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Sample records for electrophoretic nmr measurements

  1. Computer-controlled pulsed magnetic field gradient NMR system for electrophoretic mobility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarinen, Timothy R.; Woodward, W. Stephen

    1988-05-01

    A computer-controlled pulsed magnetic field gradient NMR (PFGNMR) system for making electrophoretic mobility and diffusion measurements is described. Emphasis is placed on the design and capabilities of the gradient and electrophoretic pulse generators. Various pulse sequences can be applied by the programmable gradient generator that can produce 0- to 10-A current pulses for 0 to 13 ms and continuous currents from 0 to 50 mA. The pulse areas are reproducible to within approximately 1 ppm. A pair of opposed Helmholtz coils in the probe create linear magnetic field gradients during the current pulses. Electric fields are applied across a U-tube electrophoretic cell by a 550-V constant current generator.

  2. Electrophoretic NMR measurements of lithium transference numbers in polymer gel electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, H.; Sanderson, S.; Davey, J.; Uribe, F.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Polymer gel electrolytes are of increasing interest for plastic lithium batteries largely because of their high room temperature conductivity. Several studies have probed their conductivity and electrochemical stability but very little work has been done related to lithium transference numbers. Lithium ion transference numbers, the net number of Faradays carried by lithium upon the passage of 1 Faraday of charge across a cell, are key figures of merit for any potential lithium battery electrolytes. The authors describe here their application of electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) to the determination of transference numbers of lithium ions in polymer gel electrolytes. Two types of polymer gel electrolytes were selected for this study: PAN/PC/EC/LiX and Kynar/PC/LiX. Results obtained for the two types of gels are compared and the effects of anion, polymer-ion interactions and ion-ion interactions on lithium transference numbers are discussed. Significant differences in the behavior of transference numbers with salt concentration are observed for the two types of gels. This may be due to the extent of interaction between the polymer and the ions. Implications for solid polymer electrolytes are discussed.

  3. Sensitive and robust electrophoretic NMR: instrumentation and experiments.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Fredrik; Furó, István; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Stilbs, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Although simple as a concept, electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) has so far failed to find wider application. Problems encountered are mainly due to disturbing and partly irreproducible convection-like bulk flow effects from both electro-osmosis and thermal convection. Additionally, bubble formation at the electrodes and rf noise pickup has constrained the typical sample geometry to U-tube-like arrangements with a small filling factor and a low resulting NMR sensitivity. Furthermore, the sign of the electrophoretic mobility cancels out in U-tube geometries. We present here a new electrophoretic sample cell based on a vertically placed conventional NMR sample tube with bubble-suppressing palladium metal as electrode material. A suitable radiofrequency filter design prevents noise pickup by the NMR sample coil from the high-voltage leads which extend into the sensitive sample volume. Hence, the obtained signal-to-noise ratio of this cell is one order of magnitude higher than that of our previous U-tube cells. Permitted by the retention of the sign of the displacement-related signal phase in the new cell design, an experimental approach is described where bulk flow effects by electro-osmosis and/or thermal convection are compensated through parallel monitoring of a reference signal from a non-charged species in the sample. This approach, together with a CPMG-like pulse train scheme provides a superior first-order cancellation of non-electrophoretic bulk flow effects.

  4. Sensitive and robust electrophoretic NMR: Instrumentation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Fredrik; Furó, István; Yushmanov, Pavel V.; Stilbs, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Although simple as a concept, electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) has so far failed to find wider application. Problems encountered are mainly due to disturbing and partly irreproducible convection-like bulk flow effects from both electro-osmosis and thermal convection. Additionally, bubble formation at the electrodes and rf noise pickup has constrained the typical sample geometry to U-tube-like arrangements with a small filling factor and a low resulting NMR sensitivity. Furthermore, the sign of the electrophoretic mobility cancels out in U-tube geometries. We present here a new electrophoretic sample cell based on a vertically placed conventional NMR sample tube with bubble-suppressing palladium metal as electrode material. A suitable radiofrequency filter design prevents noise pickup by the NMR sample coil from the high-voltage leads which extend into the sensitive sample volume. Hence, the obtained signal-to-noise ratio of this cell is one order of magnitude higher than that of our previous U-tube cells. Permitted by the retention of the sign of the displacement-related signal phase in the new cell design, an experimental approach is described where bulk flow effects by electro-osmosis and/or thermal convection are compensated through parallel monitoring of a reference signal from a non-charged species in the sample. This approach, together with a CPMG-like pulse train scheme provides a superior first-order cancellation of non-electrophoretic bulk flow effects.

  5. A novel method of measuring electrophoretic mobility of gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Aref Seyyed; Drelich, Jaroslaw; Yeung, Anthony; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob

    2007-04-15

    Accurate measurement of electrophoretic mobility for gas bubbles is a challenging task as it requires the creation of a desired number of very small air bubbles to ensure negligible rise velocities during the course of the measurement. Here, we report a simple and reliable method for generating stable dispersions of "nano-bubbles." Preparation of such dispersions relies on the nucleation of nano-bubbles in solutions supersaturated with gas. Electrophoretic mobility of these nano-bubbles is determined by the ZetaPALS technique (Brookhaven Instruments) using Uzgiris electrodes coated with palladium. The Smoluchowski limit is assumed in the calculation of zeta potentials. In regard to reproducibility and reliability, this novel method shows a clear advantage over other existing techniques of zeta potential measurement for bubbles.

  6. Determination of pKa values of tenoxicam from 1H NMR chemical shifts and of oxicams from electrophoretic mobilities (CZE) with the aid of programs SQUAD and HYPNMR.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Barrientos, Damaris; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto; Gutiérrez, Atilano; Moya-Hernández, Rosario; Gómez-Balderas, Rodolfo; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa

    2009-12-15

    In this work it is explained, by the first time, the application of programs SQUAD and HYPNMR to refine equilibrium constant values through the fit of electrophoretic mobilities determined by capillary zone electrophoresis experiments, due to the mathematical isomorphism of UV-vis absorptivity coefficients, NMR chemical shifts and electrophoretic mobilities as a function of pH. Then, the pK(a) values of tenoxicam in H(2)O/DMSO 1:4 (v/v) have been obtained from (1)H NMR chemical shifts, as well as of oxicams in aqueous solution from electrophoretic mobilities determined by CZE, at 25 degrees C. These values are in very good agreement with those reported by spectrophotometric and potentiometric measurements.

  7. Method for Single-Cell Mass and Electrophoretic Mobility Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    machining of the many custom components that were needed to conduct the research described in this thesis. This work has been funded by the National Cancer ...Characterization of Bacteria by Buoyant Mass and Electrophoretic Mobility 5.1 Introduction Bacterial biofilms , layers of bacterial cells attached to solid...descriptions of the initial adhesion kinetics of biofilm formation. [19, 20] One approach to this problem is to model the dependence of cellular EPM

  8. Sorption isotherm measurements by NMR.

    PubMed

    Leisen, Johannes; Beckham, Haskell W; Benham, Michael

    2002-01-01

    An experimental setup is described for the automated recording of sorption isotherms by NMR experiments at precisely defined levels of relative humidity (RH). Implementation is demonstrated for a cotton fabric; Bloch decays. T1 and T2* relaxation times were measured at predefined steps of increasing and decreasing relative humidities (RHs) so that a complete isotherm of NMR properties was obtained. Bloch decays were analyzed by fitting to relaxation functions consisting or a slow- and a fast-relaxing component. The fraction of slow-relaxing component was greater than the fraction of sorbed moisture determined from gravimetric sorption data. The excess slow-relaxing component was attributed to plasticized segments of the formerly rigid cellulose matrix. T1 and T2* sorption isotherms exhibit hysteresis similar to gravimetric sorption isotherms. However, correlating RH to moisture content (MC) reveals that both relaxation constants depend only on MC, and not on the history of moisture exposure.

  9. Simultaneous sizing and electrophoretic mobility measurement of sub-micron particles using Brownian motion

    PubMed Central

    Palanisami, Akilan; Miller, John H.

    2011-01-01

    The size and surface chemistry of micron scale particles are of fundamental importance in studies of biology and air particulate pollution. However, typical electrophoretic measurements of these and other sub-micron scale particles (300 nm – 1 μm) cannot resolve size information within heterogeneous mixtures unambiguously. Using optical microscopy, we monitor electrophoretic motion together with the Brownian velocity fluctuations—using the latter to measure size by either the Green-Kubo relation or by calibration from known size standards. Particle diameters are resolved to ±12% with 95% confidence. Strikingly, the size resolution improves as particle size decreases due to the increased Brownian motion. The sizing ability of the Brownian assessed electrophoresis method described here complements the electrophoretic mobility resolution of traditional capillary electrophoresis. PMID:20882556

  10. Electrophoretic Light Scattering: Instrumentation and Application to the Measurement of the Electric Charge of Human Blood Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-15

    blood cells Human Blood cells- . . .. . Platelets Electric charge Electrophoretic mobility 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side If necessary and...the electrophoretic mobility of human blood cells and platelets . The technique is called Electrophoretic Light Scattering (ELS), and the measurement...predictive value in ascertaining the quality of preserved red blood cells and platelets . It was found that neither liquid storage (up to 30 days) nor

  11. Hydrate Shell Growth Measured Using NMR.

    PubMed

    Haber, Agnes; Akhfash, Masoumeh; Loh, Charles K; Aman, Zachary M; Fridjonsson, Einar O; May, Eric F; Johns, Michael L

    2015-08-18

    Benchtop nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulsed field gradient (PFG) and relaxation measurements were used to monitor the clathrate hydrate shell growth occurring in water droplets dispersed in a continuous cyclopentane phase. These techniques allowed the growth of hydrate inside the opaque exterior shell to be monitored and, hence, information about the evolution of the shell's morphology to be deduced. NMR relaxation measurements were primarily used to monitor the hydrate shell growth kinetics, while PFG NMR diffusion experiments were used to determine the nominal droplet size distribution (DSD) of the unconverted water inside the shell core. A comparison of mean droplet sizes obtained directly via PFG NMR and independently deduced from relaxation measurements showed that the assumption of the shell model-a perfect spherical core of unconverted water-for these hydrate droplet systems is correct, but only after approximately 24 h of shell growth. Initially, hydrate growth is faster and heat-transfer-limited, leading to porous shells with surface areas larger than that of spheres with equivalent volumes. Subsequently, the hydrate growth rate becomes mass-transfer-limited, and the shells become thicker, spherical, and less porous.

  12. Mobile NMR: Measuring Pixels, Images, and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluemich, Bernhard

    2007-03-01

    The vision of bringing nuclear magnetic resonance out of the lab to the doctor's office, the chemical reactor, or the manufacturing site is becoming reality with the development of mobile NMR. Pioneered for well logging in the oil industry, the concept has been explored for materials testing in a more systematic way since the introduction of the NMR-MOUSE. This is a small, one-sided access NMR sensor which acquires the information of one pixel from a particular spot of a large object. As the sensor explores the stray-fields of a permanent magnet and an rf coil, the magnetic fields are inhomogeneous and the sensitive volume is limited to the region, where both fields are orthogonal and the Larmor frequency lies within the excitation bandwidth. By shaping the magnet and the coil geometries, the shape of the sensitive volume can be tailored to a thin slice or a larger volume a certain distance away from the sensor surface. In the first case, there is a strong field gradient in the depth direction, and in the second case, a homogeneous sweet spot of the field profile is desired. The first case is suitable for measuring high-resolution depth profiles, while the second case is suitable for chemical shift resolved spectroscopy and volume imaging. The basic concepts of open and closed mobile NMR sensors will be discussed along with applications from testing polymer products, cultural heritage, medical tissue, and rock cores.

  13. Measurement of vorticity diffusion by NMR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-05-01

    In a Newtonian fluid, vorticity diffuses at a rate determined by the kinematic viscosity. Here we use rapid NMR velocimetry, based on a RARE sequence, to image the time-dependent velocity field on startup of a fluid-filled cylinder and therefore measure the diffusion of vorticity. The results are consistent with the solution to the vorticity diffusion equation where the angular velocity on the outside surface of the fluid, at the cylinder's rotating wall, is fixed. This method is a means of measuring kinematic viscosity for low viscosity fluids without the need to measure stress.

  14. Measurement of the position-dependent electrophoretic force on DNA in a glass nanocapillary.

    PubMed

    Bulushev, Roman D; Steinbock, Lorenz J; Khlybov, Sergey; Steinbock, Julian F; Keyser, Ulrich F; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2014-11-12

    The electrophoretic force on a single DNA molecule inside a glass nanocapillary depends on the opening size and varies with the distance along the symmetrical axis of the nanocapillary. Using optical tweezers and DNA-coated beads, we measured the stalling forces and mapped the position-dependent force profiles acting on DNA inside nanocapillaries of different sizes. We showed that the stalling force is higher in nanocapillaries of smaller diameters. The position-dependent force profiles strongly depend on the size of the nanocapillary opening, and for openings smaller than 20 nm, the profiles resemble the behavior observed in solid-state nanopores. To characterize the position-dependent force profiles in nanocapillaries of different sizes, we used a model that combines information from both analytical approximations and numerical calculations.

  15. NMR measurements of intracellular ions in hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veniero, Joseph C.; Gupta, R. K.

    1993-08-01

    The NMR methods for the measurement of intracellular free Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and H+ are introduced. The recent literature is then presented showing applications of these methods to cells and tissues from hypertensive animal model systems, and humans with essential hypertension. The results support the hypothesis of consistent derangement of the intracellular ionic environment in hypertension. The theory that this derangement may be a common link in the disease states of high blood pressure and abnormal insulin and glucose metabolism, which are often associated clinically, is discussed.

  16. Using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays to Measure Equilibrium Dissociation Constants: GAL4-p53 Binding DNA as a Model System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffler, Michael A.; Walters, Ryan D.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2012-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that will teach students the practical and theoretical considerations for measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (K[subscript D]) for a protein/DNA interaction using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). An EMSA monitors the migration of DNA through a native gel;…

  17. Using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays to Measure Equilibrium Dissociation Constants: GAL4-p53 Binding DNA as a Model System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffler, Michael A.; Walters, Ryan D.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2012-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that will teach students the practical and theoretical considerations for measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (K[subscript D]) for a protein/DNA interaction using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). An EMSA monitors the migration of DNA through a native gel;…

  18. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectly predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.

  19. NMR measurements in solutions of dialkylimidazolium haloaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Saboungi, M.L.; Klingler, R.J.; Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

    1992-06-01

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 35}Cl NMR spectra of AlCl{sub 3}-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) melts were measured for initial compositions ranging from 50 to 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} at various temperatures. It was shown by changing the preaquisition delay time (DE value) that the dominant aluminum species are AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in the melt formed by mixing 50 mol % with EMIC and Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 7}{sup {minus}} in the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} melt. In the equimolar mixture, the chemical shift of {sup 27}Al NMR spectrum is 103.28 ppm and the line width is 22.83Hz. In the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixture, the chemical shift is 103.41 ppm and the line width is 2624Hz. A third species observed at 97 ppm in the {sup 27}Al spectra for the 55 and 60 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixtures is identified to be a product of the reaction with residual water. The relaxation rates for each species in the melts were determined.

  20. Fat Emulsification Measured Using NMR Transverse Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciani, L.; Ramanathan, C.; Tyler, D. J.; Young, P.; Manoj, P.; Wickham, M.; Fillery-Travis, A.; Spiller, R. C.; Gowland, P. A.

    2001-11-01

    This paper presents a novel method of measuring the droplet size in oil-in-water emulsions. It is based on changes in the NMR transverse relaxation rate due to the effect of microscopic magnetic susceptibility differences between fat droplets and the surrounding water. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates of a series of emulsions with constant oil volume fraction and five different mean droplet sizes, in the range 0.4-20.9 μm, were measured in vitro at 37°C using EPI. While the longitudinal relaxation rate 1/T1 did not change significantly, 1/T2 was observed to increase with mean droplet size. The measured changes in 1/T2 were found to be in good agreement with results predicted from proton random walk simulations, and were also consistent with analytical solutions based on an outer sphere relaxation model. Measurements of 1/T2 on emulsions with a higher oil volume fraction, and on emulsions of a fixed size where the water phase was doped with gadolinium to modulate the susceptibility difference between the phases, also showed the predicted behavior. As part of this study the susceptibility difference between olive oil and water was measured to be 1.55 ppm.

  1. Easy measurement and analysis method of zeta potential and electrophoretic mobility of water-dispersed colloidal particles by using a self-mixing solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.; Ohtomo, T.; Otsuka, K.

    2013-08-01

    We describe a highly sensitive method of measuring electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential of water-dispersed colloidal particles by using a self-mixing laser Doppler velocimeter with a laser-diode-pumped, thin-slice solid-state laser with extremely high optical sensitivity. The power spectra of laser output modulated by reinjected laser light scattered by the electrophoretic particles were observed. The power spectrum cannot be described by the well-known formula for translational motion or flowing Brownian motion, i.e., a combination of Doppler shift, diffusion, and translation. The power spectra shape is found to reflect the velocity distribution of electrophoretic particles in a capillary tube due to the electro-osmotic flow contribution. Not only evaluation of the electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential but also the particle diameter undergoing electrophoretic motion can be performed from the shape of the power spectrum.

  2. Earth's field NMR flow meter: preliminary quantitative measurements.

    PubMed

    Fridjonsson, Einar O; Stanwix, Paul L; Johns, Michael L

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of Earth's field NMR (EF NMR) combined with a pre-polarising permanent magnet for measuring fast fluid velocities. This time of flight measurement protocol has a considerable history in the literature; here we demonstrate that it is quantitative when employing the Earth's magnetic field for signal detection. NMR signal intensities are measured as a function of flow rate (0-1m/s) and separation distance between the permanent magnet and the EF NMR signal detection. These data are quantitatively described by a flow model, ultimately featuring no free parameters, that accounts for NMR signal modulation due to residence time inside the pre-polarising magnet, between the pre-polarising magnet and the detection RF coil and inside the detection coil respectively. The methodology is subsequently demonstrated with a metallic pipe in the pre-polarising region.

  3. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    DOE PAGES

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; ...

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectlymore » predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.« less

  4. Error analysis for NMR polymer microstructure measurement without calibration standards.

    PubMed

    Qiu, XiaoHua; Zhou, Zhe; Gobbi, Gian; Redwine, Oscar D

    2009-10-15

    We report an error analysis method for primary analytical methods in the absence of calibration standards. Quantitative (13)C NMR analysis of ethylene/1-octene (E/O) copolymers is given as an example. Because the method is based on a self-calibration scheme established by counting, it is a measure of accuracy rather than precision. We demonstrate it is self-consistent and neither underestimate nor excessively overestimate the experimental errors. We also show the method identified previously unknown systematic biases in a NMR instrument. The method can eliminate unnecessary data averaging to save valuable NMR resources. The accuracy estimate proposed is not unique to (13)C NMR spectroscopy of E/O but should be applicable to all other measurement systems where the accuracy of a subset of the measured responses can be established.

  5. Determination of electrolyte friction from measurements of the tracer diffusion coefficients, mutual diffusion coefficients, and electrophoretic mobilities of charged spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Plank, Lindsay; Ware, B. R.

    1984-07-01

    The technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching has been used to measure the tracer diffusion coefficient of fluorescein-labeled charged polystyrene spheres in dilute solutions as a function of solution ionic strength. As the ratio of the particle radius (a) to the Debye-Hückel screening length (κ-1) was varied from 13 to 0.6, a 20% reduction in tracer diffusion coefficient was observed. The mutual diffusion coefficient, measured by quasielastic light scattering, increased as κa was reduced, demonstrating the dominant effect of thermodynamic factors on this parameter. The tracer data have been compared with theoretical predictions of other workers describing the influence of small-ion interactions with a charge sphere on its translational friction. The theoretical results of Schurr, and Booth, involve an explicit dependence on the electrokinetic charge of the sphere and yield estimates of this parameter (by least squares) which are significantly smaller than those obtained from laser Doppler electrophoretic light scattering results for the electrophoretic mobility of the labeled spheres. Approximations in the theoretical analyses are expected to account for these discrepancies.

  6. Field and pore size dependence of the electrophoretic mobility of DNA: a combination of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and electric birefringence measurements.

    PubMed

    Tinland, B; Pernodet, N; Weill, G

    1996-06-01

    By combining an electrophoretic cell with a setup of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) we can measure the electrophoretic mobility mu of double-stranded lambda DNA in agarose gel as a function of electric field E and gel concentration C. Mobility varies linearly with the field in agreement with the biased reptation model with fluctuations. The slopes are analyzed in term of orientation and compared with birefringence results. The mobility extrapolated at zero field follows the prediction of the reptation theory; we deduced the variation of the pore size with the agarose concentration. With a special use of our setup, we measure directly the free-mobility mu 0 of the DNA.

  7. Field Experiment Provides Ground Truth for Surface NMR Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, R. J.; Abraham, J. D.; Cannia, J. C.; Dlubac, K. I.; Grau, B.; Grunewald, E. D.; Irons, T.; Song, Y.; Walsh, D.

    2010-12-01

    Effective and sustainable long-term management of fresh water resources requires accurate information about the availability of water in groundwater aquifers. Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) can provide a direct link to the presence of water in the pore space of geological materials through the detection of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen nuclei (protons) in the pore water. Of interest for groundwater applications is the measurement of the proton-NMR relaxation time constant, referred to as T2. This parameter is sensitive to the geometry of the water-filled pore space and can be related to the hydraulic conductivity. NMR logging instruments, which have been available since the 1980’s, provide direct measurements of T2 in boreholes. Surface NMR (SNMR) is a non-invasive geophysical method that uses a loop of wire on the surface to probe the NMR properties of groundwater aquifers to a depth of ~100 m, without the need for the drilling of boreholes. SNMR provides reliable measurements of a different NMR time constant referred to as T2*, that is related to, but not necessarily equivalent to, T2. The relationship between T2* and T2 is likely to depend upon the physical environment and the composition of the sampled material. In order to advance the use of SNMR as a non-invasive means of characterizing groundwater aquifers, we must answer the fundamental question: When probing a groundwater aquifer, what information is provided by T2*, the time constant measured with SNMR? Our approach was to conduct a field experiment in Nebraska, in an area underlain by the Quaternary Alluvium and Tertiary Ogallala aquifers. We first used SNMR to obtain a 1D profile of T2* to a depth of ~60 m. We then drilled a well inside the area of the SNMR loop, to a depth of ~150 m, and used the drill cuttings to describe the composition of the geologic material at the site. The borehole was kept open for 2 days to acquire logging NMR T2 measurements over the total depth. Three

  8. Measurements of the electrophoretic mobility with a new laser Doppler cytopherometer (Lazypher) and critical evaluation of the Electrophorese Mobility Test (EMT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, W.

    1982-01-01

    The new developed Laser Doppler Cytopherometer (Lazypher) allows the exact and objective measurement of the electrophoretic mobility of particles. Comparative experiments with the Free Flow Cell Electrophoresis instrument of Hannig showed identical results. The impression that the electrophoretic Mobility Test is not valid for cancer diagnosis has been substantiated. But in its present form with the new instrument (Lazypher) possible improvements, e.g. isolation of lymphocytes, purification of ""antigens'' or indicator particles, can be estimated objectively for their value for the test system.

  9. Electrophoretic Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    Electrophoretic focusing is a new method of continuous flow electrophoresis that introduces precision flow control to achieve high resolution separations. The electric field is applied perpendicular to an incoming sample lamina and buffer but also perpendicular to the broad faces of the thin rectangular chamber. A uniform fluid cross-flow then enters and exits the separation chamber through the same broad faces which are porous. A balance is achieved by adjusting either the electric field or the cross-flow so the desired sample fraction with its specific migration velocity encounters an opposing flow of the same velocity. Applying an electric field transverse to the incoming sample lamina and opposing this field with a carefully configured buffer flow, a sample constituent can be selected and focused into a narrow stream for subsequent analysis. Monotonically changing either electric field or buffer cross-flow will yield a scan of all constituents of the sample. Stopping the scan increases the collection time for minor constituents to improve their analysis. Using the high voltage gradients and/or cross-flow to rapidly deflect extraneous sample through the porous screens and into either of the side (purge) chambers, the selected sample is focused in the center plane of the separation chamber and collected without contact or interaction with the separation chamber walls. Results will be presented on the separation of a range of materials including dyes, proteins, and monodisperse polystyrene latexes. Sources of sample dispersion inherent in other electrokinetic techniques will be shown to be negligible for a variety of sample concentrations, buffer properties and operating conditions.

  10. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays to measure equilibrium dissociation constants: GAL4-p53 binding DNA as a model system.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Michael A; Walters, Ryan D; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2012-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that will teach students the practical and theoretical considerations for measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D) ) for a protein/DNA interaction using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). An EMSA monitors the migration of DNA through a native gel; the DNA migrates more slowly when bound to a protein. To determine a K(D) the amount of unbound and protein-bound DNA in the gel is measured as the protein concentration increases. By performing this experiment, students will be introduced to making affinity measurements and gain experience in performing quantitative EMSAs. The experiment describes measuring the K(D) for the interaction between the chimeric protein GAL4-p53 and its DNA recognition site; however, the techniques are adaptable to other DNA binding proteins. In addition, the basic experiment described can be easily expanded to include additional inquiry-driven experimentation. © 2012 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Characterization of the Cell Surface Properties of Drinking Water Pathogens by Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon and Electrophoretic Mobility Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregati...

  12. Characterization of the Cell Surface Properties of Drinking Water Pathogens by Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon and Electrophoretic Mobility Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregati...

  13. Improvements in Technique of NMR Imaging and NMR Diffusion Measurements in the Presence of Background Gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jianyu

    In this work, modification of the cosine current distribution rf coil, PCOS, has been introduced and tested. The coil produces a very homogeneous rf magnetic field, and it is inexpensive to build and easy to tune for multiple resonance frequency. The geometrical parameters of the coil are optimized to produce the most homogeneous rf field over a large volume. To avoid rf field distortion when the coil length is comparable to a quarter wavelength, a parallel PCOS coil is proposed and discussed. For testing rf coils and correcting B _1 in NMR experiments, a simple, rugged and accurate NMR rf field mapping technique has been developed. The method has been tested and used in 1D, 2D, 3D and in vivo rf mapping experiments. The method has been proven to be very useful in the design of rf coils. To preserve the linear relation between rf output applied on an rf coil and modulating input for an rf modulating -amplifying system of NMR imaging spectrometer, a quadrature feedback loop is employed in an rf modulator with two orthogonal rf channels to correct the amplitude and phase non-linearities caused by the rf components in the rf system. The modulator is very linear over a large range and it can generate an arbitrary rf shape. A diffusion imaging sequence has been developed for measuring and imaging diffusion in the presence of background gradients. Cross terms between the diffusion sensitizing gradients and background gradients or imaging gradients can complicate diffusion measurement and make the interpretation of NMR diffusion data ambiguous, but these have been eliminated in this method. Further, the background gradients has been measured and imaged. A dipole random distribution model has been established to study background magnetic fields Delta B and background magnetic gradients G_0 produced by small particles in a sample when it is in a B_0 field. From this model, the minimum distance that a spin can approach a particle can be determined by measuring

  14. Characterization of the cell surface properties of drinking water pathogens by microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon and electrophoretic mobility measurements.

    PubMed

    Popovici, Jonathan; White, Colin P; Hoelle, Jill; Kinkle, Brian K; Lytle, Darren A

    2014-06-01

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregation, adhesion to surfaces, and stability of the cells within the aqueous environments. These cell characteristics are unique to the bacterial species and are a reflection of the large diversity of surface structures, proteins, and appendages of microorganisms. CSH and EPM of bacterial cells contribute substantially to the effectiveness of drinking water treatment to remove them, and therefore an investigation of these properties will be useful in predicting their removal through drinking water treatment processes and transport through drinking water distribution systems. EPM and CSH measurements of six microbiological pathogen or surrogate species suspended in phosphate-buffered water are reported in this work. Two strains of Vibrio cholerae were hydrophobic, while three strains of Escherichia coli were hydrophilic. Bacillus cereus was categorized as moderately hydrophobic. The strains of E. coli had the highest (most negative) EPM. Based on the measurements, E. coli species is predicted to be most difficult to remove from water while V. cholerae will be the easiest to remove.

  15. Zeta potential determination by streaming current modelization and measurement in electrophoretic microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Louis; Kleimann, Pascal; Morin, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Electrophoresis in capillary and microfluidic systems, used in analytical chemistry to separate charged species, are quite sensitive to surface phenomena in terms of separation performances. In order to improve theses performances, new surface functionalization techniques are required. There is a need for methods to provide fast and accurate quantification about surface charges at liquid/solid interfaces. We present a fast, simple, and low-cost technique for the measurement of the zeta-potential, via the modelization and the measurement of streaming currents. Due to the small channel cross section in microfluidic devices, the streaming current modelization is easier than the streaming potential measurement. The modelization combines microfluidic simulations based on the Navier-Stokes equation and charge repartition simulations based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. This method has been validated with square and circular cross section shape fused-silica capillaries and can be easily transposed to any lab-on-chip microsystems.

  16. Rheo-NMR Measurements of Cocoa Butter Crystallized Under

    SciTech Connect

    Mudge, E.; Mazzanti, G

    2009-01-01

    Modifications of a benchtop NMR instrument were made to apply temperature control to a shearing NMR cell. This has enabled the determination in situ of the solid fat content (SFC) of cocoa butter under shearing conditions. The cocoa butter was cooled at 3 C/min to three final temperatures of 17.5, 20.0, and 22.5 C with applied shear rates between 45 and 720 s-1. Polymorphic transitions of the cocoa butter were determined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction with an identical shearing system constructed of Lexan. Sheared samples were shown to have accelerated phase transitions compared to static experiments. In experiments where form V was confirmed to be the dominant polymorph, the final SFC averaged around 50%. However, when other polymorphic forms were formed, a lower SFC was measured because the final temperature was within the melting range of that polymorph and only partial crystallization happened. A shear rate of 720 s-1 delayed phase transitions, likely due to viscous heating of the sample. Pulsed NMR is an invaluable tool for determining the crystalline fraction in hydrogen containing materials, yet its use for fundamental and industrial research on fat or alkanes crystallization under shear has only recently been developed.

  17. Surface charge of trypanosoma cruzi. Binding of cationized ferritin and measurement of cellular electrophoretic mobility.

    PubMed

    De Souza, W; Arguello, C; Martinez-Paloma, A; Trissl, D; Gonzáles-Robles, A; Chiari, E

    1977-08-01

    The surface charge of epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was evaluated by means of binding of cationized ferritin to the cell surface as visualized by electron microscopy, and by direct measurements of the cellular microelectrophoretic mobility (EPM). Epimastigote forms had a mean EPM of -0.52 micrometer-s-1-V-1-cm and were lightly labeled with cationized ferritin. In contrast, bloodstream trypomastigotes had a much higher EPM (-1.14), and the surface was heavily labeled with cationized ferritin. When trypomastigotes from staionary phase cultures were isolated on DEAE cellulose columns, the mean EPM was found to be significantly lower (-0.63), and labeling with cationized ferritin decreased. With a mixed population containing epimastigote, trypomastigote, and intermediate forms, EPM values ranging between -0.70 to -1.14 were found. From these observations we conclude that there is a definite increase in negative surface charge during development from epi- to trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi.

  18. Label-Free Determination of the Number of Biomolecules Attached to Cells by Measurement of the Cell's Electrophoretic Mobility in a Microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Aki, Atsushi; Nair, Baiju G.; Morimoto, Hisao; Kumar, D. Sakthi; Maekawa, Toru

    2010-01-01

    We developed a label-free method for a determination of the number of biomolecules attached to individual cells by measuring the electrophoretic mobility of the cells in a microchannel. The surface of a biological cell, which is dispersed in aqueous solution, is normally electrically charged and the charge quantity at the cell's surface is slightly changed once antibody molecules are attached to the cell, based on which we detect the attachment of antibody molecules to the surface of individual red blood cells by electrophoretic mobility measurement. We also analyzed the number of antibody molecules attached to the cell's surface using a flow cytometer. We found that there is a clear correlation between the number of antibody molecules attached to the individual cells and the electophoretic mobility of the cells. The present technique may well be utilized not only in the field of cell biology but also in the medical and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:21206908

  19. Characterization of U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes on hematite: EXAFS and electrophoretic mobility measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, John R.; Reitmeyer, Rebecca; Lenhart, John J.; Davis, James A.

    2000-01-01

    We have measured U(VI) adsorption on hematite using EXAFS spectroscopy and electrophoresis under conditions relevant to surface waters and aquifers (0.01 to 10 μM dissolved uranium concentrations, in equilibrium with air, pH 4.5 to 8.5). Both techniques suggest the existence of anionic U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes. Fits to EXAFS spectra indicate that U(VI) is simultaneously coordinated to surface FeO6 octahedra and carbonate (or bicarbonate) ligands in bidentate fashions, leading to the conclusion that the ternary complexes have an inner-sphere metal bridging (hematite-U(VI)-carbonato) structure. Greater than or equal to 50% of adsorbed U(VI) was comprised of monomeric hematite-U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes, even at pH 4.5. Multimeric U(VI) species were observed at pH ≥ 6.5 and aqueous U(VI) concentrations approximately an order of magnitude more dilute than the solubility of crystalline β-UO2(OH)2. Based on structural constraints, these complexes were interpreted as dimeric hematite-U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes. These results suggest that Fe-oxide-U(VI)-carbonato complexes are likely to be important transport-limiting species in oxic aquifers throughout a wide range of pH values.

  20. NMR and transport measurements of copper chalcogenide and clathrate compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirusi Arvij, Ali

    Due to limited sources of fossil fuels worldwide and a large percentage wasted as heat energy, searching for efficient thermoelectric materials to convert heat to electricity has gained a great deal of attention. Most of the attempts are focused on materials with substantially lower lattice thermal conductivity and narrow band gaps. Among them, inorganic clathrates and copper-based chalcogenides possess intrinsic low thermal conductivity which makes them promising thermoelectrics. In this work, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), transport, and magnetic measurements were performed on clathrates and copper-based chalcogenides to investigate their vibrational and electronic charge carrier properties, as well as the unknown structures of Cu2Se and Cu 2Te at low temperatures, and the effect of rattling of guest atoms in the clathrates. The NMR results in Ba8Ga16Ge30 indicate a pseudogap in the Ga electronic density of states, superposed upon a surprisingly large Ba contribution to the conduction band. Meanwhile, the phonon contributions to the Ga relaxation rates are large and increase more rapidly with temperature than typical semiconductors due to enhanced anharmonicity of the propagative phonon modes over a wide range. Moreover, the observed NMR shifts in the Ba8Cu5Si xGe41-x clathrates change in a nonlinear way with increasing Si substitution: from x = 0 to about 20 the shifts are essentially constant, while approaching x = 41 they increase rapidly, demonstrating a significant change in hybridizations vs Si substitution. NMR studies of Cu2Se show an initial appearance of ionic hopping in a narrow temperature range above 100 K, coinciding with the recently observed low-temperature phase transition. At room temperature and above, this goes over to rapid Cu-ion hopping and a single motionally narrowed line both above and below the alpha-beta structural transition. Furthermore, the NMR results on Cu2Te and Cu 1.98Ag0.2Te demonstrate unusually large negative chemical

  1. Poly(styrene/alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzylpolyglycidol) microspheres for immunodiagnostics. Principle of a novel latex test based on combined electrophoretic mobility and particle aggregation measurements.

    PubMed

    Radomska-Galant, Izabela; Basinska, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    The principle of a novel latex agglutination test based on combined results of electrophoretic mobility and particle aggregation measurements is described. Poly(styrene/alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzylpolyglycidol) (P(S/PGL)) microspheres were synthesized by a one step soap-free emulsion copolymerization of styrene and alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzylpolyglycidol macromonomer with number average molecular weight Mn = 2700 (polydispersity [Mw]/[Mn] = 1.10). Particles with monomodal size distribution (number average diameter Dn = 220 nm) and surface fraction of polyglycidol equal to f = 0.42 mol % were obtained. Human serum albumin (HSA) was covalently bound onto the surface of P(S/PGL) microspheres activated with 1,3,5-trichlorotriazine. In a model immunodiagnostic assay for anti-HSA, in which P(S/PGL) particles with covalently bound HSA have been used, the electrophoretic mobility and aggregation of microspheres were measured simultaneously. This approach allowed detection of anti-HSA in the serum in the range of anti-HSA concentrations from 0.1 to 150 microg/mL. The highest changes in electrophoretic mobility were registered for microspheres with surface concentration of immobilized HSA equal to Gamma = 9.2 x 10(-4) g/m2.

  2. Electrophoretically mediated microanalysis of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Harmon, B J; Patterson, D H; Regnier, F E

    1993-12-31

    Capillary electrophoresis was used to determine ethanol by the methodology of electrophoretically mediated microanalysis (EMMA). In EMMA, spatially distinct analyte and analytical reagent zones of differing electrophoretic mobility are merged under the influence of an electric field, and the resulting product is transported to the detector. The enzymatic oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase was utilized, and the concurrent reduction of NAD+ to NADH was monitored at 340 nm as a measure of the quantity of ethanol injected. Quantitation using an internal standard and normalization for peak migration time yielded a R.S.D. of 2.7%, and the linear range extended to that quantity of ethanol which could be reacted prior to passing by the detection window. Comparison of the EMMA technique to the Sigma spectrophotometric procedure revealed that the two methods do not yield significantly different values for the determination of ethanol. The EMMA method offered the advantages of electrophoretic mixing and miniaturization.

  3. Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruopeng; Pavlin, Tina; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Mair, Ross William; Cory, David G; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    In this work we present measurements of permeability, effective porosity and tortuosity on a variety of rock samples using NMR/MRI of thermal and laser-polarized gas. Permeability and effective porosity are measured simultaneously using MRI to monitor the inflow of laser-polarized xenon into the rock core. Tortuosity is determined from measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient using thermal xenon in sealed samples. The initial results from a limited number of rocks indicate inverse correlations between tortuosity and both effective porosity and permeability. Further studies to widen the number of types of rocks studied may eventually aid in explaining the poorly understood connection between permeability and tortuosity of rock cores.

  4. Ultrafast NMR diffusion measurements exploiting chirp spin echoes.

    PubMed

    Ahola, Susanna; Mankinen, Otto; Telkki, Ville-Veikko

    2017-04-01

    Standard diffusion NMR measurements require the repetition of the experiment multiple times with varying gradient strength or diffusion delay. This makes the experiment time-consuming and restricts the use of hyperpolarized substances to boost sensitivity. We propose a novel single-scan diffusion experiment, which is based on spatial encoding of two-dimensional data, employing the spin-echoes created by two successive adiabatic frequency-swept chirp π pulses. The experiment is called ultrafast pulsed-field-gradient spin-echo (UF-PGSE). We present a rigorous derivation of the echo amplitude in the UF-PGSE experiment, justifying the theoretical basis of the method. The theory reveals also that the standard analysis of experimental data leads to a diffusion coefficient value overestimated by a few per cent. Although the overestimation is of the order of experimental error and thus insignificant in many practical applications, we propose that it can be compensated by a bipolar gradient version of the experiment, UF-BP-PGSE, or by corresponding stimulated-echo experiment, UF-BP-pulsed-field-gradient stimulated-echo. The latter also removes the effect of uniform background gradients. The experiments offer significant prospects for monitoring fast processes in real time as well as for increasing the sensitivity of experiments by several orders of magnitude by nuclear spin hyperpolarization. Furthermore, they can be applied as basic blocks in various ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR experiments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Calibrating NMR measured porosity/permeability relationships using µXRCT measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, H. E.; Smith, M. M.; Hao, Y.; Carroll, S.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate reservoirs have garnered interest for potential use in carbon capture and storage (CCS) activities. To be suitable for long term carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, they must possess sufficient permeability either through existing connected pore space, or due to reactivity with CO2-acidified fluids. Adequate assessment of the target formation permeability will rely on accurate downhole well-logging tools. Primary among these tools is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well-logging. Application of this tool relies on our ability to relate the porosity and pore distributions measured by NMR to permeability. These methods are challenging to apply in carbonate reservoirs with complex mineralogies where pores sizes often span orders of magnitudes. We have assessed the ability of NMR methods to measure permeability using rocks from the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project Saskatchewan, Canada and the Arbuckle injection zone at the Wellington CO2 storage demonstration site, Kansas. Results of laboratory measured permeability values of these rocks indicate that the standard NMR methods for predicting permeability values can produce values off by orders of magnitude within the same flow units. In this presentation, we present the results of a combined NMR and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) study of these rock cores to better estimate downhole permeability values of carbonate rocks. The results of the study suggest that the dramatic differences in predicted permeability values derive from large differences in the matrix porosity, pore network tortuosities, and mineralogy of the various rock units. We will present new laboratory measurements, and methodologies aimed at producing a universal NMR calibration procedure for determining permeability in carbonate reservoirs. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. A battery cell for in situ NMR measurements of liquid electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Wiemers-Meyer, Simon; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2017-02-15

    This work describes the development of an in situ battery cell to monitor liquid electrolytes by means of NMR spectroscopy. The suitability of this approach is confirmed by NMR measurements and electrochemical analysis. The cell allows for undistorted high resolution NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, constant current cycling data, C-rate sequences and impedance measurements indicates a long cycle life as well as reasonable specific capacities and Ohmic resistances.

  7. R: A quantitative measure of NMR signal receiving efficiency.

    PubMed

    Mo, Huaping; Harwood, John; Zhang, Shucha; Xue, Yi; Santini, Robert; Raftery, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    Recognizing that the sensitivity of NMR is influenced by factors such as conductance and dielectric constant of the sample, we propose the receiving efficiency R to characterize how efficiently the NMR signal can be observed from a unit transverse magnetization in a sample under optimal probe tuning and matching conditions. Conveniently, the relative receiving efficiency can be defined as the ratio of the NMR signal induced by a unit transverse magnetization in a sample of interest and a reference solution. Based on the reciprocal relationship between excitation and observation in NMR, the relative receiving efficiency can be correlated with the 90 degrees pulse length (tau(90)). In the special case of perfect probe tuning (impedance matched to 50 Omega), R is inversely proportional to tau(90). Application of the NMR receiving efficiency in quantitative analysis potentially enables a single external concentration reference for almost any sample, eliminating the need to know its exact chemical composition or detailed electromagnetic properties.

  8. Serial serum free light chain measurements do not detect changes in disease status earlier than electrophoretic M-spike measurements in patients with intact immunoglobulin myeloma.

    PubMed

    Uljon, Sacha N; Richardson, Paul G; Schur, Peter H; Anderson, Kenneth C; Tanasijevic, Milenko J; Lindeman, Neal I

    2011-03-18

    Serum free light chains (SFLC) are used to manage patients with light chain or hyposecretory myeloma, and may also be useful in patients with intact immunoglobulin myeloma (IIMM), because their shorter half-life may enable earlier indication of relapse/response than electrophoretic M-spikes or heavy chain (IgGA) immunonephelometry. One thousand five SFLC, M-spike, and IgGA concentrations were compared at multiple time points during the treatment of 17 myeloma patients, followed over 7.7-63.4 months. Changes in these analytes were evaluated in context with changes in disease status and treatment. 14/17 (82%) patients showed synchrony between M-spike, IgGA, and SFLC measurements. SFLC changes preceded M-spike/IgGA in 1 patient, and lagged behind M-spike/IgGA in 2 patients. In eight patients, SFLC showed short-term fluctuations unaccompanied by changes in M-spike, IgGA, or clinical treatment. In 16/17 intact immunoglobulin myeloma patients tested frequently over ~3 years, SFLC performed no better than M-spike and did not add value to conventional serum electrophoresis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel Techniques for Pulsed Field Gradient NMR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, William Wallace

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) techniques now find application in multiple quantum filtering and diffusion experiments as well as in magnetic resonance imaging and spatially selective spectroscopy. Conventionally, the gradient fields are produced by azimuthal and longitudinal currents on the surfaces of one or two cylinders. Using a series of planar units consisting of azimuthal and radial current elements spaced along the longitudinal axis, we have designed gradient coils having linear regions that extend axially nearly to the ends of the coil and to more than 80% of the inner radius. These designs locate the current return paths on a concentric cylinder, so the coils are called Concentric Return Path (CRP) coils. Coils having extended linear regions can be made smaller for a given sample size. Among the advantages that can accrue from using smaller coils are improved gradient strength and switching time, reduced eddy currents in the absence of shielding, and improved use of bore space. We used an approximation technique to predict the remaining eddy currents and a time-domain model of coil performance to simulate the electrical performance of the CRP coil and several reduced volume coils of more conventional design. One of the conventional coils was designed based on the time-domain performance model. A single-point acquisition technique was developed to measure the remaining eddy currents of the reduced volume coils. Adaptive sampling increases the dynamic range of the measurement. Measuring only the center of the stimulated echo removes chemical shift and B_0 inhomogeneity effects. The technique was also used to design an inverse filter to remove the eddy current effects in a larger coil set. We added pulsed field gradient and imaging capability to a 7 T commercial spectrometer to perform neuroscience and embryology research and used it in preliminary studies of binary liquid mixtures separating near a critical point. These techniques and coil designs will find

  10. Al NMR study of molten aluminum oxide compounds and mixtures, measured at ultra high temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwowarczyk, J.; Marzke, R. F.; Wolf, G. H.; Petuskey, W. T.; Takulapalli, B.

    2002-10-01

    The technique of ultra high-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has provided insight into the chemical structure and properties of molten aluminum-bearing refractory ceramics, at temperatures in excess of 2000 ^oC. Through application of standard NMR measurements we have studied molten aluminum-bearing ceramics via ^27Al NMR. We have measured spin-lattice (T_1) and spin-spin (T_2) relaxation times, have studied Al-O-P chemical bonding within molten aluminua-monazite (Al_2O3 + LaPO_4) samples and have begun to measure Al diffusivity as a function of temperature and composition. To overcome the limitations of standard NMR heating systems a specially designed NMR probe was developed. Application of levitation technology and a laser heating system permit controlled, containerless heating of samples over a wide range of temperatures. Supported by NSF DMR 0116361, DMR 9818133 and by Research Corp. RA 0276

  11. β2-Adrenergic receptor solutions for structural biology analyzed with microscale NMR diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Horst, Reto; Stanczak, Pawel; Stevens, Raymond C; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2013-01-02

    Microcoil NMR measurements were performed to determine the final composition of solutions of the β(2)-adrenergic receptor (β(2)AR) reconstituted with a detergent and to study the hydrodynamic properties of the detergent micelles containing β(2)AR. Standards are established for the reproducible preparation of G-protein-coupled receptor solutions for crystallization trials and solution NMR studies.

  12. Method and apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise oreintationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions is zero.

  13. Method and sample spinning apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR apparatus and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus spins the sample about an axis. The angle of the axis is mechanically varied such that the time average of two or more Legendre polynomials are zero.

  14. Measurement of interfacial area from NMR time dependent diffusion and relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Fleury, M

    2017-09-07

    The interfacial area between two immiscible phases in porous media is an important parameter for describing and predicting 2 phase flow. Although present in several models, experimental investigations are sparse due to the lack of appropriate measurement techniques. We propose two NMR techniques for the measurement of oil-water interfacial area: (i) a time dependent NMR diffusion technique applicable in static conditions, similar to those used for the measurement of the solid specific surface of a porous media, and (ii) a fast relaxation technique applicable in dynamic conditions while flowing, based on an interfacial relaxation mechanism induced by the inclusion of paramagnetic salts in the water phase. For dodecane relaxing on doped water, we found an oil interfacial relaxivity of 1.8μm/s, large enough to permit the measurement of specific interfacial surface as small as 1000cm(2)/cm(3). We demonstrate both NMR techniques in drainage followed by imbibition, in a model porous media with a narrow pore size distribution. While flowing, we observe that the interfacial area is larger in imbibition than in drainage, implying a different organization of the oil phase. In a carbonate sample with a wide pore size distribution, we evidence the gradual invasion of the smallest pores as the oil-water pressure difference is increased. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Homo- and Heteronuclear Multiple-Quantum Filters for Measurement of NMR Isotope Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, E. W.; Dua, R. K.; Dotson, G. D.; Woodard, R. W.

    The measurement of NMR isotope shifts as mechanistic probes can be complicated by mixtures of isotopomers. Homo- and heteronuclear NMR techniques based on multiple-quantum filtration are presented and shown to be a useful aid in measuring such shifts. The effects of 1H/ 2H substitution and 16O/ 18O substitution on the nuclear shielding of 1H, 13C, and 31P in a multiply labeled phosphoenolpyruvate are measured and interpreted qualitatively in terms of their rovibrational origins.

  16. Site-selective NMR measurements in single crystal PrNb2Al20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Tetsuro; Kotegawa, Hisashi; Tou, Hideki; Harima, Hisatomo; Higashinaka, Ryuji; Nakama, Akihiro; Aoki, Yuji; Sato, Hideyuki

    2017-04-01

    We report the result and analysis of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements at the magnetic field of 8.57 T and temperature of 80 K using a single crystal PrNb2Al20. Combining the field angle dependence of NMR spectra, numerical simulation, and band calculation, we deconvoluted the NMR signals from the Nb, Al 48 f, and Al 96g sites. Unfortunately, the overlapping of NMR lines prevents us to extract the NMR signals from the Al 16c site. However, the obtained nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) parameters for the Nb and Al 48f sites are consistent with the previous reports [T. Kubo et al., 2014 JPS Conf. Proc. 3 012031; 2015 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 592 012093; 2016 J. Phys. Conf.: Ser. 683 012015] and for the Al 96g site are refined to be vQ = 0.98 MHz and η = 0.46.

  17. Cerebral blood flow measured by NMR indicator dilution in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J.R.; Branch, C.A.; Helpern, J.A.; Smith, M.B.; Butt, S.M.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-02-01

    We developed techniques to assess the utility of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicator for cerebral blood flow studies in cats, using Freon-22 for the first candidate. A PIN-diode-switched NMR experiment allowed the acquisition of an arterial as well as a cerebral fluorine-19 signal proportional to concentration vs. time in a 1.89 T magnet. Mean +/- SD blood:brain partition coefficients for Freon-22 were estimated at 0.93 +/- 0.08 for gray matter and 0.77 +/- 0.12 for white matter. Using maximum-likelihood curve fitting, estimates of mean +/- SD resting cerebral blood flow were 50 +/- 19 ml/100 g-min for gray matter and 5.0 +/- 2.0 ml/100 g-min for white matter. Hypercapnia produced the expected increases in gray and white matter blood flow. The physiologic effects of Freon-22, including an increase in cerebral blood flow itself with administration of 40% by volume, may limit its use as an indicator. Nevertheless, the NMR techniques described demonstrate the feasibility of fluorine-19-labeled compounds as cerebral blood flow indicators and the promise for their use in humans.

  18. Measuring Level Alignment at the Metal–Molecule Interface by In Situ Electrochemical 13C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zelakiewicz, Brian S.; Allison, Thomas C.; Tong, Yu ye J.

    2015-03-16

    A new technique to measure energy-level alignment at a metal–molecule interface between the Fermi level of the metal and the frontier orbitals of the molecule is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The method, which combines the electrochemistry of organo-ligand-stabilized Au nanoparticles with 13C NMR spectroscopy (i.e. in situ electrochemical NMR), enables measuring both occupied and unoccupied states.

  19. Ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements using an optical magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Ganssle, Paul J; Shin, Hyun D; Seltzer, Scott J; Bajaj, Vikram S; Ledbetter, Micah P; Budker, Dmitry; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Pines, Alexander

    2014-09-08

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry and diffusometry are important tools for the characterization of heterogeneous materials and porous media, with applications including medical imaging, food characterization and oil-well logging. These methods can be extremely effective in applications where high-resolution NMR is either unnecessary, impractical, or both, as is the case in the emerging field of portable chemical characterization. Here, we present a proof-of-concept experiment demonstrating the use of high-sensitivity optical magnetometers as detectors for ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements.

  20. Multistage Electrophoretic Separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Nathan; Doyle, John F.; Kurk, Andy; Vellinger, John C.; Todd, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A multistage electrophoresis apparatus has been invented for use in the separation of cells, protein molecules, and other particles and solutes in concentrated aqueous solutions and suspensions. The design exploits free electrophoresis but overcomes the deficiencies of prior free-electrophoretic separators by incorporating a combination of published advances in mathematical modeling of convection, sedimentation, electro-osmotic flow, and the sedimentation and aggregation of droplets. In comparison with other electrophoretic separators, these apparatuses are easier to use and are better suited to separation in relatively large quantities characterized in the art as preparative (in contradistinction to smaller quantities characterized in the art as analytical). In a multistage electrophoretic separator according to the invention, an applied vertical steady electric field draws the electrically charged particles of interest from within a cuvette to within a collection cavity that has been moved into position of the cuvette. There are multiple collection cavities arranged in a circle; each is aligned with the cuvette for a prescribed short time. The multistage, short-migration-path character of the invention solves, possibly for the first time, the fluid-instability problems associated with free electrophoresis. The figure shows a prototype multistage electrophoretic separator that includes four sample stations and five collection stages per sample. At each sample station, an aqueous solution or suspension containing charged species to be separated is loaded into a cuvette, which is machined into a top plate. The apparatus includes a lower plate, into which 20 collection cavities have been milled. Each cavity is filled with an electrophoresis buffer solution. For the collection of an electrophoretic fraction, the lower plate is rotated to move a designated collection cavity into alignment with the opening of the cuvette. An electric field is then applied between a non

  1. Simultaneous measurement of rock permeability and effective porosity using laser-polarized noble gas NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2004-08-01

    We report simultaneous measurements of the permeability and effective porosity of oil-reservoir rock cores using one-dimensional NMR imaging of the penetrating flow of laser-polarized xenon gas. The permeability result agrees well with industry standard techniques, whereas effective porosity is not easily determined by other methods. This NMR technique may have applications to the characterization of fluid flow in a wide variety of porous and granular media.

  2. Enzyme dynamics during catalysis measured by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kern, Dorothee; Eisenmesser, Elan Z; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2005-01-01

    Many biological processes, in particular enzyme catalysis, occur in the microsecond to millisecond time regime. While the chemical events and static structural features of enzyme catalysis have been extensively studied, very little is known about dynamic processes of the enzyme during the catalytic cycle. Dynamic NMR methods such as ZZ-exchange, line-shape analysis, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG), and rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation (R(1rho)) experiments are powerful in detecting conformational rearrangements with interconversion rates between 0.1 and 10(5) s(-1). In this chapter, the first application of these methods to enzymes during catalysis is described, in addition to studies on several other enzymes in their free states and in complex with ligands. From the experimental results of all systems, a picture arises in which flexibility in the microsecond to millisecond time regime is intrinsic and likely to be an essential property of the enzyme. Quantitative analysis of dynamics at multiple sites of the enzyme reveal large-scale collective motions. For several enzymes, the frequency of motion is comparable to the overall turnover rate, raising the possibility that conformational rearrangements may be rate limiting for catalysis in these enzymes.

  3. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Instrumentation for Real-time Enzymatic Reaction Rate Measurements by NMR.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Riccardo; Fernandes, Laetitia; Comment, Arnaud; Pidial, Laetitia; Tavitian, Bertrand; Vasos, Paul R

    2016-02-23

    The main limitation of NMR-based investigations is low sensitivity. This prompts for long acquisition times, thus preventing real-time NMR measurements of metabolic transformations. Hyperpolarization via dissolution DNP circumvents part of the sensitivity issues thanks to the large out-of-equilibrium nuclear magnetization stemming from the electron-to-nucleus spin polarization transfer. The high NMR signal obtained can be used to monitor chemical reactions in real time. The downside of hyperpolarized NMR resides in the limited time window available for signal acquisition, which is usually on the order of the nuclear spin longitudinal relaxation time constant, T1, or, in favorable cases, on the order of the relaxation time constant associated with the singlet-state of coupled nuclei, TLLS. Cellular uptake of endogenous molecules and metabolic rates can provide essential information on tumor development and drug response. Numerous previous hyperpolarized NMR studies have demonstrated the relevancy of pyruvate as a metabolic substrate for monitoring enzymatic activity in vivo. This work provides a detailed description of the experimental setup and methods required for the study of enzymatic reactions, in particular the pyruvate-to-lactate conversion rate in presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), by hyperpolarized NMR.

  4. Squid-based CW NMR system for measuring the magnetization of helium-3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Kevin Spencer

    This thesis describes the design and construction of a SQUID-based CW NMR system together with its application in a study of the two dimensional magnetism of 3He. 3He provides an exemplary system for the study of two-dimensional magnetism. Two-dimensional 3He films of varying coverages may be formed by plating 3He on relatively uniform two-dimensional substrates, such as GTA Grafoil and ZYX graphite substrates. At coverages above approximately 20 atoms/nm. 2 on these substrates, the second layer of 3He exhibits a strong ferromagnetic ordering tendency. The ferromagnetic ordering presents as a rapid onset of measured magnetization that becomes independent of the applied magnetic field as film temperatures approach 1 mK. Very low applied magnetic fields are used to probe the ferromagnetic ordering in order to minimize masking of the measured magnetization and to stay within the available bandwidth of the SQUID. Commensurate with the ferromagnetic ordering, the NMR linewidth increases dramatically at these coverages and temperatures. An increasing linewidth equates to a short decay time with respect to pulsed NMR probing of the two-dimensional 3He magnetization. The decay times at these coverages and temperatures become so short that they fall below the minimum recovery time necessary for a SQUID-based pulsed NMR system to recover from the relatively large tipping pulse and acquire meaningful data. To address this problem, we have designed a SQUID-based CW NMR system to leverage as much of an already-existing pulsed NMR system as possible but allow accurate measurement of the rapid onset of ferromagnetic ordering of the 3He films below the approximate 1 mK temperature limit of the pulsed NMR system.

  5. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms were measured. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1s-1, and the EPMs of fifteen environmental isolates ranged from -1...

  6. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms isolated from clinical and environmental sources were measured in 9.15 mM KH2PO4 buffered water. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1 ...

  7. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms were measured. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1s-1, and the EPMs of fifteen environmental isolates ranged from -1...

  8. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms isolated from clinical and environmental sources were measured in 9.15 mM KH2PO4 buffered water. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1 ...

  9. Techniques for Ultra-high Magnetic Field Gradient NMR Diffusion Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmund, Eric E.; Mitrovic, Vesna F.; Calder, Edward S.; Will Thomas, G.; Halperin, William P.; Reyes, Arneil P.; Kuhns, Philip L.; Moulton, William G.

    2001-03-01

    We report on development and application of techniques for ultraslow diffusion coefficient measurements through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in high magnetic field gradients. We have performed NMR experiments in a steady fringe field gradient of 175 T/m from a 23 T resistive Bitter magnet, as well as in a gradient of 42 T/m from an 8 T superconducting magnet. New techniques to provide optimum sensitivity in these experiments are described. To eliminate parasitic effects of the temporal instability of the resistive magnet, we have introduced a passive filter: a highly conductive cryogen-cooled inductive shield. We show experimental demonstration of such a shield’s effect on NMR performed in the Bitter magnet. For enhanced efficiency, we have employed “frequency jumping” in our spectrometer system. Application of these methods has made possible measurements of diffusion coefficients as low as 10-10 cm^2/s, probing motion on a 250 nm length scale.

  10. Development of a small-scale bioreactor: application to in vivo NMR measurement.

    PubMed

    Gmati, Dorra; Chen, Jingkui; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2005-01-20

    A perfused bioreactor allowing in vivo NMR measurement was developed and validated for Eschscholtzia californica cells. The bioreactor was made of a 10-mm NMR tube. NMR measurement of the signal-to-noise ratio was optimized using a sedimented compact bed of cells that were retained in the bioreactor by a supporting filter. Liquid medium flow through the cell bed was characterized from a mass balance on oxygen and a dispersive hydrodynamic model. Cell bed oxygen demand for 4 h perfusion required a minimal medium flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. Residence time distribution assays at 0.8-2.6 mL/min suggest that the cells are subjected to a uniform nutrient environment along the cell bed. Cell integrity was maintained for all culture conditions since the release of intracellular esterases was not significant even after 4 h of perfusion. In vivo NMR was performed for (31)P NMR and the spectrum can be recorded after only 10 min of spectral accumulation (500 scans) with peaks identified as G-6P, F-6P, cytoplasmic Pi, vacuolar Pi, ATP(gamma) and ADP(beta), ATP(alpha) and ADP(alpha), NADP and NDPG, NDPG and ATP(beta). Cell viability was shown to be maintained as (31)P chemical shifts were constant with time for all the identified nuclei, thus suggesting constant intracellular pH.

  11. An introduction to NMR-based approaches for measuring protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kleckner, Ian R; Foster, Mark P

    2010-01-01

    Proteins are inherently flexible at ambient temperature. At equilibrium, they are characterized by a set of conformations that undergo continuous exchange within a hierarchy of spatial and temporal scales ranging from nanometers to micrometers and femtoseconds to hours. Dynamic properties of proteins are essential for describing the structural bases of their biological functions including catalysis, binding, regulation and cellular structure. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy represents a powerful technique for measuring these essential features of proteins. Here we provide an introduction to NMR-based approaches for studying protein dynamics, highlighting eight distinct methods with recent examples, contextualized within a common experimental and analytical framework. The selected methods are (1) Real-time NMR, (2) Exchange spectroscopy, (3) Lineshape analysis, (4) CPMG relaxation dispersion, (5) Rotating frame relaxation dispersion, (6) Nuclear spin relaxation, (7) Residual dipolar coupling, (8) Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. PMID:21059410

  12. Permeability estimation from NMR diffusion measurements in reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, M; Brancolini, A; Gossenberg, P

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that in restricted geometries, such as in porous media, the apparent diffusion coefficient (D) of the fluid depends on the observation time. From the time dependence of D, interesting information can be derived to characterise geometrical features of the porous media that are relevant in oil industry applications. In particular, the permeability can be related to the surface-to-volume ratio (S/V), estimated from the short time behaviour of D(t), and to the connectivity of the pore space, which is probed by the long time behaviour of D(t). The stimulated spin-echo pulse sequence, with pulsed magnetic field gradients, has been used to measure the diffusion coefficients on various homogeneous and heterogeneous sandstone samples. It is shown that the petrophysical parameters obtained by our measurements are in good agreement with those yielded by conventional laboratory techniques (gas permeability and electrical conductivity). Although the diffusing time is limited by T1, eventually preventing an observation of the real asymptotic behaviour, and the surface-to-volume ratio measured by nuclear magnetic resonance is different from the value obtained by BET because of the different length scales probed, the measurement remains reliable and low-time consuming.

  13. Measurement of laser heating in spin exchange optical pumping by NMR diffusion sensitization gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, Steven R.; Deppe, Martin H.; Ajraoui, Salma; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M.; Boag, Stephen

    2010-05-15

    This paper details pulsed gradient NMR measurements of the {sup 3}He diffusion coefficient in sealed cells during spin exchange optical pumping. The potential of ultra low field magnetic resonance imgaing (MRI) and NMR for noninvasive measurement of cell pressure is demonstrated. Diffusion sensitization gradients allow measurement of the {sup 3}He diffusion coefficient from which the pressure and/or temperature of the gas can be determined during optical pumping. The pressure measurements were compared with neutron time of flight transmission measurements. Good agreement was observed between the temperature/pressure measurements and predictions based on Chapman-Enskog theory. The technique had sufficient sensitivity to observe the diffusion coefficient increasing with temperature in a sealed cell. With this method, evidence for laser heating of the {sup 3}He during optical pumping was found. The results show that NMR diffusion measurements allow noninvasive measurement of the cell temperature and/or pressure in an optical pumping setup. The method can be expanded using MRI to probe the spatial distribution of the diffusion coefficient. These techniques can be applied to the further investigation of polarization limiting effects such as laser heating.

  14. Hydrogen location in yttrium dihydride by means of NMR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.L.; Barnes, R.G.; Peterson, D.T.; Torgeson, D.R.

    1980-03-15

    The proton magnetic resonance rigid-lattice second moment in YH/sub 1.92/ and YH/sub 1.98/ has been measured in the temperature range 160--200 K. From these the occupancy factors for hydrogen in the octahedral and tetrahedral interstitial sites of the fcc metal lattice have been determined. A significant fraction (approx. = 10--15 %) of the octahedral sites are found to be occupied, consistent with features observed in the optical properties of YH/sub 2/.

  15. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a tool to measure dehydration in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Matthew; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Colucci, Lina A; Cima, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Dehydration is a prevalent pathology, where loss of bodily water can result in variable symptoms. Symptoms can range from simple thirst to dire scenarios involving loss of consciousness. Clinical methods exist that assess dehydration from qualitative weight changes to more quantitative osmolality measurements. These methods are imprecise, invasive, and/or easily confounded, despite being practiced clinically. We investigate a non-invasive, non-imaging (1)H NMR method of assessing dehydration that attempts to address issues with existing clinical methods. Dehydration was achieved by exposing mice (n = 16) to a thermally elevated environment (37 °C) for up to 7.5 h (0.11-13% weight loss). Whole body NMR measurements were made using a Bruker LF50 BCA-Analyzer before and after dehydration. Physical lean tissue, adipose, and free water compartment approximations had NMR values extracted from relaxation data through a multi-exponential fitting method. Changes in before/after NMR values were compared with clinically practiced metrics of weight loss (percent dehydration) as well as blood and urine osmolality. A linear correlation between tissue relaxometry and both animal percent dehydration and urine osmolality was observed in lean tissue, but not adipose or free fluids. Calculated R(2) values for percent dehydration were 0.8619 (lean, P < 0.0001), 0.5609 (adipose, P = 0.0008), and 0.0644 (free fluids, P = 0.3445). R(2) values for urine osmolality were 0.7760 (lean, P < 0.0001), 0.5005 (adipose, P = 0.0022), and 0.0568 (free fluids, P = 0.3739). These results suggest that non-imaging (1)H NMR methods are capable of non-invasively assessing dehydration in live animals.

  16. Measuring chirality in NMR in the presence of a time-dependent electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, Jamie D.; Harris, Robert A.

    2014-06-21

    Traditional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are “blind” to chirality since the spectra for left and right handed enantiomers are identical in an achiral medium. However, theoretical arguments have suggested that the effective Hamiltonian for spin-1/2 nuclei in the presence of electric and magnetic fields can be different for left and right handed enantiomers, thereby enabling NMR to be used to spectroscopically detect chirality even in an achiral medium. However, most proposals to detect the chiral NMR signature require measuring signals that are equivalent to picomolar concentrations for {sup 1}H nuclei, which are outside current NMR detection limits. In this work, we propose to use an AC electric field that is resonantly modulated at the Larmor frequency, thereby enhancing the effect of the chiral term by four to six orders of magnitude. We predict that a steady-state transverse magnetization, whose direction will be opposite for different enantiomers, will build up during application of an AC electric field. We also propose an experimental setup that uses a solenoid coil with an AC current to generate the necessary periodic electric fields that can be used to generate chiral signals which are equivalent to the signal from a {sup 1}H submicromolar concentration.

  17. NMR method for measuring carbon-13 isotopic enrichment of metabolites in complex solutions.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ian A; Karsten, Ryan H; Norton, Mark E; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M; Markley, John L

    2010-06-01

    Isotope-based methods are commonly used for metabolic flux analysis and metabolite quantification in biological extracts. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool for these studies because NMR can unambiguously identify compounds and accurately measure (13)C enrichment. We have developed a new pulse sequence, isotope-edited total correlation spectroscopy (ITOCSY), that filters two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H NMR spectra from (12)C- and (13)C-containing molecules into separate, quantitatively equivalent spectra. The ITOCSY spectra of labeled and unlabeled molecules are directly comparable and can be assigned using existing bioinformatics tools. In this study, we evaluate ITOCSY using synthetic mixtures of standards and extracts from Escherichia coli . We show that ITOCSY has low technical error (6.6% for metabolites ranging from 0.34 to 6.2 mM) and can detect molecules at concentrations less than 10 muM. We propose ITOCSY as a practical NMR strategy for metabolic flux analysis, isotope dilution experiments, and other methods that rely on carbon-13 labeling.

  18. NMR Method for Measuring Carbon-13 Isotopic Enrichment of Metabolites in Complex Solutions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Isotope-based methods are commonly used for metabolic flux analysis and metabolite quantification in biological extracts. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool for these studies because NMR can unambiguously identify compounds and accurately measure 13C enrichment. We have developed a new pulse sequence, isotope-edited total correlation spectroscopy (ITOCSY), that filters two-dimensional 1H−1H NMR spectra from 12C- and 13C-containing molecules into separate, quantitatively equivalent spectra. The ITOCSY spectra of labeled and unlabeled molecules are directly comparable and can be assigned using existing bioinformatics tools. In this study, we evaluate ITOCSY using synthetic mixtures of standards and extracts from Escherichia coli. We show that ITOCSY has low technical error (6.6% for metabolites ranging from 0.34 to 6.2 mM) and can detect molecules at concentrations less than 10 μM. We propose ITOCSY as a practical NMR strategy for metabolic flux analysis, isotope dilution experiments, and other methods that rely on carbon-13 labeling. PMID:20459129

  19. Surface NMR measurement of proton relaxation times in medium to coarse-grained sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Shushakov, O A

    1996-01-01

    A surface NMR investigation of groundwater in the geomagnetic field is under study. To detect the surface NMR a wire loop with a diameter of about 100 m, being an antenna for both an exciting field source and the NMR signal receiver, is laid out on the ground. A sinusoidal current pulse with a rectangular envelope is passed through the loop to excite the NMR signal. The carrier frequency of the oscillating current in this pulse is equal to the Larmor frequency of protons in the Earth's magnetic field. The current amplitude is changed up to 200 amps and the pulse duration is fixed and is equal to 40 ms. The exciting pulse is followed by an induction emf signal caused by the Larmor nuclear precession in geomagnetic field. The relaxation times T1, T2, and T2* were measured by the surface NMR for both groundwater in medium to coarse-grained sand at borehole and for bulk water under the ice surface of frozen lake. To determine T1, a longitudinal interference in experiments with repeated pulses was measured. A sequence with equal period between equal excitation pulses was used. The relaxation times T1, T2, measured for bulk water under the ice of the Ob reservoir were 1.0 s and 0.7 s, respectively. To estimate an influence of dissolved oxygen T1 of the same water at the same temperature was measured by lab NMR with and without pumping of oxygen. The relaxation time T1 measured for water in the medium to coarse-grained sand is 0.65 s. The relaxation time T2 estimated by spin echo sequence is found to be equal to 0.15 s. The relaxation time T2* is found to be about 80 ms. This result contradicts published earlier phenomenological correlation between relaxation time T2* and grain size of water-bearing rock. This could be as a result of unsound approach based on grain size or influence of paramagnetic impurities.

  20. Electrophoretic deposition of biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Keim, S.; Ma, R.; Li, Y.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2010-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is attracting increasing attention as an effective technique for the processing of biomaterials, specifically bioactive coatings and biomedical nanostructures. The well-known advantages of EPD for the production of a wide range of microstructures and nanostructures as well as unique and complex material combinations are being exploited, starting from well-dispersed suspensions of biomaterials in particulate form (microsized and nanoscale particles, nanotubes, nanoplatelets). EPD of biological entities such as enzymes, bacteria and cells is also being investigated. The review presents a comprehensive summary and discussion of relevant recent work on EPD describing the specific application of the technique in the processing of several biomaterials, focusing on (i) conventional bioactive (inorganic) coatings, e.g. hydroxyapatite or bioactive glass coatings on orthopaedic implants, and (ii) biomedical nanostructures, including biopolymer–ceramic nanocomposites, carbon nanotube coatings, tissue engineering scaffolds, deposition of proteins and other biological entities for sensors and advanced functional coatings. It is the intention to inform the reader on how EPD has become an important tool in advanced biomaterials processing, as a convenient alternative to conventional methods, and to present the potential of the technique to manipulate and control the deposition of a range of nanomaterials of interest in the biomedical and biotechnology fields. PMID:20504802

  1. NMR measurement of oil shale magnetic relaxation at high magnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seymour, Joseph D.; Washburn, Kathryn E.; Kirkland, Catherine M.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at low field is used extensively to provide porosity and pore-size distributions in reservoir rocks. For unconventional resources, due to low porosity and permeability of the samples, much of the signal exists at very short T2 relaxation times. In addition, the organic content of many shales will also produce signal at short relaxation times. Despite recent improvements in low-field technology, limitations still exist that make it difficult to account for all hydrogen-rich constituents in very tight rocks, such as shales. The short pulses and dead times along with stronger gradients available when using high-field NMR equipment provides a more complete measurement of hydrogen-bearing phases due to the ability to probe shorter T2 relaxation times (-5 sec) than can be examined using low-field equipment. Access to these shorter T2 times allows for confirmation of partially resolved peaks observed in low-field NMR data that have been attributed to solid organic phases in oil shales. High-field (300 MHz or 7 T) NMR measurements of spin-spin T2 and spin-lattice T1 magnetic relaxation of raw and artificially matured oil shales have potential to provide data complementary to low field (2 MHz or 0.05T) measurements. Measurements of high-field T2 and T1-T2 correlations are presented. These data can be interpreted in terms of organic matter phases and mineral-bound water known to be present in the shale samples, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and show distributions of hydrogen-bearing phases present in the shales that are similar to those observed in low field measurements.

  2. 13C NMR study of halogen bonding of haloarenes: measurements of solvent effects and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Rainer; Chen, Naijun; Wu, Hong; Knotts, Nathan; Kaupp, Martin

    2004-04-07

    Solvent effects on the NMR spectra of symmetrical (X = F (1), X = Cl (2), X = Br (3), X = I (4), X = NO2 (5), X = CN (6)) and unsymmetrical (X = I, Y = MeO (7), Y = PhO (8)) para-disubstituted acetophenone azines X-C6H4-CMe=N-N=CMe-C6H4-Y and of models X-C6H4-CMe=N-Z (X = I, Z = H (9), Z = NH2 (10)), 4-iodoacetophenone (11), and iodobenzene (12) were measured in CDCl(3), DMSO, THF, pyridine, and benzene to address one intramolecular and one intermolecular issue. Solvent effects on the (13)C NMR spectra are generally small, and this finding firmly establishes that the azine bridge indeed functions as a "conjugation stopper," an important design concept in our polar materials research. Since intermolecular halogen bonding of haloarenes do occur in polar organic crystalline materials, the NMR solution data pose the question as to whether the absence of solvent shifts indicates the absence of strong halogen bonding in solution. This question was studied by the theoretical analysis of the DMSO complexes of iodoarenes 4, 9-12, and of iodoacetylene. DFT and MP2 computations show iodine bonding, and characteristic structural and electronic features are described. The nonrelativistic complexation shifts and the change in the spin-orbit induced heavy atom effect of iodine compensate each other, and iodine bonding thus has no apparent effect on Ci in the iodoarenes. For iodides, complexation by DMSO occurs and may or may not manifest itself in the NMR spectra. The absence of complexation shifts in the NMR spectra of halides does not exclude the occurrence of halogen bonding in solution.

  3. Measurement of Ligand–Target Residence Times by 1H Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A ligand-observed 1H NMR relaxation experiment is introduced for measuring the binding kinetics of low-molecular-weight compounds to their biomolecular targets. We show that this approach, which does not require any isotope labeling, is applicable to ligand–target systems involving proteins and nucleic acids of variable molecular size. The experiment is particularly useful for the systematic investigation of low affinity molecules with residence times in the micro- to millisecond time regime. PMID:27933946

  4. Measurement of Ligand-Target Residence Times by (1)H Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moschen, Thomas; Grutsch, Sarina; Juen, Michael A; Wunderlich, Christoph H; Kreutz, Christoph; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-12-08

    A ligand-observed (1)H NMR relaxation experiment is introduced for measuring the binding kinetics of low-molecular-weight compounds to their biomolecular targets. We show that this approach, which does not require any isotope labeling, is applicable to ligand-target systems involving proteins and nucleic acids of variable molecular size. The experiment is particularly useful for the systematic investigation of low affinity molecules with residence times in the micro- to millisecond time regime.

  5. Pulsed-Field NMR Measurements in Porous Media and Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latour, Lawrence Lance

    During the early stages of cerebral ischemia, the diffusion of water in the brain is decreased. The physical change in the tissue that is responsible for the decrease is unknown. Previous investigations have shown that pulsed-field-gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG -NMR) measurements of diffusion in porous media contain information about microstructures. To advance the understanding of the PFG-NMR measurement of water diffusing in heterogeneous media, such as the brain, the studies presented in this dissertation were undertaken. Three groups of experiments are presented. The first set of experiments deals with the type of structural information that is available from PFG-NMR measurements of water diffusing in the pore-space of porous solids. In the second group of experiments, the diffusion of water in packed red blood cells, a model for diffusion in systems with permeable membranes, is studied. The third set of experiments deals with the diffusion of water in the rat brain during focal ischemia and cortical spreading depression. Measurements of time dependant diffusion in porous media indicate that the surface-to-pore-volume ratio and the free diffusion coefficient of the saturating fluid can be extracted from the short-time behavior and that the tortuosity of the pore space can be extracted from the long-time limit. Furthermore, the dynamic probability -of-return-to-the-origin can be obtained directly from the PFG-NMR amplitude. Experiments on packed red blood cells demonstrate that the measured diffusion coefficient is a sensitive function of both membrane permeability and extracellular volume fraction. Results on water diffusion measurements in the ischemic rat brain show the correlation between the region of the brain with decreased diffusion and the subsequently infarcted tissue and demonstrate the ability to predict the tissue salvaged by reperfusion. Also demonstrated is a decrease in diffusion following the transient depolarization of excitable

  6. An improved technique for computing permeability from NMR measurements in mudstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Dugan, Brandon

    2011-08-01

    We develop a technique for extending nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) permeability estimation to clay-rich sediments. Our technique builds on the Schlumberger-Doll Research (SDR) equation by using porosity, grain size, specific surface, and magnetic susceptibility data to yield more accurate permeability estimation in mudstones with large pore surface areas and complex mineralogies. Based on measurements of natural sediments as well as resedimented laboratory mixtures of silica, bentonite, and kaolinite powders, we find that our method predicts permeability values that match measured values over four orders of magnitude and among lithologies that vary widely in grain size, mineralogy, and surface area. Our results show that the relationship between NMR data and permeability is a function of mineralogy and grain geometry, and that permeability predictions in clay-rich sediments can be improved with insights regarding the nature of the pore system made by the Kozeny theory. This technique extends the utility of NMR measurements beyond typical reservoir-quality rocks to a wide range of lithologies.

  7. Translational diffusion of macromolecular assemblies measured using transverse relaxation-optimized PFG-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Reto; Horwich, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    In structural biology, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR for characterization of size and hydrodynamic parameters of macromolecular solutes has the advantage over other techniques that the measurements can be recorded with identical solution conditions as used for NMR structure determination or for crystallization trials. This paper describes two transverse relaxation-optimized (TRO) 15N-filtered PFG stimulated-echo (STE) experiments for studies of macromolecular translational diffusion in solution, 1H-TRO-STE and 15N-TRO-STE, which include CRINEPT and TROSY elements. Measurements with mixed micelles of the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) and the detergent Fos-10 were used for a systematic comparison of 1H-TRO-STE and 15N-TRO-STE with conventional 15N-filtered STE experimental schemes. The results provide an extended platform for evaluating the NMR experiments available for diffusion measurements in structural biology projects with molecular particles of different size ranges. An initial application of the 15N-TRO-STE experiment with very long diffusion delays showed that the tedradecamer structure of the 800 kDa Thermus thermophilus chaperonin GroEL is preserved in aqueous solution over the temperature range 25–60°C. PMID:21919531

  8. Translational diffusion of macromolecular assemblies measured using transverse-relaxation-optimized pulsed field gradient NMR.

    PubMed

    Horst, Reto; Horwich, Arthur L; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2011-10-19

    In structural biology, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy for the characterization of size and hydrodynamic parameters of macromolecular solutes has the advantage over other techniques that the measurements can be recorded with identical solution conditions as used for NMR structure determination or for crystallization trials. This paper describes two transverse-relaxation-optimized (TRO) (15)N-filtered PFG stimulated-echo (STE) experiments for studies of macromolecular translational diffusion in solution, (1)H-TRO-STE and (15)N-TRO-STE, which include CRINEPT and TROSY elements. Measurements with mixed micelles of the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) and the detergent Fos-10 were used for a systematic comparison of (1)H-TRO-STE and (15)N-TRO-STE with conventional (15)N-filtered STE experimental schemes. The results provide an extended platform for evaluating the NMR experiments available for diffusion measurements in structural biology projects involving molecular particles with different size ranges. An initial application of the (15)N-TRO-STE experiment with very long diffusion delays showed that the tedradecamer structure of the 800 kDa Thermus thermophilus chaperonin GroEL is preserved in aqueous solution over the temperature range 25-60 °C.

  9. Salinity effect on NMR-T2 measurements of MH sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, H.; Kimura, S.; Ito, T.; Kaneko, H.; Noda, S.; Tenma, N.

    2016-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates in sediment are expected to be developed as a resource of natural gas and have been studied as a possible future energy resource. Gas permeability and water permeability in the methane-hydrate (MH)-bearing sediments are important factors for estimating the efficiency of producing methane gas from the natural gas hydrate sediment. Permeability of MH-bearing sediment is considerably affected by several properties of sediment, i.e., pore-size distribution, porosity, cementing, MH saturation, and MH-bearing features.As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we performed an investigation and characterization of the pore-size distribution and the permeability for methane-hydrate-bearing sediment by using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement combined with a permeability measurement system.According to Kleinberg et al.(2003), salinity change of the seawater degree has around 0.5% of influences on an amplitude of the NMR-T2 distribution, but the influence to the peak and distribution is small. In our preliminary experiment, the result of a measurement that the NMR-T2 distribution shifted to long relaxation time, and the distribution amplitude changed was observed so that NaCl density was increased.It was thought that this effect was the cause of an electrical resistance change of the sediment, and it was confirmed for calibration that an impedance matching and pulse tuning were necessary.

  10. Local and Global Dynamics of Polyolefin Melts Measured by 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xh; Ediger, M. D.

    2000-03-01

    Although theoretically NMR relaxation measurements provide an excellent way to characterize the segmental dynamics of polymer melts, the interpretation of such experiments has been ambiguous because usually more than one distribution of relaxation times can describe the experimental results. Utilizing a variable field NMR and a high temperature probe, we measured ^13C T_1, NOE, and T_1ρ of polyethylene melts and atactic polypropylene melts over a wide range of magnetic field(20 to 500 MHz) and temperature(up to 260 ^oC). This unusually wide range enabled us to discriminate among commonly used models for segmental dynamics; the modified KWW distribution function provides much better fit than the DLM and the modified log \\chi ^2 models. Based on the unambiguous characterization of the segmental motions of polymer melts, we determined the relationship between conformational transitions and the fundamental motions for flow. Our analysis also discovered that global motions must be included to accurately describe the relaxation data. In certain favorable cases, the global motions can be well characterized by NMR relaxation measurements; the results are consistent with viscoelastic experiments and computer simulations.

  11. Lateral diffusion of bilayer lipids measured via (31)P CODEX NMR.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Qasim; Lai, Angel; Morales, Hannah H; Macdonald, Peter M

    2012-10-01

    We have employed (31)P CODEX (centre-band-only-detection-of-exchange) NMR to measure lateral diffusion coefficients of phospholipids in unilamellar lipid bilayer vesicles consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), alone or in mixtures with 30 mol% 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) or cholesterol (CHOL). The lateral diffusion coefficients of POPC and POPG were extracted from experimental CODEX signal decays as a function of increasing mixing time, after accounting for the vesicle's size and size distribution, as determined via dynamic light scattering, and the viscosity of the vesicular suspension, as determined via (1)H pulsed field gradient NMR. Lateral diffusion coefficients for POPC and POPG determined in this fashion fell in the range 1.0-3.2 × 10(-12) m(2) s(-1) at 10 °C, depending on the vesicular composition, in good agreement with accepted values. Thus, two advantages of (31)P CODEX NMR for phospholipid lateral diffusion measurements are demonstrated: no labelling of the molecule of interest is necessary, and multiple lateral diffusion coefficients can be measured simultaneously. It is expected that this approach will prove particularly useful in diagnosing heterogeneities in lateral diffusion behaviours, such as might be expected for specific lipid-lipid or lipid-protein interactions, and thermotropic or electrostatically induced phase inhomogeneities.

  12. Measurement of Internuclear Distances in Solids Using Variations of Rotational-Echo Double-Resonance NMR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, Susan Mueller

    Rotational-echo, double-resonance (REDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to measure internuclear distances in solids in many isotopically labeled biological solids. The goals of my research have been to adapt this technique to make it suitable for some special systems, such as samples with low isotopic label concentrations, samples with NMR resonances that have large chemical shift anisotropies, non-biological samples with high NMR-active spin concentrations but no isotopic spin labels, and samples having interactions between a nuclear spin and an electron. This work has included the development of multiple-resonance, background suppression techniques, such as double REDOR, rotational-echo, triple-resonance (RETRO) and transferred -echo, double-resonance (TEDOR), to be used in conjunction with REDOR on labeled biological solids. These methods have enabled the determination of a ^{13 }C-^{15}N one-bond distance of 1.48 A in glyphosate by double REDOR, and a ^{13}C- ^{19}F internuclear distance of 8.0 A in emerimicin using TEDOR-REDOR. Semiconductor materials are more difficult to specifically label than biological samples because they are made by solid-state, high-temperature methods. Using REDOR and a simple statistical model, accurate one-bond internuclear distances in cadmium phosphide ranging from 2.55 to 2.58 A were measured. The lattice contractions of crystalline domains in a mixed-phase (part amorphous, part crystalline) sample were measured to be four to five percent using REDOR. The multiple resonance, magic-angle spinning, solid-state NMR techniques described in this dissertation require up to four radiofrequency channels in the same experiment.

  13. Using NMR, SIP, and MS measurements for monitoring subsurface biogeochemical reactions at the Rifle IFRC site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosier, C. L.; Keating, K.; Williams, K. H.; Robbins, M.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Grunewald, E.; Walsh, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site is located on a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado (USA). Although removal of tailings and contaminated surface materials was completed in 1996, residual uranium contamination of groundwater and subsurface sediments remains. Since 2002, research at the site has primarily focused on quantifying uranium mobility associated with stimulated and natural biogeochemical processes. Uranium mobility at the Rifle IFRC site is typically quantified through direct sampling of groundwater; however, direct sampling does not provide information about the solid phase material outside of the borehole and continuous measurements are not always possible due to multiple constraints. Geophysical methods have been suggested as a minimally invasive alternative approach for long term monitoring of biogeochemical reactions associated with uranium remediation. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), spectral induced polarization (SIP), and magnetic susceptibility (MS) are considered as potential geophysical methods for monitoring the biogeochemical reactions occurring at the Rifle IFRC site. Additionally, a pilot field study using an NMR borehole-logging tool was carried out at the Rifle IFRC site. These methods are sensitive to changes in the chemical and physical subsurface properties that occur as a result of bioremediation efforts; specifically, changes in the redox state and chemical form of iron, production of iron sulfide minerals, production of the magnetic mineral magnetite, and associated changes in the pore geometry. Laboratory experiments consisted of monitoring changes in the NMR, SIP and MS response of an acetate-amended columns packed with sediments from the Rifle IFRC site over the course of two months. The MS values remained relatively stable throughout the course of the experiment suggesting negligible production of magnetic phases (e.g. magnetite, pyrrhotite) as a result of enhanced

  14. Low-field NMR logging sensor for measuring hydraulic parameters of model soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucre, Oscar; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Minière, Adrien; Blümich, Bernhard

    2011-08-01

    SummaryKnowing the exact hydraulic parameters of soils is very important for improving water management in agriculture and for the refinement of climate models. Up to now, however, the investigation of such parameters has required applying two techniques simultaneously which is time-consuming and invasive. Thus, the objective of this current study is to present only one technique, i.e., a new non-invasive method to measure hydraulic parameters of model soils by using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hereby, two model clay or sandy soils were respectively filled in a 2 m-long acetate column having an integrated PVC tube. After the soils were completely saturated with water, a low-field NMR sensor was moved up and down in the PVC tube to quantitatively measure along the whole column the initial water content of each soil sample. Thereafter, both columns were allowed to drain. Meanwhile, the NMR sensor was set at a certain depth to measure the water content of that soil slice. Once the hydraulic equilibrium was reached in each of the two columns, a final moisture profile was taken along the whole column. Three curves were subsequently generated accordingly: (1) the initial moisture profile, (2) the evolution curve of the moisture depletion at that particular depth, and (3) the final moisture profile. All three curves were then inverse analyzed using a MATLAB code over numerical data produced with the van Genuchten-Mualem model. Hereby, a set of values ( α, n, θr and θs) was found for the hydraulic parameters for the soils under research. Additionally, the complete decaying NMR signal could be analyzed through Inverse Laplace Transformation and averaged on the 1/ T2 space. Through measurement of the decay in pure water, the effect on the relaxation caused by the sample could be estimated from the obtained spectra. The migration of the sample-related average <1/ T2, Sample> with decreasing saturation speaks for a enhancement of the surface relaxation as

  15. {sup 19}F NMR measurements of NO production in hypertensive ISIAH and OXYS rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bobko, Andrey A. . E-mail: bobko@kinetics.nsc.ru; Sergeeva, Svetlana V.; Bagryanskaya, Elena G.; Markel, Arkadii L.; Khramtsov, Valery V.; Reznikov, Vladimir A.; Kolosova, Nataljya G.

    2005-05-06

    Recently we demonstrated the principal possibility of application of {sup 19}F NMR spin-trapping technique for in vivo {sup {center_dot}}NO detection [Free Radic. Biol. Med. 36 (2004) 248]. In the present study, we employed this method to elucidate the significance of {sup {center_dot}}NO availability in animal models of hypertension. In vivo {sup {center_dot}}NO-induced conversion of the hydroxylamine of the fluorinated nitronyl nitroxide (HNN) to the hydroxylamine of the iminonitroxide (HIN) in hypertensive ISIAH and OXYS rat strains and normotensive Wistar rat strain was measured. Significantly lower HIN/HNN ratios were measured in the blood of the hypertensive rats. The NMR data were found to positively correlate with the levels of nitrite/nitrate evaluated by Griess method and negatively correlate with the blood pressure. In comparison with other traditionally used methods {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy allows in vivo evaluation of {sup {center_dot}}NO production and provides the basis for in vivo {sup {center_dot}}NO imaging.

  16. F NMR measurement of intracellular free calcium in human red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.K.; Schanne, F.A.X.

    1986-03-01

    Optical techniques for the measurement of intracellular Ca are not readily applicable to the human red cell because of the intense absorption of hemoglobin. The authors have therefore examined the use of /sup 19/F NMR of 5,5'-difluoro-1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid (5FBAPTA) introduced non-disruptively by intracellular hydrolysis of the membrane-permeant acetoxymethyl ester derivative. /sup 19/F NMR spectra of 5FBAPTA-containing erythrocytes at 188 MHz displayed two well resolved resonances corresponding to the free and Ca-bound forms of the chelator, the resonance of the free form being ten-fold larger than that of the Ca-bound form. Addition of the ionophore A23187 resulted in the disappearance of the resonance of the free anion and a quantitative increase in the intensity of the resonance of the Ca-complex. From these data, and a K/sub D/ of 708 nM for the Ca-5FBAPTA complex, the authors estimate red cell free Ca to be 70 nM, which is in the range of values obtained for other cells, despite the fact that the human red cell, which lacks intracellular organelles for storing Ca, possesses only 1 ..mu..mol total Ca/1. cells in comparison to mmols of total Ca found in other cells. The authors ability to use /sup 19/F NMR to measure free Ca in the red blood cell paves the way for future NMR studies of red cell free Ca concentrations in human essential hypertension as well as in other diseases states in which alterations in cellular Ca homeostasis may be involved.

  17. A portable single-sided magnet system for remote NMR measurements of pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Mikayel, Dabaghyan; Iga, Muradyan; James, Butler; Eric, Frederick; Feng, Zhou; Angelos, Kyriazis; Charles, Hardin; Samuel, Patz; Mirko, Hrovat

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report initial results from a light-weight, low field magnetic resonance device designed to make relative pulmonary density measurements at the bedside. The development of this device necessarily involves special considerations for the magnet, RF and data acquisition schemes as well as a careful analysis of what is needed to provide useful information in the ICU. A homogeneous field region is created remotely from the surface of the magnet such that when the magnet is placed against the chest, an NMR signal is measured from a small volume in the lung. In order to achieve portability, one must trade off field strength and therefore spatial resolution. We report initial measurements from a ping-pong ball size region in the lung as a function of lung volume. As expected, we measured decreased signal at larger lung volumes since lung density decreases with increasing lung volume. Using a CPMG sequence with ΔTE=3.5 ms and a 20 echo train, a signal to noise ratio ~1100 was obtained from an 8.8mT planar magnet after signal averaging for 43 s. This is the first demonstration of NMR measurements made on a human lung with a light-weight planar NMR device. We argue that very low spatial resolution measurements of different lobar lung regions will provide useful diagnostic information for clinicians treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as clinicians want to avoid ventilator pressures that cause either lung over distension (too much pressure) or lung collapse (too little pressure). PMID:24953556

  18. A portable single-sided magnet system for remote NMR measurements of pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Muradyan, Iga; Hrovat, Alan; Butler, James; Frederick, Eric; Zhou, Feng; Kyriazis, Angelos; Hardin, Charles; Patz, Samuel; Hrovat, Mirko

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report initial results from a light-weight, low field magnetic resonance device designed to make relative pulmonary density measurements at the bedside. The development of this device necessarily involves special considerations for the magnet, RF and data acquisition schemes as well as a careful analysis of what is needed to provide useful information in the ICU. A homogeneous field region is created remotely from the surface of the magnet such that when the magnet is placed against the chest, an NMR signal is measured from a small volume in the lung. In order to achieve portability, one must trade off field strength and therefore spatial resolution. We report initial measurements from a ping-pong ball size region in the lung as a function of lung volume. As expected, we measured decreased signal at larger lung volumes since lung density decreases with increasing lung volume. Using a CPMG sequence with ΔTE=3.5 ms and a 20 echo train, a signal to noise ratio ~1100 was obtained from an 8.8mT planar magnet after signal averaging for 43 s. This is the first demonstration of NMR measurements made on a human lung with a light-weight planar NMR device. We argue that very low spatial resolution measurements of different lobar lung regions will provide useful diagnostic information for clinicians treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as clinicians want to avoid ventilator pressures that cause either lung over distension (too much pressure) or lung collapse (too little pressure).

  19. Analysis of NMR self-diffusion measurements by a density matrix calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepišnik, J.

    1981-04-01

    The density matrix formalism with the Magnus expansion of the time evolution operator is used to study the nmr response in a pulsed magnetic field gradient (mfg) spin-echo experiment. The results show that the spin-echo cannot only measure the self-diffusion coefficient but can determine the spectrum of the single-particle velocity autocorrelation function as well. The proper combination of rf and mfg pulse sequences are proposed for measuring self-diffusion in spin systems with strong dipolar coupling where the classical method fails.

  20. Fractional Order Analysis of Sephadex Gel Structures: NMR Measurements Reflecting Anomalous Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L; Akpa, Belinda S; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew G

    2011-12-01

    We report the appearance of anomalous water diffusion in hydrophilic Sephadex gels observed using pulse field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The NMR diffusion data was collected using a Varian 14.1 Tesla imaging system with a home-built RF saddle coil. A fractional order analysis of the data was used to characterize heterogeneity in the gels for the dynamics of water diffusion in this restricted environment. Several recent studies of anomalous diffusion have used the stretched exponential function to model the decay of the NMR signal, i.e., exp[-(bD)(α)], where D is the apparent diffusion constant, b is determined the experimental conditions (gradient pulse separation, durations and strength), and α is a measure of structural complexity. In this work, we consider a different case where the spatial Laplacian in the Bloch-Torrey equation is generalized to a fractional order model of diffusivity via a complexity parameter, β, a space constant, μ, and a diffusion coefficient, D. This treatment reverts to the classical result for the integer order case. The fractional order decay model was fit to the diffusion-weighted signal attenuation for a range of b-values (0 < b < 4,000 s-mm(-2)). Throughout this range of b values, the parameters β, μ and D, were found to correlate with the porosity and tortuosity of the gel structure.

  1. Intracellular volume and apparent diffusion constants of perfused cancer cell cultures, as measured by NMR.

    PubMed

    Pilatus, U; Shim, H; Artemov, D; Davis, D; van Zijl, P C; Glickson, J D

    1997-06-01

    Diffusion NMR spectroscopy was used to study intracellular volume and apparent water diffusion constants in different cell lines (DU145, human prostate cancer; AT3, rat prostate cancer; MCF-7, human breast cancer; RIF-1, mouse fibrosacroma). The cells were grown on various matrices (collagen sponge, collagen beads, polystyrene beads) which enabled continuous growth in perfused high density cell culture suitable for NMR studies. In perfused cell systems, the attenuation of the water signal versus the squared gradient strength was fitted by the sum of two decaying exponentials. For the slowly decaying component the apparent water diffusion constant at 37 degrees C was 0.22 (+/-0.02) x 10(-9) s/m2 for all cell lines at diffusion times > 100 ms. It continuously increased up to 0.47 (+/-0.05) x 10(-9) s/m2 when the diffusion time was decreased to 8 ms, indicating restricted diffusion. No significant effect of the matrices was observed. The fractional volume of the slow component as determined from the biexponential diffusion curve correlated with the relative intracellular volume, as obtained from the cell density in the sample and the cell size as measured by light microscopy. Therefore, this simple NMR approach can be used to determine intracellular volume in perfused cell cultures suitable for NMR studies. Using this information in combination with spectroscopic data, changes in intracellular metabolite concentration can be detected even when the cellular volume is changing during the experiment. The apparent diffusion constant for the fast diffusing component varied with growth matrix, cell density and cell type and also showed the typical characteristics of restricted diffusion (increase of apparent diffusion constant with time).

  2. A unified mathematical theory of electrophoretic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.; Palusinski, O. A.; Mosher, R. A.; Graham, A.; Saville, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical theory is presented which shows that each of the four classical electrophoretic modes (zone electrophoresis, moving boundary electrophoresis, isotachophoresis, and isoelectric focusing) is based on the same general principles and can collectively be described in terms of a single set of equations. This model can predict the evolution of the four electrophoretic modes as a function of time. The model system is one-dimensional, neglecting the effects of electroosmosis, temperature gradients, and any bulk flows of liquid. The model is based on equations which express the components' dissociation equilibria, the mass transport due to electromigration and diffusion, electroneutrality, and the conservation of mass and charge. The model consists of a system of coupled partial differential and nonlinear algebraic equations which can be solved numerically by use of a computer. The versatility of this model was verified using an example of a three-component system containing cacodylate, tris hydroxylmethylaminomethane, and histidine. Results show that this model not only correctly predicts the characteristic features of each electrophoretic mode, but also gives details of the concentration, pH, and conductivity profiles not easily amenable to direct experimental measurement.

  3. Thin-film solid-state proton NMR measurements using a synthetic mica substrate: Polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderHart, David L.; Prabhu, Vivek M.; Lavery, Kristopher A.; Dennis, Cindi L.; Rao, Ashwin B.; Lin, Eric K.

    2009-11-01

    Solid-state proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements are performed successfully on polymer blend thin films through the use of synthetic mica as a substrate. When used as a substrate, synthetic fluorophlogopite mica with its proton-free, diamagnetic character, allows for adequate measurement sensitivity while minimally perturbing the proton thin-film spectra, especially relative to more commonly available natural micas. Specifically, we use multiple-pulse techniques in the presence of magic-angle spinning to measure the degree of mixing in two different polymer blend thin films, polystyrene/poly(xylylene ether) and poly(1-methyladamantyl methacrylate) (PMAdMA)/triphenylsulfonium perfluorobutanesulfonate (TPS-PFBS), spin-coated onto mica substrates. Our earlier studies had focused on bulk systems where NMR signals are stronger, but may not be representative of thin films of the same systems that are relevant to many applications such as photoresist formulations in the electronics industry. The superiority of synthetic over natural paramagnetic mica is demonstrated by the maintenance of resolution and spinning sideband intensities (relative to bulk samples) for the synthetic mica samples. In contrast, degraded resolution and large spinning sidebands are shown to typify spectra of the natural mica samples. This approach can be applied to many other proton measurements of solid thin films, thereby greatly extending the types of systems to be investigated. Magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported for all micas used.

  4. Thin-film solid-state proton NMR measurements using a synthetic mica substrate: polymer blends.

    PubMed

    VanderHart, David L; Prabhu, Vivek M; Lavery, Kristopher A; Dennis, Cindi L; Rao, Ashwin B; Lin, Eric K

    2009-11-01

    Solid-state proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements are performed successfully on polymer blend thin films through the use of synthetic mica as a substrate. When used as a substrate, synthetic fluorophlogopite mica with its proton-free, diamagnetic character, allows for adequate measurement sensitivity while minimally perturbing the proton thin-film spectra, especially relative to more commonly available natural micas. Specifically, we use multiple-pulse techniques in the presence of magic-angle spinning to measure the degree of mixing in two different polymer blend thin films, polystyrene/poly(xylylene ether) and poly(1-methyladamantyl methacrylate) (PMAdMA)/triphenylsulfonium perfluorobutanesulfonate (TPS-PFBS), spin-coated onto mica substrates. Our earlier studies had focused on bulk systems where NMR signals are stronger, but may not be representative of thin films of the same systems that are relevant to many applications such as photoresist formulations in the electronics industry. The superiority of synthetic over natural paramagnetic mica is demonstrated by the maintenance of resolution and spinning sideband intensities (relative to bulk samples) for the synthetic mica samples. In contrast, degraded resolution and large spinning sidebands are shown to typify spectra of the natural mica samples. This approach can be applied to many other proton measurements of solid thin films, thereby greatly extending the types of systems to be investigated. Magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported for all micas used.

  5. Electrophoretic Deposition for Fabricating Microbatteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Whitacre, Jay; Bugga, Ratnakumar

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of fabrication of cathodes of microbatteries is based on electrophoretic deposition. Heretofore, sputtering (for deposition) and the use of photoresist and liftoff (for patterning) have been the primary methods of fabricating components of microbatteries. The volume of active electrode material that can be deposited by sputtering is limited, and the discharge capacities of prior microbatteries have been limited accordingly. In addition, sputter deposition is slow. In contrast, electrophoretic deposition is much faster and has shown promise for increasing discharge capacities by a factor of 10, relative to those of microbatteries fabricated by prior methods.

  6. Measurement and Quantification of Heterogeneity, Flow, and Mass Transfer in Porous Media Using NMR Low-Field Techiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciok, E.; Olaru, A. M.; Haber, A.; van Landeghem, M.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Sucre, O. E.; Perlo, J.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.; RWTH Aachen Mobile Low-Field NMR

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is renowned for its unique potential to both reveal and correlate spectroscopic, relaxometric, spatial and dynamic properties in a large variety of organic and inorganic systems. NMR has no restrictions regarding sample opacity and is an entirely non-invasive method, which makes it the ideal tool for the investigation of porous media. However, for years NMR research of soils was limited by the use of high-field NMR devices, which necessitated elaborate NMR experiments and were not applicable to bulky samples or on-site field measurements. The evolution of low-field NMR devices during the past 20 years has brought forth portable, small-scale NMR systems with open and closed magnet arrangements specialized to specific NMR applications. In combination with recent advances in 2D-NMR Laplace methodology [1], low-field NMR has opened up the possibility to study real-life microporous systems ranging from granular media to natural soils and oil well boreholes. Thus, information becomes available, which before has not been accessible with high-field NMR. In this work, we present our recent progress in mobile low-field NMR probe design for field measurements of natural soils: a slim-line logging tool, which can be rammed into the soil of interest on-site. The performance of the device is demonstrated in measurements of moisture profiles of model soils [2] and field measurements of relaxometric properties and moisture profiles of natural soils [3]. Moreover, an improved concept of the slim-line logging tool is shown, with a higher excitation volume and a better signal-to-noise due to an improved coil design. Furthermore, we present our recent results in 2D exchange relaxometry and simulation. These include relaxation-relaxation experiments on natural soils with varying degree of moisture saturation, where we could draw a connection between the relaxometric properties of the soil to its pore size-related diffusivity and to its clay content

  7. Measurements of intracellular volumes by 59Co and 2H/1H NMR and their physiological applications.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir; Navon, Gil

    2005-04-01

    Determination of the intracellular water volumes using NMR spectroscopy was performed using the NMR-visible nuclei: 59Co and 2H or 1H. Accurate measurement of intracellular water in cell suspensions and perfused organs is an important physiological parameter in the context of electrolyte homeostasis and energy metabolism, in particular when these parameters are monitored by non-invasive NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, repeated or continuous monitoring of intracellular water provided significant insights into the physiology of cardiac muscle and sarcolemmal membrane permeability and integrity.

  8. Probing the permeability of porous media by NMR measurement of stochastic dispersion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosten, Tyler; Maier, Robert; Codd, Sarah; Vogt, Sarah; Seymour, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    A generalized short-time expansion of hydrodynamic dispersion is derived using non-linear response theory. The result is in accordance with the well-known reduced cases of shear flow in ducts and pipes. In terms of viscous dominated (low Reynolds number) flow in porous media the generalized expansion facilitates the measurement of permeability by PGSE-NMR measurement of time dependent molecular displacement dynamics. To be more precise, for porous media characterized by a homogeneous permeability coefficient along the direction of flow K, and fluid volume fraction ɛ, the effective dispersion coefficient D (t) = < | R- |2 > /6 t of molecular displacements R due to flow and diffusion for a saturating fluid of molecular diffusivity κ in viscous dominated flow is shown to be partially governed by the coefficient of permeability at short times. The short-time expansion is shown to be in agreement with pulsed field gradient spin echo NMR measurement of D (t) in a random sphere pack media and analogous pore-scale random-walk particle tracking transport simulation.

  9. Structure elucidation of a new isoflavone by exclusive use of ¹H NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Alfredo R; Toscano, Rubén A; Hernández-Barragán, Angelina; Alvarez-Cisneros, Celina; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2015-10-01

    The leaves of Piscidia carthagenensis provided new 7,2',5'-trimethoxy-3',4'-methylenedioxyisoflavone (1), admixed with known 6,7-dimethoxy-3',4'-methylenedioxyisoflavone (2), and 5,4'-dihydroxy-7,2',5'-trimethoxyisoflavone (3), which were separated by extensive fractional solubillization. Selective irradiation of the H-5 "singlet" of 2 allowed distinction of the two methoxy group signals, whose chemical shift difference is only 0.004 ppm (1.2 Hz at 300 MHz). The (1)H and (13)C NMR data of 3 were assigned with the aid of HETCOR and gHMBC measurements. Although 1 looked inhomogeneous in the solid state, its solution structure followed from (1)H NMR measurements, where it looked homogeneous. To clarify the solid state aspect and confirm the structure of 1, two types of crystals were mechanically separated and subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. This study revealed polymorphism because of the concomitant presence of orthorhombic and triclinic crystals, but showed no atropisomerism. The structure of 3 was also verified by X-ray diffraction crystallography.

  10. A Multiplexed NMR-Reporter Approach to Measure Cellular Kinase and Phosphatase Activities in Real-Time.

    PubMed

    Thongwichian, Rossukon; Kosten, Jonas; Benary, Uwe; Rose, Honor May; Stuiver, Marchel; Theillet, Francois-Xavier; Dose, Alexander; Koch, Birgit; Yokoyama, Hideki; Schwarzer, Dirk; Wolf, Jana; Selenko, Philipp

    2015-05-27

    Cell signaling is governed by dynamic changes in kinase and phosphatase activities, which are difficult to assess with discontinuous readout methods. Here, we introduce an NMR-based reporter approach to directly identify active kinases and phosphatases in complex physiological environments such as cell lysates and to measure their individual activities in a semicontinuous fashion. Multiplexed NMR profiling of reporter phosphorylation states provides unique advantages for kinase inhibitor studies and reveals reversible modulations of cellular enzyme activities under different metabolic conditions.

  11. Electrophoretic Process For Purifying Wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Twitty, Garland E.; Sharnez, Rizwan; Egen, Ned B.

    1992-01-01

    Microbes, poisonous substances, and colloidal particles removed by combination of electric fields. Electrophoretic process removes pathogenicorganisms, toxins, toxic metals, and cooloidal soil particles from wastewater. Used to render domestic, industrial, and agricultural wastewater streams potable. Process also useful in bioregenerative and other closed systems like in space stations and submarines, where water must be recycled.

  12. Electrophoretic Process For Purifying Wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Twitty, Garland E.; Sharnez, Rizwan; Egen, Ned B.

    1992-01-01

    Microbes, poisonous substances, and colloidal particles removed by combination of electric fields. Electrophoretic process removes pathogenicorganisms, toxins, toxic metals, and cooloidal soil particles from wastewater. Used to render domestic, industrial, and agricultural wastewater streams potable. Process also useful in bioregenerative and other closed systems like in space stations and submarines, where water must be recycled.

  13. Entanglement detection on an NMR quantum-information processor using random local measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amandeep; Arvind, Dorai, Kavita

    2016-12-01

    Random local measurements have recently been proposed to construct entanglement witnesses and thereby detect the presence of bipartite entanglement. We experimentally demonstrate the efficacy of one such scheme on a two-qubit NMR quantum-information processor. We show that a set of three random local measurements suffices to detect the entanglement of a general two-qubit state. We experimentally generate states with different amounts of entanglement and show that the scheme is able to clearly witness entanglement. We perform complete quantum state tomography for each state and compute state fidelity to validate our results. Further, we extend previous results and perform a simulation using random local measurements to optimally detect bipartite entanglement in a hybrid system of 2 ⊗3 dimensionality.

  14. A PFG NMR experiment for translational diffusion measurements in low-viscosity solvents containing multiple resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simorellis, Alana K.; Flynn, Peter F.

    2004-10-01

    Pulsed gradient simulated-echo (PGSE) NMR diffusion measurements provide a facile and accurate means for determining the self-diffusion coefficients for molecules over a wide range of sizes and conditions. The measurement of diffusion in solvents of low intrinsic viscosity is particularly challenging, due to the persistent presence of convection. Although convection can occur in most solvent systems at elevated temperatures, in lower viscosity solvents (e.g., short chain alkanes), convection may manifest itself even at ambient laboratory temperatures. In most circumstances, solvent suppression will also be required, and for solvents that have multiple resonances, effective suppression can likewise represent a substantial challenge. In this article, we report an NMR experiment that combines a double-stimulated echo PFG approach with a WET-based solvent suppression scheme that effectively and simultaneously address the issues of dynamic range and the deleterious effects of convection. The experiment described will be of general benefit to studies aimed at the characterization of diffusion of single molecules directly dissolved in low-viscosity solvents, and should also be of substantial utility in studies of supramolecular assemblies such as reverse-micelles dissolved in apolar solvents.

  15. Metal-insulator transition in the Hollandite vanadate K2V8O16 investigated by 51V NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Katsunori; Itoh, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Isobe, Masahiko; Yamaura, Jun-Ichi; Ueda, Yutaka

    2009-03-01

    51V NMR measurements have been made on powdered samples to investigate the metal-insulator (MI) transition and the local magnetic properties of the Hollandite vanadate K2V8O16 which undergoes the MI transition at TMI~170 K. An asymmetric 51V NMR spectrum in the metallic phase has the T-dependent negative Knight shift K. The two NMR spectra appears around TMI, showing the coexistence of the metallic and insulating phases in consistent with the two-step first-order transition. The temperature dependence of K and the 51V nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate indicates the presence of the ferromagnetic spin fluctuations in the metallic phase. A 51V NMR spectrum observed below TMI has the temperature-independent K~0.35%, showing the presence of the nonmagnetic ground state.

  16. Estimating Pore Properties from NMR Relaxation Time Measurements in Heterogeneous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunewald, E.; Knight, R.

    2008-12-01

    The link between pore geometry and the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T2 is well- established for simple systems but is poorly understood for complex media with heterogeneous pores. Conventional interpretation of NMR relaxation data employs a model of isolated pores in which each hydrogen proton samples only one pore type, and the T2-distribution is directly scaled to estimate a pore-size distribution. During an actual NMR measurement, however, each proton diffuses through a finite volume of the pore network, and so may sample multiple pore types encountered within this diffusion cell. For cases in which heterogeneous pores are strongly coupled by diffusion, the meaning of the T2- distribution is not well understood and further research is required to determine how such measurements should be interpreted. In this study we directly investigate the implications of pore coupling in two groups of laboratory NMR experiments. We conduct two suites of experiments, in which samples are synthesized to exhibit a range of pore coupling strengths using two independent approaches: (a) varying the scale of the diffusion cell and (b) varying the scale over which heterogeneous pores are encountered. In the first set of experiments, we vary the scale of the diffusion cell in silica gels which have a bimodal pore-size distribution comprised of intragrannular micropores and much larger intergrannular pores. The untreated gel exhibits strong pore coupling with a single broad peak observed in the T2-distribution. By treating the gel with varied amounts of paramagnetic iron surface coatings, we decrease the surface relaxation time, T2S, and effectively decrease both the size of the diffusion cell and the degree of pore coupling. As more iron is coated to the grain surfaces, we observe a separation of the broad T2-distribution into two peaks that more accurately represent the true bimodal pore-size distribution. In the second set of experiments, we vary the scale over

  17. Fast measurements of average flow velocity by Low-Field ¹H NMR.

    PubMed

    Osán, T M; Ollé, J M; Carpinella, M; Cerioni, L M C; Pusiol, D J; Appel, M; Freeman, J; Espejo, I

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a method for measuring the average flow velocity of a sample by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. This method is based on the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence and does not require the application of any additional static or pulsed magnetic field gradients to the background magnetic field. The technique is based on analyzing the early-time behavior of the echo amplitudes of the CPMG sequence. Measurements of average flow velocity of water are presented. The experimental results show a linear relationship between the slope/y-intercept ratio of a linear fit of the first echoes in the CPMG sequence, and the average flow velocity of the flowing fluid. The proposed method can be implemented in low-cost Low-Field NMR spectrometers allowing a continuous monitoring of the average velocity of a fluid in almost real-time, even if the flow velocity changes rapidly.

  18. 19F NMR measurements of the rotational mobility of proteins in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S P; Haggie, P M; Brindle, K M

    1997-01-01

    Three glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and pyruvate kinase, were fluorine labeled in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by biosynthetic incorporation of 5-fluorotryptophan. 19F NMR longitudinal relaxation time measurements on the labeled enzymes were used to assess their rotational mobility in the intact cell. Comparison with the results obtained from relaxation time measurements of the purified enzymes in vitro and from theoretical calculations showed that two of the labeled enzymes, phosphoglycerate kinase and hexokinase, were tumbling in a cytoplasm that had a viscosity approximately twice that of water. There were no detectable signals from pyruvate kinase in vivo, although it could be detected in diluted cell extracts, indicating that there was some degree of motional restriction of the enzyme in the intact cell. PMID:8994636

  19. Measuring JHH values with a selective constant-time 2D NMR protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Proton-proton scalar couplings play important roles in molecule structure elucidation. However, measurements of JHH values in complex coupled spin systems remain challenging. In this study, we develop a selective constant-time (SECT) 2D NMR protocol with which scalar coupling networks involving chosen protons can be revealed, and corresponding JHH values can be measured through doublets along the F1 dimension. All JHH values within a network of n fully coupled protons can be separately determined with (n - 1) SECT experiments. Additionally, the proposed pulse sequence possesses satisfactory sensitivity and handy implementation. Therefore, it will interest scientists who intend to address structural analyzes of molecules with overcrowded spectra, and may greatly facilitate the applications of scalar-coupling constants in molecule structure studies.

  20. (1) H-(19) F REDOR-filtered NMR spin diffusion measurements of domain size in heterogeneous polymers.

    PubMed

    Sorte, Eric G; Alam, Todd M

    2017-06-02

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy is inherently sensitive to chemical structure and composition and thus makes an ideal method to probe the heterogeneity of multicomponent polymers. Specifically, NMR spin diffusion experiments can be used to extract reliable information about spatial domain sizes on multiple length scales, provided that magnetization selection of one domain can be achieved. In this paper, we demonstrate the preferential filtering of protons in fluorinated domains during NMR spin diffusion experiments using (1) H-(19) F heteronuclear dipolar dephasing based on rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) MAS NMR techniques. Three pulse sequence variations are demonstrated based on the different nuclei detected: direct (1) H detection, plus both (1) H➔(13) C cross polarization and (1) H➔(19) F cross polarization detection schemes. This (1) H-(19) F REDOR-filtered spin diffusion method was used to measure fluorinated domain sizes for a complex polymer blend. The efficacy of the REDOR-based spin filter does not rely on spin relaxation behavior or chemical shift differences and thus is applicable for performing NMR spin diffusion experiments in samples where traditional magnetization filters may prove unsuccessful. This REDOR-filtered NMR spin diffusion method can also be extended to other samples where a heteronuclear spin pair exists that is unique to the domain of interest. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Intracellular free calcium concentration measured with /sup 19/F NMR spectroscopy in intact ferret hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Marban, E.; Kitakaze, M.; Kusuoka, H.; Porterfield, J.K.; Yue, D.T.; Chacko, V.P.

    1987-08-01

    Changes in the intracellular free Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration, (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/, mediate excitation-contraction coupling in the heart and contribute to cellular injury during ischemia and reperfusion. To study these processes directly, the authors measured (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ in perfused ferret (Mustela putorius furo) hearts using /sup 19/F NMR spectroscopy to detect the 5,5'-difluoro derivative of the Ca/sup 2 +/ chelator, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). To load cells, hearts were perfused with the acetoxymethyl ester derivative of 5,5'-F/sub 2/-BAPTA. They measured /sup 19/F NMR spectra and left ventricular pressure simultaneously,at rest and during pacing at various external Ca concentrations ((Ca)/sub 0/). Although contractile force was attenuated by the Ca/sup 2 +/ buffering properties of 5,5'-F/sup 2/-BAPTA, the decrease in pressure could be overcome by raising (Ca)/sub 0/. The mean value of 104 nM for (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ at rest in the perfused heart agrees well with previous measurements in isolated ventricular muscle. During pacing at 0.6-4 Hz, time-averaged (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ increased; the effect of pacing was augmented by increasing (Ca)/sub 0/. (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ more than tripled during 10-20 min of global ischemia, and returned toward control levels upon reperfusion. This approach promises to be particularly useful in investigating the physiology of intact hearts and the pathophysiology of alterations in the coronary circulation

  2. Electrophoretic study of Clostridium species.

    PubMed Central

    Cato, E P; Hash, D E; Holdeman, L V; Moore, W E

    1982-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of soluble cellular proteins (without sodium dodecyl sulfate) of 70 Clostridium species indicated that the procedure was readily applicable to the differentiation of species in the genus. The protein patterns correlated well with the available DNA homology data and with most accepted differential tests. Results indicated that several earlier names for species were synonyms of those of accepted species and that two accepted species may be synonymous. Images PMID:6175658

  3. Design Modification of Electrophoretic Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddick, J. M.; Hirsch, I.

    1973-01-01

    The improved design of a zone electrophoretic sampler is reported that can be used in mass screening for hemoglobin S, the cause of sickle cell anemia. Considered is a high voltage multicell cellulose acetate device that requires 5 to 6 minutes electrophoresis periods; cells may be activitated individually or simultaneously. A multisample hemoglobin applicator standardizes the amount of sample applied and transfers the homolysate to the electrical wires.

  4. New directions in electrophoretic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Forgensen, J.W.; Phillips, M.

    1987-01-01

    This text presents the state of art of electrophoretic technology and applications. Included are electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels; immobilized pH gradients; rehydratable polyacrylamide gels; silver-stain detection of proteins; color silver staining of polypeptides; electrophoresis and electrofocusing standards; standardization in isoelectric focusing, high-resolution, two-dimensional electrophoresis; applications of isoelectric focusing; agarose gel electrophoresis; pulsed electrophoresis; capillary zone electrophoresis; capillary isotachophoresis; isotachophoresis of synthetic ion-containing polymers; and preparative electrophoresis.

  5. Design Modification of Electrophoretic Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddick, J. M.; Hirsch, I.

    1973-01-01

    The improved design of a zone electrophoretic sampler is reported that can be used in mass screening for hemoglobin S, the cause of sickle cell anemia. Considered is a high voltage multicell cellulose acetate device that requires 5 to 6 minutes electrophoresis periods; cells may be activitated individually or simultaneously. A multisample hemoglobin applicator standardizes the amount of sample applied and transfers the homolysate to the electrical wires.

  6. Velocity autocorrelation spectra in molten polymers measured by NMR modulated gradient spin-echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepišnik, Janez; Mohorič, Aleš; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried; Serša, Igor

    2014-04-01

    The segmental dynamics in molten linear polymers is studied by the NMR method of modulated gradient spin-echo, which directly probes a spectrum of molecular velocity autocorrelation function. Diffusion spectra of mono-disperse poly(isoprene-1.4) with different molecular masses, measured in the frequency range 0.1-10 kHz at a temperature of 26\\ ^{\\circ}\\text{C} , have a form similar to the spectrum of Rouse chain dynamics, which implicates the tube-Rouse motion as the dominant dynamic process in this frequency range. The scaling of the center-of-mass diffusion coefficient, given from the fitting parameters, changes from N^{-1} into N^{-2.4} at around N \\approx 3\\text{-}5 Kuhn steps, which is less than predicted by theory and simulations, while the correlation times of the tube-Rouse mode do not follow the anticipated scaling.

  7. Dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation: Prospects for real-time NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Field, Timothy R

    2014-11-01

    Recent developments in theoretical aspects of spin noise and relaxation and their interrelationship reveal a modified spin density, distinct from the density matrix, as the necessary object to describe fluctuations in spin systems. These fluctuations are to be viewed as an intrinsic quantum mechanical property of such systems immersed in random magnetic environments and are observed as "spin noise" in the absence of any radio frequency excitation. With the prospect of ultrafast digitization, the role of spin noise in real-time parameter extraction for (NMR) spin systems, and the advantage over standard techniques, is of essential importance, especially for systems containing a small number of spins. In this article we outline prospects for harnessing the recent dynamical theory in terms of spin-noise measurement, with attention to real-time properties.

  8. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Sample Susceptibility on Measured Diffusion Anisotropy Using NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudeau, J. D.; Dixon, W. T.; Hawkins, J.

    1995-07-01

    Water diffusion measurements in white matter of freshly excised pig spinal cord and in parenchyma of fresh celery (excluding the fibers along the edge of the stalk) were performed using NMR at 200 MHz. In white matter of pig spinal cord, the measured diffusion coefficient is anisotropic and independent of sample orientation with respect to the magnetic field, In celery parenchyma, diffusion is isotropic and independent of orientation in the magnetic field when using a diffusion sequence that gives results independent of self-induced magnetic-held gradients. However, when the standard diffusion pulse sequence that gives results dependent upon self-induced magnetic-field gradients is used, diffusion in celery appears isotropic when the stalk is oriented parallel to the magnetic field but anisotropic when oriented perpendicular. Susceptibility variations leading to anisotropic self-induced magnetic-field gradients approximately 3 kHz/cm in magnitude when the celery is oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field can explain this apparent anisotropic diffusion. A study of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in celery as a function of diffusion times ranging from 8 to 22 ms indicates that the motion is at most only slightly restricted. Therefore, although the effect is not seen in all types of samples, one must be aware that self-induced gradients may affect the ADC and may cause isotropic diffusion to appear anisotropic. In addition, NMR experiments that change diffusion-sensitizing gradient timings to study restricted diffusion change the effects of the self-induced gradients as well as the effect of barriers on the ADC, complicating interpretation.

  9. Binding of phenol and differently halogenated phenols to dissolved humic matter as measured by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Smejkalová, Daniela; Spaccini, Riccardo; Fontaine, Barbara; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2009-07-15

    1H- and 19F-NMR measurements of spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxationtimes and diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) were applied to investigate the association of nonsubstituted (phenol (P)) and halogen-substituted (2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP); 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP), and 2,4,6-trifluorophenol (TFP) phenols with a dissolved humic acid (HA). T1 and T2 values for both 1H and 19F in phenols decreased with enhancing HA concentration, indicating reduction in molecular mobility due to formation of noncovalent interactions. Moreover, correlation times (tau c) for different hydrogen and fluorine atoms in phenols showed that anisotropic mobility turned into isotropic motion with HA additions. Changes in relaxation times suggested that DCP and TCP were more extensively bound to HA than P and TFP. This was confirmed by diffusion measurements which showed full association of DCP and TCP to a less amount of HA than that required for entire complexation of P and TFP. Calculated values of binding constants (Ka) reflected the overall NMR behavior, being significantly larger for DCP- and TCP-HA (10.04 +/- 1.32 and 4.47 +/- 0.35 M(-1), respectively) than for P- and TFP-HA complexes (0.57 +/- 0.03 and 0.28 +/- 0.01 M(-1), respectively). Binding increased with decreasing solution pH, thus indicating a dependence on the fraction of protonated form (alpha) of phenols in solution. However, it was found that the hydrophobicity conferred to phenols by chlorine atoms on aromatic rings is a stronger drive than alpha for the phenols repartition within the HA hydrophobic domains.

  10. A New Apparatus for the Convenient Measurement of NMR Spectra in High-Pressure Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonker, C. R.; Zemanian, T. S.; Wallen, S. L.; Linehan, J. C.; Franz, J. A.

    A novel design is presented for a high-pressure NMR cell using fused silica capillary tubing. The capillary tubing is bent to form multiple loops for use in a 5 mm NMR tube in a conventional solution NMR probe. The NMR cell design eliminates explosion hazards at high pressures and makes possible simple sample loading and observation of reaction mixtures at variable pressures (up to 4 kbar) and temperatures. A chamber for the mixing and flow introduction of reaction mixtures is provided. Examples of application of the cell for 1H, 129Xe, and 19F studies of supercritical fluids, near-critical liquids, and high-pressure organometallic reactions are presented.

  11. Lithium ion diffusion in Li β-alumina single crystals measured by pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Tareque Takekawa, Reiji; Iwai, Yoshiki; Kuwata, Naoaki; Kawamura, Junichi

    2014-03-28

    The lithium ion diffusion coefficient of a 93% Li β-alumina single crystal was measured for the first time using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy with two different crystal orientations. The diffusion coefficient was found to be 1.2 × 10{sup −11} m{sup 2}/s in the direction perpendicular to the c axis at room temperature. The Li ion diffusion coefficient along the c axis direction was found to be very small (6.4 × 10{sup −13} m{sup 2}/s at 333 K), which suggests that the macroscopic diffusion of the Li ion in the β-alumina crystal is mainly two-dimensional. The diffusion coefficient for the same sample was also estimated using NMR line narrowing data and impedance measurements. The impedance data show reasonable agreement with PFG-NMR data, while the line narrowing measurements provided a lower value for the diffusion coefficient. Line narrowing measurements also provided a relatively low value for the activation energy and pre-exponential factor. The temperature dependent diffusion coefficient was obtained in the temperature range 297–333 K by PFG-NMR, from which the activation energy for diffusion of the Li ion was estimated. The activation energy obtained by PFG-NMR was smaller than that obtained by impedance measurements, which suggests that thermally activated defect formation energy exists for 93% Li β-alumina single crystals. The diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient was observed for the Li ion in the 93% Li β-alumina single crystal by means of PFG-NMR experiments. Motion of Li ion in fractal dimension might be a possible explanation for the observed diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the 93% Li β–alumina system.

  12. Lithium ion diffusion in Li β-alumina single crystals measured by pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Tareque; Takekawa, Reiji; Iwai, Yoshiki; Kuwata, Naoaki; Kawamura, Junichi

    2014-03-28

    The lithium ion diffusion coefficient of a 93% Li β-alumina single crystal was measured for the first time using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy with two different crystal orientations. The diffusion coefficient was found to be 1.2 × 10(-11) m(2)/s in the direction perpendicular to the c axis at room temperature. The Li ion diffusion coefficient along the c axis direction was found to be very small (6.4 × 10(-13) m(2)/s at 333 K), which suggests that the macroscopic diffusion of the Li ion in the β-alumina crystal is mainly two-dimensional. The diffusion coefficient for the same sample was also estimated using NMR line narrowing data and impedance measurements. The impedance data show reasonable agreement with PFG-NMR data, while the line narrowing measurements provided a lower value for the diffusion coefficient. Line narrowing measurements also provided a relatively low value for the activation energy and pre-exponential factor. The temperature dependent diffusion coefficient was obtained in the temperature range 297-333 K by PFG-NMR, from which the activation energy for diffusion of the Li ion was estimated. The activation energy obtained by PFG-NMR was smaller than that obtained by impedance measurements, which suggests that thermally activated defect formation energy exists for 93% Li β-alumina single crystals. The diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient was observed for the Li ion in the 93% Li β-alumina single crystal by means of PFG-NMR experiments. Motion of Li ion in fractal dimension might be a possible explanation for the observed diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the 93% Li β-alumina system.

  13. Experimental Measurements of 69/71Ga NMR in Optically-pumped NMR (OPNMR) of AlGaAs/GaAs Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Sophia; Sesti, Erika; Wheeler, Dustin; Willmering, Matt; Wood, Ryan; Bowers, Clifford; Saha, Dipta; Stanton, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    We have conducted photon-energy and helicity-dependent measurements of the 69Ga and 71Ga NMR signals that result from optical pumping of states in the conduction band. The sample we have used for these studies is a 60-well multiple quantum well sample of Al0.34Ga0.66As/GaAs. Our measurements show a particularly strong dependence of the OPNMR signal from the GaAs quantum wells, when irradiating at photon energies consistent with the spin-split light hole within the material. (We use a frequency-stabilized continuous wave Ti:sapphire ring laser, with a very narrow linewidth for these excitation.) The coupling to the light-hole has an important NMR signature which we will discuss in this presesntation. We will show results for multiple external magnetic field strengths (B0) and for different laser light intensities. A thorough understanding of the ``fine structure'' observed in the photon energy dependence of these OPNMR signals is afforded through theoretical modeling of these results, which will be shown in a separate presentation. Supported by NSF through grant DMR-1206447.

  14. Ultrafast NMR T1 relaxation measurements: probing molecular properties in real time.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pieter E S; Donovan, Kevin J; Szekely, Or; Baias, Maria; Frydman, Lucio

    2013-09-16

    The longitudinal relaxation properties of NMR active nuclei carry useful information about the site-specific chemical environments and about the mobility of molecular fragments. Molecular mobility is in turn a key parameter reporting both on stable properties, such as size, as well as on dynamic ones, such as transient interactions and irreversible aggregation. In order to fully investigate the latter, a fast sampling of the relaxation parameters of transiently formed molecular species may be needed. Nevertheless, the acquisition of longitudinal relaxation data is typically slow, being limited by the requirement that the time for which the nucleus relaxes be varied incrementally until a complete build-up curve is generated. Recently, a number of single-shot-inversion-recovery methods have been developed capable of alleviating this need; still, these may be challenged by either spectral resolution restrictions or when coping with very fast relaxing nuclei. Here, we present a new experiment to measure the T1s of multiple nuclear spins that experience fast longitudinal relaxation, while retaining full high-resolution chemical shift information. Good agreement is observed between T1s measured with conventional means and T1s measured using the new technique. The method is applied to the real-time investigation of the reaction between D-xylose and sodium borate, which is in turn elucidated with the aid of ancillary ultrafast and conventional 2D TOCSY measurements. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Measurement of Solution Viscosity via Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy (DOSY)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weibin; Kagan, Gerald; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, the undergraduate chemistry curriculum includes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques are often taught including two-dimensional gradient-based experiments. An investigation of intermolecular forces including viscosity, by a variety of methods, is often integrated in the undergraduate physical and…

  16. Measurement of Solution Viscosity via Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy (DOSY)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weibin; Kagan, Gerald; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, the undergraduate chemistry curriculum includes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques are often taught including two-dimensional gradient-based experiments. An investigation of intermolecular forces including viscosity, by a variety of methods, is often integrated in the undergraduate physical and…

  17. The use of dielectric and NMR measurements to determine the pore-scale location of organic contaminants. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.; Bryar, T.; Caputi, M.

    1997-07-15

    'The objective of the three-year research project is to investigate the effect of adsorbed organics on the dielectric and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response of porous geological materials. This will allow us to assess the use of dielectric and NMR measurements at a site to determine whether organic contaminants are present in the central volume of the pore space (in a water-wet system) or are adsorbed to the solid surface. In addition, the authors propose to use laboratory dielectric and NMR measurements to study the kinetics of the adsorption and desorption of organics by conducting experiments where the authors control temperature and vary fluid chemistry. This project can be divided into three parts: sample preparation, NMR studies, dielectric studies. Over the past nine months the authors have made significant progress in sample preparation and NMR studies. As the plan is to conduct the NMR and dielectric measurements on the same set of samples, the authors delayed the start of the dielectric measurements until the first stage of NMR measurements were complete. Below the authors summarize the progress in sample preparation and NMR measurements, first briefly introducing the method used for the NMR measurements.'

  18. A portable NMR sensor to measure dynamic changes in the amount of water in living stems or fruit and its potential to measure sap flow.

    PubMed

    Windt, Carel W; Blümler, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and NMR imaging (magnetic resonance imaging) offer the possibility to quantitatively and non-invasively measure the presence and movement of water. Unfortunately, traditional NMR hardware is expensive, poorly suited for plants, and because of its bulk and complexity, not suitable for use in the field. But does it need to be? We here explore how novel, small-scale portable NMR devices can be used as a flow sensor to directly measure xylem sap flow in a poplar tree (Populus nigra L.), or in a dendrometer-like fashion to measure dynamic changes in the absolute water content of fruit or stems. For the latter purpose we monitored the diurnal pattern of growth, expansion and shrinkage in a model fruit (bean pod, Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and in the stem of an oak tree (Quercus robur L.). We compared changes in absolute stem water content, as measured by the NMR sensor, against stem diameter variations as measured by a set of conventional point dendrometers, to test how well the sensitivities of the two methods compare and to investigate how well diurnal changes in trunk absolute water content correlate with the concomitant diurnal variations in stem diameter. Our results confirm the existence of a strong correlation between the two parameters, but also suggest that dynamic changes in oak stem water content could be larger than is apparent on the basis of the stem diameter variation alone.

  19. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Longhua; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of (15)N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S(2)) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S(2)) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S(2) values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S(2) parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S(2) calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner.

  20. Novel methodology for accurate resolution of fluid signatures from multi-dimensional NMR well-logging measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Vivek

    2017-03-01

    A novel methodology for accurate fluid characterization from multi-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well-logging measurements is introduced. This methodology overcomes a fundamental challenge of poor resolution of features in multi-dimensional NMR distributions due to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of well-logging measurements. Based on an unsupervised machine-learning concept of blind source separation, the methodology resolves fluid responses from simultaneous analysis of large quantities of well-logging data. The multi-dimensional NMR distributions from a well log are arranged in a database matrix that is expressed as the product of two non-negative matrices. The first matrix contains the unique fluid signatures, and the second matrix contains the relative contributions of the signatures for each measurement sample. No a priori information or subjective assumptions about the underlying features in the data are required. Furthermore, the dimensionality of the data is reduced by several orders of magnitude, which greatly simplifies the visualization and interpretation of the fluid signatures. Compared to traditional methods of NMR fluid characterization which only use the information content of a single measurement, the new methodology uses the orders-of-magnitude higher information content of the entire well log. Simulations show that the methodology can resolve accurate fluid responses in challenging SNR conditions. The application of the methodology to well-logging data from a heavy oil reservoir shows that individual fluid signatures of heavy oil, water associated with clays and water in interstitial pores can be accurately obtained.

  1. A method for direct in vivo measurement of drug concentrations from a single 2H NMR spectrum.

    PubMed

    Evelhoch, J L; McCoy, C L; Giri, B P

    1989-03-01

    The use of 2H-labeled drugs provides a measure of drug concentration in situ directly from a single 2H NMR spectrum obtained with any antenna by correcting only for differential saturation effects. The limit of detection for a drug labeled with three equivalent deuterons is roughly 0.5 mM.

  2. Electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Mathematical expressions were developed to describe the interrelationships between operating requirements (capabilities), cell parameters, and system constraints in terms of design criteria definition. The mathematical model was programmed for computer solution. The model was exercised to identify performance-limiting characteristics, and analyses were conducted to predict operation in space of an experiment involving separation of four components. An engineering model of a flowing electrophoretic separator was constructed. The design is directed toward verifying improvements in resolution and throughput of a thicker cell than can be used on earth.

  3. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Longhua; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  4. Measuring reaction kinetics in a lab-on-a-chip by microcoil NMR.

    PubMed

    Wensink, Henk; Benito-Lopez, Fernando; Hermes, Dorothee C; Verboom, Willem; Gardeniers, Han J G E; Reinhoudt, David N; van den Berg, Albert

    2005-03-01

    A microfluidic chip with an integrated planar microcoil was developed for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy on samples with volumes of less than a microliter. Real-time monitoring of imine formation from benzaldehyde and aniline in the microreactor chip by NMR was demonstrated. The reaction times in the chip can be set from 30 min down to ca. 2 s, the latter being the mixing time in the microfluidic chip. Design rules will be described to optimize the microreactor and detection coil in order to deal with the inherent sensitivity of NMR and to minimize magnetic field inhomogeneities and obtain sufficient spectral resolution.

  5. NMR methods for in-situ biofilm metabolism studies: spatial and temporal resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Wind, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    We are developing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy, spectroscopy and combined NMR/optical techniques to the study of biofilms. Objectives include: time and depth-resolved metabolite concentrations with isotropic spatial resolution on the order of 10 microns, metabolic pathways and flux rates, mass transport and ultimately their correlation with gene expression by optical microscopy in biofilms. These methods are being developed with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model system, but are equally applicable to other biofilm systems of interest. Thus, spatially resolved NMR of biofilms is expected to contribute significantly to the understanding of adherent cell metabolism.

  6. The Effect of Magnetic Field Inhomogeneity on the Transverse Relaxation of Quadrupolar Nuclei Measured by Multiple Quantum Filtered NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliav, U.; Kushnir, T.; Knubovets, T.; Itzchak, Y.; Navon, G.

    1997-09-01

    The effects of magnetic fieldsB0andB1inhomogeneities on techniques which are commonly used for the measurements of triple-quantum-filtered (TQF) NMR spectroscopy of23Na in biological tissues are analyzed. The results of measurements by pulse sequences with and without refocusing ofB0inhomogeneities are compared. It is shown that without refocusing the errors in the measurement of the transverse relaxation times by TQF NMR spectroscopy may be as large as 100%, and thus, refocusing of magnetic field inhomogeneity is mandatory. Theoretical calculations demonstrate that without refocusingB0inhomogeneities the spectral width and phase depend on the interpulse time intervals, thus, leading to errors in the measured relaxation times. It is shown that pulse sequences that were used for the refocusing of the magnetic field (B0) inhomogeneity also reduce the sensitivity of the experimental results to radiofrequency (B1) magnetic field inhomogeneity.

  7. Lateral Diffusion of PEG-Lipid in Magnetically Aligned Bicelles Measured Using Stimulated Echo Pulsed Field Gradient 1H NMR

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Ronald; Macdonald, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    Lateral diffusion measurements of PEG-lipid incorporated into magnetically aligned bicelles are demonstrated using stimulated echo (STE) pulsed field gradient (PFG) proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bicelles were composed of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) plus dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) (q = DMPC/DHPC molar ratio = 4.5) plus 1 mol % (relative to DMPC) dimyristoyl phosphatidylethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DMPE-PEG 2000) at 25 wt % lipid. 1H NMR STE spectra of perpendicular aligned bicelles contained only resonances assigned to residual HDO and to overlapping contributions from a DMPE-PEG 2000 ethoxy headgroup plus DHPC choline methyl protons. Decay of the latter's STE intensity in the STE PFG 1H NMR experiment (gz = 244 G cm−1) yielded a DMPE-PEG 2000 (1 mol %, 35°C) lateral diffusion coefficient D = 1.35 × 10−11 m2 s−1. Hence, below the “mushroom-to-brush” transition, DMPE-PEG 2000 lateral diffusion is dictated by its DMPE hydrophobic anchor. D was independent of the diffusion time, indicating unrestricted lateral diffusion over root mean-square diffusion distances of microns, supporting the “perforated lamellae” model of bicelle structure under these conditions. Overall, the results demonstrate the feasibility of lateral diffusion measurements in magnetically aligned bicelles using the STE PFG NMR technique. PMID:15475584

  8. Lateral diffusion of PEG-Lipid in magnetically aligned bicelles measured using stimulated echo pulsed field gradient 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Soong, Ronald; Macdonald, Peter M

    2005-01-01

    Lateral diffusion measurements of PEG-lipid incorporated into magnetically aligned bicelles are demonstrated using stimulated echo (STE) pulsed field gradient (PFG) proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bicelles were composed of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) plus dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) (q = DMPC/DHPC molar ratio = 4.5) plus 1 mol % (relative to DMPC) dimyristoyl phosphatidylethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DMPE-PEG 2000) at 25 wt % lipid. 1H NMR STE spectra of perpendicular aligned bicelles contained only resonances assigned to residual HDO and to overlapping contributions from a DMPE-PEG 2000 ethoxy headgroup plus DHPC choline methyl protons. Decay of the latter's STE intensity in the STE PFG 1H NMR experiment (g(z) = 244 G cm(-1)) yielded a DMPE-PEG 2000 (1 mol %, 35 degrees C) lateral diffusion coefficient D = 1.35 x 10(-11) m2 s(-1). Hence, below the "mushroom-to-brush" transition, DMPE-PEG 2000 lateral diffusion is dictated by its DMPE hydrophobic anchor. D was independent of the diffusion time, indicating unrestricted lateral diffusion over root mean-square diffusion distances of microns, supporting the "perforated lamellae" model of bicelle structure under these conditions. Overall, the results demonstrate the feasibility of lateral diffusion measurements in magnetically aligned bicelles using the STE PFG NMR technique.

  9. Accumulation of ammonium in Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings measured by in vivo 14N-NMR.

    PubMed

    Aarnes, H; Eriksen, A B; Petersen, D; Rise, F

    2007-01-01

    (14)N-NMR and (31)P-NMR have been used to monitor the in vivo pH in roots, stems, and needles from seedlings of Norway spruce, a typical ammonium-tolerant plant. The vacuolar and cytoplasmic pH measured by (31)P-NMR was found to be c. pH 4.8 and 7.0, respectively, with no significant difference between plants growing with ammonium or nitrate as the N-source. The (1)H-coupled (14) NH 4+ resonance is pH-sensitive: at alkaline pH it is a narrow singlet line and below pH 4 it is an increasing multiplet line with five signals. The pH values in ammonium-containing compartments measured by (14)N-NMR ranged from 3.7 to 3.9, notably lower than the estimated pH values of the P(i) pools. This suggests that, in seedlings of Norway spruce, ammonium is stored in vacuoles with low pH possibly to protect the seedlings against the toxic effects of ammonium ( NH 4+) or ammonia (NH3). It was also found that concentrations of malate were 3-6 times higher in stems than in roots and needles, with nitrate-grown plants containing more malate than plants grown with ammonium.

  10. The use of dielectric and NMR measurements to determine the pore-scale location of organic. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of the three-year research project is to investigate the effect of adsorbed organics on the dielectric and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response of porous geological materials. This will allow the author to assess the use of dielectric and NMR measurements at a site to determine whether organic contaminants are present in the central volume of the pore space or are adsorbed to the solid surfaces. In addition, she proposes to use laboratory dielectric and NMR measurements to study the kinetics of the adsorption and desorption of organics. This report summarizes work completed after 20 months of a three-year project. The research involves the study of the NMR and dielectric behavior of sands with three types of solid surfaces: water-wet, where water spontaneously coats and adsorbs to the solid surfaces; hydrophobic, where water is repelled from the solid surfaces by an organosilane coating; and oil-wet, where oil coats the solid surfaces. The oil-wet case is representative of a contaminated soil, in which oil has become adsorbed to the solid surfaces.'

  11. Fast proton exchange in histidine: measurement of rate constants through indirect detection by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Akansha Ashvani; Duma, Luminita; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe

    2014-05-19

    Owing to its imidazole side chain, histidine participates in various processes such as enzyme catalysis, pH regulation, metal binding, and phosphorylation. The determination of exchange rates of labile protons for such a system is important for understanding its functions. However, these rates are too fast to be measured directly in an aqueous solution by using NMR spectroscopy. We have obtained the exchange rates of the NH3(+) amino protons and the labile NH(ε2) and NH(δ1) protons of the imidazole ring by indirect detection through nitrogen-15 as a function of temperature (272 K

  12. Electrophoretic mobility of oil droplets in electrolyte and surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Wuzhang, Jiachen; Song, Yongxin; Sun, Runzhe; Pan, Xinxiang; Li, Dongqing

    2015-10-01

    Electrophoretic mobility of oil droplets of micron sizes in PBS and ionic surfactant solutions was measured in this paper. The experimental results show that, in addition to the applied electric field, the speed and the direction of electrophoretic motion of oil droplets depend on the surfactant concentration and on if the droplet is in negatively charged SDS solutions or in positively charged hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) solutions. The absolute value of the electrophoretic mobility increases with increased surfactant concentration before the surfactant concentration reaches to the CMC. It was also found that there are two vortices around the oil droplet under the applied electric field. The size of the vortices changes with the surfactant and with the electric field. The vortices around the droplet directly affect the drag of the flow field to the droplet motion and should be considered in the studies of electrophoretic mobility of oil droplets. The existence of the vortices will also influence the determination and the interpretation of the zeta potential of the oil droplets based on the measured mobility data. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    A program to develop an engineering model of an electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals is summarized. An extensive mathematical modeling study and numerous ground based tests were included. Focus was placed on developing an actual electrophoretic separator of the continuous flow type, configured and suitable for flight testing as a space processing applications rocket payload.

  14. Solute diffusion in ionic liquids, NMR measurements and comparisons to conventional solvents.

    PubMed

    Kaintz, Anne; Baker, Gary; Benesi, Alan; Maroncelli, Mark

    2013-10-03

    Diffusion coefficients of a variety of dilute solutes in the series of 1-alkyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imides ([Prn1][Tf2N], n = 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10), trihexyltetracedecylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [P14,666][Tf2N], and assorted imidazolium ionic liquids are measured using pulsed field gradient (1)H NMR. These data, combined with available literature data, are used to try to uncover the solute and solvent characteristics most important in determining tracer diffusion rates. Discussion is framed in terms of departures from simple hydrodynamic predictions for translational friction using the ratio ζobs/ζSE, where ζobs is the observed friction, determined from the measured diffusion coefficient D via ζobs = kBT/D, and ζSE = 6πηR is the Stokes friction on a sphere of radius R (determined from the solute van der Waals volume) in a solvent with viscosity η. In the case of neutral solutes, the primary determinant of whether hydrodynamic predictions are accurate is the relative size of solute versus solvent molecules. A single correlation, albeit with considerable scatter, is found between ζobs/ζSE and the ratio of solute-to-solvent van der Waals volumes, ζobs/ζSE = {1 + a(VU/VV)(-p)}, with constants a = 1.93 and p = 1.88. In the case of small solutes, the observed friction is over 100-fold smaller than predictions of hydrodynamic models. The dipole moment of the solute has little effect on the friction, whereas solute charge has a marked effect. For monovalent solutes of size comparable to or smaller than the solvent ions, the observed friction is comparable to or even greater than what is predicted by hydrodynamics. These general trends are shown to be quite similar to what is observed for tracer diffusion in conventional solvents.

  15. Sensitivity and resolution of two-dimensional NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausik, Ravinath; Hürlimann, Martin D.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of 2D NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements for fluid typing applications is analyzed. In particular, we delineate the region in the diffusion - relaxation plane that can be determined with a given gradient strength and homogeneity, and compare the performance of the single and double echo encoding with the stimulated echo diffusion encoding. We show that the diffusion editing based approach is able to determine the diffusion coefficient only if the relaxation time T2 exceeds a cutoff value T2,cutoff , that scales like T2,cutoff ∝g - 2 / 3D - 1 / 3 . For stimulated echo encoding, the optimal diffusion encoding times (Td and δ), that provide the best diffusion sensitivity, rely only on the T1 /T2 ratios and not on the diffusion coefficients of the fluids or the applied gradient strengths. Irrespective of T1 , for high enough gradients (i.e. when γ2g2 DT23 >102), the Hahn echo based encoding is superior to encoding based on the stimulated echo. For weaker gradients, the stimulated echo is superior only if the T1 /T2 ratio is much larger than 1. For single component systems, the diffusion sensitivity is not adversely impacted by the uniformity of the gradients and the diffusion distributions can be well measured. The presence of non-uniform gradients can affect the determination of the diffusion distributions when you have two fluids of comparable T2 . In such situations the effective single component diffusion coefficient is always closer to the geometric mean diffusion coefficient of the two fluids.

  16. Using pulse field gradient NMR diffusion measurements to define molecular size distributions in glycan preparations.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle C; Klyosov, Anatole; Platt, David; Mayo, Kevin H

    2009-07-06

    Glycans comprise perhaps the largest biomass in nature, and more and more glycans are used in a number of applications, including those as pharmaceutical agents in the clinic. However, defining glycan molecular weight distributions during and after their preparation is not always straightforward. Here, we use pulse field gradient (PFG) (1)H NMR self-diffusion measurements to assess molecular weight distributions in various glycan preparations. Initially, we derived diffusion coefficients, D, on a series of dextrans with reported weight-average molecular weights from about 5 kDa to 150 kDa. For each dextran sample, we analyzed 15 diffusion decay curves, one from each of the 15 major (1)H resonance envelopes, to provide diffusion coefficients. By measuring D as a function of dextran concentration, we determined D at infinite dilution, D(inf), which allowed estimation of the hydrodynamic radius, R(h), using the Stokes-Einstein relationship. A plot of log D(inf) versus log R(h) was linear and provided a standard calibration curve from which R(h) is estimated for other glycans. We then applied this methodology to investigate two other glycans, an alpha-(1-->2)-L-rhamnosyl-alpha-(1-->4)-D-galacturonosyl with quasi-randomly distributed, mostly terminal beta(1-->4)-linked galactose side-chains (GRG) and an alpha(1-->6)-D-galacto-beta(1-->4)-D-mannan (Davanat), which is presently being tested against cancer in the clinic. Using the dextran-derived calibration curve, we find that average R(h) values for GRG and Davanat are 76+/-6 x 10(-10) m and 56+/-3 x 10(-10) m, with GRG being more polydispersed than Davanat. Results from this study will be useful to investigators requiring knowledge of polysaccharide dispersity, needing to study polysaccharides under various solution conditions, or wanting to follow degradation of polysaccharides during production.

  17. A compact high-performance low-field NMR apparatus for measurements on fluids at very high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, R.; Anand, V. Ganesan, K.; Tabrizi, P.; Torres, R.; Grant, B.; Catina, D.; Ryan, D.; Borman, C.; Krueckl, C.

    2014-02-15

    We discuss an innovative new high-performance apparatus for performing low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times and diffusion measurements on fluids at very high pressures and high temperatures. The apparatus sensor design and electronics specifications allow for dual deployment either in a fluid sampling well logging tool or in a laboratory. The sensor and electronics were designed to function in both environments. This paper discusses the use of the apparatus in a laboratory environment. The operating temperature and pressure limits, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new system exceed by a very wide margin what is currently possible. This major breakthrough was made possible by a revolutionary new sensor design that breaks many of the rules of conventional high pressure NMR sensor design. A metallic sample holder capable of operating at high pressures and temperatures is provided to contain the fluid under study. The sample holder has been successfully tested for operation up to 36 Kpsi. A solenoid coil wound on a slotted titanium frame sits inside the metallic sample holder and serves as an antenna to transmit RF pulses and receive NMR signals. The metal sample holder is sandwiched between a pair of gradient coils which provide a linear field gradient for pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements. The assembly sits in the bore of a low-gradient permanent magnet. The system can operate over a wide frequency range without the need for tuning the antenna to the Larmor frequency. The SNR measured on a water sample at room temperature is more than 15 times greater than that of the commercial low-field system in our laboratory. Thus, the new system provides for data acquisition more than 200 times faster than was previously possible. Laboratory NMR measurements of relaxations times and diffusion coefficients performed at pressures up to 25 Kpsi and at temperatures up to 175 °C with crude oils enlivened with dissolved hydrocarbon gases

  18. A compact high-performance low-field NMR apparatus for measurements on fluids at very high pressures and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Freedman, R; Anand, V; Grant, B; Ganesan, K; Tabrizi, P; Torres, R; Catina, D; Ryan, D; Borman, C; Krueckl, C

    2014-02-01

    We discuss an innovative new high-performance apparatus for performing low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation times and diffusion measurements on fluids at very high pressures and high temperatures. The apparatus sensor design and electronics specifications allow for dual deployment either in a fluid sampling well logging tool or in a laboratory. The sensor and electronics were designed to function in both environments. This paper discusses the use of the apparatus in a laboratory environment. The operating temperature and pressure limits, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new system exceed by a very wide margin what is currently possible. This major breakthrough was made possible by a revolutionary new sensor design that breaks many of the rules of conventional high pressure NMR sensor design. A metallic sample holder capable of operating at high pressures and temperatures is provided to contain the fluid under study. The sample holder has been successfully tested for operation up to 36 Kpsi. A solenoid coil wound on a slotted titanium frame sits inside the metallic sample holder and serves as an antenna to transmit RF pulses and receive NMR signals. The metal sample holder is sandwiched between a pair of gradient coils which provide a linear field gradient for pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements. The assembly sits in the bore of a low-gradient permanent magnet. The system can operate over a wide frequency range without the need for tuning the antenna to the Larmor frequency. The SNR measured on a water sample at room temperature is more than 15 times greater than that of the commercial low-field system in our laboratory. Thus, the new system provides for data acquisition more than 200 times faster than was previously possible. Laboratory NMR measurements of relaxations times and diffusion coefficients performed at pressures up to 25 Kpsi and at temperatures up to 175 °C with crude oils enlivened with dissolved hydrocarbon gases

  19. Properties of sesame oil by detailed 1H and 13C NMR assignments before and after ozonation and their correlation with iodine value, peroxide value, and viscosity measurements.

    PubMed

    Sega, Alessandro; Zanardi, Iacopo; Chiasserini, Luisa; Gabbrielli, Alessandro; Bocci, Velio; Travagli, Valter

    2010-02-01

    Gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated triglyceride substrates leading to ozonated derivatives with a wide potential applications, ranging from the petrochemical to the pharmaceutical industry. To date, an ultimate understanding of the ozone reactivity during sesame oil ozonation process as well as detailed (1)H and (13)C NMR assignments are lacking. A practical advantage of NMR is that a single NMR sample measurement can explain many issues, while similar analysis by traditional methods may require several independent and time-consuming measurements. Moreover, significant relationships among NMR spectra and both conventional chemical analysis and viscosity measurements have been found. Eventually, NMR could play an important role for quality attributes of ozonated oil derivatives.

  20. Measuring translational diffusion coefficients of peptides and proteins by PFG-NMR using band-selective RF pulses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shenggen; Weber, Daniel K; Separovic, Frances; Keizer, David W

    2014-07-01

    Molecular translational self-diffusion, a measure of diffusive motion, provides information on the effective molecular hydrodynamic radius, as well as information on the properties of media or solution through which the molecule diffuses. Protein translational diffusion measured by pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) has seen increased application in structure and interaction studies, as structural changes or protein-protein interactions are often accompanied by alteration of their effective hydrodynamic radii. Unlike the analysis of complex mixtures by PFG-NMR, for monitoring changes of protein translational diffusion under various conditions, such as different stages of folding/unfolding, a partial region of the spectrum or even a single resonance is sufficient. We report translational diffusion coefficients measured by PFG-NMR with a modified stimulated echo (STE) sequence where band-selective pulses are employed for all three (1)H RF pulses. Compared with conventional non-selective sequence, e.g. the BPP-LED sequence, the advantage of this modified band-selective excitation short transient (BEST) version of STE (BEST-STE) sequence is multi-fold, namely: (1) potential sensitivity gain as in generalized BEST-based sequences, (2) water suppression is no longer required as the magnetization of solvent water is not perturbed during the measurement, and (3) dynamic range problems due to the presence of intense resonances from molecules other than the protein or peptide of interest, such as non-deuterated detergent micelles, are avoided.

  1. HRJCOSY: A three-dimensional NMR method for measuring complex samples in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuqing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wang, Kaiyu; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) NMR plays an important role in structural elucidations of complex samples, whereas difficulty remains in its applications to inhomogeneous fields. Here, we propose an NMR approach based on intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to obtain high-resolution 3D J-resolved-COSY spectra in inhomogeneous fields. Theoretical analyses are presented for verifying the proposed method. Experiments on a simple chemical solution and a complex brain phantom are performed under non-ideal field conditions to show the ability of the proposed method. This method is an application of iZQCs to high-resolution 3D NMR, and is useful for studies of complex samples in inhomogeneous fields.

  2. J-edited pure shift NMR for the facile measurement of (n)J(HH) for specific protons.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N

    2015-04-07

    We report a novel 1D J-edited pure shift NMR experiment (J-PSHIFT) that was constructed from a pseudo 2D experiment for the direct measurement of proton-proton scalar couplings. The experiment gives homonuclear broad-band (1)H-decoupled (1)H NMR spectra, which provide a single peak for chemically distinct protons, and only retain the homonuclear-scalar-coupled doublet pattern at the chemical-shift positions of the protons in the coupled network of a specific proton. This permits the direct and unambiguous measurement of the magnitudes of the couplings. The incorporation of a 1D selective correlation spectroscopy (COSY)/ total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) block in lieu of the initial selective pulse, results in the exclusive detection of the correlated spectrum of a specific proton.

  3. Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow in cat brain using intracarotid 2H2O and 2H NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Detre, J.A.; Subramanian, V.H.; Mitchell, M.D.; Smith, D.S.; Kobayashi, A.; Zaman, A.; Leigh, J.S. Jr. )

    1990-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured in cat brain in vivo at 2.7 T using 2H NMR to monitor the washout of deuterated saline injected into both carotid arteries via the lingual arteries. In anesthetized cats, global CBF varied directly with PaCO{sub 2} over a range of 20-50 mm Hg, and the corresponding global CBF values ranged from 25 to 125 ml.100 g-1.min-1. Regional CBF was measured in a 1-cm axial section of cat brain using intracarotid deuterated saline and gradient-echo 2H NMR imaging. Blood flow images with a maximum pixel resolution of 0.3 x 0.3 x 1.0 cm were generated from the deuterium signal washout at each pixel. Image derived values for CBF agreed well with other determinations, and decreased significantly with hypocapnia.

  4. Comparison of double-quantum NMR normalization schemes to measure homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-08-01

    A recent implementation of a double-quantum (DQ) recoupling solid-state NMR experiment, dubbed DQ-DRENAR, provides a quantitative measure of homonuclear dipole-dipole coupling constants in multispin-1/2 systems. It was claimed to be more robust than another, previously known experiment relying on the recording of point-by-point normalized DQ build-up curves. Focusing on the POST-C7 and BaBa-xy16 DQ pulse sequences, I here present an in-depth comparison of both approaches based upon spin-dynamics simulations, stressing that they are based upon very similar principles and that they are largely equivalent when no imperfections are present. With imperfections, it is found that DQ-DRENAR/POST-C7 does not fully compensate for additional signal dephasing related to chemical shifts (CS) and their anisotropy (CSA), which over-compensates the intrinsic CS(A)-related efficiency loss of the DQ Hamiltonian and leads to an apparent cancellation effect. The simulations further show that the CS(A)-related dephasing in DQ-DRENAR can be removed by another phase cycle step or an improved super-cycled wideband version. Only the latter, or the normalized DQ build-up, are unaffected by CS(A)-related signal loss and yield clean pure dipolar-coupling information subject to unavoidable, pulse sequence specific performance reduction related to higher-order corrections of the dipolar DQ Hamiltonian. The intrinsically super-cycled BaBa-xy16 is shown to exhibit virtually no CS(A) related imperfection terms, but its dipolar performance is somewhat more challenged by CS(A) effects than POST-C7, which can however be compensated when applied at very fast MAS (>50 kHz). Practically, DQ-DRENAR uses a clever phase cycle separation to achieve a significantly shorter experimental time, which can also be beneficially employed in normalized DQ build-up experiments.

  5. Comparison of double-quantum NMR normalization schemes to measure homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-08-14

    A recent implementation of a double-quantum (DQ) recoupling solid-state NMR experiment, dubbed DQ-DRENAR, provides a quantitative measure of homonuclear dipole-dipole coupling constants in multispin-1/2 systems. It was claimed to be more robust than another, previously known experiment relying on the recording of point-by-point normalized DQ build-up curves. Focusing on the POST-C7 and BaBa-xy16 DQ pulse sequences, I here present an in-depth comparison of both approaches based upon spin-dynamics simulations, stressing that they are based upon very similar principles and that they are largely equivalent when no imperfections are present. With imperfections, it is found that DQ-DRENAR/POST-C7 does not fully compensate for additional signal dephasing related to chemical shifts (CS) and their anisotropy (CSA), which over-compensates the intrinsic CS(A)-related efficiency loss of the DQ Hamiltonian and leads to an apparent cancellation effect. The simulations further show that the CS(A)-related dephasing in DQ-DRENAR can be removed by another phase cycle step or an improved super-cycled wideband version. Only the latter, or the normalized DQ build-up, are unaffected by CS(A)-related signal loss and yield clean pure dipolar-coupling information subject to unavoidable, pulse sequence specific performance reduction related to higher-order corrections of the dipolar DQ Hamiltonian. The intrinsically super-cycled BaBa-xy16 is shown to exhibit virtually no CS(A) related imperfection terms, but its dipolar performance is somewhat more challenged by CS(A) effects than POST-C7, which can however be compensated when applied at very fast MAS (>50 kHz). Practically, DQ-DRENAR uses a clever phase cycle separation to achieve a significantly shorter experimental time, which can also be beneficially employed in normalized DQ build-up experiments.

  6. Increasing the sensitivity of NMR diffusion measurements by paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement, with application to ribosome–nascent chain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cassaignau, Anaïs M. E.; Cabrita, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    The translational diffusion of macromolecules can be examined non-invasively by stimulated echo (STE) NMR experiments to accurately determine their molecular sizes. These measurements can be important probes of intermolecular interactions and protein folding and unfolding, and are crucial in monitoring the integrity of large macromolecular assemblies such as ribosome–nascent chain complexes (RNCs). However, NMR studies of these complexes can be severely constrained by their slow tumbling, low solubility (with maximum concentrations of up to 10 μM), and short lifetimes resulting in weak signal, and therefore continuing improvements in experimental sensitivity are essential. Here we explore the use of the paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement (PLRE) agent NiDO2A on the sensitivity of 15N XSTE and SORDID heteronuclear STE experiments, which can be used to monitor the integrity of these unstable complexes. We exploit the dependence of the PLRE effect on the gyromagnetic ratio and electronic relaxation time to accelerate recovery of 1H magnetization without adversely affecting storage on Nz during diffusion delays or introducing significant transverse relaxation line broadening. By applying the longitudinal relaxation-optimized SORDID pulse sequence together with NiDO2A to 70S Escherichia coli ribosomes and RNCs, NMR diffusion sensitivity enhancements of up to 4.5-fold relative to XSTE are achieved, alongside ~1.9-fold improvements in two-dimensional NMR sensitivity, without compromising the sample integrity. We anticipate these results will significantly advance the use of NMR to probe dynamic regions of ribosomes and other large, unstable macromolecular assemblies. PMID:26253948

  7. NMR measurement and Brownian movement in the short-time limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepišnik, Janez

    1994-05-01

    This study is carried out to find relations between the time-dependent molecular self-diffusion and the attenuation of NMR spin-echo. Two cases of diffusion are considered: the Brownian motion in Ornstein's short-time limit and the random walk with memory [13]. The friction and the correlation time describe the mechanism of entrapping interactions between molecules or their bonding to macromolecule chains. The obtained formula for the self-diffusion attenuation is valid at short times and it develops into the well-known Torrey's result in the long-time limit. It fits very efficiently into the NMR data from Refs. [19-20].

  8. Novel methodology for accurate resolution of fluid signatures from multi-dimensional NMR well-logging measurements.

    PubMed

    Anand, Vivek

    2017-03-01

    A novel methodology for accurate fluid characterization from multi-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well-logging measurements is introduced. This methodology overcomes a fundamental challenge of poor resolution of features in multi-dimensional NMR distributions due to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of well-logging measurements. Based on an unsupervised machine-learning concept of blind source separation, the methodology resolves fluid responses from simultaneous analysis of large quantities of well-logging data. The multi-dimensional NMR distributions from a well log are arranged in a database matrix that is expressed as the product of two non-negative matrices. The first matrix contains the unique fluid signatures, and the second matrix contains the relative contributions of the signatures for each measurement sample. No a priori information or subjective assumptions about the underlying features in the data are required. Furthermore, the dimensionality of the data is reduced by several orders of magnitude, which greatly simplifies the visualization and interpretation of the fluid signatures. Compared to traditional methods of NMR fluid characterization which only use the information content of a single measurement, the new methodology uses the orders-of-magnitude higher information content of the entire well log. Simulations show that the methodology can resolve accurate fluid responses in challenging SNR conditions. The application of the methodology to well-logging data from a heavy oil reservoir shows that individual fluid signatures of heavy oil, water associated with clays and water in interstitial pores can be accurately obtained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Strong Nonuniform Magnetic Field for Self-Diffusion Measurement by NMR in the Earth's Magnetic-Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepisnik, J.; Kos, M.; Planinsic, G.; Erzen, V.

    Self-diffusion measurement by NMR requires a magnetic-field gradient that is strong enough to cause sufficient dephasing of the signal of migrating spins in the time of its application. The spin-relaxation mechanism limits the duration of the gradient field, and whenever particle migration is slow, the strength of the required inhomogeneous magnetic field may exceed that of the main magnetic field. In this case, the definition of the magnetic-field gradient fails and the usual formula for self-diffusion attenuation of spin echoes is no longer valid. This always happens with NMR in the earth's weak magnetic field. In the paper an expression for the self-diffusion attenuation of the spin echo is derived that is valid for a strong nonuniform magnetic field, and it is shown that the nonuniform magnetic field must have the appropriate spatial symmetry and that only isotropic self-diffusion can be measured with the new method. NMR measurement in the earth's magnetic field of the self-diffusion constants in some liquids confirms these results.

  10. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Measurement of intracellular potassium ion concentrations by n.m.r.

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, P J; Hayer, M K; Riddell, F G

    1983-01-01

    39K n.m.r. was used to detect and quantify K+ within human erythrocytes. A shift reagent consisting of an anionic complex of dysprosium(III) with sodium tripolyphosphate permitted a distinction to be made between K+ inside and outside erythrocytes. Intracellular K+ concentrations determined by this method were similar to values obtained by flame photometry. PMID:6870815

  12. On the role of experimental imperfections in constructing (1)H spin diffusion NMR plots for domain size measurements.

    PubMed

    Nieuwendaal, Ryan C

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the precision of 1D chemical-shift-based (1)H spin diffusion NMR experiments as well as straightforward experimental protocols for reducing errors. The (1)H spin diffusion NMR experiments described herein are useful for samples that contain components with significant spectral overlap in the (1)H NMR spectrum and also for samples of small mass (<1mg). We show that even in samples that display little spectral contrast, domain sizes can be determined to a relatively high degree of certainty if common experimental variability is accounted for and known. In particular, one should (1) measure flip angles to high precision (≈±1° flip angle), (2) establish a metric for phase transients to ensure their repeatability, (3) establish a reliable spectral deconvolution procedure to ascertain the deconvolved spectra of the neat components in the composite or blend spin diffusion spectrum, and (4) when possible, perform 1D chemical-shift-based (1)H spin diffusion experiments with zero total integral to partially correct for errors and uncertainties if these requirements cannot fully be implemented. We show that minimizing the degree of phase transients is not a requirement for reliable domain size measurement, but their repeatability is essential, as is knowing their contribution to the spectral offset (i.e. the J1 coefficient). When performing experiments with zero total integral in the spin diffusion NMR spectrum with carefully measured flip angles and known phase transient effects, the largest contribution to error arises from an uncertainty in the component lineshapes which can be as high as 7%. This uncertainty can be reduced considerably if the component lineshapes deconvolved from the composite or blend spin diffusion spectra adequately match previously acquired pure component spectra. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Surface-NMR measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 in a homogeneous sandy aquifer in Skive, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walbrecker, J.; Behroozmand, A.

    2011-12-01

    Efficient groundwater management requires reliable means of characterizing shallow groundwater aquifers. One key parameter in this respect is hydraulic conductivity. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a geophysical exploration technique that can potentially provide this type of information in a noninvasive, cost-effective way. The technique is based on measuring the precession of nuclear spins of protons in groundwater molecules. It involves large loop antennas deployed on Earth's surface to generate electromagnetic pulses tuned to specifically excite and detect groundwater proton spins. Naturally, the excited state of spins is transitory - once excited, spins relax back to their equilibrium state. This relaxation process is strongly influenced by the spin environment, which, in the case of groundwater, is defined by the aquifer. By employing empirical relations, changes in relaxation behavior can be used to identify changes in aquifer hydraulic conductivity, making the NMR relaxation signal a very important piece of information. Particularly, efforts are made to record the longitudinal relaxation parameter T1, because it is known from laboratory studies that it often reliably correlates with hydraulic conductivity, even in the presence of magnetic species. In surface NMR, T1 data are collected by recording the NMR signal amplitude following two sequential excitation pulses as a function of the delay time τ between the two pulses. In conventional acquisition, the two pulses have a mutual phase shift of π. Based on theoretical arguments it was recently shown that T1 times acquired according to this conventional surface-NMR scheme are systematically biased. It was proposed that the bias can be minimized by cycling the phase of the two pulses between π and zero in subsequent double-pulse experiments, and subtracting the resulting signal amplitudes (phase-cycled pseudosaturation recovery scheme, pcPSR). We present the first surface-NMR T1 data set recorded

  14. Electrophoretic cell separation by means of immunomicrospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Smolka, A. J. K.

    1980-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of fixed human red blood cells immunologically labeled with polymeric (4-vinyl)pyridine or polyglutaraldehyde microspheres was altered to a considerable extent. This observation was utilized in the preparative scale electrophoretic separation of human and turkey fixed red blood cells, whose mobilities under normal physiological conditions do not differ sufficiently to allow their separation by continuous flow electrophoresis. It is suggested that resolution in the electrophoretic separation of cell subpopulations, currently limited by finite and often overlapping mobility distributions, may be significantly enhanced by immuno-specific labeling of target populations using microspheres.

  15. Electrophoretic cell separation by means of microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, A. J. K.; Nerren, B. H.; Margel, S.; Rembaum, A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of fixed human erythrocytes immunologically labeled with poly(vinylpyridine) or poly(glutaraldehyde) microspheres was reduced by approximately 40%. This observation was utilized in preparative scale electrophoretic separations of fixed human and turkey erythrocytes, the mobilities of which under normal physiological conditions do not differ sufficiently to allow their separation by continuous flow electrophoresis. We suggest that resolution in the electrophoretic separation of cell subpopulations, currently limited by finite and often overlapping mobility distributions, may be significantly enhanced by immunospecific labeling of target populations using microspheres.

  16. Electrophoretic cell separation by means of immunomicrospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Smolka, A. J. K.

    1980-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of fixed human red blood cells immunologically labeled with polymeric (4-vinyl)pyridine or polyglutaraldehyde microspheres was altered to a considerable extent. This observation was utilized in the preparative scale electrophoretic separation of human and turkey fixed red blood cells, whose mobilities under normal physiological conditions do not differ sufficiently to allow their separation by continuous flow electrophoresis. It is suggested that resolution in the electrophoretic separation of cell subpopulations, currently limited by finite and often overlapping mobility distributions, may be significantly enhanced by immuno-specific labeling of target populations using microspheres.

  17. SVD-Based Technique for Interference Cancellation and Noise Reduction in NMR Measurement of Time-Dependent Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenjun; Ma, Hong; Yu, De; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment for measurement of time-dependent magnetic fields was introduced. To improve the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of NMR data, a new method for interference cancellation and noise reduction (ICNR) based on singular value decomposition (SVD) was proposed. The singular values corresponding to the radio frequency interference (RFI) signal were identified in terms of the correlation between the FID data and the reference data, and then the RFI and noise were suppressed by setting the corresponding singular values to zero. The validity of the algorithm was verified by processing the measured NMR data. The results indicated that, this method has a significantly suppression of RFI and random noise, and can well preserve the FID signal. At present, the major limitation of the proposed SVD-based ICNR technique is that the threshold value for interference cancellation needs to be manually selected. Finally, the inversion waveform of the applied alternating magnetic field was given by fitting the processed experimental data. PMID:26959024

  18. SVD-Based Technique for Interference Cancellation and Noise Reduction in NMR Measurement of Time-Dependent Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjun; Ma, Hong; Yu, De; Zhang, Hua

    2016-03-04

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment for measurement of time-dependent magnetic fields was introduced. To improve the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of NMR data, a new method for interference cancellation and noise reduction (ICNR) based on singular value decomposition (SVD) was proposed. The singular values corresponding to the radio frequency interference (RFI) signal were identified in terms of the correlation between the FID data and the reference data, and then the RFI and noise were suppressed by setting the corresponding singular values to zero. The validity of the algorithm was verified by processing the measured NMR data. The results indicated that, this method has a significantly suppression of RFI and random noise, and can well preserve the FID signal. At present, the major limitation of the proposed SVD-based ICNR technique is that the threshold value for interference cancellation needs to be manually selected. Finally, the inversion waveform of the applied alternating magnetic field was given by fitting the processed experimental data.

  19. Rapid measurement of multidimensional 1H solid-state NMR spectra at ultra-fast MAS frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yue Qi; Malon, Michal; Martineau, Charlotte; Taulelle, Francis; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2014-02-01

    A novel method to realize rapid repetition of 1H NMR experiments at ultra-fast MAS frequencies is demonstrated. The ultra-fast MAS at 110 kHz slows the 1H-1H spin diffusion, leading to variations of 1H T1 relaxation times from atom to atom within a molecule. The different relaxation behavior is averaged by applying 1H-1H recoupling during relaxation delay even at ultra-fast MAS, reducing the optimal relaxation delay to maximize the signal to noise ratio. The way to determine optimal relaxation delay for arbitrary relaxation curve is shown. The reduction of optimal relaxation delay by radio-frequency driven recoupling (RFDR) was demonstrated on powder samples of glycine and ethenzamide with one and multi-dimensional NMR measurements.

  20. Longitudinal NMR parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit during the growing process using a mobile magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geya, Yuto; Kimura, Takeshi; Fujisaki, Hirotaka; Terada, Yasuhiko; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Gemma, Hiroshi; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai, Kosui) were performed using an electrically mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a 0.2 T and 16 cm gap permanent magnet. To measure the relaxation times and apparent diffusion coefficients of the pear fruit in relation to their weight, seven pear fruits were harvested almost every week during the cell enlargement period and measured in a research orchard. To evaluate the in situ relaxation times, six pear fruits were longitudinally measured for about two months during the same period. The measurements for the harvested samples showed good agreement with the in situ measurements. From the measurements of the harvested samples, it is clear that the relaxation rates of the pear fruits linearly change with the inverse of the linear dimension of the fruits, demonstrating that the relaxation mechanism is a surface relaxation. We therefore conclude that the mobile MRI system is a useful device for measuring the NMR parameters of outdoor living plants.

  1. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and Te125 NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    DOE PAGES

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-27

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S, depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n, and effective mass, m*, as S ~ m*/n2/3. The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, depends on both n and m* as 1/T1~(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1/T1~(m*)2n2/3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficientmore » and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study AgxSbxGe50–2xTe50, well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Thus, values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.« less

  2. Automated Parallel Capillary Electrophoretic System

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, Thomas E.; Liu, Changsheng; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.; Kernan, John R.

    2000-02-22

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  3. Particle separations by electrophoretic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, N.E.; Petersen, S.L.; Ducatte, G.R.; Remcho, V.T.

    1996-03-01

    A new method for particle separations based on capillary electrophoresis has been developed and characterized. It uniquely separates particles according to their chemical nature. Separations have been demonstrated with chemically modified latex particles and with inorganic oxide and silicate particles. Separations have been shown both experimentally and theoretically to be essentially independent of particle size in the range of about 0.2 {mu}m to 10 {mu}m. The method has been applied to separations of U0{sub 2} particles from environmental particulate material. For this, an integrated method was developed for capillary electrophoretic separation, collection of separated fractions, and determinations of U0{sub 2} and environmental particles in each fraction. Experimental runs with the integrated method on mixtures of UO{sub 2} particles and environmental particulate material demonstrated enrichment factors of 20 for UO{sub 2} particles in respect to environmental particles in the U0{sub 2}containing fractions. This enrichment factor reduces the costs and time for processing particulate samples by the lexan process by a factor of about 20.

  4. Two-dimensional NMR measurement and point dipole model prediction of paramagnetic shift tensors in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Walder, Brennan J.; Davis, Michael C.; Grandinetti, Philip J.; Dey, Krishna K.; Baltisberger, Jay H.

    2015-01-07

    A new two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiment to separate and correlate the first-order quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions is described. This experiment, which we call the shifting-d echo experiment, allows a more precise determination of tensor principal components values and their relative orientation. It is designed using the recently introduced symmetry pathway concept. A comparison of the shifting-d experiment with earlier proposed methods is presented and experimentally illustrated in the case of {sup 2}H (I = 1) paramagnetic shift and quadrupolar tensors of CuCl{sub 2}⋅2D{sub 2}O. The benefits of the shifting-d echo experiment over other methods are a factor of two improvement in sensitivity and the suppression of major artifacts. From the 2D lineshape analysis of the shifting-d spectrum, the {sup 2}H quadrupolar coupling parameters are 〈C{sub q}〉 = 118.1 kHz and 〈η{sub q}〉 = 0.88, and the {sup 2}H paramagnetic shift tensor anisotropy parameters are 〈ζ{sub P}〉 = − 152.5 ppm and 〈η{sub P}〉 = 0.91. The orientation of the quadrupolar coupling principal axis system (PAS) relative to the paramagnetic shift anisotropy principal axis system is given by (α,β,γ)=((π)/2 ,(π)/2 ,0). Using a simple ligand hopping model, the tensor parameters in the absence of exchange are estimated. On the basis of this analysis, the instantaneous principal components and orientation of the quadrupolar coupling are found to be in excellent agreement with previous measurements. A new point dipole model for predicting the paramagnetic shift tensor is proposed yielding significantly better agreement than previously used models. In the new model, the dipoles are displaced from nuclei at positions associated with high electron density in the singly occupied molecular orbital predicted from ligand field theory.

  5. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORETIC BEHAVIOR OF SEVEN SULFONYLUREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic behavior of bensulfuron Me, sulfometuron Me, nicosulfuron (Accent), chlorimuron Et, thifensulfuron Me (Harmony), metsulfuron Me, and chlorsulfuron was studied under capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) conditio...

  6. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORETIC BEHAVIOR OF SEVEN SULFONYLUREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic behavior of bensulfuron Me, sulfometuron Me, nicosulfuron (Accent), chlorimuron Et, thifensulfuron Me (Harmony), metsulfuron Me, and chlorsulfuron was studied under capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) conditio...

  7. Aggregation properties and structural studies of anticancer drug Irinotecan in DMSO solution based on NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amelio, N.; Aroulmoji, V.; Toraldo, A.; Sundaraganesan, N.; Anbarasan, P. M.

    2012-04-01

    Irinotecan is an antitumor drug mostly used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Its efficacy is influenced by the chemical state of the molecule undergoing chemical equilibria, metabolic changes and photodegradation. In this work, we describe the chemical equilibria of the drug in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The energetic barrier for hindered rotation around the bond connecting the piperidino—piperidino moiety with the camptothecin-like fragment was evaluated. Furthermore, we showed how the molecule aggregates in DMSO solution forming dimeric species able to prevent its degradation. The equilibrium constant for self-aggregation was determined by NMR based on the assumption of the isodesmic model. The formation of a dimer was highlighted by NMR diffusion ordered spectroscopy (NMR-DOSY) experiments at the concentrations used. Structural features of the complex were inferred by NOE and 13C chemical shift data. Molecular modelling of the complex driven by experimental data, lead to a structure implying the formation of two hydrogen bonds involving the lactone ring whose opening is one of the main causes of drug degradation. This species is probably responsible for the improved stability of the drug at concentrations higher than 1 mM.

  8. Multi-site binding of epigallocatechin gallate to human serum albumin measured by NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Joshua D.

    2017-01-01

    The affinity of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) for human serum albumin (HSA) was measured in physiological conditions using NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). NMR estimated the Ka (self-dissociation constant) of EGCG as 50 mM. NMR showed two binding events: strong (n1=1.8 ± 0.2; Kd1 =19 ± 12 μM) and weak (n2∼20; Kd2 =40 ± 20 mM). ITC also showed two binding events: strong (n1=2.5 ± 0.03; Kd1 =21.6 ± 4.0 μM) and weak (n2=9 ± 1; Kd2 =22 ± 4 mM). The two techniques are consistent, with an unexpectedly high number of bound EGCG. The strong binding is consistent with binding in the two Sudlow pockets. These results imply that almost all EGCG is transported in the blood bound to albumin and explains the wide tissue distribution and chemical stability of EGCG in vivo. PMID:28424370

  9. Encoded loop-lanthanide-binding tags for long-range distance measurements in proteins by NMR and EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Barthelmes, Dominic; Gränz, Markus; Barthelmes, Katja; Allen, Karen N; Imperiali, Barbara; Prisner, Thomas; Schwalbe, Harald

    2015-11-01

    We recently engineered encodable lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) into proteins and demonstrated their applicability in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and luminescence studies. Here, we engineered two-loop-LBTs into the model protein interleukin-1β (IL1β) and measured (1)H, (15)N-pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) by NMR spectroscopy. We determined the Δχ-tensors associated with each Tm(3+)-loaded loop-LBT and show that the experimental PCSs yield structural information at the interface between the two metal ion centers at atomic resolution. Such information is very valuable for the determination of the sites of interfaces in protein-protein-complexes. Combining the experimental PCSs of the two-loop-LBT construct IL1β-S2R2 and the respective single-loop-LBT constructs IL1β-S2, IL1β-R2 we additionally determined the distance between the metal ion centers. Further, we explore the use of two-loop LBTs loaded with Gd(3+) as a novel tool for distance determination by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy and show the NMR-derived distances to be remarkably consistent with distances derived from Pulsed Electron-Electron Dipolar Resonance.

  10. Microsolvation and sp2-stereoinversion of monomeric α-(2,6-di-tert-butylphenyl)vinyllithium as measured by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Knittl, Monika; Rossmann, Eva C

    2014-01-01

    Summary The β-unsubstituted title compound dissolves in THF as a uniformly trisolvated monomer, whereas it forms exclusively disolvated monomers in tert-butyl methyl ether, Et2O, TMEDA, or toluene with TMEDA (1.4 equiv). This was established at low temperatures through the observation of separated NMR signals for free and lithium-coordinated ligands and/or through the patterns and magnitudes of 13C,6Li NMR coupling constants. An aggregated form was observed only with Et2O (2 equiv) in toluene as the solvent. The olefinic geminal interproton coupling constants of the H2C= part can be used as a secondary criterion to differentiate between these differently solvated ground-states (3, 2, or <2 coordinated ligands per Li). Due to a kinetic trisolvation privilege of THF, the cis/trans sp2-stereoinversion rates could be measured through analyses of 1H NMR line broadening and coalescence only in THF as the solvent: The pseudomonomolecular (because THF-catalyzed), ionic mechanism is initialized by a C–Li bond heterolysis with the transient immobilization of one additional THF ligand, followed by stereoinversion of the quasi-sp2-hybridized carbanionic center in cooperation with a “conducted tour” migration of Li+(THF)4 along the α-aryl group within the solvent-separated ion pair. PMID:25383123

  11. Magnetic and structural properties of an octanuclear Cu(II) S=1/2 mesoscopic ring: Susceptibility and NMR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lascialfari, A.; Jang, Z. H.; Borsa, F.; Gatteschi, D.; Cornia, A.; Rovai, D.; Caneschi, A.; Carretta, P.

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic susceptibility, {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 63}Cu NMR-NQR experiments on two slightly different species of the molecular S=1/2 antiferromagnetic (AF) ring Cu8, [Cu{sub 8}(dmpz){sub 8}(OH){sub 8}]{center_dot}2C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N (Cu8P) and [Cu{sub 8}(dmpz){sub 8}(OH){sub 8}]{center_dot}2C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NO{sub 2} (Cu8N), are presented. The magnetic energy levels are calculated exactly for an isotropic Heisenberg model Hamiltonian in zero magnetic field. From the magnetic susceptibility measurements we estimate the AF exchange coupling constant J{approx}1000 K and the resulting gap {delta}{approx}500 K between the S{sub T}=0 ground state and the S{sub T}=1 first excited state. The {sup 63,65}Cu NQR spectra indicate the presence of four crystallographically inequivalent copper nuclei in each ring. From the combination of the {sup 63}Cu NQR spectra and of the {sup 63}Cu NMR spectra at high magnetic field, we estimate the quadrupole coupling constant v{sub Q} of each site and the average asymmetry parameter {eta} of the electric-field gradient tensor. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) decreases exponentially on decreasing temperature for all nuclei investigated. The gap parameter extracted from {sup 63}Cu NQR-NSLR is the same as for the susceptibility while a smaller value is obtained from the {sup 63}Cu NMR-NSLR in an external magnetic field of 8.2 T. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  12. Reliable electrophoretic mobilities free from Joule heating effects using CE.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Christopher J; Hruska, Vlastimil; Guijt, Rosanne M; Macka, Miroslav; Gas, Bohuslav; Marriott, Philip J; Haddad, Paul R

    2007-10-01

    Ionic electrophoretic mobilities determined by means of CE experiments are sometimes different when compared to generally accepted values based on limiting ionic conductance measurements. While the effect of ionic strength on electrophoretic mobility has been long understood, the increase in the mobility that results from Joule heating (the resistive heating that occurs when a current passes through an electrolyte) has been largely overlooked. In this work, a simple method for obtaining reliable and reproducible values of electrophoretic mobility is described. The electrophoretic mobility is measured over a range of driving powers and the extrapolation to zero power dissipation is employed to eliminate the effect of Joule heating. These extrapolated values of electrophoretic mobility can then be used to calculate limiting ionic mobilities by making a correction for ionic strength; this somewhat complicated calculation is conveniently performed by using the freeware program PeakMaster 5. These straightforward procedures improve the agreement between experimentally determined and literature values of limiting ionic mobility by at least one order of magnitude. Using Tris-chromate BGE with a value of conductivity 0.34 S/m and ionic strength 59 mM at a modest dissipated power per unit length of 2.0 W/m, values of mobility for inorganic anions were increased by an average of 12.6% relative to their values free from the effects of Joule heating. These increases were accompanied by a reduction in mobilities due to the ionic strength effect, which was 11% for univalent and 28% for divalent inorganic ions compared to their limiting ionic mobilities. Additionally, it was possible to determine the limiting ionic mobility for a number of aromatic anions by using PeakMaster 5 to perform an ionic strength correction. A major significance of this work is in being able to use CE to obtain reliable and accurate values of electrophoretic mobilities with all its benefits, including

  13. Tortuosity measurement and the effects of finite pulse widths on xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Sen, P. N.; Schwartz, L. M.; Patz, S.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    We have extended the utility of NMR as a technique to probe porous media structure over length scales of approximately 100-2000 microm by using the spin 1/2 noble gas 129Xe imbibed into the system's pore space. Such length scales are much greater than can be probed with NMR diffusion studies of water-saturated porous media. We utilized Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo NMR measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the xenon gas filling the pore space to study further the measurements of both the pore surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V(p), and the tortuosity (pore connectivity) of the medium. In uniform-size glass bead packs, we observed D(t) decreasing with increasing t, reaching an observed asymptote of approximately 0.62-0.65D(0), that could be measured over diffusion distances extending over multiple bead diameters. Measurements of D(t)/D(0) at differing gas pressures showed this tortuosity limit was not affected by changing the characteristic diffusion length of the spins during the diffusion encoding gradient pulse. This was not the case at the short time limit, where D(t)/D(0) was noticeably affected by the gas pressure in the sample. Increasing the gas pressure, and hence reducing D(0) and the diffusion during the gradient pulse served to reduce the previously observed deviation of D(t)/D(0) from the S/V(p) relation. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate between the long and short time limits in D(t). While the short time D(t) points lay above the interpolation line in the case of small beads, due to diffusion during the gradient pulse on the order of the pore size, it was also noted that the experimental D(t) data fell below the Pade line in the case of large beads, most likely due to finite size effects.

  14. Measurement of lipid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris via flow cytometry and liquid-state ¹H NMR spectroscopy for development of an NMR-traceable flow cytometry protocol.

    PubMed

    Bono, Michael S; Garcia, Ravi D; Sri-Jayantha, Dylan V; Ahner, Beth A; Kirby, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we cultured Chlorella vulgaris cells with a range of lipid contents, induced via nitrogen starvation, and characterized them via flow cytometry, with BODIPY 505/515 as a fluorescent lipid label, and liquid-state 1H NMR spectroscopy. In doing so, we demonstrate the utility of calibrating flow cytometric measurements of algal lipid content using triacylglyceride (TAG, also known as triacylglycerol or triglyceride) content per cell as measured via quantitative 1H NMR. Ensemble-averaged fluorescence of BODIPY-labeled cells was highly correlated with average TAG content per cell measured by bulk NMR, with a linear regression yielding a linear fit with r2 = 0.9974. This correlation compares favorably to previous calibrations of flow cytometry protocols to lipid content measured via extraction, and calibration by NMR avoids the time and complexity that is generally required for lipid quantitation via extraction. Flow cytometry calibrated to a direct measurement of TAG content can be used to investigate the distribution of lipid contents for cells within a culture. Our flow cytometry measurements showed that Chlorella vulgaris cells subjected to nitrogen limitation exhibited higher mean lipid content but a wider distribution of lipid content that overlapped the relatively narrow distribution of lipid content for replete cells, suggesting that nitrogen limitation induces lipid accumulation in only a subset of cells. Calibration of flow cytometry protocols using direct in situ measurement of TAG content via NMR will facilitate rapid development of more precise flow cytometry protocols, enabling investigation of algal lipid accumulation for development of more productive algal biofuel feedstocks and cultivation protocols.

  15. Measurement of Lipid Accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris via Flow Cytometry and Liquid-State ¹H NMR Spectroscopy for Development of an NMR-Traceable Flow Cytometry Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bono Jr., Michael S.; Garcia, Ravi D.; Sri-Jayantha, Dylan V.; Ahner, Beth A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we cultured Chlorella vulgaris cells with a range of lipid contents, induced via nitrogen starvation, and characterized them via flow cytometry, with BODIPY 505/515 as a fluorescent lipid label, and liquid-state 1H NMR spectroscopy. In doing so, we demonstrate the utility of calibrating flow cytometric measurements of algal lipid content using triacylglyceride (TAG, also known as triacylglycerol or triglyceride) content per cell as measured via quantitative 1H NMR. Ensemble-averaged fluorescence of BODIPY-labeled cells was highly correlated with average TAG content per cell measured by bulk NMR, with a linear regression yielding a linear fit with r2 = 0.9974. This correlation compares favorably to previous calibrations of flow cytometry protocols to lipid content measured via extraction, and calibration by NMR avoids the time and complexity that is generally required for lipid quantitation via extraction. Flow cytometry calibrated to a direct measurement of TAG content can be used to investigate the distribution of lipid contents for cells within a culture. Our flow cytometry measurements showed that Chlorella vulgaris cells subjected to nitrogen limitation exhibited higher mean lipid content but a wider distribution of lipid content that overlapped the relatively narrow distribution of lipid content for replete cells, suggesting that nitrogen limitation induces lipid accumulation in only a subset of cells. Calibration of flow cytometry protocols using direct in situ measurement of TAG content via NMR will facilitate rapid development of more precise flow cytometry protocols, enabling investigation of algal lipid accumulation for development of more productive algal biofuel feedstocks and cultivation protocols. PMID:26267664

  16. Quantitative measurement of regional blood flow with gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate bolus track NMR imaging in cerebral infarcts in rats: validation with the iodo[14C]antipyrine technique.

    PubMed Central

    Wittlich, F; Kohno, K; Mies, G; Norris, D G; Hoehn-Berlage, M

    1995-01-01

    NMR bolus track measurements were correlated with autoradiographically determined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The NMR method is based on bolus infusion of the contrast agent gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate and high-speed T*2-sensitive NMR imaging. The first pass of the contrast agent through the image plane causes a transient decrease of the signal intensity. This time course of the signal intensity is transformed into relative concentrations of the contrast agent in each pixel. The mean transit time and relative blood flow and volume are calculated from such indicator dilution curves. We investigated whether this NMR technique correctly expresses the relative rCBF. The relative blood flow data, calculated from NMR bolus track experiments, and the absolute values of iodo[14C]antipyrine autoradiography were compared. A linear relationship was observed, indicating the proportionality of the transient NMR signal change with CBF. Excellent interindividual reproducibility of calibration constants is observed (r = 0.963). For a given NMR protocol, bolus track measurements calibrated with autoradiography after the experiment allow determination of absolute values for rCBF and regional blood volume. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7892189

  17. Local electromagnetic properties of magnetic pnictides: a comparative study probed by NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Majumder, M; Ghoshray, K; Ghoshray, A; Pal, A; Awana, V P S

    2013-05-15

    (75)As and (31)P NMR studies are performed in PrCoAsO and NdCoPO respectively. The Knight shift data in PrCoAsO indicate the presence of an antiferromagnetic interaction between the 4f moments along the c axis in the ferromagnetic state of Co 3d moments. We propose a possible spin structure in this system. The (75)As quadrupolar coupling constant, νQ, increases continuously with decrease of temperature and is found to vary linearly with the intrinsic spin susceptibility, K(iso). This indicates the possibility of the presence of a coupling between charge density and spin density fluctuations. Further, the (31)P NMR Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) in the paramagnetic state of NdCoPO indicate that the differences of LaCoPO and NdCoPO from SmCoPO are due to the decrement of the interlayer separation and not due to the moments of the 4f electrons. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) in NdCoPO shows weak anisotropy at 300 K. Using the self-consistent renormalization (SCR) theory of itinerant ferromagnets, it is shown that in the ab plane, the spin fluctuations are three-dimensional ferromagnetic in nature. From SCR theory the important spin-fluctuation parameters (T0, TA, F¯1) are evaluated. The similarities and dissimilarities of the NMR results in As and P based systems with different rare earths are also discussed.

  18. Cation location in microporous zeolite, SSZ-13, probed with xenon adsorption measurement and 129Xe NMR spectrum.

    PubMed

    Shin, Na Ra; Kim, Su Hyun; Shin, Hye Sun; Jang, Ik Jun; Cho, Sung June

    2013-06-01

    The location of metal ion, Ag2+, Ca2+, Cu2+ and Y3+ in the SSZ-13 has been investigated with xenon adsorption measurement and 129Xe NMR spectrum. It was referred that the location of the metal ion varies depending on the corresponding charge. The ion-exchanged Ag ion was located in the alpha-cage to interact directly with xenon. Others multivalent cation contributed little with xenon because these were present near the six membered rings where xenon cannot access.

  19. NMR measurement system including two synchronized ring buffers, with 128 rf coils for in situ water monitoring in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kuniyasu; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Aoki, Masaru; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Morisaka, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Seitaro

    2017-01-01

    A small radio-frequency (rf) coil inserted into a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) can be used to acquire nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals from the water in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) or in oxygen gas channels in the PEFC. Measuring the spatial distribution of the water in a large PEFC requires using many rf probes, so an NMR measurement system which acquires NMR signals from 128 rf probes at intervals of 0.5 s was manufactured. The system has eight rf transceiver units with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) for modulation of the excitation pulse and quadrature phase detection of the NMR signal, and one control unit with two ring buffers for data control. The sequence data required for the NMR measurement were written into one ring buffer. The acquired NMR signal data were then written temporarily into the other ring buffer and then were transmitted to a personal computer (PC). A total of 98 rf probes were inserted into the PEFC that had an electrical generation area of 16 cm × 14 cm, and the water generated in the PEFC was measured when the PEFC operated at 100 A. As a result, time-dependent changes in the spatial distribution of the water content in the MEA and the water in the oxygen gas channels were obtained.

  20. Barium hexaferrite suspensions for electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Ovtar, Simona; Lisjak, Darja; Drofenik, Miha

    2009-09-15

    In this investigation we have looked at the preparation of barium hexaferrite suspensions, with the stability of the magnetic barium hexaferrite particles being increased by the addition of a surfactant, dodecylbenzylsulfonic acid (DBSA). The influence of the solubility DBSA in different solvents and its adsorption onto the surfaces of particles with different sizes were determined from zeta-potential measurements. The most suitable and stable suspensions of barium hexaferrite particles, regardless of their sizes, were obtained in 1-butanol, and these were then used for a subsequent electrophoretic deposition. The microstructures of the deposits were examined with electron microscopy. The thickness and density of the deposits as a function of the electric field, the zeta-potential, the particle size, and the separation distance between the electrodes were investigated. The thickness of the deposits was found to increase with the increasing zeta-potential of the suspension and with the increasing separation distance between the electrodes. Denser deposits were obtained from the suspensions of smaller particles that had narrower particle size distributions.

  1. Phosphorus-31 NMR magnetization transfer measurements of metabolic reaction rates in the rat heart and kidney in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Koretsky, A.P.

    1984-08-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the measurement of the rates of ATP synthesis in the rat kidney and of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction in the rat heart in situ. Chronically implanted detection coils, employing a balanced matching configuration of capacitors in the tuned circuit, were used to obtain /sup 31/P NMR spectra from heart, kidney, and liver in situ. Gated spectra of heart obtained at systole and diastole and the effects of fructose on kidney and liver were studied. The ability to observe other nuclei using implanted coils is illustrated with /sup 39/K NMR spectra from kidney and muscle. The theoretical considerations of applying magnetization transfer techniques to intact organs are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with multiple exchange reactions and compartmentation of reactants. Experimental measurements of the ATP synthesis rate (13 ..mu..mol/min/gm tissue) were compared to whole kidney oxygen consumption and Na/sup +/ reabsorption rates to derive ATP/O (0.8 to 1.7) and Na/sup +//ATP (4 to 10) values. The problems associated with ATP synthesis rate measurements in kidney, e.g., the heterogeneity of the inorganic phosphate resonance, are discussed and experiments to overcome these problems proposed.

  2. Use of glass capillaries to suppress thermal convection in NMR tubes in diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Takashi; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Harada, Erisa; Mori, Shoko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-04-12

    Diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) is used to determine the translational diffusion coefficients of molecules in solution. However, DOSY is highly susceptible to spurious spectral peaks resulting from thermal convection occurring in the NMR tube. Thermal convection therefore must be suppressed for accurate estimation of translational diffusion coefficients. In this study, we developed a new method to effectively suppress thermal convection using glass capillaries. A total of 6 to 18 capillaries (0.8-mm outer diameter) were inserted into a regular 5-mm NMR tube. The capillaries had minimal effect on magnetic field homogeneity and enabled us to obtain clean DOSY spectra of a mixture of small organic compounds. Moreover, the capillaries did not affect chemical shifts or signal intensities in two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra. Capillaries are a simple and inexpensive means of suppressing thermal convection and thus can be used in a wide variety of DOSY experiments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. 129Xe chemical shift in human blood and pulmonary blood oxygenation measurement in humans using hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR

    PubMed Central

    Norquay, Graham; Leung, General; Stewart, Neil J.; Wolber, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dependency of the 129Xe‐red blood cell (RBC) chemical shift on blood oxygenation, and to use this relation for noninvasive measurement of pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo with hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR. Methods Hyperpolarized 129Xe was equilibrated with blood samples of varying oxygenation in vitro, and NMR was performed at 1.5 T and 3 T. Dynamic in vivo NMR during breath hold apnea was performed at 3 T on two healthy volunteers following inhalation of hyperpolarized 129Xe. Results The 129Xe chemical shift in RBCs was found to increase nonlinearly with blood oxygenation at 1.5 T and 3 T. During breath hold apnea, the 129Xe chemical shift in RBCs exhibited a periodic time modulation and showed a net decrease in chemical shift of ∼1 ppm over a 35 s breath hold, corresponding to a decrease of 7–10 % in RBC oxygenation. The 129Xe‐RBC signal amplitude showed a modulation with the same frequency as the 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift. Conclusion The feasibility of using the 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift to measure pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo has been demonstrated. Correlation between 129Xe‐RBC signal and 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift modulations in the lung warrants further investigation, with the aim to better quantify temporal blood oxygenation changes in the cardiopulmonary vascular circuit. Magn Reson Med 77:1399–1408, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27062652

  4. (129) Xe chemical shift in human blood and pulmonary blood oxygenation measurement in humans using hyperpolarized (129) Xe NMR.

    PubMed

    Norquay, Graham; Leung, General; Stewart, Neil J; Wolber, Jan; Wild, Jim M

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the dependency of the (129) Xe-red blood cell (RBC) chemical shift on blood oxygenation, and to use this relation for noninvasive measurement of pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo with hyperpolarized (129) Xe NMR. Hyperpolarized (129) Xe was equilibrated with blood samples of varying oxygenation in vitro, and NMR was performed at 1.5 T and 3 T. Dynamic in vivo NMR during breath hold apnea was performed at 3 T on two healthy volunteers following inhalation of hyperpolarized (129) Xe. The (129) Xe chemical shift in RBCs was found to increase nonlinearly with blood oxygenation at 1.5 T and 3 T. During breath hold apnea, the (129) Xe chemical shift in RBCs exhibited a periodic time modulation and showed a net decrease in chemical shift of ∼1 ppm over a 35 s breath hold, corresponding to a decrease of 7-10 % in RBC oxygenation. The (129) Xe-RBC signal amplitude showed a modulation with the same frequency as the (129) Xe-RBC chemical shift. The feasibility of using the (129) Xe-RBC chemical shift to measure pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo has been demonstrated. Correlation between (129) Xe-RBC signal and (129) Xe-RBC chemical shift modulations in the lung warrants further investigation, with the aim to better quantify temporal blood oxygenation changes in the cardiopulmonary vascular circuit. Magn Reson Med 77:1399-1408, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Self-diffusion measurements by a mobile single-sided NMR sensor with improved magnetic field gradient.

    PubMed

    Rata, D G; Casanova, F; Perlo, J; Demco, D E; Blümich, B

    2006-06-01

    A simple and fast method of measuring self-diffusion coefficients of protonated systems with a mobile single-sided NMR sensor is discussed. The NMR sensor uses a magnet geometry that generates a highly flat sensitive volume where a strong and highly uniform static magnetic field gradient is defined. Self-diffusion coefficients were measured by Hahn- and stimulated echoes detected in the presence of the uniform magnetic field gradient of the static field. To improve the sensitivity of these experiments, a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence was applied after the main diffusion-encoding period. By adding the echo train the experimental time was strongly shortened, allowing the measurement of complete diffusion curves in less than 1min. This method has been tested by measuring the self-diffusion coefficients D of various organic solvents and poly(dimethylsiloxane) samples with different molar masses. Diffusion coefficients were also measured for n-hexane absorbed at saturation in natural rubber with different cross-link densities. The results show a dependence on the concentration that is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. Moreover, the stimulated-echo sequence was successfully used to measure the diffusion coefficient as a function of the evolution time in systems with restricted diffusion. This type of experiment proves the pore geometry and gives access to the surface-to-volume ratio. It was applied to measure the diffusion of water in sandstones and sheep Achilles tendon. Thanks to the strong static gradient G(0), all diffusion coefficients could be measured without having to account for relaxation during the pulse sequence.

  6. Electrophoretic mobilities of erythrocytes in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    The calibration of space flight equipment depends on a source of standard test particles, this test particle of choice is the fixed erythrocyte. Erythrocytes from different species have different electrophoretic mobilities. Electrophoretic mobility depends upon zeta potential, which, in turn depends upon ionic strength. Zeta potential decreases with increasing ionic strength, so cells have high electrophoretic mobility in space electrophoresis buffers than in typical physiological buffers. The electrophoretic mobilities of fixed human, rat, and rabbit erythrocytes in 0.145 M salt and buffers of varying ionic strength, temperature, and composition, to assess the effects of some of the unique combinations used in space buffers were characterized. Several effects were assessed: glycerol or DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) were considered for use as cryoprotectants. The effect of these substances on erythrocyte electrophoretic mobility was examined. The choice of buffer depended upon cell mobility. Primary experiments with kidney cells established the choice of buffer and cryoprotectant. A nonstandard temperature of EPM in the suitable buffer was determined. A loss of ionic strength control occurs in the course of preparing columns for flight, the effects of small increases in ionic strength over the expected low values need to be evaluated.

  7. Electrophoretic mobilities of erythrocytes in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    The calibration of space flight equipment depends on a source of standard test particles, this test particle of choice is the fixed erythrocyte. Erythrocytes from different species have different electrophoretic mobilities. Electrophoretic mobility depends upon zeta potential, which, in turn depends upon ionic strength. Zeta potential decreases with increasing ionic strength, so cells have high electrophoretic mobility in space electrophoresis buffers than in typical physiological buffers. The electrophoretic mobilities of fixed human, rat, and rabbit erythrocytes in 0.145 M salt and buffers of varying ionic strength, temperature, and composition, to assess the effects of some of the unique combinations used in space buffers were characterized. Several effects were assessed: glycerol or DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) were considered for use as cryoprotectants. The effect of these substances on erythrocyte electrophoretic mobility was examined. The choice of buffer depended upon cell mobility. Primary experiments with kidney cells established the choice of buffer and cryoprotectant. A nonstandard temperature of EPM in the suitable buffer was determined. A loss of ionic strength control occurs in the course of preparing columns for flight, the effects of small increases in ionic strength over the expected low values need to be evaluated.

  8. Electrophoretic properties of sulfamethoxazole microcapsules and gelatin-acacia coacervates.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, H; Kawashima, Y; Lin, S Y

    1981-03-01

    The electrophoretic properties of sulfamethoxazole microcapsules and the coacervates prepared by gelatin-acacia coacervation were investigated. The effects of the parameters in the microcapsule preparation, such as the coacervation pH, amount of formaldehyde used for hardening, and drying method of the coacervates, on the zeta-potential of the resultant microcapsules were clarified. The Büchner effect was observed in coacervates in an electric field, which indicated that the coacervate wall was flexible. The zeta-potential versus pH curves of the coacervates appeared on the upper side of the plain sulfamethoxazole, while those of the microcapsules dried conventionally shifted to the lower side due to the denaturation of the gelatin in the microcapsule wall, which occurred during drying. Spray drying increased the denaturation of gelatin, which imparted a negative charge to the spray-dried microcapsules. Formalization of the coacervates refined the electrophoretic behavior of the microcapsules, depending on the amount of formaldehyde used. The zeta-potential of the plain sulfamethoxazole also was measured in the simulated coacervation solution to analyze the mechanism of coacervation electrophoretically.

  9. Electrophoretic Retardation of Colloidal Particles in Nonpolar Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strubbe, Filip; Beunis, Filip; Brans, Toon; Karvar, Masoumeh; Woestenborghs, Wouter; Neyts, Kristiaan

    2013-04-01

    We have measured the electrophoretic mobility of single, optically trapped colloidal particles, while gradually depleting the co-ions and counterions in the liquid around the particle by applying a dc voltage. This is achieved in a nonpolar liquid, where charged reverse micelles act as co-ions and counterions. By increasing the dc voltage, the mobility first increases when the concentrations of co-ions and counterions near the particle start to decrease. At sufficiently high dc voltage (around 2 V), the mobility reaches a saturation value when the co-ions and counterions are fully separated. The increase in mobility is larger when the equilibrium ionic strength is higher. The dependence of the experimental data on the equilibrium ionic strength and on the applied voltage is in good agreement with the standard theory of electrophoretic retardation, assuming that the bare particle charge remains constant. This method is useful for studying the electrophoretic retardation effect and charging mechanisms for nonpolar colloids, and it sheds light on previously unexplained particle acceleration in electronic ink devices.

  10. Pulsed second order field NMR for real time PGSE and single-shot surface to volume ratio measurements.

    PubMed

    Kittler, W C; Obruchkov, S; Galvosas, P; Hunter, M W

    2014-10-01

    Pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance provides a powerful tool for the measurement of particle diffusion and mobility. When these particles are contained in a porous medium, the diffusive process is influenced by the pore boundaries, and their effect on diffusion measurements provides information about the pore space. The acquisition of the apparent diffusion coefficient and its dependence on time, in the short time limit, reveals the surface to volume ratio of the porous medium, and in the long time limit, its tortuosity. With conventional pulsed field gradient techniques, processes where pore boundaries are evolving on the sub-second time scale cannot be resolved. Using pulsed second order magnetic fields in conjunction with one-dimensional imaging and the pulse sequence Difftrain, this paper presents a proof of concept for the first ever real time single-shot surface to volume NMR measurement.

  11. sup 31 P NMR measurements of the ADP concentration in yeast cells genetically modified to express creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Brindle, K.; Braddock, P.; Fulton, S. )

    1990-04-03

    Rabbit muscle creatine kinase has been introduced into the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by transforming cells with a multicopy plasmid containing the coding sequence for the enzyme under the control of the yeast phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. The transformed cells showed creating kinase activities similar to those found in mammalian heart muscle. {sup 31}P NMR measurements of the near-equilibrium concentrations of phosphocreatine and cellular pH together with measurements of the total extractable concentrations of phosphocreatine and creatine allowed calculation of the free ADP/ATP ratio in the cell. The calculated ratio of approximately 2 was considerably higher than the ratio of between 0.06 and 0.1 measured directly in cell extracts.

  12. Measurement of the degree of coupled isotopic enrichment of different positions in an antibiotic peptide by NMR.

    PubMed

    Miller, A F; Egan, L A; Townsend, C A

    1997-03-01

    An experimental strategy for determining the extent to which multiply isotopically labeled fragments are incorporated intact into relatively complicated compounds of interest is presented. The NMR methods employed are based on isotope-filtered one-dimensional spectra and difference HSQC spectra incorporating a spin echo designed to report on the presence of a second NMR active isotope at a coupled site. They supplement existing methods for determining the extent of isotopic incorporation at individual sites to reveal whether two coupled labeled sites in a precursor are incorporated as an intact unit into products. The methods described also circumvent 1H signal overlap and distinguish between the effects of different nitrogens coupled to individual carbons. The somewhat complicated case of valclavam illustrates the method's utility in measuring the J coupling constants between 13C and nearby sites that are only fractionally labeled with 15N, and measuring the fraction of molecules in which 13C is coupled to 15N, at each of several sites. The 15N of [2-13C, 15N]-labeled glycine is found to be incorporated into all three N positions of valclavam but most heavily into the N11 position. Specifically, 15N and 13C are incorporated into the N11 and C10 positions together as an 15N13C fragment approximately 8% of the time, whereas 15N is incorporated largely independently at the other positions.

  13. NMR-ON measurements of123, 124, 131I in nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohya, S.; Muto, S.; Katsurayama, M.; Heiguchi, K.; Mutsuro, N.; Stone, N. J.; Rikovska, J.

    1992-11-01

    The magnetic hyperfine splitting frequencies of123I Ni,124I Ni and131I Ni in a zero external magnetic field have been determined by the NMR-ON method as 258.9(1), 165.9(1) and 179.5(2) MHz, respectively. With the known values of the magnetic moments, the magnetic hyperfine fields have been deduced: B HF(123I Ni)=30.17(5) T, B HF(124I Ni)=30.14(9) T, B HF(131I Ni)=30.06(4) T; the weighted average is B HF(I Ni)=30.11(4) T. The small difference of the B HF(131I Ni) with those of123I Ni and124I Ni is discussed comparing with results of the hyperfine splitting frequency of iodine in iron host.

  14. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  15. Noninvasive estimation of oxygen consumption in human calf muscle through combined NMR measurements of ASL perfusion and T₂ oxymetry.

    PubMed

    Decorte, Nicolas; Buehler, Tania; Caldas de Almeida Araujo, Ericky; Vignaud, Alexandre; Carlier, Pierre G

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring muscle O2 consumption (V˙O2) noninvasively with a combination of functional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging methods, and to verify that changes in muscle V˙O2 can be detected with a temporal resolution compatible with physiological investigation and patient ease. T2-based oxymetry of arterial and venous blood was combined with the arterial-spin labeling (ASL)-based determination of muscle perfusion. These measurements were performed on 8 healthy volunteers under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in order to assess the sensitivity of measurements over a range of saturation values. Blood samples were drawn simultaneously and used to titrate blood T2 measurements versus hemoglobin O2 saturation (%HbO2) in vitro. The in vitro calibration curve of blood T2 fitted very well with the %HbO2 (r(2): 0.95). The in vivo venous T2 measurements agreed well with the in vitro measurements (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.61-0.91). Oxygen extraction at rest decreased in the calf muscles subjected to hypoxia (p = 0.031). The combination of unaltered muscle perfusion and pinched arteriovenous O2 difference (p = 0.038) pointed towards a reduced calf muscle V˙O2 during transient hypoxia (p = 0.018). The results of this pilot study confirmed that muscle O2 extraction and V˙O2 can be estimated noninvasively using a combination of functional NMR techniques. Further studies are needed to confirm the usefulness in a larger sample of volunteers and patients.

  16. Structure and equilibria of Ca 2+-complexes of glucose and sorbitol from multinuclear ( 1H, 13C and 43Ca) NMR measurements supplemented with molecular modelling calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallagi, A.; Dudás, Cs.; Csendes, Z.; Forgó, P.; Pálinkó, I.; Sipos, P.

    2011-05-01

    Ca 2+-complexation of D-glucose and D-sorbitol have been investigated with the aid of multinuclear ( 1H, 13C and 43Ca) NMR spectroscopy and ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Formation constants of the forming 1:1 complexes have been estimated from one-dimensional 13C NMR spectra obtained at constant ionic strength (1 M NaCl). Binding sites were identified from 2D 1H- 43Ca NMR spectra. 2D NMR measurements and ab initio calculations indicated that Ca 2+ ions were bound in a tridentate manner via the glycosidic OH, the ethereal oxygen in the ring and the OH on the terminal carbon for the α- and β-anomers of glucose and for sorbitol simultaneous binding of four hydroxide moieties (C1, C2, C4 and C6) was suggested.

  17. Synergy between NMR measurements and MD simulations of protein/RNA complexes: application to the RRMs, the most common RNA recognition motifs

    PubMed Central

    Krepl, Miroslav; Cléry, Antoine; Blatter, Markus; Allain, Frederic H.T.; Sponer, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    RNA recognition motif (RRM) proteins represent an abundant class of proteins playing key roles in RNA biology. We present a joint atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) and experimental study of two RRM-containing proteins bound with their single-stranded target RNAs, namely the Fox-1 and SRSF1 complexes. The simulations are used in conjunction with NMR spectroscopy to interpret and expand the available structural data. We accumulate more than 50 μs of simulations and show that the MD method is robust enough to reliably describe the structural dynamics of the RRM–RNA complexes. The simulations predict unanticipated specific participation of Arg142 at the protein–RNA interface of the SRFS1 complex, which is subsequently confirmed by NMR and ITC measurements. Several segments of the protein–RNA interface may involve competition between dynamical local substates rather than firmly formed interactions, which is indirectly consistent with the primary NMR data. We demonstrate that the simulations can be used to interpret the NMR atomistic models and can provide qualified predictions. Finally, we propose a protocol for ‘MD-adapted structure ensemble’ as a way to integrate the simulation predictions and expand upon the deposited NMR structures. Unbiased μs-scale atomistic MD could become a technique routinely complementing the NMR measurements of protein–RNA complexes. PMID:27193998

  18. NMR crystallography to probe the breathing effect of the MIL-53(Al) metal-organic framework using solid-state NMR measurements of (13)C-(27)Al distances.

    PubMed

    Giovine, Raynald; Volkringer, Christophe; Trébosc, Julien; Amoureux, Jean Paul; Loiseau, Thierry; Lafon, Olivier; Pourpoint, Frédérique

    2017-03-01

    The metal-organic framework MIL-53(Al) (aluminium terephthalate) exhibits a structural transition between two porous structures with large pore (lp) or narrow pore (np) configurations. This transition, called the breathing effect, is observed upon changes in temperature or external pressure, as well as with the adsorption of guest molecules, such as H2O, within the pores. We show here how these different pore openings can be detected by observing the dephasing of (13)C magnetization under (13)C-(27)Al dipolar couplings using Rotational-Echo Saturation-Pulse Double-Resonance (RESPDOR) solid-state NMR experiments with Simultaneous Frequency and Amplitude Modulation (SFAM) recoupling. These double-resonance NMR experiments between (13)C and (27)Al nuclei, which have close Larmor frequencies, are feasible thanks to the use of a frequency splitter. The experimental SFAM-RESPDOR signal fractions agree well with those simulated from the MIL-53(Al)-lp and -np crystal structures obtained from powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Hence, these (13)C-(27)Al solid-state NMR experiments validate these structures and confirm their rigidity. A similar agreement is reported for the framework ligands in the as-synthesized (as) MIL-53(Al), in which the pores contain free ligands. Furthermore, in this case, (13)C-{(27)Al} SFAM-RESPDOR experiments allow an estimation of the average distance between the free ligands and the (27)Al nuclei of the framework.

  19. Miscibility of nifedipine and hydrophilic polymers as measured by (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Aso, Yukio; Yoshioka, Sumie; Miyazaki, Tamaki; Kawanishi, Tohru; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Satoshi; Takakura, Asako; Hayashi, Takashi; Muranushi, Noriyuki

    2007-08-01

    The miscibility of a drug with excipients in solid dispersions is considered to be one of the most important factors for preparation of stable amorphous solid dispersions. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the feasibility of (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements to assess the miscibility of a drug with excipients. Solid dispersions of nifedipine with the hydrophilic polymers poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and alpha,beta-poly(N-5-hydroxypentyl)-L-aspartamide (PHPA) with various weight ratios were prepared by spray drying, and the spin-lattice relaxation decay of the solid dispersions in a laboratory frame (T(1) decay) and in a rotating frame (T(1rho) decay) were measured. T(1rho) decay of nifedipine-PVP solid dispersions (3 : 7, 5 : 5 and 7 : 3) was describable with a mono-exponential equation, whereas T(1rho) decay of nifedipine-PHPA solid dispersions (3 : 7, 4 : 6 and 5 : 5) was describable with a bi-exponential equation. Because a mono-exponential T(1rho) decay indicates that the domain sizes of nifedipine and polymer in solid dispersion are less than several nm, it is speculated that nifedipine is miscible with PVP but not miscible with PHPA. All the nifedipine-PVP solid dispersions studied showed a single glass transition temperature (T(g)), whereas two glass transitions were observed for the nifedipine-PHPA solid dispersion (3 : 7), thus supporting the above speculation. For nifedipine-HPMC solid dispersions (3 : 7 and 5 : 5), the miscibility of nifedipine and HPMC could not be determined by DSC measurements due to the lack of obviously evident T(g). In contrast, (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements showed that nifedipine and HPMC are miscible, since T(1rho) decay of the solid dispersions (3 : 7, 5 : 5 and 7 : 3) was describable with a mono-exponential equation. These results indicate that (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements are useful for assessing the miscibility of a drug and an

  20. Rotational dynamics of benzene and water in an ionic liquid explored via molecular dynamics simulations and NMR T1 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasaka, Yoshiro; Klein, Michael L.; Nakahara, Masaru; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2012-02-01

    The rotational dynamics of benzene and water in the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and NMR T1 measurements. MD trajectories based on an effective potential are used to calculate the 2H NMR relaxation time, T1 via Fourier transform of the relevant rotational time correlation function, C2R(t). To compensate for the lack of polarization in the standard fixed-charge modeling of the IL, an effective ionic charge, which is smaller than the elementary charge is employed. The simulation results are in closest agreement with NMR experiments with respect to the temperature and Larmor frequency dependencies of T1 when an effective charge of ±0.5e is used for the anion and the cation, respectively. The computed C2R(t) of both solutes shows a bi-modal nature, comprised of an initial non-diffusive ps relaxation plus a long-time ns tail extending to the diffusive regime. Due to the latter component, the solute dynamics is not under the motional narrowing condition with respect to the prevalent Larmor frequency. It is shown that the diffusive tail of the C2R(t) is most important to understand frequency and temperature dependencies of T1 in ILs. On the other hand, the effect of the initial ps relaxation is an increase of T1 by a constant factor. This is equivalent to an "effective" reduction of the quadrupolar coupling constant (QCC). Thus, in the NMR T1 analysis, the rotational time correlation function can be modeled analytically in the form of aexp (-t/τ) (Lipari-Szabo model), where the constant a, the Lipari-Szabo factor, contains the integrated contribution of the short-time relaxation and τ represents the relaxation time of the exponential (diffusive) tail. The Debye model is a special case of the Lipari-Szabo model with a = 1, and turns out to be inappropriate to represent benzene and water dynamics in ILs since a is as small as 0.1. The use of the Debye model would result in an underestimation

  1. Biphasic Liquid Crystal and the Simultaneous Measurement of Isotropic and Anisotropic Parameters by Spatially Resolved NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reller, Malin; Wesp, Svenja; Koos, Martin R M; Reggelin, Michael; Luy, Burkhard

    2017-06-23

    Residual dipolar couplings and other anisotropic NMR parameters are powerful tools for molecular structure elucidation when conventional techniques do not suffice. With current liquid crystalline preparations it is necessary to prepare two samples to extract isotropic and anisotropic data from spectra and to derive the residual dipolar couplings. Here, we present the preparation, measurement, and interpretation of a novel biphasic liquid crystalline phase where a single sample can be used to generate both isotropic and anisotropic data. First, we introduce the synthesis of the chiral polymer leading to the biphasic liquid crystal. Second, we present two approaches to measure spatially selective CLIP-HSQC spectra. From these spectra, we extracted the couplings, performed an assignment of diastereotopic protons, and achieved the enantiomeric discrimination of isopinocampheol as a well-studied test molecule. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Magnetic properties of MnF3 investigated by 55Mn NMR and M(H) measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Baeksoon; Kang, Byeongki; Kim, Changsoo; Park, Sejun; Lee, Soonchil

    2017-01-01

    The M(T) and M(H) curves were measured to study the spin-ordered state in MnF3 at low temperatures. In order to obtain the temperature dependence of magnetization, Mn3+ NMR resonance frequency was measured as a function of temperature. The resulting curve fits well to the initial temperature dependence of the magnetization expected for antiferromagnets with magnetic anisotropy, T 3 / 2 exp(-EG /kB T) , with an energy gap EG of about 30 K. From the comparison of the M(H) curve and classical theory, the relation between the anisotropy energy, Ka, and the exchange coupling constant between the nearest neighbors, J1, was found to be Ka ∼ - 1.8J1 + 9.8 in the absolute temperature unit.

  3. High-resolution magic angle spinning (1) H NMR measurement of ligand concentration in solvent-saturated chromatographic beads.

    PubMed

    Elwinger, Fredrik; Furó, István

    2016-04-01

    A method based on (1) H high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR has been developed for measuring concentration accurately in heterogeneous materials like that of ligands in chromatography media. Ligand concentration is obtained by relating the peak integrals for a butyl ligand in the spectrum of a water-saturated chromatography medium to the integral of the added internal reference. The method is fast, with capacity of 10 min total sample preparation and analysis time per sample; precise, with a reproducibility expressed as 1.7% relative standard deviation; and accurate, as indicated by the excellent agreement of derived concentration with that obtained previously by (13) C single-pulse excitation MAS NMR. The effects of radiofrequency field inhomogeneity, spin rate, temperature increase due to spinning, and distribution and re-distribution of medium and reference solvent both inside the rotor during spinning and between bulk solvent and pore space are discussed in detail. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Measuring pK(a) values in protein folding transition state ensembles by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tollinger, Martin; Kay, Lewis E; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2005-06-29

    Protein folding kinetic data have been obtained for the marginally stable N-terminal SH3 domain of the Drosophila protein drk as a function of pH in order to investigate the electrostatic properties of Asp8 in the folding transition state ensemble. The slow exchange between folded and unfolded forms of the protein gives rise to separate NMR resonances for both folded and unfolded states at equilibrium. As a result, kinetic data can be derived from magnetization transfer between these two states without the need for denaturants. Using the fact that ionization of Asp8 dominates the electrostatic behavior of the protein between pH 2 and 3, along with pKa values for titrating groups in both folded and unfolded states that have been determined in a previous study, values of 2.9 +/- 0.1 and 3.3 +/- 0.2 are obtained for the pKa of Asp8 in the transition state for the wild-type protein and for a His7Ala mutant, respectively. The data are consistent with the partial formation in the transition state ensemble of an Asp8 side chain carboxylate-a Lys21 backbone amide interaction that represents a highly conserved contact in folded SH3 domains.

  5. Distance information for disordered proteins from NMR and ESR measurements using paramagnetic spin labels.

    PubMed

    Eliezer, David

    2012-01-01

    The growing recognition of the many roles that disordered protein states play in biology places an increasing importance on developing approaches to characterize the structural properties of this class of proteins and to clarify the links between these properties and the associated biological functions. Disordered proteins, when isolated in solution, do not adopt a fixed structure, but can and often do contain detectable and significant residual or transient structure, including both secondary and long-range structure. Such residual structure can play a role in nucleating local structural transitions as well as modulating intramolecular or intermolecular tertiary interactions, including those involved in ordered protein aggregation. An increasing array of tools has been recruited to help characterize the structural properties of disordered proteins. While a number of methods can report on residual secondary structure, detecting and quantifying transient long-range structure has proven to be more difficult. This chapter describes the use of paramagnetic spin labeling in combination with paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) in NMR spectroscopy and pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy (PDS) for this purpose.

  6. Measurement and Visualization of Tight Rock Exposed to CO2 Using NMR Relaxometry and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haitao; Lun, Zengmin; Lv, Chengyuan; Lang, Dongjiang; Ji, Bingyu; Luo, Ming; Pan, Weiyi; Wang, Rui; Gong, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Understanding mechanisms of oil mobilization of tight matrix during CO2 injection is crucial for CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration engineering design. In this study exposure behavior between CO2 and tight rock of the Ordos Basin has been studied experimentally by using nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time (NMR T2) spectrum and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) under the reservoir pressure and temperature. Quantitative analysis of recovery at the pore scale and visualization of oil mobilization are achieved. Effects of CO2 injection, exposure times and pressure on recovery performance have been investigated. The experimental results indicate that oil in all pores can be gradually mobilized to the surface of rock by CO2 injection. Oil mobilization in tight rock is time-consuming while oil on the surface of tight rock can be mobilized easily. CO2 injection can effectively mobilize oil in all pores of tight rock, especially big size pores. This understanding of process of matrix exposed to CO2 could support the CO2 EOR in tight reservoirs. PMID:28281697

  7. Measurement and Visualization of Tight Rock Exposed to CO2 Using NMR Relaxometry and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitao; Lun, Zengmin; Lv, Chengyuan; Lang, Dongjiang; Ji, Bingyu; Luo, Ming; Pan, Weiyi; Wang, Rui; Gong, Kai

    2017-03-01

    Understanding mechanisms of oil mobilization of tight matrix during CO2 injection is crucial for CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration engineering design. In this study exposure behavior between CO2 and tight rock of the Ordos Basin has been studied experimentally by using nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time (NMR T2) spectrum and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) under the reservoir pressure and temperature. Quantitative analysis of recovery at the pore scale and visualization of oil mobilization are achieved. Effects of CO2 injection, exposure times and pressure on recovery performance have been investigated. The experimental results indicate that oil in all pores can be gradually mobilized to the surface of rock by CO2 injection. Oil mobilization in tight rock is time-consuming while oil on the surface of tight rock can be mobilized easily. CO2 injection can effectively mobilize oil in all pores of tight rock, especially big size pores. This understanding of process of matrix exposed to CO2 could support the CO2 EOR in tight reservoirs.

  8. Measurement and Visualization of Tight Rock Exposed to CO2 Using NMR Relaxometry and MRI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haitao; Lun, Zengmin; Lv, Chengyuan; Lang, Dongjiang; Ji, Bingyu; Luo, Ming; Pan, Weiyi; Wang, Rui; Gong, Kai

    2017-03-10

    Understanding mechanisms of oil mobilization of tight matrix during CO2 injection is crucial for CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration engineering design. In this study exposure behavior between CO2 and tight rock of the Ordos Basin has been studied experimentally by using nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time (NMR T2) spectrum and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) under the reservoir pressure and temperature. Quantitative analysis of recovery at the pore scale and visualization of oil mobilization are achieved. Effects of CO2 injection, exposure times and pressure on recovery performance have been investigated. The experimental results indicate that oil in all pores can be gradually mobilized to the surface of rock by CO2 injection. Oil mobilization in tight rock is time-consuming while oil on the surface of tight rock can be mobilized easily. CO2 injection can effectively mobilize oil in all pores of tight rock, especially big size pores. This understanding of process of matrix exposed to CO2 could support the CO2 EOR in tight reservoirs.

  9. Metabolic response of LLC xenografted mice to oxythiamine, as measured by [¹H] NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Lan, W X; Bo, L; Niu, C; Zhou, J J; Zhu, H L

    2015-09-21

    Oxythiamine (OT) has been proven to be a potential anticancer drug. With the help of NMR-based metabonomics, we studied the metabolic changes within tumor-bearing mice with different levels of OT administration using a C57BL/6 mouse Lewis lung carcinoma tumor transplantation model. We administered different concentrations of OT (75, 150, 300, and 600 mg∙kg(-1)∙day(-1)) to the mice orally for 2 weeks, recorded animal weights and tumor volumes, sacrificed the animals, and collected blood and tumor mass samples for nuclear magnetic resonance determination. Compared with the findings for the control (untreated) group, the tumor weights and volumes of the 150, 300, and 600 mg∙kg-1∙day-1 groups decreased with no difference among these OT groups. A large metabolite difference was observed in plasma metabolites between the blank and control groups, which indicated the success of the tumor-bearing model. The metabolites in tumor associated with thiamine-dependent enzymes (TDEs) underwent considerable change between the OT and control groups, exhibiting concentration dependence and enzyme specificity. The restriction of TDEs by OT may be a major mechanism underlying its anticancer effect. The role of OT as a potential anticancer drug and a dehydrogenase inhibitor should therefore be taken into consideration in future tumor research.

  10. Unraveling the complexity of protein backbone dynamics with combined (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lamley, Jonathan M; Lougher, Matthew J; Sass, Hans Juergen; Rogowski, Marco; Grzesiek, Stephan; Lewandowski, Józef R

    2015-09-14

    Typically, protein dynamics involve a complex hierarchy of motions occurring on different time scales between conformations separated by a range of different energy barriers. NMR relaxation can in principle provide a site-specific picture of both the time scales and amplitudes of these motions, but independent relaxation rates sensitive to fluctuations in different time scale ranges are required to obtain a faithful representation of the underlying dynamic complexity. This is especially pertinent for relaxation measurements in the solid state, which report on dynamics in a broader window of time scales by more than 3 orders of magnitudes compared to solution NMR relaxation. To aid in unraveling the intricacies of biomolecular dynamics we introduce (13)C spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) as a probe of backbone nanosecond-microsecond motions in proteins in the solid state. We present measurements of (13)C'R1ρ rates in fully protonated crystalline protein GB1 at 600 and 850 MHz (1)H Larmor frequencies and compare them to (13)C'R1, (15)N R1 and R1ρ measured under the same conditions. The addition of carbon relaxation data to the model free analysis of nitrogen relaxation data leads to greatly improved characterization of time scales of protein backbone motions, minimizing the occurrence of fitting artifacts that may be present when (15)N data is used alone. We also discuss how internal motions characterized by different time scales contribute to (15)N and (13)C relaxation rates in the solid state and solution state, leading to fundamental differences between them, as well as phenomena such as underestimation of picosecond-range motions in the solid state and nanosecond-range motions in solution.

  11. NMR logging apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  12. NMR evidence of a sharp change in a measure of local order in deeply supercooled confined water

    PubMed Central

    Mallamace, F.; Corsaro, C.; Broccio, M.; Branca, C.; González-Segredo, N.; Spooren, J.; Chen, S.-H.; Stanley, H. E.

    2008-01-01

    Using NMR, we measure the proton chemical shift δ, of supercooled nanoconfined water in the temperature range 195 K < T < 350 K. Because δ is directly connected to the magnetic shielding tensor, we discuss the data in terms of the local hydrogen bond geometry and order. We argue that the derivative −(∂ ln δ/∂T)P should behave roughly as the constant pressure specific heat CP(T), and we confirm this argument by detailed comparisons with literature values of CP(T) in the range 290–370 K. We find that −(∂ ln δ/∂T)P displays a pronounced maximum upon crossing the locus of maximum correlation length at ≈240 K, consistent with the liquid-liquid critical point hypothesis for water, which predicts that CP(T) displays a maximum on crossing the Widom line. PMID:18753633

  13. NMR evidence of a sharp change in a measure of local order in deeply supercooled confined water.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, F; Corsaro, C; Broccio, M; Branca, C; González-Segredo, N; Spooren, J; Chen, S-H; Stanley, H E

    2008-09-02

    Using NMR, we measure the proton chemical shift delta, of supercooled nanoconfined water in the temperature range 195 K < T < 350 K. Because delta is directly connected to the magnetic shielding tensor, we discuss the data in terms of the local hydrogen bond geometry and order. We argue that the derivative -( partial differential ln delta/ partial differentialT)(P) should behave roughly as the constant pressure specific heat C(P)(T), and we confirm this argument by detailed comparisons with literature values of C(P)(T) in the range 290-370 K. We find that -( partial differential ln delta/ partial differentialT)(P) displays a pronounced maximum upon crossing the locus of maximum correlation length at approximately 240 K, consistent with the liquid-liquid critical point hypothesis for water, which predicts that C(P)(T) displays a maximum on crossing the Widom line.

  14. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass) due...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass) due...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass) due...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass) due...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass) due...

  19. Phosphorus-31 NMR magnetization transfer measurements of metabolic reaction rates in the rat heart and kidney in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Koretsky, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    /sup 31/P NMR is a unique tool to study bioenergetics in living cells. The application of magnetization transfer techniques to the measurement of steady-state enzyme reaction rates provides a new approach to understanding the regulation of high energy phosphate metabolism. This dissertation is concerned with the measurement of the rates of ATP synthesis in the rat kidney and of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction in the rat heart in situ. The theoretical considerations of applying magnetization transfer techniques to intact organs are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with multiple exchange reactions and compartmentation of reactants. Experimental measurements of the ATP synthesis rate were compared to whole kidney oxygen consumption and Na/sup +/ reabsorption rates to derive ATP/O values. The problems associated with ATP synthesis rate measurements in kidney, e.g. the heterogeneity of the inorganic phosphate resonance, are discussed and experiments to overcome these problems proposed. In heart, the forward rate through creatine kinase was measured to be larger than the reverse rate. To account for the difference in forward and reverse rates a model is proposed based on the compartmentation of a small pool of ATP.

  20. Mechanism of the electrophoretic assembly of cadmium selenide nanocrystal films and their mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shengguo

    This thesis consists of two closely related experimental studies of electrophoretically deposited CdSe nanocrystal films. In the first part of this thesis, the charging of CdSe nanocrystal in non-aqueous solvent and the mechanism of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) are discussed from the point of view of the influence of the nanocrystal surface. Our experiments show that the charge of these nanocrystals originates from the surface defects of the nanocrystal. EPD leads to equally thick films of CdSe nanocrystals on both positive and negative electrodes due to the deposition of equal numbers of negatively and positively charged nanocrystals, even though their concentrations are not equal in solution. The deposition stops when the charged nanocrystals with lower concentration are depleted. The second part of this thesis focuses on the mechanical and optical properties of these electrophoretically deposited CdSe nanocrystal films. Approaches to measure and analyze the mechanical parameters and fracture properties of electrophoretically deposited CdSe nanocrystal films are described in this part. The values of the elastic modulus of electrophoretically deposited CdSe nanocrystal films composed of 3.2 nm diameter nanocrystals measured by Raman microprobe scattering (˜9.7 GPa) and nanoindentation (˜10 GPa) match each other. The mechanical response of nanocrystal films suggests polymeric features that are attributable to the organic ligand on the nanocrystal cores. After nanocrystal cross-linking and partial ligand removal, the nanocrystal films exhibit more features of granularity. The fracture, strain, and stress of electrophoretically deposited CdSe nanocrystal films are studied as a function of the film thickness, nanocrystal size, and drying method. In addition to Raman microprobe scattering, optical methods such as photoluminescence, high-spatial resolution infrared spectroscopy, and ellipsometry are used to investigate the properties of these electrophoretically

  1. Adsorption of polycations on clays: A comparative in situ study using {sup 133}Cs and {sup 23}Na solution phase NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Billingham, J.; Breen, C.; Rawson, J.O.; Yarwood, J.; Mann, B.E.

    1997-09-15

    {sup 23}Na solution phase NMR has been evaluated as an in situ probe to study the adsorption of tetramethylammonium (TMA{sup +}) and two polycations, FL17 and Magnafloc 1697, onto clays in aqueous suspensions containing 2.5 mass% low iron Texas bentonite. The NMR data shows the effectiveness of the organocations at displacing Na{sup +} from the bentonite surface. This information has been correlated with that obtained from particle-size and electrophoretic measurements in aqueous solution, together with information from adsorption isotherms. These results have been compared to those obtained in parallel studies using {sup 133}Cs solution phase NMR. FL17 and 1697 both exhibited high affinity adsorption isotherms on Na{sup +}- and Cs{sup +}-clay, whereas the adsorption of TMA{sup +}, which represents the cationic portion of the polymers was of lower affinity. Na{sup +}-bentonite adsorbed almost twice the amount of polycation required to fulfill the cation-exchange capacity (CEC) of the bentonite. The electrophoretic and particle size data indicated significant differences in the size of the polycation/clay flocs and the amount of polymer adsorbed on the external faces of the flocs in the presence of Na{sup +}- and Cs{sup +}-exchange ions. Correlation of this data with the NMR results suggests that the Na{sup +}-bentonite/polycation flocs are large, of low density, and that the polycation is concentrated in the interior while the Na{sup +}-ions occupy exchange sites on the external faces.

  2. Solubilization of amphiphilic carboxylic acids in nonionic micelles: determination of partition coefficients from pKa measurements and NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Dupont-Leclercq, Laurence; Giroux, Sébastien; Henry, Bernard; Rubini, Patrice

    2007-10-09

    The solubilization of octylamidotartaric acid (C8T) and octanoic acid (C8C) in Triton X-100 and Brij 58 nonionic micelles has been studied by pHmetric and 1H NMR self-diffusion experiments. As both C8C and C8T exhibit acid-base properties, a distinction between the partition of the neutral acidic form, in terms of the partition coefficient KPH, and the partition of the charged basic form, in terms of the partition coefficient KP-, has been made. The acidity constants, Ka, of C8T and C8C in the presence of micelles have been evaluated from pHmetric experiments. For both solutes, an increase in the pKa is observed in micellar media due to the difference in the partition of acidic and basic forms of the solutes. A model has been developed to determine KPH and KP- from the pKa shifts observed. The values obtained by this pKa shift modeling method and those from self-diffusion coefficient measurements are in good agreement. The acidic form of C8C is incorporated to a larger extent into the Brij 58 micelles than the acidic form of C8T, whereas the opposite trend is observed for the basic forms. Both the acidic and basic forms of C8T are more easily incorporated into Brij 58 micelles than into Triton X-100 micelles. The influence of the structure of the polar head on the solubilization properties is demonstrated. Moreover, evidence for the localization of the solutes in the micelles is obtained from the comparison of the partition coefficients and from 1H NMR data.

  3. Measurement of protein unfolding/refolding kinetics and structural characterization of hidden intermediates by NMR relaxation dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Meinhold, Derrick W.; Wright, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed understanding of protein function and malfunction hinges on the ability to characterize transiently populated states and the transitions between them. Here, we use 15N, , and 13CO NMR R2 relaxation dispersion to investigate spontaneous unfolding and refolding events of native apomyoglobin. Above pH 5.0, dispersion is dominated by processes involving fluctuations of the F-helix region, which is invisible in NMR spectra. Measurements of R2 dispersion for residues contacted by the F-helix region in the native (N) structure reveal a transient state formed by local unfolding of helix F and undocking from the protein core. A similar state was detected at pH 4.75–4.95 and determined to be an on-pathway intermediate (I1) in a linear three-state unfolding scheme (N⇆I1⇆MG) leading to a transiently populated molten globule (MG) state. The slowest steps in unfolding and refolding are N → I1 (36 s-1) and MG → I1 (26 s-1), respectively. Differences in chemical shift between N and I1 are very small, except in regions adjacent to helix F, showing that their core structures are similar. Chemical shift changes between the N and MG states, obtained from R2 dispersion, reveal that the transient MG state is structurally similar to the equilibrium MG observed previously at high temperature and low pH. Analysis of MG state chemical shifts shows the location of residual helical structure in the transient intermediate and identifies regions that unfold or rearrange into nonnative structure during the N → MG transition. The experiments also identify regions of energetic frustration that “crack” during unfolding and impede the refolding process. PMID:21562212

  4. New insights on the mechanism of palladium-catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride from 11B NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Guella, G; Zanchetta, C; Patton, B; Miotello, A

    2006-08-31

    To gain insight on the mechanistic aspects of the palladium-catalyzed hydrolysis of NaBH(4) in alkaline media, the kinetics of the reaction has been investigated by (11)B NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) measurements taken at different times during the reaction course. Working with BH(4)(-) concentration in the range 0.05-0.1 M and with a [substrate]/[catalyst] molar ratio of 0.03-0.11, hydrolysis has been found to follow a first-order kinetic dependence from concentration of both the substrate and the catalyst (Pd/C 10 wt %). We followed the reaction of NaBH(4) and its perdeuterated analogue NaBD(4) in H(2)O, in D(2)O and H(2)O/D(2)O mixtures. When the process was carried out in D(2)O, deuterium incorporation in BH(4)(-) afforded BH(4)(-)(n)D(n)(-) (n = 1, 2, 3, 4) species, and a competition between hydrolysis and hydrogen/deuterium exchange processes was observed. By fitting the kinetics NMR data by nonlinear least-squares regression techniques, the rate constants of the elementary steps involved in the palladium-catalyzed borohydride hydrolysis have been evaluated. Such a regression analysis was performed on a reaction scheme wherein the starting reactant BH(4)(-) is allowed both to reversibly exchange hydrogen with deuterium atoms of D(2)O and to irreversibly hydrolyze into borohydroxy species B(OD)(4)(-). In contrast to acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, our results indicate that in the palladium-catalyzed process the rate constants of the exchange processes are higher than those of the corresponding hydrolysis reactions.

  5. Calcium measurements with a new high-affinity n.m.r. indicator in the isolated perfused heart.

    PubMed Central

    Kirschenlohr, H L; Grace, A A; Clarke, S D; Shachar-Hill, Y; Metcalfe, J C; Morris, P G; Smith, G A

    1993-01-01

    A new n.m.r. indicator, 1,2-bis-(2-[1-(hydroxycarbony)ethyl- (hydroxycarbonylmethyl)]amino-5-fluorophenoxy)ethane (DiMe-5FBAPTA), with a higher affinity for calcium (apparent Kd 46 nM, pH 7.2, 30 degrees C) than the parent 5FBAPTA chelator (Kd 537 nM, pH 7.1, 30 degrees C) has been used to measure the cardiac intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). DiMe-5FBAPTA was loaded into Langendorff-perfused ferret hearts maintained at 30 degrees C using the acetoxymethyl ester (AM) derivative. The intracellular concentration required to achieve an adequate signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio (> 10:1) for the n.m.r. spectra caused a similar reduction in developed pressure to that obtained using 5FBAPTA-AM. The DiMe-5FBAPTA was used to estimate [Ca2+]i in diastole, through the calcium transient and at rest in the presence of the slow calcium channel blocker diltiazem. At a pacing frequency of 1.0 Hz, end-diastolic [Ca2+]i was 198 +/- 30 nM (n = 9), and reducing the pacing frequency to 0.2 Hz lowered [Ca2+]i to 89 +/- 13 nM (n = 5). Perfusion with diltiazem (100 microM) for 60 min lowered [Ca2+]i to 10 +/- 1 nM (n = 4) in unpaced hearts and to 94 +/- 24 nM (n = 4) in hearts paced at 1.0 Hz. The [Ca2+]i transient measured with DiMe-5FBAPTA was sharper and delayed compared with the transient measured previously with 5FBAPTA. Co-loading the two indicators provided evidence that the indicator with the higher Kd had a dominant effect on the end-diastolic [Ca2+]i. The lower values for end-diastolic [Ca2+]i obtained with DiMe-5FBAPTA are consistent with fluorescent indicator measurements. These observations suggest that perturbations of [Ca2+]i caused by the new indicator are less than those induced by 5FBAPTA. DiMe-5FBAPTA therefore represents a useful step in the development of 19F-n.m.r. calcium indicators. PMID:8343122

  6. Variable temperature system using vortex tube cooling and fiber optic temperature measurement for low temperature magic angle spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rachel W.; Zilm, Kurt W.

    2004-06-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a variable temperature (VT) system for a high field fast magic angle spinning (MAS) probe. The probe is used in NMR investigations of biological macromolecules, where stable setting and continuous measurement of the temperature over periods of several days are required in order to prevent sample overheating and degradation. The VT system described is used at and below room temperature. A vortex tube is used to provide cooling in the temperature range of -20 to 20 °C, while a liquid nitrogen-cooled heat exchanger is used below -20 °C. Using this arrangement, the lowest temperature that is practically achievable is -140 °C. Measurement of the air temperature near the spinning rotor is accomplished using a fiber optic thermometer that utilizes the temperature dependence of the absorption edge of GaAs. The absorption edge of GaAs also has a magnetic field dependence that we have measured and corrected for. This dependence was calibrated at several field strengths using the well-known temperature dependence of the 1H chemical shift difference of the protons in methanol.

  7. Variable temperature system using vortex tube cooling and fiber optic temperature measurement for low temperature magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rachel W; Zilm, Kurt W

    2004-06-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a variable temperature (VT) system for a high field fast magic angle spinning (MAS) probe. The probe is used in NMR investigations of biological macromolecules, where stable setting and continuous measurement of the temperature over periods of several days are required in order to prevent sample overheating and degradation. The VT system described is used at and below room temperature. A vortex tube is used to provide cooling in the temperature range of -20 to 20 degrees C, while a liquid nitrogen-cooled heat exchanger is used below -20 degrees C. Using this arrangement, the lowest temperature that is practically achievable is -140 degrees C. Measurement of the air temperature near the spinning rotor is accomplished using a fiber optic thermometer that utilizes the temperature dependence of the absorption edge of GaAs. The absorption edge of GaAs also has a magnetic field dependence that we have measured and corrected for. This dependence was calibrated at several field strengths using the well-known temperature dependence of the (1)H chemical shift difference of the protons in methanol.

  8. Electrophoretic identification of poritid species ( Anthozoa: Scleractinia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garthwaite, R. L.; Potts, D. C.; Veron, J. E. N.; Done, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Electrophoretic surveys of 13 enzyme-coding loci distinguished unambiguously five morphologically defined species of Porites and two species of Goniopora. Each species was identifiable solely by unique, qualitative banding patterns at 1 6 loci. Genetic distances give preliminary estimates that these Porites species diverged from common ancestors 8 22 Ma during the Miocene, and that the two Goniopora species diverged about 3.5 Ma in the Pliocene, assuming Porites evolved from Goniopora 55 million years ago (Ma).

  9. Helical repeat and chirality effects on DNA gel electrophoretic mobility.

    PubMed Central

    Drak, J; Crothers, D M

    1991-01-01

    We determined a value of 10.34 +/- 0.04 base pairs (bp) per turn for the helical repeat of bent DNA sequences of the form A6N4-A6N5 by estimating the sequence repeat required to produce a planar curve, as judged from the maximum in the electrophoretic mobility anomaly of multimers containing different sequence repeats (10.00, 10.33, 10.50, 10.67, and 11.00 bp per turn). This result provides the basis for a method to evaluate the helical repeat of any DNA segment by comparative electrophoresis measurements. The sequence of interest is placed between two A-tract bends and the phasing is varied over an entire helical turn. Knowledge of the number of base pairs between the bends in the cis isomer, which has the lowest electrophoretic mobility, allows calculation of the average helical repeat of the inserted sequence. In the course of these experiments we observed an unexpected dependence of electrophoretic mobility on the shape of DNA molecules: in high-percentage polyacrylamide gels, those bent molecules for which we deduced a right-handed superhelical form are less retarded than their homologous left-handed isomers. To explain this finding we propose that superhelical chirality influences the choice of DNA migration pathway, leading to rotation of the DNA molecule relative to the local coordinate frame in the gel. High-percentage gels have sufficiently close contact with the right-handed DNA helical twist to differentiate the frictional consequences of right- and left-handed twisting motions. Images PMID:2014227

  10. A theoretical perspective on the accuracy of rotational resonance (R 2)-based distance measurements in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2010-03-01

    The application of solid-state NMR methodology for bio-molecular structure determination requires the measurement of constraints in the form of 13C-13C and 13C-15N distances, torsion angles and, in some cases, correlation of the anisotropic interactions. Since the availability of structurally important constraints in the solid state is limited due to lack of sufficient spectral resolution, the accuracy of the measured constraints become vital in studies relating the three-dimensional structure of proteins to its biological functions. Consequently, the theoretical methods employed to quantify the experimental data become important. To accentuate this aspect, we re-examine analytical two-spin models currently employed in the estimation of 13C-13C distances based on the rotational resonance (R 2) phenomenon. Although the error bars for the estimated distances tend to be in the range 0.5-1.0 Å, R 2 experiments are routinely employed in a variety of systems ranging from simple peptides to more complex amyloidogenic proteins. In this article we address this aspect by highlighting the systematic errors introduced by analytical models employing phenomenological damping terms to describe multi-spin effects. Specifically, the spin dynamics in R 2 experiments is described using Floquet theory employing two different operator formalisms. The systematic errors introduced by the phenomenological damping terms and their limitations are elucidated in two analytical models and analysed by comparing the results with rigorous numerical simulations.

  11. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-04

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach.

  12. Effective Electrophoretic Mobilities and Charges of Anti-VEGF Proteins Determined by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Li, S. Kevin; Liddell, Mark R.; Wen, He

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecules such as therapeutic proteins currently serve an important role in the treatment of eye diseases such as wet age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Particularly, bevacizumab and ranibizumab have been shown to be effective in the treatment of these diseases. Iontophoresis can be employed to enhance ocular delivery of these macromolecules, but the lack of information on the properties of these macromolecules has hindered its development. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effective electrophoretic mobilities and charges of bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and model compound polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) using capillary zone electrophoresis. Salicylate, lidocaine, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which have known electrophoretic mobilities in the literature, were also studied to validate the present technique. The hydrodynamic radii and diffusion coefficients of BSA, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and PSS were measured by dynamic light scattering. The effective charges were calculated using the Einstein relation between diffusion coefficient and electrophoretic mobility and the Henry equation. The results show that bevacizumab and ranibizumab have low electrophoretic mobilities and are net negatively charged in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of pH 7.4 and 0.16 M ionic strength. PSS has high negative charge but the electrophoretic mobility in PBS is lower than that expected from the polymer structure. The present study demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis could be used to characterize the mobility and charge properties of drug candidates in the development of iontophoretic drug delivery. PMID:21269789

  13. Effective electrophoretic mobilities and charges of anti-VEGF proteins determined by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Li, S Kevin; Liddell, Mark R; Wen, He

    2011-06-01

    Macromolecules such as therapeutic proteins currently serve an important role in the treatment of eye diseases such as wet age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Particularly, bevacizumab and ranibizumab have been shown to be effective in the treatment of these diseases. Iontophoresis can be employed to enhance ocular delivery of these macromolecules, but the lack of information on the properties of these macromolecules has hindered its development. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effective electrophoretic mobilities and charges of bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and model compound polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) using capillary zone electrophoresis. Salicylate, lidocaine, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which have known electrophoretic mobilities in the literature, were also studied to validate the present technique. The hydrodynamic radii and diffusion coefficients of BSA, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and PSS were measured by dynamic light scattering. The effective charges were calculated using the Einstein relation between diffusion coefficient and electrophoretic mobility and the Henry equation. The results show that bevacizumab and ranibizumab have low electrophoretic mobilities and are net negatively charged in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of pH 7.4 and 0.16M ionic strength. PSS has high negative charge but the electrophoretic mobility in PBS is lower than that expected from the polymer structure. The present study demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis could be used to characterize the mobility and charge properties of drug candidates in the development of iontophoretic drug delivery.

  14. Internuclear 31P-51V Distance Measurements in Polyoxoanionic Solids Using REAPDOR NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenlin; Vega, Alexander J.; Gullion, Terry; Polenova, Tatyana

    2014-01-01

    We report the first results establishing REAPDOR experiments for distance measurements between a spin-1/2 (31P) and spin-7/2 (51V) pair in a series of vanadium-substituted polyoxoanionic solids from the Keggin and Wells-Dawson families. We have quantitatively measured 31P-51V distances in mono-vanadium substituted K4PVW11O40, 1-K7P2VW17O62, and 4-K7P2VW17O62. Numerical simulations of the experimental data yield very good agreement with the averaged P-W/P-V distances determined from the X-ray diffraction measurements in the same or related compounds. REAPDOR is therefore a very sensitive P-V distance probe anticipated to be especially useful in the absence of long-range order. Our results suggest that REAPDOR spectroscopy could be broadly applicable for interatomic distance measurements in other spin-7/2-spin-1/2 nuclear pairs. PMID:17918932

  15. Solid-state Hadamard NMR spectroscopy: simultaneous measurements of multiple selective homonuclear scalar couplings.

    PubMed

    Kakita, Veera Mohana Rao; Kupče, Eriks; Bharatam, Jagadeesh

    2015-02-01

    Unambiguous measurement of homonuclear scalar couplings (J) in multi-spin scalar network systems is not straightforward. Further, the direct measurement of J-couplings is obscured in solid-state samples due to the dipolar and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA)-dominated line broadening, even under the magic angle spinning (MAS). We present a new multiple frequency selective spin-echo method based on Hadamard matrix encoding, for simultaneous measurement of multiple homonuclear scalar couplings (J) in the solid-state. In contrast to the Hadamard encoded selective excitation schemes known for the solution-state, herein the selectivity is achieved during refocusing period. The Hadamard encoded refocusing scheme concurrently allows to create the spin-spin commutation property between number of spin-pairs of choice in uniformly labelled molecules, which, therefore avoids (1) the repetition of the double selective refocusing experiments for each spin-pair and (2) the synthesis of expensive selective labelled molecules. The experimental scheme is exemplified for determining (1)JCC and (3)JCC values in (13)C6l-Histidine.HCl molecule, which are found to be in excellent agreement with those measured in conventional double frequency selective refocusing mode as well as in the solution-state. This method can be simply extended to 2D/3D pulse schemes and be applied to small bio-molecular solids.

  16. A Unique and Simple Approach to Improve Sensitivity in 15N-NMR Relaxation Measurements for NH3+ Groups: Application to a Protein-DNA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dan; Lokesh, Ganesh L.R.; Volk, David E.; Iwahara, Junji

    2017-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for research on protein dynamics. In the past decade, there has been significant progress in the development of NMR methods for studying charged side chains. In particular, NMR methods for lysine side-chain NH3+ groups have been proven to be powerful for investigating the dynamics of hydrogen bonds or ion pairs that play important roles in biological processes. However, relatively low sensitivity has been a major practical issue in NMR experiments on NH3+ groups. In this paper, we present a unique and simple approach to improve sensitivity in 15N relaxation measurements for NH3+ groups. In this approach, the efficiency of coherence transfers for the desired components are maximized, whereas undesired anti-phase or multi-spin order components are purged through pulse schemes and rapid relaxation. For lysine side-chain NH3+ groups of a protein-DNA complex, we compared the data obtained with the previous and new pulse sequences under the same conditions and confirmed that the 15N relaxation parameters were consistent for these datasets. While retaining accuracy in measuring 15N relaxation, our new pulse sequences for NH3+ groups allowed an 82% increase in detection sensitivity of 15N longitudinal and transverse relaxation measurements. PMID:28809801

  17. A Unique and Simple Approach to Improve Sensitivity in (15)N-NMR Relaxation Measurements for NH₃⁺ Groups: Application to a Protein-DNA Complex.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dan; Lokesh, Ganesh L R; Volk, David E; Iwahara, Junji

    2017-08-15

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for research on protein dynamics. In the past decade, there has been significant progress in the development of NMR methods for studying charged side chains. In particular, NMR methods for lysine side-chain NH₃⁺ groups have been proven to be powerful for investigating the dynamics of hydrogen bonds or ion pairs that play important roles in biological processes. However, relatively low sensitivity has been a major practical issue in NMR experiments on NH₃⁺ groups. In this paper, we present a unique and simple approach to improve sensitivity in (15)N relaxation measurements for NH₃⁺ groups. In this approach, the efficiency of coherence transfers for the desired components are maximized, whereas undesired anti-phase or multi-spin order components are purged through pulse schemes and rapid relaxation. For lysine side-chain NH₃⁺ groups of a protein-DNA complex, we compared the data obtained with the previous and new pulse sequences under the same conditions and confirmed that the (15)N relaxation parameters were consistent for these datasets. While retaining accuracy in measuring (15)N relaxation, our new pulse sequences for NH₃⁺ groups allowed an 82% increase in detection sensitivity of (15)N longitudinal and transverse relaxation measurements.

  18. Sequence dependence of base-pair stacking in right-handed DNA in solution: proton nuclear Overhauser effect NMR measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, D J; Kozlowski, S A; Bhatt, R

    1983-01-01

    Single-crystal x-ray studies of d(C-G-C-G-A-A-T-T-C-G-C-G) exhibit base-pair propeller twisting [Dickerson, R. E. & Drew, H. R. (1981) J. Mol. Biol. 149, 761-786] that results in close contacts between adjacent purines in the minor groove in pyrimidine (3'-5')-purine steps and in the major groove in purine (3'-5')-pyrimidine steps [Calladine, C. R. (1982) J. Mol. Biol. 161, 343-362]. These observations require an approximately 3.4 A separation between the minor groove edges of adenosines on adjacent base pairs for the dA-dA step but predict a smaller separation for the dT-dA step and a larger separation for the dA-dT step in a D(A-T-T-A).d(T-A-A-T) fragment. We have confirmed these predictions from steady-state nuclear Overhauser effect measurements between assigned minor groove adenosine H-2 protons on adjacent base pairs in the proton NMR spectrum of the d(C1-G2-A3-T4-T5-A6-T6-A5-A4-T3-C2-G1) self-complementary dodecanucleotide duplex (henceforth called the Pribnow 12-mer) in solution. The measured cross-relaxation rates (product of steady-state nuclear Overhauser effect and selective spin- lattice relaxation rates) translate to interproton separations between adjacent adenosine H-2 protons of 4.22 A in the (dA3-dT4).(dA4-dT3) step, of 3.56 A in the (dT4-dT5).dA5-dA4) step, and of 3.17 A in the (dT5-dA6).(dT6-dA5) step for the Pribnow 12-mer duplex with an isotropic rotational correlation time of 9 ns at 5 degrees C. These proton NMR results show that the sequence-dependent base-pair stacking resulting from base-pair propeller twisting of defined handedness for right-handed DNA in the solid state is maintained in aqueous solution. PMID:6575384

  19. Applications of DNP-NMR for the measurement of heteronuclear T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Iain J.; Mitchell, John C.; Snowden, Martin J.; Davis, Adrian L.

    2007-08-01

    Measurement of heteronuclear spin-lattice relaxation times is hampered by both low natural abundance and low detection sensitivity. Combined with typically long relaxation times, this results in extended acquisition times which often renders the experiment impractical. Recently a variant of dynamic nuclear polarisation has been demonstrated in which enhanced nuclear spin polarisation, generated in the cryo-solid state, is transferred to the liquid state for detection. Combining this approach with small flip angle pulse trains, similar to the FLASH- T1 imaging sequence, allows the rapid determination of spin-lattice relaxation times. In this paper we explore this method and its application to the measurement of T1 for both carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 at natural abundance. The effects of RF inhomogeneity and the influence of proton decoupling in the context of this experiment are also investigated.

  20. Applications of DNP-NMR for the measurement of heteronuclear T1 relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Day, Iain J; Mitchell, John C; Snowden, Martin J; Davis, Adrian L

    2007-08-01

    Measurement of heteronuclear spin-lattice relaxation times is hampered by both low natural abundance and low detection sensitivity. Combined with typically long relaxation times, this results in extended acquisition times which often renders the experiment impractical. Recently a variant of dynamic nuclear polarisation has been demonstrated in which enhanced nuclear spin polarisation, generated in the cryo-solid state, is transferred to the liquid state for detection. Combining this approach with small flip angle pulse trains, similar to the FLASH-T(1) imaging sequence, allows the rapid determination of spin-lattice relaxation times. In this paper we explore this method and its application to the measurement of T(1) for both carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 at natural abundance. The effects of RF inhomogeneity and the influence of proton decoupling in the context of this experiment are also investigated.

  1. Looking for central tendencies in the conformational freedom of proteins using NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarelli, Fabrizio; Sgheri, Luca

    2017-02-01

    We study the conformational freedom of a protein made by two rigid domains connected by a flexible linker. The conformational freedom is represented as an unknown probability distribution on the space of allowed states. A new algorithm for the calculation of the maximum allowable probability is proposed, which can be extended to any type of measurements. In this paper we use pseudo contact shifts and residual dipolar coupling. We reconstruct a single central tendency in the distribution and discuss in depth the results.

  2. Macromolecular Crowding Studies of Amino Acids Using NMR Diffusion Measurements and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, Amninder; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Willis, Scott; Torres, Allan; Price, William

    2015-02-01

    Molecular crowding occurs when the total concentration of macromolecular species in a solution is so high that a considerable proportion of the volume is physically occupied and therefore not accessible to other molecules. This results in significant changes in the solution properties of the molecules in such systems. Macromolecular crowding is ubiquitous in biological systems due to the generally high intracellular protein concentrations. The major hindrance to understanding crowding is the lack of direct comparison of experimental data with theoretical or simulated data. Self-diffusion is sensitive to changes in the molecular weight and shape of the diffusing species, and the available diffusion space (i.e., diffusive obstruction). Consequently, diffusion measurements are a direct means for probing crowded systems including the self-association of molecules. In this work, nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of the self-diffusion of four amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine and phenylalanine) up to their solubility limit in water were compared directly with molecular dynamics simulations. The experimental data were then analyzed using various models of aggregation and obstruction. Both experimental and simulated data revealed that the diffusion of both water and the amino acids were sensitive to the amino acid concentration. The direct comparison of the simulated and experimental data afforded greater insights into the aggregation and obstruction properties of each amino acid.

  3. Autocorrelation spectra of an air-fluidized granular system measured by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasic, S.; Stepisnik, J.; Mohoric, A.; Sersa, I.; Planinsic, G.

    2006-09-01

    A novel insight into the dynamics of a fluidized granular system is given by a nuclear magnetic resonance method that yields the spin-echo attenuation proportional to the spectrum of the grain positional fluctuation. Measurements of the air-fluidized oil-filled spheres and mustard seeds at different degrees of fluidization and grain volume fractions provide the velocity autocorrelation that differs from the commonly anticipated exponential Enskog decay. An empiric formula, which corresponds to the model of grain caging at collisions with adjacent beads, fits well to the experimental data. Its parameters are the characteristic collision time, the free path between collisions and the cage-breaking rate or the diffusion-like constant, which decreases with increasing grain volume fraction. Mean-squared displacements calculated from the correlation spectrum clearly show transitions from ballistic, through sub-diffusion and into diffusion regimes of grain motion.

  4. Investigation into the structural composition of hydroalcoholic solutions as basis for the development of multiple suppression pulse sequences for NMR measurement of alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Mushtakova, Svetlana P; Kuballa, Thomas; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2014-12-01

    An eight-fold suppression pulse sequence was recently developed to improve sensitivity in (1) H NMR measurements of alcoholic beverages [Magn. Res. Chem. 2011 (49): 734-739]. To ensure that only one combined hydroxyl peak from water and ethanol appears in the spectrum, adjustment to a certain range of ethanol concentrations was required. To explain this observation, the structure of water-ethanol solutions was studied. Hydroalcoholic solutions showed extreme behavior at 25% vol, 46% vol, and 83% vol ethanol according to (1) H NMR experiments. Near-infrared spectroscopy confirmed the occurrence of four significant compounds ('individual' ethanol and water structures as well as two water-ethanol complexes of defined composition - 1 : 1 and 1 : 3). The successful multiple suppression can be achieved for every kind of alcoholic beverage with different alcoholic strengths, when the final ethanol concentration is adjusted to a range between 25% vol and 46% vol (e.g. using dilution or pure ethanol addition). In this optimum region, an individual ethanol peak was not detected, because the 'individual' water structure and the 1 : 1 ethanol-water complex predominate. The nature of molecular association in ethanol-water solutions is essential to elucidate NMR method development for measurement of alcoholic beverages. The presented approach can be used to optimize other NMR suppression protocols for binary water-organic solvent mixtures, where hydrogen bonding plays a dominant role. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Development of an eight-channel NMR system using RF detection coils for measuring spatial distributions of current density and water content in the PEM of a PEFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Kuniyasu; Yokouchi, Yasuo; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Ito, Kohei

    2013-09-01

    The water generation and water transport occurring in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) can be estimated from the current density generated in the PEFC, and the water content in the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM). In order to measure the spatial distributions and time-dependent changes of current density generated in a PEFC and the water content in a PEM, we have developed an eight-channel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system. To detect a NMR signal from water in a PEM at eight positions, eight small planar RF detection coils of 0.6 mm inside diameter were inserted between the PEM and the gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a PEFC. The local current density generated at the position of the RF detection coil in a PEFC can be calculated from the frequency shift of the obtained NMR signal due to an additional magnetic field induced by the local current density. In addition, the water content in a PEM at the position of the RF detection coil can be calculated by the amplitude of the obtained NMR signal. The time-dependent changes in the spatial distributions were measured at 4 s intervals when the PEFC was operated with supply gas under conditions of fuel gas utilization of 0.67 and relative humidity of the fuel gas of 70%RH. The experimental result showed that the spatial distributions of the local current density and the water content in the PEM within the PEFC both fluctuated with time.

  6. Hyperpolarized 13C allows a direct measure of flux through a single enzyme-catalyzed step by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Matthew E.; Harrison, Crystal; Storey, Charles; Jeffrey, F. Mark; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.

    2007-01-01

    13C NMR is a powerful tool for monitoring metabolic fluxes in vivo. The recent availability of automated dynamic nuclear polarization equipment for hyperpolarizing 13C nuclei now offers the potential to measure metabolic fluxes through select enzyme-catalyzed steps with substantially improved sensitivity. Here, we investigated the metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-13C1]pyruvate in a widely used model for physiology and pharmacology, the perfused rat heart. Dissolved 13CO2, the immediate product of the first step of the reaction catalyzed by pyruvate dehydrogenase, was observed with a temporal resolution of ≈1 s along with H13CO3−, the hydrated form of 13CO2 generated catalytically by carbonic anhydrase. In hearts presented with the medium-chain fatty acid octanoate in addition to hyperpolarized [1-13C1]pyruvate, production of 13CO2 and H13CO3− was suppressed by ≈90%, whereas the signal from [1-13C1]lactate was enhanced. In separate experiments, it was shown that O2 consumption and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux were unchanged in the presence of added octanoate. Thus, the rate of appearance of 13CO2 and H13CO3− from [1-13C1]pyruvate does not reflect production of CO2 in the TCA cycle but rather reflects flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase exclusively. PMID:18056642

  7. Strategies for Diagnosing and Alleviating Artifactual Attenuation Associated with Large Gradient Pulses in PGSE NMR Diffusion Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, William S.; Hayamizu, Kikuko; Ide, Hiroyuki; Arata, Yoji

    1999-08-01

    The generation of phase-based artifacts resulting from mismatch in the effective areas (i.e., the time integrals) of sequential gradient pulses is discussed in the context of large gradient pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) NMR diffusion measurements. Such effects result in artifactual attenuation and distortion in the spectra which, in the first instance, are similar to (and commonly mistaken for) the effects of eddy currents. Small degrees of mismatch cause "unphysical" concave downward curvature in PGSE attenuation plots of freely diffusing species. However, larger mismatches can result in artifactual diffraction peaks in the plots which could easily be confused for true restricted diffusion effects. Although "rectangular" gradient pulses are preferable from a theoretical viewpoint, we found that shaped gradient (e.g., half-sine) pulses, which due to their slower rise and fall times were more tractable for the current amplifier, were more sequentially reproducible. As well as generating fewer phase-based artifacts such shaped pulses also decrease the likelihood of vibration problems.

  8. Electrophoretic mobility of spherical particles in bounded domain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Wei; Pennathur, Sumita; Meinhart, Carl D

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we improve on our 3D steady-state model of electrophoretic motion of spherical particles in bounded fluidic channels (Liu et al., 2014) to include the effect of nonsymmetric electrolytes, and further validate this improved model with detailed comparisons to experimental data. Specifically, we use the experimentally-measured particle mobilities from the work of Semenov et al. (2013), Napoli et al. (2011), and Wynne et al. (2012) to determine the corresponding particle zeta potentials using our model, and compare these results with classical theory. Incorporating the effects of nonsymmetric electrolytes, EDL polarization, and confinement, we show that our improved model is applicable to a wide range of practical experimental conditions, for example, particles that have high zeta potentials in a bounded channel filled with nonsymmetric electrolyte solutions, where classical theory is not applicable. In addition, we find that when electrolyte concentration is comparable to the concentration of hydronium or hydroxide ions, the complicated composition of ions increases the particle mobility. Finally, increased electrophoretic mobility can be observed when buffer solutions (phosphate or borate) were used as electrolyte solutions in experiments as opposed to simple symmetric electrolytes.

  9. Photon Correlation Spectroscopy and Electrophoretic Light Scattering Using Optical Fibres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFadyen, Allan John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In photon correlation spectroscopy, the fast local fluctuations in the intensity of the light scattered by submicron particles in suspension are recorded and analysed in terms of the particle motion. These may then be related to the particle size, or, when the particles are subjected to an electric field, the electrophoretic mobility. Light scattering apparatus traditionally incorporates a fixed goniometer arrangement. Recently, however, systems have been reported which incorporate optical fibres for use in remote or on-line situations. In this thesis, recent advances in the development of fibre-based photon correlation systems are reviewed and the design and construction of two novel optical fibre apparatus prototypes, incorporating "SELFOC" lenses, miniature prisms and single mode detection fibre, is discussed. The final outcome, an optical fibre sensor, which combines both photon correlation and electrophoretic light scattering measurements in a single, compact dip -in probe for the first time, is described. Results are presented for a variety of colloidal particles in suspension including polystyrene and "Microsilica" spheres, PTFE ellipsoids and kaolinite platelets, all of which demonstrate the viability of the apparatus.

  10. Electrophoretic deposition of composite hydroxyapatite-chitosan coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Pang Xin; Zhitomirsky, Igor . E-mail: zhitom@mcmaster.ca

    2007-04-15

    Cathodic electrophoretic deposition has been utilized for the fabrication of composite hydroxyapatite-chitosan coatings on 316L stainless steel substrates. The addition of chitosan to the hydroxyapatite suspensions promoted the electrophoretic deposition of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and resulted in the formation of composite coatings. The obtained coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, potentiodynamic polarization measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was shown that the deposit composition can be changed by a variation of the chitosan or hydroxyapatite concentration in the solutions. Experimental conditions were developed for the fabrication of hydroxyapatite-chitosan nanocomposites containing 40.9-89.8 wt.% hydroxyapatite. The method enabled the formation of adherent and uniform coatings of thicknesses up to 60 {mu}m. X-ray studies revealed that the preferred orientation of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in the chitosan matrix increases with decreasing hydroxyapatite content in the composite coatings. The obtained coatings provided the corrosion protection for the 316L stainless steel substrates00.

  11. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in MAS solid-state NMR provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanoseconds-to-milliseconds (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear (13C, 15N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radio-frequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins has been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely (i) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR), and (ii) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e. proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable, and that this cross-correlated relaxation rate constant depends on ns-ms motions, and can thus itself provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin-diffusion attenuates this cross-correlated relaxation, due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and the present manuscript reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  12. Structure and dynamics of water in tendon from NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Peto, S; Gillis, P; Henri, V P

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation times were measured in collagen tissue when varying the orientation of the fiber with respect to the static field. T1 was found to be only slightly dependent on theta, the fiber-to-field angle, but T2 was very sensitive to the orientation, with a maximum value at the magic angle. The transverse decay curves were multiexponential. Their deconvolution displayed four components; the ones that decayed most slowly were almost independent of theta, but the two fastest ones showed a strong angular dependence that was interpreted with a cross-relaxation model. Quadrupolar dips were visible in the 1/T1 dispersion curves. These dips were independent of theta, so that the magnetization transfer could also be assumed to be independent of the fiber orientation. Finally, each component was assigned to a fraction of protons localized in the macromolecular structure and characterized by particular dynamics. The model of Woessner was applied to the water molecules tightly bound into the macromolecules, which resulted in a dynamical description of this water fraction. This description is compatible with the two-sites model of Ramachandran based on x-ray diffraction and with the extensive studies of Berendsen. However, the important indications obtained from the deconvolution lead to a less static representation of the tissue. PMID:2297563

  13. Effect of acute stresses on zebra fish (Danio rerio) metabolome measured by NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Mian Yahya; Marçal, Rosilene Moretti; Champagne, Danielle L; van der Kooy, Frank; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2014-09-01

    We applied an acute stress model to zebra fish in order to measure the changes in the metabolome due to biological stress. This was done by submitting the fish to fifteen minutes of acute confinement (netting) stress, and then five minutes for the open field and light/dark field tests. A polar extract of the zebra fish was then subjected to (1)H nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Multivariate data analysis of the spectra showed a clear separation associated to a wide range of metabolites between zebra fish that were submitted to open field and light/dark field tests. Alanine, taurine, adenosine, creatine, lactate, and histidine were high in zebra fish to which the light/dark field test was applied, regardless of stress, while acetate and isoleucine/lipids appeared to be higher in zebra fish exposed to the open field test. These results show that any change in the environment, even for a small period of time, has a noticeable physiological impact. This research provides an insight of how different mechanisms are activated under different environments to maintain the homeostasis of the body. It should also contribute to establish zebra fish as a model for metabolomics studies.

  14. Scanning and storage of electrophoretic records

    DOEpatents

    McKean, Ronald A.; Stiegman, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    An electrophoretic record that includes at least one gel separation is mounted for motion laterally of the separation record. A light source is positioned to illuminate at least a portion of the record, and a linear array camera is positioned to have a field of view of the illuminated portion of the record and orthogonal to the direction of record motion. The elements of the linear array are scanned at increments of motion of the record across the field of view to develop a series of signals corresponding to intensity of light at each element at each scan increment.

  15. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  16. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  17. Variation of electrophoretic karyotypes among clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Merz, W G; Connelly, C; Hieter, P

    1988-01-01

    Orthogonal-field-alternation gel electrophoresis was used to compare clinical isolates of Candida albicans by resolving chromosome-sized DNA molecules into an electrophoretic karyotype. Seven to nine bands were observed among isolates recovered from 17 patients. In addition, 14 distinct electrophoretic patterns were noted among the isolates from these patients. In a given individual, isolates were likely to have identical electrophoretic patterns. Therefore, the electrophoretic karyotype patterns demonstrated by orthogonal-field-alternation gel electrophoresis can be used to designate a strain for epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:3290238

  18. Translational diffusion measurements by microcoil NMR in aqueous solutions of the Fos-10 detergent-solubilized membrane protein OmpX.

    PubMed

    Horst, Reto; Stanczak, Pawel; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2012-06-14

    Aqueous solutions of the detergent Fos-10 (n-decylphosphocholine) without and with addition of the integral membrane protein (IMP) OmpX (outer membrane protein X) have been characterized using pulsed field gradient-stimulated echo (PFG-STE) NMR experiments for measurements of translational diffusion coefficients. Effective diffusion coefficients for Fos-10 micelles in the absence of OmpX were obtained by observation of NMR signals from 10-bromodecan-1-ol that had been inserted into the micelles, and in the presence of OmpX by NMR observation of the protein. It is thus shown that solutions of Fos-10-reconstituted OmpX can be quantitatively described as a mixture of Fos-10 monomers, uniform Fos-10 micelles, and uniform OmpX-containing Fos-10 micelles, with Fos-10 monomers in fast exchange between the pools of these three species. This result establishes an avenue for efficient determination of the effective translational diffusion coefficients of IMP-containing detergent micelles based on observation of the intense detergent NMR signals, which is also applicable with unlabeled IMPs. This monitoring of the species present in a given IMP solution contributes to improved guidelines for rational selection of detergent and buffer conditions in structural studies of integral membrane proteins.

  19. Large-Area Chemically Modified Graphene Films: Electrophoretic Deposition and Characterization by Soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.; Whittaker, L; Jaye, C; Baroudi, K; Fischer, D; Banerjee, S

    2009-01-01

    A facile, rapid, and scalable electrophoretic deposition approach is developed for the fabrication of large-area chemically derived graphene films on conductive substrates based on the electrophoretic deposition of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide components. Two distinctive approaches for fabricating conformal graphene films are developed. In the first approach, graphene oxide sheets are electrophoretically deposited from an aqueous solution after the oxidation of graphite to graphite oxide and the subsequent exfoliation of graphite oxide to graphene oxide. Next, the graphene oxide films are reduced via dip-coating in an aqueous solution of hydrazine. In the second approach, graphene oxide is reduced to graphene nanosheets in a strongly alkaline solution and the reduced graphene sheets are directly electrophoretically deposited onto conductive substrates. The film thickness can be modified by the deposition time and the obtained films span several square millimeters in area. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is used to study the surface chemistry, electronic band structure, and degree of alignment of the electrophoretically deposited films. Polarized NEXAFS measurements verify the presence of epoxide surface functionalities on the graphene basal planes and indicate significant recovery of extended p-bonded networks upon defunctionalization by hydrazine treatment. These measurements further indicate significantly improved alignment of the graphene sheet components of the films parallel to the substrate surface when defunctionalization is performed prior to electrophoretic deposition.

  20. Characterization of electrophoretic suspension for thin polymer film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenova, D.; Weiter, M.; Stepanek, P.; Ouzzane, I.; Vala, M.; Sinigersky, V.; Zhivkov, I.

    2012-03-01

    The optical absorption and fluorescence spectra of poly [2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] toluene solutions and 50:50% toluene/acetonitrile suspensions show clearly distinguishable differences (e.g., peak broadening and shifting), which could be used for characterization of suspensions with different acetonitrile content. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement of the suspensions prepared showed a particle size of 90 nm. Thin films with thicknesses of about 400 nm were prepared by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and spin coating. As the films are very soft, a contactless optical profilometry techique based on chromatic aberration was used to measure their thickness. AFM imaging of spin coated and EPD films revealed film roughness of 20÷40 nm and 40÷80 nm, respectively. The EPD film roughness seems to be less than the suspension particle size obtained by DLS, probably due to the partial film dissolving by the toluene present in the suspension.

  1. Electrophoretic Porosimetry of Sol-Gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. A.; Smith, D. D.; Sibille, L.; Hunt, A. J.; Ng, J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that gravity has an effect on the formation and resulting microstructure of sol-gels. In order to more clearly resolve the effect of gravity, pores may be non-destructively analyzed in the wet gel, circumventing the shrinkage and coarsening associated with the drying procedure. We discuss the development of an electrophoretic technique, analogous to affinity chromatography, for the determination of pore size distribution and its application to silica gels. Specifically a monodisperse charged dye is monitored by an optical densitometer as it moves through the wet gel under the influence of an electric field. The transmittance data (output) represents the convolution of the dye concentration profile at the beginning of the run (input) with the pore size distribution (transfer function), i.e. linear systems theory applies. Because of the practical difficulty in producing a delta function input dye profile we prefer instead to use a step function. Average pore size is then related to the velocity of this dye front, while the pore size distribution is related to the spreading of the front. Preliminary results of this electrophoretic porosimetry and its application to ground and space-grown samples will be discussed.

  2. Development of an electrophoretic image display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, R.; Lalak, J.; Wittig, K.

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a 350 x 600 element X-Y addressed ElectroPhoretic Image Display (EPID). Development of the fabrication techniques for this display continues. Near-perfect seals between the substrate and grid dielectric were obtained. Ion-beam milling of Mylar in 70% oxygen: 30% argon has eliminated operational difficulties encountered with pure oxygen. No change in either the absolute or differential milling rates was observed as a result of the addition of the argon to the oxygen. Several tests have confirmed the compatibility between the materials used in fabricating the device and the components of the electrophoretic suspension. Digitization and ordering of the photolithographic masks for the 512 character display is complete. Design of the display electronics and packaging are in progress. A microprocessor interfaced to the IEEE-488 bus and an ASCII-to-5x7 character generator will provide the necessary signals to the integrated row and column drivers. The display will be mounted, using conductive elastomer interconnections, to a printed circuit board which will provide sockets for connection of the cables form the electronics package. This system will accept ASCII information from a computer connected to an IEEE-488 bus and display the printable information on the EPID as 16 lines of 32 characters each.

  3. Continuous-flow electrophoretic separator for biologicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, L. R.; Griffin, R. N.; Locker, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    In the near absence of gravity, a continuous-flow type of electrophoretic separator can be operated with a much thicker separation chamber than is possible under 1 g conditions. This should permit either better resolution or shorter separation time per unit of sample. An apparatus to perform experiments on sounding rockets is under development and will be described. The electrophoresis cell is 5 mm thick by 5 cm wide with 10 cm long electrodes. It is supplied with buffer, sample, and coolant at about 4 C through the use of a passive refrigerant system. UV sample detection and provision for recovery and cold storage of up to 50 sample fractions are now being added to the basic unit. A wide range of operating conditions are electronically programmable into the unit, even up to a short time before flight, and a further range of some parameters can be achieved by exchanging power supplies and by changing gears in the motor drive units of the pump. The preliminary results of some separation studies on various biological products using a commercially available electrophoretic separator are also presented.

  4. Electrophoretic Porosimetry of Sol-Gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. A.; Smith, D. D.; Sibille, L.; Hunt, A. J.; Ng, J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that gravity has an effect on the formation and resulting microstructure of sol-gels. In order to more clearly resolve the effect of gravity, pores may be non-destructively analyzed in the wet gel, circumventing the shrinkage and coarsening associated with the drying procedure. We discuss the development of an electrophoretic technique, analogous to affinity chromatography, for the determination of pore size distribution and its application to silica gels. Specifically a monodisperse charged dye is monitored by an optical densitometer as it moves through the wet gel under the influence of an electric field. The transmittance data (output) represents the convolution of the dye concentration profile at the beginning of the run (input) with the pore size distribution (transfer function), i.e. linear systems theory applies. Because of the practical difficulty in producing a delta function input dye profile we prefer instead to use a step function. Average pore size is then related to the velocity of this dye front, while the pore size distribution is related to the spreading of the front. Preliminary results of this electrophoretic porosimetry and its application to ground and space-grown samples will be discussed.

  5. Applications of graphene electrophoretic deposition. A review.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Valdez, A; Shaffer, M S P; Boccaccini, A R

    2013-02-14

    This Review summarizes research progress employing electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to fabricate graphene and graphene-based nanostructures for a wide range of applications, including energy storage materials, field emission devices, supports for fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, supercapacitors and sensors, among others. These carbonaceous nanomaterials can be dispersed in organic solvents, or more commonly in water, using a variety of techniques compatible with EPD. Most deposits are produced under constant voltage conditions with deposition time also playing an important role in determining the morphology of the resulting graphene structures. In addition to simple planar substrates, it has been shown that uniform graphene-based layers can be deposited on three-dimensional, porous, and even flexible substrates. In general, electrophoretically deposited graphene layers show excellent properties, e.g., high electrical conductivity, large surface area, good thermal stability, high optical transparency, and robust mechanical strength. EPD also enables the fabrication of functional composite materials, e.g., graphene combined with metallic nanoparticles, with other carbonaceous materials (e.g., carbon nanotubes) or polymers, leading to novel nanomaterials with enhanced optical and electrical properties. In summary, the analysis of the available literature reveals that EPD is a simple and convenient processing method for graphene and graphene-based materials, which is easy to apply and versatile. EPD has, therefore, a promising future for applications in the field of advanced nanomaterials, which depend on the reliable manipulation of graphene and graphene-containing systems.

  6. Comparison of surface NMR with non-invasive and in-situ measurements of soil water content at a floodplain field site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, P.; Werban, U.; Schrön, M.; Walsh, D. O.; Grunewald, E. D.; Pohle, M.; Kathage, S.

    2015-12-01

    Quantification of soil water content is a very relevant issue in soil and environmental studies. There is a broad spectrum of methods applied for measuring soil water content in the field either deployed in situ or non-invasively from the surface. For many reasons the latter is preferred in field studies. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the rare methods that measure the water content directly. Whereas others, e.g. geophysical methods, make use of proximal relationships for determination of soil water content. We applied a new single-sided NMR sensor to non-invasively measure in-situ soil moisture profiles at several points along two transects in a floodplain. The field site exhibits variations in soil water content due to morphology, e.g. flood channels and alluvial fan structures. Furthermore we applied at the same transects (1) in situ methods: soil sampling for gravimetrical analysis and TDR and (2) non-invasive methods: electromagnetical induction, mobile cosmic-ray neutron sensing with a rover and gamma-ray spectrometry. We will present results that confirm agreement of NMR and gravimetrical analysis from soil sampling and discuss issues that arise when using non-unique proxy methods and relationships for determination of soil water content.

  7. Comparison of surface NMR with non-invasive and in-situ measurements of soil water content at a floodplain field site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werban, Ulrike; Schrön, Martin; Dietrich, Peter; Walsh, David; Grunewald, Elliot; Pohle, Marco; Kathage, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of soil water content is a very relevant issue in soil and environmental studies. There is a broad spectrum of methods applied for measuring soil water content in the field either deployed in situ or non-invasively from the surface. For many reasons the latter is preferred in field studies. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the rare methods that measure the water content directly. Whereas others, e.g. geophysical methods, make use of proximal relationships for determination of soil water content. We applied a new single-sided NMR sensor to non-invasively measure in-situ soil moisture profiles at several points along two transects in a floodplain. The field site exhibits variations in soil water content due to morphology, e.g. flood channels and alluvial fan structures. Furthermore we applied at the same transects (1) in situ methods: soil sampling for gravimetrical analysis and TDR and (2) non-invasive methods: electromagnetical induction, mobile cosmic-ray neutron sensing with a rover and gamma-ray spectrometry. We will present results that confirm agreement of NMR and gravimetrical analysis from soil sampling and discuss issues that arise when using non-unique proxy methods and relationships for determination of soil water content.

  8. Analysis of the interfacial properties of fibrillated and nonfibrillated oral streptococcal strains from electrophoretic mobility and titration measurements: evidence for the shortcomings of the 'classical soft-particle approach'.

    PubMed

    Duval, Jérôme F L; Busscher, Henk J; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; van der Mei, Henny C; Norde, Willem

    2005-11-22

    Chemical and structural intricacies of bacterial cells complicate the quantitative evaluation of the physicochemical properties pertaining to the cell surface. The presence of various types of cell surface appendages has a large impact on those properties and therefore on various interfacial phenomena, such as aggregation and adhesion. In this paper, an advanced analysis of the electrophoretic mobilities of fibrillated and nonfibrillated strains (Streptococcus salivarius HB and Streptococcus salivarius HB-C12, respectively) is performed over a wide range of pH and ionic strength conditions on the basis of a recent electrokinetic theory for soft particles. The latter extends the approximate formalism originally developed by Ohshima by solving rigorously the fundamental electrokinetic equations without restrictions on the bacterial size, charge, and double layer thickness. It further allows (i) a straightforward implementation of the dissociation characteristics, as evaluated from titration experiments, of the ionogenic charged groups distributed throughout the bacterial cell wall and/or the surrounding exopolymer layer and (ii) the inclusion of possible specific interactions between the charged groups and ions from the background electrolyte other than charge-determining ions. The theory also enables an estimation of possible swelling/shrinking processes operating on the outer polymeric layer of the bacterium. Application of the electrokinetic model to HB and HB-C12 clearly shows a significant discrepancy between the amount of surface charges probed by electrophoresis and by protolytic titration. This is ascribed to the specific adsorption of cations onto pristine charged sites in the cell wall. Physicochemical parameters pertaining to the hydrodynamics (softness degree) and electrostatics of the bacterial cell wall (HB-C12) and soft polymeric layer (HB) are quantitatively derived.

  9. Electrophoretic separation of lunar soils in a space manufacturing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, J. D.; Snyder, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of electrophoretic separation of lunar soil into its mineral constituents is discussed in this paper. The process and its applicability to lunar soil separation are considered in light of the special requirements of a space manufacturing effort. Data generated in studies at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, which assess the efficiency of electrophoretic separation of lunar soil, are discussed and evaluated.

  10. Quantitative (31)P NMR spectroscopy and (1)H MRI measurements of bone mineral and matrix density differentiate metabolic bone diseases in rat models.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haihui; Nazarian, Ara; Ackerman, Jerome L; Snyder, Brian D; Rosenberg, Andrew E; Nazarian, Rosalynn M; Hrovat, Mirko I; Dai, Guangping; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Wu, Yaotang

    2010-06-01

    In this study, bone mineral density (BMD) of normal (CON), ovariectomized (OVX), and partially nephrectomized (NFR) rats was measured by (31)P NMR spectroscopy; bone matrix density was measured by (1)H water- and fat-suppressed projection imaging (WASPI); and the extent of bone mineralization (EBM) was obtained by the ratio of BMD/bone matrix density. The capability of these MR methods to distinguish the bone composition of the CON, OVX, and NFR groups was evaluated against chemical analysis (gravimetry). For cortical bone specimens, BMD of the CON and OVX groups was not significantly different; BMD of the NFR group was 22.1% (by (31)P NMR) and 17.5% (by gravimetry) lower than CON. For trabecular bone specimens, BMD of the OVX group was 40.5% (by (31)P NMR) and 24.6% (by gravimetry) lower than CON; BMD of the NFR group was 26.8% (by (31)P NMR) and 21.5% (by gravimetry) lower than CON. No significant change of cortical bone matrix density between CON and OVX was observed by WASPI or gravimetry; NFR cortical bone matrix density was 10.3% (by WASPI) and 13.9% (by gravimetry) lower than CON. OVX trabecular bone matrix density was 38.0% (by WASPI) and 30.8% (by gravimetry) lower than CON, while no significant change in NFR trabecular bone matrix density was observed by either method. The EBMs of OVX cortical and trabecular specimens were slightly higher than CON but not significantly different from CON. Importantly, EBMs of NFR cortical and trabecular specimens were 12.4% and 26.3% lower than CON by (31)P NMR/WASPI, respectively, and 4.0% and 11.9% lower by gravimetry. Histopathology showed evidence of osteoporosis in the OVX group and severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (renal osteodystrophy) in the NFR group. These results demonstrate that the combined (31)P NMR/WASPI method is capable of discerning the difference in EBM between animals with osteoporosis and those with impaired bone mineralization.

  11. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans.

  12. Arylsulfatase A: Relationship of genotype to variant electrophoretic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Park, D.S.; Poretz, R.D.; Ricketts, M.H.; Manowitz, P.

    1996-04-01

    Previous work has shown that specific electrophoretic variants of arylsulfatase A occur more frequently among alcoholic patients than among psychiatric and normal controls. The present study sequenced the gene for two of these electrophoretic variants, IIIa and IIIb. Both contain an A-to-G transition corresponding to substitution of Asn{sub 350} by Ser, with the resulting loss of an N -glycosylation site. The difference in electrophoretic mobility of their gene products is due to a mutation in the IIIb gene resulting in the replacement of Arg{sub 496} by His. Evidence is presented that individuals posessing either of two other electrophoretic variants, Va and Vb, are heterozygous for a normal ASA allele and either a IIIa or IIIb allele, respectively. Thus, the relationship between the phenotype of the electrophoretic banding patterns, IIIa, IIIb, Va, and Vb, and their corresponding genotypes has been elucidated. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. SPAR electrophoretic separation experiments, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosmi, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    The opportunity to use a sounding rocket for separation experiments is a logical continuation of earlier electrophoresis demonstrations and experiments. A free-flow electrophoresis system, developed under the Advanced Applications Flight Experiment (AAFE) Program, was designed so that it would fit into a rocket payload. The SPAR program provides a unique opportunity to complete the intial stages of microgravity testing prior to any Shuttle applications. The objective of the work described in this report was to ensure proper operating parameters for the defined experimental samples to be used in the SPAR Electrophoretic Separation Experiment. Ground based experiments were undertaken not only to define flight parameters but also to serve as a point of comparison for flight results. Possible flight experiment problem areas were also studied such as sample interaction due to sedimentation, concentration effects and storage effects. Late in the program anomalies of field strengths and buffer conductivities were also investigated.

  14. Investigation of the free flow electrophoretic process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R. A.; Lanham, J. W.; Richman, D. W.; Walker, C. D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the free flow electrophoretic process was demonstrated. The free flow electrophoresis chamber used to demonstrate the effects of gravity on the process was of a proprietary design. This chamber was 120 cm long, 16 cm wide, and 0.15 cm thick. Flow in this chamber was in the upward direction and exited through 197 outlets at the top of the chamber. During electrophoresis a stream of sample was injected into the flow near the bottom of the chamber and an electrical field was applied across the width of the chamber. The field caused a lateral force on particles in the sample proportional to the inherent change of the particle and the electric field strength. Particle lateral velocity was then dependent on the force due to viscous drag which was proportional to particle size and particle shape dependent.

  15. ELECTROPHORETIC HOMOGENEITY OF PREGNANT MARE SERUM GONADOTROPHIN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Choh Hao; Evans, Herbert M.; Wonder, Donald H.

    1940-01-01

    A highly purified and potent gonadotrophin in pregnant mare serum has been prepared. The preparation has been shown to be electrophoretically homogeneous in the Tiselius apparatus. The mobilities of the substance have been determined over a wide range of hydrogen ion concentrations. The isoelectric point lies at pH 2.60–2.65 and the value of See PDF for Equation is 4.0 x 10–5. Some chemical constituents have been studied. From the tryptophane and tyrosine content the molecular weight of the hormone is estimated to be 30,000. The hormone has been subjected to acetylation by ketene in aqueous solution at room temperature and the result suggests again the essentiality of free amino groups for the biological activity of the hormone. In this respect it is to be contrasted with human chorionic gonadotrophin. PMID:19873189

  16. Electrophoretic Deposition on Porous Non-Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compson, Charles; Besra, Laxmidhar; Liu, Meilin

    2007-01-01

    A method of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on substrates that are porous and electrically non-conductive has been invented. Heretofore, in order to perform an EPD, it has been necessary to either (1) use a substrate material that is inherently electrically conductive or (2) subject a non-conductive substrate to a thermal and/or chemical treatment to render it conductive. In the present method, instead of relying on the electrical conductivity of the substrate, one ensures that the substrate is porous enough that when it is immersed in an EPD bath, the solvent penetrates throughout the thickness, thereby forming quasi-conductive paths through the substrate. By making it unnecessary to use a conductive substrate, this method simplifies the overall EPD process and makes new applications possible. The method is expected to be especially beneficial in enabling deposition of layers of ceramic and/or metal for chemical and electrochemical devices, notably including solid oxide fuel cells.

  17. Chromatographic and electrophoretic approaches in ink analysis.

    PubMed

    Zlotnick, J A; Smith, F P

    1999-10-15

    Inks are manufactured from a wide variety of substances that exhibit very different chemical behaviors. Inks designed for use in different writing instruments or printing methods have quite dissimilar components. Since the 1950s chromatographic and electrophoretic methods have played important roles in the analysis of inks, where compositional information may have bearing on the investigation of counterfeiting, fraud, forgery, and other crimes. Techniques such as paper chromatography and electrophoresis, thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, gel electrophoresis, and the relatively new technique of capillary electrophoresis have all been explored as possible avenues for the separation of components of inks. This paper reviews the components of different types of inks and applications of the above separation methods are reviewed.

  18. Recent patents on electrophoretic displays and materials.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Marc; Phlips, Bernard F

    2010-11-01

    Electrophoretic displays (EPDs) have made their way into consumer products. EPDs enable displays that offer the look and form of a printed page, often called "electronic paper". We will review recent apparatus and method patents for EPD devices and their fabrication. A brief introduction into the basic display operation and history of EPDs is given, while pointing out the technological challenges and difficulties for inventors. Recently, the majority of scientific publications and patenting activity has been directed to micro-segmented EPDs. These devices exhibit high optical reflectance and contrast, wide viewing angle, and high image resolution. Micro-segmented EPDs can also be integrated with flexible transistors technologies into flexible displays. Typical particles size ranges from 200 nm to 2 micrometer. Currently one very active area of patenting is the development of full-color EPDs. We summarize the recent patenting activity for EPDs and provide comments on perceiving factors driving intellectual property protection for EPD technologies.

  19. Electrophoretic deposition of chiral polymers and composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Pang, X; Zhitomirsky, I

    2011-10-15

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method has been developed for the deposition of thin films of chiral polymers. EPD of poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly-L-ornithine (PLO) films was performed for the first time on conductive substrates from aqueous and ethanol-water solutions. The deposition yield was monitored using a quartz crystal microbalance. The results demonstrated that the deposition yield can be varied by variation of the deposition time, voltage and polymer concentration in the solutions. It was shown that PLL and PLO provided stabilization and charging of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles in suspensions. Composite PLL-HA and PLO-HA films of controlled thickness were prepared by EPD. Electron microscopy investigations showed that the thickness of the PLL, PLO and composite films was varied in the range of 0-3 μm. The polymer and composite films can be used for biomedical applications.

  20. Optimization of the southern electrophoretic transfer method

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.A.; Fujimura, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The technique of separating DNA fragments using agarose gel electrophoresis is essential in the analysis of nucleic acids. Further, after the method of transferring specific DNA fragments from those agarose gels to cellulose nitrate membranes was developed in 1975, a method was developed to transfer DNA, RNA, protein and ribonucleoprotein particles from various gels onto diazobenzyloxymethyl (DBM) paper using electrophoresis as well. This paper describes the optimum conditions for quantitative electrophoretic transfer of DNA onto nylon membranes. This method exemplifies the ability to hybridize the membrane more than once with specific RNA probes by providing sufficient retention of the DNA. Furthermore, the intrinsic properties of the nylon membrane allow for an increase in the efficiency and resolution of transfer while using somewhat harsh alkaline conditions. The use of alkaline conditions is of critical importance since we can now denature the DNA during transfer and thus only a short pre-treatment in acid is required for depurination. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Electrophoretic mobility of silica particles in a mixture of toluene and ethanol at different particle concentrations.

    PubMed

    Medrano, M; Pérez, A T; Lobry, L; Peters, F

    2009-10-20

    In this paper we present measurements of the electrophoretic mobility of colloidal particles by using heterodyne detection of light scattering. The measurements have been made up to concentrations of 5.4% silica nanoparticles, with a diameter on the order of 80 nm, in a mixture of 70% toluene and 30% ethanol. To make possible the measurements at these concentrations, the liquid mixture is chosen so as to match the index of refraction of the particles, thus resulting in a transparent suspension.

  2. In vivo measurement of the size of oil bodies in plant seeds using a simple and robust pulsed field gradient NMR method.

    PubMed

    Gromova, Marina; Guillermo, Armel; Bayle, Pierre-Alain; Bardet, Michel

    2015-04-01

    An easy to implement and convenient method to measure the mean size of oil bodies (OBs) in plant seeds is proposed using a pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFGNMR) approach. PFGNMR is a well-known technique used to study either free or restricted diffusion of molecules. As triacylglycerols (TAG) are confined in OBs, analysis of their diffusion properties is a well-suited experimental approach to determine OB sizes. In fact, at long diffusion time, TAG mean squared displacement is limited by the size of the domain where these molecules are confined. In order to access the OB size distribution, strong intensities of magnetic field gradients are generally required. In this work we demonstrate for the first time that a standard liquid-phase NMR probe equipped with a weak-intensity gradient coil can be used to determine the mean size of OBs. Average sizes were measured for several seeds, and OB diameters obtained by PFGNMR were fully consistent with previously published values obtained by microscopy techniques. Moreover, this approach provided evidence of TAG transfer through the network of interconnected OBs, which is dependent on the ability of adjacent membranes to open diffusion routes between OBs. The main advantage of the NMR method is that it does not require any sample preparation and experiments are performed with whole seeds directly introduced in a standard NMR tube.

  3. The structure investigations of dehydroacetic acid and 1,8-diaminonaphthalene condensation product by NMR, MS, and X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołodziej, B.; Morawiak, M.; Kamieński, B.; Schilf, W.

    2016-05-01

    A new unexpected product of condensation reaction of 1,8-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) and carbonyl compound (here: dehydroacetic acid (dha)) was synthesized. Discussion about the molecular structure of possible products of this reaction was done on the base of NMR studies. The structure of the titled product in both DMSO solution and in the solid state was resolved by analysis of its spectral data (X-ray structure analysis, multinuclear NMR in solution and solid state spectra) and MS measurements. The presented studies provided clear evidence that the titled product exists in diluted DMSO solution as the mixture of two kinetic free ionic species whereas in concentrated DMSO solution as well as in the solid state this system forms associated ionic pairs bonded together by hydrogen bonds.

  4. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Y.; Roy, B.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  5. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Yuji; Roy, Beas; Ran, Sheng; Budko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2014-03-20

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  6. Simultaneous pressure and /sup 19/F NMR pH measurements of smooth muscle cells of intact hog carotid arteries at rest and during contractions with norepinephrine

    SciTech Connect

    Grieder, T.A.; Evans, C.A.; Greenberg, S.S.; Diecke, F.P.J.

    1988-01-01

    Using /sup 19/F NMR we have measured the intracellular pH of the vascular smooth muscle cells of hog carotid arteries at rest and during contractions induced with norepinephrine. Experiments were performed on single, intact arteries closed at both ends, superfused from the lumen and loaded with the /sup 19/F NMR pH indicator ..cap alpha..-difluoromethylalanine. At rest, luminal pressure was maintained at 100 +/-2 mm Hg and intracellular pH was 7.12 +/- 0.04. Contractions elicited with 10/sup -5/ M norepinephrine were associated with a pressure increase of 18 +/-6 mm Hg and a decrease in pH of 0.04 +/- 0.02 units.

  7. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S , depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n , and effective mass, m*, as S ˜m*/n2 /3 . The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1 /T1 , depends on both n and m* as 1 /T1˜(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1 /T1˜(m*)2n2 /3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study A gxS bxG e50-2xT e50 , well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.

  8. Nickel-alumina composites and graded materials by electrophoretic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Nandakumar

    2005-07-01

    Nickel/Alumina composites and functionally-graded-materials (FGMs) were fabricated by the electrophoretic-deposition (EPD). NiO-Al 2O3 mixed suspensions were used rather than Ni-Al2O 3 since oxide powders are more stable in suspension and have higher electrophoretic mobilities than metals. The NiO reduced during sintering and the desired Ni-Al2O3 composites and graded materials formed. The EPD of FGMs was carried out in a flow-through cell, the NiO flow rate being varied to obtain different composition profiles. A model for the constant-current EPD of FGMs was developed via a continuously-stirred-tank-reactor approach thereby predicting composition profiles as a function of the deposition parameters. A single experimentally-measured parameter, k' was all the input necessary. The model predicted gradient profiles for different NiO inlet-stream flow rates, that agreed with the experimental profiles obtained. A systematic study of a dispersant-binder system (Phosphate-Ester/Poly-vinyl Butyral) was carried out to ensure crack-free, thick deposits. The binder/dispersant addition was optimized by balancing suspension-conductivity, rate-of-deposition and freedom from cracks. A pressureless sintering technique was developed incorporating a sintering aid (TiO2) to give dense, strong and tough composites. Ni-Al 2O3 composites with varying Ni content were fabricated. A mechanism was proposed for the reduction-sintering process and the improved flexural strength and fracture-toughness of the Ni-Al2O3 composites reported.

  9. The measurement of the β/α anomer composition within amorphous lactose prepared by spray and freeze drying using a simple (1)H-NMR method.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Rim; Elleman, Carole; Vermeer, Louic; Drake, Alex F; Woodhead, Brendon; Martin, Gary P; Royall, Paul G

    2012-02-01

    Reports of the anomeric composition of amorphous lactose are rare and state a highly variable range of composition (between 0% and 60% w/w β content). We aimed to develop a quantitative measurement by (1)H-NMR of α and β anomer content in amorphous lactose produced by different production methods. Amorphous lactose was prepared by spray and freeze drying 10% w/v aqueous solutions of lactose. NMR analysis was performed in DMSO; peak areas of partially resolved doublets at 6.3 and 6.6 ppm were used to calculate % of α and β lactose present. Polarimetery was used to determine optical rotation of lactose solutions. Observed specific rotation for supplied crystalline alpha lactose monohydrate of 88° recorded in DMSO was constant for the length of a typical NMR experiment (max. 10 min). β/α anomer contents of amorphous lactose measured by (1)H-NMR had standard deviations as low as 0.1% w/w (n = 6). Drying a lactose solution 4 h after its preparation led to almost 35% w/w difference in anomer composition within solid amorphous material compared to samples dried after only 30 min, e.g. for freeze dried samples, β content was 60 ± 0.1% w/w (4 h) and 25 ± 1.0% w/w (30 min). Mutarotation leads to this increase in β anomer concentration in aqueous solution and within the solid amorphous lactose stored at 25°C. e.g. after 56 d storage the β content of freeze dried lactose (30 min solution) increased from 25±1.0% to 50±0.5% w/w. A simple solution-based (1)H-NMR method for measurement of anomeric composition of lactose has been established. The solution β/α ratio at the time of drying is mirrored in the composition of the resulting solid amorphous material. In order to produce a consistent anomer composition within spray and freeze dried amorphous lactose, the standing time for the feed solution should be greater than 4 h, such that the most dynamic region of the mutarotation profile has been exceeded. If the amorphous material has been formed

  10. Still shimming or already measuring? - Quantitative reaction monitoring for small molecules on the sub minute timescale by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kind, J.; Thiele, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to enable monitoring of rapidly occurring reactions Wagner et al. recently presented a simple scheme for 1D NMR experiments with continuous data acquisition, without inter-scan delays, using a spatially-selective and frequency-shifted excitation approach (Wagner et al., 2013). This scheme allows acquisition of proton spectra with temporal resolutions on the millisecond timescale. Such high temporal resolutions are desired in the case of reaction monitoring using stopped flow setups. In regular 1H NMR-spectra without spatial selection the line width increases for a given shim setting with changes in sample volume, susceptibility, convection and temperature or concentration gradients due to the disturbance of magnetic field homogeneity. Concerning reaction monitoring this is unfortunate as shimming prior to acquisition becomes necessary to obtain narrow signals after injection of a reactant into an NMR sample. Even automatic shim routines may last up to minutes. Thus fast reactions can hardly be monitored online without large hardware dead times in a single stopped flow experiment. This problem is reduced in the spatially-selective and frequency-shifted continuous NMR experiment as magnetic field inhomogeneties are less pronounced and negative effects on the obtained line shapes are reduced as pointed out by Bax and Freeman (1980) [2] and demonstrated by Wagner et al. (2013). Here we present the utilization of this technique for observation of reactions in small molecule systems in which chemical conversion and longitudinal relaxation occur on the same timescale. By means of the alkaline ethyl acetate hydrolysis, a stoichiometric reaction, we show advantages of spatially-selective excitation on both temporal resolution and line shapes in stopped flow experiments. Results are compared to data obtained by non-selective small angle excitation experiments.

  11. Rapid, accurate, and simultaneous measurement of water and oil contents in the fried starchy system using low-field NMR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Tian, Yaoqi; Sun, Binghua; Wang, Jinpeng; Tong, Qunyi; Jin, Zhengyu

    2017-10-15

    Fried starchy food is rich in oil that may pose a risk to health. For controlling of the oil uptake, a rapid and accurate method for the determination of oil content in the fried starchy food is important. In this study, low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) was applied to simultaneously determine water and oil contents in the model fried starchy system. The proton signals from oil and water were verified and distinguished by desiccation at 105°C. There was no superposition between oil and water signals in the fried starch, making it possible for quantitative analysis of water and oil in a single test. Compared with Soxhlet extraction, the LF-NMR analysis provided a more accurate result of oil content in the fried starchy system, confirming the practicability of the application of LF-NMR technology as a fast and accurate method for the quantification of water and oil in the fried starchy system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. β-NMR measurements of molecular-scale lithium-ion dynamics in poly(ethylene oxide)-lithium-salt thin films.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Iain; Cortie, David L; Harada, Masashi; Kiefl, Robert F; Levy, C D Philip; MacFarlane, W Andrew; McFadden, Ryan M L; Morris, Gerald D; Ogata, Shin-Ichi; Pearson, Matthew R; Sugiyama, Jun

    2017-06-28

    β-detected NMR (β-NMR) has been used to study the molecular-scale dynamics of lithium ions in thin films of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) containing either lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) or lithium trifluoroacetate (LiTFA) salts at monomer-to-salt ratios (EO/Li) of 8.3. The results are compared with previous β-NMR measurements on pure PEO and PEO with lithium triflate (LiOTf) at the same loading [McKenzie et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 7833 (2014)]. Activated hopping of (8)Li(+) was observed in all of the films above ∼250 K, with the hopping parameters strongly correlated with the ionicity of the lithium salt rather than the polymer glass transition temperature. The pre-exponential factor increases exponentially with ionicity, while the activation energy for hopping increases approximately linearly, going from 6.3±0.2 kJ mol(-1) in PEO:LiTFA to 17.8±0.2 kJ mol(-1) in PEO:LiTFSI. The more rapid increase in the pre-exponential factor outweighs the effect of the larger activation energy and results in (8)Li(+) hopping being fastest in PEO followed by PEO:LiTFSI, PEO:LiOTf, and PEO:LiTFA.

  13. β-NMR measurements of molecular-scale lithium-ion dynamics in poly(ethylene oxide)-lithium-salt thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Iain; Cortie, David L.; Harada, Masashi; Kiefl, Robert F.; Levy, C. D. Philip; MacFarlane, W. Andrew; McFadden, Ryan M. L.; Morris, Gerald D.; Ogata, Shin-Ichi; Pearson, Matthew R.; Sugiyama, Jun

    2017-06-01

    β -detected NMR (β -NMR) has been used to study the molecular-scale dynamics of lithium ions in thin films of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) containing either lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) or lithium trifluoroacetate (LiTFA) salts at monomer-to-salt ratios (EO/Li) of 8.3. The results are compared with previous β -NMR measurements on pure PEO and PEO with lithium triflate (LiOTf) at the same loading [McKenzie et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 7833 (2014)]. Activated hopping of 8Li+ was observed in all of the films above ˜250 K, with the hopping parameters strongly correlated with the ionicity of the lithium salt rather than the polymer glass transition temperature. The pre-exponential factor increases exponentially with ionicity, while the activation energy for hopping increases approximately linearly, going from 6.3 ±0.2 kJ mol-1 in PEO:LiTFA to 17.8 ±0.2 kJ mol-1 in PEO:LiTFSI. The more rapid increase in the pre-exponential factor outweighs the effect of the larger activation energy and results in 8Li+ hopping being fastest in PEO followed by PEO:LiTFSI, PEO:LiOTf, and PEO:LiTFA.

  14. Cell and Particle Interactions and Aggregation During Electrophoretic Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hua; Zeng, Shulin; Loewenberg, Michael; Todd, Paul; Davis, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    The stability and pairwise aggregation rates of small spherical particles under the collective effects of buoyancy-driven motion and electrophoretic migration are analyzed. The particles are assumed to be non-Brownian, with thin double-layers and different zeta potentials. The particle aggregation rates may be enhanced or reduced, respectively, by parallel and antiparallel alignments of the buoyancy-driven and electrophoretic velocities. For antiparallel alignments, with the buoyancy-driven relative velocity exceeding the electrophoretic relative velocity between two widely-separated particles, there is a 'collision-forbidden region' in parameter space due to hydrodynamic interactions; thus, the suspension becomes stable against aggregation.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Illuminate the Role of Counterion Condensation in the Electrophoretic Transport of Homogalacturonans.

    PubMed

    Irani, Amir H; Owen, Jessie L; Mercadante, Davide; Williams, Martin A K

    2017-02-13

    Homogalacturonans (HGs) are polysaccharide copolymers of galacturonic acid and its methylesterified counterpart. The inter- and intramolecular distributions of the methylesterifed residues are vital behavior-determining characteristics of a sample's structure, and much experimental effort has been directed to their measurement. While many techniques are able to measure the sample-averaged degree of methylesterification (DM), the measurement of inter- and intramolecular charge distributions are challenging. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to calculate the electrophoretic mobilities of HGs that have different amounts and distributions of charges placed along the backbone. The simulations are shown to capture experimental results well, even for low-DM samples that possess high charge densities. In addition, they illuminate the role that local counterion condensation can play in the determination of the electrophoretic mobility of heterogeneous blocky polyelectrolytes that cannot be adequately described by a single chain-averaged charge spacing.

  16. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  17. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-08-29

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140-600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology.

  18. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay.

    PubMed

    Lin, Robert; Skandarajah, Arunan; Gerver, Rachel E; Neira, Hector D; Fletcher, Daniel A; Herr, Amy E

    2015-03-21

    Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a "lateral e-flow assay" and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to selectively immobilize unmodified capture antigen along the microchannel in a barcode-like pattern. The channel-filling polyacrylamide hydrogel incorporates a photoactive moiety (benzophenone) to immobilize capture antigen to the hydrogel without a priori antigen modification. We report a heterogeneous sandwich assay using low-power electrophoresis to drive biospecimen through the capture antigen barcode. Fluorescence barcode readout is collected via a low-resource appropriate imaging system (CellScope). We characterize lateral e-flow assay performance and demonstrate a serum assay for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In a pilot study, the lateral e-flow assay positively identifies HCV+ human sera in 60 min. The lateral e-flow assay provides a flexible format for conducting multiplexed immunoassays relevant to confirmatory diagnosis in near-patient settings.

  19. Microencapsulated Electrophoretic Films for Electronic Paper Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundson, Karl

    2003-03-01

    Despite the dominance of liquid crystal displays, they do not perform some functions very well. While backlit liquid crystal displays can offer excellent color performance, they wash out in bright lighting and suffer from high power consumption. Reflective liquid crystal displays have limited brightness, making these devices challenging to read for long periods of time. Flexible liquid crystal displays are difficult to manufacture and keep stable. All of these attributes (long battery lifetime, bright reflective appearance, compatibility with flexible substrates) are traits that would be found in an ideal electronic paper display - an updateable substitute for paper that could be employed in electronic books, newspapers, and other applications. I will discuss technologies that are being developed for electronic-paper-like displays, and especially on particle-based technologies. A microencapsulated electrophoretic display technology is being developed at the E Ink corporation. This display film offers offer high brightness and an ink-on-paper appearance, compatibility with flexible substrates, and image stability that can lead to very low power consumption. I will present some of the physical and chemical challenges associated with making display films with high performance.

  20. Fluid Delivery System For Capillary Electrophoretic Applications.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Liu, Changsheng; Kane, Thomas E.; Kernan, John R.; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.

    2002-04-23

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  1. Development of an electrophoretic image display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, R.; Lalak, J.

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an X-Y addressed electrophoretic image display (DPID). At a recent DARPA/PL/ISI meeting it was agreed to increase the size of the display from 350 x 600 to 360 x 640 elements. Glass substrates with the required In2O3 thickness have been obtained commercially; it is now no longer necessary to deposit additional material. Better difinition of the row electrodes has been obtained by using this glass and using ion-beam milling rather than liquid etching. Techniques to identify and repair shorts in the row electrodes have been developed. The number of defects has been reduced by better filtration and proper outgassing of the photoresist. Aluminum spits were eliminated by using electron-beam evaporation rather than evaporation from a tungsten coil. Sputter deposition of ITO has been replaced by the more reproducible evaporation technique. To obtain better electrical contact between the display and the fan-out board, the homogeneous conductive elastomer was replaced with a laminated one. A device free of shorts or opens in the row electrodes and free of shorts between the column electrodes is now being tested.

  2. A Microfluidic Platform for Interfacial Electrophoretic Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Young Soo; Moran, Jeffrey; Jones, Andrew; Bailey, Eric; Buie, Cullen

    2014-11-01

    Composite membranes of hydrogel and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are fabricated using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) at the interface of two immiscible liquids in microfluidic channels. Microfluidic channels, which have two parallel electrodes at the walls, are used to create electric fields across the interface of oil and water continuously supplied into the channels. Depending on the Reynolds (Re) and Weber (We) numbers of oil and water, we observe different formations of the interface. Once we find the optimal Re and We to create a planar interface in the channel, we apply an electric field across the interface for EPD of CNTs and/or silver (Ag) nanorods dispersed in water. During EPD, particles migrate to the oil/water interface, where cross-linking of polymers is induced to form composite hydrogel membranes. Properties of the composite hydrogel films are controlled by electric fields, CNT concentrations, and both Re and We numbers, allowing for continuous production. This fabrication method is effective to create composite polymer membranes placed in microfluidic devices with tunable electrical, mechanical, and biological properties. Potential applications include fabrication of doped hydrogels for drug delivery, conductive hydrogels for biological sensing, and electron permeable membranes for water splitting and osmotic power generation.

  3. Proton clouds to measure long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Sinnige, Tessa; Daniëls, Mark; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2014-03-26

    We show that selective labeling of proteins with protonated amino acids embedded in a perdeuterated matrix, dubbed 'proton clouds', provides general access to long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in proton-detected solid-state NMR, which is important to study protein tertiary structure. Proton-cloud labeling significantly improves spectral resolution by simultaneously reducing proton line width and spectral crowding despite a high local proton density in clouds. The approach is amenable to almost all canonical amino acids. Our method is demonstrated on ubiquitin and the β-barrel membrane protein BamA.

  4. A multiple pulse zero crossing NMR technique, and its application to F-19 chemical shift measurements in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W.-K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple multiple-pulse 'zero crossing technique' for accurately determining the first moment of a solid-state NMR spectrum is introduced. This technique was applied to obtain the F-19 chemical shift versus pressure curves up to 5 kbar for single crystals of CaF2 (0.29 + or - 0.02 ppm/kbar) and BaF2 (0.62 + or - 0.05 ppm/kbar). Results at ambient temperature and pressure are also reported for a number of other fluorine compounds. Because of its high data rate, this technique is potentially several orders of magnitude more sensitive than similar CW methods.

  5. Cell and Particle Interactions and Aggregation During Electrophoretic Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this research were (i) to perform experiments for observing and quantifying electrophoretic aggregation, (ii) to develop a theoretical description to appropriately analyze and compare with the experimental results, (iii) to study the combined effects of electrophoretic and gravitational aggregation of large particles, and the combined effects of electrophoretic and Brownian aggregation of small particles, and (iv) to perform a preliminary design of a potential future flight experiment involving electrophoretic aggregation. Electrophoresis refers to the motion of charged particles, droplets or molecules in response to an applied electric field. Electrophoresis is commonly used for analysis and separation of biological particles or molecules. When particles have different surface charge densities or potentials, they will migrate at different velocities in an electric field. This differential migration leads to the possibility that they will collide and aggregate, thereby preventing separation.

  6. Influence of surfactants and humic acids on Artemia Franciscana's embryonic phospho-metabolite profile as measured by (31)P NMR.

    PubMed

    Deese, Rachel D; Weldeghiorghis, Thomas K; Haywood, Benjamin J; Cook, Robert L

    2017-05-01

    Surfactants, such as triton X-100 (Tx-100), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) are known to be toxic to Artemia Franciscana (Artemia) - an organism, frequently used to monitor the health of the aquatic environment. The phospho-metabolite profile of a living organism is often indicative of imbalances that may have been caused by environmental stressors, such as surfactants. This study utilizes in vivo(31)P NMR to monitor temporal changes in the phospho-metabolite profile of Artemia caused by Tx-100, CPC, and SDS and the ability of humic acid (HA) to mitigate the toxicity of these surfactants. It was found that, while Tx-100 does not have any effect on the phospho-metabolite profile, both CPC and SDS cause a complete retardation in growth of the phosphodiester (PDE) peak in the (31)P NMR spectrum, which is indicative of the inhibited cell replication. This growth inhibition was independently verified by the decreased guanosine triphosphate (GTP) concentration in the CPC and SDS-exposed Artemia. In addition, upon introduction of HA to the CPC and SDS-exposed Artemia, an increase of PDE peak over time is indicative of HA mitigating toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Approach of the Molten Salt Chemistry for Aluminium Production: High Temperature NMR Measurements, Molecular Dynamics and DFT Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Kelly; Zanghi, Didier; Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Cadars, Sylvian; Burbano, Mario; Salanne, Mathieu; Bessada, Catherine

    In aluminum production, the electrolyte is a molten fluorides mixture typically around 1000°C. In order to have a better understanding of the industrial process, it is necessary to have a model which will describe the molten salts on a wide range of compositions and temperatures, to accurately cover all the combinations that may be encountered in an operating electrolysis vessel. The aim of this study is to describe the speciation in the electrolyte in terms of anionic species in the bulk materials far from electrodes. To determine the speciation in situ at high temperature in the absence of an electrical field, we develop an original approach combining experimental methods such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR) at high temperature with Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation coupled with first principle calculations based on Density Functional Theory (DFT). This approach allows the calculation of NMR parameters and the comparison with the experimental ones. It will be provide an additional validation and constraint of the model used for MD. We test this approach on the model NaF-AlF3 system.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of tissue water and its relationship to cell volume changes in pathological states.

    PubMed

    Sotak, Christopher H

    2004-09-01

    Diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging (DWI) is sensitive to the random translational motion of water molecules due to Brownian motion. Although the mechanism is still not completely understood, the cellular swelling that accompanies cell membrane depolarization results in a reduction in the net displacement of diffusing water molecules and thus a concomitant reduction in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of tissue water. Cerebral regions of reduced ADC appear hyperintense in a DWI and this technique has been used extensively to study acute stroke. In addition to cerebral ischemia, reductions in the ADC of cerebral water have been observed following cortical spreading depression, ischemic depolarizations (IDs), transient ischemic attack (TIA), status epilepticus, and hypoglycemia. Although the mechanism responsible for initiating membrane depolarization varies in each case, the ensuing cell volume changes follow a similar pattern. Water ADC values are also affected by the presence and orientation of barriers to translational motion (such as cell membranes and myelin fibers) and thus NMR measures of anisotropic diffusion are sensitive to more chronic pathological states where the integrity of these structures is modified by disease. Both theoretical prediction and experimental evidence suggest that the ADC of tissue water is related to the volume fraction of the interstitial space via the electrical conductivity of the tissue. The implication is that acute neurological disorders that exhibit electrical conductivity changes should also exhibit ADC changes that are detectable by DWI. A qualitative correlation between electrical conductivity and the ADC of water has been demonstrated in a number of animal model studies and the results indicate that reduced ADC values are associated with reductions in the extracellular volume fraction and increased extracellular tortuosity. The close relationship between ADC changes and cell volume changes in

  9. Effect of pH on the Electrophoretic Mobility of Spores of Bacillus anthracis and Its Surrogates in Aqueous Solutions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of endospores of Bacillus anthracis and surrogates were measured in aqueous solution across a broad pH range and several ionic strengths. EPM values trended around phylogenetic clustering based on the 16S rRNA gene. Measurements reported here prov...

  10. Effect of pH on the Electrophoretic Mobility of Spores of Bacillus anthracis and Its Surrogates in Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Popovici, Jonathan; Lytle, Darren A.; Adcock, Noreen J.; Rice, Eugene W.

    2012-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of endospores of Bacillus anthracis and surrogates was measured in aqueous solution across a broad pH range and several ionic strengths. EPM values trended around phylogenetic clustering based on the 16S rRNA gene. Measurements reported here provide new insight for Bacillus anthracis surrogate selection and for attachment/detachment and transport studies. PMID:23001659

  11. Effect of pH on the Electrophoretic Mobility of Spores of Bacillus anthracis and Its Surrogates in Aqueous Solutions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of endospores of Bacillus anthracis and surrogates were measured in aqueous solution across a broad pH range and several ionic strengths. EPM values trended around phylogenetic clustering based on the 16S rRNA gene. Measurements reported here prov...

  12. Kinetics of monolayer and bilayer nanoparticle film formation during electrophoretic deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    and Astronomy , Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235, USA 2Vanderbilt Institute for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Vanderbilt University...crystal microbalance or X- ray scattering measurements. Another possible route to increasing time resolution and repeatability is by acquiring in-situ...suppression, and inhibition in the electrophoretic deposition of nanocrystal mixture films for CdSe nanocrystals with gamma -Fe2O3 and Au nanocrystals’, Nano

  13. Electrophoretic Mobilities of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Wild-Type Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Darren A.; Rice, Eugene W.; Johnson, Clifford H.; Fox, Kim R.

    1999-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of a number of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and wild-type E. coli strains were measured. The effects of pH and ionic strength on the EPMs were investigated. The EPMs of E. coli O157:H7 strains differed from those of wild-type strains. As the suspension pH decreased, the EPMs of both types of strains increased. PMID:10388724

  14. Understanding local forces in electrophoretic ink systems: utilizing optical tweezers to explore electrophoretic display devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, David L.; Dickinson, Mark R.; Smith, N.; Gleeson, Helen F.

    2016-09-01

    Optical tweezers can be used as a valuable tool to characterize electrophoretic display (EPD) systems. EPDs are ubiquitous with e-readers and are becoming a commonplace technology where reflective, low-power displays are required; yet the physics of some features crucial to their operation remains poorly defined. We utilize optical tweezers as a tool to understand the motion of charged ink particles within the devices and show that the response of optically trapped electrophoretic particles can be used to characterize electric fields within these devices. This technique for mapping the force can be compared to simulations of the electric field in our devices, thus demonstrating that the electric field itself is the sole governor of the particle motion in an individual-particle regime. By studying the individual-particle response to the electric field, we can then begin to characterize particle motion in `real' systems with many particles. Combining optical tweezing with particle tracking techniques, we can investigate deviations in many particle systems from the single-particle case.

  15. Space Efficient Opposed-Anvil High-Pressure Cell and Its Application to Optical and NMR Measurements up to 9 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Kentaro; Gotou, Hirotada; Yagi, Takehiko; Yamada, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Takehiko; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Takigawa, Masashi

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a new type of opposed-anvil high pressure cell with substantially improved space efficiency. The clamp cell and the gasket are made of non-magnetic Ni-Cr-Al alloy. Non-magnetic tungsten carbide (NMWC) is used for the anvils. The assembled cell with the dimension φ 29 mm × 41 mm is capable of generating pressure up to 9 GPa over a relatively large volume of 7 mm3. Our cell is particularly suitable for those experiments which require large sample space to achieve good signal-to-noise ratio, such as the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment. Argon is used as the pressure transmitting medium to obtain good hydrostaticity. The pressure was calibrated in situ by measuring the fluorescence from ruby through a transparent moissanite (6H-SiC) window. We have measured the pressure and temperature dependences of the 63Cu nuclear-quadrupole-resonance (NQR) frequency of Cu2O, the in-plane Knight shift of metallic tin, and the Knight shift of platinum. These quantities can be used as reliable manometers to determine the pressure values in situ during the NMR/NQR experiments up to 9 GPa.

  16. Formation of κ-carrageenan-gelatin polyelectrolyte complexes studied by (1)H NMR, UV spectroscopy and kinematic viscosity measurements.

    PubMed

    Voron'ko, Nicolay G; Derkach, Svetlana R; Vovk, Mikhail A; Tolstoy, Peter M

    2016-10-20

    The intermolecular interactions between an anionic polysaccharide from the red algae κ-carrageenan and a gelatin polypeptide, forming stoichiometric polysaccharide-polypeptide (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes in the aqueous phase, were examined. The major method of investigation was high-resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Additional data were obtained by UV absorption spectroscopy, light scattering dispersion and capillary viscometry. Experimental data were interpreted in terms of the changing roles of electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds when κ-carrageenan-gelatin complexes are formed. At high temperatures, when biopolymer macromolecules in solution are in the state of random coil, hydrophobic interactions make a major contribution to complex stabilization. At the temperature of gelatin's coil→helix conformational transition and at lower temperatures, electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds play a defining role in complex formation. A proposed model of the κ-carrageenan-gelatin complex is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. NMR measurements of gaseous sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) to probe the cross-linking of EPDM rubber.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, M; Neutzler, S; Aluas, M; Hoepfel, D; Oellrich, L R

    2005-11-01

    The effects of embedding gaseous SF6 into EPDM rubber were investigated using NMR methods. It was found that observed sorption and desorption processes follow the behavior of the dual mode sorption model. A strong correlation was found between EPDM cross-linking and transversal relaxation time of embedded SF6. EPDM samples with different cross-link densities, preliminarily determined by 1H transversal relaxation using the Gotlib model and Litvinov's method, were investigated using embedded SF6. The sensitivity of the 19F transversal relaxation rate of SF6 to the EPDM cross-link density variation was found to be at least 10 times higher than for 1H in the polymer chain. First experiments on probing the swelling effects in EPDM due to its contact with polar liquids have been performed. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Oil quality parameters and quantitative measurement of major secoiridoid derivatives in Neb Jmel olive oil from various Tunisian origins using qNMR.

    PubMed

    Ben Mansour, Amir; Gargouri, Boutheina; Melliou, Eleni; Magiatis, Prokopios; Bouaziz, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Olive oil contains compounds with interesting biological activities which are influenced by the cultivar, the geographic origin and other factors. The aims of this work were to (1) investigate these factors in Neb Jmel olive oil from various Tunisian origins; (2) determine the influence of geographic conditions on phenolic composition of Neb Jmel olive oil and consequently on the antioxidant compounds; and (3) verify whether oils could be discriminated based on geographical origin. The characterisation of extra-virgin Neb Jmel olive oil produced in its original location has been conducted. Owing to the effect of the genotype and environmental, agronomic and technological factors on the chemical composition of olive oil and its quality, all studied olives were collected at the same season, and their oil obtained under the same processing technique. Many analyses were carried out to characterise the different olive oils: free acidity, peroxide value, fatty acid composition, Rancimat assay, pigments content and phenolic compounds by (1) H NMR. A recently developed method for the direct measurement of the oleocanthal and oleacein levels in olive oil by quantitative (1) H NMR was applied. The method was applied to the study of four Neb Jmel olive oils samples, and a broad variation of concentrations of all four secoiridoids was recorded. The concentration of each ranged from 55 to 529 mg kg(-1) and the sum of the four major secoiridoids (known as D3) ranged from 436 to 1063 mg kg(-1) . The quantification of major phenolic compounds of olive oil by NMR indicated that environmental conditions influence the production of qualitative phenolic fractions. All these compounds can be used as base 'markers' to characterise and differentiate these olive oil on geographic origin. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Fabrication of nanoelectrodes for neurophysiology: cathodic electrophoretic paint insulation and focused ion beam milling

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yi; Chen, Jie; Guo, Xiaoli; Cantrell, Donald; Ruoff, Rodney; Troy, John

    2005-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of tungsten nanoelectrodes insulated with cathodic electrophoretic paint is described together with their application within the field of neurophysiology. The tip of a 127 μm diameter tungsten wire was etched down to less than 100 nm and then insulated with cathodic electrophoretic paint. Focused ion beam (FIB) polishing was employed to remove the insulation at the electrode’s apex, leaving a nanoscale sized conductive tip of 100–1000 nm. The nanoelectrodes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their electrochemical properties characterized by steady state linear sweep voltammetry. Electrode impedance at 1 kHz was measured too. The ability of a 700 nm tipped electrode to record well-isolated action potentials extracellularly from single visual neurons in vivo was demonstrated. Such electrodes have the potential to open new populations of neurons to study. PMID:16467926

  20. Electrophoretic Migration and Axial Diffusion of Individual Nanoparticles in Cylindrical Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Rui; Wang, Gufeng; Qi, Shengda; Ma, Changbei; Yeung, Edward S.

    2012-08-01

    Membranes with straight, vertical nanopores have found widespread applications in chemical and biological sciences, including separation, detection, catalysis, and drug delivery. They can also serve as a model system to understand molecular behavior and fundamental mechanisms of separation, bridging the gap between conventional model systems such as flat surfaces and real chromatographic stationary phases such as micrometer-sized porous particles. We recently found that the axial motion of individual biomolecules inside nanopores can be significantly slower than in bulk solution. This suggests that either chromatographic adsorption was present and/or the viscosity inside the nanopores was unusually high. In this study, we measured the electrophoretic motion as well as the axial diffusion of individual nanoparticles in cylindrical alumina nanopores. We found that the electrophoretic mobilities and the diffusion coefficients of polystyrene nanoparticles were both substantially smaller compared to bulk solution independent of particle size or pore diameter. The results imply that the apparent solution viscosity in nanodomains is anomalous.

  1. Fabrication of nanoelectrodes for neurophysiology: cathodic electrophoretic paint insulation and focused ion beam milling.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yi; Chen, Jie; Guo, Xiaoli; Cantrell, Donald; Ruoff, Rodney; Troy, John

    2005-09-01

    The fabrication and characterization of tungsten nanoelectrodes insulated with cathodic electrophoretic paint is described together with their application within the field of neurophysiology. The tip of a 127 mum diameter tungsten wire was etched down to less than 100 nm and then insulated with cathodic electrophoretic paint. Focused ion beam (FIB) polishing was employed to remove the insulation at the electrode's apex, leaving a nanoscale sized conductive tip of 100-1000 nm. The nanoelectrodes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their electrochemical properties characterized by steady state linear sweep voltammetry. Electrode impedance at 1 kHz was measured too. The ability of a 700 nm tipped electrode to record well-isolated action potentials extracellularly from single visual neurons in vivo was demonstrated. Such electrodes have the potential to open new populations of neurons to study.

  2. Fabrication of fluoroalkylsilane modified ZnO nanorod films for electrode protection of electrophoretic displays.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengyuan; Meng, Xianwei; Tang, Fangqiong

    2011-11-01

    The electrode protection has gained importance because of its positive robust role for the long term display quality of electrophoretic displays. A simple method of zinc oxide nanorod films prepared by electrochemical deposition and coupling with fluoroalkylsilane (FAS) is introduced to fabricate electrode protection films for Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) electrodes. The surface microstructures of zinc oxide films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, showing a regular nanorods array. After treated by FAS the surface showed extremely low surface free energy with a water contact angle of 148.0 +/- 2.0 degrees. The settlement of pigments was considerably reduced according to the reflectance measurement by ultraviolet spectrophotometer. A weight experiment further confirmed that 90% of the pigment conglutination was prevented by the surface modification. This research can provide an economical approach to improve reliability and long-term image quality of the electrophoretic displays.

  3. Column-coupling strategies for multidimensional electrophoretic separation techniques.

    PubMed

    Kler, Pablo A; Sydes, Daniel; Huhn, Carolin

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional electrophoretic separations represent one of the most common strategies for dealing with the analysis of complex samples. In recent years we have been witnessing the explosive growth of separation techniques for the analysis of complex samples in applications ranging from life sciences to industry. In this sense, electrophoretic separations offer several strategic advantages such as excellent separation efficiency, different methods with a broad range of separation mechanisms, and low liquid consumption generating less waste effluents and lower costs per analysis, among others. Despite their impressive separation efficiency, multidimensional electrophoretic separations present some drawbacks that have delayed their extensive use: the volumes of the columns, and consequently of the injected sample, are significantly smaller compared to other analytical techniques, thus the coupling interfaces between two separations components must be very efficient in terms of providing geometrical precision with low dead volume. Likewise, very sensitive detection systems are required. Additionally, in electrophoretic separation techniques, the surface properties of the columns play a fundamental role for electroosmosis as well as the unwanted adsorption of proteins or other complex biomolecules. In this sense the requirements for an efficient coupling for electrophoretic separation techniques involve several aspects related to microfluidics and physicochemical interactions of the electrolyte solutions and the solid capillary walls. It is interesting to see how these multidimensional electrophoretic separation techniques have been used jointly with different detection techniques, for intermediate detection as well as for final identification and quantification, particularly important in the case of mass spectrometry. In this work we present a critical review about the different strategies for coupling two or more electrophoretic separation techniques and the

  4. Site-resolved measurement of microsecond-to-millisecond conformational-exchange processes in proteins by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tollinger, Martin; Sivertsen, Astrid C; Meier, Beat H; Ernst, Matthias; Schanda, Paul

    2012-09-12

    We demonstrate that conformational exchange processes in proteins on microsecond-to-millisecond time scales can be detected and quantified by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We show two independent approaches that measure the effect of conformational exchange on transverse relaxation parameters, namely Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation-dispersion experiments and measurement of differential multiple-quantum coherence decay. Long coherence lifetimes, as required for these experiments, are achieved by the use of highly deuterated samples and fast magic-angle spinning. The usefulness of the approaches is demonstrated by application to microcrystalline ubiquitin. We detect a conformational exchange process in a region of the protein for which dynamics have also been observed in solution. Interestingly, quantitative analysis of the data reveals that the exchange process is more than 1 order of magnitude slower than in solution, and this points to the impact of the crystalline environment on free energy barriers.

  5. Volovik effect and Fermi-liquid behavior in the s -wave superconductor CaPd2As2: 75As NMR-NQR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Q.-P.; Wiecki, P.; Anand, V. K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Lee, Y.; Johnston, D. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-04-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the collapsed-tetragonal CaPd2As2 superconductor (SC) with a transition temperature of 1.27 K have been investigated by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The temperature (T ) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1 /T1) and the Knight shifts indicate the absence of magnetic correlations in the normal state. In the SC state, 1 /T1 measured by 75As NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter (HS) peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially at lower T , confirming a conventional s -wave SC. In addition, the Volovik effect, also known as the Doppler shift effect, has been clearly evidenced by the observation of the suppression of the HS peak with applied magnetic field.

  6. Volovik effect and Fermi-liquid behavior in the s-wave superconductor CaPd2As2: As75 NMR-NQR measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Ding, Q. -P.; Wiecki, P.; Anand, V. K.; ...

    2016-04-07

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the collapsed-tetragonal CaPd2As2 superconductor (SC) with a transition temperature of 1.27 K have been investigated by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts indicate the absence of magnetic correlations in the normal state. In the SC state, 1/T1 measured by 75As NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter (HS) peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially at lower T, confirming a conventional s-wave SC. Additionally, the Volovik effect, also known as the Doppler shift effect, hasmore » been clearly evidenced by the observation of the suppression of the HS peak with applied magnetic field.« less

  7. Accurate measurements of 13C-13C distances in uniformly 13C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Khaneja, Navin; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2014-09-01

    Application of sets of 13C-13C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important 13C-13C distances in uniformly 13C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl (13C') and aliphatic (13Caliphatic) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly 13C,15N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of 13C'-13Caliphatic distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform 13C,15N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  8. Studies of vanadium-phosphorus-oxygen selective oxidation catalysts by sup 31 P and sup 51 V NMR spin-echo and volume susceptibility measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Juan.

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize the vanadium-phosphorous oxide (V-P-O) catalysts for the selective oxidation of n-butane and 1-butene to maleic anhydride. The utility of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance as an analytical tool in this investigation lies in its sensitivity to the electronic environment surrounding the phosphorous and vanadium nuclei, and proximity of paramagnetic species. Spin-echo mapping NMR of {sup 31}p and {sup 51}v and volume magnetic susceptibility measurements were used as local microscopic probes of the presence of V{sup 5+}, V{sup 4+}, V{sup 3+} species in the model compounds: {beta}-VOPO{sub 4}, {beta}-VOPO{sub 4} treated with n-butane/1-butene, (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} treated with n-butane/1-butene; and industrial catalysts with P/V (phosphorus to vanadium) ratio of 0.9, 1.0 and 1.1, before and after treatment with n-butane and 1-butene. The NMR spectra provide a picture of how the oxidation states of vanadium are distributed in these catalysts. 73 refs., 32 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Proton Dynamics in the Anti-ferroelectric CsH3(SeO3)2 by using 1H NMR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moohee; Ndiaye, B.; Kang, K.; Kim, H.; Sim, J.; Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-03-01

    1H NMR techniques have been employed on the anti-ferroelectric CsH3(SeO3)2 to measure spectrum, shift, T1 and T2 from 300 K down to 80 K at 4.85 T. The 1H NMR spectrum at 300 K shows a composite structure; one dominant broad peak and two small narrow peaks. From the temperature dependences of both intensity and T1 for each peak, we identify that the narrow peaks come from rapidly moving protons whereas the broad peaks originate from rigid protons. The spectra below 200 K show several peaks associated with six nonequivalent proton sites and also the T1 decays show a non-exponential curve coming from many proton sites. T1 is very long even at 300 K and becomes even longer at low temperature. By analyzing T1 decays with T1S and T1L, we confirm that 1/T1(T) show an activated behavior; the short component originates from proton dynamics with activation energy of ~ 140 K and the long component is associated with that of ~ 100 K. Further analysis suggests that some protons show an abrupt change in both shift and T1L across Tc and may be responsible for the phase transition.

  10. Solvation Structure of Imidazolium Cation in Mixtures of [C4mim][TFSA] Ionic Liquid and Diglyme by NMR Measurements and MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Takuya; Kodama, Daisuke; Kanakubo, Mitsuhiro; Tsuzuki, Seiji

    2017-04-06

    Interactions of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation ([C4mim](+)) with bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide anion ([TFSA](-)) and diethyleneglycol dimethyl ether (diglyme) in mixtures of [C4mim][TFSA] ionic liquid and diglyme have been investigated using (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of NMR chemical shift measurements and MD simulations showed that the diglyme oxygen atoms have contact with the imidazolium hydrogen atoms of [C4mim](+) in the mixtures. The contact between the hydrogen atoms of imidazolium and the oxygen atoms of [TFSA](-) remains even when the diglyme mole fraction (xdiglyme) increases up to 0.9. However, the coordination numbers of the hydrogen atoms of [C4mim](+) with oxygen atoms of diglyme increase with xdiglyme. The [TFSA](-) anions around [C4mim](+) are not completely replaced by diglyme even at xdiglyme > 0.9. The MD simulations revealed that the diglymes also have contact with the butyl group of [C4mim](+). The methyl groups of diglyme prefer to have contact with the terminal methyl group of the butyl group, whereas the diglyme oxygen atoms prefer to have contact with the methylene group connected to the imidazolium ring of [C4mim](+).

  11. Study of polymer particles suspensions for electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    De Riccardis, M Federica; Martina, Virginia; Carbone, Daniela

    2013-02-14

    Recently a great interest has been expressed in electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of polymers, both as particles and as chains. It is generally accepted that also for polymer particles, the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory is valid, therefore, in principle, polymer suspensions suitable for EPD could be easily obtained by dispersing polymer particles in an aqueous or nonaqueous medium. Nevertheless, this work demonstrated that in order to obtain good quality deposits based on poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE), some additives have to be used. In the case of PEEK, a dispersant providing citrate anions was successfully used, whereas for PTFE a steric suspension stabilization was reached by adding polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). In such a way, codeposition of PEEK and PTFE was achieved. The efficiency of the EPD process was demonstrated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. A thermal program consisting of heat/cool/heat cycles at a low rate was used in order to evaluate the crystalline amount of each polymer in the deposits. In order to explain the obtained results, it needed to also consider the dimension and structural characteristic of the polymer particles.

  12. Analysis of electrophoretic patterns of arbitrarily primed PCR profiling.

    PubMed

    Trifunović, Dragana; Radović, Milan; Ristić, Zoran; Guzvić, Miodrag; Dimitrijević, Bogomir

    2005-11-01

    We present a mathematical algorithm for the analysis of electrophoretic patterns resulting from arbitrarily primed PCR profiling. The algorithm is based on the established mathematical procedures applied to the analysis of digital images of gel patterns. The algorithm includes (a) transformation of the image into a matrix form, (b) identification of every electrophoretic lane as a set of matrix columns that are further mathematically processed, (c) averaging of matrix columns corresponding to electrophoretic lanes that define lane representatives, (d) elimination of "smiling" bands, (e) solving the problem of a lane offset, and (f) removal of the background. Representation of individual electrophoretic lanes in the form of functions allows interlane comparisons and further mathematical analysis. Direct comparison of selected lanes was obtained by employing correlation analysis. Gel images were those obtained after arbitrarily primed PCR analysis of DNA that underwent damage induced by gamma radiation from a (60)Co source. The applied method proved to be useful for elimination of subjectivity of visual inspection. It offers the possibility to avoid overlooking important differences in case of suboptimal electrophoretic resolution. In addition, higher precision is achieved in the assessment of quantitative differences due to better insight into experimental artifacts. These simple mathematical methods offer an open-type algorithm, i.e., this algorithm enables easy implementation of different parameters that may be useful for other analytical needs.

  13. Particle Aggregation due to Combined Gravitational and Electrophoretic Motion

    PubMed

    Wang; Zeng; Loewenberg; Davis

    1997-03-01

    The stability and pairwise aggregation rates of small spherical particles in a heterogeneous suspension under the collective effects of gravitational motion and electrophoretic migration are analyzed. The particles are assumed to be non-Brownian, with thin, unpolarized double layers and different zeta potentials. The gravity vector and the electric field are assumed to be oriented in either the same direction or opposite directions. The particle aggregation rates are always enhanced by the presence of an electric field for parallel alignment of the gravitational and electrophoretic velocities. For antiparallel alignment with the magnitude of the gravitational relative velocity exceeding the magnitude of the electrophoretic relative velocity between two widely separated particles, the particle aggregation rates are reduced by the presence of the electric field, and there is a "collision-forbidden" region in parameter space due to stronger hydrodynamic interactions of the particles for gravitational motion than for electrophoretic motion. For antiparallel alignment with the magnitude of the electrophoretic relative velocity exceeding the magnitude of the gravitational relative velocity between two widely separated particles, the particle aggregation rates are enhanced by the presence of the electric field.

  14. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a S33 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the S33 NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 μM taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples.

  15. Combining Diffusion NMR and Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Enables Precise Measurements of Polymer Chain Compression in a Crowded Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Swomitra; He, Lilin; Hamilton, William A.; Yethiraj, Arun; Yethiraj, Anand

    2017-03-01

    The effect of particles on the behavior of polymers in solution is important in a number of important phenomena such as the effect of "crowding" proteins in cells, colloid-polymer mixtures, and nanoparticle "fillers" in polymer solutions and melts. In this Letter, we study the effect of spherical inert nanoparticles (which we refer to as "crowders") on the diffusion coefficient and radius of gyration of polymers in solution using pulsed-field-gradient NMR and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), respectively. The diffusion coefficients exhibit a plateau below a characteristic polymer concentration, which we identify as the overlap threshold concentration c⋆. Above c⋆, in a crossover region between the dilute and semidilute regimes, the (long-time) self-diffusion coefficients are found, universally, to decrease exponentially with polymer concentration at all crowder packing fractions, consistent with a structural basis for the long-time dynamics. The radius of gyration obtained from SANS in the crossover regime changes linearly with an increase in polymer concentration, and must be extrapolated to c⋆ in order to obtain the radius of gyration of an individual polymer chain. When the polymer radius of gyration and crowder size are comparable, the polymer size is very weakly affected by the presence of crowders, consistent with recent computer simulations. There is significant chain compression, however, when the crowder size is much smaller than the polymer radius gyration.

  16. Analysis of internal motions of interleukin-13 variant associated with severe bronchial asthma using {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Yuichiro; Ohkuri, Takatoshi; Takeda, Chika; Kuroki, Ryota; Izuhara, Kenji; Imoto, Taiji; Ueda, Tadashi . E-mail: ueda@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-22

    The single nucleotide polymorphism interleukin-13 (IL-13) R110Q is associated with severe bronchial asthma because its lower affinity leads to the augmentation of local IL-13 concentration, resulting in an increase in the signal transduction via IL-13R. Since the mutation site does not directly bind to IL-13R{alpha}2, we carried out NMR relaxation analyses of the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q in order to examine whether the R110Q mutation affects the internal motions in IL-13 molecules. The results showed that the internal motion in the micro- to millisecond time scale on helix D, which is suggested to be important for the interaction between IL-13 and IL-13R{alpha}2, is increased in IL-13-R110Q compared with that in the wild-type IL-13. It therefore appears that the difference in the internal motions on helix D between the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q may be involved in their affinity differences with IL-13R{alpha}2.

  17. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M; Wang, Xiliang

    2014-12-05

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes with high capability of invasion and rapid metastasis to other organs. Malignant melanoma is the most common metastatic malignancy found in gastrointestinal tract (GI). To the best of our knowledge, previous studies of melanoma in gastrointestinal tract are all clinical case reports. In this work, 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is used to investigate the metabolite profiles differences of stomach tissue extracts of metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse and search for specific metabolite biomarker candidates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to evaluate important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Both PCA and OPLS results reveal that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. Among the 50 identified metabolites, it is found that the concentrations of 19 metabolites are statistically and significantly changed with the levels of O-phosphocholine and hypoxanthine down-regulated while the levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, isobutyrate, threonine, cadaverine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, methionine, citrate, asparagine, tryptophan, glycine, serine, uracil, and formate up-regulated in the melanoma group. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in stomach.

  18. Metastatic Melanoma Induced Metabolic Changes in C57BL/6J Mouse Stomach Measured by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, M; Wang, Xiliang

    2014-12-05

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes with high capability of invasion and rapid metastasis to other organs. Malignant melanoma is the most common metastatic malignancy found in gastrointestinal tract (GI). To the best of our knowledge, previous studies of melanoma in gastrointestinal tract are all clinical case reports. In this work, 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is used to investigate the metabolite profiles differences of stomach tissue extracts of metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse and search for specific metabolite biomarker candidates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an unsupervised multivariate data analysis method, is used to detect possible outliers, while Orthogonalmore » Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS), a supervised multivariate data analysis method, is employed to evaluate important metabolites responsible for discriminating the control and the melanoma groups. Both PCA and OPLS results reveal that the melanoma group can be well separated from its control group. Among the 50 identified metabolites, it is found that the concentrations of 19 metabolites are statistically and significantly changed with the levels of O-phosphocholine and hypoxanthine down-regulated while the levels of isoleucine, leucine, valine, isobutyrate, threonine, cadaverine, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, methionine, citrate, asparagine, tryptophan, glycine, serine, uracil, and formate up-regulated in the melanoma group. These significantly changed metabolites are associated with multiple biological pathways and may be potential biomarkers for metastatic melanoma in stomach.« less

  19. Assessment of the Effect of High or Low Protein Diet on the Human Urine Metabolome as Measured by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Lone G.; Winning, Hanne; Savorani, Francesco; Toft, Henrik; Larsen, Thomas M.; Dragsted, Lars O.; Astrup, Arne; Engelsen, Søren B.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify urinary metabolite profiles that discriminate between high and low intake of dietary protein during a dietary intervention. Seventy-seven overweight, non-diabetic subjects followed an 8-week low-calorie diet (LCD) and were then randomly assigned to a high (HP) or low (LP) protein diet for 6 months. Twenty-four hours urine samples were collected at baseline (prior to the 8-week LCD) and after dietary intervention; at months 1, 3 and 6, respectively. Metabolite profiling was performed by 1H NMR and chemometrics. Using partial least squares regression (PLS), it was possible to develop excellent prediction models for urinary nitrogen (root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) = 1.63 mmol/L; r = 0.89) and urinary creatinine (RMSECV = 0.66 mmol/L; r = 0.98). The obtained high correlations firmly establish the validity of the metabolomic approach since urinary nitrogen is a well established biomarker for daily protein consumption. The models showed that trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is correlated to urinary nitrogen. Furthermore, urinary creatine was found to be increased by the HP diet whereas citric acid was increased by the LP diet. Despite large variations in individual dietary intake, differentiated metabolite profiles were observed at the dietary group-level. PMID:22413065

  20. Combining Diffusion NMR and Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Enables Precise Measurements of Polymer Chain Compression in a Crowded Environment.

    PubMed

    Palit, Swomitra; He, Lilin; Hamilton, William A; Yethiraj, Arun; Yethiraj, Anand

    2017-03-03

    The effect of particles on the behavior of polymers in solution is important in a number of important phenomena such as the effect of "crowding" proteins in cells, colloid-polymer mixtures, and nanoparticle "fillers" in polymer solutions and melts. In this Letter, we study the effect of spherical inert nanoparticles (which we refer to as "crowders") on the diffusion coefficient and radius of gyration of polymers in solution using pulsed-field-gradient NMR and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), respectively. The diffusion coefficients exhibit a plateau below a characteristic polymer concentration, which we identify as the overlap threshold concentration c^{⋆}. Above c^{⋆}, in a crossover region between the dilute and semidilute regimes, the (long-time) self-diffusion coefficients are found, universally, to decrease exponentially with polymer concentration at all crowder packing fractions, consistent with a structural basis for the long-time dynamics. The radius of gyration obtained from SANS in the crossover regime changes linearly with an increase in polymer concentration, and must be extrapolated to c^{⋆} in order to obtain the radius of gyration of an individual polymer chain. When the polymer radius of gyration and crowder size are comparable, the polymer size is very weakly affected by the presence of crowders, consistent with recent computer simulations. There is significant chain compression, however, when the crowder size is much smaller than the polymer radius gyration.

  1. Structure and dynamics of a detergent-solubilized membrane protein: measurement of amide hydrogen exchange rates in M13 coat protein by /sub 1/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, J.D.J.; Sykes, B.D.

    1988-04-19

    The coat protein of bacteriophage M13 is inserted into the inner membrane of Escherichia coli where it exists as an integral membrane protein during the reproductive cycle of the phage. The protein sequence consists of a highly hydrophobic 19-residue central segment flanked by an acidic 20-residue N-terminus and a basic 11-residue C-terminus. The authors have measured backbone amide hydrogen exchange of the protein solubilized in perdeuteriated sodium dodecyl sulfate using /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Direct proton exchange-out measurements in D/sub 2/O at 24 /sup 0/C were used to follow the exchange of the slowest amides in the protein. Multiple exponential fitting of the exchange data showed that these amides exchanged in two kinetic sets with exchange rates that differed by more than 100-fold. Steady-state saturation-transfer techniques were also used to measure exchange. These methods showed that 15-20 amides in the protein are very stable at 55/sup 0/C and that bout 30 amides have exchange rates retarded by at least 10/sup 5/-fold at 24/sup 0/C. Saturation-transfer studies also showed that the pH dependence of exchange in the hydrophilic termini was unusual. Relaxation and solid-state NMR experiments have previously shown that the majority of the protein backbone is rigid on the picosecond to microsecond time scale, except for the extreme ends of the molecule which are mobile. The hydrogen exchange results, which are sensitive to a much longer time scale, suggest a stable core with a progressive increase in amplitude or frequency of motions as the ends of the protein are approached.

  2. Electrophoretic mobilities of neutral analytes and electroosmotic flow markers in aqueous solutions of Hofmeister salts.

    PubMed

    Křížek, Tomáš; Kubíčková, Anna; Hladílková, Jana; Coufal, Pavel; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Small neutral organic compounds have traditionally the role of EOF markers in electrophoresis, as they are expected to have zero electrophoretic mobility in external electric fields. The BGE contains, however, ions that have unequal affinities to the neutral molecules, which in turn results in their mobilization. In this study we focused on two EOF markers-thiourea and DMSO, as well as on N-methyl acetamide (NMA) as a model of the peptide bond. By means of CE and all atom molecular dynamics simulations we explored mobilization of these neutral compounds in large set of Hofmeister salts. Employing a statistical mechanics approach, we were able to reproduce by simulations the experimental electrophoretic mobility coefficients. We also established the role of the chemical composition of marker and the BGE on the measured electrophoretic mobility coefficient. For NMA, we interpreted the results in terms of the relative affinities of cations versus anions to the peptide bond. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Electrophoretic Mobility Study of the Adsorption of Alkyl Xanthate Ions on Galena and Sphalerite.

    PubMed

    Song, S.; Lopez-Valdivieso, A.; Ojeda-Escamilla, M. C.

    2001-05-01

    The adsorption of ethyl and amyl xanthate ions on galena and sphalerite fines has been studied using electrophoretic light-scattering (ELS) measurements. It was performed on galena and sphalerite (<2&mgr;m) in aqueous solution at different potassium ethyl xanthate (PEX) and potassium amyl xanthate (PAX) concentrations. It has been observed that the presence of PEX or PAX caused the isoelectric points (IEP) of galena and sphalerite fines to shift and the electrophoretic mobility to reverse in sign, indicating that the xanthate ions chemisorbed on galena and sphalerite surfaces. This adsorption markedly broadened the electrophoretic mobility distribution of the mineral fines, suggesting that the populations of the particles have quite different adsorption densities of xanthate ions, and therefore the particle hydrophobicity was different. This phenomenon might be attributable to the effect of the hemimicelle adsorption of the xanthate ions on the minerals, the nonuniform distribution of active sites and their degree of activity, the effect of particle size and shape, etc. The nonuniform adsorption has been found to increase with increasing PEX or PAX concentration, reaching a maximum at a medium concentration followed by a decline. Also, experimental results have demonstrated that the nonuniform adsorption of the xanthate ions is much stronger on sphalerite than on galena, which may explain why sphalerite has a worse flotation response than galena when alkyl xanthates are used as collectors in flotation systems. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  4. Finger-powered electrophoretic transport of discrete droplets for portable digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Wang, Yide; Sungtaek Ju, Y

    2016-07-07

    We report a finger-powered digital microfluidic device based on the electrophoretic transport of discrete droplets (EPD). An array of piezoelectric elements is connected in parallel to metal electrodes immersed in dielectric fluids. When deflected in a controlled sequence via human finger power, the piezoelectric elements charge and actuate droplets across each electrode pair through electrophoretic force. Successful droplet transportation requires the piezoelectric elements to provide both sufficient charge and voltage pulse duration. We quantify these requirements using numerical models to predict the electrical charges induced on the droplets and the corresponding electrophoretic forces. The models are experimentally validated by comparing the predicted and measured droplet translational velocities. We successfully demonstrated transport and merging of aqueous droplets over a range of droplet radii (0.6-0.9 mm). We further showed direct manipulation of body fluids, including droplets of saliva and urine, using our finger-powered EPD device. To facilitate practical implementation of multistep assays based on the approach, a hand/finger-rotated drum system with a programmable pattern of protrusions is designed to induce deflections of multiple piezoelectric elements and demonstrate programmable fluidic functions. An electrode-to-piezoelectric element connection scheme to minimize the number of piezoelectric elements necessary for a sequence of microfluidic functions is also explored. The present work establishes an engineering foundation to enable design and implementation of finger-powered portable EPD microfluidic devices.

  5. Electrophoretic interactions and aggregation of colloidal biological particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.; Nichols, Scott C.; Loewenberg, Michael; Todd, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The separation of cells or particles from solution has traditionally been accomplished with centrifuges or by sedimentation; however, many particles have specific densities close to unity, making buoyancy-driven motion slow or negligible, but most cells and particles carry surface charges, making them ideal for electrophoretic separation. Both buoyancy-driven and electrophoretic separation may be influenced by hydrodynamic interactions and aggregation of neighboring particles. Aggregation by electrophoresis was analyzed for two non-Brownian particles with different zeta potentials and thin double layers migrating through a viscous fluid. The results indicate that the initial rate of electrophoretically-driven aggregation may exceed that of buoyancy-driven aggregation, even under conditions in which buoyancy-driven relative motion of noninteracting particles is dominant.

  6. Electrophoretic gel image analysis software for the molecular biology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Redman, T; Jacobs, T

    1991-06-01

    We present GelReader 1.0, a microcomputer program designed to make precision, digital analysis of one-dimensional electrophoretic gels accessible to the molecular biology laboratory of modest means. Images of electrophoretic gels are digitized via a desktop flatbed scanner from instant photographs, autoradiograms or chromogenically stained blotting media. GelReader is then invoked to locate lanes and bands and generate a report of molecular weights of unknowns, based on specified sets of standards. Frequently used standards can be stored in the program. Lanes and bands can be added or removed, based upon users' subjective preferences. A unique lane histogram feature facilitates precise manual addition of bands missed by the software. Image enhancement features include palette manipulation, histogram equalization, shadowing and magnification. The user interface strikes a balance between program autonomy and user intervention, in recognition of the variability in electrophoretic gel quality and users' analytical needs.

  7. Electrophoretic approach to the biochemical systematics of gammarids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulnheim, H.-P.; Scholl, A.

    1981-12-01

    By utilizing the techniques for electrophoretic separation of proteins by vertical starch gels, the biochemical systematics of 10 Gammaridae species obtained from marine, brackish and freshwater habitats was studied. They included Chaetogammarus marinus, Gammarus zaddachi, G. salinus, G. oceanicus, G. tigrinus, G. chevreuxi, G. locusta, G. duebeni duebeni, G. d. celticus, G. pulex pulex, and G. fossarum. For comparison of electrophoretic mobilities selected enzymes (phosphoglucose isomerase, glutamate oxalacetate transaminase, arginine phosphokinase, hexokinase, leucine amino peptidase, mannose 6-phosphate isomerase) were assayed. They were used as diagnostic characters in terms of electrophoretic identities or diversities of most frequent alleles at polymorphic gene loci. These criteria could be applied to estimate intrageneric enzymic variation and degrees of genetic relatedness between the crustacean amphipod species under consideration, thereby complementing traditional morphological classification.

  8. Dynamic High-Resolution H-1 and P-31 NMR Spectroscopy and H-1 T-2 Measurements in Postmortem Rabbit Muscles Using Slow Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Hu, Jian Zhi; Rommereim, Donald N.; Wind, Robert A.; Andersen, Henrik J.

    2004-05-05

    Postmortem changes in rabbit muscle tissue with different glycogen status (normal vs low) were followed continuously from 13 min postmortem until 8 h postmortem and again 20 h postmortem using simultaneous magic angle spinning 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy together with measurement of the transverse relaxation time, T2, of the muscle water. The 1H metabolite spectra were measured using the phase-altered spinning sidebands (PASS) technique at a spinning rate of 40 Hz. pH values calculated from the 31P NMR spectra using the chemical shifts of the C-6 line of histidine in the 1H spectra and the chemical shifts of inorganic phosphate in the 31P spectra confirmed the different muscle glycogen status in the tissues. High-resolution 1H spectra obtained from the PASS technique revealed the presence of a new resonance line at 6.8 ppm during the postmortem period, which were absent in muscles with low muscle glycogen content. This new resonance line may originate from the aminoprotons in creatine, and its appearance may be a result of a pH effect on the exchange rate between the amino and the water protons and thereby the NMR visibility. Alternatively, the new resonance line may originate from the aromatic protons in tyrosine, and its appearance may be a result of a pH-induced protein unfolding exposing hydrophobic amino acid residues to the aqueous environment. Further studies are needed to evaluate these hypotheses. Finally, distributed analysis of the water T2 relaxation data revealed three relaxation populations and an increase in the population believed to reflect extramyofibrillar water through the postmortem period. This increase was significantly reduced (p < 0.0001) in samples from animals with low muscle glycogen content, indicating that the pH is controlling the extent of postmortem expulsion of water from myofibrillar structures. The significance of the postmortem increase in the amount extramyofibrillar water on the water-holding capacity was verified by

  9. 3D NMR Experiments for Measuring 15N Relaxation Data of Large Proteins: Application to the 44 kDa Ectodomain of SIV gp41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffrey, Michael; Kaufman, Joshua; Stahl, Stephen J.; Wingfield, Paul T.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Clore, G. Marius

    1998-12-01

    A suite of 3D NMR experiments for measuring15N-{1H} NOE,15NT1, and15NT1ρvalues in large proteins, uniformly labeled with15N and13C, is presented. These experiments are designed for proteins that exhibit extensive spectral overlap in the 2D1H-15N HSQC spectrum. The pulse sequences are readily applicable to perdeuterated samples, which increases the spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, thereby permitting the characterization of protein dynamics to be extended to larger protein systems. Application of the pulse sequences is demonstrated on a perdeuterated13C/15N-labeled sample of the 44 kDa ectodomain of SIV gp41.

  10. Magnetic dipole moments near 132Sn: Measurement on isomeric {11}/{2 -} states in odd- A131Te and 133Te by NMR/ON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, G.; Rikovska, J.; Stone, N. J.; Copnell, J.; Towner, I. S.; Oros, A. M.; Heyde, K.; Fogelberg, B.; Jacobsson, L.; Gustavsson, F.

    1998-09-01

    On-line low temperature nuclear orientation (OLNO) experiments have been performed on the odd- A Te isotopes 131Te and 133Te using the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei (NMR/ON). The magnetic moments of the isomeric {11}/{2 -} states have been measured extending the known data on these states in the Te isotopes up to the neutron shell closure at N = 82. The contribution to the {11}/{2 -} magnetic moment in 133Te due to core polarisation is calculated using an RPA shell model as well as corrections to the magnetic dipole operator caused by mesonic exchange currents. The neutron number dependence of the magnetic moments of the {11}/{2 -} isomers in heavy Te isotopes is discussed in terms of particle-core coupling model (PCM) calculations.

  11. Antiferromagnetic order in the ladder compound SrCu{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Cu-NMR/NQR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsugi, S.; Kitaoka, Y.; Azuma, M.; Fujishiro, Y.; Takano, M.

    1999-12-01

    The authors carried out the extensive Cu-nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance (NMR/NQR) experiments on the Zn(Ni)-doped ladder compound SrCu{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Sr123), Sr(Cu{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} (M = Zn and Ni) with x {le} 0.02 and the La-doped Sr123, Sr{sub 1{minus}x}La{sub x}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 3} with {alpha} {le} 0.03. A spin-correlation length {xi}{sub s}/a (a: the lattice spacing between the Cu sites along the leg) of nonmagnetic impurity-induced staggered polarization (IISP) estimated from a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) IISP along the two legs in the 0.1--2% Zn-doped Sr123 was found to be independent of temperature (T) and scaled to an mean impurity distance D{sub AV} with the relation of {xi}{sub s}/a = 2.5 + D{sub AV}. The {xi}{sub s}/a's are much longer in x = 0.001 ({xi}{sub s}/a {approximately} 50) and 0.005 ({xi}{sub s}/a {approximately} 12) than an instantaneous spin-correlation length {xi}{sub 0}/a {approximately} 3--8 in Sr123. The formula of Neel T, T{sub N} (WC-Q1D) = J exp({minus}D{sub AV}/({xi}{sub s}/a)) (J = 2,000 K) based on the weakly interladder-coupled (WC) Q1D model explains the experimental T{sub N} values quantitatively.

  12. Evolution of Quantitative Measures in NMR: Quantum Mechanical qHNMR Advances Chemical Standardization of a Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) Extract.

    PubMed

    Phansalkar, Rasika S; Simmler, Charlotte; Bisson, Jonathan; Chen, Shao-Nong; Lankin, David C; McAlpine, James B; Niemitz, Matthias; Pauli, Guido F

    2017-03-24

    Chemical standardization, along with morphological and DNA analysis ensures the authenticity and advances the integrity evaluation of botanical preparations. Achievement of a more comprehensive, metabolomic standardization requires simultaneous quantitation of multiple marker compounds. Employing quantitative (1)H NMR (qHNMR), this study determined the total isoflavone content (TIfCo; 34.5-36.5% w/w) via multimarker standardization and assessed the stability of a 10-year-old isoflavone-enriched red clover extract (RCE). Eleven markers (nine isoflavones, two flavonols) were targeted simultaneously, and outcomes were compared with LC-based standardization. Two advanced quantitative measures in qHNMR were applied to derive quantities from complex and/or overlapping resonances: a quantum mechanical (QM) method (QM-qHNMR) that employs (1)H iterative full spin analysis, and a non-QM method that uses linear peak fitting algorithms (PF-qHNMR). A 10 min UHPLC-UV method provided auxiliary orthogonal quantitation. This is the first systematic evaluation of QM and non-QM deconvolution as qHNMR quantitation measures. It demonstrates that QM-qHNMR can account successfully for the complexity of (1)H NMR spectra of individual analytes and how QM-qHNMR can be built for mixtures such as botanical extracts. The contents of the main bioactive markers were in good agreement with earlier HPLC-UV results, demonstrating the chemical stability of the RCE. QM-qHNMR advances chemical standardization by its inherent QM accuracy and the use of universal calibrants, avoiding the impractical need for identical reference materials.

  13. Evolution of Quantitative Measures in NMR: Quantum Mechanical qHNMR Advances Chemical Standardization of a Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) Extract

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Chemical standardization, along with morphological and DNA analysis ensures the authenticity and advances the integrity evaluation of botanical preparations. Achievement of a more comprehensive, metabolomic standardization requires simultaneous quantitation of multiple marker compounds. Employing quantitative 1H NMR (qHNMR), this study determined the total isoflavone content (TIfCo; 34.5–36.5% w/w) via multimarker standardization and assessed the stability of a 10-year-old isoflavone-enriched red clover extract (RCE). Eleven markers (nine isoflavones, two flavonols) were targeted simultaneously, and outcomes were compared with LC-based standardization. Two advanced quantitative measures in qHNMR were applied to derive quantities from complex and/or overlapping resonances: a quantum mechanical (QM) method (QM-qHNMR) that employs 1H iterative full spin analysis, and a non-QM method that uses linear peak fitting algorithms (PF-qHNMR). A 10 min UHPLC-UV method provided auxiliary orthogonal quantitation. This is the first systematic evaluation of QM and non-QM deconvolution as qHNMR quantitation measures. It demonstrates that QM-qHNMR can account successfully for the complexity of 1H NMR spectra of individual analytes and how QM-qHNMR can be built for mixtures such as botanical extracts. The contents of the main bioactive markers were in good agreement with earlier HPLC-UV results, demonstrating the chemical stability of the RCE. QM-qHNMR advances chemical standardization by its inherent QM accuracy and the use of universal calibrants, avoiding the impractical need for identical reference materials. PMID:28067513

  14. Hydrogen peroxide agarose gels for electrophoretic analysis of RNA.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Renu; Saluja, Daman

    2017-10-01

    Efficient electrophoretic separation of isolated total RNA utilizes chemicals and agents to aid in nuclease free environment. However cost, extensive pre-run processing protocols as well as toxic byproducts limit the usage of such protocols. Moreover, these treatments affect the overall electrophoretic results by altering the conductivity of the running buffer and weaken the gel strength. We here provide a protocol for RNA visualization that obviates these shortcomings by preparation of agarose gel with hydrogen peroxide using the regular TAE buffer. The simple, inexpensive protocol exhibits superior results in a horizontal agarose gel electrophoresis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrophoretic Transport of Biomolecules through Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinghua; Su, Xin; Wu, Ji; Hinds, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Electrophoretic transport of proteins across electrochemically oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes has been investigated. Small charged protein, lysozyme, was successfully pumped across MWCNT membranes by electric field while rejecting larger bovine serum albumin (BSA). Transport of the lysozome was reduced by a factor of about 30 in comparison to bulk mobility and consistent with prediction for hindered transport. Mobilities between 0.33-1.4×10-9 m2/V-s were observed and are approximately 10 fold faster than comparable ordered nanoporous membranes and are consistent with continuum models. For mixtures of BSA and lysozyme, complete rejection of BSA is seen with electrophoretic separations PMID:21338104

  16. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  17. Solid state {sup 31}P MAS NMR spectroscopy and conductivity measurements on NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Risskov Sørensen, Daniel; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Skou, Eivind M.

    2014-11-15

    A systematic study of composite powders of niobium oxide phosphate (NbOPO{sub 4}) and phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) has been performed in order to characterize the material's ability to perform as an electrolyte material in medium temperature fuel cells and electrolyzers. Powders of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} contents between 13.1 and 74.2 M% were produced and characterized with powder X-ray diffraction, {sup 31}P MAS NMR and impedance spectroscopy. NMR revealed that a significant degree of dehydration and vaporization of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} takes place above 200 °C, and increases with temperature. At 500 °C the NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} has reacted to form niobium pyrophosphate (Nb{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 15}). Impedance spectroscopy showed an increase in conductivity with increasing acid concentration, whereas the conductivity decreased slightly with increasing temperature. The highest conductivity measured was 2.5·10{sup −3} S/cm for a sample containing 74.2 M% of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Lastly, it was shown that NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own. - Graphical abstract: Conductivity of NbOPO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} composites as a function of equivalent P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content. The conductivity is insignificant for pure NbOPO{sub 4}. - Highlights: • Composites have been made from NbOPO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • The composites composition has been investigated with solid state NMR. • The composites have shown clear signs of acid dehydration upon heating. • The conductivity of the composites increases for increasing acid content. • NbOPO{sub 4} has no significant conductivity of its own.

  18. Solid-state NMR of inorganic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Yesinowski, James P

    2012-01-01

    Studies of inorganic semiconductors by solid-state NMR vary widely in terms of the nature of the samples investigated, the techniques employed to observe the NMR signal, and the types of information obtained. Compared with the NMR of diamagnetic non-semiconducting substances, important differences often result from the presence of electron or hole carriers that are the hallmark of semiconductors, and whose theoretical interpretation can be involved. This review aims to provide a broad perspective on the topic for the non-expert by providing: (1) a basic introduction to semiconductor physical concepts relevant to NMR, including common crystal structures and the various methods of making samples; (2) discussions of the NMR spin Hamiltonian, details of some of the NMR techniques and strategies used to make measurements and theoretically predict NMR parameters, and examples of how each of the terms in the Hamiltonian has provided useful information in bulk semiconductors; (3) a discussion of the additional considerations needed to interpret the NMR of nanoscale semiconductors, with selected examples. The area of semiconductor NMR is being revitalized by this interest in nanoscale semiconductors, the great improvements in NMR detection sensitivity and resolution that have occurred, and the current interest in optical pumping and spintronics-related studies. Promising directions for future research will be noted throughout.

  19. On the performance of Spin Diffusion NMR Techniques in Oriented Solids: Prospects for Resonance Assignments and Distance Measurements from Separated Local Field Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2010-01-01

    NMR spin diffusion experiments have the potential to provide both resonance assignment and internuclear distances for protein structure determination in oriented solid-state NMR. In this paper, we compared the efficiencies of three common spin diffusion experiments: proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD), cross-relaxation driven spin diffusion (CRDSD), and proton-mediated proton transfer (PMPT). As model systems for oriented proteins, we used single crystals of N-acetyl-L-15N-leucine (NAL) and N-acetyl-L-15N-valyl-L-15N-leucine (NAVL) to probe long- and short distances, respectively. We demonstrate that for short 15N/15N distances such as those found in NAVL (3.3 Å), the PDSD mechanism gives the most intense cross-peaks, while for longer distances (> 6.5 Å), the CRDSD and PMPT experiments are more efficient. The PDSD was highly inefficient for transferring magnetization across distances greater than 6.5 Å (NAL crystal sample), due to small 15N/15N dipolar couplings (< 4.5 Hz). Interestingly, the mismatched Hartmann-Hahn condition present in the PMPT experiment gave more intense cross-peaks for lower 1H and 15N spinlock field strengths (32 and 17 kHz, respectively) rather than higher values (55 and 50 kHz), suggesting a more complex magnetization transfer mechanism. Numerical simulations are in good agreement with the experimental findings, suggesting a combined PMPT and CRDSD effect. We conclude that in order to assign SLF spectra and measure short and long-range distances, the combined use of homonuclear correlation spectra, such as the ones surveyed in this work, are necessary. PMID:20936833

  20. On the performance of spin diffusion NMR techniques in oriented solids: prospects for resonance assignments and distance measurements from separated local field experiments.

    PubMed

    Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Gopinath, T; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2010-11-04

    NMR spin diffusion experiments have the potential to provide both resonance assignment and internuclear distances for protein structure determination in oriented solid-state NMR. In this paper, we compared the efficiencies of three spin diffusion experiments: proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD), cross-relaxation-driven spin diffusion (CRDSD), and proton-mediated proton transfer (PMPT). As model systems for oriented proteins, we used single crystals of N-acetyl-L-(15)N-leucine (NAL) and N-acetyl-L-(15)N-valyl-L-(15)N-leucine (NAVL) to probe long and short distances, respectively. We demonstrate that, for short (15)N/(15)N distances such as those found in NAVL (3.3 Å), the PDSD mechanism gives the most intense cross-peaks, while, for longer distances (>6.5 Å), the CRDSD and PMPT experiments are more efficient. The PDSD was highly inefficient for transferring magnetization across distances greater than 6.5 Å (NAL crystal sample), due to small (15)N/(15)N dipolar couplings (<4.5 Hz). Interestingly, the mismatched Hartmann-Hahn condition present in the PMPT experiment gave more intense cross-peaks for lower (1)H and (15)N RF spinlock amplitudes (32 and 17 kHz, respectively) rather than higher values (55 and 50 kHz), suggesting a more complex magnetization transfer mechanism. Numerical simulations are in good agreement with the experimental findings, suggesting a combined PMPT and CRDSD effect. We conclude that, in order to assign SLF spectra and measure short- and long-range distances, the combined use of homonuclear correlation spectra, such as the ones surveyed in this work, are necessary.

  1. Electrophoretic mobility of spherical nanoparticles confined in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Wei; Wynne, Tom; Pennathur, Sumita; Meinhart, Carl

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the mobility of a charged spherical nanoparticle driven by weak electric fields that are confined in nanochannels. Factors affecting mobility include particle zeta potential, electrolyte concentration, and channel size. Classic models for electrophoretic mobility (e.g. Smoluchowski and Huckel) are valid only in the linear regime of small particle zeta potential, and for an unbounded fluid domain. The classical models fail to predict electrophoretic mobility estimated from experiments using ~ 42 nm diameter particles confined in a ~ 100 nm nanochannel. We adopt the asymptotically-expanded formulations of Khair and Squires (Phys. Fluids, 2009), and solve the fully-coupled equations on a well-resolved 3D finite element domain. For a charged 42 nm diameter nanoparticle, confined in a 100 nm high nanochannel, the electrophoretic mobility increases nonlinearly when particle zeta potential is greater than thermal potential kB T / e . When the channel size is decreased from 2.5 um to 100 nm, the mobility is reduced by up to 20%. The result suggests that particle/wall interactions, including overlapping double layers may affect electrophoretic mobility in a non-linear manner.

  2. Electrophoretic separation of kidney and pituitary cells on STS-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Barlow, G. H.; Cleveland, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Farrington, M. A.; Hatfield, J. M.; Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Wilfinger, W.; Grindeland, R.; Lewis, M. L.

    A Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System (CFES) was used on Space Shuttle flight STS-8 to separate specific secretory cells from suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic kidney cells and rat pituitary cells. The objectives were to isolate the subfractions of kidney cells that produce the largest amounts of urokinase (plasminogen activator), and to isolate the subfractions of rat pituitary cells that secrete growth hormone, prolactin, and other hormones. Kidney cells were separated into more than 32 fractions in each of two electrophoretic runs. Electrophoretic mobility distributions in flight experiments were spread more than the ground controls. Multiple assay methods confirmed that all cultured kidney cell fractions produced some urokinase, and five to six fractions produced significantly more urokinase than the other fractions. Several fractions also produced tissue plasminogen activator. The pituitary cells were separated into 48 fractions in each of the two electrophoretic runs, and the amounts of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) released into the medium for each cell fraction were determined. Cell fractions were grouped into eight mobility classes and immunocytochemically assayed for the presence of GH, PRL, ACTH, LH, TSH, and FSH. The patterns of hormone distribution indicate that the specialized cells producing GH and PRL are isolatable due to the differences in electrophoretic mobilities.

  3. Controlled method of reducing electrophoretic mobility of various substances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanalstine, James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method of reducing electrophoretic mobility of macromolecules, particles, cells, and the like is provided. The method comprises interacting the particles or cells with a polymer-linked affinity compound composed of: a hydrophilic neutral polymer such as polyethylene glycol, and an affinity component consisting of a hydrophobic compound such as a fatty acid ester, an immunocompound such as an antibody or active fragment thereof or simular macromolecule, or other ligands. The reduction of electrophoretic mobility achieved is directly proportional to the concentration of the polymer-linked affinity compound employed, and the mobility reduction obtainable is up to 100 percent for particular particles and cells. The present invention is advantageous in that analytical electrophoretic separation can not be achieved for macromolecules, particles, and cells whose native surface charge structure had prevented them from being separated by normal electrophoretic means. Depending on the affinity component utilized, separation can be achieved on the basis of specific/irreversible, specific/reversible, semi-specific/reversible, relatively nonspecific/reversible, or relatively nonspecific/irreversible ligand-substance interactions. The present method is also advantageous in that it can be used in a variety of standard laboratory electrophoresis equipment.

  4. Monodisperse light color nanoparticle ink toward chromatic electrophoretic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bo; Li, Yue; Li, Jian; Bi, Lei; Lu, Haipeng; Xie, Jianliang; Ren, Xiangling; Cao, Yonghai; Wang, Ning; Meng, Xianwei; Deng, Longjiang; Guo, Zhanhu

    2016-05-01

    The facile synthesis of nanoparticles for precise image control and fast response of chromatic electrophoretic displays (EPDs) is a challenge. Herein, we report a general method to prepare pink, blue, and yellow nanoparticles with low density and a tunable size of 230-310 nm. The monodispersity is down to 0.02 and surface charges are up to 666e. Importantly, our work highlights the feasibility of chromatic nanoparticles as cost-effective candidates for electrophoretic displays.The facile synthesis of nanoparticles for precise image control and fast response of chromatic electrophoretic displays (EPDs) is a challenge. Herein, we report a general method to prepare pink, blue, and yellow nanoparticles with low density and a tunable size of 230-310 nm. The monodispersity is down to 0.02 and surface charges are up to 666e. Importantly, our work highlights the feasibility of chromatic nanoparticles as cost-effective candidates for electrophoretic displays. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02524b

  5. Electrophoretic separation of human kidney cells at zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.; Lazer, S. L.; Rueter, A.; Allen, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Electrophoretic isolation of cells results in a loss of resolution power caused by the sedimentation of the cells in the media. The results of an experiment to extract urokinase from human embryos during the Apollo Soyuz mission are presented and discussed.

  6. Liquid phase separation of proteins based on electrophoretic effects in an electrospray setup during sample introduction into a gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analyzer (CE-GEMMA/CE-ES-DMA).

    PubMed

    Weiss, Victor U; Kerul, Lukas; Kallinger, Peter; Szymanski, Wladyslaw W; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter

    2014-09-02

    Nanoparticle characterization is gaining importance in food technology, biotechnology, medicine, and pharmaceutical industry. An instrument to determine particle electrophoretic mobility (EM) diameters in the single-digit to double-digit nanometer range receiving increased attention is the gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analyzer (GEMMA) separating electrophoretically single charged analytes in the gas-phase at ambient pressure. A fused-silica capillary is used for analyte transfer to the gas-phase by means of a nano electrospray (ES) unit. The potential of this capillary to separate analytes electrophoretically in the liquid phase due to different mobilities is, at measurement conditions recommended by the manufacturer, eliminated due to elevated pressure applied for sample introduction. Measurements are carried out upon constant feeding of analytes to the system. Under these conditions, aggregate formation is observed for samples including high amounts of non-volatile components or complex samples. This makes the EM determination of individual species sometimes difficult, if not impossible. With the current study we demonstrate that liquid phase electrophoretic separation of proteins (as exemplary analytes) occurs in the capillary (capillary zone electrophoresis, CE) of the nano ES unit of the GEMMA. This finding was consecutively applied for on-line desalting allowing EM diameter determination of analytes despite a high salt concentration within samples. The present study is to our knowledge the first report on the use of the GEMMA to determine EM diameters of analytes solubilized in the ES incompatible electrolyte solutions by the intended use of electrophoresis (in the liquid phase) during sample delivery. Results demonstrate the proof of concept of such an approach and additionally illustrate the high potential of a future on-line coupling of a capillary electrophoresis to a GEMMA instrument. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B

  7. On the flow field about an electrophoretic particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsini, Gabriele; Tricoli, Vincenzo

    2012-10-01

    The flow field about an electrophoretic body is theoretically investigated by analytical methods. An effective boundary condition for the electric potential at particle surface is derived. This condition, which generalizes the one obtained by Levich [Physicochemical Hydrodynamics (Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1962), Chap. 9, p. 475], captures the effect of (convective and electromigratory) surface current in the Debye layer and is valid as far as it is legitimate to neglect ion-concentration gradient in the bulk liquid. Conditions for negligible concentration gradients are also presented and discussed. The effect of surface current determines a deviation from Morrison's "classical" theory, which predicts irrotational flow-field for any particle shape with electrophoretic velocity given by the well-known Smoluchowski formula and always directed along the applied electric field. It is shown here that in the presence of the above effect the irrotationality of the flow field is not preserved if the particle surface has non-uniform curvature. However, irrotational flow-field still subsists for a sphere and a cylinder and is analytically determined in terms of a new non-dimensional parameter, referred to as the electrophoretic number. The case of spheroidal objects is also examined in detail. In this case the flow field, though not strictly irrotational, is shown to be nearly approximated by an irrotational flow-field, which is also determined over wide ranges of electrophoretic number and spheroid aspect ratio. The quality of this approximation is expressed as a relative error on the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski condition and numerically evaluated both in longitudinal and transverse configuration. The limiting cases of spheroid degenerating into a needle and a disk are also addressed. In all above cases the respective mobilities deviate from Smoluchowski's formula and depend on the electrophoretic number. An important effect of surface ion-transport in the double layer is

  8. Electrophoretic Separation of Single Particles Using Nanoscale Thermoplastic Columns.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon-Ratnayake, Kumuditha M; Uba, Franklin I; Oliver-Calixte, Nyoté J; Soper, Steven A

    2016-04-05

    Phenomena associated with microscale electrophoresis separations cannot, in many cases, be applied to the nanoscale. Thus, understanding the electrophoretic characteristics associated with the nanoscale will help formulate relevant strategies that can optimize the performance of separations carried out on columns with at least one dimension below 150 nm. Electric double layer (EDL) overlap, diffusion, and adsorption/desorption properties and/or dielectrophoretic effects giving rise to stick/slip motion are some of the processes that can play a role in determining the efficiency of nanoscale electrophoretic separations. We investigated the performance characteristics of electrophoretic separations carried out in nanoslits fabricated in poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, devices. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were used as the model system with tracking of their transport via dark field microscopy and localized surface plasmon resonance. AgNPs capped with citrate groups and the negatively charged PMMA walls (induced by O2 plasma modification of the nanoslit walls) enabled separations that were not apparent when these particles were electrophoresed in microscale columns. The separation of AgNPs based on their size without the need for buffer additives using PMMA nanoslit devices is demonstrated herein. Operational parameters such as the electric field strength, nanoslit dimensions, and buffer composition were evaluated as to their effects on the electrophoretic performance, both in terms of efficiency (plate numbers) and resolution. Electrophoretic separations performed at high electric field strengths (>200 V/cm) resulted in higher plate numbers compared to lower fields due to the absence of stick/slip motion at the higher electric field strengths. Indeed, 60 nm AgNPs could be separated from 100 nm particles in free solution using nanoscale electrophoresis with 100 μm long columns.

  9. Measurement of the Isotopic Ratio of [to the tenth power]B/[to the eleventh power]B in NaBH[subscript 4] by [to the first power]H NMR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanger, Murray; Moyna, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    A study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in a novel way to determine the isotopic ration between [to the tenth power]B and [to the eleventh power]B in sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The experiment provides an unusual and relatively simple means for undergraduate chemistry students to accurately measure the distribution of the two…

  10. Measurement of the Isotopic Ratio of [to the tenth power]B/[to the eleventh power]B in NaBH[subscript 4] by [to the first power]H NMR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanger, Murray; Moyna, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    A study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in a novel way to determine the isotopic ration between [to the tenth power]B and [to the eleventh power]B in sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The experiment provides an unusual and relatively simple means for undergraduate chemistry students to accurately measure the distribution of the two…

  11. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  12. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  13. NMR investigations of hydrogen in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, M.; Goze-Bac, C.; Krämer, S.; Mehring, M.; Roth, S.; Bernier, P.

    2002-10-01

    We report proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) measurements on hydrogen loaded single walled carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes were produced with different kinds of catalysts and hydrogen loaded under 23 bar hydrogen pressure. The hydrogen adsorption properties of the carbon nanotube materials were investigated by temperature dependent analysis of the 1H-NMR spectra.

  14. Measurement of side-chain carboxyl pK(a) values of glutamate and aspartate residues in an unfolded protein by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tollinger, Martin; Forman-Kay, Julie D; Kay, Lewis E

    2002-05-22

    A triple-resonance NMR pulse scheme is presented for measuring aspartic and glutamic acid side-chain pK(a) values in unfolded protein states where chemical shift overlap is limiting. The experiment correlates side-chain carboxyl carbon chemical shifts of these residues with the backbone amide proton chemical shift of the following residue. The methodology is applied to an (15)N, (13)C labeled sample of the N-terminal SH3 domain of the Drosophila protein drk, which exists in equilibrium between folded (F(exch)) and unfolded (U(exch)) states under nondenaturing conditions. Residue-specific pK(a) values of side-chain carboxyl groups are presented for the first time for an unfolded protein (drk U(exch) state), determined from a pH titration. Results indicate that deviations from pK(a) values measured for model compounds are likely due to local effects, while long-range electrostatic interactions appear to be of minor importance for this protein.

  15. Ionic liquid containing microemulsions: probe by conductance, dynamic light scattering, diffusion-ordered spectroscopy NMR measurements, and study of solvent relaxation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Rajib; Sarkar, Souravi; Ghatak, Chiranjib; Rao, Vishal Govind; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2011-03-17

    Room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P(13)][Tf(2)N]), was substituted for polar water and formed nonaqueous microemulsions with benzene by the aid of nonionic surfactant TX-100. The phase behavior of the ternary system was investigated, and microregions of [P(13)][Tf(2)N]-in-benzene (IL/O), bicontinuous, and benzene-in-[P(13)][Tf(2)N] (O/IL) were identified by traditional electrical conductivity measurements. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed the formation of these IL microemulsions because with gradual increase of RTIL contents the droplet sizes of the microemulsions are also gradually increasing. Pulsed-field gradient spin-echo NMR have been studied to measure the diffusion coefficients of neat [P(13)][Tf(2)N] and [P(13)][Tf(2)N] in microemulsions which indicate ionic liquid containing microemulsions is formed. Moreover, the dynamics of solvent relaxation have been investigated in [P(13)][Tf(2)N]/TX100/benzene microemulsions using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy using coumarin 153 (C-153) and coumarin 480 (C-480) fluorescence probe with variation of RTIL contents in microemulsions. For both of the probes with increasing amount of ionic liquids in microemulsions the relative contribution of the fast components increases and the slow components contribution decreases; therefore the average solvation time decreases. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Correlating steric hydration forces with water dynamics through surface force and diffusion NMR measurements in a lipid–DMSO–H2O system

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Alex M.; Donaldson, Stephen H.; Song, Jinsuk; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Dong Woog; Han, Songi; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a common solvent and biological additive possessing well-known utility in cellular cryoprotection and lipid membrane permeabilization, but the governing mechanisms at membrane interfaces remain poorly understood. Many studies have focused on DMSO–lipid interactions and the subsequent effects on membrane-phase behavior, but explanations often rely on qualitative notions of DMSO-induced dehydration of lipid head groups. In this work, surface forces measurements between gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes in DMSO–water mixtures quantify the hydration- and solvation-length scales with angstrom resolution as a function of DMSO concentration from 0 mol% to 20 mol%. DMSO causes a drastic decrease in the range of the steric hydration repulsion, leading to an increase in adhesion at a much-reduced intermembrane distance. Pulsed field gradient NMR of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group analogs, dimethyl phosphate and tetramethylammonium ions, shows that the ion hydrodynamic radius decreases with increasing DMSO concentration up to 10 mol% DMSO. The complementary measurements indicate that, at concentrations below 10 mol%, the primary effect of DMSO is to decrease the solvated volume of the PC head group and that, from 10 mol% to 20 mol%, DMSO acts to gradually collapse head groups down onto the surface and suppress their thermal motion. This work shows a connection between surface forces, head group conformation and dynamics, and surface water diffusion, with important implications for soft matter and colloidal systems. PMID:26261313

  17. Characterisation of the electron self-exchange rates in hexametaphosphate-cytochrome-c aggregates measured using high-resolution 1H-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Concar, D W; Whitford, D; Williams, R J

    1991-08-01

    1H-NMR spectroscopy has been used to measure the rate of unimolecular electron exchange between cytochrome c molecules in protein aggregates stabilised by the addition of sodium hexametaphosphate. The average intracomplex electron exchange rate is measured from line broadening of hyperfine-shifted resonances of ferricytochrome c in an equimolar mixture of reduced and oxidised protein. The line-broadening due to electron exchange is significantly greater than that due to protein aggregation and reaches a maximum value between 1-2 mol hexametaphosphate/mol protein. Significantly the exchange-induced broadening is a first-order process and is directly proportional to the size of the cytochrome c oligomer. From the temperature dependence of exchange broadening the activation enthalpy was estimated to be 75.8 kJ mol-1 whereas the activation entropy was 295 J mol-1 K-1 for a dimer of cytochrome c at a hexametaphosphate/protein molar ratio of 1. Both activation parameters decrease in magnitude as the order of the cytochrome c oligomer increases. The rates of intracomplex electron exchange in Saccharomyces cerevisiae iso-2 and Candida krusei cytochromes c are lower than that of the horse protein, implying that primary sequence plays a fundamental part in determining the rate of exchange. The relevance of these observations is discussed in terms of the function of cytochrome c.

  18. Correlating steric hydration forces with water dynamics through surface force and diffusion NMR measurements in a lipid-DMSO-H2O system.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Alex M; Donaldson, Stephen H; Song, Jinsuk; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Dong Woog; Han, Songi; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-08-25

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a common solvent and biological additive possessing well-known utility in cellular cryoprotection and lipid membrane permeabilization, but the governing mechanisms at membrane interfaces remain poorly understood. Many studies have focused on DMSO-lipid interactions and the subsequent effects on membrane-phase behavior, but explanations often rely on qualitative notions of DMSO-induced dehydration of lipid head groups. In this work, surface forces measurements between gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes in DMSO-water mixtures quantify the hydration- and solvation-length scales with angstrom resolution as a function of DMSO concentration from 0 mol% to 20 mol%. DMSO causes a drastic decrease in the range of the steric hydration repulsion, leading to an increase in adhesion at a much-reduced intermembrane distance. Pulsed field gradient NMR of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group analogs, dimethyl phosphate and tetramethylammonium ions, shows that the ion hydrodynamic radius decreases with increasing DMSO concentration up to 10 mol% DMSO. The complementary measurements indicate that, at concentrations below 10 mol%, the primary effect of DMSO is to decrease the solvated volume of the PC head group and that, from 10 mol% to 20 mol%, DMSO acts to gradually collapse head groups down onto the surface and suppress their thermal motion. This work shows a connection between surface forces, head group conformation and dynamics, and surface water diffusion, with important implications for soft matter and colloidal systems.

  19. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focused on variable temperature spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 5 figs.

  20. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focussed on spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. NMR of lignins

    Treesearch

    John Ralph; Larry L. Landucci

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will consider the basic aspects and findings of several forms of NMR spectroscopy, including separate discussions of proton, carbon, heteronuclear, and multidimensional NMR. Enhanced focus will be on 13C NMR, because of its qualitative and quantitative importance, followed by NMR’s contributions to our understanding of lignin...

  2. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  3. Comparing nanostructured hydroxyapatite coating on AZ91 alloy samples via sol-gel and electrophoretic deposition for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Rojaee, Ramin; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Raeissi, Keyvan

    2014-12-01

    Magnesium is one of the most critical elements in hard tissues regeneration and therefore causes speeding up the restoration of harmed bones, while high deterioration rate of magnesium in body fluid restricts it to be used as biodegradable implants. Alloying magnesium with some relatively nobler metals such as aluminium, zinc, rare earth elements, magnesium-bioceramics composites, and surface modification techniques are some of the routes to control magnesium corrosion rate. In this study AZ91 magnesium alloy had been coated by nanostructured hydroxyapatite via sol-gel dip coating and electrophoretical methods to survey the final barricade properties of the obtained coatings. In order to perform electrophoretic coating, powders were prepared by sol-gel method, and then the powders deposited on substrates utilizing direct current electricity. Zeta potentials of the electrophoresis suspensions were measured to determine a best mode for good quality coatings. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to confirm nanoscale dimension, and the uniformity of the nanostructured hydroxyapatite coating, respectively. Fourier Transform-Infrared and X-ray diffraction analysis were utilized for functional group and phase structure evaluation of the prepared coatings, correspondingly. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed in SBF at 37±1 (°)C which revealed considerable increase in corrosion protection resistivity and corrosion current density for electrophoretic coated specimens versus sol-gel coated specimens. Results showed that both sol-gel and electrophoretical techniques seem to be suitable to coat magnesium alloys for biomedical applications but electrophoretic coating technique is a better choice due to the more homogeneity and more crystalline structure of the coating.

  4. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  5. Metabolic flux and metabolic network analysis of Penicillium chrysogenum using 2D [13C, 1H] COSY NMR measurements and cumulative bondomer simulation.

    PubMed

    van Winden, Wouter A; van Gulik, Walter M; Schipper, Dick; Verheijen, Peter J T; Krabben, Preben; Vinke, Jacobus L; Heijnen, Joseph J

    2003-07-05

    At present two alternative methods are available for analyzing the fluxes in a metabolic network: (1) combining measurements of net conversion rates with a set of metabolite balances including the cofactor balances, or (2) leaving out the cofactor balances and fitting the resulting free fluxes to measured (13)C-labeling data. In this study these two approaches are applied to the fluxes in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway of Penicillium chrysogenum growing on either ammonia or nitrate as the nitrogen source, which is expected to give different pentose phosphate pathway fluxes. The presented flux analyses are based on extensive sets of 2D [(13)C, (1)H] COSY data. A new concept is applied for simulation of this type of (13)C-labeling data: cumulative bondomer modeling. The outcomes of the (13)C-labeling based flux analysis substantially differ from those of the pure metabolite balancing approach. The fluxes that are determined using (13)C-labeling data are shown to be highly dependent on the chosen metabolic network. Extending the traditional nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway with additional transketolase and transaldolase reactions, extending the glycolysis with a fructose 6-phosphate aldolase/dihydroxyacetone kinase reaction sequence or adding a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase reaction to the model considerably improves the fit of the measured and the simulated NMR data. The results obtained using the extended version of the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway model show that the transketolase and transaldolase reactions need not be assumed reversible to get a good fit of the (13)C-labeling data. Strict statistical testing of the outcomes of (13)C-labeling based flux analysis using realistic measurement errors is demonstrated to be of prime importance for verifying the assumed metabolic model. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 83: 75-92, 2003.

  6. Capillary Electrophoretic Technologies for Single Cell Metabolomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapainis, Theodore E.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the functioning of the brain is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the full complement of neurotransmitters and neuromodulatory compounds. Single cell measurements aid in the discovery of neurotransmitters used by small subsets of neurons that would be diluted below detection limits or masked by ubiquitous compounds when working with…

  7. Capillary Electrophoretic Technologies for Single Cell Metabolomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapainis, Theodore E.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the functioning of the brain is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the full complement of neurotransmitters and neuromodulatory compounds. Single cell measurements aid in the discovery of neurotransmitters used by small subsets of neurons that would be diluted below detection limits or masked by ubiquitous compounds when working with…

  8. Method for in-vivo NMR measurements in the human breast to screen for small breast cancer in an otherwise healthy breast

    SciTech Connect

    Rollwitz, W.L.

    1986-09-02

    A method is described of conducting a noninvasive female breast cancer test comprising the steps of: (a) forming an inhomogeneous magnetic field between the poles of a magnet wherein the magnetic field defines a specific volume between the poles wherein the specific volume has a specified magnetic field intensity H/sub o/ for NMR testing and the specific volume extends outwardly to an edge defined by the outer edge of the female breast; (b) moving incrementally the specific volume from a beginning point toward an ending point to scan a breast between the pole pieces of the magnet and thereby move the specific volume through the breast the movement being with N examinations located along the breast at different locations wherein each specific volume has the defined thickness and outward extent; (c) periodically interrogating by a transmitted pulse from a coil into the breast portion located in the specific volume for NMR response wherein the NMR response is dependent on hydrogen in the water, and the water has two states, one state in cancer cells and the other state in healthy tissue, and the cancer cells provide a different NMR response compared with water in the healthy tissue, the step of interrogating including first and second NMR interrogations of specific breast volumes forming NMR responses; (d) wherein the magnetic field intensity in the specific volume and the pulse from the coil cause an NMR response from water in the body tissue making up the breast portion; and (e) determining cancer cell anomalies arising from cancer cells in the breast as indicated by comparison of the NMR water responses to form difference signals.

  9. Rapid sample injection for hyperpolarized NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Sean; Hilty, Christian

    2010-06-14

    Due to its ability to enhance the signal of a single NMR scan by several orders of magnitude, solid-to-liquid state dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) appears well suited for the analysis of minimal amounts of compounds, as well as for the study of rapid chemical reactions. A key requirement in enabling the application of DNP-NMR to typical small-molecule substances encountered in chemistry and biochemistry is the ability to obtain high-resolution spectra, while at the same time minimizing the loss of polarization due to spin relaxation between the separate steps of DNP polarization and NMR measurement. Here, we present data demonstrating the capability of measuring DNP enhanced NMR spectra of compounds with comparably short relaxation times, with only minimal line broadening attributable to the sample transfer process. We discuss the performance characteristics of a sample injection apparatus specifically designed to provide high-resolution DNP-NMR spectra of small molecule compounds.

  10. Properties of poly(styrene/alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol) microspheres suspended in water. Effect of sodium chloride and temperature on particle diameters and electrophoretic mobility.

    PubMed

    Basinska, Teresa; Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Kazmierski, Slawomir; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2008-08-19

    Hydrodynamic and electrophoretic properties of core-shell poly(styrene/alpha- tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol) (P(S/PGL)) microspheres suspended in water are described. The microspheres were obtained by surfactant-free emulsion copolymerization of styrene and alpha- tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol macromonomer ( M n = 2800, M w/ M n = 1.05). The process yielded microspheres with number average diameter D n = 270 nm and with low diameter dispersity index D w/ D n = 1.01. Shells of P(S/PGL) microspheres were enriched in polyglycidol. Molar fraction of polyglycidol monomeric units in the shells (determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) was equal to 0.34, which is much higher than the average molar fraction of polyglycidol monomeric units in whole particles of 0.048. Influences of NaCl concentration and temperature on P(S/PGL) microsphere diameters and on their electrophoretic mobility were investigated. It was found that hydrodynamic diameter of P(S/PGL) microspheres, determined by photon correlation spectroscopy, decreased significantly when temperature did exceed a certain value (transition temperature, T t). It has been found that the decrease is more pronounced for higher concentrations of NaCl in the medium. For microspheres suspended in 10 (-1) M NaCl, the hydrodynamic diameter decreased by 8% whereas for the same particles in pure water the diameter decreased by 5.2%. The process of shrinkage was fully reversible. Values of T t for P(S/PGL) microspheres were lower for higher concentrations of NaCl. Adjustment of salt concentration allowed controlling T t in a range from 44.4 to 49.9 degrees C. 13C NMR relaxation time measurements (T 1) for carbon atoms in polyglycidol macromonomer revealed that T 1 did increase with increasing temperature (in temperature range from 25 to 75 degrees C) indicating higher motion of chains at higher temperature. Addition of NaCl did not induce a substantial change of T 1 in the mentioned temperature

  11. Atomic-scale measurement of ultraslow Li motions in glassy LiAlSi2O6 by two-time L6i spin-alignment echo NMR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkening, M.; Kuhn, A.; Heitjans, P.

    2008-08-01

    L6i spin-alignment echo (SAE) nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used to monitor single-particle two-time correlation functions in LiAlSi2O6 glass. The method, here applied in the temperature range from 300 to 400 K, is sensitive to ultraslow Li hopping processes with rates (1/τSAE) down to 10 jumps/s. The use of a sample with natural L6i abundance allowed the measurement of pure NMR spin-alignment echoes which are damped with increasing mixing time exclusively by slow Li jumps, i.e., free of influences arising from, e.g., interfering spin-diffusion effects. The considerably stretched correlation functions reveal the presence of a broad distribution of jump rates. The results are comprehensively compared with those recently obtained from both L7i SAE and L7i spin-lattice relaxation NMR as well as from dc conductivity measurements. Interestingly, the activation energy of the latter, which are sensitive to long-range Li transport parameters, is in good agreement with that microscopically probed by L6i SAE NMR, here.

  12. Strong-coupling induced damping of spin-echo modulations in magic-angle-spinning NMR: Implications for J coupling measurements in disordered solids.

    PubMed

    Guerry, Paul; Brown, Steven P; Smith, Mark E

    2017-08-19

    In the context of improving J coupling measurements in disordered solids, strong coupling effects have been investigated in the spin-echo and refocused INADEQUATE spin-echo (REINE) modulations of three- and four-spin systems under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), using density matrix simulations and solid-state NMR experiments on a cadmium phosphate glass. Analytical models are developed for the different modulation regimes, which are shown to be distinguishable in practice using Akaike's information criterion. REINE modulations are shown to be free of the damping that occurs for spin-echo modulations when the observed spin has the same isotropic chemical shift as its neighbour. Damping also occurs when the observed spin is bonded to a strongly-coupled pair. For mid-chain units, the presence of both direct and relayed damping makes both REINE and spin-echo modulations impossible to interpret quantitatively. We nonetheless outline how a qualitative comparison of the modulation curves can provide valuable information on disordered networks, possibly also pertaining to dynamic effects therein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Measuring dynamic and kinetic information in the previously inaccessible supra-τ(c) window of nanoseconds to microseconds by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ban, David; Sabo, T Michael; Griesinger, Christian; Lee, Donghan

    2013-09-26

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool that has enabled experimentalists to characterize molecular dynamics and kinetics spanning a wide range of time-scales from picoseconds to days. This review focuses on addressing the previously inaccessible supra-tc window (defined as τ(c) < supra-τ(c) < 40 μs; in which tc is the overall tumbling time of a molecule) from the perspective of local inter-nuclear vector dynamics extracted from residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and from the perspective of conformational exchange captured by relaxation dispersion measurements (RD). The goal of the first section is to present a detailed analysis of how to extract protein dynamics encoded in RDCs and how to relate this information to protein functionality within the previously inaccessible supra-τ(c) window. In the second section, the current state of the art for RD is analyzed, as well as the considerable progress toward pushing the sensitivity of RD further into the supra-τ(c) scale by up to a factor of two (motion up to 25 μs). From the data obtained with these techniques and methodology, the importance of the supra-τ(c) scale for protein function and molecular recognition is becoming increasingly clearer as the connection between motion on the supra-τ(c) scale and protein functionality from the experimental side is further strengthened with results from molecular dynamics simulations.

  14. Developing a targeting system for bacterial membranes: measuring receptor-phosphatidylglycerol interactions with (1)H NMR, ITC and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Alliband, Amanda; Wang, Zifan; Thacker, Christopher; English, Douglas S; Burns, Dennis H

    2015-01-14

    An ammonium picket porphyrin that targets bacterial membranes has been prepared and shown to bind to phosphatidylglycerol (PG), a bacterial lipid, when the lipid was in solution, contained within synthetic membrane vesicles, or when in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial membranes. The multifunctional receptor was designed to interact with both the phosphate anion portion and neutral glycerol portion of the lipid headgroup. The receptor's affinity and selectivity for binding to surfactant vesicles or lipid vesicles that contain PG within their membranes was directly measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). FCS demonstrated that the picket porphyrin's binding pocket was complementary for the lipid headgroup, since simple Coulombic interactions alone did not induce binding. (1)H NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) were used to determine the receptor's binding stoichiometry, receptor-lipid complex structure, binding constant, and associated thermodynamic properties of complexation in solution. The lipid-receptor binding motif in solution was shown to mirror the binding motif of membrane-bound PG and receptor. Cell lysis assays with E. coli (Gram-negative) and Bacillus thuringiensis (Gram-positive) probed with UV/Visible spectrophotometry indicated that the receptor was able to penetrate either bacterial cell wall and to bind to the bacterial inner membrane.

  15. Nanomaterials for sample pretreatment prior to capillary electrophoretic analysis.

    PubMed

    Adam, Vojtech; Vaculovicova, Marketa

    2017-02-16

    Nanomaterials are, in analytical science, used for a broad range of purposes, covering the area of sample pretreatment as well as separation, detection and identification of target molecules. This review covers the application of nanomaterials for sample pretreatment in capillary electrophoresis. It targets the utilization of nanomaterials for sample purification, preconcentration and/or extraction coupled both off-line and on-line with capillary electrophoretic analysis. Especially due to their large surface area, nanoparticles and nanomaterials are exceptionally helpful in making up for the limited concentration detection limits provided by capillary electrophoresis. This method possesses excellent separation power; however, its sensitivity may be problematic in some cases. Therefore, this review is focused on utilization of nanomaterials as a powerful tool for sample preconcentration, which is so often required prior to capillary electrophoretic analysis.

  16. Preparation of Panel and Charged Particles for Electrophoretic Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyung Suk; Park, Jin Woo; Park, Lee Soon; Lee, Jung Kyung; Han, Yoon Soo; Kwon, Younghwan

    Studies on the formulation of photosensitive paste for transparent soft mold press (TSMP) method have been performed. With the optimum formulation of the photosensitive paste the box-type barrier rib with good flexibility and high solvent resistance was fabricated, suitable for the panel material of the electrophoretic display. Cationically-charged white particles were prepared by using TiO2 nanoparticles, silane coupling agent with amino groups, dispersant and acetic acid. The cationically charged TiO2 particles exhibited 74.09 mV of zeta potential and 3.11 × 10-5 cm2/Vs of mobility. Electrophoretic display fabricated with the charged TiO2 particles exhibited 10 V of low driving voltage and maximum contrast ratio (5.3/1) at 30 V.

  17. Accurate measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings by phase-alternating R-symmetry (PARS) sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangjin; Lu, Xingyu; Vega, Alexander J.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2014-09-01

    We report a Phase-Alternating R-Symmetry (PARS) dipolar recoupling scheme for accurate measurement of heteronuclear 1H-X (X = 13C, 15N, 31P, etc.) dipolar couplings in MAS NMR experiments. It is an improvement of conventional C- and R-symmetry type DIPSHIFT experiments where, in addition to the dipolar interaction, the 1H CSA interaction persists and thereby introduces considerable errors in the dipolar measurements. In PARS, phase-shifted RN symmetry pulse blocks applied on the 1H spins combined with π pulses applied on the X spins at the end of each RN block efficiently suppress the effect from 1H chemical shift anisotropy, while keeping the 1H-X dipolar couplings intact. Another advantage over conventional DIPSHIFT experiments, which require the signal to be detected in the form of a reduced-intensity Hahn echo, is that the series of π pulses refocuses the X chemical shift and avoids the necessity of echo formation. PARS permits determination of accurate dipolar couplings in a single experiment; it is suitable for a wide range of MAS conditions including both slow and fast MAS frequencies; and it assures dipolar truncation from the remote protons. The performance of PARS is tested on two model systems, [15N]-N-acetyl-valine and [U-13C,15N]-N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe tripeptide. The application of PARS for site-resolved measurement of accurate 1H-15N dipolar couplings in the context of 3D experiments is presented on U-13C,15N-enriched dynein light chain protein LC8.

  18. Accurate measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings by phase-alternating R-symmetry (PARS) sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Guangjin E-mail: tpolenov@udel.edu; Lu, Xingyu E-mail: lexvega@comcast.net; Vega, Alexander J. E-mail: lexvega@comcast.net; Polenova, Tatyana E-mail: tpolenov@udel.edu

    2014-09-14

    We report a Phase-Alternating R-Symmetry (PARS) dipolar recoupling scheme for accurate measurement of heteronuclear {sup 1}H-X (X = {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, {sup 31}P, etc.) dipolar couplings in MAS NMR experiments. It is an improvement of conventional C- and R-symmetry type DIPSHIFT experiments where, in addition to the dipolar interaction, the {sup 1}H CSA interaction persists and thereby introduces considerable errors in the dipolar measurements. In PARS, phase-shifted RN symmetry pulse blocks applied on the {sup 1}H spins combined with π pulses applied on the X spins at the end of each RN block efficiently suppress the effect from {sup 1}H chemical shift anisotropy, while keeping the {sup 1}H-X dipolar couplings intact. Another advantage over conventional DIPSHIFT experiments, which require the signal to be detected in the form of a reduced-intensity Hahn echo, is that the series of π pulses refocuses the X chemical shift and avoids the necessity of echo formation. PARS permits determination of accurate dipolar couplings in a single experiment; it is suitable for a wide range of MAS conditions including both slow and fast MAS frequencies; and it assures dipolar truncation from the remote protons. The performance of PARS is tested on two model systems, [{sup 15}N]-N-acetyl-valine and [U-{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N]-N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe tripeptide. The application of PARS for site-resolved measurement of accurate {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N dipolar couplings in the context of 3D experiments is presented on U-{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-enriched dynein light chain protein LC8.

  19. A Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Method for the Site-Specific Measurement of Proton Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Biological and Organic Solids.

    PubMed

    Hou, Guangjin; Gupta, Rupal; Polenova, Tatyana; Vega, Alexander J

    2014-02-01

    Proton chemical shifts are a rich probe of structure and hydrogen bonding environments in organic and biological molecules. Until recently, measurements of (1)H chemical shift tensors have been restricted to either solid systems with sparse proton sites or were based on the indirect determination of anisotropic tensor components from cross-relaxation and liquid-crystal experiments. We have introduced an MAS approach that permits site-resolved determination of CSA tensors of protons forming chemical bonds with labeled spin-1/2 nuclei in fully protonated solids with multiple sites, including organic molecules and proteins. This approach, originally introduced for the measurements of chemical shift tensors of amide protons, is based on three RN-symmetry based experiments, from which the principal components of the (1)H CS tensor can be reliably extracted by simultaneous triple fit of the data. In this article, we expand our approach to a much more challenging system involving aliphatic and aromatic protons. We start with a review of the prior work on experimental-NMR and computational-quantum-chemical approaches for the measurements of (1)H chemical shift tensors and for relating these to the electronic structures. We then present our experimental results on U-(13)C,(15)N-labeled histdine demonstrating that (1)H chemical shift tensors can be reliably determined for the (1)H(15)N and (1)H(13)C spin pairs in cationic and neutral forms of histidine. Finally, we demonstrate that the experimental (1)H(C) and (1)H(N) chemical shift tensors are in agreement with Density Functional Theory calculations, therefore establishing the usefulness of our method for characterization of structure and hydrogen bonding environment in organic and biological solids.

  20. A Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Method for the Site-Specific Measurement of Proton Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Biological and Organic Solids

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guangjin; Gupta, Rupal; Polenova, Tatyana; Vega, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Proton chemical shifts are a rich probe of structure and hydrogen bonding environments in organic and biological molecules. Until recently, measurements of 1H chemical shift tensors have been restricted to either solid systems with sparse proton sites or were based on the indirect determination of anisotropic tensor components from cross-relaxation and liquid-crystal experiments. We have introduced an MAS approach that permits site-resolved determination of CSA tensors of protons forming chemical bonds with labeled spin-1/2 nuclei in fully protonated solids with multiple sites, including organic molecules and proteins. This approach, originally introduced for the measurements of chemical shift tensors of amide protons, is based on three RN-symmetry based experiments, from which the principal components of the 1H CS tensor can be reliably extracted by simultaneous triple fit of the data. In this article, we expand our approach to a much more challenging system involving aliphatic and aromatic protons. We start with a review of the prior work on experimental-NMR and computational-quantum-chemical approaches for the measurements of 1H chemical shift tensors and for relating these to the electronic structures. We then present our experimental results on U-13C,15N-labeled histdine demonstrating that 1H chemical shift tensors can be reliably determined for the 1H15N and 1H13C spin pairs in cationic and neutral forms of histidine. Finally, we demonstrate that the experimental 1H(C) and 1H(N) chemical shift tensors are in agreement with Density Functional Theory calculations, therefore establishing the usefulness of our method for characterization of structure and hydrogen bonding environment in organic and biological solids. PMID:25484446

  1. Accurate measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings by phase-alternating R-symmetry (PARS) sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hou, Guangjin; Lu, Xingyu; Vega, Alexander J; Polenova, Tatyana

    2014-09-14

    We report a Phase-Alternating R-Symmetry (PARS) dipolar recoupling scheme for accurate measurement of heteronuclear (1)H-X (X = (13)C, (15)N, (31)P, etc.) dipolar couplings in MAS NMR experiments. It is an improvement of conventional C- and R-symmetry type DIPSHIFT experiments where, in addition to the dipolar interaction, the (1)H CSA interaction persists and thereby introduces considerable errors in the dipolar measurements. In PARS, phase-shifted RN symmetry pulse blocks applied on the (1)H spins combined with π pulses applied on the X spins at the end of each RN block efficiently suppress the effect from (1)H chemical shift anisotropy, while keeping the (1)H-X dipolar couplings intact. Another advantage over conventional DIPSHIFT experiments, which require the signal to be detected in the form of a reduced-intensity Hahn echo, is that the series of π pulses refocuses the X chemical shift and avoids the necessity of echo formation. PARS permits determination of accurate dipolar couplings in a single experiment; it is suitable for a wide range of MAS conditions including both slow and fast MAS frequencies; and it assures dipolar truncation from the remote protons. The performance of PARS is tested on two model systems, [(15)N]-N-acetyl-valine and [U-(13)C,(15)N]-N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe tripeptide. The application of PARS for site-resolved measurement of accurate (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings in the context of 3D experiments is presented on U-(13)C,(15)N-enriched dynein light chain protein LC8.

  2. Electrophoretic separation of serum proteins from gray squirrels.

    PubMed

    Chan, M S; Hoff, G L; Bigler, W J; Tomas, J A; Schneider, N J

    1976-10-01

    Serum proteins of gray squirrels were electrophoretically separated into 7 fractions as compared with the 5 fractions obtained from human serum. The mobility of the albumin fraction was approximately the same for both human and squirrel serums. The prealbumin fraction did not vary significantly in the percentage for squirrels bled at different times of the year. Immunoelectrophoresis patterns showed squirrel serum had a small number of fractions with the same antigenic characteristics as human serum.

  3. 13C-detected NMR experiments for measuring chemical shifts and coupling constants in nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Fiala, Radovan; Sklenár, Vladimír

    2007-10-01

    The paper presents a set of two-dimensional experiments that utilize direct (13)C detection to provide proton-carbon, carbon-carbon and carbon-nitrogen correlations in the bases of nucleic acids. The set includes a (13)C-detected proton-carbon correlation experiment for the measurement of (13)C-(13)C couplings, the CaCb experiment for correlating two quaternary carbons, the HCaCb experiment for the (13)C-(13)C correlations in cases where one of the carbons has a proton attached, the HCC-TOCSY experiment for correlating a proton with a network of coupled carbons, and a (13)C-detected (13)C-(15)N correlation experiment for detecting the nitrogen nuclei that cannot be detected via protons. The IPAP procedure is used for extracting the carbon-carbon couplings and/or carbon decoupling in the direct dimension, while the S(3)E procedure is preferred in the indirect dimension of the carbon-nitrogen experiment to obtain the value of the coupling constant. The experiments supply accurate values of (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts and carbon-carbon and carbon-nitrogen coupling constants. These values can help to reveal structural features of nucleic acids either directly or via induced changes when the sample is dissolved in oriented media.

  4. Relaxation time: a proton NMR-based approach as a metric to measure reactivity of engineered nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruthi, Archini; Misra, Superb K.

    2017-08-01

    The toxicological impact of engineered nanoparticles in environmental or biological milieu is very difficult to predict and control because of the complexity of interactions of nanoparticles with the varied constituents in the suspended media. Nanoparticles are different from their bulk counterparts due to their high surface area-to-volume ratio per unit mass, which plays a vital role in bioavailability of these nanoparticles to its surroundings. This study explores how changes in the spin-spin nuclear relaxation time can be used to gauge the availability of surface area and suspension stability of selected nanoparticles (CuO, ZnO, and SiO2), in a range of simulated media. Spin-spin nuclear relaxation time can be mathematically correlated to wetted surface area, which is well backed up by the data of hydrodynamic size measurements and suspension stability. We monitored the change in spin-spin relaxation time for all the nanoparticles, over a range of concentrations (2.5 -100 ppm) in deionized water and artificial seawater. Selective concentrations of nanoparticle suspensions were subjected for temporal studies over a period of 48 hrs to understand the concept of spin-spin nuclear relaxation time-based reactivity of nanoparticle suspension. The nanoparticles showed high degree of agglomeration, when suspended in artificial seawater. This was captured by a decrease in spin-spin nuclear relaxation time and also an increment in the hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles.

  5. Atomic-force-controlled capillary electrophoretic nanoprinting of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lovsky, Yulia; Lewis, Aaron; Sukenik, Chaim; Grushka, Eli

    2010-01-01

    The general nanoprinting and nanoinjection of proteins on non-conducting or conducting substrates with a high degree of control both in terms of positional and timing accuracy is an important goal that could impact diverse fields from biotechnology (protein chips) to molecular electronics and from fundamental studies in cell biology to nanophotonics. In this paper, we combine capillary electrophoresis (CE), a separation method with considerable control of protein movement, with the unparalleled positional accuracy of an atomic force microscope (AFM). This combination provides the ability to electrophoretically or electroosmotically correlate the timing of protein migration with AFM control of the protein deposition at a high concentration in defined locations and highly confined volumes estimated to be 2 al. Electrical control of bovine serum albumin printing on standard protein-spotting glass substrates is demonstrated. For this advance, fountain pen nanolithography (FPN) that uses cantilevered glass-tapered capillaries is amended with the placement of electrodes on the nanopipette itself. This results in imposed voltages that are three orders of magnitude less than what is normally used in capillary electrophoresis. The development of atomic-force-controlled capillary electrophoretic printing (ACCEP) has the potential for electrophoretic separation, with high resolution, both in time and in space. The large voltage drop at the tip of the tapered nanopipettes allows for significant increases in concentration of protein in the small printed volumes. All of these attributes combine to suggest that this methodology should have a significant impact in science and technology.

  6. A rapid gel electrophoretic chip for serum cholesterol determination.

    PubMed

    Kaminikado, Kenta; Ikeda, Ryuzo; Idegami, Koutaro; Nagatani, Naoki; Vestergaard, Mun'delanji C; Saito, Masato; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2011-05-07

    We present a rapid gel electrophoretic chip, composed of 2.5% (w/v) acrylamide and 1% (w/v) agarose gel, for serum cholesterol determination using a photo lithography technique. After optimizations, we determined the lipoprotein concentration of standard serum using a conventional enzyme method. The serum was diluted, stained and loaded for 15 min onto the chip. After loading, the intensities of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) bands separated at the chip were estimated using an image analyzer. The intensities of these bands corresponded to concentrations obtained from a standard enzyme-based method. The detected LDL-C and HDL-C concentrations were linear up to 146 mg dL(-1) and 53 mg dL(-1) respectively. Finally, we carried out the cholesterol analysis using real biological samples obtained from nine volunteers using our electrophoretic chip. The LDL-C and HDL-C levels detected using our chip correlated well with the results obtained using the conventional enzyme-based method r(2) = 0.98 and r(2) = 0.86 for LDL-C and HDL-C, respectively. Although our sample size is small and confined only to health volunteers, we have demonstrated that this proof-of-concept gel electrophoretic chip can determine lipoproteins, simultaneously.

  7. Electrophoretic detection of protein p53 in human leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Paponov, V.D.; Kupsik, E.G.; Shcheglova, E.G.; Yarullin, N.N.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have found an acid-soluble protein with mol. wt. of about 53 kD in peripheral blood leukocytes of persons with Down's syndrome. It was present in different quantities in all 20 patients tested, but was virtually not discovered in 12 healthy blood donors. This paper determines the possible identity of this protein with protein p53 from mouse ascites carcinoma by comparing their electrophoretic mobilities, because the accuracy of electrophoretic determination of the molecular weight of proteins is not sufficient to identify them. The paper also describes experiments to detect a protein with electrophoretic mobility identical with that of a protein in the leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome in leukocytes of patients with leukemia. To discover if protein p53 is involved in cell proliferation, the protein composition of leukocytes from healthy blood donors, cultured in the presence and absence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), was compared. Increased incorporation of H 3-thymidine by leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome is explained by the presence of a population of immature leukocytes actively synthesizing DNA in the peripheral blood of these patients, and this can also explain the presence of protein p53 in the leukocytes of these patients.

  8. Urokinase production by electrophoretically separated cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Giranda, V.; Sedor, K.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Urokinase is a plasminogen activator found in urine. Relatively pure preparations have been tested in Europe, Japan and the United States for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and other dangerous blood clots. Human embryonic kidney cell cultures have been found to produce urokinase at much higher concentrations, but less than 5% of the cells in typical cultures are producers. Since human diploid cells become senescent in culture the selection of clones derived from single cells will not provide enough material to be useful, so a bulk purification method is needed for the isolation of urokinase producing cell populations. Preparative cell electrophoresis was chosen as the method, since evidence exists that human embryonic cell cultures are richly heterogeneous with respect to electrophoretic mobility, and preliminary electrophoretic separations on the Apollo-Soyuz space flight produced cell populations that were rich in urokinase production. Similarly, erythropoietin is useful in the treatment of certain anemias and is a kidney cell duct, and electrophoretically enriched cell populations producing this product have been reported. Thus, there is a clear need for diploid human cells that produce these products, and there is evidence that such cells should be separable by free-flow cell electrophoresis.

  9. Jet-Printed Active-Matrix Backplanes and Electrophoretic Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Jurgen; Arias, Ana Claudia; Wong, William; Lujan, Rene; Ready, Steve; Krusor, Brent; Street, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The fabrication of large-area electronics, such as active-matrix pixel circuits in flat-panel displays, is becoming increasingly challenging. Particularly for applications such as electronic paper, flexibility of the display and fabrication at extremely low cost is important. Therefore, novel fabrication methods have to be explored. We have developed jet-printing technology to fabricate active-matrix backplanes for paper-like electrophoretic displays. In three approaches we implement several stages of evolution of the printing technology. First, the photolithographic patterning of photoresist used in conventional fabrication is replaced by digital printing of a wax etch mask. Second, the amorphous silicon semiconductor for the thin-film-transistors is replaced with a printed organic semiconductor. Third, the active-matrix pixel circuit is fabricated in an all-additive printing process. In order to test our backplanes we are developing electrophoretic display media. The media is based on microfabricated cell-structures which contain the electrophoretic ink. Particularly for flexible displays, the cells have to be individually sealed and several methods are being explored.

  10. Urokinase production by electrophoretically separated cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Giranda, V.; Sedor, K.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Urokinase is a plasminogen activator found in urine. Relatively pure preparations have been tested in Europe, Japan and the United States for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and other dangerous blood clots. Human embryonic kidney cell cultures have been found to produce urokinase at much higher concentrations, but less than 5% of the cells in typical cultures are producers. Since human diploid cells become senescent in culture the selection of clones derived from single cells will not provide enough material to be useful, so a bulk purification method is needed for the isolation of urokinase producing cell populations. Preparative cell electrophoresis was chosen as the method, since evidence exists that human embryonic cell cultures are richly heterogeneous with respect to electrophoretic mobility, and preliminary electrophoretic separations on the Apollo-Soyuz space flight produced cell populations that were rich in urokinase production. Similarly, erythropoietin is useful in the treatment of certain anemias and is a kidney cell duct, and electrophoretically enriched cell populations producing this product have been reported. Thus, there is a clear need for diploid human cells that produce these products, and there is evidence that such cells should be separable by free-flow cell electrophoresis.

  11. Electrophoretic and dynamic light scattering in evaluating dispersion and size distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeong; Kim, Jin Soo; An, Kay Hyeok; Lee, Kyu; Kim, Dong Young; Bae, Dong Jae; Lee, Young Hee

    2005-07-01

    We have introduced both electrophoretic and dynamic light scattering to evaluate the polydispersity, nanodispersity, and stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in distilled water with surfactants. By controlling the sodium dodecyl sulfate composition and some pretreatment by sonication, we were able to achieve nanodispersion (dispersion into individual nanotubes). The polydispersity was well described by combining both methods. We further showed that the nanodispersion and length distribution observed in the dynamic light scattering spectra were clearly identified by atomic force microscopy. Although surfactants with aliphatic groups can nanodisperse SWNT bundles, the dispersivity and stability depended seriously on the sample preparation process. Our measurements showed that a combination of electrophoretic and dynamic light scattering can provide a convenient and robust means of measuring polydispersity, nanodispersity, and stability of SWNTs in various solutions.

  12. Pleural effusion lipoproteins measured by NMR spectroscopy for diagnosis of exudative pleural effusions: a novel tool for pore-size estimation.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ching-Wan; Law, Chun-Yiu

    2014-09-05

    High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry of biofluids has been increasingly used in laboratory diagnosis of various diseases. In this study, we extended the use of (1)H NMR spectroscopy for laboratory diagnosis of exudative pleural effusions using pleural fluids. We compared this new NMR-based test with Light's criteria, the current gold standard for laboratory diagnosis of exudative pleural effusions. We analyzed 67 samples of pleural effusions from patients with pulmonary malignancy (N = 32), pulmonary tuberculosis (N = 18), and congestive heart failure (N = 17). The metabolomes of pleural effusions were analyzed using (1)H NMR spectroscopy on a Bruker 600 MHz spectrometer. Through a metabolome-wide association approach with filtering of insignificant markers (p value <4 × 10(-6)) and multivariate analysis (principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis), lipoprotein was found to be the best biomarker that distinguished exudates from transudates. Using NMR-based lipoprotein profiling to classify exudative pleural effusions from transudates, the area-under-receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.96 with sensitivity of 98%, specificity of 88%, and accuracy of 98%. In contrast, the current gold standard, Light's criteria, give a specificity of only 65% at the same sensitivity level of 98%. Using the principle of size exclusion, NMR-based lipoprotein profiling of pleural fluids has an unprecedented diagnostic performance superiority over the Light's criteria. The capillary leaks secondary to inflammation result in a larger pleural pore-size, which allows the large-sized lipoproteins to accumulate in exudative pleural effusions. In contrast, the pleural permeability is intact in transudates, which allow only small-sized lipoproteins to pass into the pleural effusions. The average capillary pore-size of the pleura can therefore be determined by using NMR-based lipoprotein profiling of

  13. In vitro NMR proton measurements in peritoneal ascites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, A.; Tez, M.; Göral, V.; Boylu, S.; Kaplan, A.; Kavak, G.

    1996-03-01

    The proton spin - lattice relaxation rate in malignant and non-malignant ascites was measured with an FT NMR spectrometer operating at 60 MHz. The mean relaxation rate in non-malignant ascites was significantly smaller than that of malignant ascites. However, the of malignant ascites overlaps with that of non-malignant ascites over all concentrations of total protein (TP) in samples. The in non-malignant ascites correlates strongly with TP, whilst the in malignant ascites shows only a moderate correlation. measurements before and after addition of ascorbic acid (reductant) suggest that there is a small paramagnetic contribution of ions to the in malignant ascites. The least-squares fitting of versus TP for non-malignant data gives a linear relationship, and suggests that the mechanism in non-malignant ascites is caused by a fast chemical exchange of water molecules between protein-bound water and free water.

  14. Magnetically-responsive electrophoretic silica organosols.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gregory N; Eastoe, Julian

    2014-07-15

    Silica nanoparticles can be dispersed in organic solvents (organosols) using surfactants, such as didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB). DDAB analogs prepared with lathanide tetrahalide counterions, either a high-magnetic moment ion (HoCl3Br, DDAH) or low-magnetic moment one (NdCl3Br, DDAN), are expected to produce charged particles, but only DDAH-stabilized dispersions are expected to be magnetically responsive. Phase-analysis light scattering (PALS) measurements have been performed to determine the charge on DDAH- and DDAN-stabilized organosols. Magnetic sedimentation experiments have been performed to determine whether or not the silica dispersions are magnetically responsive. Sedimentation was monitored both by visual observations and UV-vis spectroscopy. Both DDAH and DDAN organosols are negatively charged, the same as DDAB-stabilized nanoparticles. The DDAH-stabilized nanoparticles are found to respond to a magnetic field, whereas the DDAN-stabilized nanoparticles do not. This opens up possibilities for creating nanoparticle dispersions in nonpolar solvents which can be tailored to respond to desired external stimuli. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. NMR and MRI apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Myers, Whittier; McDermott, Robert; ten Haken, Bernard; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas

    2007-03-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. Additional signal to noise benefits are obtained by use of a low noise polarization coil, comprising litz wire or superconducting materials. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  16. Unilateral NMR with a barrel magnet.

    PubMed

    Utsuzawa, Shin; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2017-09-01

    Unilateral NMR can examine samples without regard to sample size. It is also an easy path to mobile or portable NMR as well as inexpensive NMR. The objective of this work was to develop unilateral NMR with an improved performance in a sample region that was remote from the apparatus. This was accomplished with the creation of a saddle point where all second derivatives of the main component of the field were nulled. A ∼10cm diameter ∼5cm thick magnet combined with a gradiometer coil on the surface detected signals from a sensitive region that extended ∼2cm from the magnet. The relatively homogeneous field of these unilateral NMR devices allows the measurement of rapidly diffusing spins as well as the use of smaller RF amplifiers, which enhances system mobility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. My starting point: the discovery of an NMR method for measuring blood oxygenation using the transverse relaxation time of blood water.

    PubMed

    Thulborn, Keith R

    2012-08-15

    This invited personal story, covering the period from 1979 to 2010, describes the discovery of the dependence of the transverse relaxation time of water in blood on the oxygenation state of hemoglobin in the erythrocytes. The underlying mechanism of the compartmentation of the different magnetic susceptibilities of hemoglobin in its different oxygenation states also explains the mechanism that underlies blood oxygenation level dependent contrast used in fMRI. The story begins with the initial observation of line broadening during ischemia in small rodents detected by in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy at high field. This spectroscopic line broadening or T2* relaxation effect was demonstrated to be related to the oxygenation state of blood. The effect was quantified more accurately using T2 values measured by the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill method. The effect was dependent on the integrity of the erythrocytes to compartmentalize the different magnetic susceptibilities produced by the changing spin state of the ferrous iron of hemoglobin in its different oxygenation states between the erythrocytes and the suspending solution. The hematocrit and magnetic field dependence, the requirement for erythrocyte integrity and lack of T1 dependence confirmed that the magnetic susceptibility effect explained the oxygenation state dependence of T2* and T2. This T2/T2* effect was combined with T1 based measurements of blood flow to measure oxygen consumption in animals. This blood oxygenation assay and its underlying magnetic susceptibility gradient mechanism was published in the biochemistry literature in 1982 and largely forgotten. The observation was revived to explain evolving imaging features of cerebral hematoma as MR imaging of humans increased in field strength to 1.5 T by the mid 1980s. Although the imaging version of this assay was used to measure a global metabolic rate of cerebral oxygen consumption in humans at 1.5-T by 1991, the global measurement had little clinical value

  18. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Wong, G. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Patz, S.; Schwartz, L. M.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks.

  19. Electrophoretic and aggregation behavior of bovine, horse and human red blood cells in plasma and in polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Bäumler, H; Neu, B; Mitlöhner, R; Georgieva, R; Meiselman, H J; Kiesewetter, H

    2001-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of native and glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine, human, and horse red blood cells (RBC) was investigated as a function of ionic strength (5-150 mM) and concentration of 464 kDa dextran (2 and 3 g/dl); RBC aggregation in autologous plasma and in dextran solutions was also measured. In agreement with previous observations, human and horse RBC form stable rouleaux whereas bovine RBC do not aggregate in either plasma or in dextran 464 kDa solutions. Electrophoretic measurements showed a species-dependent adsorption and depletion of dextran that can be theoretically evaluated. Adsorption of polymer is not a prerequisite for RBC aggregation (bovine RBC show the highest amount of adsorbed dextran yet do not aggregate). Aggregate formation thus occurs as long as the Gibbs free energy difference, given by the osmotic pressure difference between the bulk phase and the polymer-depleted region between two RBC, is larger than the steric and electrostatic repulsive energy contributed by the macromolecules present on the RBC surface. With increasing bulk-phase polymer concentration the depletion layer thickness decreases and the amount of adsorbed macromolecules increases, thereby resulting in an increase of the repulsive component of the interaction energy and decreased aggregation. We thus view electrophoretic measurements of RBC in various media as an important tool for understanding polymer behavior near the red cell surface and hence the mechanisms involved in RBC aggregation.

  20. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  1. Whole Blood Reveals More Metabolic Detail of the Human Metabolome than Serum as Measured by 1H-NMR Spectroscopy: Implications for Sepsis Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Kathleen A.; Younger, John G.; McHugh, Cora; Yeomans, Larisa; Finkel, Michael A.; Puskarich, Michael A.; Jones, Alan E.; Trexel, Julie; Karnovsky, Alla

    2015-01-01

    Serum is a common sample of convenience for metabolomics studies. Its processing time can be lengthy and may result in the loss of metabolites including those of red blood cells (RBC). Unlike serum, whole blood (WB) is quickly processed, minimizing the influence of variable hemolysis while including RBC metabolites. To determine differences between serum and WB metabolomes, both sample types, collected from healthy volunteers, were assayed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. A total of 34 and 50 aqueous metabolites were quantified from serum and WB, respectively. Free hemoglobin (Hgb) levels in serum were measured and the correlation between Hgb and metabolite concentrations was determined. All metabolites detected in serum were at higher concentrations in WB with the exception of acetoacetate and propylene glycol. The 18 unique metabolites of WB included adenosine, AMP, ADP and ATP, which are associated with RBC metabolism. The use of serum results in the underrepresentation of a number of metabolic pathways including branched chain amino acid degradation and glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. The range of free Hgb in serum was 0.03-0.01 g/dL and 8 metabolites were associated (p ≤ 0.05) with free Hgb. The range of free Hgb in serum samples from 18 sepsis patients was 0.02-0.46 g/dL. WB and serum have unique aqueous metabolite profiles but the use of serum may introduce potential pathway bias. Use of WB for metabolomics may be particularly important for studies in diseases like sepsis in which RBC metabolism is altered and mechanical and sepsis-induced hemolysis contributes to variance in the metabolome. PMID:26009817

  2. Characterization of CNT-MnO2 nanocomposite by electrophoretic deposition as potential electrode for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darari, Alfin; Ardiansah, Hafidh Rahman; Arifin, Rismaningsih, Nurmanita; Ningrum, Andini Novia; Subagio, Agus

    2016-04-01

    Energy crisis that occured in Indonesia suggests that energy supply could not offset the high rate request and needs an electric energy saving device which can save high voltage, safety, and unlimited lifetime. The weakness of batteries is durable but has a low power density while the capacitor has a high power density but it doesn't durable. The renewal of this study is CNT-MnO2 thin film fabrication method using electrophoretic deposition. Electrophoretic deposition is a newest method to deposited CNT using power supply with cheap, and make a good result. The result of FTIR analysis showed that the best CNT-MnO2 composition is 75:25 and C-C bond is detected in fingerprint area. The result is electrode thin film homogen and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks 2θ=26,63° is characterization of graphite, and 2θ=43,97° is characterization of diamond Carbon type and measured by Scherrer formula results 52,3 nm material average size .EIS test results its capacitance about 7,86 F. from the data it can be concluded that CNT-MnO2 potential electrode very promising for further study and has a potential to be a high capacitance, and fast charge supercapacitor which can be applied for electronic devices, energy converter, even electric car.

  3. Capillary electrophoretic and computational study of the complexation of valinomycin with rubidium cation.

    PubMed

    Ehala, Sille; Dybal, Jirí; Makrlík, Emanuel; Kasicka, Václav

    2009-03-01

    This study is focused on the characterization of interactions of valinomycin (Val), a macrocyclic dodecadepsipeptide antibiotic ionophore, with rubidium cation, Rb(+). Capillary affinity electrophoresis was employed for the experimental evaluation of the strength of the Val-Rb(+) complex. The study involved the measurement of the change of effective electrophoretic mobility of Val at increasing concentration of Rb(+) cation in the BGE. From the dependence of Val effective electrophoretic mobility on the Rb(+) cation concentration in the BGE (methanolic solution of 100 mM Tris, 50 mM acetic acid, 0-1 mM RbCl), the apparent binding (stability) constant (K(b)) of the Val-Rb(+) complex in methanol was evaluated as log K(b)=4.63+/-0.27. According to the quantum mechanical density functional theory calculations employed to predict the most probable structure of Val-Rb(+) complex, Val is stabilized by strong non-covalent bond interactions of Rb(+) with six ester carbonyl oxygen atoms so that the position of the "central" Rb(+) cation in the Val cage is symmetric.

  4. Effect of nanodroplet ink concentration on image contrast for reverse-emulsion electrophoretic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Winston Kuantung

    Reverse-emulsion electrophoretic display technology is based on an electro-responsive ink comprised of self-assembled nanodroplets dispersed in a non-polar liquid. The dye-containing nanodroplets are selectively driven toward or away from the viewing plane of a display by electric fields. The hypothesis of this study is that image contrast in a nanodroplet electrophoretic display is governed by concentration and steric effects that limit the intensity of the dark state. Simultaneously, steric effects as well as electrostatic screening can diminish whiteness in the light state. This hypothesis has been tested by multiphysics simulation of dilute species in electrostatic fields and experimental measurements of relative luminance in test displays. Concentration level was varied in a range of dilutions from full concentration (100%) to one-eighth (12.5%) and the highest contrast ratio was achieved at 25%. The test devices exhibited behavior that was similar to the saturation effects predicted by simulation, accounting for steric effects. Ink concentration showed little effect on switching time, reaching steady-state within approximately 2 seconds for all concentration levels. The hypothesis was further tested by experimentally observing the effect of driving voltage between 1 V to 8 V. The results showed no significant improvement of contrast even at higher voltage, further suggesting that concentration and steric effects dictate maximum contrast.

  5. Electrophoretic deposition of HA/MWNTs composite coating for biomaterial applications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Changjian; Han, Huijuan; Zhang, Fang; Li, Aimin

    2008-07-01

    A composite coating of hydroxyapatite (HA)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) has been fabricated by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). The nano powders of HA and MWNTs were dispersed in ethanol with total concentration of 0.005 g/mL and MWNTs 20% and 30% contents (wt). And the pH value of suspension was adjusted in a range from 4 to 5. After stabilization the mixture was ultrasonically treated for 3 h to form a stable suspension. Prior to the electrophoretic deposition, the titanium substrate was hydrothermally treated at 140 in NaOH (10 mol/L) solution for 6 h. A titanium sheet and circinal net of stainless steel were used as a cathode and an anode respectively, and a constant deposition voltage of 30 V was applied for 50-60 s in the EPD process. The thickness of the coatings was controlled from 10 microm to 20 microm. The samples of composite coating were then sintered in a resistance tube furnace in flowing argon at 700 for 2 h. The structure of the as prepared coating was characterized by SEM and XRD, and the bonding force of the coating/substrate was measured by an interfacial shear strength test. It is shown that the bonding strengths between the coating and the titanium substrate is as high as 35 MPa. The cell culture experiments indicate that the prepared composite coating of HA/MWNTs possesses good biocompatibility.

  6. Hydroxyapatite-anatase-carbon nanotube nanocomposite coatings fabricated by electrophoretic codeposition for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bokai; Kwok, Chi Tat

    2011-10-01

    In order to eliminate micro-cracks in the monolithic hydroxyapatite (HA) and composite hydroxyapatite/carbon nanotube (HA/CNT) coatings, novel HA/TiO(2)/CNT nanocomposite coatings on Ti6Al4V were attempted to fabricate by a single-step electrophoretic codeposition process for biomedical applications. The electrophoretically deposited layers with difference contents of HA, TiO(2) (anatase) and CNT nanoparticles were sintered at 800°C for densification with thickness of about 7-10 μm. A dense and crack-free coating was achieved with constituents of 85 wt% HA, 10 wt% TiO(2) and 5 wt% CNT. Open-circuit potential measurements and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests were used to investigate the electrochemical corrosion behavior of the coatings in vitro conditions (Hanks' solution at 37°C). The HA/TiO(2)/CNT coatings possess higher corrosion resistance than that of the Ti6Al4V substrate as reflected by nobler open circuit potential and lower corrosion current density. In addition, the surface hardness and adhesion strength of the HA/TiO(2)/CNT coatings are higher than that of the monolithic HA and HA/CNT coatings without compromising their apatite forming ability. The enhanced properties were attributed to the nanostructure of the coatings with the appropriate TiO(2) and CNT contents for eliminating micro-cracks and micro-pores.

  7. Microfluidic devices for DNA sequencing: sample preparation and electrophoretic analysis.

    PubMed

    Paegel, Brian M; Blazej, Robert G; Mathies, Richard A

    2003-02-01

    Modern DNA sequencing 'factories' have revolutionized biology by completing the human genome sequence, but in the race to completion we are left with inefficient, cumbersome, and costly macroscale processes and supporting facilities. During the same period, microfabricated DNA sequencing, sample processing and analysis devices have advanced rapidly toward the goal of a 'sequencing lab-on-a-chip'. Integrated microfluidic processing dramatically reduces analysis time and reagent consumption, and eliminates costly and unreliable macroscale robotics and laboratory apparatus. A microfabricated device for high-throughput DNA sequencing that couples clone isolation, template amplification, Sanger extension, purification, and electrophoretic analysis in a single microfluidic circuit is now attainable.

  8. Selectively-etched nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Surh, Michael P.; Wilson, William D.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Lane, Stephen M.

    2006-06-27

    Nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices having selectively-etched nanolaminates located in the fluid transport channel. The normally flat surfaces of the nanolaminate having exposed conductive (metal) stripes are selectively-etched to form trenches and baffles. The modifications of the prior utilized flat exposed surfaces increase the amount of exposed metal to facilitate electrochemical redox reaction or control the exposure of the metal surfaces to analytes of large size. These etched areas variously increase the sensitivity of electrochemical detection devices to low concentrations of analyte, improve the plug flow characteristic of the channel, and allow additional discrimination of the colloidal particles during cyclic voltammetry.

  9. Selectively-etched nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Surh, Michael P.; Wilson, William D.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Lane, Stephen M.

    2004-11-16

    Nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices having selectively-etched nanolaminates located in the fluid transport channel. The normally flat surfaces of the nanolaminate having exposed conductive (metal) stripes are selectively-etched to form trenches and baffles. The modifications of the prior utilized flat exposed surfaces increase the amount of exposed metal to facilitate electrochemical redox reaction or control the exposure of the metal surfaces to analytes of large size. These etched areas variously increase the sensitivity of electrochemical detection devices to low concentrations of analyte, improve the plug flow characteristic of the channel, and allow additional discrimination of the colloidal particles during cyclic voltammetry.

  10. Antisera against electrophoretically purified tubulin stimulate colchicine-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, J E; Subrahmanyan, L; Kalnins, V I; Ling, V

    1976-01-01

    Several rabbit antisera have been prepared against reduced and alkylated, electrophoretically purified tubulin isolated from chick brain. These antisera give a single precipitin line in Ouchterlony double diffusion plates when tested against partially purified tubulin, and label specifically microtubule- and tubulin-containing structures, such as mitotic spindles, cilia, and vinblastine-induced crystals, in a variety of cells. The same antisera also display the unique ability to stimulate the colchicine-binding activity of tubulin preparations from chick brain and Chinese hamster ovary tissue culture cells. This specific stimulation of colchicine binding activity is also obtained with the gamma globulin fractions purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation of these antisera. Images PMID:57619

  11. Power and limitations of electrophoretic separations in proteomics strategies.

    PubMed

    Rabilloud, Thierry; Vaezzadeh, Ali R; Potier, Noelle; Lelong, Cécile; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle; Chevallet, Mireille

    2009-01-01

    Proteomics can be defined as the large-scale analysis of proteins. Due to the complexity of biological systems, it is required to concatenate various separation techniques prior to mass spectrometry. These techniques, dealing with proteins or peptides, can rely on chromatography or electrophoresis. In this review, the electrophoretic techniques are under scrutiny. Their principles are recalled, and their applications for peptide and protein separations are presented and critically discussed. In addition, the features that are specific to gel electrophoresis and that interplay with mass spectrometry (i.e., protein detection after electrophoresis, and the process leading from a gel piece to a solution of peptides) are also discussed.

  12. AN ELECTROPHORETIC STUDY OF NEPHROTIC SERA AND URINE

    PubMed Central

    Longsworth, L. G.; MacInnes, D. A.

    1940-01-01

    The electrophoretic patterns of the sera and urine of two cases of lipoid nephrosis have been obtained and have been compared with a typical pattern of normal serum. The patterns of the pathological sera deviated widely from the normal, indicating relatively low albumin and high globulin content. The comparison of the patterns of nephrotic sera cleared by centrifugation and by ether extraction shows that a large portion of the β globulin consisted of a labile lipo-protein. The pattern of the nephrotic urine proteins resembled that of normal serum, with, however, significant differences. PMID:19870946

  13. Electrophoretic separation of kidney and pituitary cells on STS-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Barlow, G. H.; Cleveland, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Farrington, M. A.; Hatfield, J. M.; Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R.; Lewis, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Specific secretory cells were separated from suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic cells and rat pituitary cells in microgravity conditions, with an objective of isolating the subfractions of kidney cells that produce the largest amount of urakinase, and the subfractions of rat pituitary cells that secrete growth hormones (GH), prolactin (PRL), and other hormones. It is inferred from the experimental observations that the surface charge distributions of the GH-containing cells differ from those of the PRL-containing cells, which is explained by the presence of secretory products on the surface of pituitary cells. For kidney cells, the electrophoretic mobility distributions in flight experiments were spread more than the ground controls.

  14. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  15. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  16. Rotary echo nutation NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, R.; Tijink, G. A. H.; Veeman, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional solid state NMR experiment which combines rotary echoes and nutation NMR is investigated and used to study different sodium sites in zeolite NaA. It is shown that with this technique sodium ions with different relaxation rates in the rotating frame can be distinguished.

  17. Multiecho scheme advances surface NMR for aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunewald, Elliot; Walsh, David

    2013-12-01

    nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is increasingly used as a method to noninvasively characterize aquifers. This technology follows a successful history of NMR logging, applied over decades to estimate hydrocarbon reservoir properties. In contrast to logging, however, surface methods have utilized relatively simple acquisition sequences, from which pore-scale properties may not be reliably and efficiently estimated. We demonstrate for the first time the capability of sophisticated multiecho measurements to rapidly record a surface NMR response that more directly reflects aquifer characteristics. Specifically, we develop an adaptation of the multipulse Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence, widely used in logging, to measure the T2 relaxation response in a single scan. We validate this approach in a field surface NMR data set and by direct comparison with an NMR log. Adoption of the CPMG marked a landmark advancement in the history of logging NMR; we have now realized this same advancement in the surface NMR method.

  18. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment.

    PubMed

    Williams, Travis J; Kershaw, Allan D; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-05-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this article will enable instructors to use inversion recovery as a laboratory activity in applied NMR classes and provide research students with a convenient template with which to acquire inversion recovery data on research samples.

  19. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this article will enable instructors to use inversion recovery as a laboratory activity in applied NMR classes and provide research students with a convenient template with which to acquire inversion recovery data on research samples. PMID:21552343

  20. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander; McDermott, Robert F.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  1. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  2. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  3. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  4. Simulated null-gravity environments as applied to electrophoretic separations of biological species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giannovario, J. A.; Griffin, R. N.

    1978-01-01

    The scale-up of electrophoretic separations to provide preparative quantities of materials has been hampered by gravity induced convection and sedimentation. The separation of biologically important species may be significantly enhanced by electrophoretic space processing. Simple demonstrations on past space flights have proven some principles. Several techniques have been evolved to study electrophoretic separations where the effects of gravity have been nullified or significantly reduced. These techniques employ mechanical design, density gradients and computer modeling. Utilization of these techniques for ground based studies will yield clues as to which biological species can be considered prime candidates for electrophoretic processing in zero-G.

  5. UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-18

    UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition For the UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition proposal, a new 400 MHz and an upgraded 500 MHz NMR ...UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition Report Title For the UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition proposal, a new 400 MHz and an upgraded 500...MHz NMR have been delivered, installed, and incorporated into research and two lab courses. While no results from these instruments have been

  6. The Electrophoretic-like Mechanism of Huge Current effect in Electronically Phase Separated Manganite Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Lifeng; Wei, Wengang; Shen, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Electronically phase separated (La, Pr)CaMnO3 manganite wires are found to exhibit huge current effect. As the current density increase, the resistivity of wires decrease dramatically, and the metal-insulator transition temperatures get enhanced. However, the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device measurements show that the magnetizations with current on and off are almost identical. It is further confirmed by magnetic force microscope measurements, i.e. the current only changes the shape of ferromagnetic domain, while not the volume of ferromagnetic domain. The results conform to a phenomenological model in which the inherent nanoscale insulating and metallic domains are rearranged through electrophoretic-like processes to open and close percolation channels.

  7. [Erythrocyte sedimentation rate in diluted suspensions and their electrophoretic mobility in a vertical electrical field].

    PubMed

    Balmukhanov, B S; Basenova, A T; Bulegenov, K E

    1989-01-01

    The sedimentation rates (SR) of human red blood cells (RBC) were measured in diluted suspensions using the thin plate chamber. If the suspension medium was phosphate buffer saline or 0,18 M NaCl the SR-dependence on the distance to the chambers wall corresponded to SR distribution of small particles without interaction. The more NaCl content was decreased down to 0.145 M, the more temperature-dependent variations of SR were noted, while SR distribution became distinct with the predicted one for the non-interacting particles. The use of SR distribution is discussed for testing the RBC interaction in diluted suspensions caused by sedimentation. The electrophoretic measurements carried out under vertical oriented electrical field showed the rate of RBC movement to be the linear function of the field gradient and to be not influenced under the SR modifying conditions.

  8. Quasielastic and electrophoretic light scattering studies of polyelectrolyte-micelle complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigsbee, Daniel R.; Dubin, Paul L.

    1991-06-01

    The aqueous system comprised of poly(dimethylammonium chloride) (a strongly cationic polymer) and a mixture of sodium dodecyl sulfate and Triton X-100 (anionic/nonionic mixed micelles) forms polyelectrolyte-micelle complexes. At suitable micelle compositions and ionic strengths, soluble complexes are formed, which may be studied by a variety of solution techniques, including quasielastic light scattering. In this report, the authors examine the influence of polymer molecular weight and micelle composition on the nature of these complexes. Multiangle measurements were made with two different instruments (hence different procedures for extracting apparent size distributions from measured autocorrelation curves). At the concentrations employed, multipolymer complexes appear to form. The QELS data, taken in conjunction with limited electrophoretic light scattering results, suggest that the main determinant of the extent of higher-order aggregation are those factors influencing the net charge of a 'primary' i.e. intrapolymer complex, with molecular weight per se playing a secondary role.

  9. Insights into cyclodextrin interactions during sample stacking using capillary isotachophoresis with on-line microcoil NMR detection.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Valentino K; Larive, Cynthia K

    2005-09-01

    On-line capillary isotachophoresis (cITP)-NMR experiments were used to probe the interactions of the pharmaceutical compounds S-alprenolol, S-atenolol, R-propranolol, R-salbutamol and S-terbutaline with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) during cITP concentration. In cITP, ionic analytes are concentrated and separated on the basis of their electrophoretic mobility. Because neutral molecules have an electrophoretic mobility of zero, they are normally not concentrated or separated in electrophoretic experiments like cITP. Most of the analytes studied were concentrated by cITP sample stacking by a factor of around 300. For analytes that formed a strong inclusion complex, beta-CD co-concentrated during cITP sample stacking. However, once the focusing process was complete, a discrete diffusional boundary formed between the cITP-focused analyte band and the leading and trailing electrolyte, which restricted diffusion into and out of the analyte band.

  10. Compositional differences between soil humic acids extracted by various methods as evidenced by photosensitizing and electrophoretic properties.

    PubMed

    Gieguzynska, E; Amine-Khodja, A; Trubetskoj, O A; Trubetskaya, O E; Guyot, G; Ter Halle, A; Golebiowska, D; Richard, C

    2009-05-01

    Humic acids (HAs) were isolated from Elliott soil provided by the International Humic Substances Society (1BS102M) by three commonly used methods: (i) 0.1M NaOH (EI-HA), (ii) neutral 0.1M Na(4)P(2)O(7) (L-HA) and subsequent 0.1M NaOH (S-HA), and (iii) 0.1M NaOH+0.1M Na(4)P(2)O(7) (NP-HA). The objective was to evaluate the impact of these extractants on the photosensitizing properties of the isolated HAs. HAs were analyzed for their elemental composition, functional acid groups content, absorption and emission properties, electrophoretic characteristics and ability to produce singlet oxygen using furfuryl alcohol (FFA) as a scavenger. L-HA was slightly more aromatic and oxygenated than the other HAs and contained a higher portion of long-wavelength fluorophores and macromolecules showing low molecular size (MS) and high electrophoretic mobility. L-HA also gave a rate of FFA photooxygenation between 1.25- and 1.6-fold higher than the other HAs. This suggests that the free humic macromolecules ionized at pH 7 and/or weakly bounded on mineral surfaces via cation bridges are of relatively low MS and contribute significantly to the photosensitizing and long-wavelength emitting properties. Differences among the other HAs were more subtle, but the parallel evolution of the reactivity and electrophoretic characteristics was observed. Photochemical and electrophoretic measurements seem to be sensitive indicators to evaluate differences among the extraction procedures of HAs.

  11. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and Te125 NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-27

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S, depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n, and effective mass, m*, as S ~ m*/n2/3. The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, depends on both n and m* as 1/T1~(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1/T1~(m*)2n2/3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study AgxSbxGe50–2xTe50, well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Thus, values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.

  12. Charge carrier effective mass and concentration derived from combination of Seebeck coefficient and Te125 NMR measurements in complex tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E. M.

    2016-06-27

    Thermoelectric materials utilize the Seebeck effect to convert heat to electrical energy. The Seebeck coefficient (thermopower), S, depends on the free (mobile) carrier concentration, n, and effective mass, m*, as S ~ m*/n2/3. The carrier concentration in tellurides can be derived from 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation measurements. The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, depends on both n and m* as 1/T1~(m*)3/2n (within classical Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics) or as 1/T1~(m*)2n2/3 (within quantum Fermi-Dirac statistics), which challenges the correct determination of the carrier concentration in some materials by NMR. Here it is shown that the combination of the Seebeck coefficient and 125Te NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements in complex tellurides provides a unique opportunity to derive the carrier effective mass and then to calculate the carrier concentration. This approach was used to study AgxSbxGe50–2xTe50, well-known GeTe-based high-efficiency tellurium-antimony-germanium-silver thermoelectric materials, where the replacement of Ge by [Ag+Sb] results in significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. Thus, values of both m* and n derived using this combination show that the enhancement of thermopower can be attributed primarily to an increase of the carrier effective mass and partially to a decrease of the carrier concentration when the [Ag+Sb] content increases.

  13. SEM Analysis of Electrophoretically-Deposited Nanoparticle Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Neil

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (20 nm) were synthesized and electrophoretically deposited onto aluminum foil, graphite paper, and carbon felt in order to study its potential as a cost-effective electrocatalyst for the oxidation of ammonium sulfite to ammonium sulfate in a proposed sulfur ammonia thermochemical cycle. Scanning electron microscopy and linear sweep voltammetry were used to characterize the deposited films and investigate their electrochemical activity. Furthermore, the effects of electrophoretic deposition conditions on deposit morphology and subsequently the effects of deposit morphology on electrochemical activity in 2 M ammonium sulfite were studied to better understand how to improve electrocatalysts. It was found that there is a critical deposit thickness for each substrate, where additional deposited particles reduce overall electrocatalytic activity of the deposits. For graphite paper, this thickness was estimated to be 3 particle layers for the EPD conditions studied. The 3 particle layer film on graphite paper resulted in a 5.5 fold increase in current density from a blank graphite paper substrate. For carbon felt, the deposit thickness threshold was calculated to be 0.13 of a particle layer for the EPD conditions studied. Moreover, this film was found to have a 4.3 fold increase in current density from a blank carbon felt substrate.

  14. Electrophoretic analysis of coniferyl alcohol oxidase and related laccases.

    PubMed

    Udagama-Randeniya, P; Savidge, R

    1994-01-01

    Gradient gel electrophoretic methods enabled a distinction to be made between coniferyl alcohol oxidase (CAO) of lignifying cell walls and a pI approximately 9 pine "laccase" recently implicated in lignification (Science 1993 260, 672). Following treatment of a partially purified protein mixture from developing xylem of Pinus strobus with 2-[N-morpholine]ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer, isoelectric focusing and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that CAO had been selectively precipitated by MES and thereby purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. Purified CAO was determined to be a cell-wall-bound glycoprotein (38% glycan), M(r) 107,500, pI 7.6, pH and temperature optima 6.3 and 30 degrees C, respectively. By graphite-furnace atomic-absorption analysis, CAO contained one copper atom per protein molecule. Proteins obtained from lignifying cambial derivatives of conifers (family Pinaceae) and from Rhus typhina bark were compared with CAO and the pI approximately 9 pine "laccase" following electrophoresis and Western blotting. For Abies balsamea, Larix laricina, Picea rubens, Pinus banksiana, Pinus taeda, and R. typhina, the isoelectric points of oxidatively active bands were identical to those of purified CAO. In addition, for all species only the pI 7.6 band was immunoreactive with antibodies against periodate-deglycosylated CAO.

  15. Electrophoretic deposition of zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guangfei; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Shengmin

    2014-06-01

    Zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles synthesized by the co-precipitation method were used to coat stainless steel plates by electrophoretic deposition in n-butanol with triethanolamine as a dispersant. The effect of zinc concentration in the synthesis on the morphology and microstructure of coatings was investigated. It is found that the deposition current densities significantly increase with the increasing zinc concentration. The zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It is inferred that hydroxyapatite and triethanolamine predominate in the chemical composition of coatings. With the increasing Zn/Ca ratios, the contents of triethanolamine decrease in the final products. The triethanolamine can be burnt out by heat treatment. The tests of adhesive strength have confirmed good adhesion between the coatings and substrates. The formation of new apatite layer on the coatings has been observed after 7days of immersion in a simulated body fluid. In summary, the results show that dense, uniform zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings are obtained by electrophoretic deposition when the Zn/Ca ratio reaches 5%.

  16. Automated band mapping in electrophoretic gel images using background information

    PubMed Central

    Zerr, Troy; Henikoff, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Some popular methods for polymorphism and mutation discovery involve ascertainment of novel bands by the examination of electrophoretic gel images. Although existing strategies for mapping bands work well for specific applications, such as DNA sequencing, these strategies are not well suited for novel band detection. Here, we describe a general strategy for band mapping that uses background banding patterns to facilitate lane calling and size calibration. We have implemented this strategy in GelBuddy, a user-friendly Java-based program for PC and Macintosh computers, which includes several utilities to assist discovery of mutations and polymorphisms. We demonstrate the use of GelBuddy in applications based on single-base mismatch cleavage of heteroduplexed PCR products. Use of software designed to facilitate novel band detection can significantly shorten the time needed for image analysis and data entry in a high-throughput setting. Furthermore, the interactive strategy implemented in GelBuddy has been successfully applied to DNA fingerprinting applications, such as AFLP. GelBuddy promises to make electrophoretic gel analysis a viable alternative to DNA resequencing for discovery of mutations and polymorphisms. PMID:15894797

  17. Electrophoretic preparation and characterization of porous electrodes from diamond nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Torre Riveros, Lyda; Soto, Keyla; Tryk, Donald A.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2007-04-01

    We carried out chemical purification of commercially available diamond nanoparticles by refluxing in aqueous HNO3 and characterized the samples by spectroscopic and surface techniques before and after purification. As a first step in the preparation of electrodes for electrochemistry, we have electrophoretically deposited thin, highly uniform films of controlled thickness (1-8 μm) on silicon substrates using the purified diamond nanoparticles. These have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All films obtained were homogeneous in thickness and without macroscopic holes or cracks. Such structures could also be used in many other applications such as fuel cells or lithium batteries. We have performed cyclic voltammetry experiments with these electrodes. The voltammograms of diamond nanoparticles electrophoretically deposited on silicon indicate hydrogen evolution. This demonstrates that the material is useful as electrocatalitic support. This conclusion is supported by the cyclic voltammograms obtained using ferrycyanide (III) chloride and hexaamineruthenium (III) chloride complexes as redox probes. However, these redox probes showed very small peak currents. This behavior could be improved by doping the diamond nanoparticles with an impurity such as boron.

  18. Electrophoretic mobility of cells in a vertical Ficoll gradiant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Todd, P. W.; Kunze, M. E.; Gaines, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The upward migration of living cells and test particles under the influence of a constant electric field in a low conductivity Ficoll gradient occurs at nearly constant velocity. Viscosity and neutral polymer concentration affect migration rate. Decreasing viscosity speeds up the particle migration, decreasing neutral polymer (Ficoll) concentration, slows particle migration, since electrophoretic mobility increases approximately linearly with neutral polymer concentration. Neutral polymers interact with the cell surface to effectively raise its zeta potential. An analytic function was developed from the known dependence of these physical variables on migration distance; the analysis expresses migration velocity as an explicit function of position in the density gradient. It predicts an almost linear increase in velocity of about 12 to 16% over the working region of the gradient. It was numerically integrated and correctly predicts cell migration distance vs time curves without the use of any fitted parameters. The resulting migration curves follow the expected slowly varying exponential form that closely resembles a straight line. The ability to determine standard electrophoretic mobilities from such curves depends on knowledge of the effect of Ficoll on the zeta potential of the cell type that is separated.

  19. Electrophoretic mobility of cells in a vertical Ficoll gradiant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Todd, P. W.; Kunze, M. E.; Gaines, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The upward migration of living cells and test particles under the influence of a constant electric field in a low conductivity Ficoll gradient occurs at nearly constant velocity. Viscosity and neutral polymer concentration affect migration rate. Decreasing viscosity speeds up the particle migration, decreasing neutral polymer (Ficoll) concentration, slows particle migration, since electrophoretic mobility increases approximately linearly with neutral polymer concentration. Neutral polymers interact with the cell surface to effectively raise its zeta potential. An analytic function was developed from the known dependence of these physical variables on migration distance; the analysis expresses migration velocity as an explicit function of position in the density gradient. It predicts an almost linear increase in velocity of about 12 to 16% over the working region of the gradient. It was numerically integrated and correctly predicts cell migration distance vs time curves without the use of any fitted parameters. The resulting migration curves follow the expected slowly varying exponential form that closely resembles a straight line. The ability to determine standard electrophoretic mobilities from such curves depends on knowledge of the effect of Ficoll on the zeta potential of the cell type that is separated.

  20. Electrophoretic fingerprinting of benzodiazepine tablets in spike drinks.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Ortega-Ojeda, Fernando; López-Melero, Lucía; Montalvo, Gema; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2014-11-01

    Over the last few years, there has been an increase in the reports of drug-facilitated crimes. The list of drugs associated with these crimes is extensive and benzodiazepines constitute one of the groups of substances more commonly used. The sedative properties, which characterize benzodiazepines, are enhanced when such drugs are combined with alcohol, being more attractive for committing these types of crimes. In this work, a capillary electrophoresis method was applied to the analysis of 63 different samples of club drinks spiked with benzodiazepine tablets. The resulting electropherograms were processed and analyzed with the chemometric multivariate techniques: principal component analysis (PCA) and soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA) classification. The PCA results allowed a clear differentiation of each drug class in a 3D plot. In addition, the SIMCA classification model (5% significance level) showed that eight out of nine test samples were automatically assigned by software to their proper sample class. The conflicting sample was correctly classified in the Coomans' plot (95% confidence). This novel approach based on the comparison of electrophoretic profiles of spiked drinks by chemometric tools allows determining the benzodiazepine used for drink spiking without the use of drug standards. Moreover, it provides an opportunity for the forensic laboratories to incorporate the identification capability provided by the electrophoretic fingerprinting of benzodiazepine solutions in existing or new databases. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Survival rate of eukaryotic cells following electrophoretic nanoinjection

    PubMed Central

    Simonis, Matthias; Hübner, Wolfgang; Wilking, Alice; Huser, Thomas; Hennig, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Insertion of foreign molecules such as functionalized fluorescent probes, antibodies, or plasmid DNA to living cells requires overcoming the plasma membrane barrier without harming the cell during the staining process. Many techniques such as electroporation, lipofection or microinjection have been developed to overcome the cellular plasma membrane, but they all result in reduced cell viability. A novel approach is the injection of cells with a nanopipette and using electrophoretic forces for the delivery of molecules. The tip size of these pipettes is approximately ten times smaller than typical microinjection pipettes and rather than pressure pulses as delivery method, moderate DC electric fields are used to drive charged molecules out of the tip. Here, we show that this approach leads to a significantly higher survival rate of nanoinjected cells and that injection with nanopipettes has a significantly lower impact on the proliferation behavior of injected cells. Thus, we propose that injection with nanopipettes using electrophoretic delivery is an excellent alternative when working with valuable and rare living cells, such as primary cells or stem cells. PMID:28120926

  2. Electrophoretic motion of ideally polarizable particles in a microchannel.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhemin; Gao, Yandong; Li, Dongqing

    2009-03-01

    The induced-charge electrophoretic (ICEP) motion of ideally polarizable particles in a microchannel is numerically studied in this paper. A complete 3-D multi-physics model is set up to simulate the transient ICEP motion of spherical ideally polarizable particles in a microchannel. The study shows that a non-uniform distribution of induced surface charge occurs when an ideally polarizable particle is immersed in an externally applied electric field, resulting in a varying slipping (EOF) velocity along the particle's surface and hence producing micro vortexes in the liquid. The numerical results verify that the steady-state ICEP velocity of an ideally polarizable particle does not differ from the electrophoretic velocity of a non-conducting particle, although the flow field near the particle does. A strong wall-repelling effect of ICEP is found when the polarizable particle is placed close to the channel wall. This is due to the lifting effect generated from the interaction between the induced micro vortexes and the channel wall and depends on the electric field and the particle size. The wall effects on ICEP motion can be used for focusing particles and for separation of particle by density.

  3. Recent innovations in protein separation on microchips by electrophoretic methods.

    PubMed

    Peng, Youyuan; Pallandre, Antoine; Tran, N Thuy; Taverna, Myriam

    2008-01-01

    Microchips for analytical purposes have attracted great attention over the last 20 years. In the present review, we focus on the most recent development of microchips for electrophoretic separation of proteins. This review starts with a short recalling about the microchips covering the basic microchip layout for CE and the commercial chips and microchip platforms. A short paragraph is dedicated to the surface treatment of microchips, which is of paramount importance in protein analysis. One section is dedicated to on-line sample pretreatment in microchips and summarizes different strategies to pre-concentrate or to purify proteins from complex matrixes. Most of the common modes used for CE of proteins have already been adapted to the chip format, while multidimensional approaches are still in progress. The different routes to achieve detection in microchip are also presented with a special attention to derivatization or labeling of proteins. Finally, several recent applications are mentioned. They highlight the great potential of electrophoretic separations of proteins in numerous fields such as biological, pharmaceutical or agricultural and food analysis. A bibliography with 151 references is provided covering papers published from 2000 to the early 2007.

  4. Interplay between electrophoretic mobility and intrinsic viscosity of polypeptide chains.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, María V

    2012-03-01

    The present work is motivated specifically by the need to find a simple interplay between experimental values of electrophoretic mobility and intrinsic viscosity (IV) of polypeptides. The connection between these two properties, as they are evaluated experimentally in a formulated dilute solution, may provide relevant information concerning the physicochemical characterization and separation of electrically charged chains such as polypeptides. Based on this aspect, a study on the relation between the effective electrophoretic mobility and the IV of the following globular proteins is carried out: bovine carbonic anhydrase, staphylococcal nuclease, human carbonic anhydrase, lysozyme, human serum albumin. The basic interpretation of the IV through polypeptide chain conformations involves two unknowns: one is the Flory characteristic ratio involving short-range intramolecular interactions and the other is the Mark-Houwink exponent associated with large-range intramolecular interactions. Here, it will be shown via basic and well-established electrokinetic theories and scaling concepts that the IV and global chain flexibility of polypeptides in dilute solutions may be estimated from capillary zone electrophoresis, in addition to classical transport properties. The polypeptide local chain flexibility may change due to electrostatic interactions among closer chain ionizing groups and the hindrance effect of their associated structural water.

  5. Site-resolved multiple-quantum filtered correlations and distance measurements by magic-angle spinning NMR: Theory and applications to spins with weak to vanishing quadrupolar couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Eliav, U. E-mail: eliav@tau.ac.il; Haimovich, A.; Goldbourt, A. E-mail: eliav@tau.ac.il

    2016-01-14

    We discuss and analyze four magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR methods that can be used to measure internuclear distances and to obtain correlation spectra between a spin I = 1/2 and a half-integer spin S > 1/2 having a small quadrupolar coupling constant. Three of the methods are based on the heteronuclear multiple-quantum and single-quantum correlation experiments, that is, high rank tensors that involve the half spin and the quadrupolar spin are generated. Here, both zero and single-quantum coherence of the half spins are allowed and various coherence orders of the quadrupolar spin are generated, and filtered, via active recoupling of the dipolar interaction. As a result of generating coherence orders larger than one, the spectral resolution for the quadrupolar nucleus increases linearly with the coherence order. Since the formation of high rank tensors is independent of the existence of a finite quadrupolar interaction, these experiments are also suitable to materials in which there is high symmetry around the quadrupolar spin. A fourth experiment is based on the initial quadrupolar-driven excitation of symmetric high order coherences (up to p = 2S, where S is the spin number) and subsequently generating by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction higher rank (l + 1 or higher) tensors that involve also the half spins. Due to the nature of this technique, it also provides information on the relative orientations of the quadrupolar and dipolar interaction tensors. For the ideal case in which the pulses are sufficiently strong with respect to other interactions, we derive analytical expressions for all experiments as well as for the transferred echo double resonance experiment involving a quadrupolar spin. We show by comparison of the fitting of simulations and the analytical expressions to experimental data that the analytical expressions are sufficiently accurate to provide experimental {sup 7}Li–{sup 13}C distances in a complex of lithium, glycine, and water

  6. Probing microsecond time scale dynamics in proteins by methyl (1)H Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion NMR measurements. Application to activation of the signaling protein NtrC(r).

    PubMed

    Otten, Renee; Villali, Janice; Kern, Dorothee; Mulder, Frans A A

    2010-12-01

    To study microsecond processes by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy, low power deposition and short pulses are crucial and encourage the development of experiments that employ (1)H Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse trains. Herein, a method is described for the comprehensive study of microsecond to millisecond time scale dynamics of methyl groups in proteins, exploiting their high abundance and favorable relaxation properties. In our approach, protein samples are produced using [(1)H, (13)C]-d-glucose in ∼100% D(2)O, which yields CHD(2) methyl groups for alanine, valine, threonine, isoleucine, leucine, and methionine residues with high abundance, in an otherwise largely deuterated background. Methyl groups in such samples can be sequence-specifically assigned to near completion, using (13)C TOCSY NMR spectroscopy, as was recently demonstrated (Otten, R.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 2952-2960). In this Article, NMR pulse schemes are presented to measure (1)H CPMG relaxation dispersion profiles for CHD(2) methyl groups, in a vein similar to that of backbone relaxation experiments. Because of the high deuteration level of methyl-bearing side chains, artifacts arising from proton scalar coupling during the CPMG pulse train are negligible, with the exception of Ile-δ1 and Thr-γ2 methyl groups, and a pulse scheme is described to remove the artifacts for those residues. Strong (13)C scalar coupling effects, observed for several leucine residues, are removed by alternative biochemical and NMR approaches. The methodology is applied to the transcriptional activator NtrC(r), for which an inactive/active state transition was previously measured and the motions in the microsecond time range were estimated through a combination of backbone (15)N CPMG dispersion NMR spectroscopy and a collection of experiments to determine the exchange-free component to the transverse relaxation rate. Exchange contributions to the (1)H line width were detected for 21 methyl

  7. (1)JCH NMR Profile: Identification of Key Structural Features and Functionalities by Visual Observation and Direct Measurement of One-Bond Proton-Carbon Coupling Constants.

    PubMed

    Marcó, Núria; Souza, Alexandre A; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Gil, Roberto R; Parella, Teodor

    2017-02-17

    A user-friendly NMR interface for the visual and accurate determination of experimental one-bond proton-carbon coupling constants ((1)JCH) in small molecules is presented. This intuitive (1)JCH profile correlates directly to δ((1)H), and (1)JCH facilitates the rapid identification and assignment of (1)H signals belonging to key structural elements and functional groups. Illustrative examples are provided for some target molecules, including terminal alkynes, strained rings, electronegative substituents, or lone-pair-bearing heteronuclei.

  8. Metabolic changes in rat lens after in vivo exposure to ultraviolet irradiation: measurements by high resolution MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Risa, Øystein; Saether, Oddbjørn; Löfgren, Stefan; Söderberg, Per G; Krane, Jostein; Midelfart, Anna

    2004-06-01

    In the present study, high-resolution magic angle spinning proton nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS (1)H NMR) spectroscopy was used to investigate changes in the metabolic profile of intact rat lenses after UVB irradiation of the eyes. Three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to UVB radiation at 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 kJ/m(2). One eye was exposed, and the contralateral eye served as the control. One week after exposure, the lenses were removed and forward light-scattering was quantified. Thereafter, proton NMR spectra from the intact lenses were obtained. Relative changes in metabolite concentrations were determined. The lenses in all three groups showed significant increases in light-scattering after UVB irradiation. The high-quality HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectra permitted more than 30 different metabolites to be identified. UVB irradiation caused a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in concentrations of taurine, hypotaurine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, valine, myo-inositol, phosphocholine, betaine, succinate, and glutathione at all three UV doses. For glycine, glutamate, and lactate, significant decreases in concentration were observed at the two lowest UVR-B doses. The total amount of adenosine tri- and diphosphate and (ATP, ADP) decreased significantly and that of adenosine monophosphate AMP increased significantly at the two highest doses. Alanine was the only amino acid that increased after UVB irradiation. None of these metabolites exhibited a significant UVB dose-dependent relationship. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential of HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectroscopy as an analytical tool for use on intact lenses. Near-threshold UVR-B doses led to a generally significant decrease in water-soluble metabolites 1 week after exposure. The lack of dose-dependent changes in the metabolites indicates that repair processes during the first week after UVB irradiation overcome the immediate metabolic disturbances.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Roeder, Stephen B. W.; Assink, Roger A.; Gibson, Atholl A. V.

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  10. Difference in microchip electrophoretic mobility between partially and fully PEGylated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Ji; Na, Dong Hee

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the difference in electrophoretic mobility between partially and fully poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (part-PEG-PAMAM and full-PEG-PAMAM, respectively) using a microchip capillary gel electrophoresis (MCGE). While MCGE allowed size-based separation of PEG-PAMAMs prepared with monomethoxy PEG-nitrophenyl carbonate, full-PEG-PAMAMs migrated slower than part-PEG-PAMAMs that were similar in size or larger. When the measured molecular weights obtained from MCGE analysis and the calculated molecular weights were plotted, each part-PEG-PAMAM and full-PEG-PAMAM showed correlation coefficients greater than 0.98. This study indicates that MCGE would be useful for characterizing PEG-PAMAMs with different PEGylation degrees. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dielectric properties of colloidal Gd2O3 nanocrystal films fabricated via electrophoretic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, S. V.; Dickerson, J. H.

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the dielectric characteristics of [Al/Gd2O3/Si] metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors, which were fabricated from films of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanocrystals used as the gate oxide layer. Electrophoretic deposition cast Gd2O3 nanocrystal films of different thicknesses by varying the concentration of the nanocrystal suspensions. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements of the MOS capacitors exhibited hysteresis, which indicated potentially favorable charge-storage properties. The films' dielectric constant (κ =3.90), calculated from the C-V data, led to the packing density of nanocrystals within the film (66%), which is in the glassy regime approximated by randomly closed packed spheres.

  12. Electrophoretic deposition of titanium dioxide films on copper in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Laamari, M; Ben Youssef, A; Bousselmi, L

    Electrophoretic deposition was used to produce titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanostructured films on copper substrate in aqueous media for photocatalytic application. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) with a weight rate from 0 to 15% was added to TiO2 P25 suspension in order to enhance film adhesion. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, contact angle measurement, nanoindentation, scratch test and photoluminescence. The photocatalytic activity of the films was tested with amido black 10B under UV irradiation. The results indicated that the morphology and the mechanical properties of films depended on the added PVP amount. Scratch test showed that adhesion strength rose with increased PVP amount. The photocatalytic activity indicated that TiO2 film synthesized with 13% PVP had the highest efficiency.

  13. Methods for functionalization of microsized polystyrene beads with titania nanoparticles for cathodic electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Radice, S; Kern, P; Dietsch, H; Mischler, S; Michler, J

    2008-02-15

    Functionalization of colloidal particles based on the use of polyelectrolytes and heterocoagulation was combined with electrophoretic deposition (EPD), with the aim of depositing titania-polystyrene (TiO(2)-PS) composite particles on Ti6Al4V substrates. The composite particles were obtained by heterocoagulation of TiO(2) nanoparticles on the surface of monosized polystyrene beads of 4.6 microm in diameter. Two alternative methods were developed for the preparation of the TiO(2)-PS suspensions in organic fluids for cathodic electrodeposition. The first method was carried out in alkaline aqueous medium with the use of polyelectrolytes and intermediate control measurements of zeta potential, conductivity, and pH; the second one was carried out directly in the organic solvent used for EPD, typically isopropanol. Examples of deposits obtained by EPD in both suspensions and a comparative analysis between the two methods are presented.

  14. Synthesis, analytical characterization and capillary electrophoretic use of the single-isomer heptakis-(6-O-sulfobutyl)-beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Milo; Fejős, Ida; Varga, Erzsébet; Benkovics, Gábor; Darcsi, András; Szemán, Julianna; Béni, Szabolcs

    2017-09-08

    This contribution reports the synthesis, characterization and capillary electrophoretic application of heptakis-(6-O-sulfobutyl-ether)-β-cyclodextrin sodium salt, (6-(SB)7-β-CD). The compound was obtained through a five-steps synthesis and it represents the first example of single-isomer sulfobutylated cyclodextrin that carries the negatively charged functions exclusively on its primary side and it is unmodified on the lower rim. The purity of each intermediate was determined by appropriate liquid chromatographic methods, while the isomeric purity of the final product was established by an ad-hoc developed HPLC method based on a CD-Screen-IEC column. The structural identification of 6-(SB)7-β-CD was carried out by 1D, 2D NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS. The chiral separation ability of 6-(SB)7-β-CD was studied by chiral capillary electrophoresis using the single-isomer host as a background electrolyte additive to separate the enantiomers of a representative set of pharmacologically significant model compounds such as verapamil, dapoxetine, ondansetron, propranolol, atenolol, metoprolol, carvedilol, terbutaline, amlodipine and tadalafil. The enantiomer migration order and the effects of the selector concentration on the enantiorecognition properties were investigated. NMR spectroscopy was applied to deepen and further confirm the host-guest interactions and in the case of the model compound dapoxetine a potential representation for the supramolecular assembly was developed based on the dataset collected by the extensive 2D NMR analysis. This single-isomer chiral selector offers a new alternative to the widely applied randomly sulfobutylated- and sulfated-beta-cylodextrins as well as to the single-isomer sulfated and carboxymethylated derivatives in chiral separations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Demonstrating Electrophoretic Separation in a Straight Paper Channel Delimited by a Hydrophobic Wax Barrier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Chunxiu; Lin, Wanqi; Cai, Longfei

    2016-01-01

    A demonstration is described of electrophoretic separation of carmine and sunset yellow with a paper-based device. The channel in the paper device was fabricated by hand with a wax pen. Electrophoretic separation of carmine and sunset yellow was achieved within a few minutes by applying potential on the channel using a simple and inexpensive power…

  16. Relationship between electrophoretic mobility of erythrocytes and blood erythrocyte count in rats.

    PubMed

    Matyushichev, V B; Shamratova, V G

    2005-03-01

    A significant curvilinear relationship was found between erythrocyte count in rat blood and electrokinetic characteristics of these cells. Electrophoretic mobility of erythrocytes remained unchanged, slightly increased, or decreased with increasing cell count in the vascular bed depending on animal state. Excessive increase in the number of erythrocytes was accompanied by accumulation of cells with low electrophoretic mobility in the electric field.

  17. Demonstrating Electrophoretic Separation in a Straight Paper Channel Delimited by a Hydrophobic Wax Barrier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Chunxiu; Lin, Wanqi; Cai, Longfei

    2016-01-01

    A demonstration is described of electrophoretic separation of carmine and sunset yellow with a paper-based device. The channel in the paper device was fabricated by hand with a wax pen. Electrophoretic separation of carmine and sunset yellow was achieved within a few minutes by applying potential on the channel using a simple and inexpensive power…

  18. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites - An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. 1H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T2 is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T2 measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  19. Electrophoretic transfer of DNA, RNA and protein onto diazobenzyloxymethyl (DBM) - paper.

    PubMed Central

    Stellwag, E J; Dahlberg, A E

    1980-01-01

    A method has been developed for the electrophoretic transfer of DNA, RNA, protein and ribonucleoprotein particles from a variety of gels onto diazobenzyloxymethyl (DBM) - paper. Conditions for the electrophoretic transfer of these macromolecules have been optimized to allow for nearly quantitative transfer and covalent coupling. DNA and RNA electrophoretically transferred to DBM-paper retain their ability to hybridize with specific probes. The high efficiency of transfer and the high capacity of DBM-paper for nucleic acids makes possible the sensitive detection of specific nucleotide sequences. Similar efficiency is achieved in electrophoretic transfer and covalent coupling of proteins to DBM-paper. Macromolecules can also be electrophoretically transferred and bound to DBM-paper incapable of covalent bond formation. Their elution from the paper in high salt provides a new and useful preparative method for isolation of DNA, RNA and protein. Images PMID:6158735

  20. Renal transplant NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.; Kressel, H.; Thickman, D.; Alavi, A.

    1985-05-01

    The preliminary results of NMR evaluation of renal transplants (Txs) are reported including correlation with nuclear medicine (NM) and ultrasound (US). Thirteen Txs (8 cadaver (Cd), 5 living related doner (LRD) in 13 patients (6M, 7F) ranging in age from 25-47 (x 35) were evaluated by NM (32), NMR (15) and US (5). Clinical diagnoses included: rejection (8), ATN (2), infarction (1), and normal (2). Of the 8 patients with rejection (5) Cd; 3 LRD) pathologic proof was obtained in 3. An experimental 0.12 T resistive magnet (GE) was used with a partial saturation technique with repetition time (TR) of 143 and 286 msec to provide T1 weighting. T2 weighted information was obtained with a spin echo technique with echo times (TE) of 20, 40, 60 and 80 msec. The NMR appearance of normal Txs consisted of a uniform signal intensity (Tx> pelvic musculature), well-defined internal architecture with good cortical medullary differentiation and normal appearing vessels. The NMR appearance of abnormal transplants consisted of a heterogeneous or overall decrease in signal intensity (kidney muscle) with poor cortical medullary differentiation with or without a halo of decreased signal intensity. Although NMR was able to differentiate normal from abnormal, it was unable to clearly discriminate between ATN and rejection. Advantages of NMR included the ability to demonstrate regional anatomy, vasculature, post operative fluid collections and hematomas, and associated avascular necrosis of the hips.