before. It may ultimately be the tool through which health fund agents will promote best practice, including self-help to clients, and therefore direct discriminating individuals to select health practitioners who have been endorsed by professional and fund agencies as providing a contemporary service which conforms to evidence-based practice. PMID:11034887

  2. Modelling group navigation: transitive social structures improve navigational performance

    PubMed Central

    Flack, Andrea; Biro, Dora; Guilford, Tim; Freeman, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Collective navigation demands that group members reach consensus on which path to follow, a task that might become more challenging when the group's members have different social connections. Group decision-making mechanisms have been studied successfully in the past using individual-based modelling, although many of these studies have neglected the role of social connections between the group's interacting members. Nevertheless, empirical studies have demonstrated that individual recognition, previous shared experiences and inter-individual familiarity can influence the cohesion and the dynamics of the group as well as the relative spatial positions of specific individuals within it. Here, we use models of collective motion to study the impact of social relationships on group navigation by introducing social network structures into a model of collective motion. Our results show that groups consisting of equally informed individuals achieve the highest level of accuracy when they are hierarchically organized with the minimum number of preferred connections per individual. We also observe that the navigational accuracy of a group will depend strongly on detailed aspects of its social organization. More specifically, group navigation does not only depend on the underlying social relationships, but also on how much weight leading individuals put on following others. Also, we show that groups with certain social structures can compensate better for an increased level of navigational error. The results have broader implications for studies on collective navigation and motion because they show that only by considering a group's social system can we fully elucidate the dynamics and advantages of joint movements. PMID:26063820

  3. Autonomous navigation system. [gyroscopic pendulum for air navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merhav, S. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An inertial navigation system utilizing a servo-controlled two degree of freedom pendulum to obtain specific force components in the locally level coordinate system is described. The pendulum includes a leveling gyroscope and an azimuth gyroscope supported on a two gimbal system. The specific force components in the locally level coordinate system are converted to components in the geographical coordinate system by means of a single Euler transformation. The standard navigation equations are solved to determine longitudinal and lateral velocities. Finally, vehicle position is determined by a further integration.

  4. Mission Operations and Navigation Toolkit Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunseri, Richard F.; Wu, Hsi-Cheng; Hanna, Robert A.; Mossey, Michael P.; Duncan, Courtney B.; Evans, Scott E.; Evans, James R.; Drain, Theodore R.; Guevara, Michelle M.; Martin Mur, Tomas J.; Attiyah, Ahlam A.

    2009-01-01

    MONTE (Mission Operations and Navigation Toolkit Environment) Release 7.3 is an extensible software system designed to support trajectory and navigation analysis/design for space missions. MONTE is intended to replace the current navigation and trajectory analysis software systems, which, at the time of this reporting, are used by JPL's Navigation and Mission Design section. The software provides an integrated, simplified, and flexible system that can be easily maintained to serve the needs of future missions in need of navigation services.

  5. 14 CFR 125.267 - Flight navigator and long-range navigation equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight navigator and long-range navigation... Requirements § 125.267 Flight navigator and long-range navigation equipment. (a) No certificate holder may...-range means of navigation which enable a reliable determination to be made of the position of...

  6. 14 CFR 125.267 - Flight navigator and long-range navigation equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight navigator and long-range navigation... Requirements § 125.267 Flight navigator and long-range navigation equipment. (a) No certificate holder may...-range means of navigation which enable a reliable determination to be made of the position of...

  7. 14 CFR 125.267 - Flight navigator and long-range navigation equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight navigator and long-range navigation... Requirements § 125.267 Flight navigator and long-range navigation equipment. (a) No certificate holder may...-range means of navigation which enable a reliable determination to be made of the position of...

  8. 14 CFR 125.267 - Flight navigator and long-range navigation equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight navigator and long-range navigation... Requirements § 125.267 Flight navigator and long-range navigation equipment. (a) No certificate holder may...-range means of navigation which enable a reliable determination to be made of the position of...

  9. 14 CFR 125.267 - Flight navigator and long-range navigation equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight navigator and long-range navigation... Requirements § 125.267 Flight navigator and long-range navigation equipment. (a) No certificate holder may...-range means of navigation which enable a reliable determination to be made of the position of...

  10. Navigation in GPS Challenged Environments Based Upon Ranging Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markiel, J. N. Nikki

    The ability of living creatures to navigate their environment is one of the great mysteries of life. Humans, even from an early age, can acquire data about their surroundings, determine whether objects are movable or fixed, and identify open space, separate static and non-static objects, and move towards another location with minimal effort, in infinitesimal time spans. Over extended time periods humans can recall the location of objects and duplicate navigation tasks based purely on relative positioning of landmarks. Our ability to emulate this complex process in autonomous vehicles remains incomplete, despite significant research efforts over the past half century. Autonomous vehicles rely on a variety of electronic sensors to acquire data about their environment; the challenge is to transform that data into information supporting the objective of navigation. Historically, much of the sensor data was limited to the two dimensional (2D) instance; recent technological developments such as Laser Ranging and 3D Sonar are extending data collection to full three dimensional (3D) acquisition. The objective of this dissertation is the development of an algorithm to support the transformation of 3D ranging data into a navigation solution within unknown environments, and in the presence of dynamically moving objects. The algorithm reflects one of the very first attempts to leverage the 3D ranging technology for the purpose of autonomous navigation, and provides a system which enables the ability to complete the following objectives: • Separation of static and non-static elements in the environment. • Navigation based upon the range measurements of static elements. This research extends the body of knowledge in three primary topics. 1) The first is the development of a general method to identify n features in an initial data set from m features in a subsequent data set, given that both data sets are acquired via 3D ranging sensors. Accomplishing this objective

  11. Neural mechanisms of insect navigation.

    PubMed

    Webb, Barbara; Wystrach, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    We know more about the ethology of insect navigation than the neural substrates. Few studies have shown direct effects of brain manipulation on navigational behaviour; or measure brain responses that clearly relate to the animal's current location or spatial target, independently of specific sensory cues. This is partly due to the methodological problems of obtaining neural data in a naturally behaving animal. However, substantial indirect evidence, such as comparative anatomy and knowledge of the neural circuits that provide relevant sensory inputs provide converging arguments for the role of some specific brain areas: the mushroom bodies; and the central complex. Finally, modelling can help bridge the gap by relating the computational requirements of a given navigational task to the type of computation offered by different brain areas. PMID:27436729

  12. Behavioral Mapless Navigation Using Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Randall P.; Miller, Samuel A.; Bradley, Arthur T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents work on the development and implementation of a novel approach to robotic navigation. In this system, map-building and localization for obstacle avoidance are discarded in favor of moment-by-moment behavioral processing of the sonar sensor data. To accomplish this, we developed a network of behaviors that communicate through the passing of rings, data structures that are similar in form to the sonar data itself and express the decisions of each behavior. Through the use of these rings, behaviors can moderate each other, conflicting impulses can be mediated, and designers can easily connect modules to create complex emergent navigational techniques. We discuss the development of a number of these modules and their successful use as a navigation system in the Trinity omnidirectional robot.

  13. Navigation: traveling the water highways!

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Marion; Vandas, Stephen; Farrar, Frank

    1996-01-01

    NAVIGATION is travel or transportation over water. Many different kinds of boats and ships are used on rivers and oceans to move people and products from one place to another. Navigation was extremely important for foreign and domestic trade and travel in the early days of our country before cars, trucks, trains, and airplanes were invented. In those days, rivers were used as "roads" to connect inland settlements to river and coastal ports. Communities established at these commercial ports became important economic, cultural, and social hubs in the development of our Nation.

  14. Navigator program: exploring new worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Navigator Program is a series of interrelated missions to explore and characterize new worlds. Each successive mission provides an essential step toward the ultimate goal of discovering habitable planets and life around nearby stars. Are there other solar systems like our own? Are there other habitable worlds? Is there life elsewhere in the universe? these questions are timeless, but only in this generation has technology progressed to the state where we can conceive of an build a suite of missions that capable of answering them. The Navigator Program and its missions are described in this paper.

  15. Seamless Resource-Adaptive Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Tim; Stahl, Christoph; Baus, Jörg; Wahlster, Wolfgang

    Research in the project RENA (REsource-Adapative NAvigation) together with DFKI GmbH, BMW Research and Technology AG, and Eyeled GmbH has been concerned with the conceptual and methodological foundations and the design of a resource-adaptive platform for seamless outdoor and indoor navigation that can serve as a basis for product development by the companies in the RENA consortium. Future in-car assistance systems will have a user interface, which adapts to the driveŕs current exposure caused by the actual traffic situation.

  16. Midlet Navigation Graphs in JML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostowski, Wojciech; Poll, Erik

    In the context of the EU project Mobius on Proof Carrying Code for Java programs (midlets) on mobile devices, we present a way to express midlet navigation graphs in JML. Such navigation graphs express certain security policies for a midlet. The resulting JML specifications can be automatically checked with the static checker ESC/Java2. Our work was guided by a realistically sized case study developed as demonstrator in the project. We discuss practical difficulties with creating efficient and meaningful JML specifications for automatic verification with a lightweight verification tool such as ESC/Java2, and the potential use of these specifications for PCC.

  17. Low cost omega navigation receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a low cost Omega navigation receiver is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the completion and testing of a modular, multipurpose Omega receiver which utilizes a digital memory-aided, phase-locked loop to provide phase measurement data to a variety of applications interfaces. The functional units contained in the prototype device are described. The receiver is capable of receiving and storing phase measurements for up to eight Omega signals and computes two switch-selectable lines of position, displaying this navigation data in chart-recorded form.

  18. Flight tests of the microsatellite magnetic navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyayev, S. M.; Korepanov, V. Ye; Yefimenko, M. V.

    Modern spacecrafts use different onboard systems for navigation, based mostly on the combination of optical, magnetic and gravitational principles. We show that at present level of electronic technology and computer systems reasonable quality of navigation may be obtained using only one high-quality measuring device, namely, flux-gate magnetometer. We describe the recent model of onboard flux-gate magnetometer used in the experiment with the microsatellite "Micron", launche as piggy-back load together with the satellite "Sich-1M" on 24 December 2004. In spite of a very short operation term of the microsatellite, the experimental data obtained confirm both the efficiency of the application of the new navigation methodology and a high quality of the magnetometer developed.

  19. Multiple source navigation signal generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojda, Petr

    2010-09-01

    The paper presents a FPGA based digital VOR/LOC signal generator. It provides the composite signal, which consists of the particular signals of several predefined navigation sources - VOR beacons. Design of the generator is implemented into the two different FPGA DSP platforms.

  20. Linguistic geometry for autonomous navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Stilman, B.

    1995-09-01

    To discover the inner properties of human expert heuristics, which were successful in a certain class of complex control systems, we develop a formal theory, the Linguistic Geometry. This paper reports two examples of application of Linguistic Geometry to autonomous navigation of aerospace vehicles that demonstrate dramatic search reduction.

  1. Autonomous navigation for artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, P. S.

    1975-01-01

    An autonomous navigation system is considered that provides a satellite with sufficient numbers and types of sensors, as well as computational hardware and software, to enable it to track itself. Considered are attitude type sensors, meteorological cameras and scanners, one way Doppler, and image correlator.

  2. SMALL CRAFT OPERATION AND NAVIGATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    THIS REFERENCE TEXTBOOK WAS PREPARED FOR USE IN THE FIRST PART OF A TWO-PART COURSE IN MARINE NAVIGATION AND SMALL CRAFT OPERATION ON INLAND AND INTERNATIONAL WATERS. THE MATERIAL WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INDIVIDUAL AUTHOR FOR USE IN TRADE SCHOOL PREPARATORY AND EXTENSION CLASSES FOR MALE ADULTS WHO PLAN TO OPERATE BOATS. IT IS MAINLY CONCERNED WITH…

  3. Self-Navigating THE TERRAIN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyaso, Hilary Hurd

    2008-01-01

    There's some good news in the academy regarding Black women: They occupy a number of high-profile executive posts in higher education. But whether Black women scholars want to follow in their footsteps or continue in a teaching or research capacity, the bad news is that many feel they are left to navigate the personal and professional politics of…

  4. Precision Time Protocol-Based Trilateration for Planetary Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdock, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Progeny Systems Corporation has developed a high-fidelity, field-scalable, non-Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation system that offers precision localization over communications channels. The system is bidirectional, providing position information to both base and mobile units. It is the first-ever wireless use of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Precision Time Protocol (PTP) in a bidirectional trilateration navigation system. The innovation provides a precise and reliable navigation capability to support traverse-path planning systems and other mapping applications, and it establishes a core infrastructure for long-term lunar and planetary occupation. Mature technologies are integrated to provide navigation capability and to support data and voice communications on the same network. On Earth, the innovation is particularly well suited for use in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), as it offers a non-GPS precision navigation and location service for use in GPS-denied environments. Its bidirectional capability provides real-time location data to the UAV operator and to the UAV. This approach optimizes assisted GPS techniques and can be used to determine the presence of GPS degradation, spoofing, or jamming.

  5. Hierarchical state-space estimation of leatherback turtle navigation ability.

    PubMed

    Mills Flemming, Joanna; Jonsen, Ian D; Myers, Ransom A; Field, Christopher A

    2010-01-01

    Remotely sensed tracking technology has revealed remarkable migration patterns that were previously unknown; however, models to optimally use such data have developed more slowly. Here, we present a hierarchical Bayes state-space framework that allows us to combine tracking data from a collection of animals and make inferences at both individual and broader levels. We formulate models that allow the navigation ability of animals to be estimated and demonstrate how information can be combined over many animals to allow improved estimation. We also show how formal hypothesis testing regarding navigation ability can easily be accomplished in this framework. Using Argos satellite tracking data from 14 leatherback turtles, 7 males and 7 females, during their southward migration from Nova Scotia, Canada, we find that the circle of confusion (the radius around an animal's location within which it is unable to determine its location precisely) is approximately 96 km. This estimate suggests that the turtles' navigation does not need to be highly accurate, especially if they are able to use more reliable cues as they near their destination. Moreover, for the 14 turtles examined, there is little evidence to suggest that male and female navigation abilities differ. Because of the minimal assumptions made about the movement process, our approach can be used to estimate and compare navigation ability for many migratory species that are able to carry electronic tracking devices. PMID:21203382

  6. Hierarchical state-space estimation of leatherback turtle navigation ability.

    PubMed

    Mills Flemming, Joanna; Jonsen, Ian D; Myers, Ransom A; Field, Christopher A

    2010-12-28

    Remotely sensed tracking technology has revealed remarkable migration patterns that were previously unknown; however, models to optimally use such data have developed more slowly. Here, we present a hierarchical Bayes state-space framework that allows us to combine tracking data from a collection of animals and make inferences at both individual and broader levels. We formulate models that allow the navigation ability of animals to be estimated and demonstrate how information can be combined over many animals to allow improved estimation. We also show how formal hypothesis testing regarding navigation ability can easily be accomplished in this framework. Using Argos satellite tracking data from 14 leatherback turtles, 7 males and 7 females, during their southward migration from Nova Scotia, Canada, we find that the circle of confusion (the radius around an animal's location within which it is unable to determine its location precisely) is approximately 96 km. This estimate suggests that the turtles' navigation does not need to be highly accurate, especially if they are able to use more reliable cues as they near their destination. Moreover, for the 14 turtles examined, there is little evidence to suggest that male and female navigation abilities differ. Because of the minimal assumptions made about the movement process, our approach can be used to estimate and compare navigation ability for many migratory species that are able to carry electronic tracking devices.

  7. 33 CFR 263.21 - Small navigation project authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Small navigation project authority. 263.21 Section 263.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTINUING AUTHORITIES PROGRAMS Navigation Policy § 263.21 Small navigation...

  8. 33 CFR 164.78 - Navigation under way: Towing vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Navigation under way: Towing vessels. 164.78 Section 164.78 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.78 Navigation under...

  9. 33 CFR 263.21 - Small navigation project authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Small navigation project authority. 263.21 Section 263.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTINUING AUTHORITIES PROGRAMS Navigation Policy § 263.21 Small navigation...

  10. 33 CFR 164.13 - Navigation underway: tankers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Navigation underway: tankers. 164.13 Section 164.13 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.13 Navigation underway:...

  11. 33 CFR 164.78 - Navigation under way: Towing vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Navigation under way: Towing vessels. 164.78 Section 164.78 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.78 Navigation under...

  12. 33 CFR 263.21 - Small navigation project authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Small navigation project authority. 263.21 Section 263.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTINUING AUTHORITIES PROGRAMS Navigation Policy § 263.21 Small navigation...

  13. 33 CFR 164.78 - Navigation under way: Towing vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Navigation under way: Towing vessels. 164.78 Section 164.78 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.78 Navigation under...

  14. 33 CFR 164.13 - Navigation underway: tankers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Navigation underway: tankers. 164.13 Section 164.13 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.13 Navigation underway:...

  15. 33 CFR 164.13 - Navigation underway: tankers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Navigation underway: tankers. 164.13 Section 164.13 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.13 Navigation underway:...

  16. 33 CFR 164.13 - Navigation underway: tankers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navigation underway: tankers. 164.13 Section 164.13 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.13 Navigation underway:...

  17. 33 CFR 263.21 - Small navigation project authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Small navigation project authority. 263.21 Section 263.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTINUING AUTHORITIES PROGRAMS Navigation Policy § 263.21 Small navigation...

  18. 33 CFR 164.13 - Navigation underway: tankers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Navigation underway: tankers. 164.13 Section 164.13 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.13 Navigation underway:...

  19. 33 CFR 263.21 - Small navigation project authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Small navigation project authority. 263.21 Section 263.21 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTINUING AUTHORITIES PROGRAMS Navigation Policy § 263.21 Small navigation...

  20. 33 CFR 401.54 - Interference with navigation aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interference with navigation aids. 401.54 Section 401.54 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION... with navigation aids. (a) Aids to navigation shall not be interfered with or used as moorings. (b)...

  1. 33 CFR 401.54 - Interference with navigation aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interference with navigation aids. 401.54 Section 401.54 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION... with navigation aids. (a) Aids to navigation shall not be interfered with or used as moorings. (b)...

  2. 33 CFR 67.35-10 - Private aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Private aids to navigation. 67.35-10 Section 67.35-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Applications §...

  3. 33 CFR 401.54 - Interference with navigation aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interference with navigation aids. 401.54 Section 401.54 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION... with navigation aids. (a) Aids to navigation shall not be interfered with or used as moorings. (b)...

  4. 33 CFR 67.35-10 - Private aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Private aids to navigation. 67.35-10 Section 67.35-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Applications §...

  5. 33 CFR 67.35-10 - Private aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Private aids to navigation. 67.35-10 Section 67.35-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Applications §...

  6. 33 CFR 67.35-10 - Private aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Private aids to navigation. 67.35-10 Section 67.35-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Applications §...

  7. 33 CFR 67.35-10 - Private aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Private aids to navigation. 67.35-10 Section 67.35-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Applications §...

  8. 33 CFR 401.54 - Interference with navigation aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interference with navigation aids. 401.54 Section 401.54 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION... with navigation aids. (a) Aids to navigation shall not be interfered with or used as moorings. (b)...

  9. 33 CFR 401.54 - Interference with navigation aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Interference with navigation aids. 401.54 Section 401.54 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION... with navigation aids. (a) Aids to navigation shall not be interfered with or used as moorings. (b)...

  10. 32 CFR 644.3 - Navigation Projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Requirements for navigation aids should be coordinated by the District Engineer with the local Coast Guard... construction and borrow areas. (3) In navigation-only projects, the right to permanently flood should...

  11. 32 CFR 644.3 - Navigation projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... maintenance. Requirements for navigation aids should be coordinated by the District Engineer with the local..., and temporary construction and borrow areas. (3) In navigation-only projects, the right to...

  12. 33 CFR 66.05-100 - Designation of navigable waters as State waters for private aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... as State waters for private aids to navigation. 66.05-100 Section 66.05-100 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION State Aids to Navigation § 66.05-100 Designation of navigable waters as State waters for private aids...

  13. 33 CFR 66.05-100 - Designation of navigable waters as State waters for private aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... as State waters for private aids to navigation. 66.05-100 Section 66.05-100 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION State Aids to Navigation § 66.05-100 Designation of navigable waters as State waters for private aids...

  14. 33 CFR 66.05-100 - Designation of navigable waters as State waters for private aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... as State waters for private aids to navigation. 66.05-100 Section 66.05-100 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION State Aids to Navigation § 66.05-100 Designation of navigable waters as State waters for private aids...

  15. 33 CFR 66.05-100 - Designation of navigable waters as State waters for private aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... as State waters for private aids to navigation. 66.05-100 Section 66.05-100 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION State Aids to Navigation § 66.05-100 Designation of navigable waters as State waters for private aids...

  16. 33 CFR 66.05-100 - Designation of navigable waters as State waters for private aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... as State waters for private aids to navigation. 66.05-100 Section 66.05-100 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION State Aids to Navigation § 66.05-100 Designation of navigable waters as State waters for private aids...

  17. 46 CFR 129.430 - Navigational lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Navigational lighting. 129.430 Section 129.430 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Lighting Systems § 129.430 Navigational lighting. (a) Each vessel of less than 100 gross tons and less than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must have navigational lighting in compliance with...

  18. 46 CFR 129.430 - Navigational lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Navigational lighting. 129.430 Section 129.430 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Lighting Systems § 129.430 Navigational lighting. (a) Each vessel of less than 100 gross tons and less than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must have navigational lighting in compliance with...

  19. 46 CFR 129.430 - Navigational lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Navigational lighting. 129.430 Section 129.430 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Lighting Systems § 129.430 Navigational lighting. (a) Each vessel of less than 100 gross tons and less than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must have navigational lighting in compliance with...

  20. 46 CFR 129.430 - Navigational lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Navigational lighting. 129.430 Section 129.430 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Lighting Systems § 129.430 Navigational lighting. (a) Each vessel of less than 100 gross tons and less than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must have navigational lighting in compliance with...

  1. 46 CFR 129.430 - Navigational lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Navigational lighting. 129.430 Section 129.430 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Lighting Systems § 129.430 Navigational lighting. (a) Each vessel of less than 100 gross tons and less than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must have navigational lighting in compliance with...

  2. Shuttle OFT Level C navigation requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Detailed requirements for the orbital operations computer loads, OPS 2, and OPS 8 are given. These requirements represent the total on-orbit/rendezvous navigation baseline requirements for the following principal functions: on-orbital/rendezvous navigation sequencer; on-orbit/rendezvous UPP sequencer; on-orbit rendezvous navigation; on-orbit prediction; on-orbit user parameter processing; and landing Site update.

  3. Autonomous Guidance, Navigation and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordano, A. J.; McSwain, G. G.; Fernandes, S. T.

    The NASA Autonomous Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) Bridging program is reviewed to demonstrate the program plan and GN&C systems for the Space Shuttle. The ascent CN&C system is described in terms of elements such as the general-purpose digital computers, sensors for the navigation subsystem, the guidance-system software, and the flight-control subsystem. Balloon-based and lidar wind soundings are used for operations assessment on the day of launch, and the guidance software is based on dedicated units for atmospheric powered flight, vacuum powered flight, and abort-specific situations. Optimization of the flight trajectories is discussed, and flight-control responses are illustrated for wavelengths of 500-6000 m. Alternate sensors are used for load relief, and adaptive GN&C systems based on alternate gain synthesis are used for systems failures.

  4. NAVIGATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire

    2015-01-01

    Navigation was the most significant advance in instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty over the last decade. It provides surgeons with a precision tool for carrying out surgery, with the possibility of intraoperative simulation and objective control over various anatomical and surgical parameters and references. Since the first systems, which were basically used to control the alignment of bone cutting referenced to the mechanical axis of the lower limb, many other surgical steps have been incorporated, such as component rotation, ligament balancing and arranging the symmetry of flexion and extension spaces, among others. Its efficacy as a precision tool with an effective capacity for promoting better alignment of the lower-limb axis has been widely proven in the literature, but the real value of optimized alignment and the impact of navigation on clinical results and the longevity of arthroplasty have yet to be established. PMID:27026979

  5. 77 FR 42637 - Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... 21, 2012 (77 FR 37305), the Coast Guard published a final rule entitled ``Navigation and Navigable... Register of Thursday, June 21, 2012 (77 FR 37305). The regulations related to technical, organizational and... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Parts 84 and 115 RIN 1625-AB86 Navigation and Navigable Waters;...

  6. 78 FR 68861 - Certain Navigation Products, Including GPS Devices, Navigation and Display Systems, Radar Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ..., Navigational Aids, Mapping Systems and Related Software; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to 19 U.S.C... and display systems, radar systems, navigational aids, mapping systems and related software by reason... products, including GPS devices, navigation and display systems, radar systems, navigational aids,...

  7. Orientation in birds. Olfactory navigation.

    PubMed

    Papi, F

    1991-01-01

    Research work on the olfactory navigation of birds, which has only recently attracted attention, has shown that many wild species rely on an osmotactic mechanism to find food sources, even at a considerable distance. The homing pigeon, the only bird to have been thoroughly investigated with respect to olfactory navigation, has been found to rely on local odours for homeward orientation, and to integrate olfactory cues perceived during passive transportation with those picked up at the release site. It is possible to design experiments in which birds are given false olfactory information, and predictions about the effects of this can be made and tested. Pigeons are able to home from unfamiliar sites because they acquire an olfactory map extending beyond the area they have flown over. The olfactory map is built up by associating wind-borne odours with the direction from which they come; this was shown by experiments which aimed to prevent, limit or alter this association. One aim of the research work has been to test whether pigeons flying over unfamiliar areas also rely or can learn to rely on non-olfactory cues, depending on their local availability, and/or on the methods of rearing and training applied to them. Various evaluations have been made of the results; the most recent experiments, however, confirm that pigeons do derive directional information from atmospheric odours. A neurobiological approach is also in progress; its results show that some telencephalic areas are involved in orientation and olfactory navigation. The lack of any knowledge about the distribution and chemical nature of the odorants which allow pigeons to navigate hinders progress in this area of research.

  8. Astronomical Methods in Aerial Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beij, K Hilding

    1925-01-01

    The astronomical method of determining position is universally used in marine navigation and may also be of service in aerial navigation. The practical application of the method, however, must be modified and adapted to conform to the requirements of aviation. Much of this work of adaptation has already been accomplished, but being scattered through various technical journals in a number of languages, is not readily available. This report is for the purpose of collecting under one cover such previous work as appears to be of value to the aerial navigator, comparing instruments and methods, indicating the best practice, and suggesting future developments. The various methods of determining position and their application and value are outlined, and a brief resume of the theory of the astronomical method is given. Observation instruments are described in detail. A complete discussion of the reduction of observations follows, including a rapid method of finding position from the altitudes of two stars. Maps and map cases are briefly considered. A bibliography of the subject is appended.

  9. Onboard navigation rendezvous expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocen, Michelle

    The Onboard Navigation rendezvous expert system is designed to aid the ground flight controller in monitoring the shuttle onboard navigation system. The system is designed to keep track of the navigation sensors and relative state vectors. In addition, the system also keeps an event log and fills out forms usually handled by the flight controller. This expert system is one of the few rendezvous specific systems being developed for the Mission Control Center. The expert system has been in development for six years. Through these years the system has seen hardware, software, and personnel changes. Initial development was done by the Information Systems Directorate (ISD) and Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at Johnson Space Center. As of October 1, 1991 the system has been turned over to MOD. The system is completely developed except for some minor adjustments to the user interface. The rule base is in the verification stage with total certification of the system due to be completed by May 1992. Test cases for verification are obtained by saving data used for flight controller integrated simulations. The actual data comes from both the shuttle mission simulator and the Mission Control Center Computer. So far no actual flight data has been available. This paper covers all aspects of the system from the development history to the current hardware, software, and use of the system.

  10. Mars Exploration Rovers navigation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amario, Louis A.

    2004-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, were launched on June 10, 2003, and July 8, 2003, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. Spirit and Opportunity were targeted for landings at Gusev Crater (arrival on January 4, 2004) and Meridiani Planum (arrival on January 25, 2004). The primary navigation challenge was to deliver each spacecraft to the desired atmospheric entry interface point with sufficient accuracy such that each lander would touch down within a specified landing ellipse (about 70 km x 5 km) determined to be safe for landing and also judged to be scientifically interesting. In order to achieve landing within the target ellipse, precise control of the inertial entry flight path angle (FPA) at atmospheric entry was required. The maximum allowable errors in FPA following TCM-5 (trajectory correction maneuver #5) at Entry (E) -2 days were +/-0.12 deg(3 sigma) for Spirit and +/-0.14 deg(3 sigma) for Opportunity. Achieving these entry delivery accuracies necessitated significant improvements to the interplanetary navigation system used for MER. These improvements included new processes and software for orbit determination, propulsive maneuver design, and entry, descent, and landing (EDL) trajectory simulation. The actual achieved atmospheric entry accuracies for Spirit and Opportunity significantly exceeded the requirements. At the navigation data cutoff for the TCM-5 final design, the orbit determination FPA knowledge error was 0.028 deg(3 sigma) for Spirit and 0.035 deg(3 sigma) for Opportunity. Because of exceptionally accurate navigation performance, TCM-5 (E - 2 days) and TCM-6 (E - 4 hours) were canceled for both Spirit and Opportunity. The actual landing locations (determined from in-situ Doppler tracking between the MER rovers and the Mars Odyssey orbiter) differed from the target landing points by 10.1 km (downtrack) for Spirit and 24.6 km (downtrack) for Opportunity. The majority of the landing position offsets for both landers was

  11. Cooperative navigation and localization for multiple UUVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Chuan; Xu, De-Min; Liu, Ming-Yong; Yan, Wei-Sheng

    2009-09-01

    The authors proposed a moving long baseline algorithm based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF) for cooperative navigation and localization of multi-unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs). Research on cooperative navigation and localization for multi-UUVs is important to solve navigation problems that restrict long and deep excursions. The authors investigated improvements in navigation accuracy. In the moving long base line (MLBL) structure, the master UUV is equipped with a high precision navigation system as a node of the moving long baseline, and the slave UUV is equipped with a low precision navigation system. They are both equipped with acoustic devices to measure relative location. Using traditional triangulation methods to calculate the position of the slave UUV may cause a faulty solution. An EKF was designed to solve this, combining the proprioceptive and exteroceptive sensors. Research results proved that the navigational accuracy is improved significantly with the MLBL method based on EKF.

  12. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.306 Missouri River;...

  13. 33 CFR 117.455 - Houma Navigation Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Houma Navigation Canal. 117.455 Section 117.455 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.455 Houma Navigation Canal. The...

  14. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.306 Missouri River;...

  15. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 162.105 Section 162.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS §...

  16. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 162.105 Section 162.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS §...

  17. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.306 Missouri River;...

  18. 33 CFR 165.10 - Regulated navigation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated navigation areas. 165.10 Section 165.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS...

  19. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 162.105 Section 162.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS §...

  20. 33 CFR 165.10 - Regulated navigation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulated navigation areas. 165.10 Section 165.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS...

  1. 33 CFR 117.455 - Houma Navigation Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Houma Navigation Canal. 117.455 Section 117.455 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.455 Houma Navigation Canal. The...

  2. 33 CFR 64.31 - Determination of hazard to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determination of hazard to navigation. 64.31 Section 64.31 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION MARKING OF STRUCTURES, SUNKEN VESSELS AND OTHER OBSTRUCTIONS...

  3. 33 CFR 165.10 - Regulated navigation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulated navigation areas. 165.10 Section 165.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS...

  4. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.306 Missouri River;...

  5. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.306 Missouri River;...

  6. 33 CFR 165.10 - Regulated navigation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulated navigation areas. 165.10 Section 165.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS...

  7. 33 CFR 401.97 - Closing procedures and ice navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Closing procedures and ice navigation. 401.97 Section 401.97 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Navigation...

  8. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 162.105 Section 162.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS §...

  9. 33 CFR 401.97 - Closing procedures and ice navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Closing procedures and ice navigation. 401.97 Section 401.97 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Navigation...

  10. 33 CFR 209.315 - Public access to navigation works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public access to navigation works. 209.315 Section 209.315 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.315 Public access to navigation works. While...

  11. 33 CFR 64.31 - Determination of hazard to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determination of hazard to navigation. 64.31 Section 64.31 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION MARKING OF STRUCTURES, SUNKEN VESSELS AND OTHER OBSTRUCTIONS...

  12. 33 CFR 401.97 - Closing procedures and ice navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closing procedures and ice navigation. 401.97 Section 401.97 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Navigation...

  13. 33 CFR 401.97 - Closing procedures and ice navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Closing procedures and ice navigation. 401.97 Section 401.97 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Navigation...

  14. 33 CFR 117.455 - Houma Navigation Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Houma Navigation Canal. 117.455 Section 117.455 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.455 Houma Navigation Canal. The...

  15. 33 CFR 209.315 - Public access to navigation works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public access to navigation works. 209.315 Section 209.315 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.315 Public access to navigation works. While...

  16. 33 CFR 162.240 - Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation. 162.240 Section 162.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.240...

  17. 33 CFR 165.10 - Regulated navigation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulated navigation areas. 165.10 Section 165.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS...

  18. 33 CFR 209.315 - Public access to navigation works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Public access to navigation works. 209.315 Section 209.315 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.315 Public access to navigation works. While...

  19. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 162.105 Section 162.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS §...

  20. 33 CFR 209.315 - Public access to navigation works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public access to navigation works. 209.315 Section 209.315 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.315 Public access to navigation works. While...

  1. 33 CFR 117.455 - Houma Navigation Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Houma Navigation Canal. 117.455 Section 117.455 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.455 Houma Navigation Canal. The...

  2. 33 CFR 162.240 - Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation. 162.240 Section 162.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.240...

  3. 33 CFR 401.97 - Closing procedures and ice navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Closing procedures and ice navigation. 401.97 Section 401.97 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Navigation...

  4. 33 CFR 162.240 - Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation. 162.240 Section 162.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.240...

  5. 33 CFR 162.240 - Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation. 162.240 Section 162.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.240...

  6. 33 CFR 401.9 - Radio telephone and navigation equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Radio telephone and navigation equipment. 401.9 Section 401.9 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION... telephone and navigation equipment. (a) Self-propelled vessels, other than pleasure craft of less than...

  7. 33 CFR 209.200 - Regulations governing navigable waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulations governing navigable... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.200 Regulations governing navigable waters... of the Army to govern navigation and navigable waters, are contained in the Code of...

  8. 33 CFR 209.200 - Regulations governing navigable waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulations governing navigable... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.200 Regulations governing navigable waters... of the Army to govern navigation and navigable waters, are contained in the Code of...

  9. 33 CFR 209.200 - Regulations governing navigable waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulations governing navigable... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.200 Regulations governing navigable waters... of the Army to govern navigation and navigable waters, are contained in the Code of...

  10. 33 CFR 66.10-35 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Navigation lights. 66.10-35... NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System § 66.10-35 Navigation lights. A red light shall only be used on a solid colored red buoy. A green light shall only be used on a...

  11. 33 CFR 66.10-35 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Navigation lights. 66.10-35... NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System § 66.10-35 Navigation lights. A red light shall only be used on a solid colored red buoy. A green light shall only be used on a...

  12. 33 CFR 66.10-35 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Navigation lights. 66.10-35... NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System § 66.10-35 Navigation lights. A red light shall only be used on a solid colored red buoy. A green light shall only be used on a...

  13. 33 CFR 329.14 - Determination of navigability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determination of navigability. 329.14 Section 329.14 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DEFINITION OF NAVIGABLE WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES § 329.14 Determination...

  14. 33 CFR 329.14 - Determination of navigability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of navigability. 329.14 Section 329.14 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DEFINITION OF NAVIGABLE WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES § 329.14 Determination...

  15. 33 CFR 66.10-35 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System § 66.10-35 Navigation lights. A red light shall only be used on a solid colored red buoy. A green light shall only be used on a solid... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Navigation lights....

  16. 33 CFR 66.10-35 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION Uniform State Waterway Marking System § 66.10-35 Navigation lights. A red light shall only be used on a solid colored red buoy. A green light shall only be used on a solid... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navigation lights....

  17. Crew-Aided Autonomous Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.

    2015-01-01

    A sextant provides manual capability to perform star/planet-limb sightings and offers a cheap, simple, robust backup navigation source for exploration missions independent from the ground. Sextant sightings from spacecraft were first exercised in Gemini and flew as the lost-communication backup for all Apollo missions. This study characterized error sources of navigation-grade sextants for feasibility of taking star and planetary limb sightings from inside a spacecraft. A series of similar studies was performed in the early/mid-1960s in preparation for Apollo missions. This study modernized and updated those findings in addition to showing feasibility using Linear Covariance analysis techniques. The human eyeball is a remarkable piece of optical equipment and provides many advantages over camera-based systems, including dynamic range and detail resolution. This technique utilizes those advantages and provides important autonomy to the crew in the event of lost communication with the ground. It can also provide confidence and verification of low-TRL automated onboard systems. The technique is extremely flexible and is not dependent on any particular vehicle type. The investigation involved procuring navigation-grade sextants and characterizing their performance under a variety of conditions encountered in exploration missions. The JSC optical sensor lab and Orion mockup were the primary testing locations. For the accuracy assessment, a group of test subjects took sextant readings on calibrated targets while instrument/operator precision was measured. The study demonstrated repeatability of star/planet-limb sightings with bias and standard deviation around 10 arcseconds, then used high-fidelity simulations to verify those accuracy levels met the needs for targeting mid-course maneuvers in preparation for Earth reen.

  18. Emergency navigation without an infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Gelenbe, Erol; Bi, Huibo

    2014-08-18

    Emergency navigation systems for buildings and other built environments, such as sport arenas or shopping centres, typically rely on simple sensor networks to detect emergencies and, then, provide automatic signs to direct the evacuees. The major drawbacks of such static wireless sensor network (WSN)-based emergency navigation systems are the very limited computing capacity, which makes adaptivity very difficult, and the restricted battery power, due to the low cost of sensor nodes for unattended operation. If static wireless sensor networks and cloud-computing can be integrated, then intensive computations that are needed to determine optimal evacuation routes in the presence of time-varying hazards can be offloaded to the cloud, but the disadvantages of limited battery life-time at the client side, as well as the high likelihood of system malfunction during an emergency still remain. By making use of the powerful sensing ability of smart phones, which are increasingly ubiquitous, this paper presents a cloud-enabled indoor emergency navigation framework to direct evacuees in a coordinated fashion and to improve the reliability and resilience for both communication and localization. By combining social potential fields (SPF) and a cognitive packet network (CPN)-based algorithm, evacuees are guided to exits in dynamic loose clusters. Rather than relying on a conventional telecommunications infrastructure, we suggest an ad hoc cognitive packet network (AHCPN)-based protocol to adaptively search optimal communication routes between portable devices and the network egress nodes that provide access to cloud servers, in a manner that spares the remaining battery power of smart phones and minimizes the time latency. Experimental results through detailed simulations indicate that smart human motion and smart network management can increase the survival rate of evacuees and reduce the number of drained smart phones in an evacuation process.

  19. Emergency Navigation without an Infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Gelenbe, Erol; Bi, Huibo

    2014-01-01

    Emergency navigation systems for buildings and other built environments, such as sport arenas or shopping centres, typically rely on simple sensor networks to detect emergencies and, then, provide automatic signs to direct the evacuees. The major drawbacks of such static wireless sensor network (WSN)-based emergency navigation systems are the very limited computing capacity, which makes adaptivity very difficult, and the restricted battery power, due to the low cost of sensor nodes for unattended operation. If static wireless sensor networks and cloud-computing can be integrated, then intensive computations that are needed to determine optimal evacuation routes in the presence of time-varying hazards can be offloaded to the cloud, but the disadvantages of limited battery life-time at the client side, as well as the high likelihood of system malfunction during an emergency still remain. By making use of the powerful sensing ability of smart phones, which are increasingly ubiquitous, this paper presents a cloud-enabled indoor emergency navigation framework to direct evacuees in a coordinated fashion and to improve the reliability and resilience for both communication and localization. By combining social potential fields (SPF) and a cognitive packet network (CPN)-based algorithm, evacuees are guided to exits in dynamic loose clusters. Rather than relying on a conventional telecommunications infrastructure, we suggest an ad hoc cognitive packet network (AHCPN)-based protocol to adaptively search optimal communication routes between portable devices and the network egress nodes that provide access to cloud servers, in a manner that spares the remaining battery power of smart phones and minimizes the time latency. Experimental results through detailed simulations indicate that smart human motion and smart network management can increase the survival rate of evacuees and reduce the number of drained smart phones in an evacuation process. PMID:25196014

  20. Guidance, Navigation, and Control Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Tamblyn, Scott; Jackson, William L.; Foster, Chris; Brazzel, Jack; Manning, Thomas R.; Clark, Fred; Spehar, Pete; Barrett, Jim D.; Milenkovic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The Rendezvous and Proximity Operations Program (RPOP) is real-time guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) domain piloting-aid software that provides 3D Orbiter graphics and runs on the Space Shuttle's Criticality-3 Payload and General Support Computer (PGSC) in the crew cockpit. This software provides the crew with Situational Awareness during the rendezvous and proximity operations phases of flight. RPOP can be configured from flight to flight, accounting for mission-specific flight scenarios and target vehicles, via initialization load (I-load) data files. The software provides real-time, automated, closed-loop guidance recommendations and the capability to integrate the crew s manual backup techniques. The software can bring all relative navigation sensor data, including the Orbiter's GPC (general purpose computer) data, into one central application to provide comprehensive situational awareness of the rendezvous and proximity operations trajectory. RPOP also can separately maintain trajectory estimates (past, current, and predicted) based on certain data types and co-plot them, in order to show how the various navigation solutions compare. RPOP s best estimate of the relative trajectory is determined by a relative Kalman filter processing data provided by the sensor suite s most accurate sensor, the trajectory control sensor (TCS). Integrated with the Kalman filter is an algorithm that identifies the reflector that the TCS is tracking. Because RPOP runs on PC laptop computers, the development and certification lifecycles are more agile, flexible, and cheaper than those that govern the Orbiter FSW (flight software) that runs in the GPC. New releases of RPOP can be turned around on a 3- to 6-month template, from new Change Request (CR) to certification, depending on the complexity of the changes.

  1. Mars Odyssey interplanetary navigation strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mase, Robert A.; Antreasian, Peter G.; Bell, Julia L.

    2003-01-01

    The 2001 Mars Odyssey Mission has returned an orbiter to map the planet and search for water. The success of this mission has reestablished confidence in Mars exploration that will pave the way for future orbiters, landers, adn rovers. The spacecraft has completed its journey and is now in the orbital science-gathering phase of the primary mission, which will continue through August 2004. This paper will describe teh strategy that was designed to safely and accurately navigate the spacecraft to Mars, and also relate the in-flight experience.

  2. Mars Exploration Rovers navigation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amario, Louis A.

    2004-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, were launched on June 10, 2003(dagger), and July 8, 2003, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. Spirit and Opportunity were targeted for landings at Gusev Crater (arrival on January 4, 2004) and Meridiani Planum (arrival on January 25, 2004). The primary navigation challenge was to deliver each spacecraft to the desired atmospheric entry interface point with sufficient accuracy such that each lander would touch down within a specified landing ellipse (about 70 km x 5 km) determined to be safe for landing and also judged to be scientifically interesting. In order to achieve landing within the target ellipse, precise control of the inertial entry flight path angle (FPA) at atmospheric entry was required. The maximum allowable errors in FPA following TCM-5 (trajectory correction maneuver #5) at Entry (E) - 2 days were +/-0.12(deg) (3(sigma)) for Spirit and +/-0.14(deg) (3(sigma)) for Opportunity. Achieving these entry delivery accuracies necessitated significant improvements to the interplanetary avigation system used for MER. These improvements included new processes and software for orbit determination, propulsive maneuver design, and entry, descent, and landing (EDL) trajectory simulation. The actual achieved atmospheric entry accuracies for Spirit and Opportunity significantly exceeded the requirements. At the navigation data cutoff for the TCM-5 final design, the orbit determination FPA knowledge error was +/-0.028(deg) (3(sigma) ) for Spirit and +/-0.035(deg) (3(sigma)) for Opportunity. Because of exceptionally accurate navigation performance, TCM-5 (E - 2 days) and TCM-6 (E - 4 hours) were canceled for both Spirit and Opportunity. The actual landing locations (determined from in-situ Doppler tracking between the MER rovers and the Mars Odyssey orbiter) differed from the target landing points by 10.1 km (downtrack) for Spirit and 24.6 km (downtrack) for Opportunity. The majority of the landing position offsets

  3. Navigation Operations for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Anne; Farahmand, Mitra; Carpenter, Russell

    2015-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission employs four identical spinning spacecraft flying in highly elliptical Earth orbits. These spacecraft will fly in a series of tetrahedral formations with separations of less than 10 km. MMS navigation operations use onboard navigation to satisfy the mission definitive orbit and time determination requirements and in addition to minimize operations cost and complexity. The onboard navigation subsystem consists of the Navigator GPS receiver with Goddard Enhanced Onboard Navigation System (GEONS) software, and an Ultra-Stable Oscillator. The four MMS spacecraft are operated from a single Mission Operations Center, which includes a Flight Dynamics Operations Area (FDOA) that supports MMS navigation operations, as well as maneuver planning, conjunction assessment and attitude ground operations. The System Manager component of the FDOA automates routine operations processes. The GEONS Ground Support System component of the FDOA provides the tools needed to support MMS navigation operations. This paper provides an overview of the MMS mission and associated navigation requirements and constraints and discusses MMS navigation operations and the associated MMS ground system components built to support navigation-related operations.

  4. PNP: mining of profile navigational patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-Fu; Shan, Man-Kwan

    2002-03-01

    Web usage mining is a key knowledge discovery research and as such has been well researched. So far, this research has focused mainly on databases containing access log data only. However, many real-world databases contain users profile data and current solutions for this situation are still insufficient. In this paper we have a large database containing of user profile information together with user web-pages navigation patterns. The user profile data includes quantitative attributes, such as salary or age, and categorical attributes, such as sex or marital status. We introduce the concept of profile navigation patterns, which discusses the problem of relating user profile information to navigational behavior. An example of such profile navigation pattern might be 20% of married people between age 25 and 30 have the similar navigational behavior <(a,c)(c,h)(h,i)(i,h)(h,l)>, where a, c, h, i, l are web pages in a web site. The navigation patterns may contain the generic traversal behavior, e.g. trend to backward moves, cycles etc. The objective of mining profile navigation patterns is to identify browser profile for web personalization. We give an algorithm for mining such profile navigation patterns. Our method (algorithm PNP) can discover profile navigation patterns efficiently. We also present new inclination measurements to identify the interesting profile navigational patterns. Experimental results show the efficiency and scalability of PNP.

  5. 33 CFR 207.169 - Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.169 Section 207.169 Navigation... REGULATIONS § 207.169 Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration,...

  6. 33 CFR 207.169 - Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.169 Section 207.169 Navigation... REGULATIONS § 207.169 Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration,...

  7. 33 CFR 207.169 - Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.169 Section 207.169 Navigation... REGULATIONS § 207.169 Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration,...

  8. 33 CFR 207.169 - Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.169 Section 207.169 Navigation... REGULATIONS § 207.169 Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration,...

  9. 33 CFR 207.169 - Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.169 Section 207.169 Navigation... REGULATIONS § 207.169 Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration,...

  10. Intelligent navigation and multivehicle coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Mark D.; Anderson, Matthew O.; Kinoshita, Robert A.; Flann, Nicholas S.

    1999-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Utah State University's Center for Self-Organizing and Intelligent Systems have developed a team of autonomous robotic vehicles. This paper discusses the development of a strategy that uses a sophisticated, highly intelligent sensor platform to allow centralized coordination between smaller and inexpensive robots. The three components of the multi-agent cooperative scheme are small-scale robots, large-scale robots, and the central control station running a mission and path- planning software. The smaller robots are used for activities where the probability of loss increases, such as Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) or mine detonation. The research is aimed at building simple, inexpensive multi-agent vehicles and an intelligent navigation and multi-vehicle coordination system suitable for UXO, environmental remediation or mine detection. These simplified robots are capable of conducting hunting missions using low-cost positioning sensors and intelligent algorithms. Additionally, a larger sensor-rich intelligent system capable of transporting smaller units to outlying remote sites has been developed. The larger system interfaces to the central control station and provides navigation assistance to multiple low-cost vehicles. Finally, mission and path-planning software serves as the operator control unit, allowing central data collection, map creation and tracking, and an interface to the larger system as well as each smaller unit. The power of this scheme is the ability to scale to the appropriate level for the complexity of the mission.

  11. Optic flow and autonomous navigation.

    PubMed

    Campani, M; Giachetti, A; Torre, V

    1995-01-01

    Many animals, especially insects, compute and use optic flow to control their motion direction and to avoid obstacles. Recent advances in computer vision have shown that an adequate optic flow can be computed from image sequences. Therefore studying whether artificial systems, such as robots, can use optic flow for similar purposes is of particular interest. Experiments are reviewed that suggest the possible use of optic flow for the navigation of a robot moving in indoor and outdoor environments. The optic flow is used to detect and localise obstacles in indoor scenes, such as corridors, offices, and laboratories. These routines are based on the computation of a reduced optic flow. The robot is usually able to avoid large obstacles such as a chair or a person. The avoidance performances of the proposed algorithm critically depend on the optomotor reaction of the robot. The optic flow can be used to understand the ego-motion in outdoor scenes, that is, to obtain information on the absolute velocity of the moving vehicle and to detect the presence of other moving objects. A critical step is the correction of the optic flow for shocks and vibrations present during image acquisition. The results obtained suggest that optic flow can be successfully used by biological and artificial systems to control their navigation. Moreover, both systems require fast and accurate optomotor reactions and need to compensate for the instability of the viewed world. PMID:7617428

  12. Optic flow and autonomous navigation.

    PubMed

    Campani, M; Giachetti, A; Torre, V

    1995-01-01

    Many animals, especially insects, compute and use optic flow to control their motion direction and to avoid obstacles. Recent advances in computer vision have shown that an adequate optic flow can be computed from image sequences. Therefore studying whether artificial systems, such as robots, can use optic flow for similar purposes is of particular interest. Experiments are reviewed that suggest the possible use of optic flow for the navigation of a robot moving in indoor and outdoor environments. The optic flow is used to detect and localise obstacles in indoor scenes, such as corridors, offices, and laboratories. These routines are based on the computation of a reduced optic flow. The robot is usually able to avoid large obstacles such as a chair or a person. The avoidance performances of the proposed algorithm critically depend on the optomotor reaction of the robot. The optic flow can be used to understand the ego-motion in outdoor scenes, that is, to obtain information on the absolute velocity of the moving vehicle and to detect the presence of other moving objects. A critical step is the correction of the optic flow for shocks and vibrations present during image acquisition. The results obtained suggest that optic flow can be successfully used by biological and artificial systems to control their navigation. Moreover, both systems require fast and accurate optomotor reactions and need to compensate for the instability of the viewed world.

  13. Navigation of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Navigational systems and operations for the Space Shuttle are described. All navigational instrumentation is controlled from within the pressurized main cabin. Measurements of the state vector and the attitude are made with an inertial measurement unit (IMU), which uses data initialized at the moment of take-off. Orbital location is calculated in approximations using the initial propulsion conditions, models of the gravity field, and aerodynamic drag forces. Updates are periodically received from ground tracking stations. IMU continues attitude information, and additional references are made with an automated startracker device. Information can also be gathered by optical alignment, and future systems will include radar tracking in an approach mode. Deorbit is accompanied by IMU altitude measurements as well as calculations of altitude based on drag measurements. Barometric measurements begin at about 80,000 ft altitude. Signals are received from TACAN beginning at 145,000 ft, and the microwave scanning beam landing system is started at 20,000 ft. Various radionavigation systems are also employed in all flight phases.

  14. Novel navigation sensor for autonomous guide vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenwei; Zhuang, Bao Hua; Zhang, YanXin

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel navigation sensor used for real-time navigation in which a position-sensitive detector is used. According to the features of the position-sensitive detector, the special floor mark stuck on the predefined path is developed. In addition, the formulas for the centroid position of the image of incident laser line on the position-sensitive detector, which is determined by the relative position between the floor mark and the navigation sensor, are derived. The navigation sensor, which can obtain proper navigation accuracy and controlling signal, navigates the autonomous guide vehicle running on the predefined path. It is suitable for application in autonomous guide vehicles and other automatic instruments. The experimental results are given.

  15. Optical navigation during the Voyager Neptune encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedel, J. E.; Owen, W. M., Jr.; Stuve, J. A.; Synnott, S. P.; Vaughan, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Optical navigation techniques were required to successfully complete the planetary exploration phase of the NASA deep-space Voyager mission. The last of Voyager's planetary encounters, with Neptune, posed unique problems from an optical navigation standpoint. In this paper we briefly review general aspects of the optical navigation process as practiced during the Voyager mission, and discuss in detail particular features of the Neptune encounter which affected optical navigation. New approaches to the centerfinding problem were developed for both stars and extended bodies, and these are described. Results of the optical navigation data analysis are presented, as well as a description of the optical orbit determination system and results of its use during encounter. Partially as a result of the optical navigation processing, results of scientific significance were obtained. These results include the discovery and orbit determination of several new satellites of Neptune and the determination of the size of Triton, Neptune's largest moon.

  16. Spatial Database Modeling for Indoor Navigation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotlib, Dariusz; Gnat, Miłosz

    2013-12-01

    For many years, cartographers are involved in designing GIS and navigation systems. Most GIS applications use the outdoor data. Increasingly, similar applications are used inside buildings. Therefore it is important to find the proper model of indoor spatial database. The development of indoor navigation systems should utilize advanced teleinformation, geoinformatics, geodetic and cartographical knowledge. The authors present the fundamental requirements for the indoor data model for navigation purposes. Presenting some of the solutions adopted in the world they emphasize that navigation applications require specific data to present the navigation routes in the right way. There is presented original solution for indoor data model created by authors on the basis of BISDM model. Its purpose is to expand the opportunities for use in indoor navigation.

  17. A molecular compass for bird navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hore, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Migratory birds travel spectacular distances, navigating and orienting by a variety of means, most of which are poorly understood. Among them is a remarkable ability to perceive the intensity and direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Biologically credible mechanisms for the sensing of such weak fields (25-65 microtesla) are scarce and in recent years just two proposals have emerged as frontrunners. One involves biogenic iron-containing nanoparticles; the other relies on the magnetic sensitivity of short-lived photochemical intermediates known as radical pairs. The latter began to attract attention following the proposal 15 years ago that the necessary physics and chemistry could take place in the bird's retina in specialised photoactive proteins called cryptochromes. The coherent dynamics of the electron-nuclear spin systems of pairs of photo-induced radicals is conjectured to form the basis of the sensing mechanism even though the interaction of an electron spin with the geomagnetic field is six orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy. The possibility that slowing decohering, entangled electron spins could form the basis of an important sensory mechanism has qualified radical pair magnetoreception for a place under the umbrella of ``Quantum Biology.'' In this talk, I will introduce the radical pair mechanism, comment on the roles of entanglement and quantum coherence, outline some of the experimental evidence for the cryptochrome hypothesis, and summarize what still needs to be done to determine whether birds (and maybe other animals) really do use a chemical compass to find their way around. This work was supported by grants from DARPA, AFOSR, ERC and the EMF Biological Research Trust.

  18. [Laser navigation guided cleft lip repair].

    PubMed

    Bing, Shi

    2016-06-01

    A new method using the ideal mid-facial line as the navigating reference was introduced to improve the outcome of cleft lip repair. Using the verticle coordinate crossing the middle point of the intercanthus line, surgeons could observe and correct the distortion of the fine structures in labial-nasal area. This laser projecting mid-facial-line navigation was repeatable, while not interfere the operating. In conclusion, generalizing laser navigation is a valuable supplementary for cleft lip repair. PMID:27526442

  19. Computation Simulation Of Autonomous Vehicle Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meystel, A.; Koch, E.

    1984-06-01

    A concept of navigation is simulated based upon heuristic search. A mobile robot with a vision system navigates with an unknown or an unclear map. The range of vision is limited, thus, inflicting various judgments concerned with the comparison of alternatives of motion. The frequency of the decision-making procedure is limited by a definite time of computation. The system is simulated with a number of maps and the results of navigation are compared.

  20. Relative Navigation of Formation Flying Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Anne; Kelbel, David; Lee, Taesul; Leung, Dominic; Carpenter, Russell; Gramling, Cheryl; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center (GNCC) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has successfully developed high-accuracy autonomous satellite navigation systems using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) space and ground communications systems and the Global Positioning System (GPS). In addition, an autonomous navigation system that uses celestial object sensor measurements is currently under development and has been successfully tested using real Sun and Earth horizon measurements.The GNCC has developed advanced spacecraft systems that provide autonomous navigation and control of formation flyers in near-Earth, high-Earth, and libration point orbits. To support this effort, the GNCC is assessing the relative navigation accuracy achievable for proposed formations using GPS, intersatellite crosslink, ground-to-satellite Doppler, and celestial object sensor measurements. This paper evaluates the performance of these relative navigation approaches for three proposed missions with two or more vehicles maintaining relatively tight formations. High-fidelity simulations were performed to quantify the absolute and relative navigation accuracy as a function of navigation algorithm and measurement type. Realistically-simulated measurements were processed using the extended Kalman filter implemented in the GPS Enhanced Inboard Navigation System (GEONS) flight software developed by GSFC GNCC. Solutions obtained by simultaneously estimating all satellites in the formation were compared with the results obtained using a simpler approach based on differencing independently estimated state vectors.

  1. Applications of navigation for orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bobek, Samuel L

    2014-11-01

    Stereotactic surgical navigation has been used in oral and maxillofacial surgery for orbital reconstruction, reduction of facial fractures, localization of foreign bodies, placement of implants, skull base surgery, tumor removal, temporomandibular joint surgery, and orthognathic surgery. The primary goals in adopting intraoperative navigation into these different surgeries were to define and localize operative anatomy, to localize implant position, and to orient the surgical wound. Navigation can optimize the functional and esthetic outcomes in patients with dentofacial deformities by identifying pertinent anatomic structures, transferring the surgical plan to the patient, and verifying the surgical result. This article discusses the principles of navigation-guided orthognathic surgery.

  2. Limitations of navigation through Nubaria canal, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Magdy G.

    2013-01-01

    Alexandria port is the main Egyptian port at the Mediterranean Sea. It is connected to the Nile River through Nubaria canal, which is a main irrigation canal. The canal was designed to irrigate eight hundred thousand acres of agricultural lands, along its course which extends 100 km. The canal has three barrages and four locks to control the flow and allow light navigation by some small barges. Recently, it was decided to improve the locks located on the canal. More than 40 million US$ was invested in these projects. This decision was taken to allow larger barges and increase the transported capacity through the canal. On the other hand, navigation through canals and restricted shallow waterways is affected by several parameters related to both the channel and the vessel. Navigation lane width as well as vessel speed and maneuverability are affected by both the channel and vessel dimensions. Moreover, vessel dimensions and speed will affect the canal stability. In Egypt, there are no guide rules for navigation through narrow and shallow canals such Nubaria. This situation threatens the canal stability and safety of navigation through it. This paper discussed the characteristics of Nubaria canal and the guide rules for navigation in shallow restricted water ways. Dimensions limitation for barges navigating through Nubaria canal is presented. New safe operation rules for navigation in Nubaria canal are also presented. Moreover, the implication of navigation through locks on canal discharge is estimated. PMID:25685482

  3. Visual field dependence as a navigational strategy

    PubMed Central

    Willey, Chéla R.; Jackson, Russell E.

    2015-01-01

    Visual perception is an important component of environmental navigation. Previous research has revealed large individual differences in navigational strategies (i.e., the body's kinesthetic and embodied approach to movement) and the perception of environmental surfaces (via distance estimations), but little research has investigated the potential relationship between these sources of individual variation. An important navigational strategy is the interaction between reliance on visual cues and vestibular or proprioceptive cues. We investigated the role of this navigational strategy in the perception of environmental surfaces. The results supported three embodied evolutionary predictions: Individuals who were most reliant on visual context (1) overestimated vertical surfaces significantly more, and (2) feared falling significantly more, than did those who were least reliant on visual context; and (3) all individuals had roughly accurate horizontal distance estimates, regardless of their navigational strategy. These are among the first data to suggest that individual differences in perception are closely related to the individual differences in navigation that derive from navigational risks. Variable navigational strategies may reflect variable capacities to perceive and navigate the environment. PMID:24519434

  4. Vision-Based Navigation Around Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kicman, Pawel; Lisowski, Jakub; Bidaux-Sokolowski, Ambroise

    The paper is focused on the vision-based navigation around small bodies, starting with general overview of methods used in space navigation. The mission scenario is based on the latest guidelines for the ESA's Phobos Sample Return mission (until recently known as Phootprint) and the focus of the presented research is placed on the body relative navigation methods that are applicable for use around asteroids and small moons. In particular, detailed analysis of absolute navigation with reference to the body surface is performed. The results section contains analysis of the positioning accuracy achieved by the presented algorithms on a set of images generated using PANGU software.

  5. Space Shuttle Orbiter entry through landing navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewell, J. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter navigation system must be capable of determining its position and velocity throughout a variety of operational regimes. The design and operation of the entry through landing navigation system is described as it operates during a nominal end of mission from the orbital coasting phase throughout atmospheric flight and landing. Design and operation of the Kalman filter is described. Stabilization of the altitude channel prior to acquisition of external measurement data is described. Utilization of the Tactical Air Navigation (TACAN), barometric altimeter, and Microwave Scan Beam Landing System external measurement data is described. A comparison is made between predicted performance and the navigation accuracy observed during flight.

  6. The JPL roadmap for Deep Space navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Abraham, Douglas S.; Berry, David; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Cesarone, Robert J.; Wood, Lincoln

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the tentative set of deep space missions that will be supported by NASA's Deep Space Mission System in the next twenty-five years, and extracts the driving set of navigation capabilities that these missions will require. There will be many challenges including the support of new mission navigation approaches such as formation flying and rendezvous in deep space, low-energy and low-thrust orbit transfers, precise landing and ascent vehicles, and autonomous navigation. Innovative strategies and approaches will be needed to develop and field advanced navigation capabilities.

  7. Switching from reaching to navigation: differential cognitive strategies for spatial memory in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Belmonti, Vittorio; Cioni, Giovanni; Berthoz, Alain

    2015-07-01

    Navigational and reaching spaces are known to involve different cognitive strategies and brain networks, whose development in humans is still debated. In fact, high-level spatial processing, including allocentric location encoding, is already available to very young children, but navigational strategies are not mature until late childhood. The Magic Carpet (MC) is a new electronic device translating the traditional Corsi Block-tapping Test (CBT) to navigational space. In this study, the MC and the CBT were used to assess spatial memory for navigation and for reaching, respectively. Our hypothesis was that school-age children would not treat MC stimuli as navigational paths, assimilating them to reaching sequences. Ninety-one healthy children aged 6 to 11 years and 18 adults were enrolled. Overall short-term memory performance (span) on both tests, effects of sequence geometry, and error patterns according to a new classification were studied. Span increased with age on both tests, but relatively more in navigational than in reaching space, particularly in males. Sequence geometry specifically influenced navigation, not reaching. The number of body rotations along the path affected MC performance in children more than in adults, and in women more than in men. Error patterns indicated that navigational sequences were increasingly retained as global paths across development, in contrast to separately stored reaching locations. A sequence of spatial locations can be coded as a navigational path only if a cognitive switch from a reaching mode to a navigation mode occurs. This implies the integration of egocentric and allocentric reference frames, of visual and idiothetic cues, and access to long-term memory. This switch is not yet fulfilled at school age due to immature executive functions.

  8. Switching from reaching to navigation: differential cognitive strategies for spatial memory in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Belmonti, Vittorio; Cioni, Giovanni; Berthoz, Alain

    2015-07-01

    Navigational and reaching spaces are known to involve different cognitive strategies and brain networks, whose development in humans is still debated. In fact, high-level spatial processing, including allocentric location encoding, is already available to very young children, but navigational strategies are not mature until late childhood. The Magic Carpet (MC) is a new electronic device translating the traditional Corsi Block-tapping Test (CBT) to navigational space. In this study, the MC and the CBT were used to assess spatial memory for navigation and for reaching, respectively. Our hypothesis was that school-age children would not treat MC stimuli as navigational paths, assimilating them to reaching sequences. Ninety-one healthy children aged 6 to 11 years and 18 adults were enrolled. Overall short-term memory performance (span) on both tests, effects of sequence geometry, and error patterns according to a new classification were studied. Span increased with age on both tests, but relatively more in navigational than in reaching space, particularly in males. Sequence geometry specifically influenced navigation, not reaching. The number of body rotations along the path affected MC performance in children more than in adults, and in women more than in men. Error patterns indicated that navigational sequences were increasingly retained as global paths across development, in contrast to separately stored reaching locations. A sequence of spatial locations can be coded as a navigational path only if a cognitive switch from a reaching mode to a navigation mode occurs. This implies the integration of egocentric and allocentric reference frames, of visual and idiothetic cues, and access to long-term memory. This switch is not yet fulfilled at school age due to immature executive functions. PMID:25443319

  9. Radio occultation based on BeiDou satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hu; Hu, Haiying; Shen, Xue-min; Gong, Wenbin; Zhang, Yonghe

    2014-11-01

    With the development of GNSS systems, it has become a tendency that radio occultation is used to sense the Earth's atmosphere. By this means, the moisture, temperature, pressure, and total electron content can be derived. Based on the sensing results, more complicated models for atmosphere might come into being. Meteorology well benefits from this technology. As scheduled, the BD satellite navigation system will have a worldwide coverage by the end of 2020. Radio occultation studies in China have been highlighted in the recent decade. More and more feasibilities reports have been published in either domestic or international journals. Herein, some scenarios are proposed to assess the coverage of radio occultation based on two different phases of BD satellite navigation system. Phase one for BD is composed of GEO,IGSO and several MEO satellites. Phase two for BD consists mostly of 24 MEO satellites, some GEO and IGSO satellites. The characteristics of radio occultation based on these two phases are presented respectively.

  10. Autonomous navigation system and method

    DOEpatents

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-08

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller, which executes instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The instructions repeat, on each iteration through an event timing loop, the acts of defining an event horizon based on the robot's current velocity, detecting a range to obstacles around the robot, testing for an event horizon intrusion by determining if any range to the obstacles is within the event horizon, and adjusting rotational and translational velocity of the robot accordingly. If the event horizon intrusion occurs, rotational velocity is modified by a proportion of the current rotational velocity reduced by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle and translational velocity is modified by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle. If no event horizon intrusion occurs, translational velocity is set as a ratio of a speed factor relative to a maximum speed.

  11. GOES-next navigation operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorello, John L., Jr.; Oh, In-Hwan; Ranne, C. Lee

    1988-01-01

    The next generation of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, GOES-I through -M (hereafter referred to as GOES-Next), begins a new era in the operation of weather satellites by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). With a new spacecraft design, three-axis attitude stabilization, new ground support equipment, and improved methods of image navigation and registration that use on board compensation techniques to correct images for satellite motion, NOAA expects improved performance over the current series of dual-spin spacecraft. To meet these expectations, planning is currently underway for providing the complex and intensive operational environment that will meet the challenge of operating the GOES-Next spacecraft. This paper describes that operational environment.

  12. US Satellite Navigation Program Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Carl

    This, and the following paper, were first presented during the European GNSS98 Symposium held at the Centre de Congrès Pierre Baudis, Toulouse, France, from 20 to 23 October 1998; however, both authors have provided updated scripts for use in this Volume of the Journal.This paper provides an update of the development and implementation of the United States of America Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) and Local Area Augmentation Systems (LAAS). It also addresses FAA efforts to implement these satellite navigation technologies into the US National Airspace System (NAS), as well as interoperability efforts concerning Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS) between the FAA and other worldwide Civil Aviation Authorities.

  13. 33 CFR 165.100 - Regulated Navigation Area: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 CFR 2.36, within the geographic boundaries of the First Coast Guard District, as defined in 33 CFR...: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District. 165.100 Section 165.100 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY...

  14. 33 CFR 165.100 - Regulated Navigation Area: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 CFR 2.36, within the geographic boundaries of the First Coast Guard District, as defined in 33 CFR...: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District. 165.100 Section 165.100 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY...

  15. 33 CFR 165.100 - Regulated Navigation Area: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 CFR 2.36, within the geographic boundaries of the First Coast Guard District, as defined in 33 CFR...: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District. 165.100 Section 165.100 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY...

  16. 33 CFR 165.100 - Regulated Navigation Area: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 CFR 2.36, within the geographic boundaries of the First Coast Guard District, as defined in 33 CFR...: Navigable waters within the First Coast Guard District. 165.100 Section 165.100 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY...

  17. 75 FR 32275 - Regulated Navigation Area; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, Harvey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... Waterway, Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans, LA'' in the Federal Register (74 FR 22722). No public... navigation area (RNA) to prohibit all vessels from being within the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal...

  18. 33 CFR 2.36 - Navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (b) of this section, navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial waters mean, except where Congress has designated them not to be navigable waters of the United States: (1) Territorial seas of the United States; (2) Internal waters of the United States that are......

  19. 33 CFR 2.36 - Navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (b) of this section, navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial waters mean, except where Congress has designated them not to be navigable waters of the United States: (1) Territorial seas of the United States; (2) Internal waters of the United States that are......

  20. 33 CFR 2.36 - Navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (b) of this section, navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial waters mean, except where Congress has designated them not to be navigable waters of the United States: (1) Territorial seas of the United States; (2) Internal waters of the United States that are......

  1. 33 CFR 2.36 - Navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (b) of this section, navigable waters of the United States, navigable waters, and territorial waters mean, except where Congress has designated them not to be navigable waters of the United States: (1) Territorial seas of the United States; (2) Internal waters of the United States that are......

  2. Processing Images of Craters for Spacecraft Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yang; Johnson, Andrew E.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    A crater-detection algorithm has been conceived to enable automation of what, heretofore, have been manual processes for utilizing images of craters on a celestial body as landmarks for navigating a spacecraft flying near or landing on that body. The images are acquired by an electronic camera aboard the spacecraft, then digitized, then processed by the algorithm, which consists mainly of the following steps: 1. Edges in an image detected and placed in a database. 2. Crater rim edges are selected from the edge database. 3. Edges that belong to the same crater are grouped together. 4. An ellipse is fitted to each group of crater edges. 5. Ellipses are refined directly in the image domain to reduce errors introduced in the detection of edges and fitting of ellipses. 6. The quality of each detected crater is evaluated. It is planned to utilize this algorithm as the basis of a computer program for automated, real-time, onboard processing of crater-image data. Experimental studies have led to the conclusion that this algorithm is capable of a detection rate >93 percent, a false-alarm rate <5 percent, a geometric error <0.5 pixel, and a position error <0.3 pixel.

  3. An assessment of the effects of navigation maps on drivers' mental workloads.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chin-Jung; Lin, Chia-Hsyang; Hsu, Shang-Hwa

    2014-06-01

    This study compares the mental workloads and subjective feelings of drivers navigating different road patterns using different formats of electronic and paper maps. The results show drivers experience lower mental workloads when using 2D electronic maps compared to 3D electronic maps. Significant differences in galvanic skin responses were observed for navigation map formats with different road intersection patterns. The low- and high-frequency components of heart rate variability showed significant differences between map formats for regular road intersections, but no significant differences between map formats for irregular road intersections. Statistically significant effects on subjective feelings were found between different map formats and road intersection patterns. The wider implications of the study results for the design and use of navigation map interfaces are discussed.

  4. Technologies Old and New: Teaching Ancient Navigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spalding, Simon

    1995-01-01

    One educator presents maritime history to students using technologies available to ancient seafarers. Techniques include dead reckoning, the sandglass, the magnetic compass, celestial navigation, and various navigation techniques of precontact Polynesia that depended upon oral transmission of knowledge. The paper notes differences between…

  5. 46 CFR 169.691 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Navigation lights. 169.691 Section 169.691 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... lights. Navigation light systems must meet the requirements of § 111.75-17 of this chapter except...

  6. 46 CFR 169.691 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Navigation lights. 169.691 Section 169.691 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... lights. Navigation light systems must meet the requirements of § 111.75-17 of this chapter except...

  7. Learning and Navigation Assistance in a Hypermedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khentout, Chabane; Harous, Saad; Douidi, Lamri; Djoudi, Mahieddine

    2006-01-01

    Navigating through hypermedia the user faces problems of locating oneself with respect to space and time. That is why there is a need to develop tools that can help the user locate himself to see where he has been browsing through the net during a particular navigation session through hypermedia. It is needed to offer the user a map of the visited…

  8. Navigator. Volume 45, Number 3, Spring 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Education Leadership Association, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The National Science Education Leadership Association (NSELA) was formed in 1959 to meet a need to develop science education leadership for K-16 school systems. "Navigator" is published by NSELA to provide the latest NSELA events. This issue of "Navigator" includes the following items: (1) A Message from the President (Brenda Wojnowski); (2) NSELA…

  9. 46 CFR 185.304 - Navigation underway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Navigation underway. 185.304 Section 185.304 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Miscellaneous Operating Requirements § 185.304 Navigation underway. (a) The movement of...

  10. 46 CFR 122.304 - Navigation underway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Navigation underway. 122.304 Section 122.304 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... Requirements § 122.304 Navigation underway. (a) The movement of a vessel shall be under the direction...

  11. Evolved Navigation Theory and Horizontal Visual Illusions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Russell E.; Willey, Chela R.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental perception is prerequisite to most vertebrate behavior and its modern investigation initiated the founding of experimental psychology. Navigation costs may affect environmental perception, such as overestimating distances while encumbered (Solomon, 1949). However, little is known about how this occurs in real-world navigation or how…

  12. 46 CFR 122.304 - Navigation underway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Navigation underway. 122.304 Section 122.304 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... Requirements § 122.304 Navigation underway. (a) The movement of a vessel shall be under the direction...

  13. 46 CFR 122.304 - Navigation underway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Navigation underway. 122.304 Section 122.304 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... Requirements § 122.304 Navigation underway. (a) The movement of a vessel shall be under the direction...

  14. 46 CFR 122.304 - Navigation underway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Navigation underway. 122.304 Section 122.304 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... Requirements § 122.304 Navigation underway. (a) The movement of a vessel shall be under the direction...

  15. 46 CFR 185.304 - Navigation underway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Navigation underway. 185.304 Section 185.304 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Miscellaneous Operating Requirements § 185.304 Navigation underway. (a) The movement of...

  16. 76 FR 21772 - Navigation Safety Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... Register (73 FR 3316). Docket: For access to the docket to read documents or comments related to this... SECURITY Coast Guard Navigation Safety Advisory Council AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Navigation Safety Advisory Council (NAVSAC) will meet on May...

  17. Characterizing Navigation in Interactive Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Hai-Ning; Sedig, Kamran

    2009-01-01

    Interactive learning environments (ILEs) are increasingly used to support and enhance instruction and learning experiences. ILEs maintain and display information, allowing learners to interact with this information. One important method of interacting with information is navigation. Often, learners are required to navigate through the information…

  18. 46 CFR 185.304 - Navigation underway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Navigation underway. 185.304 Section 185.304 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Miscellaneous Operating Requirements § 185.304 Navigation underway. (a) The movement of...

  19. 75 FR 41987 - Inland Navigation Rules; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ...-1565 Scott.R.Medeiros@uscg.mil . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In FR doc 2010-8532 appearing on page 20294... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AB43 Inland Navigation Rules; Correction ACTION: Final rule... Navigation Rules into the Code of Federal Regulations. That publication contained an error in...

  20. 46 CFR 122.304 - Navigation underway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Navigation underway. 122.304 Section 122.304 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... Requirements § 122.304 Navigation underway. (a) The movement of a vessel shall be under the direction...

  1. Understanding the Social Navigation User Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goecks, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    A social navigation system collects data from its users--its community--about what they are doing, their opinions, and their decisions, aggregates this data, and provides the aggregated data--community data--back to individuals so that they can use it to guide behavior and decisions. Social navigation systems empower users with the ability to…

  2. 76 FR 63934 - Navigation Safety Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Docket: For access to the docket to read documents or comments... measures, marine information, diving safety, and aids to navigation systems. The meeting will be open to... information, diving safety, and aids to navigation systems. Agenda The NAVSAC will meet to review, discuss...

  3. Disputing Viking navigation by polarized skylight.

    PubMed

    Roslund, C; Beckman, C

    1994-07-20

    The widely held notion that the Vikings utilized polarization of skylight on overcast days for navigational purposes is demonstrated to have no scientific basis. The use of polarized skylight for navigation under partly cloudfree skies should be treated with caution and skepticism.

  4. Memorable Messages for Navigating College Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazione, Samantha; Laplante, Carolyn; Smith, Sandi W.; Cornacchione, Jennifer; Russell, Jessica; Stohl, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript details an investigation of memorable messages that help students navigate college life using a control theory framework. Researchers conducted face-to-face interviews with 61 undergraduate students who recalled a specific memorable message that helped them as they navigated college. Results of this formative study show the…

  5. 46 CFR 169.691 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Navigation lights. 169.691 Section 169.691 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... lights. Navigation light systems must meet the requirements of § 111.75-17 of this chapter except...

  6. 46 CFR 169.691 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Navigation lights. 169.691 Section 169.691 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... lights. Navigation light systems must meet the requirements of § 111.75-17 of this chapter except...

  7. 46 CFR 169.691 - Navigation lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Navigation lights. 169.691 Section 169.691 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... lights. Navigation light systems must meet the requirements of § 111.75-17 of this chapter except...

  8. Navigator. Volume 45, Number 2, Winter 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Education Leadership Association, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The National Science Education Leadership Association (NSELA) was formed in 1959 to meet a need to develop science education leadership for K-16 school systems. "Navigator" is published by NSELA to provide the latest NSELA events. This issue of "Navigator" contains the following reports: (1) A Message from the President: Creating Networks of…

  9. Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Rodney L.; Born, George H.; Leonard, Jason M.; McGranaghan, Ryan M.; Fujimoto, Kohei

    2013-01-01

    A navigation technology known as LiAISON (Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation) has been known to produce very impressive navigation results for scenarios involving two or more cooperative satellites near the Moon, such that at least one satellite must be in an orbit significantly perturbed by the Earth, such as a lunar halo orbit. The two (or more) satellites track each other using satellite-to-satellite range and/or range-rate measurements. These relative measurements yield absolute orbit navigation when one of the satellites is in a lunar halo orbit, or the like. The geometry between a lunar halo orbiter and a GEO satellite continuously changes, which dramatically improves the information content of a satellite-to-satellite tracking signal. The geometrical variations include significant out-of-plane shifts, as well as inplane shifts. Further, the GEO satellite is almost continuously in view of a lunar halo orbiter. High-fidelity simulations demonstrate that LiAISON technology improves the navigation of GEO orbiters by an order of magnitude, relative to standard ground tracking. If a GEO satellite is navigated using LiAISON- only tracking measurements, its position is typically known to better than 10 meters. If LiAISON measurements are combined with simple radiometric ground observations, then the satellite s position is typically known to better than 3 meters, which is substantially better than the current state of GEO navigation. There are two features of LiAISON that are novel and advantageous compared with conventional satellite navigation. First, ordinary satellite-to-satellite tracking data only provides relative navigation of each satellite. The novelty is the placement of one navigation satellite in an orbit that is significantly perturbed by both the Earth and the Moon. A navigation satellite can track other satellites elsewhere in the Earth-Moon system and acquire knowledge about both satellites absolute positions and velocities

  10. Cognitive Navigation: Toward a Biological Basis for Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripp, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Discusses cognitive navigation, cognitive maps and online learning, and the role of the hippocampus in navigation. Topics include brain research in animal and human studies; types of memory; human navigation, including land navigation and information navigation; instructional strategies; tree maps of curriculum structure; cognitive complexity; and…

  11. 33 CFR 245.20 - Determination of hazard to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Determination of hazard to navigation. 245.20 Section 245.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REMOVAL OF WRECKS AND OTHER OBSTRUCTIONS § 245.20 Determination of hazard to...

  12. 33 CFR 245.20 - Determination of hazard to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determination of hazard to navigation. 245.20 Section 245.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REMOVAL OF WRECKS AND OTHER OBSTRUCTIONS § 245.20 Determination of hazard to...

  13. 33 CFR 245.20 - Determination of hazard to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Determination of hazard to navigation. 245.20 Section 245.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REMOVAL OF WRECKS AND OTHER OBSTRUCTIONS § 245.20 Determination of hazard to...

  14. 33 CFR 162.240 - Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Register citations affecting § 162.240, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation. 162.240 Section 162.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF...

  15. 33 CFR 245.20 - Determination of hazard to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of hazard to navigation. 245.20 Section 245.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REMOVAL OF WRECKS AND OTHER OBSTRUCTIONS § 245.20 Determination of hazard to...

  16. 33 CFR 245.20 - Determination of hazard to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determination of hazard to navigation. 245.20 Section 245.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REMOVAL OF WRECKS AND OTHER OBSTRUCTIONS § 245.20 Determination of hazard to...

  17. 33 CFR 100.45 - Establishment of aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Establishment of aids to... SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.45 Establishment of aids to navigation. The District Commander will establish and maintain only those aids to navigation necessary...

  18. 33 CFR 100.45 - Establishment of aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Establishment of aids to... SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.45 Establishment of aids to navigation. The District Commander will establish and maintain only those aids to navigation necessary...

  19. 33 CFR 100.45 - Establishment of aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Establishment of aids to... SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.45 Establishment of aids to navigation. The District Commander will establish and maintain only those aids to navigation necessary...

  20. 33 CFR 100.45 - Establishment of aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Establishment of aids to... SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.45 Establishment of aids to navigation. The District Commander will establish and maintain only those aids to navigation necessary...

  1. 33 CFR 100.45 - Establishment of aids to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Establishment of aids to... SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.45 Establishment of aids to navigation. The District Commander will establish and maintain only those aids to navigation necessary...

  2. 33 CFR 209.315 - Public access to navigation works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Public access to navigation works..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.315 Public access to navigation works. While the... navigation works of general public interest subject to the following criteria: (a) The public will not...

  3. GPS-based navigation for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champetier, C.; Duhamel, T.; Frezet, M.

    1995-03-01

    We present in this paper a survey of the applications of the GPS (global positioning system) system for spacecraft navigation. The use of the GPS techniques for space missions is a striking example of dual-use of military technology; it can bring vast improvements in performances and, in some cases, for a reduced cost. We only deal in this paper with the functional aspects and performances of GPS uses without addressing the issues of hardware implementation where current developments are leading to an increased miniaturization of the GPS receiver hardware. We start this paper with a general overview of the GPS system and its various uses for space missions. We then focus on four areas where MATRA MARCONI Space has conducted detailed analyses of performances: autonomous navigation for geostationary spacecraft, relative navigation for space rendezvous, differential navigation for landing vehicles, absolute navigation for launchers and reentry vehicles.

  4. Risk management model of winter navigation operations.

    PubMed

    Valdez Banda, Osiris A; Goerlandt, Floris; Kuzmin, Vladimir; Kujala, Pentti; Montewka, Jakub

    2016-07-15

    The wintertime maritime traffic operations in the Gulf of Finland are managed through the Finnish-Swedish Winter Navigation System. This establishes the requirements and limitations for the vessels navigating when ice covers this area. During winter navigation in the Gulf of Finland, the largest risk stems from accidental ship collisions which may also trigger oil spills. In this article, a model for managing the risk of winter navigation operations is presented. The model analyses the probability of oil spills derived from collisions involving oil tanker vessels and other vessel types. The model structure is based on the steps provided in the Formal Safety Assessment (FSA) by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and adapted into a Bayesian Network model. The results indicate that ship independent navigation and convoys are the operations with higher probability of oil spills. Minor spills are most probable, while major oil spills found very unlikely but possible.

  5. Autonomous Deep-Space Optical Navigation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This project will advance the Autonomous Deep-space navigation capability applied to Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) system by testing it on hardware, particularly in a flight processor, with a goal of limited testing in the Integrated Power, Avionics and Software (IPAS) with the ARCM (Asteroid Retrieval Crewed Mission) DRO (Distant Retrograde Orbit) Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) scenario. The technology, which will be harnessed, is called 'optical flow', also known as 'visual odometry'. It is being matured in the automotive and SLAM (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) applications but has yet to be applied to spacecraft navigation. In light of the tremendous potential of this technique, we believe that NASA needs to design a optical navigation architecture that will use this technique. It is flexible enough to be applicable to navigating around planetary bodies, such as asteroids.

  6. A study of navigation in virtual space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darken, Rudy; Sibert, John L.; Shumaker, Randy

    1994-01-01

    In the physical world, man has developed efficient methods for navigation and orientation. These methods are dependent on the high-fidelity stimuli presented by the environment. When placed in a virtual world which cannot offer stimuli of the same quality due to computing constraints and immature technology, tasks requiring the maintenance of position and orientation knowledge become laborious. In this paper, we present a representative set of techniques based on principles of navigation derived from real world analogs including human and avian navigation behavior and cartography. A preliminary classification of virtual worlds is presented based on the size of the world, the density of objects in the world, and the level of activity taking place in the world. We also summarize an informal study we performed to determine how the tools influenced the subjects' navigation strategies and behavior. We conclude that principles extracted from real world navigation aids such as maps can be seen to apply in virtual environments.

  7. BOREAS Level-0 C-130 Navigation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strub, Richard; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Domingues, Roseanne; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The level-0 C-130 navigation data files contain aircraft attitude and position information acquired during the digital image and photographic data collection missions over the BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) study areas. Various portions of the navigation data were collected at 1, 10, and 30 Hz. The level-0 C-130 navigation data collected for BOREAS in 1994 were improved over previous years in that the C-130 onboard navigation system was upgraded to output inertial navigation parameters every 1/30th of a second (i.e., 30 Hz). This upgrade was encouraged by users of the aircraft scanner data with the hope of improving the relative geometric positioning of the collected images.

  8. Risk management model of winter navigation operations.

    PubMed

    Valdez Banda, Osiris A; Goerlandt, Floris; Kuzmin, Vladimir; Kujala, Pentti; Montewka, Jakub

    2016-07-15

    The wintertime maritime traffic operations in the Gulf of Finland are managed through the Finnish-Swedish Winter Navigation System. This establishes the requirements and limitations for the vessels navigating when ice covers this area. During winter navigation in the Gulf of Finland, the largest risk stems from accidental ship collisions which may also trigger oil spills. In this article, a model for managing the risk of winter navigation operations is presented. The model analyses the probability of oil spills derived from collisions involving oil tanker vessels and other vessel types. The model structure is based on the steps provided in the Formal Safety Assessment (FSA) by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and adapted into a Bayesian Network model. The results indicate that ship independent navigation and convoys are the operations with higher probability of oil spills. Minor spills are most probable, while major oil spills found very unlikely but possible. PMID:27207023

  9. New bionic navigation algorithm based on the visual navigation mechanism of bees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yufeng; Liu, Yi; Liu, Jianguo

    2015-04-01

    Through some research on visual navigation mechanisms of flying insects especially honeybees, a novel navigation algorithm integrating entropy flow with Kalman filter has been introduced in this paper. Concepts of entropy image and entropy flow are also introduced, which can characterize topographic features and measure changes of the image respectively. To characterize texture feature and spatial distribution of an image, a new concept of contrast entropy image has been presented in this paper. Applying the contrast entropy image to the navigation algorithm to test its' performance of navigation and comparing with simulation results of intensity entropy image, a conclusion that contrast entropy image performs better and more robust in navigation has been made.

  10. Patient Navigation from the Paired Perspectives of Cancer Patients and Navigators: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yosha, Amanat M.; Carroll, Jennifer K.; Hendren, Samantha; Salamone, Charcy M.; Sanders, Mechelle; Fiscella, Kevin; Epstein, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Patient navigation for cancer care assesses and alleviates barriers to health care services. We examined paired perspectives of cancer patients and their navigators to examine the process of patient navigation. We explored the strengths, limitations, and our own lessons learned about adopting the novel methodology of multiperspective analysis. Methods As part of a larger RCT, patients and navigators were interviewed separately. We reviewed interviews with 18 patient-navigator dyads. Dyad summaries were created that explicitly incorporated both patient and navigator perspectives. Emerging themes and verbatim quotations were reflected in the summaries. Results Paired perspectives were valuable in identifying struggles that arose during navigation. These were represented as imbalanced investment and relational amelioration. Patients and navigators had general consensus about important patient needs for cancer care, but characterized these needs differently. Conclusion Our experience with multiperspective analysis revealed a methodology that delivers novel relational findings, but is best conducted de novo rather than as part of a larger study. Practice Implications Multiperspective analysis should be more widely adopted with clear aims and analytic strategy that strengthen the ability to reveal relational dynamics. Navigation training programs should anticipate navigator struggles and provide navigators with tools to manage them. PMID:21255958

  11. Geomagnetic Navigation in Sea Turtles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, K.; Putman, N.; Lohmann, C.

    2011-12-01

    Young loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) from eastern Florida undertake a transoceanic migration in which they gradually circle the north Atlantic Ocean before returning to the North American coast. Newly hatched turtles (hatchlings) begin the migration with a 'magnetic map' in which regional magnetic fields function as navigational markers and elicit changes in swimming direction at crucial geographic boundaries. In laboratory experiments, young turtles that had never before been in the ocean were exposed to fields like those that exist at various, widely separated locations along their transoceanic migratory route. Turtles responded by swimming in directions that would, in each case, help them remain within the North Atlantic gyre currents and advance along the migratory pathway. The results demonstrate that turtles can derive both longitudinal and latitudinal information from the Earth's field, and provide strong evidence that hatchling loggerheads inherit a remarkably elaborate set of responses that function in guiding them along their open-sea migratory route. For young sea turtles, couplings of oriented swimming to regional magnetic fields appear to provide the fundamental building blocks from which natural selection can sculpt a sequence of responses capable of guiding first-time ocean migrants along complex migratory routes. The results imply that hatchlings from different populations in different parts of the world are likely to have magnetic navigational responses uniquely suited for the migratory routes that each group follows. Thus, from a conservation perspective, turtles from different populations are not interchangeable. From an evolutionary perspective, the responses are not incompatible with either secular variation or magnetic polarity reversals. As Earth's field gradually changes, strong selective pressure presumably acts to maintain an approximate match between the responses of hatchlings and the fields that exist at critical points along

  12. 14 CFR 121.349 - Communication and navigation equipment for operations under VFR over routes not navigated by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (c) of this section, two approved independent navigation systems suitable for navigating the airplane... have two-way voice communication capability. (c) Use of a single independent navigation system for... be equipped with a single independent navigation system suitable for navigating the airplane...

  13. 14 CFR 121.349 - Communication and navigation equipment for operations under VFR over routes not navigated by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (c) of this section, two approved independent navigation systems suitable for navigating the airplane... have two-way voice communication capability. (c) Use of a single independent navigation system for... be equipped with a single independent navigation system suitable for navigating the airplane...

  14. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kasatkin, A. A. Nigmatullina, A. R.; Urakov, A. L.

    2015-11-17

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient’s exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  15. Robot navigation using image sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, C.; Hager, G.D.

    1996-12-31

    We describe a framework for robot navigation that exploits the continuity of image sequences. Tracked visual features both guide the robot and provide predictive information about subsequent features to track. Our hypothesis is that image-based techniques will allow accurate motion without a precise geometric model of the world, while using predictive information will add speed and robustness. A basic component of our framework is called a scene, which is the set of image features stable over some segment of motion. When the scene changes, it is appended to a stored sequence. As the robot moves, correspondences and dissimilarities between current, remembered, and expected scenes provide cues to join and split scene sequences, forming a map-like directed graph. Visual servoing on features in successive scenes is used to traverse a path between robot and goal map locations. In our framework, a human guide serves as a scene recognition oracle during a map-learning phase; thereafter, assuming a known starting position, the robot can independently determine its location without general scene recognition ability. A prototype implementation of this framework uses as features color patches, sum-of-squared differences (SSD) subimages, or image projections of rectangles.

  16. Inertial sensors for smartphones navigation.

    PubMed

    Dabove, P; Ghinamo, G; Lingua, A M

    2015-01-01

    The advent of smartphones and tablets, means that we can constantly get information on our current geographical location. These devices include not only GPS/GNSS chipsets but also mass-market inertial platforms that can be used to plan activities, share locations on social networks, and also to perform positioning in indoor and outdoor scenarios. This paper shows the performance of smartphones and their inertial sensors in terms of gaining information about the user's current geographical locatio n considering an indoor navigation scenario. Tests were carried out to determine the accuracy and precision obtainable with internal and external sensors. In terms of the attitude and drift estimation with an updating interval equal to 1 s, 2D accuracies of about 15 cm were obtained with the images. Residual benefits were also obtained, however, for large intervals, e.g. 2 and 5 s, where the accuracies decreased to 50 cm and 2.2 m, respectively. PMID:26753121

  17. Defining, Navigating, and Negotiating Success

    PubMed Central

    Kalet, Adina L; Fletcher, Kathlyn E; Ferdman, Dina J; Bickell, Nina A

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND We studied female graduates of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program (CSP, Class of 1984 to 1989) to explore and describe the complexity of creating balance in the life of mid-career academic woman physicians. METHODS We conducted and qualitatively analyzed (κ 0.35 to 1.0 for theme identification among rater pairs) data from a semi-structured survey of 21 women and obtained their curricula vitae to quantify publications and grant support, measures of academic productivity. RESULTS Sixteen of 21 (76%) women completed the survey. Mean age was 48 (range: 45 to 56). Three were full professors, 10 were associate professors, and 3 had left academic medicine. Eleven women had had children (mean 2.4; range: 1 to 3) and 3 worked part-time. From these data, the conceptual model expands on 3 key themes: (1) defining, navigating, and negotiating success, (2) making life work, and (3) making work work. The women who described themselves as satisfied with their careers (10/16) had clarity of values and goals and a sense of control over their time. Those less satisfied with their careers (6/16) emphasized the personal and professional costs of the struggle to balance their lives and described explicit institutional barriers to fulfillment of their potential. CONCLUSION For this group of fellowship-prepared academic women physicians satisfaction is achieving professional and personal balance. PMID:16918735

  18. Manifold learning for robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Keeratipranon, Narongdech; Maire, Frederic; Huang, Henry

    2006-10-01

    In this paper we introduce methods to build a SOM that can be used as an isometric map for mobile robots. That is, given a dataset of sensor readings collected at points uniformly distributed with respect to the ground, we wish to build a SOM whose neurons (prototype vectors in sensor space) correspond to points uniformly distributed on the ground. Manifold learning techniques have already been used for dimensionality reduction of sensor space in navigation systems. Our focus is on the isometric property of the SOM. For reliable path-planning and information sharing between several robots, it is desirable that the robots build an internal representation of the sensor manifold, a map, that is isometric with the environment. We show experimentally that standard Non-Linear Dimensionality Reduction (NLDR) algorithms do not provide isometric maps for range data and bearing data. However, the auxiliary low dimensional manifolds created can be used to improve the distribution of the neurons of a SOM (that is, make the neurons more evenly distributed with respect to the ground). We also describe a method to create an isometric map from a sensor readings collected along a polygonal line random walk.

  19. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatkin, A. A.; Urakov, A. L.; Nigmatullina, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient's exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  20. 76 FR 33773 - Navigation Safety Advisory Council; Vacancies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Navigation Safety Advisory Council; Vacancies AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Request for applications. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard seeks applications for membership on the Navigation... the Road, navigation regulations and equipment, routing measures, marine information, diving...

  1. 78 FR 19277 - Navigation Safety Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... SECURITY United States Coast Guard Navigation Safety Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: United States Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Federal Advisory Committee meeting: correction. SUMMARY: The Navigation...; navigation regulations and equipment; routing measures; marine information; diving safety; and aids...

  2. GPS/MEMS IMU/Microprocessor Board for Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gender, Thomas K.; Chow, James; Ott, William E.

    2009-01-01

    A miniaturized instrumentation package comprising a (1) Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, (2) an inertial measurement unit (IMU) consisting largely of surface-micromachined sensors of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type, and (3) a microprocessor, all residing on a single circuit board, is part of the navigation system of a compact robotic spacecraft intended to be released from a larger spacecraft [e.g., the International Space Station (ISS)] for exterior visual inspection of the larger spacecraft. Variants of the package may also be useful in terrestrial collision-detection and -avoidance applications. The navigation solution obtained by integrating the IMU outputs is fed back to a correlator in the GPS receiver to aid in tracking GPS signals. The raw GPS and IMU data are blended in a Kalman filter to obtain an optimal navigation solution, which can be supplemented by range and velocity data obtained by use of (l) a stereoscopic pair of electronic cameras aboard the robotic spacecraft and/or (2) a laser dynamic range imager aboard the ISS. The novelty of the package lies mostly in those aspects of the design of the MEMS IMU that pertain to controlling mechanical resonances and stabilizing scale factors and biases.

  3. Space Shuttle Navigation in the GPS Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle navigation architecture was originally designed in the 1970s. A variety of on-board and ground based navigation sensors and computers are used during the ascent, orbit coast, rendezvous, (including proximity operations and docking) and entry flight phases. With the advent of GPS navigation and tightly coupled GPS/INS Units employing strapdown sensors, opportunities to improve and streamline the Shuttle navigation process are being pursued. These improvements can potentially result in increased safety, reliability, and cost savings in maintenance through the replacement of older technologies and elimination of ground support systems (such as Tactical Air Control and Navigation (TACAN), Microwave Landing System (MLS) and ground radar). Selection and missionization of "off the shelf" GPS and GPS/INS units pose a unique challenge since the units in question were not originally designed for the Space Shuttle application. Various options for integrating GPS and GPS/INS units with the existing orbiter avionics system were considered in light of budget constraints, software quality concerns, and schedule limitations. An overview of Shuttle navigation methodology from 1981 to the present is given, along with how GPS and GPS/INS technology will change, or not change, the way Space Shuttle navigation is performed in the 21 5 century.

  4. 33 CFR 209.325 - Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data policy, practices and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or interest to general navigation. Notice need not be given as to such buoys, lights, or fog signals... also lights or fog signals on ferry slips and on piers used only by certain vessels, and stakes,...

  5. 33 CFR 209.325 - Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data policy, practices and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or interest to general navigation. Notice need not be given as to such buoys, lights, or fog signals... also lights or fog signals on ferry slips and on piers used only by certain vessels, and stakes,...

  6. 33 CFR 209.325 - Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data policy, practices and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or interest to general navigation. Notice need not be given as to such buoys, lights, or fog signals... also lights or fog signals on ferry slips and on piers used only by certain vessels, and stakes,...

  7. Optical Navigation for the EPOXI Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, Brian P.; Owen, William M. , Jr.; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Synnott, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    The Deep Impact spacecraft flew by comet Hartley 2 on November 4, 2010 as part of its extended mission called EPOXI. Successful navigation depended critically on the quality and timing of optical navigation data processing, since pictures of the comet provided the most precise comet-relative position of the spacecraft. This paper describes the planning, including the picture timing and pointing; the methods used to determine the center of the comet image in each picture; and the optical navigation results, which provided the necessary information to allow the cameras to accurately target the comet for science imaging at encounter.

  8. Navigating nuclear science: Enhancing analysis through visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, N.H.; Berkel, J. van; Johnson, D.K.; Wylie, B.N.

    1997-09-01

    Data visualization is an emerging technology with high potential for addressing the information overload problem. This project extends the data visualization work of the Navigating Science project by coupling it with more traditional information retrieval methods. A citation-derived landscape was augmented with documents using a text-based similarity measure to show viability of extension into datasets where citation lists do not exist. Landscapes, showing hills where clusters of similar documents occur, can be navigated, manipulated and queried in this environment. The capabilities of this tool provide users with an intuitive explore-by-navigation method not currently available in today`s retrieval systems.

  9. Enhancing Navigation Skills through Audio Gaming

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Jaime; Sáenz, Mauricio; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Merabet, Lotfi

    2014-01-01

    We present the design, development and initial cognitive evaluation of an Audio-based Environment Simulator (AbES). This software allows a blind user to navigate through a virtual representation of a real space for the purposes of training orientation and mobility skills. Our findings indicate that users feel satisfied and self-confident when interacting with the audio-based interface, and the embedded sounds allow them to correctly orient themselves and navigate within the virtual world. Furthermore, users are able to transfer spatial information acquired through virtual interactions into real world navigation and problem solving tasks. PMID:25505796

  10. Integration of Omega and satellite navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlachta, Henry B.

    An extensive series of laboratory tests and flight trials has established that the hybrid Omega/VLF/GPS system effectively applies GPS to the enhancement of Omega with a cost-effective operator installation. The accuracy enhancement thus achieved also increases the reliability of navigation and furnishes aviation fuel savings superior to those of Omega, as a result of reduced flight-path wavering. The prospective GPS/GLONASS navigation system currently undergoing definition will be the first certifiable as a sole means on navigation; the Omega/VLF/GPS hybrid can serve as a transitional system.

  11. Navigation for people with mild dementia.

    PubMed

    Hettinga, Marike; De Boer, Johannes; Goldberg, Eli; Moelaert, Ferial

    2009-01-01

    Community dwelling is a problem for people with dementia. Can GPS route navigation support on a mobile device provide a solution? In a small scale exploratory research with this target group we studied the effects of two different types of audio instructions and assessed the pedestrian safety while operating the device. Methodological issues that limited the size and scope of data collection notwithstanding, evidence of unsafe behaviour was not found. Navigation instructions spoken by a familiar voice seemed to have a positive impact on the effectiveness of the navigation system, while the use of warning sounds seemed to have the opposite effect.

  12. Fuzzy Behavior-Based Navigation for Planetary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tunstel, Edward; Danny, Harrison; Lippincott, Tanya; Jamshidi, Mo

    1997-01-01

    Adaptive behavioral capabilities are necessary for robust rover navigation in unstructured and partially-mapped environments. A control approach is described which exploits the approximate reasoning capability of fuzzy logic to produce adaptive motion behavior. In particular, a behavior-based architecture for hierarchical fuzzy control of microrovers is presented. Its structure is described, as well as mechanisms of control decision-making which give rise to adaptive behavior. Control decisions for local navigation result from a consensus of recommendations offered only by behaviors that are applicable to current situations. Simulation predicts the navigation performance on a microrover in simplified Mars-analog terrain.

  13. Functional connections between optic flow areas and navigationally responsive brain regions during goal-directed navigation.

    PubMed

    Sherrill, Katherine R; Chrastil, Elizabeth R; Ross, Robert S; Erdem, Uğur M; Hasselmo, Michael E; Stern, Chantal E

    2015-09-01

    Recent computational models suggest that visual input from optic flow provides information about egocentric (navigator-centered) motion and influences firing patterns in spatially tuned cells during navigation. Computationally, self-motion cues can be extracted from optic flow during navigation. Despite the importance of optic flow to navigation, a functional link between brain regions sensitive to optic flow and brain regions important for navigation has not been established in either humans or animals. Here, we used a beta-series correlation methodology coupled with two fMRI tasks to establish this functional link during goal-directed navigation in humans. Functionally defined optic flow sensitive cortical areas V3A, V6, and hMT+ were used as seed regions. fMRI data was collected during a navigation task in which participants updated position and orientation based on self-motion cues to successfully navigate to an encoded goal location. The results demonstrate that goal-directed navigation requiring updating of position and orientation in the first person perspective involves a cooperative interaction between optic flow sensitive regions V3A, V6, and hMT+ and the hippocampus, retrosplenial cortex, posterior parietal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortex. These functional connections suggest a dynamic interaction between these systems to support goal-directed navigation.

  14. Navigating the cancer journey: a review of patient navigator programs for Indigenous cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Whop, Lisa J; Valery, Patricia C; Beesley, Vanessa L; Moore, Suzanne P; Lokuge, Kamalini; Jacka, Catherine; Garvey, Gail

    2012-12-01

    Patient navigator programs have evolved to facilitate access to care and improve outcomes for Indigenous cancer patients. We reviewed the scientific literature on patient navigator programs in Indigenous people with cancer. We conducted a review of the published literature up to 13 April 2011. PubMed, MEDLINE and CINAHL databases were searched for original articles on Indigenous patient navigation programs. The review produced eight relevant articles covering two specific programs, the Native Sisters Program and the Walking Forward Program. Program descriptions, patient navigator's roles, cultural aspects and the impact of the programs were described. Patient navigators' roles in the programs varied, as did their qualifications, but importantly, all were Indigenous. Both programs aimed to increase participation in screening, remove barriers to treatment and decrease mortality. The Native Sisters Program documented an increase in adherence to breast screening among navigated American Indian participants, although there were substantial differences in the baseline screening adherence between navigated and non-navigated participants. The Walking Forward Program yielded on average 3 fewer days of treatment delays for navigated American Indians than for non-navigated American Indians. However, adjustments for socioeconomic characteristics and disease characteristics were not described. Although preliminary outcomes are seemingly positive, further rigorous evaluation of quantitative impacts are needed.

  15. Mars Science Laboratory Navigation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Kruizingas, Gerhard L.; Burkhart, P. Daniel; Wong, Mau C.; Abilleira, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), carrying the Curiosity rover to Mars, was launched on November 26, 2011, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The target for MSL was selected to be Gale Crater, near the equator of Mars, with an arrival date in early August 2012. The two main interplanetary navigation tasks for the mission were to deliver the spacecraft to an entry interface point that would allow the rover to safely reach the landing area, and to tell the spacecraft where it entered the atmosphere of Mars, so it could guide itself accurately to close proximity of the landing target. MSL used entry guidance as it slowed down from the entry speed to a speed low enough to allow for a successful parachute deployment, and this guidance allowed shrinking the landing ellipse to a 99% conservative estimate of 7 by 20 kilometers. Since there is no global positioning system in Mars, achieving this accuracy was predicated on flying a trajectory that closely matched the reference trajectory used to design the guidance algorithm, and on initializing the guidance system with an accurate Mars-relative entry state that could be used as the starting point to integrate the inertial measurement unit data during entry and descent. The pre-launch entry flight path angle (EFPA) delivery requirement was +/- 0.20 deg, but after launch a smaller threshold of +/- 0.05 deg was used as the criteria for late trajectory correction maneuver (TCM) decisions. The pre-launch requirement for entry state knowledge was 2.8 kilometers in position error and 2 meters per second in velocity error, but also smaller thresholds were defined after launch to evaluate entry state update opportunities. The biggest challenge for the navigation team was to accurately predict the trajectory of the spacecraft, so the estimates of the entry conditions could be stable, and late trajectory correction maneuvers or entry parameter updates could be waved off. As a matter of fact, the prediction accuracy was such that the last

  16. Vision assisted aircraft lateral navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohideen, Mohamed Ibrahim; Ramegowda, Dinesh; Seiler, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Surface operation is currently one of the least technologically equipped phases of aircraft operation. The increased air traffic congestion necessitates more aircraft operations in degraded weather and at night. The traditional surface procedures worked well in most cases as airport surfaces have not been congested and airport layouts were less complex. Despite the best efforts of FAA and other safety agencies, runway incursions continue to occur frequently due to incorrect surface operation. Several studies conducted by FAA suggest that pilot induced error contributes significantly to runway incursions. Further, the report attributes pilot's lack of situational awareness - local (e.g., minimizing lateral deviation), global (e.g., traffic in the vicinity) and route (e.g., distance to next turn) - to the problem. An Enhanced Vision System (EVS) is one concept that is being considered to resolve these issues. These systems use on-board sensors to provide situational awareness under poor visibility conditions. In this paper, we propose the use of an Image processing based system to estimate the aircraft position and orientation relative to taxiway markings to use as lateral guidance aid. We estimate aircraft yaw angle and lateral offset from slope of the taxiway centerline and horizontal position of vanishing line. Unlike automotive applications, several cues such as aircraft maneuvers along assigned route with minimal deviations, clear ground markings, even taxiway surface, limited aircraft speed are available and enable us to implement significant algorithm optimizations. We present experimental results to show high precision navigation accuracy with sensitivity analysis with respect to camera mount, optics, and image processing error.

  17. Navigating the Internet: A Beginning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, George H., II

    1992-01-01

    Explains how to become more knowledgeable about using resources available on Internet. Four main areas are discussed: (1) print media resources; (2) learning to use a personal computer effectively, including the maintenance of hard disks; (3) electronic mail; and (4) interactive networking. Current and future improvements to make networks more…

  18. Observability analysis of Mars entry integrated navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liansheng; Xia, Yuanqing

    2015-09-01

    This paper studies three schemes of Mars entry navigation: inertial measurement unit (IMU) based dead reckoning (DR), IMU/orbiter based integrated navigation, and IMU/orbiter/Mars surface beacon (MSB) based integrated navigation. We demonstrate through simulations that first scheme, IMU based DR, produces substantially large state estimation errors. Although these errors are reduced by adding two Mars orbiters, the system is only barely observable. However, by adding two MSBs in above configuration, the position and velocity estimation errors are reduced to the scope of 10 m and 0.5 m/s respectively and the navigation system becomes completely observable. Finally, the estimability of states is investigated; it is observed that velocity variables or velocity variables linear combinations can be estimated better than position variables.

  19. An overview of optical gyroscopes for navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, J. G.; Tazartes, D. A.

    1992-11-01

    In the 1980's, Ring Laser Gyroscopes (RLG) displaced the mechanical (spinning wheel) gyroscope as the angular sensor of choice for navigation. While the RLG remains the standard navigation grade instrument, several other optical gyroscopes have recently appeared. The multi oscillator (or four-mode gyro) represents a new generation in laser gyroscopes. Systems based on this technology are now being delivered for use on commercial and military aircraft. Another optical sensor, the fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) has been incorporated in inertial measurement units (IMU) and proved itself capable of AHRS (attitude and heading reference system) accuracy. This gyroscope should find many applications in aided navigation systems. Integrated FOG/GPS systems appear attractive as low cost navigators. This paper addresses technology involved in these optical gyroscopes and discusses their advantages and disadvantages in relation to present and future applications.

  20. Analysis of Ares 1 Ascent Navigation Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Lee; Tao, Yee-Chee; Hall, Robert; Chuang, Jason; Whorton, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The paper documents a collaborative analysis of ascent Navigation options for the Ares 1 launch vehicle by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the C. S. Draper Laboratory. The objective of the work was the development of a Navigation concept and supporting requirements which meet the Ares 1 accuracy specification in a manner which is straightforward, reliable, and cost effective. Six primary Navigation architectures were considered. In each case analysis was performed to determine under what conditions the required accuracy at second stage cutoff could be achieved. Those architectures which met the accuracy requirements were then assessed in terms of cost, complexity, and reliability to determine a baseline Navigation approach and the primary supporting requirements.

  1. PTTI applications to deep space navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curkendall, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Radio metric deep space navigation relies nearly exclusively upon coherent, two way, Doppler and ranging for all precise applications. These data types and the navigational accuracies they can produce are reviewed. The deployment of hydrogen maser frequency standards and the development of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) systems within the Deep Space Network are used in the development of non-coherent, one way data forms that promise much greater inherent navigational accuracy. The underlying structure between each data class and clock performance is charted. VLBI observations of the natural radio sources are the planned instrument for the synchronization task. This method and a navigational scheme using differential measurements between the spacecraft and nearby quasars are described.

  2. Interplanetary approach optical navigation with applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerath, N.

    1978-01-01

    The use of optical data from onboard television cameras for the navigation of interplanetary spacecraft during the planet approach phase is investigated. Three optical data types were studied: the planet limb with auxiliary celestial references, the satellite-star, and the planet-star two-camera methods. Analysis and modelling issues related to the nature and information content of the optical methods were examined. Dynamic and measurement system modelling, data sequence design, measurement extraction, model estimation and orbit determination, as relating optical navigation, are discussed, and the various error sources were analyzed. The methodology developed was applied to the Mariner 9 and the Viking Mars missions. Navigation accuracies were evaluated at the control and knowledge points, with particular emphasis devoted to the combined use of radio and optical data. A parametric probability analysis technique was developed to evaluate navigation performance as a function of system reliabilities.

  3. Navigated femoral shaft fracture treatment: current status.

    PubMed

    Hawi, Nael; Haentjes, Jonas; Suero, Eduardo M; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Krettek, Christian; Stübig, Timo; Hüfner, Tobias; Citak, Musa

    2012-01-01

    Femoral malrotation is a common complication after internal fixation of a femoral shaft fracture. The only valid, objective monitoring method is computer tomography-assisted torsion measurement between the proximal and distal femur; unfortunately, this can only be carried out postoperatively. A difference of 15° compared to the contralateral femur is seen as an indication for revision. With the development of computer-assisted surgery, new possibilities for performing torsion control and correction intraoperatively has been introduced. These methods also allow for navigation-assisted definition of the optimal incision site, intramedullary access, femoral nail and interlocking. The main problem lies in the extra time of surgery, which is due to performing all the steps of the surgery navigated. The solution for this problem is "hybrid navigation", in which the surgeon can select the steps he needs from the navigation system, depending on his experience or surgical technique.

  4. Space shuttle entry and landing navigation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, H. L.; Crawford, B. S.

    1974-01-01

    A navigation system for the entry phase of a Space Shuttle mission which is an aided-inertial system which uses a Kalman filter to mix IMU data with data derived from external navigation aids is evaluated. A drag pseudo-measurement used during radio blackout is treated as an additional external aid. A comprehensive truth model with 101 states is formulated and used to generate detailed error budgets at several significant time points -- end-of-blackout, start of final approach, over runway threshold, and touchdown. Sensitivity curves illustrating the effect of variations in the size of individual error sources on navigation accuracy are presented. The sensitivity of the navigation system performance to filter modifications is analyzed. The projected overall performance is shown in the form of time histories of position and velocity error components. The detailed results are summarized and interpreted, and suggestions are made concerning possible software improvements.

  5. Mariner Mars 1971 optical navigation demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Born, G. H.; Duxbury, T. C.; Breckenridge, W. G.; Acton, C. H.; Mohan, S.; Jerath, N.; Ohtakay, H.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of using a combination of spacecraft-based optical data and earth-based Doppler data to perform near-real-time approach navigation was demonstrated by the Mariner Mars 71 Project. The important findings, conclusions, and recommendations are documented. A summary along with publications and papers giving additional details on the objectives of the demonstration are provided. Instrument calibration and performance as well as navigation and science results are reported.

  6. VOR area navigation - Techniques and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragsdale, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    Several methods for deriving position from VOR (without DME) have been developed and evaluated in this study. These methods permit navigation to arbitrary waypoints using either two VOR's or one VOR and a clock. These algorithms have been tested in computer simulations and in flight tests. The single VOR method appears to be the most practical and is a candidate for an automated light plane area navigation system, called VORNAV.

  7. 19 CFR 4.98 - Navigation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... calculated in accordance with § 24.17(d) Customs Regulations (19 CFR 24.17(d)), and be based upon the amount... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Navigation fees. 4.98 Section 4.98 Customs Duties... VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES General § 4.98 Navigation fees. (a)(1) The Customs Service...

  8. 19 CFR 4.98 - Navigation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... calculated in accordance with § 24.17(d) Customs Regulations (19 CFR 24.17(d)), and be based upon the amount... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Navigation fees. 4.98 Section 4.98 Customs Duties... VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES General § 4.98 Navigation fees. (a)(1) The Customs Service...

  9. 19 CFR 4.98 - Navigation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... calculated in accordance with § 24.17(d) Customs Regulations (19 CFR 24.17(d)), and be based upon the amount... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Navigation fees. 4.98 Section 4.98 Customs Duties... VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES General § 4.98 Navigation fees. (a)(1) The Customs Service...

  10. 19 CFR 4.98 - Navigation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... calculated in accordance with § 24.17(d) Customs Regulations (19 CFR 24.17(d)), and be based upon the amount... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Navigation fees. 4.98 Section 4.98 Customs Duties... VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES General § 4.98 Navigation fees. (a)(1) The Customs Service...

  11. 19 CFR 4.98 - Navigation fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... calculated in accordance with § 24.17(d) Customs Regulations (19 CFR 24.17(d)), and be based upon the amount... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Navigation fees. 4.98 Section 4.98 Customs Duties... VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES General § 4.98 Navigation fees. (a)(1) The Customs Service...

  12. Navigation domain representation for interactive multiview imaging.

    PubMed

    Maugey, Thomas; Daribo, Ismael; Cheung, Gene; Frossard, Pascal

    2013-09-01

    Enabling users to interactively navigate through different viewpoints of a static scene is a new interesting functionality in 3D streaming systems. While it opens exciting perspectives toward rich multimedia applications, it requires the design of novel representations and coding techniques to solve the new challenges imposed by the interactive navigation. In particular, the encoder must prepare a priori a compressed media stream that is flexible enough to enable the free selection of multiview navigation paths by different streaming media clients. Interactivity clearly brings new design constraints: the encoder is unaware of the exact decoding process, while the decoder has to reconstruct information from incomplete subsets of data since the server generally cannot transmit images for all possible viewpoints due to resource constrains. In this paper, we propose a novel multiview data representation that permits us to satisfy bandwidth and storage constraints in an interactive multiview streaming system. In particular, we partition the multiview navigation domain into segments, each of which is described by a reference image (color and depth data) and some auxiliary information. The auxiliary information enables the client to recreate any viewpoint in the navigation segment via view synthesis. The decoder is then able to navigate freely in the segment without further data request to the server; it requests additional data only when it moves to a different segment. We discuss the benefits of this novel representation in interactive navigation systems and further propose a method to optimize the partitioning of the navigation domain into independent segments, under bandwidth and storage constraints. Experimental results confirm the potential of the proposed representation; namely, our system leads to similar compression performance as classical inter-view coding, while it provides the high level of flexibility that is required for interactive streaming. Because of

  13. Navigation Algorithms for Formation Flying Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huxel, Paul J.; Bishop, Robert H.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the investigations is to develop navigation algorithms to support formation flying missions. In particular, we examine the advantages and concerns associated with the use of combinations of inertial and relative measurements, as well as address observability issues. In our analysis we consider the interaction between measurement types, update frequencies, and trajectory geometry and their cumulative impact on observability. Furthermore, we investigate how relative measurements affect inertial navigation in terms of algorithm performance.

  14. An integrated platform for inertial navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrascu, Ana; Tamas, Razvan D.; Caruntu, George; Bobirca, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we propose a new configuration for an inertial navigation system (INS), type strap down, designed to be used onboard a ship. The system consists of an inertial navigation unit (IMU), using a 9-axis inertial sensor and pressure and temperature sensors, a GPS module, various interfaces for optimal communication and command, a microcontroller for data processing and computing and a power supply.

  15. Three-dimensional motor schema based navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, Ronald C.

    1989-01-01

    Reactive schema-based navigation is possible in space domains by extending the methods developed for ground-based navigation found within the Autonomous Robot Architecture (AuRA). Reformulation of two dimensional motor schemas for three dimensional applications is a straightforward process. The manifold advantages of schema-based control persist, including modular development, amenability to distributed processing, and responsiveness to environmental sensing. Simulation results show the feasibility of this methodology for space docking operations in a cluttered work area.

  16. Autonomous satellite navigation by stellar refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gounley, R.; White, R.; Gai, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes an error analysis of an autonomous navigator using refraction measurements of starlight passing through the upper atmosphere. The analysis is based on a discrete linear Kalman filter. The filter generated steady-state values of navigator performance for a variety of test cases. Results of these simulations show that in low-earth orbit position-error standard deviations of less than 0.100 km may be obtained using only 40 star sightings per orbit.

  17. Precise laser gyroscope for autonomous inertial navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, A G; Molchanov, A V; Izmailov, E A; Chirkin, M V

    2015-01-31

    Requirements to gyroscopes of strapdown inertial navigation systems for aircraft application are formulated. The construction of a ring helium – neon laser designed for autonomous navigation is described. The processes that determine the laser service life and the relation between the random error of the angular velocity measurement and the surface relief features of the cavity mirrors are analysed. The results of modelling one of the promising approaches to processing the laser gyroscope signals are presented. (laser gyroscopes)

  18. Forty years of olfactory navigation in birds.

    PubMed

    Gagliardo, Anna

    2013-06-15

    Forty years ago, Papi and colleagues discovered that anosmic pigeons cannot find their way home when released at unfamiliar locations. They explained this phenomenon by developing the olfactory navigation hypothesis: pigeons at the home loft learn the odours carried by the winds in association with wind direction; once at the release site, they determine the direction of displacement on the basis of the odours perceived locally and orient homeward. In addition to the old classical experiments, new GPS tracking data and observations on the activation of the olfactory system in displaced pigeons have provided further evidence for the specific role of olfactory cues in pigeon navigation. Although it is not known which odours the birds might rely on for navigation, it has been shown that volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere are distributed as fairly stable gradients to allow environmental odour-based navigation. The investigation of the potential role of olfactory cues for navigation in wild birds is still at an early stage; however, the evidence collected so far suggests that olfactory navigation might be a widespread mechanism in avian species.

  19. NFC Internal: An Indoor Navigation System

    PubMed Central

    Ozdenizci, Busra; Coskun, Vedat; Ok, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    Indoor navigation systems have recently become a popular research field due to the lack of GPS signals indoors. Several indoors navigation systems have already been proposed in order to eliminate deficiencies; however each of them has several technical and usability limitations. In this study, we propose NFC Internal, a Near Field Communication (NFC)-based indoor navigation system, which enables users to navigate through a building or a complex by enabling a simple location update, simply by touching NFC tags those are spread around and orient users to the destination. In this paper, we initially present the system requirements, give the design details and study the viability of NFC Internal with a prototype application and a case study. Moreover, we evaluate the performance of the system and compare it with existing indoor navigation systems. It is seen that NFC Internal has considerable advantages and significant contributions to existing indoor navigation systems in terms of security and privacy, cost, performance, robustness, complexity, user preference and commercial availability. PMID:25825976

  20. Sensor fusion for improved indoor navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilsson, Erika; Rydell, Joakim

    2012-09-01

    A reliable indoor positioning system providing high accuracy has the potential to increase the safety of first responders and military personnel significantly. To enable navigation in a broad range of environments and obtain more accurate and robust positioning results, we propose a multi-sensor fusion approach. We describe and evaluate a positioning system, based on sensor fusion between a foot-mounted inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a camera-based system for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). The complete system provides accurate navigation in many relevant environments without depending on preinstalled infrastructure. The camera-based system uses both inertial measurements and visual data, thereby enabling navigation also in environments and scenarios where one of the sensors provides unreliable data during a few seconds. When sufficient light is available, the camera-based system generally provides good performance. The foot-mounted system provides accurate positioning when distinct steps can be detected, e.g., during walking and running, even in dark or smoke-filled environments. By combining the two systems, the integrated positioning system can be expected to enable accurate navigation in almost all kinds of environments and scenarios. In this paper we present results from initial tests, which show that the proposed sensor fusion improves the navigation solution considerably in scenarios where either the foot-mounted or camera-based system is unable to navigate on its own.

  1. Global navigation system with RFID tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukiyama, Toshifumi

    2002-02-01

    A new navigation system is described for a mobile robot moving around in man-made environments such as hallways in a building. The system is based on a commercial three-wheel mobile platform with the addition of a Linux-based laptop computer, a Radio Frequency Identification (RDID) tag sensor and a vision system. At critical junctions such as the intersection of two passages the navigation system must identify the robot's location on a given map. We propose a method using RFID tags as landmarks. Each RFID tag has a unique ID number corresponding to its location on the map. The navigation system can decide the next movement (left-turn, right-turn and so on) toward a given goal based on this number. The navigation system also can automatically follow walls using the vision system. Since the equipment setup is very simple and the navigation system is easily combined with general mobile robot systems, our proposed technique would be useful for real-world robotic applications such as intelligent navigation for motorized wheelchairs.

  2. Robot navigation using simple sensor fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jollay, D.M.; Ricks, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Sensors on an autonomous mobile system are essential in enviornment determination for navigation purposes. As is well documented in previous publications, sonar sensors are inadequate in providing a depiction of a real world environment and therefore do not provide accurate information for navigation, it not used in conjunction with another type of sensor. This paper describes a simple, inexpensive, and relatively fast navigation algorithm involving vision and sonar sensor fusion for use in navigating an autonomous robot in an unknown and potentially dynamic environment. Navigation of the mobile robot was accomplished by use of a TV camera as the primary sensor. Input data received from the camera were digitized through a video module and then processed using a dedicated vision system to enable detection of obstacles and to determine edge positions relative to the robot. Since 3D vision was not attempted due to its complex and time consuming nature, sonar sensors were then sued as secondary sensors in order to determine the proximity of detected obstacles. By then fusing the sensor data, the robot was able to navigate (quickly and collision free) to a given goal, achieving obstacle avoidance in real-time.

  3. Experimental validation of navigation workload metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schryver, J.C.; Wachtel, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    Advanced digital computer display interfaces in the control room may increase operator workload. Workstation monitors provide limited display area, and information is represented in large-scale display networks. Display navigation may generate disorienting effects, require additional resources for window management, and increase memory and data integration requirements. Six ORNL employees participated in an experiment to validate proposed metrics of navigation workload in the advanced control room. The task environment was a display network consisting of 25 windows resembling a simplified Safety Parameter Display System for Pressurized Water Reactors. A repeated measures design with 3 within subjects factors was employed. The factors were task difficulty, navigation distance level, and a blocking factor. Participants were asked to monitor a single parameter or two parameters. Fourteen candidate metrics were tested. Analysis of variance of the modified task load index (MTLX) and rating subscales demonstrated substantial support for the claim that navigation of large-scale display networks can impose additional mental load. Primary and secondary task performance measures exhibited ceiling effects. Memory probes for these tasks were inadequate because they were recognition-based and coarse. Eye gaze measures were not validated, indicating a need for more refined data reduction algorithms. Strong positive correlations were found between MTLX and both navigation duration and standard deviation of pupil diameter. Further study and increased statistical power are required to validate objective navigation workload metrics.

  4. The Mathematics of Navigating the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintz, Gerald

    2000-01-01

    In navigating spacecraft throughout the solar system, the space navigator relies on three academic disciplines - optimization, estimation, and control - that work on mathematical models of the real world. Thus, the navigator determines the flight path that will consume propellant and other resources in an efficient manner, determines where the craft is and predicts where it will go, and transfers it onto the optimal trajectory that meets operational and mission constraints. Mission requirements, for example, demand that observational measurements be made with sufficient precision that relativity must be modeled in collecting and fitting (the estimation process) the data, and propagating the trajectory. Thousands of parameters are now determined in near real-time to model the gravitational forces acting on a spacecraft in the vicinity of an irregularly shaped body. Completing these tasks requires mathematical models, analyses, and processing techniques. Newton, Gauss, Lambert, Legendre, and others are justly famous for their contributions to the mathematics of these tasks. More recently, graduate students participated in research to update the gravity model of the Saturnian system, including higher order gravity harmonics, tidal effects, and the influence of the rings. This investigation was conducted for the Cassini project to incorporate new trajectory modeling features in the navigation software. The resulting trajectory model will be used in navigating the 4-year tour of the Saturnian satellites. Also, undergraduate students are determining the ephemerides (locations versus time) of asteroids that will be used as reference objects in navigating the New Millennium's Deep Space 1 spacecraft autonomously.

  5. Educational and Scientific Applications of the \\itTime Navigator}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, M.; Snow, J. T.; Slatt, R. M.

    2001-05-01

    Several recent conferences have noted the need to focus on the evolving interface between research and education at all levels of science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education. This interface, which is a distinguishing feature of graduate education in the U.S., is increasingly in demand at the undergraduate and K-12 levels, particularly in the earth sciences. In this talk, we present a new database for earth systems science and will explore applications to K-12 and undergraduate education, as well as the scientific and graduate role. The University of Oklahoma, College of Geosciences is in the process of acquiring the \\itTime Navigator}, a multi-disciplinary, multimedia database, which will form the core asset of the Center for Earth Systems Science. The Center, whose mission is to further the understanding of the dynamic Earth within both the academic and the general public communities, will serve as a portal for research, information, and education for scientists and educators. \\itTime Navigator} was developed over a period of some twenty years by the noted British geoscience author, Ron Redfern, in connection with the recently published, \\itOrigins, the evolution of continents, oceans and life}, the third in a series of books for the educated layperson. Over the years \\itTime Navigator} has evolved into an interactive, multimedia database displaying much of the significant geological, paleontological, climatological, and tectonic events from the latest Proterozoic (750 MYA) through to the present. The focus is mainly on the Western Hemisphere and events associated with the coalescence and breakup of Pangea and the evolution of the earth into its present form. \\itOrigins} will be available as early as Fall 2001 as an interactive electronic book for the general, scientifically-literate public. While electronic books are unlikely to replace traditional print books, the format does allow non-linear exploration of content. We believe that the

  6. Navigating to health: Evaluation of a community health center patient navigation program.

    PubMed

    Wang, Monica L; Gallivan, Leah; Lemon, Stephenie C; Borg, Amy; Ramirez, Jose; Figueroa, Brenda; McGuire, Antonia; Rosal, Milagros C

    2015-01-01

    Patient Navigators are trained, lay health care workers who guide patients in overcoming barriers to health care access and utilization. Little evidence exists regarding reach and impact of Patient Navigators for chronic disease management. This study evaluated a Patient Navigator program aimed at optimizing health care utilization among ethnically diverse patients with diabetes and/or hypertension at a community health center (CHC). Trained Patient Navigators contacted eligible patients who had not seen a primary care provider (PCP) for ≥ 6 months. Outcomes included number of patients reached by Patient Navigators and seen by PCPs after Patient Navigator contact. Distributions and frequencies of outcomes pre- and post-call were compared. A total of 215 patients had ≥ 1 call attempt from Patient Navigators. Of these, 74 were additionally contacted via mailed letters or at the time of a CHC visit. Among the 45 patients reached, 77.8% scheduled an appointment through the Patient Navigator. These patients had higher rates of PCP visits 6 months post-call (90%) than those not reached (42.2%) (p < 0.0001). Findings emphasize the value of direct telephone contact in patient health care re-engagement and may inform the development of future Patient Navigator programs to improve reach and effectiveness. PMID:26844134

  7. Gender Differences in Online Reading Engagement, Metacognitive Strategies, Navigation Skills and Reading Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, J-Y.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how knowledge of metacognitive strategies and navigation skills mediate the relationship between online reading activities and printed reading assessment (PRA) and electronic reading assessment (ERA) across 19 countries using the PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) 2009 database. Participants were 34?104…

  8. 46 CFR 112.43-7 - Navigating bridge distribution panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Navigating bridge distribution panel. 112.43-7 Section... EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Lighting Systems § 112.43-7 Navigating bridge distribution... supplied from a distribution panel on the navigating bridge: (1) Navigation lights not supplied by...

  9. 46 CFR 112.43-7 - Navigating bridge distribution panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Navigating bridge distribution panel. 112.43-7 Section... EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Lighting Systems § 112.43-7 Navigating bridge distribution... supplied from a distribution panel on the navigating bridge: (1) Navigation lights not supplied by...

  10. 46 CFR 92.03-1 - Navigation bridge visibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Navigation bridge visibility. 92.03-1 Section 92.03-1... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Navigation Bridge Visibility § 92.03-1 Navigation bridge visibility. Each cargo... navigation bridge, whether the vessel is in a laden or unladen condition, must be such that: (1) From...

  11. 46 CFR 92.03-1 - Navigation bridge visibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Navigation bridge visibility. 92.03-1 Section 92.03-1... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Navigation Bridge Visibility § 92.03-1 Navigation bridge visibility. Each cargo... navigation bridge, whether the vessel is in a laden or unladen condition, must be such that: (1) From...

  12. 46 CFR 92.03-1 - Navigation bridge visibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Navigation bridge visibility. 92.03-1 Section 92.03-1... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Navigation Bridge Visibility § 92.03-1 Navigation bridge visibility. Each cargo... navigation bridge, whether the vessel is in a laden or unladen condition, must be such that: (1) From...

  13. 46 CFR 112.43-7 - Navigating bridge distribution panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Navigating bridge distribution panel. 112.43-7 Section... EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Lighting Systems § 112.43-7 Navigating bridge distribution... supplied from a distribution panel on the navigating bridge: (1) Navigation lights not supplied by...

  14. 46 CFR 112.43-7 - Navigating bridge distribution panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Navigating bridge distribution panel. 112.43-7 Section... EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Lighting Systems § 112.43-7 Navigating bridge distribution... supplied from a distribution panel on the navigating bridge: (1) Navigation lights not supplied by...

  15. 46 CFR 190.02-1 - Navigation bridge visibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Navigation bridge visibility. 190.02-1 Section 190.02-1... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Navigation Bridge Visibility § 190.02-1 Navigation bridge visibility. Each... September 7, 1990, must meet the following requirements: (a) The field of vision from the navigation...

  16. 46 CFR 190.02-1 - Navigation bridge visibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Navigation bridge visibility. 190.02-1 Section 190.02-1... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Navigation Bridge Visibility § 190.02-1 Navigation bridge visibility. Each... September 7, 1990, must meet the following requirements: (a) The field of vision from the navigation...

  17. 46 CFR 112.43-7 - Navigating bridge distribution panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Navigating bridge distribution panel. 112.43-7 Section... EMERGENCY LIGHTING AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Lighting Systems § 112.43-7 Navigating bridge distribution... supplied from a distribution panel on the navigating bridge: (1) Navigation lights not supplied by...

  18. 33 CFR 183.810 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... without removing or disassembling the light and that states the following: (i) “USCG Approval 33 CFR 183... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navigation light certification... SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Navigation Lights § 183.810...

  19. 33 CFR 183.810 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... without removing or disassembling the light and that states the following: (i) “USCG Approval 33 CFR 183... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Navigation light certification... SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Navigation Lights § 183.810...

  20. 33 CFR 117.455 - Houma Navigation Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Houma Navigation Canal. 117.455... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.455 Houma Navigation Canal. The draw of SR 661 (Houma Nav Canal) bridge, mile 36.0, at Houma, shall open on signal; except that, the...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1303 - Flight and navigation instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight and navigation instruments. 25.1303... navigation instruments. (a) The following flight and navigation instruments must be installed so that the... indicator (nonstabilized magnetic compass). (b) The following flight and navigation instruments must...

  2. 75 FR 51473 - Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Houston/Galveston Navigation Safety Advisory Committee (HOGANSAC... navigation, area projects impacting safety on the Houston Ship Channel, and various other navigation...

  3. Cognitive Costs of Navigation Aids in Hypermedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waniek, Jacqueline; Ewald, Karolin

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the cognitive costs of navigation aids in a hypermedia learning task. In a 2(navigable vs. non-navigable) x 2(map vs. content list) experimental design cognitive requirements were measured by users' eye movement data. Additionally, data from users' navigation operations, knowledge acquisition, and subjective evaluation of the…

  4. 14 CFR 25.1303 - Flight and navigation instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight and navigation instruments. 25.1303... navigation instruments. (a) The following flight and navigation instruments must be installed so that the... indicator (nonstabilized magnetic compass). (b) The following flight and navigation instruments must...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1303 - Flight and navigation instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight and navigation instruments. 25.1303... navigation instruments. (a) The following flight and navigation instruments must be installed so that the... indicator (nonstabilized magnetic compass). (b) The following flight and navigation instruments must...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1303 - Flight and navigation instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight and navigation instruments. 25.1303... navigation instruments. (a) The following flight and navigation instruments must be installed so that the... indicator (nonstabilized magnetic compass). (b) The following flight and navigation instruments must...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1303 - Flight and navigation instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight and navigation instruments. 25.1303... navigation instruments. (a) The following flight and navigation instruments must be installed so that the... indicator (nonstabilized magnetic compass). (b) The following flight and navigation instruments must...

  8. 14 CFR 63.61 - Flight navigator courses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight navigator courses. 63.61 Section 63...) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS OTHER THAN PILOTS Flight Navigators § 63.61 Flight navigator courses. An applicant for approval of a flight navigator course must submit a letter to the...

  9. Outer planet probe navigation. [considering Pioneer space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, L.

    1974-01-01

    A series of navigation studies in conjunction with outer planet Pioneer missions are reformed to determine navigation requirements and measurement systems in order to target probes. Some particular cases are established where optical navigation is important and some cases where radio alone navigation is suffucient. Considered are a direct Saturn mission, a Saturn Uranus mission, a Jupiter Uranus mission, and a Titan probe mission.

  10. 33 CFR 183.810 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... without removing or disassembling the light and that states the following: (i) “USCG Approval 33 CFR 183... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Navigation light certification... SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Navigation Lights § 183.810...

  11. 33 CFR 183.810 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... without removing or disassembling the light and that states the following: (i) “USCG Approval 33 CFR 183... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Navigation light certification... SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Navigation Lights § 183.810...

  12. 33 CFR 183.810 - Navigation light certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... without removing or disassembling the light and that states the following: (i) “USCG Approval 33 CFR 183... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Navigation light certification... SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Navigation Lights § 183.810...

  13. 14 CFR 63.61 - Flight navigator courses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight navigator courses. 63.61 Section 63...) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS OTHER THAN PILOTS Flight Navigators § 63.61 Flight navigator courses. An applicant for approval of a flight navigator course must submit a letter to the...

  14. Does Navigation Always Predict Performance? Effects of Navigation on Digital Reading Are Moderated by Comprehension Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naumann, Johannes; Salmerón, Ladislao

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated interactive effects of navigation and offline comprehension skill on digital reading performance. As indicators of navigation, relevant page selection and irrelevant page selection were considered. In 533 Spanish high school students aged 11-17 positive effects of offline comprehension skill and relevant page selection on…

  15. Integrated navigation method of a marine strapdown inertial navigation system using a star sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiuying; Diao, Ming; Gao, Wei; Zhu, Minghong; Xiao, Shu

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an integrated navigation method of the strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) using a star sensor. According to the principle of SINS, its own navigation information contains an error that increases with time. Hence, the inertial attitude matrix from the star sensor is introduced as the reference information to correct the SINS increases error. For the integrated navigation method, the vehicle’s attitude can be obtained in two ways: one is calculated from SINS; the other, which we have called star sensor attitude, is obtained as the product between the SINS position and the inertial attitude matrix from the star sensor. Therefore, the SINS position error is introduced in the star sensor attitude error. Based on the characteristics of star sensor attitude error and the mathematical derivation, the SINS navigation errors can be obtained by the coupling calculation between the SINS attitude and the star sensor attitude. Unlike several current techniques, the navigation process of this method is non-radiating and invulnerable to jamming. The effectiveness of this approach was demonstrated by simulation and experimental study. The results show that this integrated navigation method can estimate the attitude error and the position error of SINS. Therefore, the SINS navigation accuracy is improved.

  16. 77 FR 45991 - Regulated Navigation Area; Buzzard's Bay, MA; Navigable Waterways Within the First Coast Guard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ...) applicable to First Coast Guard District waters. (72 FR 50052; corrected by 72 FR 70780). The purpose of... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Parts 161 and 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Buzzard's Bay, MA; Navigable Waterways Within the First Coast Guard District AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...

  17. Preliminary navigation accuracy analysis for the TDRSS Onboard Navigation System (TONS) experiment on EP/EUVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramling, C. J.; Long, A. C.; Lee, T.; Ottenstein, N. A.; Samii, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    A Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Onboard Navigation System (TONS) is currently being developed by NASA to provide a high accuracy autonomous navigation capability for users of TDRSS and its successor, the Advanced TDRSS (ATDRSS). The fully autonomous user onboard navigation system will support orbit determination, time determination, and frequency determination, based on observation of a continuously available, unscheduled navigation beacon signal. A TONS experiment will be performed in conjunction with the Explorer Platform (EP) Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) mission to flight quality TONS Block 1. An overview is presented of TONS and a preliminary analysis of the navigation accuracy anticipated for the TONS experiment. Descriptions of the TONS experiment and the associated navigation objectives, as well as a description of the onboard navigation algorithms, are provided. The accuracy of the selected algorithms is evaluated based on the processing of realistic simulated TDRSS one way forward link Doppler measurements. The analysis process is discussed and the associated navigation accuracy results are presented.

  18. 75 FR 50884 - Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments, Sector...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... INFORMATION: In FR doc 2010-19754 appearing on page 48564 in the issue of Wednesday, August 11, 2010, the..., Organizational, and Conforming Amendments, Sector Columbia River; Correction AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... read ``Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments,...

  19. 76 FR 31831 - Navigation and Navigable Waters; Technical, Organizational, and Conforming Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... conforming amendments and technical corrections to Coast Guard navigation and navigable water regulations. This rule will have no substantive effect on the regulated public. These changes are provided to..., between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. You may also find this...

  20. Intelligent navigation to improve obstetrical sonography.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    'Manual navigation' by the operator is the standard method used to obtain information from two-dimensional and volumetric sonography. Two-dimensional sonography is highly operator dependent and requires extensive training and expertise to assess fetal anatomy properly. Most of the sonographic examination time is devoted to acquisition of images, while 'retrieval' and display of diagnostic planes occurs rapidly (essentially instantaneously). In contrast, volumetric sonography has a rapid acquisition phase, but the retrieval and display of relevant diagnostic planes is often time-consuming, tedious and challenging. We propose the term 'intelligent navigation' to refer to a new method of interrogation of a volume dataset whereby identification and selection of key anatomical landmarks allow the system to: 1) generate a geometrical reconstruction of the organ of interest; and 2) automatically navigate, find, extract and display specific diagnostic planes. This is accomplished using operator-independent algorithms that are both predictable and adaptive. Virtual Intelligent Sonographer Assistance (VIS-Assistance®) is a tool that allows operator-independent sonographic navigation and exploration of the surrounding structures in previously identified diagnostic planes. The advantage of intelligent (over manual) navigation in volumetric sonography is the short time required for both acquisition and retrieval and display of diagnostic planes. Intelligent navigation technology automatically realigns the volume, and reorients and standardizes the anatomical position, so that the fetus and the diagnostic planes are consistently displayed in the same manner each time, regardless of the fetal position or the initial orientation. Automatic labeling of anatomical structures, subject orientation and each of the diagnostic planes is also possible. Intelligent navigation technology can operate on conventional computers, and is not dependent on specific ultrasound platforms or on the

  1. Intelligent navigation to improve obstetrical sonography.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    'Manual navigation' by the operator is the standard method used to obtain information from two-dimensional and volumetric sonography. Two-dimensional sonography is highly operator dependent and requires extensive training and expertise to assess fetal anatomy properly. Most of the sonographic examination time is devoted to acquisition of images, while 'retrieval' and display of diagnostic planes occurs rapidly (essentially instantaneously). In contrast, volumetric sonography has a rapid acquisition phase, but the retrieval and display of relevant diagnostic planes is often time-consuming, tedious and challenging. We propose the term 'intelligent navigation' to refer to a new method of interrogation of a volume dataset whereby identification and selection of key anatomical landmarks allow the system to: 1) generate a geometrical reconstruction of the organ of interest; and 2) automatically navigate, find, extract and display specific diagnostic planes. This is accomplished using operator-independent algorithms that are both predictable and adaptive. Virtual Intelligent Sonographer Assistance (VIS-Assistance®) is a tool that allows operator-independent sonographic navigation and exploration of the surrounding structures in previously identified diagnostic planes. The advantage of intelligent (over manual) navigation in volumetric sonography is the short time required for both acquisition and retrieval and display of diagnostic planes. Intelligent navigation technology automatically realigns the volume, and reorients and standardizes the anatomical position, so that the fetus and the diagnostic planes are consistently displayed in the same manner each time, regardless of the fetal position or the initial orientation. Automatic labeling of anatomical structures, subject orientation and each of the diagnostic planes is also possible. Intelligent navigation technology can operate on conventional computers, and is not dependent on specific ultrasound platforms or on the

  2. 14 CFR 121.349 - Communication and navigation equipment for operations under VFR over routes not navigated by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... operations under VFR over routes not navigated by pilotage or for operations under IFR or over the top. 121... § 121.349 Communication and navigation equipment for operations under VFR over routes not navigated by... person may conduct operations under VFR over routes that cannot be navigated by pilotage, or...

  3. 14 CFR 121.349 - Communication and navigation equipment for operations under VFR over routes not navigated by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... operations under VFR over routes not navigated by pilotage or for operations under IFR or over the top. 121... § 121.349 Communication and navigation equipment for operations under VFR over routes not navigated by... person may conduct operations under VFR over routes that cannot be navigated by pilotage, or...

  4. 14 CFR 121.349 - Communication and navigation equipment for operations under VFR over routes not navigated by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... operations under VFR over routes not navigated by pilotage or for operations under IFR or over the top. 121... § 121.349 Communication and navigation equipment for operations under VFR over routes not navigated by... person may conduct operations under VFR over routes that cannot be navigated by pilotage, or...

  5. 14 CFR 129.22 - Communication and navigation equipment for rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated by pilotage. 129.22 Section 129.22 Aeronautics and... and navigation equipment for rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated by pilotage. (a) No foreign air carrier may operate a rotorcraft under VFR over routes that can be navigated by...

  6. 14 CFR 129.22 - Communication and navigation equipment for rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated by pilotage. 129.22 Section 129.22 Aeronautics and... and navigation equipment for rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated by pilotage. (a) No foreign air carrier may operate a rotorcraft under VFR over routes that can be navigated by...

  7. 14 CFR 129.22 - Communication and navigation equipment for rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated by pilotage. 129.22 Section 129.22 Aeronautics and... and navigation equipment for rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated by pilotage. (a) No foreign air carrier may operate a rotorcraft under VFR over routes that can be navigated by...

  8. 14 CFR 129.22 - Communication and navigation equipment for rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated by pilotage. 129.22 Section 129.22 Aeronautics and... and navigation equipment for rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated by pilotage. (a) No foreign air carrier may operate a rotorcraft under VFR over routes that can be navigated by...

  9. 14 CFR 129.22 - Communication and navigation equipment for rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated by pilotage. 129.22 Section 129.22 Aeronautics and... and navigation equipment for rotorcraft operations under VFR over routes navigated by pilotage. (a) No foreign air carrier may operate a rotorcraft under VFR over routes that can be navigated by...

  10. Fuzzy Behavior Modulation with Threshold Activation for Autonomous Vehicle Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tunstel, Edward

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes fuzzy logic techniques used in a hierarchical behavior-based architecture for robot navigation. An architectural feature for threshold activation of fuzzy-behaviors is emphasized, which is potentially useful for tuning navigation performance in real world applications. The target application is autonomous local navigation of a small planetary rover. Threshold activation of low-level navigation behaviors is the primary focus. A preliminary assessment of its impact on local navigation performance is provided based on computer simulations.

  11. Navigation Architecture for a Space Mobile Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Jennifer E.; Ashman, Benjamin; Gramling, Cheryl; Heckler, Gregory W.; Carpenter, Russell

    2016-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS) is a proposed beacon service to provide a global, space based GPS augmentation service based on the NASA Global Differential GPS (GDGPS) System. The TASS signal will be tied to the GPS time system and usable as an additional ranging and Doppler radiometric source. Additionally, it will provide data vital to autonomous navigation in the near Earth regime, including space weather information, TDRS ephemerides, Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP), and forward commanding capability. TASS benefits include enhancing situational awareness, enabling increased autonomy, and providing near real-time command access for user platforms. As NASA Headquarters' Space Communication and Navigation Office (SCaN) begins to move away from a centralized network architecture and towards a Space Mobile Network (SMN) that allows for user initiated services, autonomous navigation will be a key part of such a system. This paper explores how a TASS beacon service enables the Space Mobile Networking paradigm, what a typical user platform would require, and provides an in-depth analysis of several navigation scenarios and operations concepts. This paper provides an overview of the TASS beacon and its role within the SMN and user community. Supporting navigation analysis is presented for two user mission scenarios: an Earth observing spacecraft in low earth orbit (LEO), and a highly elliptical spacecraft in a lunar resonance orbit. These diverse flight scenarios indicate the breadth of applicability of the TASS beacon for upcoming users within the current network architecture and in the SMN.

  12. Cloud Absorption Radiometer Autonomous Navigation System - CANS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Duncan; Gatebe, Charles; McCune, Bill; Hellwig, Dustan

    2013-01-01

    CAR (cloud absorption radiometer) acquires spatial reference data from host aircraft navigation systems. This poses various problems during CAR data reduction, including navigation data format, accuracy of position data, accuracy of airframe inertial data, and navigation data rate. Incorporating its own navigation system, which included GPS (Global Positioning System), roll axis inertia and rates, and three axis acceleration, CANS expedites data reduction and increases the accuracy of the CAR end data product. CANS provides a self-contained navigation system for the CAR, using inertial reference and GPS positional information. The intent of the software application was to correct the sensor with respect to aircraft roll in real time based upon inputs from a precision navigation sensor. In addition, the navigation information (including GPS position), attitude data, and sensor position details are all streamed to a remote system for recording and later analysis. CANS comprises a commercially available inertial navigation system with integral GPS capability (Attitude Heading Reference System AHRS) integrated into the CAR support structure and data system. The unit is attached to the bottom of the tripod support structure. The related GPS antenna is located on the P-3 radome immediately above the CAR. The AHRS unit provides a RS-232 data stream containing global position and inertial attitude and velocity data to the CAR, which is recorded concurrently with the CAR data. This independence from aircraft navigation input provides for position and inertial state data that accounts for very small changes in aircraft attitude and position, sensed at the CAR location as opposed to aircraft state sensors typically installed close to the aircraft center of gravity. More accurate positional data enables quicker CAR data reduction with better resolution. The CANS software operates in two modes: initialization/calibration and operational. In the initialization/calibration mode

  13. Navigation interface for recommending home medical products.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang

    2012-04-01

    Based on users' health issues, an intelligent personal health record (iPHR) system can automatically recommend home medical products (HMPs) and display them in a sequential order. However, the sequential output interface does not categorize search results and is not easy for users to quickly navigate to their desired HMPs. To address this problem, we developed a navigation interface for retrieved HMPs. Our idea is to use medical knowledge and nursing knowledge to construct a navigation hierarchy based on product categories. This hierarchy is added to the left side of each search result Web page to help users move through retrieved HMPs. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our techniques using USMLE medical exam cases.

  14. Active-imaging-based underwater navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnin, David; Schmitt, Gwenaël.; Fischer, Colin; Laurenzis, Martin; Christnacher, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are widely used for the localization and the navigation of unmanned and remotely operated vehicles (ROV). In contrast to ground or aerial vehicles, GNSS cannot be employed for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) without the use of a communication link to the water surface, since satellite signals cannot be received underwater. However, underwater autonomous navigation is still possible using self-localization methods which determines the relative location of an AUV with respect to a reference location using inertial measurement units (IMU), depth sensors and even sometimes radar or sonar imaging. As an alternative or a complementary solution to common underwater reckoning techniques, we present the first results of a feasibility study of an active-imaging-based localization method which uses a range-gated active-imaging system and can yield radiometric and odometric information even in turbid water.

  15. Navigation of robotic system using cricket motes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yogendra J.; Baine, Nicholas A.; Rattan, Kuldip S.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for self-mapping of the cricket motes that can be used for indoor navigation of autonomous robotic systems. The cricket system is a wireless sensor network that can provide indoor localization service to its user via acoustic ranging techniques. The behavior of the ultrasonic transducer on the cricket mote is studied and the regions where satisfactorily distance measurements can be obtained are recorded. Placing the motes in these regions results fine-grain mapping of the cricket motes. Trilateration is used to obtain a rigid coordinate system, but is insufficient if the network is to be used for navigation. A modified SLAM algorithm is applied to overcome the shortcomings of trilateration. Finally, the self-mapped cricket motes can be used for navigation of autonomous robotic systems in an indoor location.

  16. Airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1992-01-01

    Proper interpretation of airborne gravimetry and altimetry requires good knowledge of aircraft trajectory. Recent advances in precise navigation with differential GPS have made it possible to measure gravity from the air with accuracies of a few milligals, and to obtain altimeter profiles of terrain or sea surface correct to one decimeter. These developments are opening otherwise inaccessible regions to detailed geophysical mapping. Navigation with GPS presents some problems that grow worse with increasing distance from a fixed receiver: the effect of errors in tropospheric refraction correction, GPS ephemerides, and the coordinates of the fixed receivers. Ionospheric refraction and orbit error complicate ambiguity resolution. Optimal navigation should treat all error sources as unknowns, together with the instantaneous vehicle position. To do so, fast and reliable numerical techniques are needed: efficient and stable Kalman filter-smoother algorithms, together with data compression and, sometimes, the use of simplified dynamics.

  17. Pigeon Navigation: Different Routes Lead to Frankfurt

    PubMed Central

    Schiffner, Ingo; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2014-01-01

    Background Tracks of pigeons homing to the Frankfurt loft revealed an odd phenomenon: whereas birds returning from the North approach their loft more or less directly in a broad front, pigeons returning from the South choose, from 25 km from home onward, either of two corridors, a direct one and one with a considerable detour to the West. This implies differences in the navigational process. Methodology/Principle Findings Pigeons released at sites at the beginning of the westerly corridor and in this corridor behave just like pigeons returning from farther south, deviating to the west before turning towards their loft. Birds released at sites within the straight corridors, in contrast, take more or less straight routes. The analysis of the short-term correlation dimension, a quantity reflecting the complexity of the system and with it, the number of factors involved in the navigational process, reveals that it is significantly larger in pigeons choosing the westerly corridor than in the birds flying straight - 3.03 vs. 2.85. The difference is small, however, suggesting a different interpretation of the same factors, with some birds apparently preferring particular factors over others. Conclusions The specific regional distribution of the factors which pigeons use to determine their home course seems to provide ambiguous information in the area 25 km south of the loft, resulting in the two corridors. Pigeons appear to navigate by deriving their routes directly from the locally available navigational factors which they interpret in an individual way. The fractal nature of the correlation dimensions indicates that the navigation process of pigeons is chaotic-deterministic; published tracks of migratory birds suggest that this may apply to avian navigation in general. PMID:25391144

  18. Computer navigation versus fluoroscopy-guided navigation for thoracic pedicle screw placement: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiao-Tong; Guan, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Hai-Long; He, Shi-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Although application of intraoperative computer navigation technique had been integrated into placement of pedicle screws (PSs) in thoracic fusion for years, its security and practicability remain controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy, the operative time consumption, the amount of intraoperative blood loss, time of pedicle insertion and the incidence of complications of thoracic pedicle screw placement in patients with thoracic diseases such as scoliosis and kyphosis. Pubmed, Web of Knowledge, and Google scholar were searched to identify comparative studies of thoracic pedicle screw placement between intraoperative computer navigation and fluoroscopy-guided navigation. Outcomes of malposition rate, operative time consumption, insertion time, intraoperative blood loss, and the incidence of complications are evaluated. Fourteen articles including 1723 patients and 9019 PSs were identified matching inclusion criteria. The malposition rate was lower (RR: 0.33, 95 % CI: 0.28-0.38, P < 0.01) in computer navigation group than that in fluoroscopy-guided navigation group; the operative time was significantly longer [weighted mean difference (WMD) = 23.66, 95 % CI: 14.74-32.57, P < 0.01] in computer navigation group than that in fluoroscopy-guided navigation group. The time of insertion was shorter (WMD = -1.88, 95 % CI: -2.25- -1.52, P < 0.01) in computer navigation group than that in fluoroscopy-guided navigation group. The incidence of complications was lower (RR = 0. 23, 95 % CI: 0.12-0.46, P < 0.01) in computer navigation group than that in the other group. The intraoperative blood loss was fewer (WMD = -167.49, 95 % CI: -266.39- -68.58, P < 0.01) in computer navigation group than that in the other. In conclusion, the meta-analysis of thoracic pedicle screw placement studies clearly demonstrated lower malposition rate, less intraoperative blood loss, and fewer complications when using computer

  19. Computer navigation versus fluoroscopy-guided navigation for thoracic pedicle screw placement: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiao-Tong; Guan, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Hai-Long; He, Shi-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Although application of intraoperative computer navigation technique had been integrated into placement of pedicle screws (PSs) in thoracic fusion for years, its security and practicability remain controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy, the operative time consumption, the amount of intraoperative blood loss, time of pedicle insertion and the incidence of complications of thoracic pedicle screw placement in patients with thoracic diseases such as scoliosis and kyphosis. Pubmed, Web of Knowledge, and Google scholar were searched to identify comparative studies of thoracic pedicle screw placement between intraoperative computer navigation and fluoroscopy-guided navigation. Outcomes of malposition rate, operative time consumption, insertion time, intraoperative blood loss, and the incidence of complications are evaluated. Fourteen articles including 1723 patients and 9019 PSs were identified matching inclusion criteria. The malposition rate was lower (RR: 0.33, 95 % CI: 0.28-0.38, P < 0.01) in computer navigation group than that in fluoroscopy-guided navigation group; the operative time was significantly longer [weighted mean difference (WMD) = 23.66, 95 % CI: 14.74-32.57, P < 0.01] in computer navigation group than that in fluoroscopy-guided navigation group. The time of insertion was shorter (WMD = -1.88, 95 % CI: -2.25- -1.52, P < 0.01) in computer navigation group than that in fluoroscopy-guided navigation group. The incidence of complications was lower (RR = 0. 23, 95 % CI: 0.12-0.46, P < 0.01) in computer navigation group than that in the other group. The intraoperative blood loss was fewer (WMD = -167.49, 95 % CI: -266.39- -68.58, P < 0.01) in computer navigation group than that in the other. In conclusion, the meta-analysis of thoracic pedicle screw placement studies clearly demonstrated lower malposition rate, less intraoperative blood loss, and fewer complications when using computer

  20. Mars Science Laboratory Interplanetary Navigation Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Kruizinga, Gerhard; Wong, Mau

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, carrying the Curiosity rover to Mars, hit the top of the Martian atmosphere just 200 meters from where it had been predicted more than six days earlier, and 2.6 million kilometers away. This un-expected level of accuracy was achieved by a combination of factors including: spacecraft performance, tracking data processing, dynamical modeling choices, and navigation filter setup. This paper will describe our best understanding of what were the factors that contributed to this excellent interplanetary trajectory prediction performance. The accurate interplanetary navigation contributed to the very precise landing performance, and to the overall success of the mission.

  1. Inertial navigation sensor integrated obstacle detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhanu, Bir (Inventor); Roberts, Barry A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A system that incorporates inertial sensor information into optical flow computations to detect obstacles and to provide alternative navigational paths free from obstacles. The system is a maximally passive obstacle detection system that makes selective use of an active sensor. The active detection typically utilizes a laser. Passive sensor suite includes binocular stereo, motion stereo and variable fields-of-view. Optical flow computations involve extraction, derotation and matching of interest points from sequential frames of imagery, for range interpolation of the sensed scene, which in turn provides obstacle information for purposes of safe navigation.

  2. Navigation Flight Operations for Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robin M.; Kallemeyn, Pieter H., Jr.; Spencer, David A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    On July 4, 1997, Mars Pathfinder became the first spacecraft to land on the surface of Mars in 21 years. Pathfinder was launched on December 4, 1996 and spent seven months en route to the red planet. This report discusses the navigation flight experience for the Mars Pathfinder interplanetary cruise. In particular, orbit determination and maneuver design and execution results are presented. Special emphasis is given to the navigation role in the days and hours leading up to and including the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase.

  3. Evolutionary strategy for achieving autonomous navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, Douglas W.

    1999-01-01

    An approach is presented for the evolutionary development of supervised autonomous navigation capabilities for small 'backpackable' ground robots, in the context of a DARPA- sponsored program to provide robotic support to small units of dismounted warfighters. This development approach relies on the implementation of a baseline visual serving navigation capability, including tools to support operator oversight and override, which is then enhanced with semantically referenced commands and a mission scripting structure. As current and future machine perception techniques are able to automatically designate visual serving goal points, this approach should provide a natural evolutionary pathway to higher levels of autonomous operation and reduced requirements for operator intervention.

  4. BOREAS Level-0 ER-2 Navigation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strub, Richard; Dominguez, Roseanne; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS Staff Science effort covered those activities that were BOREAS community-level activities or required uniform data collection procedures across sites and time. These activities included the acquisition, processing, and archiving of aircraft navigation/attitude data to complement the digital image data. The level-0 ER-2 navigation data files contain aircraft attitude and position information acquired during the digital image and photographic data collection missions. Temporally, the data were acquired from April to September 1994. Data were recorded at intervals of 5 seconds. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  5. Bio-inspired polarized skylight navigation: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Wan, Yongqin; Li, Lijing

    2015-12-01

    The idea of using skylight polarization in navigation is learned from animals such as desert ants and honeybees. Various research groups have been working on the development of novel navigation systems inspired by polarized skylight. The research of background in polarized skylight navigation is introduced, and basic principle of the insects navigation is expatiated. Then, the research progress status at home and abroad in skylight polarization pattern, three bio-inspired polarized skylight navigation sensors and polarized skylight navigation are reviewed. Finally, the research focuses in the field of polarized skylight navigation are analyzed. At the same time, the trend of development and prospect in the future are predicted. It is believed that the review is helpful to people understand polarized skylight navigation and polarized skylight navigation sensors.

  6. Vision-based fast navigation of micro aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loianno, Giuseppe; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-05-01

    We address the key challenges for autonomous fast flight for Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAVs) in 3-D, cluttered environments. For complete autonomy, the system must identify the vehicle's state at high rates, using either absolute or relative asynchronous on-board sensor measurements, use these state estimates for feedback control, and plan trajectories to the destination. State estimation requires information from different sensors to be fused, exploiting information from different, possible asynchronous sensors at different rates. In this work, we present techniques in the area of planning, control and visual-inertial state estimation for fast navigation of MAVs. We demonstrate how to solve on-board, on a small computational unit, the pose estimation, control and planning problems for MAVs, using a minimal sensor suite for autonomous navigation composed of a single camera and IMU. Additionally, we show that a consumer electronic device such as a smartphone can alternatively be employed for both sensing and computation. Experimental results validate the proposed techniques. Any consumer, provided with a smartphone, can autonomously drive a quadrotor platform at high speed, without GPS, and concurrently build 3-D maps, using a suitably designed app.

  7. System using leo satellites for centimeter-level navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabinowitz, Matthew (Inventor); Parkinson, Bradford W. (Inventor); Cohen, Clark E. (Inventor); Lawrence, David G. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a system for rapidly resolving position with centimeter-level accuracy for a mobile or stationary receiver [4]. This is achieved by estimating a set of parameters that are related to the integer cycle ambiguities which arise in tracking the carrier phase of satellite downlinks [5,6]. In the preferred embodiment, the technique involves a navigation receiver [4] simultaneously tracking transmissions [6] from Low Earth Orbit Satellites (LEOS) [2] together with transmissions [5] from GPS navigation satellites [1]. The rapid change in the line-of-sight vectors from the receiver [4] to the LEO signal sources [2], due to the orbital motion of the LEOS, enables the resolution with integrity of the integer cycle ambiguities of the GPS signals [5] as well as parameters related to the integer cycle ambiguity on the LEOS signals [6]. These parameters, once identified, enable real-time centimeter-level positioning of the receiver [4]. In order to achieve high-precision position estimates without the use of specialized electronics such as atomic clocks, the technique accounts for instabilities in the crystal oscillators driving the satellite transmitters, as well as those in the reference [3] and user [4] receivers. In addition, the algorithm accommodates as well as to LEOS that receive signals from ground-based transmitters, then re-transmit frequency-converted signals to the ground.

  8. Semantic retrieval and navigation in clinical document collections.

    PubMed

    Kreuzthaler, Markus; Daumke, Philipp; Schulz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic diseases undergo numerous in- and outpatient treatment periods, and therefore many documents accumulate in their electronic records. We report on an on-going project focussing on the semantic enrichment of medical texts, in order to support recall-oriented navigation across a patient's complete documentation. A document pool of 1,696 de-identified discharge summaries was used for prototyping. A natural language processing toolset for document annotation (based on the text-mining framework UIMA) and indexing (Solr) was used to support a browser-based platform for document import, search and navigation. The integrated search engine combines free text and concept-based querying, supported by dynamically generated facets (diagnoses, procedures, medications, lab values, and body parts). The prototype demonstrates the feasibility of semantic document enrichment within document collections of a single patient. Originally conceived as an add-on for the clinical workplace, this technology could also be adapted to support personalised health record platforms, as well as cross-patient search for cohort building and other secondary use scenarios.

  9. Imaging, Navigation, and Robotics in Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    Spinal technology involves imaging, navigation, and robotics-collectively known as "image-guided therapy." Imaging coupled with navigation enhances visualization of irregular anatomy, enabling less invasive procedures. With robotics surgeons can perform quicker and safer hand movements with increased accuracy. In the 1890s, X-rays were invented by Roentgen. The first piece of X-ray equipment, the Cryptoscope, would take an image for 15 minutes, with the surgeon placing his hand in front of the beam to guide calibration; radiation exposure for both surgeon and patient was extreme. In the 1950s, fluoroscopy (C-arm) was invented. In the 1970s, computer-assisted tomography (CAT), known as CAT scan, became available; magnetic resonance imaging had its beginnings in the 1980s, and in 1985, the first robotic surgery was performed to obtain a neurosurgical biopsy specimen. The concept of navigation was introduced in the 1990s, and today's niche products for navigation came onto the market in the 2000s. PMID:27015071

  10. A Novel Navigation Paradigm for XML Repositories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azagury, Alain; Factor, Michael E.; Maarek, Yoelle S.; Mandler, Benny

    2002-01-01

    Discusses data exchange over the Internet and describes the architecture and implementation of an XML document repository that promotes a navigation paradigm for XML documents based on content and context. Topics include information retrieval and semistructured documents; and file systems as information storage infrastructure, particularly XMLFS.…

  11. Non-Navigable Streams and Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2006, the US Supreme Court addressed jurisdiction of non-navigable waters and adjacent wetlands (NSW) under the Clean Water Act (CWA). The Rapanos decision resulted in two criteria for determining CWA jurisdiction of NSWs: their hydrological permanence and whether they have ...

  12. Hawaii: Navigating a Different Way of Knowing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thuermer, Kitty

    1999-01-01

    Seafarer Nainoa Thompson proved Western scientists wrong when they claimed his Pacific Island ancestors lacked the navigational skills to make their 2,500 mile trans-Pacific voyages, guided only by the stars and the sea. In the same way, schools must model different, more affiliative ways of gaining and imparting knowledge. (MLH)

  13. Understanding Hypertext Navigation through Cluster Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawless, Kimberly A.; Kulikowich, Jonna M.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the navigational profiles of 42 undergraduate students processing a hypertext document. Three profiles emerged: (1) knowledge seekers, (2) feature explorers, and (3) apathetic hypertext users. Results indicate that students who are interested in computers and hypertext but who don't possess relevant amounts of domain knowledge aligned…

  14. Mosaic: NCSA Internet Network Navigational Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machovec, George S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes Mosaic, an Internet resource locator and navigation tool developed at the University of Illinois' National Center for Super-Computing Applications (NCSA). Topics discussed include the relationship with the World Wide Web; flexibility; obtaining Mosaic client software; and file transfer protocol instructions. (Contains seven references.)…

  15. The Magnetic Attraction of Honeybee Navigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayres, David

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are the division of labor, defenses, genetics and evolution, communication, and navigation power of honeybees. The scientific and cross-curricular themes that can be offered using the economically important honeybee are described. Research that suggests that bees may be flying magnets is also discussed. (KR)

  16. Spatial Navigation in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Samantha L.; Fagan, Anne M.; Morris, John C.; Head, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Although several previous studies have demonstrated navigational deficits in early-stage symptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD), navigational abilities in preclinical AD have not been examined. The present investigation examined the effects of preclinical AD and early-stage symptomatic AD on spatial navigation performance. Performance on tasks of wayfinding and route learning in a virtual reality environment were examined. Comparisons were made across the following three groups: Clinically normal without preclinical AD (n = 42), clinically normal with preclinical AD (n = 13), and early-stage symptomatic AD (n = 16) groups. Preclinical AD was defined based on cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 levels below 500 pg/ml. Preclinical AD was associated with deficits in the use of a wayfinding strategy, but not a route learning strategy. Moreover, post-hoc analyses indicated that wayfinding performance had moderate sensitivity and specificity. Results also confirmed early-stage symptomatic AD-related deficits in the use of both wayfinding and route learning strategies. The results of this study suggest that aspects of spatial navigation may be particularly sensitive at detecting the earliest cognitive deficits of AD. PMID:26967209

  17. 77 FR 62435 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information On... Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations (77 FR 27007). We received 1 comment. Specifically, Lake Carriers... wake damage to vessels and shore structures (See 60 FR 35701-01). Because the Detroit River Light...

  18. LED display for solo aircraft instrument navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Kelly, W. L., VI; Lina, L. J.; Meredith, B. D.

    1979-01-01

    Solo pilot's task is made easier through convenient display of landing and navigation data. Use of display shows promise as more efficient means of presenting sequential instructions and data, such as course heading, altitude, and radio frequency, to minimize pilot's workload during solo instrument flight.

  19. Celestial Navigation on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malay, Benjamin P.

    2001-05-01

    A simple, accurate, and autonomous method of finding position on the surface of Mars currently does not exist. The goal of this project is to develop a celestial navigation process that will fix a position on Mars with 100-meter accuracy. This method requires knowing the position of the stars and planets referenced to the Martian surface with one arcsecond accuracy. This information is contained in an ephemeris known as the Aeronautical Almanac (from Ares, the god of war) . Naval Observatory Vector Astrometry Subroutines (NOVAS) form the basis of the code used to generate the almanac. Planetary position data come the JPL DE405 Planetary Ephemeris. The theoretical accuracy of the almanac is determined mathematically and compared with the Ephemeris for Physical Observations of Mars contained in the Astronautical Almanac. A preliminary design of an autonomous celestial navigation system is presented. Recommendations of how to integrate celestial navigation into NASA=s current Mars exploration program are also discussed. This project is a useful and much-needed first step towards establishing celestial navigation as a practical way to find position on the surface of Mars.

  20. Navigating Online Menus: A Quantitative Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliasen, Karen; McKinstry, Jill; Fraser, Beth Mabel; Babbitt, Elizabeth P.

    1997-01-01

    A study of 170 undergraduates at the University of Washington examined the effect of terminology and screen layout on student ability to select databases from an initial online interface, "Session Manager." Results indicated that student ability to navigate menu screens was improved with expanded terminology and type grouping of online resources…

  1. Thinking Style, Browsing Primes and Hypermedia Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiorina, Lorenzo; Antonietti, Alessandro; Colombo, Barbara; Bartolomeo, Annella

    2007-01-01

    There is a common assumption that hypermedia navigation is influenced by a learner's style of thinking, so people who are inclined to apply sequential and analytical strategies (left-thinkers) are thought to browse hypermedia in a linear way, whereas those who prefer holistic and intuitive strategies (right-thinkers) tend towards non-linear paths.…

  2. 78 FR 32556 - Navigation Underway; Tankers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... Sec. 164.13, the effective date note is reinstated to read as follows: ``Effective Date Note: At 58 FR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 164 Navigation Underway; Tankers CFR Correction In Title 33 of the Code...

  3. Imaging, Navigation, and Robotics in Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    Spinal technology involves imaging, navigation, and robotics-collectively known as "image-guided therapy." Imaging coupled with navigation enhances visualization of irregular anatomy, enabling less invasive procedures. With robotics surgeons can perform quicker and safer hand movements with increased accuracy. In the 1890s, X-rays were invented by Roentgen. The first piece of X-ray equipment, the Cryptoscope, would take an image for 15 minutes, with the surgeon placing his hand in front of the beam to guide calibration; radiation exposure for both surgeon and patient was extreme. In the 1950s, fluoroscopy (C-arm) was invented. In the 1970s, computer-assisted tomography (CAT), known as CAT scan, became available; magnetic resonance imaging had its beginnings in the 1980s, and in 1985, the first robotic surgery was performed to obtain a neurosurgical biopsy specimen. The concept of navigation was introduced in the 1990s, and today's niche products for navigation came onto the market in the 2000s.

  4. Innovations for Navigating the Doctoral Dissertation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Pierro, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Concept papers and quality circles help future dissertation advisors improve doctoral student success in the completion of the Ph.D. and increase retention. Through these tools, students navigate the conceptual development of a topic and evaluate final drafts of chapters. Implementation of these innovations indicates positive trends in the…

  5. The memory structure of navigation in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Randolf; Greggers, Uwe

    2015-06-01

    The analytical approach to navigation studies aims to identify elementary sensory motor processes that guide an animal to a remote site. This approach will be used here to characterize components of navigation in a flying insect, the honeybee. However, navigation studies need to go beyond an analysis of behavioral routines to come up with a synthesis. We will defend the concept of an active memory structure guiding navigation in bees that is best described as a mental or cognitive map. In our opinion, spatial/temporal relations of landmarks are stored in a mental map in such a way that behavioral routines such as expectation and planning, as indicated by shortcutting, are possible. We view the mental map of animals including the honeybee as an "action memory of spatial relations" rather than as a sensory representation as we humans experience it by introspection. Two components characterize the mental map, the relational representation of landmarks and the meaning of locations to the animal. As yet, there is little data to suggest that bees assign meaning to the experienced locations. To explore this possibility, further studies will be needed, whereby honeybees provide a unique model to address this question.

  6. Navigating the Bio-Politics of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Nick; Motzkau, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Childhood research has long shared a bio-political terrain with state agencies in which children figure primarily as "human futures". In the 20th century bio-social dualism helped to make that terrain navigable by researchers, but, as life processes increasingly become key sites of bio-political action, bio-social dualism is becoming less useful…

  7. Multidisciplinary Collaboration through Learning Communities: Navigating Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLathouwer, Erin; Roy, Wendy; Martin, Ann; Liska, Jasmine

    2012-01-01

    A problem common to university faculty and students is an implicit sense of inadequacy regarding institutional hierarchies and disciplinary boundaries. Through a focus on multidisciplinarity, learning communities enable members to navigate multiple points of view within, between, and beyond apparent institutional boundaries. After having led a…

  8. Learning to navigate: experience versus maps.

    PubMed

    Meilinger, Tobias; Frankenstein, Julia; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2013-10-01

    People use "route knowledge" to navigate to targets along familiar routes and "survey knowledge" to determine (by pointing, for example) a target's metric location. We show that both root in separate memories of the same environment: participants navigating through their home city relied on representations and reference frames different from those they used when doing a matched survey task. Tübingen residents recalled their way along a familiar route to a distant target while located in a photorealistic virtual 3D model of Tübingen, indicating their route decisions on a keyboard. Participants had previously done a survey task (pointing) using the same start points and targets. Errors and response latencies observed in route recall were completely unrelated to errors and latencies in pointing. This suggests participants employed different and independent representations for each task. Further, participants made fewer routing errors when asked to respond from a horizontal walking perspective rather than a constant aerial perspective. This suggests that instead of the single reference, north-up frame (similar to a conventional map) they used in the survey task, participants employed different, and most probably multiple, reference frames learned from "on the ground" navigating experience. The implication is that, within their everyday environment, people use map or navigation-based knowledge according to which best suits the task. PMID:23820180

  9. Adaptive bioinspired landmark identification for navigation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Paolo; Cruse, Holk; Fortuna, Luigi; Lombardo, Davide; Patané, Luca; Rapisarda, Rosa

    2007-05-01

    In this paper a new methodology for landmark navigation will be introduced. Either for animals or for artificial agents, the whole problem of landmark navigation can be divided into two parts: first, the agent has to recognize, from the dynamic environment, space invariant objects which can be considered as suitable landmarks for driving the motion towards a goal position; second, it has to use the information on the landmarks to effectively navigate within the environment. Here, the problem of determining landmarks has been addressed by processing the external information through a spiking network with dynamic synapses plastically tuned by an STDP algorithm. The learning processes establish correlations between the incoming stimuli, allowing the system to extract from the scenario important features which can play the role of landmarks. Once established the landmarks, the agent acquires geometric relationships between them and the goal position. This process defines the parameters of a recurrent neural network (RNN). This in turn drives the agent navigation, filtering the information about landmarks given within an absolute reference system (e.g the North). When the absolute reference is not available, a safety mechanism acts to control the motion maintaining a correct heading. Simulation results showed the potentiality of the proposed architecture: this is able to drive an agent towards the desired position in presence of stimuli subject to noise and also in the case of partially obscured landmarks.

  10. Learning to navigate: experience versus maps.

    PubMed

    Meilinger, Tobias; Frankenstein, Julia; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2013-10-01

    People use "route knowledge" to navigate to targets along familiar routes and "survey knowledge" to determine (by pointing, for example) a target's metric location. We show that both root in separate memories of the same environment: participants navigating through their home city relied on representations and reference frames different from those they used when doing a matched survey task. Tübingen residents recalled their way along a familiar route to a distant target while located in a photorealistic virtual 3D model of Tübingen, indicating their route decisions on a keyboard. Participants had previously done a survey task (pointing) using the same start points and targets. Errors and response latencies observed in route recall were completely unrelated to errors and latencies in pointing. This suggests participants employed different and independent representations for each task. Further, participants made fewer routing errors when asked to respond from a horizontal walking perspective rather than a constant aerial perspective. This suggests that instead of the single reference, north-up frame (similar to a conventional map) they used in the survey task, participants employed different, and most probably multiple, reference frames learned from "on the ground" navigating experience. The implication is that, within their everyday environment, people use map or navigation-based knowledge according to which best suits the task.

  11. Cameras Improve Navigation for Pilots, Drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Scientific Concepts Inc. (ASC), of Santa Barbara, California, received SBIR awards and other funding from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Johnson Space Center, and Langley Research Center to develop and refine its 3D flash LIDAR technologies for space applications. Today, ASC's NASA-derived technology is sold to assist with collision avoidance, navigation, and object tracking.

  12. Navigation Architecture For A Space Mobile Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Jennifer E.; Ashman, Benjamin; Gramling, Cheryl; Heckler, Gregory W.; Carpenter, Russell

    2016-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS) is a proposed beacon service to provide a global, space-based GPS augmentation service based on the NASA Global Differential GPS (GDGPS) System. The TASS signal will be tied to the GPS time system and usable as an additional ranging and Doppler radiometric source. Additionally, it will provide data vital to autonomous navigation in the near Earth regime, including space weather information, TDRS ephemerides, Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP), and forward commanding capability. TASS benefits include enhancing situational awareness, enabling increased autonomy, and providing near real-time command access for user platforms. As NASA Headquarters Space Communication and Navigation Office (SCaN) begins to move away from a centralized network architecture and towards a Space Mobile Network (SMN) that allows for user initiated services, autonomous navigation will be a key part of such a system. This paper explores how a TASS beacon service enables the Space Mobile Networking paradigm, what a typical user platform would require, and provides an in-depth analysis of several navigation scenarios and operations concepts.

  13. SMALL CRAFT OPERATION AND NAVIGATION, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    THE MATERIAL IN THIS COURSE IN MARINE NAVIGATION AND SMALL CRAFT OPERATION ON INLAND AND INTERNATIONAL WATERS WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INDIVIDUAL AUTHOR FOR USE IN TRADE SCHOOL PREPARATORY AND EXTENSION CLASSES FOR MALE ADULTS WHO PLAN TO OPERATE BOATS. THE OBJECTIVE IS TO PREPARE THE SMALL BOAT OPERATOR FOR HIS OWN CONTINUATION IN THE STUDY OF…

  14. 18 CFR 1304.410 - Navigation restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Navigation restrictions. 1304.410 Section 1304.410 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL... to reduce wave and wash action....

  15. 18 CFR 1304.410 - Navigation restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Navigation restrictions. 1304.410 Section 1304.410 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL... to reduce wave and wash action....

  16. 18 CFR 1304.410 - Navigation restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Navigation restrictions. 1304.410 Section 1304.410 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL... to reduce wave and wash action....

  17. 18 CFR 1304.410 - Navigation restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Navigation restrictions. 1304.410 Section 1304.410 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL... to reduce wave and wash action....

  18. 18 CFR 1304.410 - Navigation restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Navigation restrictions. 1304.410 Section 1304.410 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL... to reduce wave and wash action....

  19. Spatial abstraction for autonomous robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Susan L; Aroor, Anoop; Evanusa, Matthew; Sklar, Elizabeth I; Parsons, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Optimal navigation for a simulated robot relies on a detailed map and explicit path planning, an approach problematic for real-world robots that are subject to noise and error. This paper reports on autonomous robots that rely on local spatial perception, learning, and commonsense rationales instead. Despite realistic actuator error, learned spatial abstractions form a model that supports effective travel. PMID:26227680

  20. Spatial abstraction for autonomous robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Susan L; Aroor, Anoop; Evanusa, Matthew; Sklar, Elizabeth I; Parsons, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Optimal navigation for a simulated robot relies on a detailed map and explicit path planning, an approach problematic for real-world robots that are subject to noise and error. This paper reports on autonomous robots that rely on local spatial perception, learning, and commonsense rationales instead. Despite realistic actuator error, learned spatial abstractions form a model that supports effective travel.