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Sample records for electrospray characteristic curves

  1. Electrospray characteristic curves: in pursuit of improved performance in the nano-flow regime

    PubMed Central

    Marginean, Ioan; Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi

    2008-01-01

    Depending on its coordinates in the parameter space, an electrospray can manifest in one of several known regimes – stable, quasi-stable, transitional-chaotic, and non-axial – that ultimately impact measurement sensitivity and precision. An electrospray operating in cone-jet regime provides large and stable spray current, as well as smaller initial droplets that are prerequisites for higher sensitivity and quality mass spectrometric analyses. However, the dynamic conditions encountered in gradient elution-based liquid separations create difficulties for continuous operation in this regime throughout the analysis. We present a preliminary study aimed at stabilizing the electrospray in the cone-jet regime. On the basis of spray current measurements obtained using solvent conditions typically found in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, an improved description of the cone-jet stability island is provided by including transitions to and from the recently described astable regime. Additionally, the experimental conditions in which the astable regime marks the transition between pulsating and cone-jet regimes are further clarified. PMID:17896826

  2. Comparing Item Characteristic Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops and applies three nonparametric comparisons of the shapes of two item characteristic surfaces: (1) proportional latent odds; (2) uniform relative difficulty; and (3) item sensitivity. A method is presented for comparing the relative shapes of two item characteristic curves in two examinee populations who were administered an…

  3. Effect of pressure on electrospray characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Marginean, Ioan; Page, Jason S.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of pulsating electrosprays operated at subambient pressure is reported. The pressure domain that affords stable electrospray operation appears to be limited by the vapor pressure of the liquid. The voltage driving the electrospray is shown to have a logarithmic dependence on pressure. The observed scaling amends the relationship currently used to calculate the electric field at the tip of the meniscus of an electrified liquid. PMID:19997584

  4. The Characteristic Curves of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumaier, Arnold; Deiters, Ulrich K.

    2016-09-01

    In 1960, E. H. Brown defined a set of characteristic curves (also known as ideal curves) of pure fluids, along which some thermodynamic properties match those of an ideal gas. These curves are used for testing the extrapolation behaviour of equations of state. This work is revisited, and an elegant representation of the first-order characteristic curves as level curves of a master function is proposed. It is shown that Brown's postulate—that these curves are unique and dome-shaped in a double-logarithmic p, T representation—may fail for fluids exhibiting a density anomaly. A careful study of the Amagat curve (Joule inversion curve) generated from the IAPWS-95 reference equation of state for water reveals the existence of an additional branch.

  5. Curved characteristics behind blast waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laporte, O.; Chang, T. S.

    1972-01-01

    The behavior of nonisentropic flow behind a propagating blast wave is theoretically studied. Exact solutions, expressed in closed form in terms of elementary functions, are presented for three sets of curved characteristicseind a self-similar, strong blast wave.

  6. A digital algorithm for characteristic film curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckner, J.; Cash, T.; Craven, P.; Edwards, T.

    1975-01-01

    The task of establishing a film calibration scheme for magnitude studies of Skylab photographic images of Comet Kohoutek is examined. Since the data are recorded in terms of film density and have to be used in terms of exposure, the conversion from density to exposure is critical. In this film calibration scheme, the hardware deals with the data sources, recording medium, and data conversion to a computer compatible program, whereas the software deals with signal to noise enhancement, stepwedge calibration curve and leads to modeling of the film characteristic curves. A mathematical model of the characteristic curve is obtained using a modified version of Efroymson's (1960) stepwise multiple linear regression algorithm, which gives log exposure as a function of density. The difference in the calibration curves from pre- and postflight exposures is well accounted for in the model as a result of sensitive statistical tests. The characteristic curve modeling program requires about 4K of core and is executed in about 3 min.

  7. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  8. Electrospray ionization mass spectral characteristics and fragmentation mechanisms of Angiotensin II and its analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huihui; Yuan, Gu

    2006-05-01

    The characteristic fragmentation pathways of Angiotensin II and eight analogues were investigated by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The main fragmentations involve the cleavages of the CCO and CONH bonds with the loss of water, ammonia or carbon monoxide and rearrangements involving hydrogen atoms, and the MS/MS spectra give significant sequence information of these octapeptides. In addition, the two members of the analogues with the same mass and different elemental composition can be distinguished by the MS/MS spectra of [M + H]+ and fragment ions. These results show that ESI tandem mass spectrometry is an excellent tool for the structural identification of Angiotensin II and its analogues.

  9. Pharmaceutical microparticle engineering with electrospraying: the role of mixed solvent systems in particle formation and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Adam; Wan, Feng; Kristensen, Jakob; Dyas, Mark; Stride, Eleanor; Baldursdottír, Stefania; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Yang, Mingshi

    2015-02-01

    Microparticles of Celecoxib, dispersed in a matrix of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), were prepared by electrospraying using different solvent mixtures to investigate the influence upon particle formation and the resulting particle characteristics. Mixtures consisting of a good solvent, acetone, and an anti-solvent, methanol, for PLGA were studied in different ratios. Properties of the spraying solutions were examined and the resulting microparticles were characterized with regard to size, morphology, porosity, solid state form, surface chemistry and drug release. Particle formation was strongly influenced by the polymer molecular conformation during droplet formation and by the anti-solvent concentration during droplet drying. A strong correlation was found between particle morphology and the solubility of the polymer in the solvent mixtures. The lack of chain entanglements in droplets containing anti-solvent resulted in compact polymer conformation and grain-like particle morphology. Further, the early precipitation of polymer and low chain interaction with increasing content of anti-solvent resulted in surface enrichment of drug (from 10 and 20% up to 41 and 57% respectively), also demonstrated by the increasingly higher drug release rates. The results demonstrate the importance of solvent composition in particle preparation and indicate potential for exploiting this dependence to improve pharmaceutical particle design and performance.

  10. Electrospray device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmons, Nathaniel (Inventor); Martin, Roy (Inventor); Hruby, Vladimir (Inventor); Roy, Thomas (Inventor); Spence, Douglas (Inventor); Ehrbar, Eric (Inventor); Zwahlen, Jurg (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electrospray device includes an electrospray emitter adapted to receive electrospray fluid; an extractor plate spaced from the electrospray emitter and having at least one aperture; and a power supply for applying a first voltage between the extractor plate and emitter for generating at least one Taylor cone emission through the aperture to create an electrospray plume from the electrospray fluid, the extractor plate as well as accelerator and shaping plates may include a porous, conductive medium for transporting and storing excess, accumulated electrospray fluid away from the aperture.

  11. Characteristic coloring curve for white bread during baking.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Masanobu; Inoue, Michiko; Araki, Tetsuya; Iwabuchi, Hisakatsu; Sagara, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    The effect of heating conditions on the crust color formation was investigated during the baking of white bread. The surface temperatures were monitored with thermocouples attached to the inside surface of the loaf pan cover. The trace of the surface color in the L(*)a(*)b(*) color coordinate system is defined as the characteristic coloring curve. The overall baking process was classified into the following four stages based on the characteristic coloring curve: i) pre-heating (surface temperature < 110 °C), ii) Maillard reaction (110-150 °C), iii) caramelization (150-200 °C), and iv) over-baking (surface temperature>200 °C). A linear relationship was observed between the L(*) decrease and the increase in weight loss of a sample at each oven air temperature. The L(*) value appeared to be suitable as an indicator to control the surface color by baking conditions.

  12. Influence of sample characteristics on probability of detection curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annis, P. E. Charles

    2014-02-01

    POD curves are typically constructed as statistical models of responses to known characteristics of the POD demonstration samples. MIL-HDBK-1823A provides some guidance in choosing the number of samples - viz. at least 40 targets for tests that provide a quantitative response (â) and 60 for binary responses (hit/miss) - but says little about the size range or how they should be placed within that range. Here we report on how the number of targets, their size range, and their distribution (uniform, skewed left or right) with respect to a true POD vs. size relationship influences the POD curve that is estimated from these targets. From the parameter estimates we compute confidence bounds to quantity statistical uncertainty. The work is for binary response data and is based on a novel simulation method for computing the confidence bounds which would prohibitively time-consuming using conventional Monte Carlo methods.

  13. Effects of rail dynamics and friction characteristics on curve squeal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B.; Squicciarini, G.; Thompson, D. J.

    2016-09-01

    Curve squeal in railway vehicles is an instability mechanism that arises in tight curves under certain running and environmental conditions. In developing a model the most important elements are the characterisation of friction coupled with an accurate representation of the structural dynamics of the wheel. However, the role played by the dynamics of the rail is not fully understood and it is unclear whether this should be included in a model or whether it can be safely neglected. This paper makes use of previously developed time domain and frequency domain curve squeal models to assess whether the presence of the rail and the falling characteristics of the friction force can modify the instability mechanisms and the final response. For this purpose, the time-domain model has been updated to include the rail dynamics in terms of its state space representation in various directions. Frequency domain and time domain analyses results show that falling friction is not the only reason for squeal and rail dynamics can play an important role, especially under constant friction conditions.

  14. Therapy operating characteristic curves: tools for precision chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Harrison H; Alberts, David S; Woolfenden, James M; Caucci, Luca; Hoppin, John W

    2016-04-01

    The therapy operating characteristic (TOC) curve, developed in the context of radiation therapy, is a plot of the probability of tumor control versus the probability of normal-tissue complications as the overall radiation dose level is varied, e.g., by varying the beam current in external-beam radiotherapy or the total injected activity in radionuclide therapy. This paper shows how TOC can be applied to chemotherapy with the administered drug dosage as the variable. The area under a TOC curve (AUTOC) can be used as a figure of merit for therapeutic efficacy, analogous to the area under an ROC curve (AUROC), which is a figure of merit for diagnostic efficacy. In radiation therapy, AUTOC can be computed for a single patient by using image data along with radiobiological models for tumor response and adverse side effects. The mathematical analogy between response of observers to images and the response of tumors to distributions of a chemotherapy drug is exploited to obtain linear discriminant functions from which AUTOC can be calculated. Methods for using mathematical models of drug delivery and tumor response with imaging data to estimate patient-specific parameters that are needed for calculation of AUTOC are outlined. The implications of this viewpoint for clinical trials are discussed.

  15. Exploring Alternative Characteristic Curve Approaches to Linking Parameter Estimates from the Generalized Partial Credit Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Bao, Han; Huang, Chun-Wei; Gagne, Phill

    Characteristic curve approaches for linking parameters from the generalized partial credit model were examined for cases in which common (anchor) items are calibrated separately in two groups. Three of these approaches are simple extensions of the test characteristic curve (TCC), item characteristic curve (ICC), and operating characteristic curve…

  16. Variability of physical characteristics of electro-sprayed poly(3-hexylthiophene) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M.; Abbas, M.; Shah, S. K.; Bontempi, E.; Colombi, P.; Di Cicco, A.; Gunnella, R.

    2011-09-01

    Structural and electronic properties of homogeneous poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films obtained from the electro-spray method were presented by means of grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, optical absorption, photoelectron spectroscopy, and (photo)electrical conductivity. Starting from different solution concentrations and flow rate conditions, differently assembled thin films were obtained whose physical properties were peculiarly different from those ones obtained by other deposition methods. If properly refined, the method could in principle broaden the spectrum of the existing nano and microscale structures of the P3HT thin films.

  17. LPG sensing characteristics of electrospray deposited SnO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürbüz, Mevlüt; Günkaya, Göktuğ; Doğan, Aydın

    2014-11-01

    In this study, SnO2 films were fabricated on conductive substrate such as aluminum and platinum coated alumina using electro-spray deposition (ESD) method for gas sensor applications. Solution flow rate, coating time, substrate-nozzle distance and solid/alcohol ratio were studied to optimize SnO2 film structure. The morphology of the deposited films was characterized by stereo and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The gas sensing properties of tin oxide films were investigated using liquid petroleum gas (LPG) for various lower explosive limit (LEL). The results obtained from microscopic analyses show that optimum SnO2 films were evaluated at flow rate of 0.05 ml/min, at distance of 6 cm, for 10 min deposition time, for 20 gSnO2/Lethanol ratio and at 7 kV DC electric field. By the results obtained from the gas sensing behavior, the sensitivity of the films was increased with operating temperature. The films showed better sensitivity for 20 LEL LPG concentration at 450 °C operating temperature.

  18. 7 CFR 42.140 - Operating Characteristic (OC) curves for on-line sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... section contains the Operating Characteristic (OC) curve for each of the sampling plans given in Tables I, I-A, II, II-A, III, and III-A. The OC curve and the corresponding sampling plans are listed by AQL... must be obtained from the applicable sampling plan tables. (c) The curves show the ability of...

  19. Modelling Soil Water Characteristic Curves for the Investigation of Hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallin, Ingrid; Matthews, Peter; Laudone, Maurizio; Van Keulen, Geertje; Doerr, Stefan; Francis, Lewis; Dudley, Ed; Gazze, Andrea; Quinn, Gerry; Whalley, Richard; Ashton, Rhys

    2016-04-01

    Soil hydrophobicity presents a major challenge for the future, as it reduces both plant-available water and irrigation efficiency, and can increase flooding hazards and erosion. A collaborative research project has been set up in the UK to study hydrophobicity over a wide range of length scales. At core scale, we are investigating the wetting behaviour of water repellent soils in order to model percolation through hydrophobic pore spaces. To that end, water retention measurements were carried out on both wettable and forcibly-wetted water-repellent soils collected from three locations in England and Wales. The data were then fitted with both the commonly used Van Genuchten model and an alternative model from PoreXpert, a software program that analyses and models porous materials. The Van Genuchten model fits a curve to the data using parameters related to air entry suction, irreducible water content and pore size distribution. By contrast, PoreXpert uses a Boltzmann-annealed simplex to find a best-fit curve based on parameters directly related to the void structure of the soil: the size of the voids, the shape of the void size distribution, and how the voids are connected to each other. Both Van Genuchten and PoreXpert fit the experimental data well, but where Van Genuchten forces an S-shaped curve that can mask small variations, PoreXpert gives a closer fit of no pre-defined shape that captures subtle differences between data points. This allows us to calculate differences in the effective pore and throat size distributions, and provides a mechanistic framework from which to model additional hydrologic behaviour in water repellent soil. Simulations of capillary induced wetting based on these mechanistic postulates are then compared to wicking experiments at the core scale, which can then be upscaled and applied to other soils.

  20. Influence of horizontally curved roadway section characteristics on motorcycle-to-barrier crash frequency.

    PubMed

    Gabauer, Douglas J; Li, Xiaolong

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate motorcycle-to-barrier crash frequency on horizontally curved roadway sections in Washington State using police-reported crash data linked with roadway data and augmented with barrier presence information. Data included 4915 horizontal curved roadway sections with 252 of these sections experiencing 329 motorcycle-to-barrier crashes between 2002 and 2011. Negative binomial regression was used to predict motorcycle-to-barrier crash frequency using horizontal curvature and other roadway characteristics. Based on the model results, the strongest predictor of crash frequency was found to be curve radius. This supports a motorcycle-to-barrier crash countermeasure placement criterion based, at the very least, on horizontal curve radius. With respect to the existing horizontal curve criterion of 820 feet or less, curves meeting this criterion were found to increase motorcycle-to-barrier crash frequency rate by a factor of 10 compared to curves not meeting this criterion. Other statistically significant predictors were curve length, traffic volume and the location of adjacent curves. Assuming curves of identical radius, the model results suggest that longer curves, those with higher traffic volume, and those that have no adjacent curved sections within 300 feet of either curve end would likely be better candidates for a motorcycle-to-barrier crash countermeasure.

  1. 7 CFR 43.105 - Operating characteristics (OC) curves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 43.105 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS STANDARDS FOR SAMPLING PLANS Sampling Plans § 43.105 Operating characteristics...

  2. Receiver operating characteristic-curve limits of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysoczanski, Artur; Voigtman, Edward

    2014-10-01

    Using a simple UV LED-excited ruby fluorescence measurement system, we demonstrate that it is easily possible to obtain unbiased detection limits, despite the system deliberately having non-linear response function and non-Gaussian noise. Even when the noise precision model is heteroscedastic, but otherwise only roughly linear, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method readily yields results that are in accordance with a priori canonical specifications of false positives and false negatives at the detection limit. The present work demonstrates that obtaining unbiased detection limits is not abstruse and need not be mathematically complicated. Rather, detection limits continue to serve a useful purpose as part of the characterization of chemical measurement systems.

  3. Atlas of Light Curves of Faint Mira-Type Stars. Statistical Relations Between the Characteristics of Smoothed Phase Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudashkina, L. S.; Andronov, I. L.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a set of the photometric parameters which could be useful for the classiffication of the pulsating Mira-type stars and related objects and determination of the EAGB and TPAGB stages of the stellar evolution. To solve this problem, the light curves of faint Mira- type stars and of the semi-regular variable V411 Sct were approximated using the program FDCN, which computes a trigonometric polynomial of a statistically optimal degree (I.L.Andronov, 1994, 2003). The at las of statistically optimal fits of the phase curves of 34 long-period is presented, based on digitized data from the scanned "Atlas" by P. Maffei and G.Tosti (http://astro.fisica.unipg.it/atlasmaffei/main.htm). Some statistical relations between the parameters of the trigonometrical polynomial approximation of the phase curve are analyzed. for an additional criterion of detailed classiffication of long-perodic variables, we used various parameters, e.g. "period", "amplitude", "asymmetry", "slope of the ascending branch", "characteristic time of brightening by 1m": Discussion of the results is presented.

  4. Lognormal Lorenz and normal receiver operating characteristic curves as mirror images.

    PubMed

    Irwin, R John; Hautus, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    The Lorenz curve for assessing economic inequality depicts the relation between two cumulative distribution functions (CDFs), one for the distribution of incomes or wealth and the other for their first-moment distribution. By contrast, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for evaluating diagnostic systems depicts the relation between the complements of two CDFs, one for the distribution noise and the other for the distribution of signal plus noise. We demonstrate that the lognormal model of the Lorenz curve, which is often adopted to model the distribution of income and wealth, is a mirror image of the equal-variance normal model of the ROC curve, which is a fundamental model for evaluating diagnostic systems. The relationship between these two models extends the potential application of each. For example, the lognormal Lorenz curve can be used to evaluate diagnostic systems derived from equal-variance normal distributions. PMID:26064596

  5. Estimating Item Characteristic Curves. Final Report for Period March 1978 through September 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ree, Malcolm James

    Item characteristic curve (ICC) theory describes the relationship between the ability of individuals and the probability of their answering a test question correctly; it is useful in estimating test scores, equating the scores of various tests, and scoring responses during adaptive testing. A simulation study of the effectiveness of the following…

  6. Effects on Scale Linking of Different Definitions of Criterion Functions for the IRT Characteristic Curve Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonghoon; Kolen, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Under item response theory, the characteristic curve methods (Haebara and Stocking-Lord methods) are used to link two ability scales from separate calibrations. The linking methods use their respective criterion functions that can be defined differently according to the symmetry- and distribution-related schemes. The symmetry-related scheme…

  7. A Comparison of Methods for Nonparametric Estimation of Item Characteristic Curves for Binary Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Young-Sun

    2007-01-01

    This study compares the performance of three nonparametric item characteristic curve (ICC) estimation procedures: isotonic regression, smoothed isotonic regression, and kernel smoothing. Smoothed isotonic regression, employed along with an appropriate kernel function, provides better estimates and also satisfies the assumption of strict…

  8. On the Use of Nonparametric Item Characteristic Curve Estimation Techniques for Checking Parametric Model Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Young-Sun; Wollack, James A.; Douglas, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the model fit of a 2PL through comparison with the nonparametric item characteristic curve (ICC) estimation procedures. Results indicate that three nonparametric procedures implemented produced ICCs that are similar to that of the 2PL for items simulated to fit the 2PL. However for misfitting items,…

  9. Use of a submersible pressure outflow cell for determination of moisture characteristic curves on rock core

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L.

    1993-06-01

    A simple device for developing moisture characteristic data curves, the submersible pressure outflow cell, was modified for application to rock core at matric potentials of 0 to -0.5 megapascals (MPa) and possibly to -1.0 Mpa. An automated system was developed to continuously and simultaneously collect data from many cells, obtain sorption and desorption characteristic curves to provide hysteretic information, and data from multi-step outflow experiments. The latter can be used to estimate unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The system has resolved many of the problems inherent in standard measurement techniques. Model simulation of imbibition using the hysteretic data collected are in close agreement with laboratory measurements of imbibition, data collected are in close agreement with laboratory measurements of imbibition, suggesting the moisture characteristic data correctly describes the core properties.19 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison ofnon-hysteretic and hysteretic characteristic curves

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine

    2006-07-17

    Numerical models of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2)in brine-bearing formations use characteristic curves to represent theinteractions of non-wetting-phase CO2 and wetting-phase brine. When aproblem includes both injection of CO2 (a drainage process) and itssubsequent post-injection evolution (a combination of drainage andwetting), hysteretic characteristic curves are required to correctlycapture the behavior of the CO2 plume. In the hysteretic formulation,capillary pressure and relative permeability depend not only on thecurrent grid-block saturation, but also on the history of the saturationin the grid block. For a problem that involves only drainage or onlywetting, a non-hysteretic formulation, in which capillary pressure andrelative permeability depend only on the current value of the grid-blocksaturation, is adequate. For the hysteretic formulation to be robustcomputationally, care must be taken to ensure the differentiability ofthe characteristic curves both within and beyond the turning-pointsaturations where transitions between branches of the curves occur. Twoexample problems involving geologic CO2 storage are simulated withTOUGH2, a multiphase, multicomponent code for flow and transport codethrough geological media. Both non-hysteretic and hysteretic formulationsare used, to illustrate the applicability and limitations ofnon-hysteretic methods.The first application considers leakage of CO2from the storage formation to the ground surface, while the secondexamines the role of heterogeneity within the storageformation.

  11. Modified inverse square sensitometry for the determination of the characteristic curve of radiographic screen/film systems.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, A; Hiraki, Y; Ohkawa, Y; Yamada, T; Hashimoto, K; Aono, K

    1986-02-01

    To determine the characteristic curve of the radiographic screen/film systems in a short focal spot-film distance, the inverse square sensitometric method was modified by changing the radiation intensity with two kinds of filters. The characteristic curves obtained in the two exposure series with these two kinds of filters were overlapped to obtain a complete one. The characteristic curve thus obtained was almost the same as the one obtained by the original inverse square sensitometric method. The accuracy of the characteristic curves obtained by the modified method was well-reflected in the clinical radiographs. PMID:3962729

  12. Thermoluminescence glow-curve characteristics of LiF phosphors at high doses of gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benny, P. G.; Khader, S. A.; Sarma, K. S. S.

    2013-05-01

    High doses of ionising radiation are becoming increasingly common for radiation-processing applications of various medical, agricultural and polymer products using gamma and electron beams. The objective of this work was to study thermoluminescence (TL) glow-curve characteristics of commonly used commercial LiF TL phosphors at high doses of radiation with a view to use them in dosimetry of radiation-processing applications. The TL properties of TLD 100 and 700 phosphors, procured from the Thermo-Scientific (previously Harshaw) company, have been studied in the dose range of 1-60 kGy. The shift in glow peaks was observed in this dose range. Integral TL responses of TLD 100 and TLD 700 were found to decrease as a linear function of dose in the range of 5-50 kGy. The paper describes initial results related to the glow-curve characteristics of these phosphors.

  13. Consequence analysis to determine the damage to humans from vapour cloud explosions using characteristic curves.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Fernando Díaz; Ferradás, Enrique González; Sánchez, Teresa de Jesús Jiménez; Aznar, Agustín Miñana; Gimeno, José Ruiz; Alonso, Jesús Martínez

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this paper is to provide a methodology to facilitate consequence analysis for vapour cloud explosions (VCE). Firstly, the main PROBIT equations to evaluate direct damage on humans from those accidents (eardrum rupture, death due to skull fracture, death due to whole body impact and lung damage) are discussed and the most suitable ones are selected. Secondly, a new methodology is developed to relate characteristic overpressure-impulse-distance curves for VCE, obtained in a previous paper (F. Diaz Alonso et al., Characteristic overpressure-impulse-distance curves for vapour cloud explosions using the TNO Multi-Energy model, J. Hazard. Mater. A137 (2006) 734-741) with the selected PROBIT equations. This methodology allows the determination of damage as a function of distance to the accident's origin in only one step, using explosion energy and VCE Multi-Energy charge strength as input parameters.

  14. Comparison Of Methods Used To Measure The Characteristic Curve Of Radiographic Screen/Film Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Louis K.; Haus, Arthur G.; Barnes, Gary T.; Bencomo, Jose A.; Amtey, Sharad R.

    1980-08-01

    A systematic study was performed to investigate the accuracy and precision attained by four methods for determining the characteristic curve of radiographic screen/film systems. The four methods include: inverse square sensitometry, KVP adjusted bootstrap sensitometry step-wedge bootstrap sensitometry, and step wedge attenuation sensitometry. The inverse square method was used as the reference standard for accuracy. The extent of and the sources of the inaccurcies involved when using the alternative methods is discussed.

  15. Linking Parameters Estimated with the Generalized Graded Unfolding Model: A Comparison of the Accuracy of Characteristic Curve Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson Koenig, Judith; Roberts, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Methods for linking item response theory (IRT) parameters are developed for attitude questionnaire responses calibrated with the generalized graded unfolding model (GGUM). One class of IRT linking methods derives the linking coefficients by comparing characteristic curves, and three of these methods---test characteristic curve (TCC), item…

  16. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: PHOTOMETRIC LIGHT CURVES AND OPTICAL VARIABILITY CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Jonelle L.; Bentz, Misty C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Minezaki, Takeo; Sakata, Yu; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Baliber, Nairn; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Street, Rachel A.; Treu, Tommaso; Li Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Stern, Daniel; Brown, Timothy M.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2009-11-01

    The Lick AGN Monitoring Project targeted 13 nearby Seyfert 1 galaxies with the intent of measuring the masses of their central black holes using reverberation mapping. The sample includes 12 galaxies selected to have black holes with masses roughly in the range 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M {sub sun}, as well as the well-studied active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 5548. In conjunction with a spectroscopic monitoring campaign, we obtained broadband B and V images on most nights from 2008 February through 2008 May. The imaging observations were carried out by four telescopes: the 0.76 m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope, the 2 m Multicolor Active Galactic Nuclei Monitoring telescope, the Palomar 60 inch (1.5 m) telescope, and the 0.80 m Tenagra II telescope. Having well-sampled light curves over the course of a few months is useful for obtaining the broad-line reverberation lag and black hole mass, and also allows us to examine the characteristics of the continuum variability. In this paper, we discuss the observational methods and the photometric measurements, and present the AGN continuum light curves. We measure various variability characteristics of each of the light curves. We do not detect any evidence for a time lag between the B- and V-band variations, and we do not find significant color variations for the AGNs in our sample.

  17. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of super high resolution video for histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Kenneth J.; Rozek, L. S.; Weinstein, Ronald S.

    1987-10-01

    The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve is used to assess the ability of a diagnostic test to distinguish between two discreet states, such as tumor present or tumor absent in a histopathologic section. We have used ROC methodology to assess the ability of pathologists to diagnose frozen section biopsies of breast tissue as benign or malignant, using both a conventional light microscope and a high resolution camera/monitor system. 115 consecutive frozen section breast biopsies were reviewed using each of the above modalities. Results yielded identical ROC curves for the conventional light microscope and high resolution camera/monitor system. Furthermore, the percentage of cases in which pathologists rendered an "equivocal" diagnosis was the same with both modalities.

  18. Evaluation of curving characteristics of flexible liquid crystal displays fabricated using polycarbonate substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Akihito; Ishinabe, Takahiro; Fujikake, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    The improvement of the contrast ratio of flexible liquid crystal displays (LCDs) fabricated using plastic substrates in a curved state is an important problem to achieve high-quality flexible LCDs. In this study, we evaluated the distributions of in-plane phase retardation and slow axis direction of polycarbonate substrates and the effects of curvature on the electro-optical properties of flexible LCDs. As a result, we clarified that the polycarbonate substrates have high uniformity in the in-plane phase retardation and slow axis direction, and that the change in the phase retardation of the polycarbonate substrate caused by the curvature deformation has a small effect on the electro-optical characteristics of flexible LCDs. We successfully achieved a high contrast ratio of 1042:1 by fabricating the device using polycarbonate substrates. This result indicates that it is possible to realize high-quality images in flexible LCDs fabricated using polycarbonate substrates even in the curved state.

  19. Full receiver operating characteristic curve estimation using two alternative forced choice studies.

    PubMed

    Massanes, Francesc; Brankov, Jovan G

    2016-01-01

    Task-based medical image quality is typically measured by the degree to which a human observer can perform a diagnostic task in a psychophysical human observer study. During a typical study, an observer is asked to provide a numerical score quantifying his confidence as to whether an image contains a diagnostic marker or not. Such scores are then used to measure the observers' diagnostic accuracy, summarized by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the area under ROC curve. These types of human studies are difficult to arrange, costly, and time consuming. In addition, human observers involved in this type of study should be experts on the image genre to avoid inconsistent scoring through the lengthy study. In two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) studies, known to be faster, two images are compared simultaneously and a single indicator is given. Unfortunately, the 2AFC approach cannot lead to a full ROC curve or a set of image scores. The aim of this work is to propose a methodology in which multiple rounds of the 2AFC studies are used to re-estimate an image confidence score (a.k.a. rating, ranking) and generate the full ROC curve. In the proposed approach, we treat image confidence score as an unknown rating that needs to be estimated and 2AFC as a two-player match game. To achieve this, we use the ELO rating system, which is used for calculating the relative skill levels of players in competitor-versus-competitor games such as chess. The proposed methodology is not limited to ELO, and other rating methods such as TrueSkill™, Chessmetrics, or Glicko can be also used. The presented results, using simulated data, indicate that a full ROC curve can be recovered using several rounds of 2AFC studies and that the best pairing strategy starts with the first round of pairing abnormal versus normal images (as in the classical 2AFC approach) followed by a number of rounds using random pairing. In addition, the proposed method was tested in a pilot human

  20. Full receiver operating characteristic curve estimation using two alternative forced choice studies.

    PubMed

    Massanes, Francesc; Brankov, Jovan G

    2016-01-01

    Task-based medical image quality is typically measured by the degree to which a human observer can perform a diagnostic task in a psychophysical human observer study. During a typical study, an observer is asked to provide a numerical score quantifying his confidence as to whether an image contains a diagnostic marker or not. Such scores are then used to measure the observers' diagnostic accuracy, summarized by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the area under ROC curve. These types of human studies are difficult to arrange, costly, and time consuming. In addition, human observers involved in this type of study should be experts on the image genre to avoid inconsistent scoring through the lengthy study. In two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) studies, known to be faster, two images are compared simultaneously and a single indicator is given. Unfortunately, the 2AFC approach cannot lead to a full ROC curve or a set of image scores. The aim of this work is to propose a methodology in which multiple rounds of the 2AFC studies are used to re-estimate an image confidence score (a.k.a. rating, ranking) and generate the full ROC curve. In the proposed approach, we treat image confidence score as an unknown rating that needs to be estimated and 2AFC as a two-player match game. To achieve this, we use the ELO rating system, which is used for calculating the relative skill levels of players in competitor-versus-competitor games such as chess. The proposed methodology is not limited to ELO, and other rating methods such as TrueSkill™, Chessmetrics, or Glicko can be also used. The presented results, using simulated data, indicate that a full ROC curve can be recovered using several rounds of 2AFC studies and that the best pairing strategy starts with the first round of pairing abnormal versus normal images (as in the classical 2AFC approach) followed by a number of rounds using random pairing. In addition, the proposed method was tested in a pilot human

  1. An examination of errors in characteristic curve measurements of radiographic screen/film systems.

    PubMed

    Wagner, L K; Barnes, G T; Bencomo, J A; Haus, A G

    1983-01-01

    The precision and accuracy achieved in the measurement of characteristic curves for radiographic screen/film systems is quantitatively investigated for three techniques: inverse square, kVp bootstrap, and step-wedge bootstrap. Precision of all techniques is generally better than +/- 1.5% while the agreement among all intensity-scale techniques is better than 2% over the useful exposure latitude. However, the accuracy of the sensitometry will depend on several factors, including linearity and energy dependence of the calibration instrument, that may introduce larger errors. Comparisons of time-scale and intensity-scale methods are made and a means of measuring reciprocity law failure is demonstrated. PMID:6877185

  2. Study on the effect of transition curve to the dynamic characteristics of high-temperature superconducting maglev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Nan; Zheng, Botian; Gou, Yanfeng; Chen, Ping; Zheng, Jun; Deng, Zigang

    2015-12-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev technology is becoming more and more mature, and many key technologies have been deeply studied. However, the transition curve plays a key role in HTS maglev system, and related studies have not been carried out. In this paper series of simulations were conducted to test the lateral and vertical vibration of HTS maglev when passing through curves. Two magnetic guideways, of which one has transition curves but the other does not, are designed to test the vibration characteristics of a mini HTS maglev model running though curves. Results show that after adding transition curves between straight line and circular curve the vibration of HTS maglev model in lateral and vertical directions are all weakened in different degrees. It proves that adding transition curve into HTS maglev system is favorable and necessary.

  3. Water films and scaling of soil characteristic curves at low water contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuller, Markus; Or, Dani

    2005-09-01

    Individual contributions of capillarity and adsorptive surface forces to the matric potential are seldom differentiated in determination of soil water characteristic (SWC) curves. Typically, capillary forces dominate at the wet end, whereas adsorptive surface forces dominate at the dry end of a SWC where water is held as thin liquid films. The amount of adsorbed soil water is intimately linked to soil specific surface area (SA) and plays an important role in various biological and transport processes in arid environments. Dominated by van der Waals adsorptive forces, surface-water interactions give rise to a nearly universal scaling relationship for SWC curves at low water contents. We demonstrate that scaling measured water content at the dry end by soil specific surface area yields remarkable similarity across a range of soil textures and is in good agreement with theoretical predictions based on van der Waals interactions. These scaling relationships are important for accurate description of SWC curves in dry soils and may provide rapid and reliable estimates of soil specific surface area from SWC measurements for matric potentials below -10 MPa conveniently measured with the chilled-mirror dew point technique. Surface area estimates acquired by fitting the scaling relationship to measured SWC data were in good agreement with SA data measured by standard methods. Preliminary results suggest that the proposed method could provide reliable SA estimates for natural soils with hydratable surface areas smaller than 200 m2/g.

  4. Water films and scaling of soil characteristic curves at low water contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuller, Markus; Or, Dani

    2005-09-01

    Individual contributions of capillarity and adsorptive surface forces to the matric potential are seldom differentiated in determination of soil water characteristic (SWC) curves. Typically, capillary forces dominate at the wet end, whereas adsorptive surface forces dominate at the dry end of a SWC where water is held as thin liquid films. The amount of adsorbed soil water is intimately linked to soil specific surface area (SA) and plays an important role in various biological and transport processes in arid environments. Dominated by van der Waals adsorptive forces, surface-water interactions give rise to a nearly universal scaling relationship for SWC curves at low water contents. We demonstrate that scaling measured water content at the dry end by soil specific surface area yields remarkable similarity across a range of soil textures and is in good agreement with theoretical predictions based on van der Waals interactions. These scaling relationships are important for accurate description of SWC curves in dry soils and may provide rapid and reliable estimates of soil specific surface area from SWC measurements for matric potentials below ‒10 MPa conveniently measured with the chilled-mirror dew point technique. Surface area estimates acquired by fitting the scaling relationship to measured SWC data were in good agreement with SA data measured by standard methods. Preliminary results suggest that the proposed method could provide reliable SA estimates for natural soils with hydratable surface areas smaller than 200 m2/g.

  5. Characteristics of dewatering induced drawdown curve under blocking effect of retaining wall in aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong-Xia; Shen, Shui-Long; Yuan, Da-Jun

    2016-08-01

    For deep excavation pits that require the pumping of confined groundwater, a combination of a retaining wall and dewatering with large-diameter wells is usually adopted during excavation to improve safety. Since a retaining wall has a much lower hydraulic conductivity than the surrounding material in the aquifer, blocking of seepage to prolong the seepage path of the groundwater outside of the pit is effective. The retaining walls used during excavation dewatering cause hydraulic head drawdown inside the pit much faster than outside the pit. Thus, difference in hydraulic head between inside and outside of the pit increases. To investigate the mechanism of the blocking effect, numerical simulation using the finite difference method (FDM) was conducted to analyze the effects of pumping in the pit. The FDM results show that drawdown varies along the depth of the confined aquifer. The influence factors of drawdown inside and outside the pit include insertion depth of retaining walls, anisotropy of a confined aquifer and screen length of pumping wells. In addition, FDM results also show that the drawdown-time curve can be divided into four stages: in Stage I, drawdown inside the pit is very small and outside the pit it is almost zero; in Stage II, drawdown increases quickly with time; in Stage III, the drawdown curve is parallel to the Cooper-Jacob curve on semi-log axes; and in Stage IV, the drawdown becomes constant. These characteristics of the drawdown curve under the blocking effect of a retaining wall in an aquifer provide a way of estimating hydrogeological parameters according to pumping test results.

  6. Assessing the Classification Accuracy of Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measures Using Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laracy, Seth D.; Hojnoski, Robin L.; Dever, Bridget V.

    2016-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to investigate the ability of early numeracy curriculum-based measures (EN-CBM) administered in preschool to predict performance below the 25th and 40th percentiles on a quantity discrimination measure in kindergarten. Areas under the curve derived from a sample of 279 students ranged…

  7. Characteristic overpressure-impulse-distance curves for vapour cloud explosions using the TNO Multi-Energy model.

    PubMed

    Díaz Alonso, Fernando; González Ferradás, Enrique; Sánchez Pérez, Juan Francisco; Miñana Aznar, Agustín; Ruiz Gimeno, José; Martínez Alonso, Jesús

    2006-09-21

    A number of models have been proposed to calculate overpressure and impulse from accidental industrial explosions. When the blast is produced by ignition of a vapour cloud, the TNO Multi-Energy model is widely used. From the curves given by this model, data are fitted to obtain equations showing the relationship between overpressure, impulse and distance. These equations, referred herein as characteristic curves, can be fitted by means of power equations, which depend on explosion energy and charge strength. Characteristic curves allow the determination of overpressure and impulse at each distance.

  8. Characteristic overpressure-impulse-distance curves for vapour cloud explosions using the TNO Multi-Energy model.

    PubMed

    Díaz Alonso, Fernando; González Ferradás, Enrique; Sánchez Pérez, Juan Francisco; Miñana Aznar, Agustín; Ruiz Gimeno, José; Martínez Alonso, Jesús

    2006-09-21

    A number of models have been proposed to calculate overpressure and impulse from accidental industrial explosions. When the blast is produced by ignition of a vapour cloud, the TNO Multi-Energy model is widely used. From the curves given by this model, data are fitted to obtain equations showing the relationship between overpressure, impulse and distance. These equations, referred herein as characteristic curves, can be fitted by means of power equations, which depend on explosion energy and charge strength. Characteristic curves allow the determination of overpressure and impulse at each distance. PMID:16704903

  9. Diagnostic accuracy and receiver-operating characteristics curve analysis in surgical research and decision making.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil; Kørner, Hartwig; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2011-01-01

    In surgical research, the ability to correctly classify one type of condition or specific outcome from another is of great importance for variables influencing clinical decision making. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis is a useful tool in assessing the diagnostic accuracy of any variable with a continuous spectrum of results. In order to rule a disease state in or out with a given test, the test results are usually binary, with arbitrarily chosen cut-offs for defining disease versus health, or for grading of disease severity. In the postgenomic era, the translation from bench-to-bedside of biomarkers in various tissues and body fluids requires appropriate tools for analysis. In contrast to predetermining a cut-off value to define disease, the advantages of applying ROC analysis include the ability to test diagnostic accuracy across the entire range of variable scores and test outcomes. In addition, ROC analysis can easily examine visual and statistical comparisons across tests or scores. ROC is also favored because it is thought to be independent from the prevalence of the condition under investigation. ROC analysis is used in various surgical settings and across disciplines, including cancer research, biomarker assessment, imaging evaluation, and assessment of risk scores.With appropriate use, ROC curves may help identify the most appropriate cutoff value for clinical and surgical decision making and avoid confounding effects seen with subjective ratings. ROC curve results should always be put in perspective, because a good classifier does not guarantee the expected clinical outcome. In this review, we discuss the fundamental roles, suggested presentation, potential biases, and interpretation of ROC analysis in surgical research.

  10. Application of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curves for Explosives Detection Using Different Sampling and Detection Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Young, Mimy; Fan, Wen; Raeva, Anna; Almirall, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Reported for the first time are receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves constructed to describe the performance of a sorbent-coated disk, planar solid phase microextraction (PSPME) unit for non-contact sampling of a variety of volatiles. The PSPME is coupled to ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) for the detection of volatile chemical markers associated with the presence of smokeless powders, model systems of explosives containing diphenylamine (DPA), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) and nitroglycerin (NG) as the target analytes. The performance of the PSPME-IMS was compared with the widely accepted solid-phase microextraction (SPME), coupled to a GC-MS. A set of optimized sampling conditions for different volume containers (1–45 L) with various sample amounts of explosives, were studied in replicates (n = 30) to determine the true positive rates (TPR) and false positive detection rates (FPR) for the different scenarios. These studies were obtained in order to construct the ROC curves for two IMS instruments (a bench-top and field-portable system) and a bench top GC-MS system in low and high clutter environments. Both static and dynamic PSPME sampling were studied in which 10–500 mg quantities of smokeless powders were detected within 10 min of static sampling and 1 min of dynamic sampling.

  11. Interrelations among the soil-water retention, hydraulic conductivity, and suction-stress characteristic curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Kaya, Murat; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    The three fundamental constitutive relations that describe fluid flow, strength, and deformation behavior of variably saturated soils are the soil-water retention curve (SWRC), hydraulic conductivity function (HCF), and suction-stress characteristic curve (SSCC). Until recently, the interrelations among the SWRC, HCF, and SSCC have not been well established. This work sought experimental confirmation of interrelations among these three constitutive functions. Results taken from the literature for six soils and those obtained for 11 different soils were used. Using newly established analytical relations among the SWRC, HCF, and SSCC and these test results, the authors showed that these three constitutive relations can be defined by a common set of hydromechanical parameters. The coefficient of determination for air-entry pressures determined independently using hydraulic and mechanical methods is >0.99, >0.98 for the pore size parameter, and 0.94 for the residual degree of saturation. One practical implication is that one of any of the four experiments (axis-translation, hydraulic, shear-strength, or deformation) is sufficient to quantify all three constitutive relations.

  12. Optimal algorithm for automatic detection of microaneurysms based on receiver operating characteristic curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lili; Luo, Shuqian

    2010-11-01

    Microaneurysms (MAs) are the first manifestations of the diabetic retinopathy (DR) as well as an indicator for its progression. Their automatic detection plays a key role for both mass screening and monitoring and is therefore in the core of any system for computer-assisted diagnosis of DR. The algorithm basically comprises the following stages: candidate detection aiming at extracting the patterns possibly corresponding to MAs based on mathematical morphological black top hat, feature extraction to characterize these candidates, and classification based on support vector machine (SVM), to validate MAs. Feature vector and kernel function of SVM selection is very important to the algorithm. We use the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to evaluate the distinguishing performance of different feature vectors and different kernel functions of SVM. The ROC analysis indicates the quadratic polynomial SVM with a combination of features as the input shows the best discriminating performance.

  13. 7 CFR 42.143 - Operating Characteristic (OC) curves for on-line sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... plans provided in subpart D. The OC curve and the corresponding cumulative sum sampling plans are listed by AQL. (b) Different plan parameters used to make acceptance and rejection decisions are provided for each AQL. (c) The curves show the ability of the various cumulative sum sampling plans...

  14. Learner Characteristic Based Learning Effort Curve Mode: The Core Mechanism on Developing Personalized Adaptive E-Learning Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Pi-Shan

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to develop the core mechanism for realizing the development of personalized adaptive e-learning platform, which is based on the previous learning effort curve research and takes into account the learner characteristics of learning style and self-efficacy. 125 university students from Taiwan are classified into 16 groups according…

  15. Prediction Accuracy of the Washington and Illinois Risk Assessment Instruments: An Application of Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camasso, Michael J.; Jagannathan, Radha

    1995-01-01

    Compares the predictive performances of the Illinois CANTS 17B and the Washington State Risk Matrix on a sample of New Jersey child protective services cases using logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Both instruments predict case recidivism, closings, and substantiation with probabilities greater than chance.…

  16. Characteristic correlations between the Δm* interaction curves and the Preisach diagram in particulate media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoni, G.; Candolfo, D.; Cecchetti, A.

    2002-05-01

    Magnetic interparticle interactions are analyzed by Δm* curves calculated from the initial magnetization curve and the hysteresis loop, instead of the usual deviation Δm based on remanence curves. This study is made on tapes of acicular CrO2 particles and on tapes of CoTi-doped Ba ferrite platelet-shaped particles. The standard Preisach map of the samples is experimentally constructed and the Δm* values, computed from this map, and the values agree fairly well with the Δm* curves measured for the ac demagnetized state and various dc demagnetized states. We describe a procedure for remagnetizing the dc demagnetized samples. For the acicular particles, the peak of the remagnetized curves is lower than that computed from the Preisach map. The opposite occurs for the platelet-shaped particles. This different behavior is ascribed to the different influence of the statistical interaction field and the mean interaction field.

  17. On nonlocal characteristics of curved inhomogeneous Euler-Bernoulli nanobeams under different temperature distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Barati, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, thermo-mechanical buckling analysis of curved functionally graded (FG) nanobeams is carried out via an analytical solution method. Curved FG nanobeam is subjected to uniform, linear and nonlinear temperature distributions across the thickness. Three kinds of boundary condition namely, simply supported-simply supported, simply supported-clamped and clamped-clamped are investigated. Thermo-elastic properties of curved FG beam change in radial direction according to the power-law model. Nonlocal elasticity theory is adopted to capture the size effects. Nonlocal governing equations of curved FG nanobeam are obtained from Hamilton's principle based on Euler-Bernoulli beam model. Finally, the influences of thermal loadings, nonlocal parameter, opening angle, material composition, slenderness ratio and boundary conditions on the thermal buckling behavior of nanosize curved FG beams are explored.

  18. Tsunami Simulation using CIP Method with Characteristic Curve Equations and TVD-MacCormack Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukazawa, Souki; Tosaka, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    After entering 21st century, we already had two big tsunami disasters associated with Mw9 earthquakes in Sumatra and Japan. To mitigate the damages of tsunami, the numerical simulation technology combined with information technologies could provide reliable predictions in planning countermeasures to prevent the damage to the social system, making safety maps, and submitting early evacuation information to the residents. Shallow water equations are still solved not only for global scale simulation of the ocean tsunami propagation but also for local scale simulation of overland inundation in many tsunami simulators though three-dimensional model starts to be used due to improvement of CPU. One-dimensional shallow water equations are below: partial bm{Q}/partial t+partial bm{E}/partial x=bm{S} in which bm{Q}=( D M )), bm{E}=( M M^2/D+gD^2/2 )), bm{S}=( 0 -gDpartial z/partial x-gn2 M|M| /D7/3 )). where D[m] is total water depth; M[m^2/s] is water flux; z[m] is topography; g[m/s^2] is the gravitational acceleration; n[s/m1/3] is Manning's roughness coefficient. To solve these, the staggered leapfrog scheme is used in a lot of wide-scale tsunami simulator. But this scheme has a problem that lagging phase error occurs when courant number is small. In some practical simulation, a kind of diffusion term is added. In this study, we developed two wide-scale tsunami simulators with different schemes and compared usual scheme and other schemes in practicability and validity. One is a total variation diminishing modification of the MacCormack method (TVD-MacCormack method) which is famous for the simulation of compressible fluids. The other is the Cubic Interpolated Profile (CIP) method with characteristic curve equations transformed from shallow water equations. Characteristic curve equations derived from shallow water equations are below: partial R_x±/partial t+C_x±partial R_x±/partial x=∓ g/2partial z/partial x in which R_x±=√{gD}± u/2, C_x±=u± √{gD}. where u

  19. Field-Obtained Soil Water Characteristic Curves and Hydraulic Conductivity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, Ishimwe

    A compacted clay liner (test pad) was constructed and instrumented with volumetric water content and soil matric potential sensors to determine soil water characteristic curves (SWCC) and hydraulic conductivity (k) functions. Specifically, the compacted clay liner was subjected to an infiltration cycle during a sealed double ring infiltrometer (SDRI) test followed by a drying cycle. After the drying cycle, Shelby tube samples were collected from the compacted clay liner and flexible wall permeability (FWP) tests were conducted on sub-samples to determine the saturated hydraulic conductivity. Moreover, two computer programs (RETC and UNSAT-H) were utilized to model the SWCCs and k-functions of the soil based on obtained measurements including the volumetric water content, the soil matric potential, and the saturated hudraulic conductivity (ks). Results obtained from the RETC program (s, r, α, n and ks) were ingested into UNSAT-H program to calculate the movement of water (rate and location) through the compacted clay liner. Although a linear wetting front (location of water infiltration as a function of time) is typically utilized for SDRI calculations, the use of a hyperbolic wetting front is recommended as a hyperbolic wetting front was modeled from the testing results. The suggested shape of the wetting front is associated with utilization of the desorption SWCC instead of the sorption SWCC and with relatively high values of ks (average value of 7.2E-7 cm/sec) were measured in the FWP tests while relatively low values of ks (average value of 1.2E-7 cm/sec) were measured in the SDRI test.

  20. The relative value of carotid noninvasive testing as determined by receiver operator characteristic curves.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, T F; Pauker, S G; Callow, A D; Kelly, J J; McBride, K J; Korwin, S

    1980-01-01

    To determine the relative value of carotid phonoangiography (CPA), oculoplethysmography-Kartchner (OPG-K), and Doppler ultrasonic arteriography (UA), 90 vessels undergoing carotid endarterectomy were prospectively examined. By analyzing the data on receiver operator characteristic curves, the dynamic relationship between sensitivity and specificity for each of the three noninvasive tests was assessed. Disease was defined by either the percentage of angiographic stenosis or the mean pressure gradient across the carotid (deltaP). All three tests were shown to be relatively insensitive, but quite specific, if disease was defined by 50% and 60% angiographic stenosis or deltaP of greater than 10 and 20 mm Hg. By employing a more rigid definition of disease, 70% stenosis or deltaP of greater than 30 mm Hg, sensitivity was increased for all examinations and was highest in OPG-K and UA for a given specificity. The sensitivity for UA was enhanced to 80% with a comparable specificity, if those 23 UA exams with plaque were treated as positive studies. The combination of CPA, OPG-K, and UA was superior to any one of these tests alone, but the best value balancing maximum sensitivity and specificity still was associated with a 23% false negative rate. This study would suggest that these three tests should be limited to screening patients at risk for carotid stenosis and not for symptomatic patients. To achieve the best balance between sensitivity and specificity, lax threshold criteria for calling the test positive should be employed, and the tests should be used in combination.

  1. Is there Link between the Type of the Volumetric Strain Curve and Elastic Constants, Porosity, Stress and Strain Characteristics ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchik, V.

    2013-03-01

    The stress [crack damage stress ( σ cd) and uniaxial compressive strength ( σ c)] and strain characteristics [maximum total volumetric strain ( ɛ cd), axial failure strain ( ɛ af)], porosity ( n) and elastic constants [elastic modulus ( E) and Poisson's ratio ( ν)] and their ratios were coordinated with the existence of two different types (type 1 and type 2) of volumetric strain curve. Type 1 volumetric strain curve has a reversal point and, therefore, σ cd is less than the uniaxial compressive strength ( σ c). Type 2 has no reversal point, and the bulk volume of rock decreases until its failure occurs (i.e., σ cd = σ c). It is confirmed that the ratio between the elastic modulus ( E) and the parameter λ = n/ ɛ cd strongly affects the crack damage stress ( σ cd) for both type 1 and type 2 volumetric strain curves. It is revealed that heterogeneous carbonate rock samples exhibit different types of the volumetric strain curve even within the same rock formation, and the range of σ cd/ σ c = 0.54-1 for carbonate rocks is wider than the range (0.71 < σ cd/ σ c < 0.84) obtained by other researchers for granites, sandstones and quartzite. It is established that there is no connection between the type of the volumetric strain curve and values of n, E, σ cd, ν, E/(1 - 2 ν), M R = E/ σ c and E/ λ. On the other hand, the type of volumetric strain curve is connected with the values of λ and the ratio between the axial failure strain ( ɛ af) and the maximum total volumetric strain ( ɛ cd). It is argued that in case of small ɛ af/ ɛ cd-small λ, volumetric strain curve follows the type 2.

  2. 7 CFR 42.143 - Operating Characteristic (OC) curves for on-line sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... plans provided in subpart D. The OC curve and the corresponding cumulative sum sampling plans are listed by AQL. (b) Different plan parameters used to make acceptance and rejection decisions are...

  3. Grip strength characteristics using force-time curves in rheumatoid hands.

    PubMed

    Dias, J J; Singh, H P; Taub, Nick; Thompson, J

    2013-02-01

    The use of force-time curves in rheumatoid hands was investigated to assess peak force, average force, total grip time, area under the curve, and variability of the plateau region of the curves to identify the impact of different rheumatoid hand deformities on grip strength. We studied 43 patients - 10 men and 33 women - with established rheumatoid arthritis affecting their hands. Mean age was 61 years and mean duration of hand involvement was 13 years. Of the 86 hands, 38 had no finger deformity, eight had metacarpophalangeal joint ulnar deviation without any additional finger deformities, 16 had swan neck deformities, and 10 had boutonnière deformities. Fourteen hands had a combination of deformities. The hands with combined deformities were the weakest, had poor grip strength (34.7 N, SE 8), and were able to sustain grip for only a short time (22 sec, SE 3). Swan neck deformity also profoundly affects the magnitude (49.8 N, SE 7) and sustainability of grip (15 sec, SE 2). Even when only one finger had a swan neck deformity the mean strength was poor at 45 N. Swan neck deformity causes greater loss of strength than boutonnière deformity (82.7 N, SE 15). The strongest rheumatoid hands were those with only ulnar deviation deformities (90.8 N, SE 14). The area under the curve best predicted disability assessed using the Patient Evaluation Measure. PMID:22357327

  4. The soil water characteristic as new class of closed-form parametric expressions for the flow duration curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadegh, M.; Vrugt, J. A.; Gupta, H. V.; Xu, C.

    2016-04-01

    The flow duration curve is a signature catchment characteristic that depicts graphically the relationship between the exceedance probability of streamflow and its magnitude. This curve is relatively easy to create and interpret, and is used widely for hydrologic analysis, water quality management, and the design of hydroelectric power plants (among others). Several mathematical expressions have been proposed to mimic the FDC. Yet, these efforts have not been particularly successful, in large part because available functions are not flexible enough to portray accurately the functional shape of the FDC for a large range of catchments and contrasting hydrologic behaviors. Here, we extend the work of Vrugt and Sadegh (2013) and introduce several commonly used models of the soil water characteristic as new class of closed-form parametric expressions for the flow duration curve. These soil water retention functions are relatively simple to use, contain between two to three parameters, and mimic closely the empirical FDCs of 430 catchments of the MOPEX data set. We then relate the calibrated parameter values of these models to physical and climatological characteristics of the watershed using multivariate linear regression analysis, and evaluate the regionalization potential of our proposed models against those of the literature. If quality of fit is of main importance then the 3-parameter van Genuchten model is preferred, whereas the 2-parameter lognormal, 3-parameter GEV and generalized Pareto models show greater promise for regionalization.

  5. Physical Characteristics of Faint Meteors by Light Curve and High-resolution Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasinghe, Dilini; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D.; Stokan, Edward

    2014-11-01

    The physical structure of a meteoroid may be inferred from optical observations, particularly the light curve, of a meteor. For example: a classically shaped (late peaked) light curve is seen as evidence of a solid single body, whereas a symmetric light curve may indicate a dustball structure. High-resolution optical observations show how the meteoroid fragments: continuously, leaving a long wake, or discretely, leaving several distinct pieces. Calculating the orbit of the meteoroid using two station data then allows the object to be associated with asteroidal or cometary parent bodies. Optical observations thus provide simultaneous information on meteoroid structure, fragmentation mode, and origin.CAMO (the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory) has been continuously collecting faint (masses < 10-4 kg) two station optical meteors with image-intensified narrow field (with a resolution of up to 3 meters per pixel) and wide field (26 by 19 degrees) cameras since 2010. The narrow field, telescopic cameras allow the meteor fragmentation to be studied using a pair of mirrors to track the meteor. The wide-field cameras provide the light curve and trajectory solution.We present preliminary results from classifying light curves and high-resolution optical observations for 3000 faint meteors recorded since 2010. We find that most meteors (both asteroidal and cometary) show long trails, while meteors with short trails are the second most common morphology. It is expected that meteoroids that experience negligible fragmentation have the shortest trails, so our results imply that the majority of small meteoroids fragment during ablation. A surprising observation is that almost equal fractions of asteroidal and cometary meteors fragment (showing long trails), implying a similar structure for both types of meteoroids.

  6. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  7. Running characteristics of the magnetically levitated train in a curved track section

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, S.; Ohsaki, H.; Masada, E.

    1997-09-01

    A three-dimensional running simulation program of the train motion which includes both electromagnetic and mechanical systems has been developed. For verification of running stability, the motion of the Maglev train with four bogies and three cars running into the curved section was calculated. Because the spring strength of the secondary suspension between bogies and cabins was much smaller than that of the electrodynamic suspension, interaction among bogies was small. The lateral displacement reached 0.045m, which is about 50% of the lateral air gap. Therefore train can run without touching the wall of the guideway. As this lateral air gap caused roll torque, total roll angle of the bogie became 12.5% larger than the cant angle of the curved section.

  8. Influence of recirculation on Y-Q characteristic curve of hydrodynamic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klas, Roman; Pochylý, František; Rudolf, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Contribution is focused on discussion of different design modifications of the volute, impeller and rotor-stator cavity in case of very low specific speed pump with recirculation channels. Amount of the liquid flowing through the recirculation channels has significant effect on delivery height, stability of the head curve and hydraulic efficiency. Analysis of these effects is based on the evaluation of the dissipated power in different internal parts of the pump and for different flow rates. It has already been proved in our previous research that volute has substantial impact on stability of the head curve. It is apparent that similar effect can also be attributed to distribution and shape of the recirculation channels. This fact is connected with the inflow into the channels and with magnitude of the flow rate through the recirculation channels. Influence of mentioned parameters on recirculation is discussed in present paper.

  9. 7 CFR 42.140 - Operating Characteristic (OC) curves for on-line sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Units Comparable sampling plans Identification number of OC curve R1 nc Ac Re R2 nc Ac Re R3 nc Ac Re R4 nc Ac Re N4 nc Ac Re N5 nc Ac Re N6 nc Ac Re N7 nc Ac Re N8 nc Ac Re Single 29 1 2 84 1 2 126 0 1 315... 36 1 2 96 1 2 180 1 2 336 1 2 540 2 3 864 3 4 nc=Cumulative sample size.Ac=Acceptance...

  10. Influence of the characteristic curve on the clinical image quality and patient absorbed dose in lumbar spine radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingberg, Anders; Herrmann, Clemens; Lanhede, Birgitta; Almen, Anja; Mattsson, Saron; Panzer, Werner; Besjakov, Jack; Mansson, Lars G.; Kheddache, Susanne; Zankl, Maria

    2001-06-01

    The 'European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Diagnostic Radiographic Images' do not address the choice of film characteristic (H/D) curve, which is an important parameter for the description of a radiographic screen-film system. Since it is not possible to investigate this influence by taking repeated exposures of the same patients on films with systematically varied H/D curves, patient images of lumbar spine were digitised in the current study. The image contrast was altered by digital image processing techniques, simulating images with H/D curves varying from flat over standard latitude to a film type steeper than a mammography film. The manipulated images were printed on film for evaluation. Seven European radiologists evaluated the clinical image quality of in total 224 images by analysing the fulfilment of the European Image Criteria and by visual grading analysis of the images. The results show that the local quality can be significantly improved by the application of films with a steeper film H/D curve compared to the standard latitude film. For images with an average optical density of about 1.25, the application of the steeper film results in a reduction of patient absorbed dose by about 10-15% without a loss of diagnostically relevant image information. The results also show that the patient absorbed dose reduction obtained by altering the tube voltage from 70 kV to 90 kV coincides with a loss of image information that cannot be compensated for by simply changing the shape of the H/D curve.

  11. Weighted Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve and Its Application to Gene Selection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jialiang; Fine, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Partial area under the ROC curve (PAUC) has been proposed for gene selection in Pepe et al. (2003) and thereafter applied in real data analysis. It was noticed from empirical studies that this measure has several key weaknesses, such as an inability to reflect nonuniform weighting of different decision thresholds, resulting in large numbers of ties. We propose the weighted area under the ROC curve (WAUC) in this paper to address the problems associated with PAUC. Our proposed measure enjoys a greater flexibility to describe the discrimination accuracy of genes. Nonparametric and parametric estimation methods are introduced, including PAUC as a special case, along with theoretical properties of the estimators. We also provide a simple variance formula, yielding a novel variance estimator for nonparametric estimation of PAUC, which has proven challenging in previous work. The proposed methods permit sensitivity analyses, whereby the impact of differing weight functions on gene rankings may be assessed and results may be synthesized across weights. Simulations and re-analysis of two well-known microarray datasets illustrate the practical utility of WAUC. PMID:25125706

  12. Understanding the effect of watershed characteristic on the runoff using SCS curve number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damayanti, Frieta; Schneider, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Runoff modeling is a key component in watershed management. The temporal course and amount of runoff is a complex function of a multitude of parameters such as climate, soil, topography, land use, and water management. Against the background of the current rapid environmental change, which is due to both i) man-made changes (e.g. urban development, land use change, water management) as well as ii) changes in the natural systems (e.g. climate change), understanding and predicting the impacts of these changes upon the runoff is very important and affects the wellbeing of many people living in the watershed. A main tool for predictions is hydrologic models. Particularly process based models are the method of choice to assess the impact of land use and climate change. However, many regions which experience large changes in the watersheds can be described as rather data poor, which limits the applicability of such models. This is particularly also true for the Telomoyo Watershed (545 km2) which is located in southern part of Central Java province. The average annual rainfall of the study area reaches 2971 mm. Irrigated paddy field are the dominating land use (35%), followed by built-up area and dry land agriculture. The only available soil map is the FAO soil digital map of the world, which provides rather general soil information. A field survey accompanied by a lab analysis 65 soil samples of was carried out to provide more detailed soil texture information. The soil texture map is a key input in the SCS method to define hydrological soil groups. In the frame of our study on 'Integrated Analysis on Flood Risk of Telomoyo Watershed in Response to the Climate and Land Use Change' funded by the German Academic Exchange service (DAAD) we analyzed the sensitivity of the modeled runoff upon the choice of the method to estimate the CN values using the SCS-CN method. The goal of this study is to analyze the impact of different data sources on the curve numbers and the

  13. Electrosprayed nanoparticles for drug delivery and pharmaceutical applications

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology based Pharma has emerged significantly and has influenced the Pharma industry up to a considerable extent. Nanoparticles technology holds a good share of the nanotech Pharma and is significant in comparison with the other domains. Electrospraying technology answers the potential needs of nanoparticle production such as scalability, reproducibility, effective encapsulation etc. Many drugs have been electrosprayed with and without polymer carriers. Drug release characteristics are improved with the incorporation of biodegradable polymer carriers which sustain the release of encapsulated drug. Electrospraying is acknowledged as an important technique for the preparation of nanoparticles with respect to pharmaceutical applications. Herein we attempted to consolidate the reports pertaining to electrospraying and their corresponding therapeutic application area. PMID:23512013

  14. The influence of acceleration loading curve characteristics on traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Post, Andrew; Blaine Hoshizaki, T; Gilchrist, Michael D; Brien, Susan; Cusimano, Michael D; Marshall, Shawn

    2014-03-21

    To prevent brain trauma, understanding the mechanism of injury is essential. Once the mechanism of brain injury has been identified, prevention technologies could then be developed to aid in their prevention. The incidence of brain injury is linked to how the kinematics of a brain injury event affects the internal structures of the brain. As a result it is essential that an attempt be made to describe how the characteristics of the linear and rotational acceleration influence specific traumatic brain injury lesions. As a result, the purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the characteristics of linear and rotational acceleration pulses and how they account for the variance in predicting the outcome of TBI lesions, namely contusion, subdural hematoma (SDH), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and epidural hematoma (EDH) using a principal components analysis (PCA). Monorail impacts were conducted which simulated falls which caused the TBI lesions. From these reconstructions, the characteristics of the linear and rotational acceleration were determined and used for a PCA analysis. The results indicated that peak resultant acceleration variables did not account for any of the variance in predicting TBI lesions. The majority of the variance was accounted for by duration of the resultant and component linear and rotational acceleration. In addition, the components of linear and rotational acceleration characteristics on the x, y, and z axes accounted for the majority of the remainder of the variance after duration.

  15. Modeling the Flow Curve Characteristics of 410 Martensitic Stainless Steel Under Hot Working Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Amir; Dehghani, Kamran; Ebrahimi, Golam Reza; Keshmiri, Hamid

    2010-11-01

    The hot deformation behavior of AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel was investigated by conducting hot compression tests between 1173 K (900 °C) and 1423 K (1150 °C) and between strain rates of 0.001 s-1 to 1 s-1. The hyperbolic sine function described the relation well between flow stress at a given strain and the Zener-Hollomon parameter ( Z). The variation of flow stress with deformation temperature gave the average value of apparent activation energy as 448 kJ/mol. The strain and stress corresponding to two important points associated with flow curve ( i.e., peak strain and the onset of steady-state flow) were related to the Z parameter using power-law equations. A model also was proposed based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation to estimate the fractional softening of dynamic recrystallization at any given strain. This model can be used readily for the prediction of flow stress. The values of n and k, material constants in the JMAK equation, were determined for the studied material. The strains regarding the peak and the onset of steady-state flow were formulated in term of applied strain rate and the constants of the JMAK equation. A good agreement was found between the predicted strains and those obtained by the experimental work.

  16. The Soil-Water Characteristic Curve of Unsaturated Tropical Residual Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, M. F.; Setapa, A. S.; Tajudin, S. A. A.; Madun, A.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Marto, A.

    2016-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the SWCC of unsaturated tropical residual soil in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Undisturbed soil samples at five locations of high-risk slopes area were taken at a depth of 0.5 m using block sampler. In the determination of the SWCC, the pressure plate extractor with the capacity of 1500 kN/m2 has been used. The index properties of the soil such as natural moisture content, Atterberg limits, specific gravity, and soil classification are performed according to BS 1377: Part 2: 1990. The results of index properties show that the natural moisture content of the soil is between 36% to 46%, the plasticity index is between 10% - 26%, the specific gravity is between 2.51 - 2.61 and the soils is classified as silty organic clay of low plasticity. The SWCC data from the pressure plate extractor have been fitted with the Fredlund and Xing equation. The results show that the air entry value and residual matric suction for residual soils are in the range of 17 kN/m2 to 24 kN/m2 and 145 kN/m2 to 225 kN/m2 respectively. From the fitting curve, it is found that the average value of the Fredlund and Xing parameters such as a, n and m are in the range of 0.24-0.299, 1.7-4.8 and 0.142-0.440 respectively.

  17. A Method to Recover Useful Geothermal-Reservoir Parameters from Production Characteristic Curves (2) Hot Water Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, E.; Arellano, V.; Molinar, R.

    1983-12-15

    In this paper we develop and demonstrate a method to estimate the reservoir pressure, a mass productivity index, and a thermal power productivity index for vertical water-fed geothermal wells, from its production characteristic (also called output) curves. In addition, the method allows to estimate the radius of influence of the well, provided that a value of the reservoir transmisivity is available. The basic structure of the present method is: first, the measured wellhead mass flowrate; and pressures are transformed to downhole conditions by means of a numerical simulator; then, the computed downhole variables are fitted to a simple radial model that predicts the sandface flowrate in terms of the flowing pressure. For demonstration, the method was applied to several wells from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field. We found very good agreement of the model with this ample set of field data. The main advantages of our method are that it provides a way to retrieve important reservoir information from usually available production characteristic curves, that it works from easily and accurately taken wellhead measurements, and that its results address the two main aspects of geothermal resource utilization, namely, mass and heat production.

  18. Investigation of Liner Characteristics in the NASA Langley Curved Duct Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    The Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR), which is designed to investigate propagation of sound in a duct with flow, has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The duct incorporates an adaptive control system to generate a tone in the duct at a specific frequency with a target Sound Pressure Level and a target mode shape. The size of the duct, the ability to isolate higher order modes, and the ability to modify the duct configuration make this rig unique among experimental duct acoustics facilities. An experiment is described in which the facility performance is evaluated by measuring the sound attenuation by a sample duct liner. The liner sample comprises one wall of the liner test section. Sound in tones from 500 to 2400 Hz, with modes that are parallel to the liner surface of order 0 to 5, and that are normal to the liner surface of order 0 to 2, can be generated incident on the liner test section. Tests are performed in which sound is generated without axial flow in the duct and with flow at a Mach number of 0.275. The attenuation of the liner is determined by comparing the sound power in a hard wall section downstream of the liner test section to the sound power in a hard wall section upstream of the liner test section. These experimentally determined attenuations are compared to numerically determined attenuations calculated by means of a finite element analysis code. The code incorporates liner impedance values educed from measured data from the NASA Langley Grazing Incidence Tube, a test rig that is used for investigating liner performance with flow and with (0,0) mode incident grazing. The analytical and experimental results compare favorably, indicating the validity of the finite element method and demonstrating that finite element prediction tools can be used together with experiment to characterize the liner attenuation.

  19. Factors Affecting The Experimental Line Spread Function (Lsf) Measurement And Modulation Transfer Function (Mtf) Calculation Including Deviation In Characteristic Curve Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahle, Marcia E.; Haus, Arthur G.

    1980-08-01

    The major potential errors in the slit method measurement of the line spread function (LSF) and the modu-lation transfer function (MTF) of radiographic screen-film systems are reviewed. These errors are compared with the potential error introduced in the LSF due to an erroneous representation of the characteristic curve (sensitometric data). If a deviation in the sensitometric data results in a lower average gradient of the characteristic curve, the MTF will show higher resolution capabilities.

  20. Flow visualization of time-varying structural characteristics of dean vortices in a curved channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bella, David Wayne

    1988-12-01

    The time varying development and structure of Dean vortices were studied using flow visualization. Observations were made over a range of Dean numbers from 40 to 200 using a transparent channel with mild curvature, 40:1 aspect ratio, and an inner to outer radius ratio of 0.979. Seven flow visualization techniques were tried but only one, a wood burning smoke generator, produced usable results. Different vortex characteristics were observed and documented in sequences of photographs spaced one quarter of a second apart at locations ranging from 85 to 135 degrees from the start of curvature. Evidence is presented that supports the twisting/rocking nature of the flow.

  1. Regional Curves for Bankfull Channel Characteristics in the Appalachian Plateaus, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messinger, Terence

    2009-01-01

    Streams in the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province in West Virginia were classified as a single region on the basis of bankfull characteristics. Regression lines for annual peak flow and drainage area measured at streamgages in the study area at recurrence intervals between 1.2 and 1.7 years fell within the 99-percent confidence interval of the regression line for bankfull flow. Channel characteristics were intermediate among those from surrounding states and regions where comparable studies have been done. The stream reaches that were surveyed were selected for apparent stability, and to represent gradients of drainage area, elevation, and mean annual precipitation. Profiles of high-water marks left by bankfull and near-bankfull peaks were surveyed, either as part of slope-area flow measurements at ungaged reaches, or to transfer known flow information to cross sections for gaged reaches. The slope-area measurements made it possible to include ungaged sites in the study, but still relate bankfull dimensions to peak flow and frequency.

  2. Applications of electrospinning/electrospraying in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Azin; Adibkia, Khosro

    2016-01-01

    During recent years, nanoscaled materials have gained much attention because of their applications in the field of pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences. Electrospinning/electrospraying, as simple, effective and single-step methods, are used in the preparation of nanostructured materials (nanofibers and nanobeads). They offer an opportunity for direct encapsulation of the different types of drug molecules. The generated nanomaterials possess high surface area with porous characteristics, and the liberation of the loaded drugs follows a controlled-release pattern. Because of their wide applications in medical/pharmaceutical researches, the aim of this editorial is to highlight the importance of electrospinning/electrospraying technologies in drug delivery. PMID:27340617

  3. Applications of electrospinning/electrospraying in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Azin; Adibkia, Khosro

    2016-01-01

    During recent years, nanoscaled materials have gained much attention because of their applications in the field of pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences. Electrospinning/electrospraying, as simple, effective and single-step methods, are used in the preparation of nanostructured materials (nanofibers and nanobeads). They offer an opportunity for direct encapsulation of the different types of drug molecules. The generated nanomaterials possess high surface area with porous characteristics, and the liberation of the loaded drugs follows a controlled-release pattern. Because of their wide applications in medical/pharmaceutical researches, the aim of this editorial is to highlight the importance of electrospinning/electrospraying technologies in drug delivery.

  4. Fractal Characteristics of Soil Retention Curve and Particle Size Distribution with Different Vegetation Types in Mountain Areas of Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiang; Gao, Peng; Wang, Bing; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Based on fractal theory, the fractal characteristics of soil particle size distribution (PSD) and soil water retention curve (WRC) under the five vegetation types were studied in the mountainous land of Northern China. Results showed that: (1) the fractal parameters of soil PSD and soil WRC varied greatly under each different vegetation type, with Quercus acutissima Carr. and Robina pseudoacacia Linn. mixed plantation (QRM) > Pinus thunbergii Parl. and Pistacia chinensis Bunge mixed plantation (PPM) > Pinus thunbergii Parl. (PTP) > Juglans rigia Linn. (JRL) > abandoned grassland (ABG); (2) the soil fractal dimensions of woodlands (QRM, PPM, PTP and JRL) were significantly higher than that in ABG, and mixed forests (QRM and PPM) were higher than that in pure forests (PTP and JRL); (3) the fractal dimension of soil was positively correlated with the silt and clay content but negatively correlated with the sand content; and (4) the fractal dimension of soil PSD was positively correlated with the soil WRC. These indicated that the fractal parameters of soil PSD and soil WRC could act as quantitative indices to reflect the physical properties of the soil, and could be used to describe the influences of the Return Farmland to Forests Projects on soil structure. PMID:26633458

  5. Fractal Characteristics of Soil Retention Curve and Particle Size Distribution with Different Vegetation Types in Mountain Areas of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiang; Gao, Peng; Wang, Bing; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-03

    Based on fractal theory, the fractal characteristics of soil particle size distribution (PSD) and soil water retention curve (WRC) under the five vegetation types were studied in the mountainous land of Northern China. Results showed that: (1) the fractal parameters of soil PSD and soil WRC varied greatly under each different vegetation type, with Quercus acutissima Carr. and Robina pseudoacacia Linn. mixed plantation (QRM) > Pinus thunbergii Parl. and Pistacia chinensis Bunge mixed plantation (PPM) > Pinus thunbergii Parl. (PTP) > Juglans rigia Linn. (JRL) > abandoned grassland (ABG); (2) the soil fractal dimensions of woodlands (QRM, PPM, PTP and JRL) were significantly higher than that in ABG, and mixed forests (QRM and PPM) were higher than that in pure forests (PTP and JRL); (3) the fractal dimension of soil was positively correlated with the silt and clay content but negatively correlated with the sand content; and (4) the fractal dimension of soil PSD was positively correlated with the soil WRC. These indicated that the fractal parameters of soil PSD and soil WRC could act as quantitative indices to reflect the physical properties of the soil, and could be used to describe the influences of the Return Farmland to Forests Projects on soil structure.

  6. Using the optimal receiver operating characteristic curve to design a predictive genetic test, exemplified with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Elston, Robert C

    2008-03-01

    Current extensive genetic research into common complex diseases, especially with the completion of genome-wide association studies, is bringing to light many novel genetic risk loci. These new discoveries, along with previously known genetic risk variants, offer an important opportunity for researchers to improve health care. We describe a method of quick evaluation of these new findings for potential clinical practice by designing a new predictive genetic test, estimating its classification accuracy, and determining the sample size required for the verification of this accuracy. The proposed predictive test is asymptotically more powerful than tests built on any other existing method and can be extended to scenarios where loci are linked or interact. We illustrate the approach for the case of type 2 diabetes. We incorporate recently discovered risk factors into the proposed test and find a potentially better predictive genetic test. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of the proposed test is estimated to be higher (AUC = 0.671) than for the existing test (AUC = 0.580).

  7. Fractal Characteristics of Soil Retention Curve and Particle Size Distribution with Different Vegetation Types in Mountain Areas of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiang; Gao, Peng; Wang, Bing; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Based on fractal theory, the fractal characteristics of soil particle size distribution (PSD) and soil water retention curve (WRC) under the five vegetation types were studied in the mountainous land of Northern China. Results showed that: (1) the fractal parameters of soil PSD and soil WRC varied greatly under each different vegetation type, with Quercus acutissima Carr. and Robina pseudoacacia Linn. mixed plantation (QRM) > Pinus thunbergii Parl. and Pistacia chinensis Bunge mixed plantation (PPM) > Pinus thunbergii Parl. (PTP) > Juglans rigia Linn. (JRL) > abandoned grassland (ABG); (2) the soil fractal dimensions of woodlands (QRM, PPM, PTP and JRL) were significantly higher than that in ABG, and mixed forests (QRM and PPM) were higher than that in pure forests (PTP and JRL); (3) the fractal dimension of soil was positively correlated with the silt and clay content but negatively correlated with the sand content; and (4) the fractal dimension of soil PSD was positively correlated with the soil WRC. These indicated that the fractal parameters of soil PSD and soil WRC could act as quantitative indices to reflect the physical properties of the soil, and could be used to describe the influences of the Return Farmland to Forests Projects on soil structure. PMID:26633458

  8. Characteristics of concentration-inhibition curves of individual chemicals and applicability of the concentration addition model for mixture toxicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Wang, Xiaochang C; Ma, Xiaoyan

    2015-03-01

    The concentration addition (CA) model has been widely applied to predict mixture toxicity. However, its applicability is difficult to evaluate due to the complexity of interactions among substances. Considering that the concentration-response curve (CRC) of each component of the mixture is closely related to the prediction of mixture toxicity, mathematical treatments were used to derive a characteristic index kECx (k was the slope of the tangent line of a CRC at concentration ECx). The implication is that the CA model would be applicable for predicting the mixture toxicity only when chemical components have similar kECx in the whole or part of the concentration range. For five selected chemicals whose toxicity was detected using luminescent bacteria, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) showed much higher kECx values than the others and its existence in the binary mixtures brought about overestimation of the mixture toxicity with the CA model. The higher the mass ratio of SDBS in a multi-mixture was, the more the toxicity prediction deviated from measurements. By applying the method proposed in this study to analyze some published data, it is confirmed that some components having significantly different kECx values from the other components could explain the large deviation of the mixture toxicity predicted by the CA model. PMID:25499050

  9. Machine learning-based receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for crisp and fuzzy classification of DNA microarrays in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Leif E; Coleman, Matthew A

    2008-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to obtain classification area under the curve (AUC) as a function of feature standardization, fuzzification, and sample size from nine large sets of cancer-related DNA microarrays. Classifiers used included k nearest neighbor (kNN), näive Bayes classifier (NBC), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), learning vector quantization (LVQ1), logistic regression (LOG), polytomous logistic regression (PLOG), artificial neural networks (ANN), particle swarm optimization (PSO), constricted particle swarm optimization (CPSO), kernel regression (RBF), radial basis function networks (RBFN), gradient descent support vector machines (SVMGD), and least squares support vector machines (SVMLS). For each data set, AUC was determined for a number of combinations of sample size, total sum[-log(p)] of feature t-tests, with and without feature standardization and with (fuzzy) and without (crisp) fuzzification of features. Altogether, a total of 2,123,530 classification runs were made. At the greatest level of sample size, ANN resulted in a fitted AUC of 90%, while PSO resulted in the lowest fitted AUC of 72.1%. AUC values derived from 4NN were the most dependent on sample size, while PSO was the least. ANN depended the most on total statistical significance of features used based on sum[-log(p)], whereas PSO was the least dependent. Standardization of features increased AUC by 8.1% for PSO and -0.2% for QDA, while fuzzification increased AUC by 9.4% for PSO and reduced AUC by 3.8% for QDA. AUC determination in planned microarray experiments without standardization and fuzzification of features will benefit the most if CPSO is used for lower levels of feature significance (i.e., sum[-log(p)] ~ 50) and ANN is used for greater levels of significance (i.e., sum[-log(p)] ~ 500). When only standardization of features is performed, studies are likely to benefit most by using CPSO for low levels

  10. Machine learning-based receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for crisp and fuzzy classification of DNA microarrays in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Leif E.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to obtain classification area under the curve (AUC) as a function of feature standardization, fuzzification, and sample size from nine large sets of cancer-related DNA microarrays. Classifiers used included k nearest neighbor (kNN), näive Bayes classifier (NBC), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), learning vector quantization (LVQ1), logistic regression (LOG), polytomous logistic regression (PLOG), artificial neural networks (ANN), particle swarm optimization (PSO), constricted particle swarm optimization (CPSO), kernel regression (RBF), radial basis function networks (RBFN), gradient descent support vector machines (SVMGD), and least squares support vector machines (SVMLS). For each data set, AUC was determined for a number of combinations of sample size, total sum[−log(p)] of feature t-tests, with and without feature standardization and with (fuzzy) and without (crisp) fuzzification of features. Altogether, a total of 2,123,530 classification runs were made. At the greatest level of sample size, ANN resulted in a fitted AUC of 90%, while PSO resulted in the lowest fitted AUC of 72.1%. AUC values derived from 4NN were the most dependent on sample size, while PSO was the least. ANN depended the most on total statistical significance of features used based on sum[−log(p)], whereas PSO was the least dependent. Standardization of features increased AUC by 8.1% for PSO and -0.2% for QDA, while fuzzification increased AUC by 9.4% for PSO and reduced AUC by 3.8% for QDA. AUC determination in planned microarray experiments without standardization and fuzzification of features will benefit the most if CPSO is used for lower levels of feature significance (i.e., sum[−log(p)] ~ 50) and ANN is used for greater levels of significance (i.e., sum[−log(p)] ~ 500). When only standardization of features is performed, studies are likely to benefit most by using CPSO for low

  11. Item Characteristic Curve Estimation of Signal Detection Theory-Based Personality Data: A Two-Stage Approach to Item Response Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kevin M.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2003-01-01

    Developed an item characteristic curve estimation of signal detection theory based personality data. Results for 266 college students taking the Overclaiming Questionnaire (D. Paulhus and N. Bruce, 1990) suggest that this method is a reasonable approach to describing item functioning and that there are advantages to this method over traditional…

  12. Effects of Average Signed Area Between Two Item Characteristic Curves and Test Purification Procedures on the DIF Detection via the Mantel-Haenszel Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Su, Ya-Hui

    2004-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of the average signed area (ASA) between the item characteristic curves of the reference and focal groups and three test purification procedures on the uniform differential item functioning (DIF) detection via the Mantel-Haenszel (M-H) method through Monte Carlo simulations. The results showed that ASA,…

  13. A Monte Carlo Study of the Effect of Item Characteristic Curve Estimation on the Accuracy of Three Person-Fit Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Onge, Christina; Valois, Pierre; Abdous, Belkacem; Germain, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    To date, there have been no studies comparing parametric and nonparametric Item Characteristic Curve (ICC) estimation methods on the effectiveness of Person-Fit Statistics (PFS). The primary aim of this study was to determine if the use of ICCs estimated by nonparametric methods would increase the accuracy of item response theory-based PFS for…

  14. Electrospray Collection of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dziekan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A report describes ElectroSpray Ionization based Electrostatic Precipitation (ESIEP) for collecting lunar dust particles. While some HEPA filtration processes may remove a higher fraction (>99.9 percent) of the particles, the high efficiency may not be appropriate from an overall system standpoint, especially in light of the relatively large power requirement that such systems demand. The new electrospray particle capture technology is described as a variant of electrostatic precipitation that eliminates the current drawbacks of electrostatic precipitation. The new approach replaces corona prone field with a mist of highly charged micro-droplets generated by electrospray ionization (ESI) as the mechanism by which incoming particles are attracted and captured. In electrospray, a miniscule flow rate (microliters/minute) of liquid (typically water and a small amount of salt to enhance conductivity) is fed from the tip of a needle held at a high voltage potential relative to an opposite counter electrode. At sufficient field strength, a sharp liquid meniscus forms , which emits a jet of highly charged droplets that drift through the surrounding gas and are collected on the walls of a conductive tube. Particles in the gas have a high probability of contact with the droplets either by adhering to the droplets or otherwise acquiring a high level of charge, causing them to be captured on the collecting electrode as well. The spray acts as a filtration material that is continuously introduced and removed from the gas flow, and thus can never become clogged.

  15. The fate of electrospray drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaran, Osman; Collins, Robert; Sambath, Krishnaraj; Harris, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Drops subjected to strong electric fields emit thin fluid jets from conical structures (Taylor cones) that form at their surfaces. Such behavior has practical, e.g. electrospray mass spectrometry, and fundamental, e.g. raindrops in thunderclouds, implications. Theoretical analysis of the temporal development of such EHD tip-streaming phenomena is challenging given the large disparity in length scales between the macroscopic drops and the microscopic jets. Furthermore, there exist conflicting theories and measurements on the size and charge of these small electrospray droplets. We use theory and simulation to show that conductivity can be tuned to yield three scaling regimes for droplet radius and charge, a finding missed by previous studies. The amount of charge Q that electrospray droplets carry determines whether they are coulombically stable and charged below the Rayleigh limit of stability R or are unstable and hence prone to further explosions once formed. Previous experiments reported droplet charge values ranging from 1/10th to in excess of R. Simulations unequivocally show that electrospray droplets are coulombically stable at the instant they are created and that there exists a universal scaling law for droplet charge, Q=0.44 R.

  16. Salt Tolerance of Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Ayanna U.; Talaty, Nari; Cooks, R G; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2007-01-01

    Suppression of ion intensity in the presence of high salt matrices is common in most mass spectrometry ionization techniques. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is an ionization method that exhibits salt tolerance, and this is investigated. DESI analysis was performed on three different drug mixtures in the presence of 0, 0.2, 2, 5, 10, and 20% NaCl:KCl weight by volume from seven different surfaces. At physiological concentrations individual drugs in each mixture were observed with each surface. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to provide additional confirmation for select compounds. Multiple stage experiments, to MS5, were performed for select compounds. Even in the absence of added salt, the benzodiazepine containing mixture yielded sodium and potassium adducts of carbamazepine which masked the ions of interest. These adducts were eliminated by adding 0.1% 7M ammonium acetate to the standard methanol:water (1:1) spray solvent. Comparison of the salt tolerance of DESI with that of electrospray ionization (ESI) demonstrated much better signal/noise characteristics for DESI in this study. The salt tolerance of DESI was also studied by performing limit of detection and dynamic range experiments. Even at a salt concentration significantly above physiological concentrations, select surfaces were effective in providing spectra that allowed the ready identification of the compounds of interest. The already high salt tolerance of DESI can be optimized further by appropriate choices of surface and spray solution.

  17. Radial arrays of nano-electrospray ionization emitters and methods of forming electrosprays

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ryan T [West Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2010-10-19

    Electrospray ionization emitter arrays, as well as methods for forming electrosprays, are described. The arrays are characterized by a radial configuration of three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters without an extractor electrode. The methods are characterized by distributing fluid flow of the liquid sample among three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters, forming an electrospray at outlets of the emitters without utilizing an extractor electrode, and directing the electrosprays into an entrance to a mass spectrometry device. Each of the nano-electrospray ionization emitters can have a discrete channel for fluid flow. The nano-electrospray ionization emitters are circularly arranged such that each is shielded substantially equally from an electrospray-inducing electric field.

  18. Estimated Bankfull Discharge for Selected Michigan Rivers and Regional Hydraulic Geometry Curves for Estimating Bankfull Characteristics in Southern Michigan Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rachol, Cynthia M.; Boley-Morse, Kristine

    2009-01-01

    Regional hydraulic geometry curves are power-function equations that relate riffle dimensions and bankfull discharge to drainage-basin size. They are defined by data collected through surveys conducted at stable stream reaches and can be used to aid watershed managers, design engineers, and others involved in determination of the best course of action for an unstable stream. Hydraulic geometry curves provide a mechanism through which comparisons can be made between riffle dimensions collected at an unstable stream to those collected at stable streams within the same region. In 2005, a study was initiated to delineate regional hydraulic geometry curves for Michigan. After in-office review of 343 U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging stations and an extensive field reconnaissance effort, 44 stable reaches were selected for this study. Detailed surveys that included cross-sectional and longitudinal profiles and pebble counts were conducted at selected streamgages, which were distributed throughout Michigan. By use of survey data from riffle cross sections and water-surface slope, bankfull discharge was estimated and compared to flood-recurrence intervals using regional flood equations. This comparison shows that bankfull discharges in Michigan recur more frequently than every 2 years. Regional hydraulic geometry curves were developed rather than statewide curves owing to large differences in factors that control channel geometry across the State. However, after the data were subdivided according to ecoregions, it was determined that there were enough data to delineate regional hydraulic geometry curves only for the Southern Lower Michigan Ecoregion. For this ecoregion, geometry curve equations and their coefficients of determination are: Width = 8.19 x DA0.44; R2 = 0.69, Depth = 0.67 x DA0.27; R2 = 0.28, Area = 4.38 x DA0.74; R2 = 0.59, where DA is the drainage area and R2 is the coefficient of determination. By use of discharge estimates for the Southern Lower Michigan

  19. Digital electrospray for controlled deposition.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiwei; Waits, C Mike; Gomez, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    Many novel functional structures are now fabricated by controlled deposition as a maskless, bottom-up fabrication technique. These applications require rapid and precise deposition of minute amounts of solutions/suspensions or their ultimate particle products in predefined patterns. The electrospray is a promising alternative to the commonly used inkjet printing because it can easily handle highly viscous liquid, avoid high shear rates, and has low risk of clogging. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept digital electrospray. This system consists of a 61-nozzle array microfabricated in silicon and a 61-element digital extractor fabricated using flexible polyimide substrates. "Digital" refers to the state of each electrospray source that can be tuned either on or off independently and responsively. We showed a resolution of 675 mum and a response frequency up to 100 Hz. With similar design and industry standard fabrication procedures, it is feasible to scale up the system to O(1000) sources with spatial resolution better than 250 mum and a O(kHz) response frequency. The latter is controlled by the viscous damping time.

  20. Correlation of free-response and receiver-operating-characteristic area-under-the-curve estimates: Results from independently conducted FROC/ROC studies in mammography

    PubMed Central

    Zanca, Federica; Hillis, Stephen L.; Claus, Filip; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Celis, Valerie; Provoost, Veerle; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: From independently conducted free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiments, to study fixed-reader associations between three estimators: the area under the alternative FROC (AFROC) curve computed from FROC data, the area under the ROC curve computed from FROC highest rating data, and the area under the ROC curve computed from confidence-of-disease ratings. Methods: Two hundred mammograms, 100 of which were abnormal, were processed by two image-processing algorithms and interpreted by four radiologists under the FROC paradigm. From the FROC data, inferred-ROC data were derived, using the highest rating assumption. Eighteen months afterwards, the images were interpreted by the same radiologists under the conventional ROC paradigm; conventional-ROC data (in contrast to inferred-ROC data) were obtained. FROC and ROC (inferred, conventional) data were analyzed using the nonparametric area-under-the-curve (AUC), (AFROC and ROC curve, respectively). Pearson correlation was used to quantify the degree of association between the modality-specific AUC indices and standard errors were computed using the bootstrap-after-bootstrap method. The magnitude of the correlations was assessed by comparison with computed Obuchowski-Rockette fixed reader correlations. Results: Average Pearson correlations (with 95% confidence intervals in square brackets) were: Corr(FROC, inferred ROC) = 0.76[0.64, 0.84] > Corr(inferred ROC, conventional ROC) = 0.40[0.18, 0.58] > Corr (FROC, conventional ROC) = 0.32[0.16, 0.46]. Conclusions: Correlation between FROC and inferred-ROC data AUC estimates was high. Correlation between inferred- and conventional-ROC AUC was similar to the correlation between two modalities for a single reader using one estimation method, suggesting that the highest rating assumption might be questionable. PMID:23039631

  1. Correlation of free-response and receiver-operating-characteristic area-under-the-curve estimates: Results from independently conducted FROC/ROC studies in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, Federica; Hillis, Stephen L.; Claus, Filip; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Celis, Valerie; Provoost, Veerle; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: From independently conducted free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiments, to study fixed-reader associations between three estimators: the area under the alternative FROC (AFROC) curve computed from FROC data, the area under the ROC curve computed from FROC highest rating data, and the area under the ROC curve computed from confidence-of-disease ratings. Methods: Two hundred mammograms, 100 of which were abnormal, were processed by two image-processing algorithms and interpreted by four radiologists under the FROC paradigm. From the FROC data, inferred-ROC data were derived, using the highest rating assumption. Eighteen months afterwards, the images were interpreted by the same radiologists under the conventional ROC paradigm; conventional-ROC data (in contrast to inferred-ROC data) were obtained. FROC and ROC (inferred, conventional) data were analyzed using the nonparametric area-under-the-curve (AUC), (AFROC and ROC curve, respectively). Pearson correlation was used to quantify the degree of association between the modality-specific AUC indices and standard errors were computed using the bootstrap-after-bootstrap method. The magnitude of the correlations was assessed by comparison with computed Obuchowski-Rockette fixed reader correlations. Results: Average Pearson correlations (with 95% confidence intervals in square brackets) were: Corr(FROC, inferred ROC) = 0.76[0.64, 0.84] > Corr(inferred ROC, conventional ROC) = 0.40[0.18, 0.58] > Corr (FROC, conventional ROC) = 0.32[0.16, 0.46]. Conclusions: Correlation between FROC and inferred-ROC data AUC estimates was high. Correlation between inferred- and conventional-ROC AUC was similar to the correlation between two modalities for a single reader using one estimation method, suggesting that the highest rating assumption might be questionable.

  2. Quantitative mass spectrometry imaging of emtricitabine in cervical tissue model using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization

    PubMed Central

    Bokhart, Mark T.; Rosen, Elias; Thompson, Corbin; Sykes, Craig; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Muddiman, David C.

    2015-01-01

    A quantitative mass spectrometry imaging (QMSI) technique using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) is demonstrated for the antiretroviral (ARV) drug emtricitabine in incubated human cervical tissue. Method development of the QMSI technique leads to a gain in sensitivity and removal of interferences for several ARV drugs. Analyte response was significantly improved by a detailed evaluation of several cationization agents. Increased sensitivity and removal of an isobaric interference was demonstrated with sodium chloride in the electrospray solvent. Voxel-to-voxel variability was improved for the MSI experiments by normalizing analyte abundance to a uniformly applied compound with similar characteristics to the drug of interest. Finally, emtricitabine was quantified in tissue with a calibration curve generated from the stable isotope-labeled analog of emtricitabine followed by cross-validation using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The quantitative IR-MALDESI analysis proved to be reproducible with an emtricitabine concentration of 17.2±1.8 μg/gtissue. This amount corresponds to the detection of 7 fmol/voxel in the IR-MALDESI QMSI experiment. Adjacent tissue slices were analyzed using LC-MS/MS which resulted in an emtricitabine concentration of 28.4±2.8 μg/gtissue. PMID:25318460

  3. Quantitative mass spectrometry imaging of emtricitabine in cervical tissue model using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Bokhart, Mark T; Rosen, Elias; Thompson, Corbin; Sykes, Craig; Kashuba, Angela D M; Muddiman, David C

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative mass spectrometry imaging (QMSI) technique using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) is demonstrated for the antiretroviral (ARV) drug emtricitabine in incubated human cervical tissue. Method development of the QMSI technique leads to a gain in sensitivity and removal of interferences for several ARV drugs. Analyte response was significantly improved by a detailed evaluation of several cationization agents. Increased sensitivity and removal of an isobaric interference was demonstrated with sodium chloride in the electrospray solvent. Voxel-to-voxel variability was improved for the MSI experiments by normalizing analyte abundance to a uniformly applied compound with similar characteristics to the drug of interest. Finally, emtricitabine was quantified in tissue with a calibration curve generated from the stable isotope-labeled analog of emtricitabine followed by cross-validation using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The quantitative IR-MALDESI analysis proved to be reproducible with an emtricitabine concentration of 17.2 ± 1.8 μg/gtissue. This amount corresponds to the detection of 7 fmol/voxel in the IR-MALDESI QMSI experiment. Adjacent tissue slices were analyzed using LC-MS/MS which resulted in an emtricitabine concentration of 28.4 ± 2.8 μg/gtissue.

  4. Electrosprayed polyaniline as cathode material for lithium secondary batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, James; Raghavan, Prasanth; Shin, Chorong; Heo, Min-Yeong; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Noh, Jung-Pil; Cho, Gyu-Bong; Ryu, Ho-Suk; Ahn, Hyo-Jun

    2010-03-15

    Doped polyaniline with LiPF{sub 6} is electrosprayed onto aluminum foil using electrospinning technique, and evaluated as cathode active material for application in room-temperature lithium batteries. Doping level is characterized using FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy. In FTIR Spectra, characteristic peaks of PANI are shifted to lower bands as a result of doping which indicates the effectiveness of doping. Doping level is also confirmed by UV-vis spectra. Surface morphology of the cathode is studied using scanning electron microscope. Electrochemical evaluation of the cell using electrosprayed PANI as cathode show good cycling properties. The cell delivers a high discharge value of 142.5 mAh/g which is about 100% of theoretical capacity, and the capacity is lowered during cycle and reached 61% of theoretical capacity after 50 cycles. The cell delivers a stable but lower discharge capacity at higher C-rates.

  5. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for classification of 18F-NaF uptake on PET/CT*

    PubMed Central

    Valadares, Agnes Araujo; Duarte, Paulo Schiavom; Carvalho, Giovanna; Ono, Carla Rachel; Coura-Filho, George Barberio; Sado, Heitor Naoki; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the cutoff values established by ROC curves to classify 18F-NaF uptake as normal or malignant. Materials and Methods PET/CT images were acquired 1 hour after administration of 185 MBq of 18F-NaF. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were drawn on three regions of the skeleton as follows: proximal right humerus diaphysis (HD), proximal right femoral diaphysis (FD) and first vertebral body (VB1), in a total of 254 patients, totalling 762 VOIs. The uptake in the VOIs was classified as normal or malignant on the basis of the radiopharmaceutical distribution pattern and of the CT images. A total of 675 volumes were classified as normal and 52 were classified as malignant. Thirty-five VOIs classified as indeterminate or nonmalignant lesions were excluded from analysis. The standardized uptake value (SUV) measured on the VOIs were plotted on an ROC curve for each one of the three regions. The area under the ROC (AUC) as well as the best cutoff SUVs to classify the VOIs were calculated. The best cutoff values were established as the ones with higher result of the sum of sensitivity and specificity. Results The AUCs were 0.933, 0.889 and 0.975 for UD, FD and VB1, respectively. The best SUV cutoffs were 9.0 (sensitivity: 73%; specificity: 99%), 8.4 (sensitivity: 79%; specificity: 94%) and 21.0 (sensitivity: 93%; specificity: 95%) for UD, FD and VB1, respectively. Conclusion The best cutoff value varies according to bone region of analysis and it is not possible to establish one value for the whole body. PMID:26929455

  6. Confidence Intervals for the Probability of Superiority Effect Size Measure and the Area under a Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruscio, John; Mullen, Tara

    2012-01-01

    It is good scientific practice to the report an appropriate estimate of effect size and a confidence interval (CI) to indicate the precision with which a population effect was estimated. For comparisons of 2 independent groups, a probability-based effect size estimator (A) that is equal to the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve…

  7. Electrospray Ionization on Solid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    So, Pui-Kin; Hu, Bin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Development of electrospray ionization on solid substrates (solid-substrate ESI) avoids the clogging problem encountered in conventional capillary-based ESI, allows more convenient sampling and permits new applications. So far, solid-substrate ESI with various materials, e.g., metals, paper, wood, fibers and biological tissue, has been developed, and applications ranging from analysis of pure compounds to complex mixtures as well as in vivo study were demonstrated. Particularly, the capability of solid-substrate ESI in direct analysis of complex samples, e.g., biological fluids and foods, has significantly facilitated mass spectrometric analysis in real-life applications and led to increasingly important roles of these techniques nowadays. In this review, various solid-substrate ESI techniques and their applications are summarized and the prospects in this field are discussed. PMID:26819900

  8. Detectability of Planetary Characteristics in Disk-Averaged Spectra II: Synthetic Spectra and Light-Curves of Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Kiang, Nancy Y.; Kahn, Brian H.; Fishbein, Evan; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Turnbull, Margaret

    2006-12-01

    Spatially and spectrally resolved models were used to explore the observational sensitivity to changes in atmospheric and surface properties and the detectability of surface biosignatures in the globally averaged spectra and light-curves of the Earth. Compared with previous efforts to characterize the Earth using disk-averaged models, a more comprehensive and realistic treatment of the surface and atmosphere was taken into account here. Our results are presented as a function of viewing geometry and phases at both visible/near-infrared (0.5-1.7 µm) and mid-infrared (5-25 µm) wavelength ranges, applicable to the proposed NASA-Terrestrial Planet Finder visible coronagraph and mid-infrared interferometer and to the ESADarwin mission architectures. Clouds can change the thermal emission by as much as 50% compared with the cloud-free case and increase the visible albedo by up to 500% for completely overcast cases at the dichotomy phase. Depending on the observed phase and their distribution and type, clouds can also significantly alter the spectral shape. Moreover, clouds impact the detectability of surface biosignatures in the visible wavelength range. Modeling the disk-averaged sensitivity to the "red-edge," a distinctive spectral signature of vegetation, showed that Earth's land vegetation could be seen in disk-averaged spectra, even with cloud cover, when the signal was averaged over the daily time scale. We found that vegetation is more readily discriminated from clouds at dichotomy (50% illumination) rather than at full phase. The detectability of phytoplankton was also explored, but was found to be more difficult to detect in the disk-average than land vegetation.

  9. Detectability of planetary characteristics in disk-averaged spectra II: synthetic spectra and light-curves of earth.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Kiang, Nancy Y; Kahn, Brian H; Bosc, Emmanuel; Fishbein, Evan; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Turnbull, Margaret

    2006-12-01

    Spatially and spectrally resolved models were used to explore the observational sensitivity to changes in atmospheric and surface properties and the detectability of surface biosignatures in the globally averaged spectra and light-curves of the Earth. Compared with previous efforts to characterize the Earth using disk-averaged models, a more comprehensive and realistic treatment of the surface and atmosphere was taken into account here. Our results are presented as a function of viewing geometry and phases at both visible/near-infrared (0.5-1.7 microm) and mid-infrared (5-25 microm) wavelength ranges, applicable to the proposed NASA-Terrestrial Planet Finder visible coronagraph and mid-infrared interferometer and to the ESADarwin mission architectures. Clouds can change the thermal emission by as much as 50% compared with the cloud-free case and increase the visible albedo by up to 500% for completely overcast cases at the dichotomy phase. Depending on the observed phase and their distribution and type, clouds can also significantly alter the spectral shape. Moreover, clouds impact the detectability of surface biosignatures in the visible wavelength range. Modeling the disk-averaged sensitivity to the "red-edge," a distinctive spectral signature of vegetation, showed that Earth's land vegetation could be seen in disk-averaged spectra, even with cloud cover, when the signal was averaged over the daily time scale. We found that vegetation is more readily discriminated from clouds at dichotomy (50% illumination) rather than at full phase. The detectability of phytoplankton was also explored, but was found to be more difficult to detect in the disk-average than land vegetation.

  10. The influence of electrospray ion source design on matrix effects.

    PubMed

    Stahnke, Helen; Kittlaus, Stefan; Kempe, Günther; Hemmerling, Christlieb; Alder, Lutz

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates to which extent the design of electrospray ion sources influences the susceptibility to matrix effects (MEs) in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). For this purpose, MEs were measured under comparable conditions (identical sample extracts, identical LC column, same chromatographic method and always positive ion mode) on four LC-MS/MS instrument platforms. The instruments were combined with five electrospray ion sources, viz. Turbo Ion Spray, Turbo V(TM) Source, Standard ESI, Jet Stream ESI and Standard Z-Spray Source. The comparison of MEs could be made at all retention times because the method of permanent postcolumn infusion was applied. The MEs ascertained for 45 pesticides showed for each electrospray ion source the same pattern, i.e. the same number of characteristic signal suppressions at equivalent retention times in the chromatogram. The Turbo Ion Spray (off-axis geometry), Turbo V(TM) Source (orthogonal geometry) and the Standard Z-Spray Source (double orthogonal geometry) did not differ much in their susceptibility to MEs. The Jet Stream ESI (orthogonal geometry) reaches a higher sensitivity by an additional heated sheath gas, but suffers at the same time from significantly stronger signal suppressions than the comparable Standard ESI (orthogonal geometry) without sheath gas. No relation between source geometry and extent of signal suppression was found in this study.

  11. Electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry: principles and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ho, C S; Lam, C W K; Chan, M H M; Cheung, R C K; Law, L K; Lit, L C W; Ng, K F; Suen, M W M; Tai, H L

    2003-01-01

    This mini-review provides a general understanding of electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) which has become an increasingly important technique in the clinical laboratory for structural study or quantitative measurement of metabolites in a complex biological sample. The first part of the review explains the electrospray ionisation process, design of mass spectrometers with separation capability, characteristics of the mass spectrum, and practical considerations in quantitative analysis. The second part then focuses on some clinical applications. The capability of ESI-tandem-MS in measuring bio-molecules sharing similar molecular structures makes it particularly useful in screening for inborn errors of amino acid, fatty acid, purine, pyrimidine metabolism and diagnosis of galactosaemia and peroxisomal disorders. Electrospray ionisation is also efficient in generating cluster ions for structural elucidation of macromolecules. This has fostered a new and improved approach (vs electrophoresis) for identification and quantification of haemoglobin variants. With the understanding of glycohaemoglobin structure, an IFCC reference method for glycohaemoglobin assay has been established using ESI-MS. It represents a significant advancement for the standardisation of HbA1c in diabetic monitoring. With its other applications such as in therapeutic drug monitoring, ESI-MS will continue to exert an important influence in the future development and organisation of the clinical laboratory service.

  12. Charge and Size Distributions of Electrospray Drops

    PubMed

    de Juan L; de la Mora JF

    1997-02-15

    The distributions of charge q and diameter d of drops emitted from electrified liquid cones in the cone-jet mode are investigated with two aerosol instruments. A differential mobility analyzer (DMA, Vienna type) first samples the spray drops, selects those with electrical mobilities within a narrow band, and either measures the associated current or passes them to a second instrument. The drops may also be individually counted optically and sized by sampling them into an aerodynamic size spectrometer (API's Aerosizer). For a given cone-jet, the distribution of charge q for the main electrospray drops is some 2.5 times broader than their distribution of diameters d, with qmax/qmin approximately 4. But mobility-selected drops have relative standard deviations of only 5% for both d and q, showing that the support of the (q, d) distribution is a narrow band centered around a curve q(d). The approximate one-dimensionality of this support region is explained through the mechanism of jet breakup, which is a random process with only one degree of freedom: the wavelength of axial modulation of the jet. The observed near constancy of the charge over volume ratio (q approximately d3) shows that the charge is frozen in the liquid surface at the time scale of the breakup process. The charge over volume ratio of the primary drops varies between 98 and 55% of the ratio of spray current I over liquid flow rate Q, and decreases at increasing Q. I/Q is therefore an unreliable measure of the charge density of these drops.

  13. Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry

    DOEpatents

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-07-30

    An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

  14. Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry

    DOEpatents

    Kertesz, Vilmos [Knoxville, TN; Van Berkel, Gary [Clinton, TN

    2011-08-23

    An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

  15. Virtual screening workflow development guided by the "receiver operating characteristic" curve approach. Application to high-throughput docking on metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4.

    PubMed

    Triballeau, Nicolas; Acher, Francine; Brabet, Isabelle; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier

    2005-04-01

    The "receiver operating characteristic" (ROC) curve method is a well-recognized metric used as an objective way to evaluate the ability of a given test to discriminate between two populations. This facilitates decision-making in a plethora of fields in which a wrong judgment may have serious consequences including clinical diagnosis, public safety, travel security, and economic strategies. When virtual screening is used to speed-up the drug discovery process in pharmaceutical research, taking the right decision upon selecting or discarding a molecule prior to in vitro evaluation is of paramount importance. Characterizing both the ability of a virtual screening workflow to select active molecules and the ability to discard inactive ones, the ROC curve approach is well suited for this critical decision gate. As a case study, the first virtual screening workflow focused on metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGlu4R) agonists is reported here. Six compounds out of 38 selected and tested in vitro were shown to have agonist activity on this target of therapeutic interest.

  16. Building damage characteristics based on surveyed data and fragility curves of the 2011 Great East Japan tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppasri, A.; Mas, E.; Charvet, I.; Gunasekera, R.; Imai, K.; Fukutani, Y.; Abe, Y.; Imamura, F.

    2012-12-01

    A large amount of buildings was damaged or destroyed by the 2011 Great East Japan tsunami. Numerous field surveys were conducted in order to collect the tsunami inundation and building damage data in the affected areas. Therefore, this event provides us with one of the most complete datasets amongst tsunami events in history. In this study, fragility function are derived using data provided by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation of Japan (MLIT), with more than 250,000 surveyed structures. The dataset have details on damage level, structural material, number of stories per building and location (town). This informtaion is crucial to the understanding of the causes of building damage, as differences in structural characteristics and building location can be taken into account in the damage probability analysis. Firstly, the results show a resistant performance of RC (reinforced concrete) and steel buildings over wood or brick buildings, which is consistent with previous studies. For example, the probability that a 2 m inundation depth damages RC, steel, brick and wood buildings as level 5 (collapsed and washed away) is approximately 0.1, 0.2, 0.25 and 0.45 respectively. While all (100%) of wood buildings and most lightweight buildings were washed away when the inundation depth was greater than 10 m, only 50% or less were washed away for steel and RC structures. Secondly, three (or more) storey buildings were much stronger than one or two storey buildings. For both RC and wood structures, there are no major differences in damage probability between one and two-storey buildings; whereas the damage probability is significantly lower for multistorey structures (3 storeys or more). Finally, the effects of coastal topography on damage probability are also discussed here. At the same tsunami inundation depth, buildings along the Sanriku ria coast suffered greater damage than buildings from the plain coast in Miyagi prefecture. For example in Ishinomaki

  17. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the rocking curves measured for MoK{sub α} X-ray characteristic lines in the double-crystal nondispersive scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenkov, N. V. Chukhovskii, F. N.; Blagov, A. E.

    2015-03-15

    The rocking curves (RCs) for MoK{sub α1} and MoK{sub α2} characteristic X-ray lines have been experimentally and theoretically studied in the nondispersive scheme of an X-ray double-crystal TPC-K diffractometer. The results of measurements and theoretical calculations of double-crystal RCs for characteristic X-rays from tubes with a molybdenum anode and different widths of slits show that a decrease in the slit width leads to an increase in the relative contribution of the MoK{sub α2}-line RC in comparison with the intensity of the tails of the MoK{sub α1}-line RC. It is shown that the second peak of the MoK{sub α2} line becomes increasingly pronounced in the tail of the MoK{sub α1}-line RC with a decrease in the slit width. Two plane-parallel Si plates (input faces (110), diffraction vector h 〈220〉) were used as a monochromator crystal and a sample. The results of measuring double-crystal RCs are in good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  18. Production and properties of electrosprayed sericin nanopowder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazeri, Najmeh; Tavanai, Hossein; Moradi, Ali Reza

    2012-06-01

    Sericin is a proteinous substrate that envelops fibroin (silk) fiber, and its recovery provides significant economical and social benefits. Sericin is an antibacterial agent that resists oxidation and absorbs moisture and UV light. In powder form, sericin has a wide range of applications in food, cosmetics and drug delivery. Asides from other techniques of producing powder, such as precipitation and spray drying, electrospraying can yield solid nanoparticles, particularly in the submicron range. Here, we report the production of sericin nanopowder by electrospraying. Sericin sponge was recovered from Bombyx mori cocoons through a high-temperature, high-pressure process, followed by centrifugation and freeze drying of the sericin solution. The electrospraying solution was prepared by dissolving the sericin sponge in dimethyl sulfoxide. We demonstrate that electrospraying is capable of producing sericin nanopowder with an average particle size of 25 nm, which is by far smaller than the particles produced by other techniques. The electrosprayed sericin nanopowder consists of small crystallites and exhibits a high moisture absorbance.

  19. Task-based detectability comparison of exponential transformation of free-response operating characteristic (EFROC) curve and channelized Hotelling observer (CHO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khobragade, P.; Fan, Jiahua; Rupcich, Franco; Crotty, Dominic J.; Gilat Schmidt, Taly

    2016-03-01

    This study quantitatively evaluated the performance of the exponential transformation of the free-response operating characteristic curve (EFROC) metric, with the Channelized Hotelling Observer (CHO) as a reference. The CHO has been used for image quality assessment of reconstruction algorithms and imaging systems and often it is applied to study the signal-location-known cases. The CHO also requires a large set of images to estimate the covariance matrix. In terms of clinical applications, this assumption and requirement may be unrealistic. The newly developed location-unknown EFROC detectability metric is estimated from the confidence scores reported by a model observer. Unlike the CHO, EFROC does not require a channelization step and is a non-parametric detectability metric. There are few quantitative studies available on application of the EFROC metric, most of which are based on simulation data. This study investigated the EFROC metric using experimental CT data. A phantom with four low contrast objects: 3mm (14 HU), 5mm (7HU), 7mm (5 HU) and 10 mm (3 HU) was scanned at dose levels ranging from 25 mAs to 270 mAs and reconstructed using filtered backprojection. The area under the curve values for CHO (AUC) and EFROC (AFE) were plotted with respect to different dose levels. The number of images required to estimate the non-parametric AFE metric was calculated for varying tasks and found to be less than the number of images required for parametric CHO estimation. The AFE metric was found to be more sensitive to changes in dose than the CHO metric. This increased sensitivity and the assumption of unknown signal location may be useful for investigating and optimizing CT imaging methods. Future work is required to validate the AFE metric against human observers.

  20. Growth curves and age-related changes in carcass characteristics, organs, serum parameters, and intestinal transporter gene expression in domestic pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Gao, C Q; Yang, J X; Chen, M X; Yan, H C; Wang, X Q

    2016-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to fit growth curves, and determine age-related changes in carcass characteristics, organs, serum biochemical parameters, and gene expression of intestinal nutrient transporters in domestic pigeon (Columba livia). In experiment 1, body weight (BW) of 30 pigeons was respectively determined at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days old to fit growth curves and to describe the growth of pigeons. In experiment 2, eighty-four 1-day-old squabs were grouped by weight into 7 groups. On d 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35, twelve birds from each group were randomly selected for slaughter and post-slaughter analysis. The results showed that BW of pigeons increased rapidly from d 1 to d 28 (a 25.7-fold increase), and then had little change until d 35. The Logistic, Gompertz, and Von Bertalanffy functions can all be well fitted with the growth curve of domestic pigeons (R2>0.90) and the Gompertz model showed the highest R2value among the models (R2=0.9997). The equation of Gompertz model was Y=507.72×e-(3.76exp(-0.17t))(Y=BW of pigeon (g); t=time (day)). In addition, breast meat yield (%) increased with age throughout the experiment, whereas the leg meat yield (%) reached to the peak on d 14. Serum total protein, albumin, globulin, and glucose concentration were increased with age, whereas serum uric acid concentration was decreased (P<0.05). Furthermore, the gene expressions of nutrient transporters (y+LAT2, LAT1, B0AT1, PepT1, and NHE2) in jejunum of pigeon were increased with age. The results of correlation analysis showed the gene expressions of B0AT1, PepT1, and NHE2 had positive correlations with BW (0.73

  1. Impact of molecular weight on the formation of electrosprayed chitosan microcapsules as delivery vehicles for bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Mascaraque, Laura G; Sanchez, Gloria; López-Rubio, Amparo

    2016-10-01

    The molecular weight of chitosan is one of its most determinant characteristics, which affects its processability and its performance as a biomaterial. However, information about the effect of this parameter on the formation of electrosprayed chitosan microcapsules is scarce. In this work, the impact of chitosan molecular weight on its electrosprayability was studied and correlated with its effect on the viscosity, surface tension and electrical conductivity of solutions. A Discriminant Function Analysis revealed that the morphology of the electrosprayed chitosan materials could be correctly predicted using these three parameters for almost 85% of the samples. The suitability of using electrosprayed chitosan capsules as carriers for bioactive agents was also assessed by loading them with a model active compound, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). This encapsulation, with an estimated efficiency of around 80% in terms of preserved antioxidant activity, showed the potential to prolong the antiviral activity of EGCG against murine norovirus via gradual bioactive release combined with its protection against degradation in simulated physiological conditions.

  2. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  3. Bacterial spores survive electrospray charging and desolvation.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Sara N; Austin, Daniel E

    2014-05-01

    The survivability of Bacillus subtilis spores and vegetative Escherichia coli cells after electrospray from aqueous suspension was tested using mobility experiments at atmospheric pressure. E. coli did not survive electrospray charging and desolvation, but B. subtilis did. Experimental conditions ensured that any surviving bacteria were de-agglomerated, desolvated, and electrically charged. Based on mobility measurements, B. subtilis spores survived even with 2,000-20,000 positive charges. B. subtilis was also found to survive introduction into vacuum after either positive or negative electrospray. Attempts to measure the charge distribution of viable B. subtilis spores using electrostatic deflection in vacuum were inconclusive; however, viable spores with low charge states (less than 42 positive or less than 26 negative charges) were observed.

  4. Surface tension effects on submerged electrosprays

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Álvaro G.; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Barrero, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Electrosprays are a powerful technique to generate charged micro/nanodroplets. In the last century, the technique has been extensively studied, developed, and recognized with a shared Nobel price in Chemistry in 2002 for its wide spread application in mass spectrometry. However, nowadays techniques based on microfluidic devices are competing to be the next generation in atomization techniques. Therefore, an interesting development would be to integrate the electrospray technique into a microfluidic liquid-liquid device. Several works in the literature have attempted to build a microfluidic electrospray with disputable results. The main problem for its integration is the lack of knowledge of the working parameters of the liquid-liquid electrospray. The “submerged electrosprays” share similar properties as their counterparts in air. However, in the microfluidic generation of micro/nanodroplets, the liquid-liquid interfaces are normally stabilized with surface active agents, which might have critical effects on the electrospray behavior. In this work, we review the main properties of the submerged electrosprays in liquid baths with no surfactant, and we methodically study the behavior of the system for increasing surfactant concentrations. The different regimes found are then analyzed and compared with both classical and more recent experimental, theoretical and numerical studies. A very rich phenomenology is found when the surface tension is allowed to vary in the system. More concretely, the lower states of electrification achieved with the reduced surface tension regimes might be of interest in biological or biomedical applications in which excessive electrification can be hazardous for the encapsulated entities. PMID:24155865

  5. Bradford Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of informetric distributions shows that generalized Leimkuhler functions give proper fits to a large variety of Bradford curves, including those exhibiting a Groos droop or a rising tail. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to test goodness of fit, and least-square fits are compared with Egghe's method. (Contains 53 references.) (LRW)

  6. Evaluating and comparing biomarkers with respect to the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve in two-phase case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Two-phase sampling design, where biomarkers are subsampled from a phase-one cohort sample representative of the target population, has become the gold standard in biomarker evaluation. Many two-phase case-control studies involve biased sampling of cases and/or controls in the second phase. For example, controls are often frequency-matched to cases with respect to other covariates. Ignoring biased sampling of cases and/or controls can lead to biased inference regarding biomarkers' classification accuracy. Considering the problems of estimating and comparing the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) for a binary disease outcome, the impact of biased sampling of cases and/or controls on inference and the strategy to efficiently account for the sampling scheme have not been well studied. In this project, we investigate the inverse-probability-weighted method to adjust for biased sampling in estimating and comparing AUC. Asymptotic properties of the estimator and its inference procedure are developed for both Bernoulli sampling and finite-population stratified sampling. In simulation studies, the weighted estimators provide valid inference for estimation and hypothesis testing, while the standard empirical estimators can generate invalid inference. We demonstrate the use of the analytical variance formula for optimizing sampling schemes in biomarker study design and the application of the proposed AUC estimators to examples in HIV vaccine research and prostate cancer research.

  7. Perspective Biological Markers for Autism Spectrum Disorders: Advantages of the Use of Receiver Operating Characteristic Curves in Evaluating Marker Sensitivity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders. Recognized causes of ASD include genetic factors, metabolic diseases, toxic and environmental factors, and a combination of these. Available tests fail to recognize genetic abnormalities in about 70% of ASD children, where diagnosis is solely based on behavioral signs and symptoms, which are difficult to evaluate in very young children. Although it is advisable that specific psychotherapeutic and pedagogic interventions are initiated as early as possible, early diagnosis is hampered by the lack of nongenetic specific biological markers. In the past ten years, the scientific literature has reported dozens of neurophysiological and biochemical alterations in ASD children; however no real biomarker has emerged. Such literature is here reviewed in the light of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis, a very valuable statistical tool, which evaluates the sensitivity and the specificity of biomarkers to be used in diagnostic decision making. We also apply ROC analysis to some of our previously published data and discuss the increased diagnostic value of combining more variables in one ROC curve analysis. We also discuss the use of biomarkers as a tool for advancing our understanding of nonsyndromic ASD. PMID:26648598

  8. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.; Barinaga, Charles J.

    1995-01-01

    An improvement to the system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample that comprises improvements to an electrospray ionization source for interfacing to mass spectrometers and other detection devices. The improvement consists of establishing a unique electrical circuit pattern and nozzle configuration, a metallic coated and conical shaped capillary outlet, coupled with sizing of the capillary to obtain maximum sensitivity.

  9. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.; Barinaga, C.J.

    1995-06-13

    An improvement to the system and method is disclosed for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample that comprises improvements to an electrospray ionization source for interfacing to mass spectrometers and other detection devices. The improvement consists of establishing a unique electrical circuit pattern and nozzle configuration, a metallic coated and conical shaped capillary outlet, coupled with sizing of the capillary to obtain maximum sensitivity. 10 figs.

  10. Electrospray ionization of volatiles in breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Lozano, P.; de La Mora, J. Fernández

    2007-08-01

    Recent work by Zenobi and colleagues [H. Chen, A. Wortmann, W. Zhang, R. Zenobi, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 46 (2007) 580] reports that human breath charged by contact with an electrospray (ES) cloud yields many mass peaks of species such as urea, glucose, and other ions, some with molecular weights above 1000 Da. All these species are presumed to be involatile, and to originate from breath aerosols by so-called extractive electrospray ionization EESI [H. Chen, A. Venter, R.G. Cooks, Chem. Commun. (2006) 2042]. However, prior work by Fenn and colleagues [C.M. Whitehouse, F. Levin, C.K. Meng, J.B. Fenn, Proceedings of the 34th ASMS Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics, Denver, 1986 p. 507; S. Fuerstenau, P. Kiselev, J.B. Fenn, Proceedings of the 47th ASMS Conference on Mass Spectrometry, 1999, Dallas, TX, 1999] and by Hill and colleagues [C. Wu, W.F. Siems, H.H. Hill Jr., Anal. Chem. 72 (2000) 396] have reported the ability of electrospray drops to ionize a variety of low vapor pressure substances directly from the gas phase, without an apparent need for the vapor to be brought into the charging ES in aerosol form. The Ph.D. Thesis of Martínez-Lozano [P. Martínez-Lozano Sinués, Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Thermal and Fluid Engineering, University Carlos III of Madrid; April 5, 2006 (in Spanish); http://hdl.handle.net/10016/655] had also previously argued that the numerous human breath species observed via a similar ES ionization approach were in fact ionized directly from the vapor. Here, we observe that passage of the breath stream through a submicron filter does not eliminate the majority of the breath vapors seen in the absence of the filter. We conclude that direct vapor charging is the leading mechanism in breath ionization by electrospray drops, though aerosol ionization may also play a role.

  11. Colloidal crystals by electrospraying polystyrene nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This work introduces the electrospray technique as a suitable option to fabricate large-scale colloidal nanostructures, including colloidal crystals, in just a few minutes. It is shown that by changing the deposition conditions, different metamaterials can be fabricated: from scattered monolayers of polystyrene nanospheres to self-assembled three-dimensional ordered nanolayers having colloidal crystal properties. The electrospray technique overcomes the main problems encountered by top-down fabrication approaches, largely simplifying the experimental setup. Polystyrene nanospheres, with 360-nm diameter, were typically electrosprayed using off-the-shelf nanofluids. Several parameters of the setup and deposition conditions were explored, namely the distance between electrodes, nanofluid conductivity, applied voltage, and deposition rate. Layers thicker than 20 μm and area of 1 cm2 were typically produced, showing several domains of tens of microns wide with dislocations in between, but no cracks. The applied voltage was in the range of 10 kV, and the conductivity of the colloidal solution was in the range of 3 to 4 mS. Besides the morphology of the layers, the quality was also assessed by means of optical reflectance measurements showing an 80% reflectivity peak in the vicinity of 950-nm wavelength. PMID:23311494

  12. Modeling Electrospray Deposition of Nanoparticle Inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ao; Fideles da Silva, Jefferson; Yong, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Electrospray of nanoparticle inks is of great importance to the manufacturing of functional materials. In this study, we develop a new three-dimensional multiphysics method to model the electrospray of colloidal suspension to a flat substrate. The Lagrangian Particle Tracking (LPT) transport equation is coupled to mass and heat transfer using convective droplet vaporization model, which allow us to track each particle-laden ink droplets and dry nanoparticles in the electrospray plume and probe the deposit structures. Herein, we consider dilute inks that are experimentally relevant, assuming monodisperse nanoparticles. We characterize the overall statistics of the plume and the dynamics of individual ink droplet or dry nanoparticle. It is shown that the segregation effect affects not only primary and satellite droplets but also dry nanoparticles. We observe nanoparticles deposit structure changing process, in particular time evolution of the density profile along radial direction. Our results show that the region of high nanoparticle density transitioning from only the edge to both the edge and center, which agrees with previous experimental studies.

  13. Electrospray as a tool for drug micro- and nanoparticle patterning.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Elke; Dhamankar, Himanshu; Bromberg, Lev; Rutledge, Gregory C; Hatton, T Alan

    2011-06-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ) microparticles of different sizes and shapes, including spheres, q-tips, elongated spheres, and tear-shaped particles, were formed by electrospraying solutions of different CBZ concentrations. The particle characteristics were determined by the interplay between jet formation, droplet breakup, solvent evaporation, and eventual particle solidification. The average particle size increased with increasing CBZ concentration, with particles of different shapes being observed for different CBZ concentrations. The cascade of sizes and shapes observed was interpreted in terms of Rayleigh instability theory as applied to charged jets and droplets, with the final sizes depending upon the time needed to evaporate the solvent sufficiently for CBZ to solidify; the lower the initial concentration of CBZ, the smaller the final droplets/particles that are formed. PMID:21548568

  14. A Growth Curve Analysis of the Joint Influences of Parenting Affect, Child Characteristics and Deviant Peers on Adolescent Illicit Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Paulo; Jenkins, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    This study purports that parental rejection and warmth are critical to the development of adolescent drug use, and investigates a model that also considers children's vulnerability and deviant peer affiliations. It tests mediation through the proximal risk factor of deviant peers. Poisson growth curve modeling was used to examine participants from…

  15. Transport and Deposition of Electrosprayed Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Nicholas; Chiarot, Paul

    2015-11-01

    In an electrospray, high electric potentials are utilized to generate a fine aerosol of a conductive solvent. For this study, the solvent consisted of nanoparticles dispersed in alcohol. The nanoparticle suspensions act as printable nanoparticle inks. In this process, a glass capillary tube is held as a high electric potential relative to a grounded reference plate located below the tip. Droplets are ejected from the tube and are directed towards the ground plate. If the solvent is sufficiently volatile, it will rapidly evaporate while the droplets are in flight (due to the high surface area to volume ratio) leaving behind dry, highly charged nanoparticles. The droplets/nanoparticles are deposited onto a target substrate that is place onto the grounded plate. The transport of any individual droplet/nanoparticle from the emitter tip to the target substrate is a stochastic process. This transport can be modeled using a Monte Carlo simulation. The probability of an individual particle being deposited at a given location on the target substrate is directly related to the electric potential at that location. In other words, the probability function that determines the deposition is directly related to the electric potential at the substrate. The total potential is comprised of the applied electric potential required to generate the electrospray, the induced charge on the surface of the target dielectric, and the charge on the individual particles themselves. We report on the structure of droplet/nanoparticle deposits printed using electrospray. The evolution of the deposit is investigated over time using experimental studies and Monte Carlo simulations. The deposit structure passes through four distinct regimes that are characterized by repeatable bulk features.

  16. Multi-Reader Multi-Case Studies Using the Area under the Receiver Operator Characteristic Curve as a Measure of Diagnostic Accuracy: Systematic Review with a Focus on Quality of Data Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Dendumrongsup, Thaworn; Plumb, Andrew A.; Halligan, Steve; Fanshawe, Thomas R.; Altman, Douglas G.; Mallett, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We examined the design, analysis and reporting in multi-reader multi-case (MRMC) research studies using the area under the receiver-operating curve (ROC AUC) as a measure of diagnostic performance. Methods We performed a systematic literature review from 2005 to 2013 inclusive to identify a minimum 50 studies. Articles of diagnostic test accuracy in humans were identified via their citation of key methodological articles dealing with MRMC ROC AUC. Two researchers in consensus then extracted information from primary articles relating to study characteristics and design, methods for reporting study outcomes, model fitting, model assumptions, presentation of results, and interpretation of findings. Results were summarized and presented with a descriptive analysis. Results Sixty-four full papers were retrieved from 475 identified citations and ultimately 49 articles describing 51 studies were reviewed and extracted. Radiological imaging was the index test in all. Most studies focused on lesion detection vs. characterization and used less than 10 readers. Only 6 (12%) studies trained readers in advance to use the confidence scale used to build the ROC curve. Overall, description of confidence scores, the ROC curve and its analysis was often incomplete. For example, 21 (41%) studies presented no ROC curve and only 3 (6%) described the distribution of confidence scores. Of 30 studies presenting curves, only 4 (13%) presented the data points underlying the curve, thereby allowing assessment of extrapolation. The mean change in AUC was 0.05 (−0.05 to 0.28). Non-significant change in AUC was attributed to underpowering rather than the diagnostic test failing to improve diagnostic accuracy. Conclusions Data reporting in MRMC studies using ROC AUC as an outcome measure is frequently incomplete, hampering understanding of methods and the reliability of results and study conclusions. Authors using this analysis should be encouraged to provide a full description of

  17. The electrospray: Fundamentals and combustion applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Alessandro

    1993-01-01

    Liquid fuel dispersion in practical systems is typically achieved by spraying the fuel into a polydisperse distribution of droplets evaporating and burning in a turbulent gaseous environment. In view of the nearly unsurmountable difficulties of this two-phase flow, it would be useful to use an experimental arrangement that allow a systematic study of spray evolution and burning in configurations of gradually increasing levels of complexity, starting from laminar sprays to fully turbulent ones. An Electrostatic Spray (ES) of charged droplets lends itself to this type of combustion experiments under well-defined conditions and can be used to synthesize gradually more complex spray environments. In its simplest configuration, a liquid is fed into a small metal tube maintained at several kilovolts relative to a ground electrode few centimeters away. Under the action of the electric field, the liquid meniscus at the outlet of the capillary takes a conical shape, with a thin jet emerging from the cone tip. This jet breaks up farther downstream into a fine spray of charged droplets. Several advantages distinguish the electrospray from alternative atomization techniques: the self-dispersion property of the spray due to coulombic repulsion; the absence of droplet coalescence; the potential control of the trajectories of charged droplets by suitable disposition of electrostatic fields; and the decoupling of atomization, which is strictly electrostatic, from gas flow processes. Furthermore, as recently shown in our laboratory, the electrospray can produce quasi-monodisperse droplets over a very broad size range (1-100 microns). The ultimate objective of this research project is to study the formation and burning of electrosprays of liquid fuels first in laminar regimes and then in turbulent ones. Combustion will eventually be investigated in conditions of three-dimensional droplet-droplet interaction, for which experimental studies have been limited to either qualitative

  18. Curves and Their Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Robert C.

    This volume, a reprinting of a classic first published in 1952, presents detailed discussions of 26 curves or families of curves, and 17 analytic systems of curves. For each curve the author provides a historical note, a sketch or sketches, a description of the curve, a discussion of pertinent facts, and a bibliography. Depending upon the curve,…

  19. Coaxial electrospray of microparticles and nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Leilei; Huang, Jiwei; Si, Ting; Xu, Ronald X

    2013-01-01

    Coaxial electrospray is an electrohydrodynamic process that produces multilayer microparticles and nanoparticles by introducing coaxial electrified jets. In comparison with other microencapsulation/nanoencapsulation processes, coaxial electrospray has several potential advantages such as high encapsulation efficiency, effective protection of bioactivity and uniform size distribution. However, process control in coaxial electrospray is challenged by the multiphysical nature of the process and the complex interplay of multiple design, process and material parameters. This paper reviews the previous works and the recent advances in design, modeling and control of a coaxial electrospray process. The review intends to provide general guidance for coaxial electrospray and stimulate further research and development interests in this promising microencapsulation/nanoencapsulation process. PMID:23249155

  20. Simple and double emulsions via electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrero, Antonio; Loscertales, Ignacio G.

    2005-11-01

    Generation of nanoemulsions is of great interest in medical and pharmaceutical applications; drug delivery or antiviral emulsions are typical examples. The use of electrosprays for dispersing liquids inside liquid insulator baths have been recently reported, (Barrero et al. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 272, 104, 2004). Capsules, nanotubes and coaxial nanofibers have been obtained from electrified coaxial jets (Loscertales et al. Science 295, n. 5560, 1695, 2002; J. American Chem. Soc. 126, 5376, 2004). Here we present a method for making double emulsions (both water-oil-water and o/w/o) based on the generation of compound electrosprays inside insulator liquid baths. Basically, a conducting liquid injected throughout a capillary needle is electroatomized in cone-jet mode inside a dielectric liquid bath. A third insulating liquid is injected inside the Taylor cone to form a second meniscus. Then, a steady coaxial jet, in which the insulating liquid is coated by the conducting one, develops. A double emulsion forms as a result of the jet breaking up into compound droplets electrically charged. Experimental results carried out with glycerine and different oils in a bath of heptane are reported.

  1. The thermoluminescence characteristics and the glow curves of Thulium doped silica fiber exposed to 10MV photon and 21MeV electron radiation.

    PubMed

    Alawiah, A; Alina, M S; Bauk, S; Abdul-Rashid, H A; Gieszczyk, W; Noramaliza, M N; Mahdiraji, G A; Tamchek, N; Zulkifli, M I; Bradley, D A; Marashdeh, M W

    2015-04-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves and kinetics parameters of Thulium (Tm) doped silica cylindrical fibers (CF) are presented. A linear accelerator (LINAC) was used to deliver high-energy radiation of 21MeV electrons and 10MV photons. The CFs were irradiated in the dose range of 0.2-10Gy. The experimental glow curve data was reconstructed by using WinREMS. The WinGCF software was used for the kinetic parameters evaluation. The TL sensitivity of Tm-doped silica CF is about 2 times higher as compared to pure silica CF. Tm-doped silica CF seems to be more sensitive to 21MeV electrons than to 10MV photons. Surprisingly, no supralinearity was displayed and a sub-linear response of Tm-doped silica CF was observed within the analyzed dose range for both 21MeV electrons and 10MV photons. The Tm-doped silica CF glow curve consists of 5 individual glow peaks. The Ea of peak 4 and peak 5 was highly dependent on dose when irradiated with photons. We also noticed that the electron radiation (21MeV) caused a shift of glow peak by 7-13°C to the higher temperature region compared with photons radiation (10MV). Our Tm-doped fibers seem to give high TL response after 21MeV electrons, which gives around 2 times higher peak integral as compared with 10MV photon radiation. We concluded that peak 4 is the first-order kinetic peak and can be used as the main dosimetric peak of Tm-doped silica CF.

  2. An experimental study of pilots' control characteristics for flight of an STOL aircraft in backside of drag curve at approach and landing.

    PubMed

    Ema, T

    1992-01-01

    In general, most vehicles can be modelled by a multi-variable system which has interactive variables. It can be clearly shown that there is an interactive response in an aircraft's velocity and altitude obtained by stick control and/or throttle control. In particular, if the flight conditions fall to backside of drag curve in the flight of an STOL aircraft at approach and landing then the ratio of drag variation to velocity change has a negative value (delta D/delta u less than 0) and the system of motion presents a non-minimum phase. Therefore, the interaction between velocity and altitude response becomes so complicated that it affects to pilot's control actions and it may be difficult to control the STOL aircraft at approach and landing. In this paper, experimental results of a pilot's ability to control the STOL aircraft are presented for a multi-variable manual control system using a fixed ground base simulator and the pilot's control ability is discussed for the flight of an STOL aircraft at backside of drag curve at approach and landing.

  3. The effect of electrospray solvent composition on desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) efficiency and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Green, F M; Salter, T L; Gilmore, I S; Stokes, P; O'Connor, G

    2010-04-01

    In desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) the interaction between the electrospray and the surface is key to two important analytical parameters, the spatial resolution and the sensitivity. We evaluate the effect of the electrospray solvent type, organic solvent fraction with water, analyte solubility and substrate wettability on DESI erosion diameter and material transferral into useful ion signal. To do this five amino acids, glycine, alanine, valine, leucine and phenylalanine are prepared as thin films on three substrates, UV/ozone treated glass, glass and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Four different solvents, acetonitrile (ACN), methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and propan-2-ol (IPA), are used with organic solvent fractions with water varying from 0.1 to 1. These model systems allow the solubility or wettability to be kept constant as other parameters are varied. Additionally, comparison with electrospray ionisation (ESI) allows effects of ionisation efficiency to be determined. It is shown that the DESI efficiency is linearly dependent on the solubility (for these materials at least) and for analytes with solubilities below 1.5 g kg(-1), additional strategies may be required for DESI to be effective. We show that the DESI erosion diameter improves linearly with organic solvent fraction, with an organic solvent fraction of 0.9 instead of 0.5 leading to a 2 fold improvement. Furthermore, this leads to a 35 fold increase in DESI efficiency, defined as the molecular ion yield per unit area. It is shown that these improvements correlate with smaller droplet sizes rather than surface wetting or ionisation. PMID:20349538

  4. Nanoparticle preparation of Mefenamic acid by electrospray drying

    SciTech Connect

    Zolkepali, Nurul Karimah Bakar, Noor Fitrah Abu Anuar, Nornizar; Naim, M. Nazli; Bakar, Mohd Rushdi Abu

    2014-02-24

    Nanoparticles preparation of Mefenamic acid (MA) by using an electrospray drying method was conducted in this study. Electrospray drying is a process that uses electrostatic force to disperse a conductive liquid stream into fine charged droplets through the coulomb fission of charges in the liquid and finally dry into fine particles. Electrospray drying modes operation usually in Taylor cone jet, and it was formed by controlling applied voltage and liquid flow rate. A conductive liquid (2.77–8.55μScm{sup −1}) which is MA solution was prepared by using acetone with concentration 0.041 and 0.055 M before pumping at a flow rate of 3–6ml/h. By applying the applied voltage at 1.3–1.5 kV, Taylor cone jet mode was formed prior to the electrospray. During electrospray drying process, solvent evaporation from the droplet was occurring that leads to coulomb disruption and may generate to nanoparticles. The dried nanoparticles were collected on a grounded substrate that was placed at varying distance from the electrospray. MA particle with size range of 100–400 nm were produced by electrospray drying process. Characterization of particles by using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) show that particles formed into polymorph I.

  5. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard P.; Udseth, Harold R.; Olivares, Jose A.

    1989-01-01

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample includes: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5-100 KVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g., .+-.2-8 KVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit, or by conduction through a sheath electrode discharged in an annular sheath flow about the capillary exit.

  6. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.; Olivares, Jose A.

    1994-10-18

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample includes: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5-100 KVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g., .+-.2-8 KVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit, or by conduction through a sheath electrode discharged in an annular sheath flow about the capillary exit.

  7. Electrospray and tandem mass spectrometry in biochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, W J; Jonsson, A P; Liu, S; Rai, D K; Wang, Y

    2001-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, biological MS has changed out of all recognition. This is primarily due to the development in the 1980s of 'soft ionization' methods that permit the ionization and vaporization of large, polar, and thermally labile biomolecules. These developments in ionization mode have driven the design and manufacture of smaller and cheaper mass analysers, making the mass spectrometer a routine instrument in the biochemistry laboratory today. In the present review the revolutionary 'soft ionization' methods will be discussed with particular reference to electrospray. The mass analysis of ions will be described, and the concept of tandem MS introduced. Where appropriate, examples of the application of MS in biochemistry will be provided. Although the present review will concentrate on the MS of peptides/proteins and lipids, all classes of biomolecules can be analysed, and much excellent work has been done in the fields of carbohydrate and nucleic acid biochemistry. PMID:11311115

  8. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.; Olivares, J.A.

    1994-10-18

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample include: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5--100 kVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g.,{+-}2--8 kVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit, or by conduction through a sheath electrode discharged in an annular sheath flow about the capillary exit. 21 figs.

  9. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, R.P.; Udseth, H.R.; Olivares, J.A.

    1989-12-05

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample includes: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5--100 kVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g., [+-]2--8 kVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit, or by conduction through a sheath electrode discharged in an annular sheath flow about the capillary exit. 21 figs.

  10. Explicit superconic curves.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sunggoo

    2016-09-01

    Conics and Cartesian ovals are extremely important curves in various fields of science. In addition, aspheric curves based on conics are useful in optical design. Superconic curves, recently suggested by Greynolds, are extensions of both conics and Cartesian ovals and have been applied to optical design. However, they are not extensions of aspheric curves based on conics. In this work, we investigate another type of superconic curves. These superconic curves are extensions of not only conics and Cartesian ovals but also aspheric curves based on conics. Moreover, these are represented in explicit form, while Greynolds's superconic curves are in implicit form. PMID:27607506

  11. A research program to reduce interior noise in general aviation airplanes. Influence of depressurization and damping material on the noise reduction characteristics of flat and curved stiffened panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navaneethan, R.; Streeter, B.; Koontz, S.; Roskam, J.

    1981-01-01

    Some 20 x 20 aluminum panels were studied in a frequency range from 20 Hz to 5000 Hz. The noise sources used were a swept sine wave generator and a random noise generator. The effect of noise source was found to be negligible. Increasing the pressure differential across the panel gave better noise reduction below the fundamental resonance frequency due to an increase in stiffness. The largest increase occurred in the first 1 psi pressure differential. The curved, stiffened panel exhibited similar behavior, but with a lower increase of low frequency noise reduction. Depressurization on these panels resulted in decreased noise reduction at higher frequencies. The effect of damping tapes on the overall noise reduction values of the test specimens was small away from the resonance frequency. In the mass-law region, a slight and proportional improvement in noise reduction was observed by adding damping material. Adding sound absorbtion material to a panel with damping material beneficially increased noise reduction at high frequencies.

  12. Frequency dependence of alternating current electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chetwani, Nishant; Cassou, Catherine A; Go, David B; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2011-04-15

    The novel effects resulting from the entrainment of low mobility ions during alternating current (ac) electrospray ionization are examined through mass spectrometry and voltage/current measurements. Curious phenomena such as pH modulation at high frequencies (>150 kHz) of an applied ac electric field are revealed and explained using simple mechanistic arguments. Current measurements are utilized to supplement these observations, and a simplified one-dimensional transient diffusion model for charge transport is used to arrive at a scaling law that provides better insight into the ac electrospray ionization process. Moreover, because of the different pathway for ion formation in comparison to direct current (dc) electrospray, ac electrospray (at frequencies >250 kHz) is shown to reduce the effects of ionization suppression in a mixture of two molecules with different surface activities. PMID:21417427

  13. Electrospray-printed nanostructured graphene oxide gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Anthony P; Velásquez-García, Luis F

    2015-12-18

    We report low-cost conductometric gas sensors that use an ultrathin film made of graphene oxide (GO) nanoflakes as transducing element. The devices were fabricated by lift-off metallization and near-room temperature, atmospheric pressure electrospray printing using a shadow mask. The sensors are sensitive to reactive gases at room temperature without requiring any post heat treatment, harsh chemical reduction, or doping with metal nanoparticles. The sensors' response to humidity at atmospheric pressure tracks that of a commercial sensor, and is linear with changes in humidity in the 10%-60% relative humidity range while consuming <6 μW. Devices with GO layers printed by different deposition recipes yielded nearly identical response characteristics, suggesting that intrinsic properties of the film control the sensing mechanism. The gas sensors successfully detected ammonia at concentrations down to 500 ppm (absolute partial pressure of ∼5 × 10(-4) T) at ∼1 T pressure, room temperature conditions. The sensor technology can be used in a great variety of applications including air conditioning and sensing of reactive gas species in vacuum lines and abatement systems. PMID:26579701

  14. Electrospray-printed nanostructured graphene oxide gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Anthony P.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-12-01

    We report low-cost conductometric gas sensors that use an ultrathin film made of graphene oxide (GO) nanoflakes as transducing element. The devices were fabricated by lift-off metallization and near-room temperature, atmospheric pressure electrospray printing using a shadow mask. The sensors are sensitive to reactive gases at room temperature without requiring any post heat treatment, harsh chemical reduction, or doping with metal nanoparticles. The sensors’ response to humidity at atmospheric pressure tracks that of a commercial sensor, and is linear with changes in humidity in the 10%-60% relative humidity range while consuming <6 μW. Devices with GO layers printed by different deposition recipes yielded nearly identical response characteristics, suggesting that intrinsic properties of the film control the sensing mechanism. The gas sensors successfully detected ammonia at concentrations down to 500 ppm (absolute partial pressure of ˜5 × 10-4 T) at ˜1 T pressure, room temperature conditions. The sensor technology can be used in a great variety of applications including air conditioning and sensing of reactive gas species in vacuum lines and abatement systems.

  15. Thin Film Formation and Morphology of Electrosprayed Polydimethylsiloxane.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Florian M; Töpper, Tino; Osmani, Bekim; Deyhle, Hans; Kovacs, Gabor; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Low-voltage dielectric actuators (DEAs) can be fabricated using submicrometer-thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films. The two established techniques, namely spin coating and molecular beam deposition, however, are inappropriate to produce multistack DEAs in an efficient way. Therefore, we propose an alternative deposition technique, i.e., the alternating current electrospray deposition (ACESD) of 5 vol % PDMS in ethyl acetate solution and subsequent ultraviolet light curing. Atomic force microscopy makes possible the three-dimensional analysis of cured droplet-like islands. These circular islands, prepared on 2 in. Si(100) wafers from four polymers with molecular masses between 800 and 62,700 g/mol, reveal a characteristic morphology with an increasing height-to-diameter ratio. Using the 6000 g/mol polymer for ACESD, the film morphology evolution was tracked by applying conventional optical microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. When the deposition was terminated after 13 s, circular islands with a mean height of 30 nm were found, while terminating the deposition after about 155 s led to a confluent layer with a mean height of 91 ± 10 nm. Potential electrostatic interactions between the droplets could not be identified through the analysis of spatial island distribution. Nevertheless, ACESD is a budget-priced and competitive deposition technique that can be employed to fabricate submicrometer-thin PDMS films with true nanometer roughness. PMID:26978236

  16. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry of adsorbed molecules at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Simon, Kuriakose; Levis, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure mass analysis of solid phase biomolecules is performed using laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS). A non-resonant femtosecond duration laser pulse vaporizes native samples at atmospheric pressure for subsequent electrospray ionization and transfer into a mass spectrometer. LEMS was used to detect a complex molecule (irinotecan HCl), a complex mixture (cold medicine formulation with active ingredients: acetaminophen, dextromethorphan HBr and doxylamine succinate), and a biological building block (deoxyguanosine) deposited on steel surfaces without a matrix molecule.

  17. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  18. Impact of molecular weight on the formation of electrosprayed chitosan microcapsules as delivery vehicles for bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Mascaraque, Laura G; Sanchez, Gloria; López-Rubio, Amparo

    2016-10-01

    The molecular weight of chitosan is one of its most determinant characteristics, which affects its processability and its performance as a biomaterial. However, information about the effect of this parameter on the formation of electrosprayed chitosan microcapsules is scarce. In this work, the impact of chitosan molecular weight on its electrosprayability was studied and correlated with its effect on the viscosity, surface tension and electrical conductivity of solutions. A Discriminant Function Analysis revealed that the morphology of the electrosprayed chitosan materials could be correctly predicted using these three parameters for almost 85% of the samples. The suitability of using electrosprayed chitosan capsules as carriers for bioactive agents was also assessed by loading them with a model active compound, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). This encapsulation, with an estimated efficiency of around 80% in terms of preserved antioxidant activity, showed the potential to prolong the antiviral activity of EGCG against murine norovirus via gradual bioactive release combined with its protection against degradation in simulated physiological conditions. PMID:27312621

  19. Quantitative Caffeine Analysis Using a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Deibel, Michael A.; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 {mu}m/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 {mu}L) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by 8% or more) than the literature values.

  20. Generating Resources Supply Curves.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Power Resources Planning.

    1985-07-01

    This report documents Pacific Northwest supply curve information for both renewable and other generating resources. Resources are characterized as ''Renewable'' and ''Other'' as defined in section 3 or the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act. The following resources are described: renewable: (cogeneration; geothermal; hydroelectric (new); hydroelectric (efficiency improvement); solar; and wind); other (nonrenewable generation resources: coal; combustion turbines; and nuclear. Each resource has the following information documented in tabular format: (1) Technical Characteristics; (2) Costs (capital and O and M); (3) Energy Distribution by Month; and (4) Supply Forecast (energy). Combustion turbine (CT) energy supply is not forecasted because of CT's typical peaking application. Their supply is therefore unconstrained in order to facilitate analysis of their operation in the regional electrical supply system. The generic nuclear resource is considered unavailable to the region over the planning horizon.

  1. Uniform discotic wax particles via electrospray emulsification.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Andres F; He, Peng; Luo, Dawei; Marquez, Manuel; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2009-06-01

    We present a novel colloidal discotic system: the formation and self-assembling of wax microdisks with a narrow size distribution. Uniform wax emulsions are first fabricated by electrospraying of melt alpha-eicosene. The size of the emulsions can be flexibly tailored by varying the flow rate of the discontinuous phase, its electric conductivity, and the applied voltage. The process of entrainment of wax droplets, vital for obtaining uniform emulsions, is facilitated by the reduction of air-water surface tension and the density of the continuous phase. Then uniform wax discotic particles are produced via phase transition, during which the formation of a layered structure of the rotator phase of wax converts the droplets, one by one, into oblate particles. The time span for the conversion from spherical emulsions to disk particles is linearly dependent on the size of droplets in the emulsion, indicating the growth of a rotator phase from surface to the center is the limiting step in the shape transition. Using polarized light microscopy, the self-assembling of wax disks is observed by increasing disk concentration and inducing depletion attraction among disks, where several phases, such as isotropic, condensed, columnar stacking, and self-assembly of columnar rods are present sequentially during solvent evaporation of a suspension drop. PMID:19383560

  2. Uniform discotic wax particles via electrospray emulsification.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Andres F; He, Peng; Luo, Dawei; Marquez, Manuel; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2009-06-01

    We present a novel colloidal discotic system: the formation and self-assembling of wax microdisks with a narrow size distribution. Uniform wax emulsions are first fabricated by electrospraying of melt alpha-eicosene. The size of the emulsions can be flexibly tailored by varying the flow rate of the discontinuous phase, its electric conductivity, and the applied voltage. The process of entrainment of wax droplets, vital for obtaining uniform emulsions, is facilitated by the reduction of air-water surface tension and the density of the continuous phase. Then uniform wax discotic particles are produced via phase transition, during which the formation of a layered structure of the rotator phase of wax converts the droplets, one by one, into oblate particles. The time span for the conversion from spherical emulsions to disk particles is linearly dependent on the size of droplets in the emulsion, indicating the growth of a rotator phase from surface to the center is the limiting step in the shape transition. Using polarized light microscopy, the self-assembling of wax disks is observed by increasing disk concentration and inducing depletion attraction among disks, where several phases, such as isotropic, condensed, columnar stacking, and self-assembly of columnar rods are present sequentially during solvent evaporation of a suspension drop.

  3. Analysis of limonoid glucosides from citrus by electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schoch, T K; Manners, G D; Hasegawa, S

    2001-03-01

    An electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (ESI-LC-MS) method for the detection and quantitation of limonoid glucosides has been developed. Negative ions [M - H(+)](-) characteristic of six limonoid glucosides can be detected and quantified from selected ion monitoring chromatograms using carminic acid as an internal standard. The described method has been applied to the analysis of limonoid glucoside content in various liquid and solid Citrus spp. samples as well as complex mixtures of partially purified limonoid glucosides. Rapid and sensitive qualitative screening of samples for limonoid glucosides can also be accomplished with slight modifications of the method. PMID:11312819

  4. Protein Viability on Au Nanoparticles during an Electrospray and Electrostatic-Force-Directed Assembly Process

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mao, Shun; Lu, Ganhua; Yu, Kehan; Chen, Junhong

    2010-01-01

    We study the protein viability on Au nanoparticles during an electrospray and electrostatic-force-directed assembly process, through which Au nanoparticle-antibody conjugates are assembled onto the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to fabricate carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) biosensors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and field-effect transistor (FET) measurements have been used to investigate the antibody activity after the nanoparticle assembly. Upon the introduction of matching antigens, the colored reaction from the ELISA and the change in the electrical characteristic of the CNTFET device confirm that the antibody activity is preserved during the assembly process.

  5. A user-friendly, menu-driven, language-free laser characteristics curves graphing program for desk-top IBM PC compatible computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klutz, Glenn

    1989-01-01

    A facility was established that uses collected data and feeds it into mathematical models that generate improved data arrays by correcting for various losses, base line drift, and conversion to unity scaling. These developed data arrays have headers and other identifying information affixed and are subsequently stored in a Laser Materials and Characteristics data base which is accessible to various users. The two part data base: absorption - emission spectra and tabulated data, is developed around twelve laser models. The tabulated section of the data base is divided into several parts: crystalline, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties; aborption and emission spectra information; chemical name and formulas; and miscellaneous. A menu-driven, language-free graphing program will reduce and/or remove the requirement that users become competent FORTRAN programmers and the concomitant requirement that they also spend several days to a few weeks becoming conversant with the GEOGRAF library and sequence of calls and the continual refreshers of both. The work included becoming thoroughly conversant with or at least very familiar with GEOGRAF by GEOCOMP Corp. The development of the graphing program involved trial runs of the various callable library routines on dummy data in order to become familiar with actual implementation and sequencing. This was followed by trial runs with actual data base files and some additional data from current research that was not in the data base but currently needed graphs. After successful runs, with dummy and real data, using actual FORTRAN instructions steps were undertaken to develop the menu-driven language-free implementation of a program which would require the user only know how to use microcomputers. The user would simply be responding to items displayed on the video screen. To assist the user in arriving at the optimum values needed for a specific graph, a paper, and pencil check list was made available to use on the trial runs.

  6. Comparison Between Differently Priced Devices for Digital Capture of X-Ray Films Using Computed Tomography as a Gold Standard: A Multireader-Multicase Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Study

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Juan Camilo; Aguirre, Diego Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Film digitizers are a specialized technology that is available for scanning X-ray radiographs; however, their cost makes them unaffordable for developing countries. Thus, less expensive alternatives are used. The purpose of this study was to compare three devices for digital capture of X-ray films: a film digitizer (US $15,000), a flatbed scanner (US $1800), and a 10-megapixel digital camera (US $450), in terms of diagnostic accuracy, defined as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves and computed tomography as the gold standard. Materials and Methods: The sample included 136 chest X-ray cases with computed tomography confirmation of the presence or absence of pneumothorax, interstitial opacities, or nodules. The readers were six radiologists who made observations of eight variables for each digital capture of the X-ray films: three main variables to determine the accuracy in the detection of the above-mentioned pathologies, four secondary variables to categorize other pathological classifications, and one variable regarding digital image quality. Results: The receiver operating characteristic curves for each device and pathology were very similar. For the main variables, there was no significant statistical difference in diagnostic accuracy between the devices. For the secondary variables, >84% of cases were correctly classified, even those that were classified with the lowest image quality. High accuracy was determined for the three main variables (0.75 to 0.96), indicating good performance for all tested devices, despite their very different prices. Conclusions: Choosing a device for a teleradiology service should involve additional factors, such as capture time, maintenance concerns, and training requirements. PMID:21457011

  7. Electrospray methodologies for characterization and deposition of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto Lopez, Luis Balam

    Electrospray is an aerosolization method that generates highly charged droplets from solutions or suspensions and, after a series of solvent evaporation -- droplet fission cycles, it results in particles carrying multiple charges. Highly charged particles are used in a variety of applications, including particle characterization, thin film deposition, nanopatterning, and inhalation studies among several others. In this work, a soft X-ray photoionization was coupled with an electrospray to obtain monodisperse, singly charged nanoparticles for applications in online size characterization with electrical mobility analysis. Photoionization with the soft X-ray charger enhanced the diffusion neutralization rate of the highly charged bacteriophages, proteins, and solid particles. The effect of nanoparticle surface charge and nanoparticle agglomeration in liquids on the electrospray process was studied experimentally and a modified expression to calculate the effective electrical conductivity of nanosuspensions was proposed. The effective electrical conductivity of TiO2 nanoparticle suspensions is strongly dependent on the electrical double layer and the agglomeration dynamics of the particles; and such dependence is more remarkable in liquids with low ionic strength. TiO2 nanoparticle agglomerates with nearly monodisperse sizes in the nanometer and submicrometer ranges were generated, by electrospraying suspensions with tuned effective electrical conductivity, and used to deposit photocatalytic films for water-splitting. Nanostructured films of iron oxide with uniform distribution of particles over the entire deposition area were formed with an electrospray system. The micro-Raman spectra of the iron oxide films showed that transverse and longitudinal optical modes are highly sensitive to the crystallize size of the electrospray-deposited films. The fabrication of films of natural light-harvesting complexes, with the aim of designing biohybrid photovoltaic devices, was

  8. Increasing Protein Charge State When Using Laser Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Santosh; Flanigan, Paul M.; Perez, Johnny J.; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    Femtosecond (fs) laser vaporization is used to transfer cytochrome c, myoglobin, lysozyme, and ubiquitin from the condensed phase into an electrospray (ES) plume consisting of a mixture of a supercharging reagent, m-nitrobenzyl alcohol ( m-NBA), and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), acetic acid (AA), or formic acid (FA). Interaction of acid-sensitive proteins like cytochrome c and myoglobin with the highly charged ES droplets resulted in a shift to higher charge states in comparison with acid-stable proteins like lysozyme and ubiquitin. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS) measurements showed an increase in both the average charge states (Zavg) and the charge state with maximum intensity (Zmode) for acid-sensitive proteins compared with conventional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) under equivalent solvent conditions. A marked increase in ion abundance of higher charge states was observed for LEMS in comparison with conventional electrospray for cytochrome c (ranging from 19+ to 21+ versus 13+ to 16+) and myoglobin (ranging from 19+ to 26+ versus 18+ to 21+) using an ES solution containing m-NBA and TFA. LEMS measurements as a function of electrospray flow rate yielded increasing charge states with decreasing flow rates for cytochrome c and myoglobin.

  9. A compact high resolution electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, T; Kirk, A T; Ahrens, A; Raddatz, C-R; Thoben, C; Zimmermann, S

    2016-04-01

    Electrospray is a commonly used ionization method for the analysis of liquids. An electrospray is a dispersed nebular of charged droplets produced under the influence of a strong electrical field. Subsequently, ions are produced in a complex process initiated by evaporation of neutral solvent molecules from these droplets. We coupled an electrospray ionization source to our previously described high resolution ion mobility spectrometer with 75 mm drift tube length and a drift voltage of 5 kV. When using a tritium source for chemical gas phase ionization, a resolving power of R=100 was reported for this setup. We replaced the tritium source and the field switching shutter by an electrospray needle, a desolvation region with variable length and a three-grid shutter for injecting ions into the drift region. Preliminary measurements with tetraalkylammonium halides show that the current configuration with the electrospray ionization source maintains the resolving power of R=100. In this work, we present the characterization of our setup. One major advantage of our setup is that the desolvation region can be heated separately from the drift region so that the temperature in the drift region stays at room temperature even up to desolvation region temperatures of 100 °C. We perform parametric studies for the investigation of the influence of temperature on solvent evaporation with different ratios of water and methanol in the solvent for different analyte substances. Furthermore, the setup is operated in negative mode and spectra of bentazon with different solvents are presented.

  10. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  11. Low pressure electrospray ionization system and process for effective transmission of ions

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi; Page, Jason S; Kelly, Ryan T; Smith, Richard D

    2012-05-08

    Systems and methods that provide up to complete transmission of ions between coupled stages with low effective ion losses. An "interfaceless" electrospray ionization system is further described that operates an electrospray at a reduced pressure such that standard electrospray sample solutions can be directly sprayed into an electrodynamic ion funnel which provides ion focusing and transmission of ions into a mass analyzer. Furthermore, chambers maintained at different pressures can allow for more optimal operating conditions for an electrospray emitter and an ion guide.

  12. Generating electrospray from microchip devices using electroosmotic pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, R.S.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1997-03-15

    A method of generating electrospray from solutions emerging from small channels etched on planer substrates in described. The fluids are delivered using electroosmotically induced pressures and are sprayed electrostatically from the terminus of a channel by applying an electrical potential of sufficient amplitude to generate the electrospray between the microchip and a conductor spaced from the channel terminus. No major modification of the microchip is required other than to expose a channel opening. The principles that regulate the fluid delivery are described and demonstrated. A spectrum for a test compound, tetrabutylammonium iodide, that was continuously electrophoresed was obtained by coupling the microchip to an ion trap mass spectrometer. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  14. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  15. Multiplexed electrospray deposition for protein microarray with micromachined silicon device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat

    2007-07-01

    Multiplexed electrospray deposition device capable of delivering picoliter volumes made by silicon micromachining technology has been developed as a deposition tool for making protein microarrays in a noncontact mode. Upon application of potential difference in the range of 7-9kV, biomolecules dissolved in suitable buffer with nonionic surfactant and loaded on the electrospray tips were dispensed on the substrate with microfabricated hydrogel features (1-10μm) in cone-jet mode. Schiff base chemistry followed by reductive amination was utilized for covalent immobilization.

  16. Encapsulation of bioactive compound from extracted jasmine flower using β-Cyclodextrin via electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmam., S.; Naim., M. N.; Ng., E.; Mokhtar, M. Nn; Abu Bakar, N. F.

    2016-06-01

    The ability of electrospray to encapsulate the bioactive compound extracted from Jasmine flower with β-Cyclodextrion (β-CD) without any thermal-assisted processing was demonstrated in this study. The extraction of Jasmine compound were conducted using sonicator at 70 000 Hz, for 10 minutes and followed by mixing of the filtered compound with β-CD. Then, the mixture was electrosprayed under a stable Taylor cone jet mode at the voltage of 4 - 5 kV, with flow rate of 0.2 ml/hour. The aluminum substrate that used for collecting the deposit was placed at 30 cm from the needle's tip to allow the occurrence of evaporation and droplet fission until the droplet transform to solid particles. Characteristics of solidified bioactive compound from Jasmine flower (non-encapsulated compound) and solidified bioactive compound with β-CD (encapsulated compound) were studied in this work. From SEM images, it can be observed that the particles size distribution of encapsulated compound deposits have better deposition array and did not aggregate with each other compared to the non-encapsulated compound. FE-SEM images of encapsulated compound deposits indicate more solid crystal looks while non-encapsulated compound was obtained in the porous form. The electrospray process in this work has successfully encapsulated the Jasmine compound with β-CD without any thermal-assisted process. The encapsulation occurrence was determined using FTIR analysis. Identical peaks that referred to the β-CD were found on the encapsulated compound demonstrated that most deposits were encapsulated with β-CD.

  17. Novel erythrocyte-like graphene microspheres with high quality and mass production capability via electrospray assisted self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yayang; Wu, Guan; Tian, Xike; Tao, Xiaoming; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We report for the first time a novel erythrocyte-like graphene microsphere (ELGMs) which can be produced with high quality and mass production capability via electrospray assisted self-assembly. Through simple electrospray treatment of GO suspension into coagulation bath followed by chemical reduction, large quantity of ELGMs with uniform morphology and size can be obtained with production rate of around 2.4 mg/h. Compared with other 3D structures, the ELGMs have a very interesting structural characteristic of perfect exterior doughnut shape and interior porous network. Accordingly, the as-prepared porous ELGMs exhibit excellent capability for fast and recyclable removal of oil and toxic organic solvents from water, reaching up to 216 times of its weight in absorption efficiency, which is tens of times higher than that of conventional sorbent materials. It is strongly believed that the novel hierarchical graphene structures and synergy among different techniques will lead to more future advances in graphene applications.

  18. Novel Erythrocyte-like Graphene Microspheres with High Quality and Mass Production Capability via Electrospray Assisted Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yayang; Wu, Guan; Tian, Xike; Tao, Xiaoming; Chen, Wei

    2013-11-01

    We report for the first time a novel erythrocyte-like graphene microsphere (ELGMs) which can be produced with high quality and mass production capability via electrospray assisted self-assembly. Through simple electrospray treatment of GO suspension into coagulation bath followed by chemical reduction, large quantity of ELGMs with uniform morphology and size can be obtained with production rate of around 2.4 mg/h. Compared with other 3D structures, the ELGMs have a very interesting structural characteristic of perfect exterior doughnut shape and interior porous network. Accordingly, the as-prepared porous ELGMs exhibit excellent capability for fast and recyclable removal of oil and toxic organic solvents from water, reaching up to 216 times of its weight in absorption efficiency, which is tens of times higher than that of conventional sorbent materials. It is strongly believed that the novel hierarchical graphene structures and synergy among different techniques will lead to more future advances in graphene applications.

  19. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of intact bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used to differentiate 7 bacterial species based on their measured DESI-mass spectral profile. Both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were tested and included Escherichia coli, Staphyloccocus aureus, Enterococcus sp., Bordete...

  20. Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry of proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was evaluated for the detection of proteins ranging in molecular mass from 12 to 66 kDa. Proteins were uniformly deposited on a solid surface without pretreatment and analyzed with a DESI source coupled to a quadrupole ion trap mass spec...

  1. Fundamentals of Biomolecule Analysis by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinecke, Andrea; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is a soft ionization technique that allows transfer of fragile biomolecules directly from solution into the gas phase. An instrumental analysis laboratory experiment is designed that would introduce the students to the ESI technique, major parameters of the ion trap mass spectrometers and some caveats in…

  2. Analytical investigation of curved steel girder behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Michael Donald

    Horizontally curved bridges meet an increasing demand for complex highway geometries in congested urban areas. A popular type of curved bridge consists of steel I-girders interconnected by cross-frames and a composite concrete deck slab. Prior to hardening of the concrete deck each I-girder is susceptible to a lateral torsional buckling-type failure. Unlike a straight I-girder, a curved I-girder resists major components of stress resulting from strong axis bending, weak axis bending and warping. The combination of these stresses reduce the available strength of a curved girder versus that of an equivalent straight girder. Experiments demonstrating the ultimate strength characteristics of curved girders are few in number. Of the available experimental research, few studies have used full scale-tests and boundary conditions indicative of those found in an actual bridge structure. Unlike straight girders, curved girders are characterized by nonlinear out-of-plane deformations which, depending upon the magnitude of curvature, may occur at very low load levels. Because of the inherent nonlinear behaviour, some have questioned the application of the term lateral torsional buckling to curved girders; rather curved girders behave in a manner consistent with a deflection-amplification problem. Even with the advent of sophisticated analytical techniques, there is a glaring void in the documented literature regarding calibration of these techniques with known experimental curved girder behaviour. Presented here is an analytical study of the nonlinear modelling of curved steel girders and bridges. This is accomplished by incorporating large deflection and nonlinear material behaviour into three dimensional finite element models generated using the program ANSYS. Emphasis is placed on the calibration of the finite method with known experimental ultimate strength data. It is demonstrated that accurate predictions of load deformation and ultimate strength are attainable via the

  3. Simultaneous determination of Eleutheroside B and Eleutheroside E in rat plasma by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and its application in a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Yinhui; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiuyu; Li, Xiaotian; Yang, Xiaojing; Yao, Di; Sun, Jingjing; Cui, Guangbo; Ying, Hanjie

    2013-02-15

    Eleutheroside B and Eleutheroside E, two kinds of the major bioactive saponins of Eleutherococcus senticosus, play a pivotal role in biologic activity. In this study, a specific and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method (HPLC-MS/MS) was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of Eleutheroside B and Eleutheroside E in rat plasma. The analytes were extracted from rat plasma via a simple protein precipitation procedure with methanol and polygonin was used as internal standard. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a C18 column using a gradient elution program with acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% ammonium hydroxide solution as the mobile phase, with a flow rate of 0.2mL/min. The detection was performed on a triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer by multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode in a negative ion mode via electrospray ionization (ESI). The transition monitored were m/z 371 [M-H](-)→209 for Eleutheroside B, m/z 741[M-H](-)→579 for Eleutheroside E and m/z 389[M-H](-)→277 for internal standard. Linear calibration curves were obtained in the concentration range of 1-2000ng/mL for both (Eleutheroside B and Eleutheroside E), with a lower limit of quantification of 1ng/mL. Extraction recovery was over 80% in plasma. The intra- and inter-day precision (RSD) values were below 12% and accuracy (RE) was -2.80 to 5.70% at three QC levels for both. The assay was successfully applied to study pharmacokinetics behavior in rats after oral and intravenous administration of the single substances (Eleutheroside B and Eleutheroside E). And further research was performed by comparing the difference in pharmacokinetic behavior between the single substances and an aqueous extract of E. senticosus after oral administration. Significant difference in pharmacokinetic characteristics between the single substances and an aqueous extract was found in rat, which would be beneficial for

  4. Modeling the impact of spatial relationships on horizontal curve safety.

    PubMed

    Findley, Daniel J; Hummer, Joseph E; Rasdorf, William; Zegeer, Charles V; Fowler, Tyler J

    2012-03-01

    The curved segments of roadways are more hazardous because of the additional centripetalforces exerted on a vehicle, driver expectations, and other factors. The safety of a curve is dependent on various factors, most notably by geometric factors, but the location of a curve in relation to other curves is also thought to influence the safety of those curves because of a driver's expectation to encounter additional curves. The link between an individual curve's geometric characteristics and its safety performance has been established, but spatial considerations are typically not included in a safety analysis. The spatial considerations included in this research consisted of four components: distance to adjacent curves, direction of turn of the adjacent curves, and radius and length of the adjacent curves. The primary objective of this paper is to quantify the spatial relationship between adjacent horizontal curves and horizontal curve safety using a crash modification factor. Doing so enables a safety professional to more accurately estimate safety to allocate funding to reduce or prevent future collisions and more efficiently design new roadway sections to minimize crash risk where there will be a series of curves along a route. The most important finding from this research is the statistical significance of spatial considerations for the prediction of horizontal curve safety. The distances to adjacent curves were found to be a reliable predictor of observed collisions. This research recommends a model which utilizes spatial considerations for horizontal curve safety prediction in addition to current Highway Safety Manual prediction capabilities using individual curve geometric features.

  5. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  6. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  7. Molecular resolution and fragmentation of fulvic acid by electrospray ionization/multistage tandem mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Rostad, C.E.; Gates, Paul M.; Furlong, E.T.; Ferrer, I.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular weight distributions of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, were investigated by electrospray ionization/quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI/QMS), and fragmentation pathways of specific fulvic acid masses were investigated by electrospray ionization/ion trap multistage tandem mass spectrometry (ESI/MST/MS). ESI/QMS studies of the free acid form of low molecular weight poly(carboxylic acid) standards in 75% methanol/25% water mobile phase found that negative ion detection gave the optimum generation of parent ions that can be used for molecular weight determinations. However, experiments with poly(acrylic acid) mixtures and specific high molecular weight standards found multiply charged negative ions that gave a low bias to molecular mass distributions. The number of negative charges on a molecule is dependent on the distance between charges. ESI/MST/MS of model compounds found characteristic water loss from alcohol dehydration and anhydride formation, as well as CO2 loss from decarboxylation, and CO loss from ester structures. Application of these fragmentation pathways to specific masses of fulvic acid isolated and fragmented by ESI/MST/MS is indicative of specific structures that can serve as a basis for future structural confirmation after these hypothesized structures are synthesized.

  8. Thin-Layer Chromatography/Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Investigation of Goldenseal Alkaloids

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2007-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was investigated as a means to qualitatively identify and to quantify analytes directly from developed normal-phase thin layer chromatography plates. The atmospheric sampling capillary of a commercial ion trap mass spectrometer was extended to permit sampling and ionization of analytes in bands separated on intact TLC plates (up to 10 cm x 10 cm). A surface positioning software package and the appropriate hardware enabled computer-controlled surface scanning along the length of development lanes or at fixed RF value across the plates versus the stationary desorption electrospray emitter. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and related alkaloids and commercial dietary supplements were used as standards and samples. Alkaloid standards and samples were spotted and separated on aluminum- or glass-backed plates using established literature methods. The mass spectral signal levels as a function of desorption spray solvent were investigated with acetonitrile proving superior to methanol. The detection levels (ca. 5 ng each or 14 -28 pmol) in mass spectral full scan mode were determined statistically from the calibration curves (2.5 - 100 pmol) for the standards berberine, palmatine and hydrastinine spotted as a mixture and separated on the plates. Qualitative screening of the major alkaloids present in six different over-the-counter "goldenseal" dietary supplements was accomplished by obtaining full scan mass spectra during surface scans along the development lane in the direction of increasing RF value. In one sample, alkaloids were detected that strongly suggested the presence of at least one additional herb undeclared on the product label. These same data indicated the misidentification of one of the alkaloids in the TLC literature. Quantities of the alkaloids present in two of the samples determined using the mass spectral data were in reasonable agreement with the label values indicating the quantitative ability of

  9. Search for liquids electrospraying the smallest possible nanodrops in vacuo

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Matilla, R.; Fernández-García, J.; Congdon, H.; Fernández de la Mora, J.

    2014-12-14

    Prior work with electrosprays in vacuum of mixtures of ionic liquids (ILs) and the moderately high boiling point (T{sub b}) solvents formamide (FM) and propylene carbonate (PC) (T{sub b} of 210 and 241 °C) has shown that the charged drops produced have reasonably narrow charge/mass distributions, controllable over a wide mass/charge range. This enables their use as propellants in electrical propulsion with specific impulse I{sub sp} varying from a few hundred to a few thousand seconds (10 kV beam energy) and with excellent propulsion efficiency. However, some limitations are imposed by the finite room temperature volatility of FM and PC. Here, we seek improved performance from propellants based on the polar but viscous solvent Sulfolane (SF; ε = 43.2, μ = 10.3 cP) and the low viscosity but less polar solvent tributyl phosphate (TBP; ε = 8.9, μ = 3.4 cP), both with T{sub b} > 280 °C. Neither TBP nor its low viscosity mixtures with SF achieve the electrical conductivities needed to yield high I{sub sp}. Most ILs used in SF/IL mixtures tested were based on the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium (EMI) or 1,3-dimethylimidazolium (DMI) cations, including EMI-BF{sub 4}, EMI-N(CN){sub 2}, and DMI-N(CN){sub 2}. These combinations reach high conductivities, some approaching 3 S/m, but have limited propulsive performance because evaporation of ions directly from the electrified meniscus produces undesirable mixed beams of drops and ions. Exceptional characteristics are found in mixtures of SF with ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), where the small EA{sup +} cation is strongly bound to the solvent, greatly delaying ion evaporation from the meniscus. Evidence on the formation of nano-jets with diameters as small as 1 nm is seen. Although unprecedented, this finding agrees with what would be expected if ion evaporation were suppressed. SF/EAN mixtures thus provide the best available sources to produce the smallest possible nanodrops, minimally polluted by

  10. A curved vitrectomy probe.

    PubMed

    Chalam, K V; Shah, Vinay A; Tripathi, Ramesh C

    2004-01-01

    A curved vitrectomy probe for better accessibility of the peripheral retina in phakic eyes is described. The specially designed curved vitrectomy probe has a 20-gauge pneumatic cutter. The radius of curvature at the shaft is 19.4 mm and it is 25 mm long. The ora serrata is accessed through a 3.0- or 4.0-mm sclerotomy in phakic eyes without touching the crystalline lens. Use of this instrument avoids inadvertent trauma to the clear lens in phakic eyes requiring vitreous base excision. This curved vitrectomy instrument complements wide-angle viewing systems and endoscopes for safe surgical treatment of peripheral retinal pathology in phakic eyes. PMID:15185799

  11. Are Driving and Overtaking on Right Curves More Dangerous than on Left Curves?

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Sarbaz; Thomson, Robert; Lannér, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    that drivers behave differently depending on the curve direction where both speed and acceleration were higher on right than left curves. The implication of this study is that curve direction should be taken into consideration to a greater extent when designing and redesigning curves. It appears that the driver and the vehicle are influenced by different infrastructure factors depending on the curve direction. In addition, the results suggest that the vehicle dynamics response alone cannot explain the higher crash risk in right curves. Further studies of the links between driver, vehicle, and highway characteristics are needed, such as naturalistic driving studies, to identify the key safety indicators for highway safety. PMID:21050608

  12. Are driving and overtaking on right curves more dangerous than on left curves?

    PubMed

    Othman, Sarbaz; Thomson, Robert; Lannér, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    that drivers behave differently depending on the curve direction where both speed and acceleration were higher on right than left curves. The implication of this study is that curve direction should be taken into consideration to a greater extent when designing and redesigning curves. It appears that the driver and the vehicle are influenced by different infrastructure factors depending on the curve direction. In addition, the results suggest that the vehicle dynamics response alone cannot explain the higher crash risk in right curves. Further studies of the links between driver, vehicle, and highway characteristics are needed, such as naturalistic driving studies, to identify the key safety indicators for highway safety.

  13. Curved centerline air intake for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruehr, W. C.; Younghans, J. L.; Smith, E. B. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An inlet for a gas turbine engine was disposed about a curved centerline for the purpose of accepting intake air that is flowing at an angle to engine centerline and progressively turning that intake airflow along a curved path into alignment with the engine. This curved inlet is intended for use in under the wing locations and similar regions where airflow direction is altered by aerodynamic characteristics of the airplane. By curving the inlet, aerodynamic loss and acoustic generation and emission are decreased.

  14. Electrosprayed inulin microparticles for microbiota triggered targeting of colon.

    PubMed

    Jain, Arvind K; Sood, Vishesh; Bora, Meghali; Vasita, Rajesh; Katti, Dhirendra S

    2014-11-01

    Inulin, a naturally occurring polysaccharide, was acetylated to make it processable by electrospraying, a facile and single step method for microparticle fabrication. Electrospraying process parameters were optimized for fabrication of spherical and monodisperse indomethacin (IDM) loaded inulin acetate (INA) microparticles. The apparent entrapment efficiency of IDM was determined to be 100%, whereas working encapsulation efficiency was estimated to be 35.39 ± 1.63%. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed molecular dispersion of IDM in an amorphous state within the INA matrix. Finally, the results from in vitro release study performed in simulated gastro-intestinal fluids demonstrated that IDM was released only in simulated colonic fluid that contained inulinase. Therefore, this study demonstrates that acetylation of inulin does not alter its susceptibility to inulinase and that microparticles fabricated from INA can be developed as a colon targeting drug delivery system.

  15. Micro- and nanoparticles by electrospray: advances and applications in foods.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Hernández, José A; Torres-Chávez, Patricia I; Ramírez-Wong, Benjamín; Rascón-Chu, Agustín; Plascencia-Jatomea, Maribel; Barreras-Urbina, Carlos G; Rangel-Vázquez, Norma A; Rodríguez-Félix, Francisco

    2015-05-20

    Micro- and nanotechnology are tools being used strongly in the area of food technology. The electrospray technique is booming because of its importance in developing micro- and nanoparticles containing an active ingredient as bioactive compounds, enhancing molecules of flavors, odors, and packaging coatings, and developing polymers that are obtained from food (proteins, carbohydrates), as chitosan, alginate, gelatin, agar, starch, or gluten. The electrospray technique compared to conventional techniques such as nanoprecipitation, emulsion-diffusion, double-emulsification, and layer by layer provides greater advantages to develop micro- and nanoparticles because it is simple, low cost, uses a low amount of solvents, and products are obtained in one step. This technique could also be applied in the agrifood sector for the preparation of controlled and/or prolonged release systems of fertilizer or agrochemicals, for which more research must be conducted.

  16. Sampling probe for microarray read out using electrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2004-10-12

    An automated electrospray based sampling system and method for analysis obtains samples from surface array spots having analytes. The system includes at least one probe, the probe including an inlet for flowing at least one eluting solvent to respective ones of a plurality of spots and an outlet for directing the analyte away from the spots. An automatic positioning system is provided for translating the probe relative to the spots to permit sampling of any spot. An electrospray ion source having an input fluidicly connected to the probe receives the analyte and generates ions from the analyte. The ion source provides the generated ions to a structure for analysis to identify the analyte, preferably being a mass spectrometer. The probe can be a surface contact probe, where the probe forms an enclosing seal along the periphery of the array spot surface.

  17. Micro- and nanoparticles by electrospray: advances and applications in foods.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Hernández, José A; Torres-Chávez, Patricia I; Ramírez-Wong, Benjamín; Rascón-Chu, Agustín; Plascencia-Jatomea, Maribel; Barreras-Urbina, Carlos G; Rangel-Vázquez, Norma A; Rodríguez-Félix, Francisco

    2015-05-20

    Micro- and nanotechnology are tools being used strongly in the area of food technology. The electrospray technique is booming because of its importance in developing micro- and nanoparticles containing an active ingredient as bioactive compounds, enhancing molecules of flavors, odors, and packaging coatings, and developing polymers that are obtained from food (proteins, carbohydrates), as chitosan, alginate, gelatin, agar, starch, or gluten. The electrospray technique compared to conventional techniques such as nanoprecipitation, emulsion-diffusion, double-emulsification, and layer by layer provides greater advantages to develop micro- and nanoparticles because it is simple, low cost, uses a low amount of solvents, and products are obtained in one step. This technique could also be applied in the agrifood sector for the preparation of controlled and/or prolonged release systems of fertilizer or agrochemicals, for which more research must be conducted. PMID:25938374

  18. Electrosprayed inulin microparticles for microbiota triggered targeting of colon.

    PubMed

    Jain, Arvind K; Sood, Vishesh; Bora, Meghali; Vasita, Rajesh; Katti, Dhirendra S

    2014-11-01

    Inulin, a naturally occurring polysaccharide, was acetylated to make it processable by electrospraying, a facile and single step method for microparticle fabrication. Electrospraying process parameters were optimized for fabrication of spherical and monodisperse indomethacin (IDM) loaded inulin acetate (INA) microparticles. The apparent entrapment efficiency of IDM was determined to be 100%, whereas working encapsulation efficiency was estimated to be 35.39 ± 1.63%. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed molecular dispersion of IDM in an amorphous state within the INA matrix. Finally, the results from in vitro release study performed in simulated gastro-intestinal fluids demonstrated that IDM was released only in simulated colonic fluid that contained inulinase. Therefore, this study demonstrates that acetylation of inulin does not alter its susceptibility to inulinase and that microparticles fabricated from INA can be developed as a colon targeting drug delivery system. PMID:25129739

  19. The dynamics of a steady Taylor cone electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Martin; Rutgers, Maarten A.

    1998-11-01

    A liquid drop at the tip of a needle will become conical if a high voltage is supplied to the needle. This is known as a Zeleny^1-Taylor^2 cone. Due to the finite conductivity of most liquids, a thin liquid jet will emerge from the cone tip. This jet can be thinner than 1 micrometer and move with speeds in excess of 10 m/s! The jet breaks up due to a Rayleigh instability into a stream of monodisperse droplets. The particles themselves carry charge and can cause the droplet stream to break up into a diverging conical spray. De La Mora^3 has calculated the relation between the liquid and spray cone angles, but less in known about the dynamics with which the droplets move from the initial jet into the final electrospray cone. We have observed electrosprayed droplets in a regime where the Taylor cone oscillates axisymmetrically, leading to an interrupted spray. By periodically driving the volume of the Taylor cone, and illuminating the spray stroboscopically at the same frequency, we can essentially `freeze' the evolution of a packet of droplets in the spray cone. We clearly observe the disintegration of the initial jet of droplets into a growing spherical cloud. The expanding clouds can be inscribed in the cone of an uninterrupted electrospray. ^1J. Zeleny, Phys. Rev. 3:69, (1914), ^2G.I. Taylor, J. Fluid Mech. 2:1, (1965) ^3J.F. De La Mora, J. Fluid Mech. 243:561, (1992)

  20. Ultrasonically Aided Electrospray source for monodisperse, charged nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Weidong

    This dissertation presents a new method of producing nearly monodisperse electrospray using charged capillary standing waves. This method, based on the Ultrasonically Aided Electrospraying (UAE) technology concept invented by the author, includes the steps of dispensing a liquid on the top surface of a diaphragm so as to form a liquid film on the surface of the diaphragm, setting the diaphragm into vibration using piezoelectric transducers so as to induce capillary standing waves in the liquid film, applying electric charge to the capillary standing waves so that electrospray is extracted from the crests of the capillary standing waves. Theoretical analysis on the formation of charged particles from charged capillary standing waves at critically stable condition is performed. An experimental UAE system is designed, built, and tested and the performance of this new technology concept is assessed. Experimental results validate the capabilities of the UAE concept. The method has several applications including electric space propulsion, nano particulate technologies, nanoparticle spray coating and painting techniques, semiconductor fabrication and biomedical processes. Two example applications in electric space propulsion and nanoparticle spray coating are introduced.

  1. Zeptomole-sensitivity electrospray ionization--Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of proteins.

    PubMed

    Belov, M E; Gorshkov, M V; Udseth, H R; Anderson, G A; Smith, R D

    2000-05-15

    Methods are being developed for ultrasensitive protein characterization based upon electrospray ionization (ESI) with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). The sensitivity of a FTICR mass spectrometer equipped with an ESI source depends on the overall ion transmission, which combines the probability of ionization, transmission efficiency, and ion trapping in the FTICR cell. Our developments implemented in a 3.5 tesla FTICR mass spectrometer include introduction and optimization of a newly designed electrodynamic ion funnel in the ESI interface, improving the ion beam characteristics in a quadrupole-electrostatic ion guide interface, and modification of the electrostatic ion guide. These developments provide a detection limit of approximately 30 zmol (approximately 18,000 molecules) for proteins with molecular weights ranging from 8 to 20 kDa.

  2. Fast quantitative detection of cocaine in beverages using nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Peng, Xuejiao; Yang, Shuiping; Gu, Haiwei; Chen, Huanwen; Huan, Yanfu; Zhang, Tingting; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2010-02-01

    Without any sample pretreatment, effervescent beverage fluids were manually sprayed into the primary ion plume created by using a nanoelectrospray ionization source for direct ionization, and the analyte ions of interest were guided into an ion trap mass spectrometer for tandem mass analysis. Functional ingredients (e.g., vitamins, taurine, and caffeine, etc.) and spiked impurity (e.g., cocaine) in various beverages, such as Red Bull energy drink, Coco-cola, and Pepsi samples were rapidly identified within 1.5 s. The limit of detection was found to be 7-15 fg (S/N = 3) for cocaine in different samples using the characteristic fragment (m/z 150) observed in the MS(3) experiments. Typical relative standard deviation and recovery of this method were 6.9%-8.6% and 104%-108% for direct analysis of three actual samples, showing that nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry is a useful technique for fast screening cocaine presence in beverages.

  3. Photovoltaic and optical properties of perovskite thin films fabricated using Marangoni flow assisted electrospraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarang, Som; Ishihara, Hidetaka; Chen, Yen-Chang; Lin, Oliver; Tung, Vincent C.; Ghosh, Sayantani

    2016-02-01

    We have developed an electrospraying technique inspired from Marangoni flow seen in nature. We demonstrate our ability to synthesise highly crystalline uniform perovskite thin films with enhanced coverage and high absorption. Due to a difference in the vapour pressure of DMSO and NMP, a gradient force is developed that helps in propagating the incoming precursor droplet to coalesce and merge with other droplets thus inducing a dynamic self-assembly within the thin film. This results in thin films with high uniformity and good morphological and topological characteristics, that collectivelty resulted in a respectable PCE of greater than 14%. Optical studies are conducted in parallel to better understand the energy phase space of perovskite crystals. The high temperature tetragonal phase showed a high recombination rate of 180 ns, ideal for photovoltaic performances, while the low temperature measurements reveal considerable complexity in spectral and dynamic properties that demand further invesgtiation.

  4. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry fingerprinting of perfumes: Rapid classification and counterfeit detection.

    PubMed

    Marques, Lygia de Azevedo; Catharino, Rodrigo Ramos; Bruns, Roy E; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2006-01-01

    A fast procedure to classify perfumes and identify counterfeit samples is described. Dilution of a few microL of the sample in a 1:1 methanol/water solution is followed by detection of its major polar components via direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in the positive ion mode. As proof-of-principle cases, three famous brands of perfumes were used. The ESI+-MS fingerprints of authentic samples were very characteristic, showing distinctive sets of polar markers for each sample. Principal component analysis (PCA) placed samples of the three perfume brands in well-defined groups. Counterfeit samples were also clearly detected owing to contrasting ESI-MS fingerprints, with PCA placing these samples far away from the authentic samples.

  5. A Novel Route to Recognizing Quaternary Ammonium Cations Using Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shackman, Holly M.; Ding, Wei; Bolgar, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing and elucidating structures is a commonplace and necessary activity in the pharmaceutical industry with mass spectrometry and NMR being the primary tools for analysis. Although many functional groups are readily identifiable, quaternary ammonium cations have proven to be difficult to unequivocally identify using these techniques. Due to the lack of an N-H bond, quaternary ammonium groups can only be detected in the 1H NMR spectra by weak signals generated from long-range 14N-H coupling, which by themselves are inconclusive evidence of a quaternary ammonium functional group. Due to their low intensity, these signals are frequently not detected. Additionally, ions cannot be differentiated in a mass spectrum as an M+ or [M + H]+ ion without prior knowledge of the compound's structure. In order to utilize mass spectrometry as a tool for determining this functionality, ion cluster formation of quaternary ammonium cations and non-quaternary amines was studied using electrospray ionization. Several mobile phase modifiers were compared; however, the addition of small amounts of trifluoroacetic acid proved superior in producing characteristic and intense [M +2TFA]- clusters for compounds containing quaternary ammonium cations when using negative electrospray. By fragmenting this characteristic ion using CID, nearly all compounds studied could be unambiguously identified as containing a quaternary ammonium cation or a non-quaternary amine attributable to the presence (non-quaternary amine) or absence (quaternary ammonium cation) of the resulting [2TFA + H]- ion in the product spectra. This method of analysis provides a rapid, novel, and reliable technique for indicating the presence of quaternary ammonium cations in order to aid in structural elucidation.

  6. A novel route to recognizing quaternary ammonium cations using electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shackman, Holly M; Ding, Wei; Bolgar, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing and elucidating structures is a commonplace and necessary activity in the pharmaceutical industry with mass spectrometry and NMR being the primary tools for analysis. Although many functional groups are readily identifiable, quaternary ammonium cations have proven to be difficult to unequivocally identify using these techniques. Due to the lack of an N-H bond, quaternary ammonium groups can only be detected in the (1)H NMR spectra by weak signals generated from long-range (14)N-H coupling, which by themselves are inconclusive evidence of a quaternary ammonium functional group. Due to their low intensity, these signals are frequently not detected. Additionally, ions cannot be differentiated in a mass spectrum as an M(+) or [M + H](+) ion without prior knowledge of the compound's structure. In order to utilize mass spectrometry as a tool for determining this functionality, ion cluster formation of quaternary ammonium cations and non-quaternary amines was studied using electrospray ionization. Several mobile phase modifiers were compared; however, the addition of small amounts of trifluoroacetic acid proved superior in producing characteristic and intense [M +2TFA](-) clusters for compounds containing quaternary ammonium cations when using negative electrospray. By fragmenting this characteristic ion using CID, nearly all compounds studied could be unambiguously identified as containing a quaternary ammonium cation or a non-quaternary amine attributable to the presence (non-quaternary amine) or absence (quaternary ammonium cation) of the resulting [2TFA + H](-) ion in the product spectra. This method of analysis provides a rapid, novel, and reliable technique for indicating the presence of quaternary ammonium cations in order to aid in structural elucidation.

  7. Low pressure electrospray ionization system and process for effective transmission of ions

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi; Page, Jason S.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-03-02

    A system and method are disclosed that provide up to complete transmission of ions between coupled stages with low effective ion losses. A novel "interfaceless" electrospray ionization system is further described that operates the electrospray at a reduced pressure such that standard electrospray sample solutions can be directly sprayed into an electrodynamic ion funnel which provides ion focusing and transmission of ions into a mass analyzer.

  8. The sales learning curve.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Mark; Holloway, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    When a company launches a new product into a new market, the temptation is to immediately ramp up sales force capacity to gain customers as quickly as possible. But hiring a full sales force too early just causes the firm to burn through cash and fail to meet revenue expectations. Before it can sell an innovative product efficiently, the entire organization needs to learn how customers will acquire and use it, a process the authors call the sales learning curve. The concept of a learning curve is well understood in manufacturing. Employees transfer knowledge and experience back and forth between the production line and purchasing, manufacturing, engineering, planning, and operations. The sales learning curve unfolds similarly through the give-and-take between the company--marketing, sales, product support, and product development--and its customers. As customers adopt the product, the firm modifies both the offering and the processes associated with making and selling it. Progress along the manufacturing curve is measured by tracking cost per unit: The more a firm learns about the manufacturing process, the more efficient it becomes, and the lower the unit cost goes. Progress along the sales learning curve is measured in an analogous way: The more a company learns about the sales process, the more efficient it becomes at selling, and the higher the sales yield. As the sales yield increases, the sales learning process unfolds in three distinct phases--initiation, transition, and execution. Each phase requires a different size--and kind--of sales force and represents a different stage in a company's production, marketing, and sales strategies. Adjusting those strategies as the firm progresses along the sales learning curve allows managers to plan resource allocation more accurately, set appropriate expectations, avoid disastrous cash shortfalls, and reduce both the time and money required to turn a profit.

  9. Classification of ASKAP Vast Radio Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbapragada, Umaa; Lo, Kitty; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Reed, Colorado; Murphy, Tara; Thompson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The VAST survey is a wide-field survey that observes with unprecedented instrument sensitivity (0.5 mJy or lower) and repeat cadence (a goal of 5 seconds) that will enable novel scientific discoveries related to known and unknown classes of radio transients and variables. Given the unprecedented observing characteristics of VAST, it is important to estimate source classification performance, and determine best practices prior to the launch of ASKAP's BETA in 2012. The goal of this study is to identify light curve characterization and classification algorithms that are best suited for archival VAST light curve classification. We perform our experiments on light curve simulations of eight source types and achieve best case performance of approximately 90% accuracy. We note that classification performance is most influenced by light curve characterization rather than classifier algorithm.

  10. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to comparemore » internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.« less

  11. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to compare internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.

  12. Textbook Factor Demand Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teachers and textbook graphics follow the same basic pattern in illustrating changes in demand curves when product prices increase. Asserts that the use of computer graphics will enable teachers to be more precise in their graphic presentation of price elasticity. (CFR)

  13. Curve Fit Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Suzanne R.; Driskell, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    Graphic tips for using the Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP) are described. The methods to import an image into GSP, define a coordinate system, plot points and curve fit the function using a graphical calculator are demonstrated where the graphic features of GSP allow teachers to expand the use of the technology application beyond the classroom.

  14. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  15. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  16. Straightening Out Learning Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corlett, E. N.; Morecombe, V. J.

    1970-01-01

    The basic mathematical theory behind learning curves is explained, together with implications for clerical and industrial training, evaluation of skill development, and prediction of future performance. Brief studies of textile worker and typist training are presented to illustrate such concepts as the reduction fraction (a consistent decrease in…

  17. Nonlinear Growth Curves in Developmental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Kevin J.; Ram, Nilam; Hamagami, Fumiaki

    2011-01-01

    Developmentalists are often interested in understanding change processes, and growth models are the most common analytic tool for examining such processes. Nonlinear growth curves are especially valuable to developmentalists because the defining characteristics of the growth process such as initial levels, rates of change during growth spurts, and…

  18. An electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometer as detector for high- performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zühlke, Martin; Riebe, Daniel; Beitz, Toralf; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Zenichowski, Karl; Diener, Marc; Linscheid, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The application of electrospray ionization (ESI) ion mobility (IM) spectrometry on the detection end of a high-performance liquid chromatograph has been a subject of study for some time. So far, this method has been limited to low flow rates or has required splitting of the liquid flow. This work presents a novel concept of an ESI source facilitating the stable operation of the spectrometer at flow rates between 10 μL mn(-1) and 1500 μL min(-1) without flow splitting, advancing the T-cylinder design developed by Kurnin and co-workers. Flow rates eight times faster than previously reported were achieved because of a more efficient dispersion of the liquid at increased electrospray voltages combined with nebulization by a sheath gas. Imaging revealed the spray operation to be in a rotationally symmetric multijet mode. The novel ESI-IM spectrometer tolerates high water contents (≤90%) and electrolyte concentrations up to 10mM, meeting another condition required of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) detectors. Limits of detection of 50 nM for promazine in the positive mode and 1 μM for 1,3-dinitrobenzene in the negative mode were established. Three mixtures of reduced complexity (five surfactants, four neuroleptics, and two isomers) were separated in the millisecond regime in stand-alone operation of the spectrometer. Separations of two more complex mixtures (five neuroleptics and 13 pesticides) demonstrate the application of the spectrometer as an HPLC detector. The examples illustrate the advantages of the spectrometer over the established diode array detector, in terms of additional IM separation of substances not fully separated in the retention time domain as well as identification of substances based on their characteristic Ims.

  19. Reactive extractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry for sensitive detection of tetrabromobisphenol A derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong; Chen, Jian; Ouyang, Yong-zhong; Qu, Guang-bo; Liu, Ai-feng; Wang, Xue-mei; Liu, Chun-xiao; Shi, Jian-bo; Chen, Huan-wen; Jiang, Gui-bin

    2014-03-01

    Sensitive detection of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and its derivatives, a group of emerging toxic contaminants, is highly necessitated in environmental investigation. Herein a novel analytical strategy based on reactive extractive electrospray ionization (EESI) tandem mass spectrometry for detection of tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2-hydroxyethyl ether) (TBBPA-BHEE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(glycidyl ether) (TBBPA-BGE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(allylether) (TBBPA-BAE), and tetrabromobisphenol S bis(allylether) (TBBPS-BAE) in industrial waste water samples was developed. Active silver cations (Ag(+)), generated by electrospraying a silver nitrate methanol solution (10 mg L(-1)), collides the neutral TBBPA derivatives molecules in the EESI source to form [M+Ag](+) complexes of the analytes under the ambient conditions. Upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), characteristic fragments of the [M+Ag](+) complexes were identified for confident and sensitive detection of the four TBBPA derivatives. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the instrumental limits of detection (LODs) of TBBPA-BHEE, TBBPA-BGE, TBBPA-BAE and TBBPS-BAE were 0.37, 0.050, 0.76, and 4.6 μg L(-1), respectively. The linear ranges extended to 1000 μg L(-1) (R(2)≥0.9919), and the relative standard deviations (RSDs), inter-day variation and intra-day variation were less than 7.8% (n=9), 10.0% (n=5), and 14.8% (n=1 per day for 5 days) for all derivatives. TBBPA derivative manufacturing industrial waste water, river water and tap water samples were fast analyzed with the proposed method. The contents of TBBPA derivatives were various in the collected samples, with the highest 19.9±0.3 μg L(-1) of TBBPA-BAE in the waste water samples. PMID:24528843

  20. Factorization with genus 2 curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosset, Romain

    2010-04-01

    The elliptic curve method (ECM) is one of the best factorization methods available. It is possible to use hyperelliptic curves instead of elliptic curves but it is in theory slower. We use special hyperelliptic curves and Kummer surfaces to reduce the complexity of the algorithm. Our implementation GMP-HECM is faster than GMP-ECM for factoring large numbers.

  1. Desorption electrospray ionization imaging of small organics on mineral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Rachel V; Fernández, Facundo M

    2015-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI)-mass spectrometry facilitates the ambient chemical analysis of a variety of surfaces. Here we describe the protocol for using DESI imaging to measure the distributions of small prebiotically relevant molecules on granite surfaces. Granites that contain a variety of juxtaposed mineral species were reacted with formamide in order to study the role of local mineral environment on the production of purines and pyrimidines. The mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) methods described here can also be applied to the surface analysis of rock samples involved in other applications such as petroleum or environmental chemistries. PMID:25361668

  2. Numerical simulation of electrospray in the cone-jet mode.

    PubMed

    Herrada, M A; López-Herrera, J M; Gañán-Calvo, A M; Vega, E J; Montanero, J M; Popinet, S

    2012-08-01

    We present a robust and computationally efficient numerical scheme for simulating steady electrohydrodynamic atomization processes (electrospray). The main simplification assumed in this scheme is that all the free electrical charges are distributed over the interface. A comparison of the results with those calculated with a volume-of-fluid method showed that the numerical scheme presented here accurately describes the flow pattern within the entire liquid domain. Experiments were performed to partially validate the numerical predictions. The simulations reproduced accurately the experimental shape of the liquid cone jet, providing correct values of the emitted electric current even for configurations very close to the cone-jet stability limit. PMID:23005852

  3. Desorption electrospray ionization imaging of small organics on mineral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Rachel V; Fernández, Facundo M

    2015-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI)-mass spectrometry facilitates the ambient chemical analysis of a variety of surfaces. Here we describe the protocol for using DESI imaging to measure the distributions of small prebiotically relevant molecules on granite surfaces. Granites that contain a variety of juxtaposed mineral species were reacted with formamide in order to study the role of local mineral environment on the production of purines and pyrimidines. The mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) methods described here can also be applied to the surface analysis of rock samples involved in other applications such as petroleum or environmental chemistries.

  4. Numerical simulation of electrospray in the cone-jet mode.

    PubMed

    Herrada, M A; López-Herrera, J M; Gañán-Calvo, A M; Vega, E J; Montanero, J M; Popinet, S

    2012-08-01

    We present a robust and computationally efficient numerical scheme for simulating steady electrohydrodynamic atomization processes (electrospray). The main simplification assumed in this scheme is that all the free electrical charges are distributed over the interface. A comparison of the results with those calculated with a volume-of-fluid method showed that the numerical scheme presented here accurately describes the flow pattern within the entire liquid domain. Experiments were performed to partially validate the numerical predictions. The simulations reproduced accurately the experimental shape of the liquid cone jet, providing correct values of the emitted electric current even for configurations very close to the cone-jet stability limit.

  5. Aspartame degradation study using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pattanaargson, S; Sanchavanakit, C

    2000-01-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometry was used to simultaneously determine aspartame (APM) and five of its degradation products; aspartic acid, aspartylphenylalanine, 5-benzyl-3,6-dioxo-2-piperazieacetic acid (diketopiperazine), phenylalanine, and phenylalanine methyl ester. Under the ionization conditions used, there was no interfering fragmentation for any of the six compounds, i.e., no fragmentation of the compound being tested into other species also being monitored. A study of APM degradation in solution at various pH's and at various temperatures using this method was performed.

  6. Studying the Chemistry of Cationized Triacylglycerols Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Density Functional Theory Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossert, J. Stuart; Herrera, Lisandra Cubero; Ramaley, Louis; Melanson, Jeremy E.

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of triacylglycerols (TAGs), found as complex mixtures in living organisms, is typically accomplished using liquid chromatography, often coupled to mass spectrometry. TAGs, weak bases not protonated using electrospray ionization, are usually ionized by adduct formation with a cation, including those present in the solvent (e.g., Na+). There are relatively few reports on the binding of TAGs with cations or on the mechanisms by which cationized TAGs fragment. This work examines binding efficiencies, determined by mass spectrometry and computations, for the complexation of TAGs to a range of cations (Na+, Li+, K+, Ag+, NH4 +). While most cations bind to oxygen, Ag+ binding to unsaturation in the acid side chains is significant. The importance of dimer formation, [2TAG + M]+ was demonstrated using several different types of mass spectrometers. From breakdown curves, it became apparent that two or three acid side chains must be attached to glycerol for strong cationization. Possible mechanisms for fragmentation of lithiated TAGs were modeled by computations on tripropionylglycerol. Viable pathways were found for losses of neutral acids and lithium salts of acids from different positions on the glycerol moiety. Novel lactone structures were proposed for the loss of a neutral acid from one position of the glycerol moiety. These were studied further using triple-stage mass spectrometry (MS3). These lactones can account for all the major product ions in the MS3 spectra in both this work and the literature, which should allow for new insights into the challenging analytical methods needed for naturally occurring TAGs.

  7. Trishear for curved faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Fault-propagation folds form an important trapping element in both onshore and offshore fold-thrust belts, and as such benefit from reliable interpretation. Building an accurate geologic interpretation of such structures requires palinspastic restorations, which are made more challenging by the interplay between folding and faulting. Trishear (Erslev, 1991; Allmendinger, 1998) is a useful tool to unravel this relationship kinematically, but is limited by a restriction to planar fault geometries, or at least planar fault segments. Here, new methods are presented for trishear along continuously curved reverse faults defining a flat-ramp transition. In these methods, rotation of the hanging wall above a curved fault is coupled to translation along a horizontal detachment. Including hanging wall rotation allows for investigation of structures with progressive backlimb rotation. Application of the new algorithms are shown for two fault-propagation fold structures: the Turner Valley Anticline in Southwestern Alberta, and the Alpha Structure in the Niger Delta.

  8. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes

    PubMed Central

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L’Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A.; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  9. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L'Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  10. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L'Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories.

  11. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  12. Anatomical curve identification

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Adrian W.; Katina, Stanislav; Smith, Joanna; Brown, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Methods for capturing images in three dimensions are now widely available, with stereo-photogrammetry and laser scanning being two common approaches. In anatomical studies, a number of landmarks are usually identified manually from each of these images and these form the basis of subsequent statistical analysis. However, landmarks express only a very small proportion of the information available from the images. Anatomically defined curves have the advantage of providing a much richer expression of shape. This is explored in the context of identifying the boundary of breasts from an image of the female torso and the boundary of the lips from a facial image. The curves of interest are characterised by ridges or valleys. Key issues in estimation are the ability to navigate across the anatomical surface in three-dimensions, the ability to recognise the relevant boundary and the need to assess the evidence for the presence of the surface feature of interest. The first issue is addressed by the use of principal curves, as an extension of principal components, the second by suitable assessment of curvature and the third by change-point detection. P-spline smoothing is used as an integral part of the methods but adaptations are made to the specific anatomical features of interest. After estimation of the boundary curves, the intermediate surfaces of the anatomical feature of interest can be characterised by surface interpolation. This allows shape variation to be explored using standard methods such as principal components. These tools are applied to a collection of images of women where one breast has been reconstructed after mastectomy and where interest lies in shape differences between the reconstructed and unreconstructed breasts. They are also applied to a collection of lip images where possible differences in shape between males and females are of interest. PMID:26041943

  13. Vapor Pressure of Hexamethylene Triperoxide Diamine (HMTD) Estimated Using Secondary Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aernecke, Matthew J; Mendum, Ted; Geurtsen, Geoff; Ostrinskaya, Alla; Kunz, Roderick R

    2015-11-25

    A rapid method for vapor pressure measurement was developed and used to derive the vapor pressure curve of the thermally labile peroxide-based explosive hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) over the temperature range from 28 to 80 °C. This method uses a controlled flow of vapor from a solid-phase HMTD source that is presented to an ambient-pressure-ionization mass spectrometer equipped with a secondary-electrospray-ionization (SESI) source. The subpart-per-trillion sensitivity of this system enables direct detection of HMTD vapor through an intact [M + H](+) ion in real time at temperatures near 20 °C. By calibrating this method using vapor sources of cocaine and heroin, which have known pressure-temperature (P-T) curves, the temperature dependence of HMTD vapor was determined, and a Clausius-Clapeyron plot of ln[P (Pa)] vs 1/[T (K)] yielded a straight line with the expression ln[P (Pa)] = {(-11091 ± 356) × 1/[T (K)]} + 25 ± 1 (error limits are the standard error of the regression analysis). From this equation, the sublimation enthalpy of HMTD was estimated to be 92 ± 3 kJ/mol, which compares well with the theoretical estimate of 95 kJ/mol, and the vapor pressure at 20 °C was estimated to be ∼60 parts per trillion by volume, which is within a factor of 2 of previous theoretical estimates. Thus, this method provides not only the first direct experimental determination of HMTD vapor pressure but also a rapid, near-real-time capability to quantitatively measure low-vapor-pressure compounds, which will be useful for aiding in the development of training aids for bomb-sniffing canines. PMID:26505487

  14. Vapor Pressure of Hexamethylene Triperoxide Diamine (HMTD) Estimated Using Secondary Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aernecke, Matthew J; Mendum, Ted; Geurtsen, Geoff; Ostrinskaya, Alla; Kunz, Roderick R

    2015-11-25

    A rapid method for vapor pressure measurement was developed and used to derive the vapor pressure curve of the thermally labile peroxide-based explosive hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) over the temperature range from 28 to 80 °C. This method uses a controlled flow of vapor from a solid-phase HMTD source that is presented to an ambient-pressure-ionization mass spectrometer equipped with a secondary-electrospray-ionization (SESI) source. The subpart-per-trillion sensitivity of this system enables direct detection of HMTD vapor through an intact [M + H](+) ion in real time at temperatures near 20 °C. By calibrating this method using vapor sources of cocaine and heroin, which have known pressure-temperature (P-T) curves, the temperature dependence of HMTD vapor was determined, and a Clausius-Clapeyron plot of ln[P (Pa)] vs 1/[T (K)] yielded a straight line with the expression ln[P (Pa)] = {(-11091 ± 356) × 1/[T (K)]} + 25 ± 1 (error limits are the standard error of the regression analysis). From this equation, the sublimation enthalpy of HMTD was estimated to be 92 ± 3 kJ/mol, which compares well with the theoretical estimate of 95 kJ/mol, and the vapor pressure at 20 °C was estimated to be ∼60 parts per trillion by volume, which is within a factor of 2 of previous theoretical estimates. Thus, this method provides not only the first direct experimental determination of HMTD vapor pressure but also a rapid, near-real-time capability to quantitatively measure low-vapor-pressure compounds, which will be useful for aiding in the development of training aids for bomb-sniffing canines.

  15. Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric analysis of low vapor pressure chemical particulates collected from a surface.

    PubMed

    Ewing, K J; Gibson, D; Sanghera, J; Miklos, F

    2015-01-01

    The collection of a low vapor pressure chemical simulant triethyl phosphate sorbed onto silica gel (TEP/SG) from a surface with subsequent analysis of the TEP/SG particulates using desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is described. Collection of TEP/SG particulates on a surface was accomplished using a sticky screen sampler composed of a stainless steel screen coated with partially polymerized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). DESI-MS analysis of TEP/SG particulates containing different percentages of TEP sorbed onto silica gel enabled the generation of response curves for the TEP ions m/z 155 and m/z 127. Using the response curves the calculation of the mass of TEP in a 25 wt% sample of TEP/SG was calculated, results show that the calculated mass of TEP was 14% different from the actual mass of TEP in the sample using the m/z 127 TEP ion response curve. Detection limits for the TEP vapor and TEP/SG particulates were calculated to be 4 μg and 6 particles, respectively.

  16. Smarandache curves according to Sabban frame of fixed pole curve belonging to the Bertrand curves pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şenyurt, Süleyman; Altun, Yasin; Cevahir, Ceyda

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the Smarandache curves according to Sabban frame of fixed pole curve which drawn by the unit Darboux vector of the Bertrand partner curve. Some results have been obtained. These results were expressed as the depends Bertrand curve.

  17. Piecewise power laws in individual learning curves.

    PubMed

    Donner, Yoni; Hardy, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    The notion that human learning follows a smooth power law (PL) of diminishing gains is well-established in psychology. This characteristic is observed when multiple curves are averaged, potentially masking more complex dynamics underpinning the curves of individual learners. Here, we analyzed 25,280 individual learning curves, each comprising 500 measurements of cognitive performance taken from four cognitive tasks. A piecewise PL (PPL) model explained the individual learning curves significantly better than a single PL, controlling for model complexity. The PPL model allows for multiple PLs connected at different points in the learning process. We also explored the transition dynamics between PL curve component pieces. Performance in later pieces typically surpassed that in earlier pieces, after a brief drop in performance at the transition point. The transition rate was negatively associated with age, even after controlling for overall performance. Our results suggest at least two processes at work in individual learning curves: locally, a gradual, smooth improvement, with diminishing gains within a specific strategy, which is modeled well as a PL; and globally, a discrete sequence of strategy shifts, in which each strategy is better in the long term than the ones preceding it. The piecewise extension of the classic PL of practice has implications for both individual skill acquisition and theories of learning.

  18. Piecewise power laws in individual learning curves.

    PubMed

    Donner, Yoni; Hardy, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    The notion that human learning follows a smooth power law (PL) of diminishing gains is well-established in psychology. This characteristic is observed when multiple curves are averaged, potentially masking more complex dynamics underpinning the curves of individual learners. Here, we analyzed 25,280 individual learning curves, each comprising 500 measurements of cognitive performance taken from four cognitive tasks. A piecewise PL (PPL) model explained the individual learning curves significantly better than a single PL, controlling for model complexity. The PPL model allows for multiple PLs connected at different points in the learning process. We also explored the transition dynamics between PL curve component pieces. Performance in later pieces typically surpassed that in earlier pieces, after a brief drop in performance at the transition point. The transition rate was negatively associated with age, even after controlling for overall performance. Our results suggest at least two processes at work in individual learning curves: locally, a gradual, smooth improvement, with diminishing gains within a specific strategy, which is modeled well as a PL; and globally, a discrete sequence of strategy shifts, in which each strategy is better in the long term than the ones preceding it. The piecewise extension of the classic PL of practice has implications for both individual skill acquisition and theories of learning. PMID:25711183

  19. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture/Electrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-09-01

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed noncontact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect material ablated by a 355 nm UV laser in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appears to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the `softness' of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. In this work, a series of benzylpyridinium salts were employed as thermometer ions to compare internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation/liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. These data, along with results from the analysis the biological molecules bradykinin and angiotensin III indicated that the ions or their fragments formed directly by UV laser ablation that survive the liquid capture/electrospray ionization process were likely to be an extremely small component of the total ion signal observed. Instead, the preponderate neutral molecules, clusters, and particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream, then electrosprayed, were the principal source of the ion signal observed. Thus, the electrospray ionization process used controls the overall `softness' of this technique.

  20. A broad area electrospray generated by a piezoelectric transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramshani, Zeinab; Johnson, Michael J.; Atashbar, Massood Z.; Go, David B.

    2016-07-01

    Electrosprays are typically formed by the application of a high (kilovolt) voltage to the flow exiting a small diameter capillary, and they have been used in applications ranging from material synthesis to spray coating because of the finely controlled plume of micron-sized droplets they produce. In this work, we report a similar but distinct spray directly off the surface of a piezoelectric transformer. Using a paper wick to deliver liquid to the surface of the piezoelectric crystal, a continuous, broad area spray is generated from the wick in contact with the transformer surface, only requiring input voltages on the order of 20 Vamp. Systematic variation of critical parameters indicate that this piezoelectric transformer-generated spray is similar to a conventional electrospray, with the spray current exhibiting a non-linear dependence on the solution conductivity, but distinct, as the spray exhibits little dependence on the solution surface tension. This innovative spray could potentially lead to uniform, large area spray coverage from a single device for a wide variety of applications.

  1. A Corona Discharge Initiated Electrochemical Electrospray Ionization Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, John R.; Hess, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    We report here the development of a corona discharge (CD) initiated electrochemical (EC) electrospray ionization (ESI) technique using a standard electrospray ion source. This is a new ionization technique distinct from ESI, electrochemistry inherent to ESI, APCI, and techniques using hydroxyl radicals produced under atmospheric pressure conditions. By maximizing the observable CD at the tip of a stainless steel ESI capillary, efficient electrochemical oxidation of electrochemically active compounds is observed. For electrochemical oxidation to be observed, the ionization potential of the analyte must be lower than Fe. Ferrocene labeled compounds were chosen as the electrochemically active moiety. The electrochemical cell in the ESI source was robust and generated ions with selectivity according to the ionization potential of the analytes and up to zeptomolar sensitivity. Our results indicate that CD initiated electrochemical ionization has the potential to become a powerful technique to increase the dynamic range, sensitivity and selectivity of ESI experiments. Synopsis Using a standard ESI source a corona discharge initiated electrochemical ionization technique was established resulting from the electrochemistry occurring at the CD electrode surface. PMID:19747843

  2. Transferability of the Electrospray Ionization Efficiency Scale between Different Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liigand, Jaanus; Kruve, Anneli; Liigand, Piia; Laaniste, Asko; Girod, Marion; Antoine, Rodolphe; Leito, Ivo

    2015-11-01

    For the first time, quantitative electrospray (ESI) ionization efficiencies (IE), expressed as log IE values, obtained on different mass-spectrometric setups (four mass analyzers and four ESI sources) are compared for 15 compounds of diverse properties. The general trends of change of IE with molecular structure are the same with all experimental setups. The obtained IE scales could be applied on different setups: there were no statistically significant changes in the order of ionization efficiency and the root mean of squared differences of the log IE values of compounds between the scales compiled on different instruments were found to be between 0.21 and 0.55 log units. The results show that orthogonal ESI source geometry gives better differentiating power and additional pneumatic assistance improves it even more. It is also shown that the ionization efficiency values are transferable between different mass-spectrometric setups by three anchoring points and a linear model. The root mean square error of log IE prediction ranged from 0.24 to 0.72 depending on the instrument. This work demonstrates for the first time the inter-instrument transferability of quantitative electrospray ionization efficiency data.

  3. Analysis of metal-EDTA complexes by electrospray mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, D.; Hering, J.G.

    1998-07-01

    Solutions of the strong complexing agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and Cu, Pb, Cd, Al, and Fe(III) were examined by electrospray mass spectrometry (ES/MS). Uncomplexed EDTA and metal-EDTA complexes survive the electrospray process intact and can be detected simultaneously by mass spectrometry. Best sensitivity was achieved in the positive ion mode in which EDTA and EDTA-metal complexes (present in solution as anions) were detected as protonated species with a single positive charge. Except for the protonation, the aqueous metal-EDTA complexes are preserved and neither fragmentation of complexes nor formation of clusters with more than one metal or ligand were observed in the mass spectra. Detection limits are between approximately 1 to 2 {micro}M for uncomplexed EDTA and for the Cu-EDTA and Pb-EDTA complexes, with a linear range up to 10{sup {minus}4} M. Calibrations based on solutions with equimolar concentrations of EDTA and Cu or Pb can be used to quantify EDTA-metal complexes in solutions with excess EDTA or metal, and in solutions with more than one metal present. Isotopic signatures of metals in the metal-ligand complexes are preserved, allowing the identification of the metal in a metal-ligand complex. Isotopic signatures of metals can therefore aid in the identification of metal-ligand complexes in unknown samples.

  4. Scaling up the power of an electrospray microthruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenguito, G.; Fernandez de la Mora, J.; Gomez, A.

    2014-05-01

    We report on the development of an electrospray (ES) microthruster that, by emitting fast nanodroplets, covers a wide range of specific impulse and thrust at high (>50%) propulsion efficiency. To achieve a useful thrust, many ES microthrusters must operate in parallel (multiplexing). The multiplexed electrospray microthruster (MES) is packaged in an alumina case that can operate at voltages up to ΔV = 7.56 kV and a reservoir pressure up to 5 bar. We compared nozzle arrays with 7, 37 and 91 capillaries (ID/OD = 10/30 µm). To ensure uniform flow through the various emitters, the hydraulic resistance was increased by filling the capillaries with 2.01 µm beads. The MES devices sprayed the ionic liquid ethylammonium nitrate. The 37-MES device covered a 2.6-fold range of specific impulse reaching 1870 s, and a 4.2-fold range of thrust up to 31.1 µN. The 91-MES device reached higher thrust, but it covered a narrower range. All devices operated stably for hours with modest current fluctuations. The beam cleared the electrodes, with no signs of erosion. The developed microthruster has already reached performances suitable for fine attitude control of microsatellites. Further scaling up by one order of magnitude would enable orbit change and station keeping for small satellites.

  5. Unexpected Analyte Oxidation during Desorption Electrospray Ionization - Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    During the analysis of surface spotted analytes using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS), abundant ions are sometimes observed that appear to be the result of oxygen addition reactions. In this investigation, the effect of sample aging, the ambient lab environment, spray voltage, analyte surface concentration, and surface type on this oxidative modification of spotted analytes, exemplified by tamoxifen and reserpine, during analysis by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was studied. Simple exposure of the samples to air and to ambient lighting increased the extent of oxidation. Increased spray voltage lead also to increased analyte oxidation, possibly as a result of oxidative species formed electrochemically at the emitter electrode or in the gas - phase by discharge processes. These oxidative species are carried by the spray and impinge on and react with the sampled analyte during desorption/ionization. The relative abundance of oxidized species was more significant for analysis of deposited analyte having a relatively low surface concentration. Increasing spray solvent flow rate and addition of hydroquinone as a redox buffer to the spray solvent were found to decrease, but not entirely eliminate, analyte oxidation during analysis. The major parameters that both minimize and maximize analyte oxidation were identified and DESI-MS operational recommendations to avoid these unwanted reactions are suggested.

  6. Brush potential curve tracer

    DOEpatents

    Finch, Hilvan A.

    1987-01-01

    A device for analyzing commutating characteristics of a motor or generator includes a holder for supporting a plurality of probes adjacent a brush of the motor or generator. Measurements of electrical current characteristics in each of the probes provides information useful in analyzing operation of the machine. Methods for employing a device in accordance with the invention are also disclosed.

  7. Brush potential curve tracer

    DOEpatents

    Finch, H.A.

    1985-06-21

    A device for analyzing commutating characteristics of a motor or generator includes a holder for supporting a plurality of probes adjacent a brush of the motor or generator. Measurements of electrical current characteristics of the probes provides information useful in analyzing operation of the machine. Methods for employing a device in accordance with the invention are also disclosed.

  8. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, James A.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Devary, Brooks J.; Valenzuela, Blandina R.

    2007-09-03

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane, (C6H6N12O12, MW 438) {CL-20}, is a high-energy propellent that has been recently developed and successfully tested (Nielsen et al. 1998). CL-20 releases more energy on ignition and is more stable to accidental detonation than currently used energetic materials. It is expected to replace many of the energetic materials currently being used by the Department of Defense (DoD). The EPA method 8330 (EPA 1997) for the analysis of explosives and metabolites in soils calls for the use of UV/Vis detection. High performance liquid chromatography has been used to quantify CL-20 and precursor concentration (Bazaki et al. 1998`) at relatively high concentrations. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to identify different crystal forms of CL-20 (4 isomers; Kim et al. 1998). Campbell et al. (1997) utilized particle beam mass spectrometry for the analysis of enzymatic degradation of explosives. Introduction and recent improvements of ionization techniques such as electrospray (ES) have allowed the mass spectrometer to become more widely used in liquid chromatography. Schilling(1996) also examined explosive components and metabolites using electrospray (ES) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Schilling’s results showed that compared to thermospray LC/MS, APCI and ES were more sensitive than thermospray by at least an order of magnitude. 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX), 10 nitroso-RDX metabolites, and other munitions in ground water have been analyzed using solid phase extraction and isotope dilution liquid chromatography-APCI mass spectrometry (Cassada et al. 1999). The method detection limits indicate that nitramine and nitroaromatic compounds can be routinely determined in ground water samples using electrospray LC/MS with concentration techniques utilizing solid-phase extraction. Miller et al. (1996) studied nitrated explosives with mobile phase

  9. Online antioxidant activity and ultra-performance LC-electrospray ionisation-quadrupole time-of-fight mass spectrometry for chemical fingerprinting of Indian polyherbal formulations.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Pamita; Kumar, Neeraj; Khan, Shahid M; Bhutani, Kamlesh K

    2016-01-01

    A HPLC-DAD-DPPH method was developed for evaluating the 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radical scavenging activity of ethylacetate extracts of different polyherbal formulations (draksarista, draksava, lohasava and arvindasava) by using RP-18e column. The ethylacetate extract from polyherbal, 'draksarista' exhibited maximum free radical scavenging activity (99.9 ± 0.38%) followed by draksava (99.8 ± 0.34%), lohasava (98.5 ± 0.30%) and arvindasava (42.3 ± 0.34%) at 100 μg mL(-1). Simultaneously, ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionisation-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS) was used to study chemical composition of the ethylacetate extracts of formulations. The characteristic electrospray mass ionisation reveals the dominance of polyphenols and their glycosides in the four polyherbal formulations.

  10. Magnetism in curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  11. Magnetism in curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  12. Curved shock theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2016-07-01

    Curved shock theory (CST) is introduced, developed and applied to relate pressure gradients, streamline curvatures, vorticity and shock curvatures in flows with planar or axial symmetry. Explicit expressions are given, in an influence coefficient format, that relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. The effect of pre-shock flow divergence/convergence, on vorticity generation, is related to the transverse shock curvature. A novel derivation for the post-shock vorticity is presented that includes the effects of pre-shock flow non-uniformities. CST applicability to unsteady flows is discussed.

  13. Validation of Cognitive Sensitivity for Item Response Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatsuoka, Kikumi K.

    1987-01-01

    This study examined whether the item response curves from a two-parameter model reflected characteristics of the mathematics items, each of which required unique cognitive tasks. A computer program performed error analysis of test performance. Cognitive subtasks appeared to influence the slopes and difficulties of item response curves. (GDC)

  14. Variable thrust/specific-impulse of multiplexed electrospray microthrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenguito, G.; Fernandez de la Mora, J.; Gomez, A.

    We report on the development of a single-propellant ElectroSpray (ES) microthruster able to: (a) cover a wide range of specific impulse (Isp) and thrust at high propulsion efficiency, and (b) provide macroscopic thrust via micro-fabricated emitter arrays. The electrospray is a mature technology for the emission of fast nanodroplets at a propulsive efficiency larger than 50% over the full Isp range. The size of the droplets depends on the propellant flow rate and the physical properties of the electrolyte, especially the electric conductivity. To achieve a useful thrust one needs to multiplex the ES by operating many in parallel, which we achieve via silicon microfabrication of arrays of multiple and identical nozzles. The Multiplexed Electrospray (MES) micro-thruster is composed mainly of two electrodes: a nozzle-array and an extractor electrode, between which the electric field needed to form the ES is established. We tested nozzle arrays with up to 37 capillaries, that are spaced 1mm apart, with ID/OD = 10/30μ m. The capillaries are filled with 2.01μ m silicon dioxide beads to increase the hydraulic impedance and ensure uniform flow rate through the different emitters. A third electrode (accelerator) is mounted downstream the extractor to accelerate the droplets, thereby increasing the microthruster performance. The system is packaged in an alumina casing for electrical insulation and propellant feed. Tests run in a vacuum chamber at a pressure ≤ 10-5 mbar demonstrated reliable operation for several hours with a relatively high beam energy of 7.56kV. The 37-nozzle MES device was tested with the ionic liquid ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), at estimated total flow rates between 1.2 and 14 μ L/h, emitted currents between 14.2 and 23.0 μ A, specific impulse ranging between 710 and 1930s, and thrust ranging between 7.5 and 33 μ N. EAN is well suited to cover a relatively broad range of charge/mass- at an average propulsion efficiency of 66%. With further scale

  15. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  16. A Program For Optics of Curved Crystal Neutron Spectrometers.

    1990-04-26

    Version 00 TRAX computes the resolution matrix and characteristic line widths and intensities for three-axis slow-neutron spectrometers with flat or curved, mosaic or perfect crystals, with or without Soller collimators or limiting diaphragms.

  17. Classification and properties of UV extinction curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, G.; Mazzei, P.; Morbidelli, L.; Patriarchi, P.; Perinotto, M.

    2001-01-01

    The catalog of Savage et al. (\\cite{ref27}) reporting colour excesses of 1415 stars from ANS photometry offers the opportunity to deeply investigate the characteristics of UV extinction curves which differ from the standard extinction of the diffuse interstellar medium. To this aim we have selected a sample of 252 curves, which have been compared with the relations derived by Cardelli et al. (\\cite{ref4}; CCM in the following) for a variety of R_V values in the range 2.4-5 and have been classified as normal if they fit at least one of the CCM curves or anomalous otherwise. We find that normal curves with small R_V are just as numerous as those with large R_V. The anomalous objects are arranged into two groups according to the strength of the bump at 0.217 mu . For a given value of c_2 this increases along the sequence: type A anomalous, normals and type B anomalous, suggesting that this sequence should correspond to an increase of the amount of small grains along the sightline. Considerations concerning the environmental characteristics indicate that the anomalous behaviour is not necessarily tied to the existence of dense gas clouds along the line of sight.

  18. Novel Erythrocyte-like Graphene Microspheres with High Quality and Mass Production Capability via Electrospray Assisted Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yayang; Wu, Guan; Tian, Xike; Tao, Xiaoming; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We report for the first time a novel erythrocyte-like graphene microsphere (ELGMs) which can be produced with high quality and mass production capability via electrospray assisted self-assembly. Through simple electrospray treatment of GO suspension into coagulation bath followed by chemical reduction, large quantity of ELGMs with uniform morphology and size can be obtained with production rate of around 2.4 mg/h. Compared with other 3D structures, the ELGMs have a very interesting structural characteristic of perfect exterior doughnut shape and interior porous network. Accordingly, the as-prepared porous ELGMs exhibit excellent capability for fast and recyclable removal of oil and toxic organic solvents from water, reaching up to 216 times of its weight in absorption efficiency, which is tens of times higher than that of conventional sorbent materials. It is strongly believed that the novel hierarchical graphene structures and synergy among different techniques will lead to more future advances in graphene applications. PMID:24270315

  19. Application of spray-drying and electrospraying/electospinning for poorly water-soluble drugs: a particle engineering approach.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Adam; Boetker, Johan P; Rades, Thomas; Rantanen, Jukka; Yang, Mingshi

    2014-01-01

    Solid dispersions have been widely studied as an attractive formulation strategy for the increasingly prevalent poorly water-soluble drug compounds, including herbal medicines, often leading to improvements in drug dissolution rate and bioavailability. However, several challenges are encountered with solid dispersions, for instance regarding their physical stability, and the full potential of these formulations has yet to be reached. Solid dispersions have mainly been used to produce immediate release systems using water-soluble polymers but an extended release system may provide equal or better performance due to enhancement in the pharmacokinetics and low variability in plasma concentration. Progress in processing technologies and particle engineering provides new opportunities to prepare particle-based solid dispersions with control of physical characteristics and tailored drug release kinetics. Spray-drying and electrospraying are both technologies that allow production and continuous manufacturing of particle-based amorphous solid dispersions in a single step process and electrospinning further allows the production of fiber based systems. This review presents the use of spray drying and electrospraying/electrospinning as techniques for preparing particle-based solid dispersions, describes the particle formation processes via numerical and experimental models and discusses particle engineering using these techniques. Examples are given on the applications of these techniques for preparing solid dispersions and the challenges associated with the techniques such as stability, preparation of final dosage form and scale-up are also discussed.

  20. Combined electrophoretic-separation and electrospray method and system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, R.D.; Olivares, J.A.

    1989-06-27

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample includes: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary zone electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5--100 kVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g., [+-]2--8 kVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit. 10 figs.

  1. Fabrication of silica nanocomposite-cups using electrospraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deotare, P. B.; Kameoka, J.

    2006-03-01

    We have investigated a new process for the fabrication of nanocomposite cups by electrospraying blended polymer-sol-gel solutions followed by calcination. Due to the low viscosity and high surface tension of the blended polymer-sol-gel solutions, the electrostatically extruded continuous liquid jet from the spray source became tiny droplets with diameters of less than 1 µm. These droplets dried in transit and were collected at the counter electrode. To eliminate polymers, as well as cross-link sol-gel material, they were calcined at 850 °C for 3 h. We also investigated a probable method to control the morphology of the nanocups by changing the ionic concentration of the polymer solution. This is a simple and efficient approach for producing nanocomposite cups, which cannot be made by the aggregation method. These nanocomposite cups may find applications in drug delivery and filtration media.

  2. Planar flow-by electrode capacitive electrospray ion source

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2004-01-13

    An electrospray ion source includes a chamber including a channel region therein, the channel including at least one inlet for directing a solution into the channel and at least a first and a second outlet for transmitting the solution or derivatives therefrom out from channel. Structure for separating ions in the solution is provided from separating the solution into at least a first and a second flow stream portion. The first flow stream portion is enriched in negative ions and the second flow stream portion is enriched in positive ions. The first flow stream portion is adapted to exit the chamber through the first outlet while the second flow stream portion is adapted to exit the chamber through the second outlet. A method of charge separation can include the step of simultaneously providing at least two gas phase ion stream portions having opposite polarity.

  3. Deposition of PLA/CDHA composite coating via electrospraying.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2013-01-01

    Composite coatings composed of carbonated calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) and polylactic acid (PLA) were deposited on a PLA substrate surface via electrospraying. The operation parameters, structural properties, bioactivity, cell adhesion, and growth capability of as-fabricated PLA/CDHA coatings were investigated. The composite coating showed good biocompatibility and bioactivity. The deposited coating was also applied as a carrier to assist alendronate sodium (AS) local release. AS, an approved bisphosphonate drug used for the treatment of osteoporosis, was incorporated into a composite coating matrix via coelectrospraying. Its release behavior showed a long-term sustained release. This approach can be a potential coating technique for the surface modification of biopolymer implants. PMID:23594068

  4. Coupling Electrochemistry with Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Liu, Pengyuan; Held, Michael A; Dewald, Howard D; Chen, Hao

    2016-04-18

    A new coupling of electrochemistry with mass spectrometry (MS) using probe electrospray ionization (PESI) is presented. Due to the high salt tolerance of PESI, the detection of electrochemical reaction products in room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) is realized for the first time. Furthermore, PESI-MS allows the analysis of electrochemical reaction products on different or multiple electrode surfaces. In addition, peptides and proteins fractionated through isoelectric focusing (IEF) in the presence of an external electric field can also be directly analyzed by using PESI-MS, suggesting a new and rapid characterization means for the IEF technique. This study reveals the versatility of EC/PESI-MS, which could have an impact in electrochemistry and bioanalysis fields.

  5. Combined electrophoretic-separation and electrospray method and system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Olivares, Jose A.

    1989-01-01

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample includes: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary zone electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5-100 KVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g., .+-.2-8 KVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit.

  6. Analysis of tear glucose concentration with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Christopher R; Baca, Justin T; Asher, Sanford A; Grabowski, Joseph J; Finegold, David N

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a mass spectrometry-based method that allows one to accurately determine the glucose concentration of tear fluid. We used a 1 microL micro-capillary to collect tear fluid from the tear meniscus with minimal irritation of the eye. We analyzed the 1 muL volume of collected tear fluid with liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with the use of D-glucose-6,6-d2 as an internal standard. Repeated measurements and a recovery experiment on pooled, onion-induced tears showed that the analysis of the glucose in tears was precise (4% relative standard deviation) and provided 100% recovery. We found the tear glucose concentration of one fasting nondiabetic subject to be 13 to 51 microM while the onion-induced tear glucose concentration of a different nondiabetic subject to be 211 to 256 microM. PMID:17084090

  7. Analysis of Tear Glucose Concentration with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taormina, Christopher R.; Baca, Justin T.; Finegold, David N.; Asher, Sanford A.; Grabowski, Joseph J.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a mass spectrometry-based method which allows one to accurately determine the glucose concentration of tear fluid. We used a 1 μL micro-capillary to collect tear fluid from the tear meniscus with minimal irritation of the eye. We analyzed the 1 μL volume of collected tear fluid with liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with the use of D-glucose-6,6-d2 as an internal standard. Repeated measurements and a recovery experiment on pooled, onion-induced tears showed that the analysis of the glucose in tears was precise (4% relative standard deviation) and provided 100% recovery. We found the tear glucose concentration of one fasting non-diabetic subject to be 13 to 51 μM while the onion-induced tear glucose concentration of a different non-diabetic subject to be 211 to 256 μM. PMID:17084090

  8. Effect of Mobile Phase on Electrospray Ionization Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liigand, Jaanus; Kruve, Anneli; Leito, Ivo; Girod, Marion; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2014-08-01

    Electrospray (ESI) ionization efficiencies (IE) of a set of 10 compounds differing by chemical nature, extent of ionization in solution (basicity), and by hydrophobicity (tetrapropylammonium and tetraethylammonium ion, triethylamine, 1-naphthylamine, N,N-dimethylaniline, diphenylphthalate, dimethylphtahalate, piperidine, pyrrolidine, pyridine) have been measured in seven mobile phases (three acetonitrile percentages 20%, 50%, and 80%, and three different pH-adjusting additives, 0.1% formic acid, 1 mM ammonia, pH 5.0 buffer combination) using the relative measurement method. MS parameters were optimized separately for each ion. The resulting relative IE data were converted into comparable logIE values by anchoring them to the logIE of tetrapropylammonium ion taking into account the differences of ionization in different solvents and thereby making the logIE values of the compounds comparable across solvents. The following conclusions were made from analysis of the data. The compounds with pK a values in the range of the solution pH values displayed higher IE at lower pH. The sensitivity of IE towards pH depends on hydrophobicity being very strong with pyridine, weaker with N,N-dimethylaniline, and weakest with 1-naphthylamine. IEs of tetraalkylammonium ions and triethylamine were expectedly insensitive towards solution pH. Surprisingly high IEs of phthalate esters were observed. The differences in solutions with different acetonitrile content and similar pH were smaller compared with the pH effects. These results highlight the importance of hydrophobicity in electrospray and demonstrate that high hydrophobicity can sometimes successfully compensate for low basicity.

  9. Electrospray neutralization process and apparatus for generation of nano-aerosol and nano-structured materials

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, Charles L.; Morozov, Victor; Vsevolodov, Nikolai N.

    2010-08-17

    The claimed invention describes methods and apparatuses for manufacturing nano-aerosols and nano-structured materials based on the neutralization of charged electrosprayed products with oppositely charged electrosprayed products. Electrosprayed products include molecular ions, nano-clusters and nano-fibers. Nano-aerosols can be generated when neutralization occurs in the gas phase. Neutralization of electrospan nano-fibers with molecular ions and charged nano-clusters may result in the formation of fibrous aerosols or free nano-mats. Nano-mats can also be produced on a suitable substrate, forming efficient nano-filters.

  10. Portable I/V-Curve Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, S. W.

    1983-01-01

    Electronic load circuit for displaying current/voltage characteristic curves of power sources uses low-cost low-power CMOS operational amplifiers to control load current flowing through power MOSFET Q2 and main load transistor Q3. Thermal cutoff device turns off transistor Q3 in case of overload. To maximize battery life, battery is connected via "push-to-read" momentary-contact pushbutton switch.

  11. Neutral loss analysis of amino acids by desorption electrospray ionization using an unmodified tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Corso, Gaetano; Paglia, Giuseppe; Garofalo, Daniela; D'Apolito, Oceania

    2007-01-01

    A new method to analyze free amino acids using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) has been implemented. The method is based on the neutral loss mode determination of underivatized amino acids using a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with an unmodified atmospheric interface. Qualitative and quantitative optimization of DESI parameters, including ESI voltage, solvent flow rate, angle of collection and incidence, gas flow and temperatures, was performed for amino acids detection. The parameters for DESI analysis were evaluated using a mixture of valine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine and tyrosine standards. A few microliters of this mixture were deposited on a slide, dried and analyzed at a flow rate of 2 microL/min. The optimal ionization response was obtained using laboratory glass slides and an equivalent solution of water/methanol doped with 2% of formic acid. The method specificity was evaluated by comparing product ion spectra and neutral loss analysis of amino acids obtained either by DESI or by electrospray ionization flow injection analysis (ESI-FIA). To evaluate the quantitative response on amino acids analyzed by DESI, calibration curves were performed on amino acid standard solutions spiked with a fixed amount of labelled amino acids. The method was also employed to analyze free amino acids from blood spots, after a rapid solvent extraction without other sample pretreatment, from positive and negative subjects. The method enables one to analyze biological samples and to discriminate healthy subjects from patients affected by inherited metabolic diseases. The intrinsic high-throughput analysis of DESI represents an opportunity, because of its potential application in clinical chemistry, for the expanded screening of some inborn errors of metabolism.

  12. Role of the effective electrical conductivity of nanosuspension in the generation of TiO2 agglomerates with electrospray

    SciTech Connect

    Modesto-Lopez, Luis B.; Biswas, Pratim

    2010-04-26

    Suspensions with varying volume fraction of TiO2 nanoparticles and ionic strength were electrosprayed to obtain agglomerates of different characteristics, which were then deposited to produce films with tailored morphology, thickness, and porosity. The role of the nanoparticle volume fraction in both the effective electrical conductivity of TiO2 nanosuspensions and the control of the size of agglomerates produced by electrospray was investigated. A simple modified equation for the effective electrical conductivity of TiO2 nanoparticle suspensions was derived. The equation, which accounted for nanoparticles' diffuse ionic layer and their agglomeration in a liquid, showed that the effective electrical conductivity is not only a function of the liquid and particle conductivities, and the particle volume fraction but also a function of both the thickness of the adsorbed ionic layer on the particles and the particle size. Gradual increase of particle volume fraction resulted in an increase in the suspension's effective electrical conductivity, when the initial liquid conductivity was in the range of 10-4–10-3 S m-1. When the liquid conductivity was in the range of 10-3–10-2 S m-1; however, addition of particles did not have any significant effect on the effective electrical conductivity. Control over the size of the TiO2 nanoparticle agglomerates was achieved by electrospraying suspensions with liquid electrical conductivity of the order of 10{sup -3} S m-1 and by varying the particle volume fraction. Electrospray deposition of suspensions with TiO2 volume fraction=0.04% resulted in a more compact film with lower porosity and showed better water-splitting performance.

  13. Quantitative Detection of Trace Malachite Green in Aquiculture Water Samples by Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaowei; Yang, Shuiping; Chingin, Konstantin; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Xinglei; Zhou, Zhiquan; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to malachite green (MG) may pose great health risks to humans; thus, it is of prime importance to develop fast and robust methods to quantitatively screen the presence of malachite green in water. Herein the application of extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) has been extended to the trace detection of MG within lake water and aquiculture water, due to the intensive use of MG as a biocide in fisheries. This method has the advantage of obviating offline liquid-liquid extraction or tedious matrix separation prior to the measurement of malachite green in native aqueous medium. The experimental results indicate that the extrapolated detection limit for MG was ~3.8 μg·L(-1) (S/N = 3) in lake water samples and ~0.5 μg·L(-1) in ultrapure water under optimized experimental conditions. The signal intensity of MG showed good linearity over the concentration range of 10-1000 μg·L(-1). Measurement of practical water samples fortified with MG at 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg·L(-1) gave a good validation of the established calibration curve. The average recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) of malachite green in lake water and Carassius carassius fish farm effluent water were 115% (6.64% RSD), 85.4% (9.17% RSD) and 96.0% (7.44% RSD), respectively. Overall, the established EESI-MS/MS method has been demonstrated suitable for sensitive and rapid (<2 min per sample) quantitative detection of malachite green in various aqueous media, indicating its potential for online real-time monitoring of real life samples.

  14. Quantitative Detection of Trace Malachite Green in Aquiculture Water Samples by Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaowei; Yang, Shuiping; Chingin, Konstantin; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Xinglei; Zhou, Zhiquan; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to malachite green (MG) may pose great health risks to humans; thus, it is of prime importance to develop fast and robust methods to quantitatively screen the presence of malachite green in water. Herein the application of extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) has been extended to the trace detection of MG within lake water and aquiculture water, due to the intensive use of MG as a biocide in fisheries. This method has the advantage of obviating offline liquid-liquid extraction or tedious matrix separation prior to the measurement of malachite green in native aqueous medium. The experimental results indicate that the extrapolated detection limit for MG was ~3.8 μg·L(-1) (S/N = 3) in lake water samples and ~0.5 μg·L(-1) in ultrapure water under optimized experimental conditions. The signal intensity of MG showed good linearity over the concentration range of 10-1000 μg·L(-1). Measurement of practical water samples fortified with MG at 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg·L(-1) gave a good validation of the established calibration curve. The average recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) of malachite green in lake water and Carassius carassius fish farm effluent water were 115% (6.64% RSD), 85.4% (9.17% RSD) and 96.0% (7.44% RSD), respectively. Overall, the established EESI-MS/MS method has been demonstrated suitable for sensitive and rapid (<2 min per sample) quantitative detection of malachite green in various aqueous media, indicating its potential for online real-time monitoring of real life samples. PMID:27529262

  15. Quantitative Detection of Trace Malachite Green in Aquiculture Water Samples by Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiaowei; Yang, Shuiping; Chingin, Konstantin; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Xinglei; Zhou, Zhiquan; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to malachite green (MG) may pose great health risks to humans; thus, it is of prime importance to develop fast and robust methods to quantitatively screen the presence of malachite green in water. Herein the application of extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) has been extended to the trace detection of MG within lake water and aquiculture water, due to the intensive use of MG as a biocide in fisheries. This method has the advantage of obviating offline liquid-liquid extraction or tedious matrix separation prior to the measurement of malachite green in native aqueous medium. The experimental results indicate that the extrapolated detection limit for MG was ~3.8 μg·L−1 (S/N = 3) in lake water samples and ~0.5 μg·L−1 in ultrapure water under optimized experimental conditions. The signal intensity of MG showed good linearity over the concentration range of 10–1000 μg·L−1. Measurement of practical water samples fortified with MG at 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg·L−1 gave a good validation of the established calibration curve. The average recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) of malachite green in lake water and Carassius carassius fish farm effluent water were 115% (6.64% RSD), 85.4% (9.17% RSD) and 96.0% (7.44% RSD), respectively. Overall, the established EESI-MS/MS method has been demonstrated suitable for sensitive and rapid (<2 min per sample) quantitative detection of malachite green in various aqueous media, indicating its potential for online real-time monitoring of real life samples. PMID:27529262

  16. Electrospray and Taylor-Cone theory, Dole's beam of macromolecules at last?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilm, Matthias S.; Mann, Matthias

    1994-09-01

    A theoretical description of the electrostatic dispersion in electrospray is presented. The theory predicts the size of the zone at the tip of the Taylor Cone from which the liquid is ejected. To minimize this emission zone a modified electrospray ion source, the micro electrospray, has been constructed. With this ion source the size of the droplets is in the 200 nm range or below. The spray is very stable so that aqueous solutions can be dispersed in negative or positive mode without any assistance. The micro electrospray ion source is very efficient in the use of the applied amount of sample. Its flow rate of less than 25 nl/min makes MS-MS investigations on 0.5 [mu]l of sample possible. An overall transmission coefficient of 8 x 10-4 for a peptide from the solution state to the detector has been measured.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ELECTROSPRAY MASS SPECTROMETRIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An electrospray mass spectrometric method has been developed for application to agricultural and horticultural fertilizers to determine perchlorate. After fertilizers are leached or dissolved in water, the method relies on the formation of stable ion pair complex of the perchlor...

  18. Poly(amidoamine)-Cholesterol Conjugate Nanoparticles Obtained by Electrospraying as Novel Tamoxifen Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, R; Bisazza, A; Bussano, R; Trotta, M; Civra, A; Lembo, D; Ranucci, E; Ferruti, P

    2011-01-01

    A new poly(amidoamine)-cholesterol (PAA-cholesterol) conjugate was synthesized, characterized and used to produce nanoparticles by the electrospraying technique. The electrospraying is a method of liquid atomization that consists in the dispersion of a solution into small charged droplets by an electric field. Tuning the electrospraying process parameters spherical PAA-chol nanoparticles formed. The PAA-cholesterol nanoparticles showed sizes lower than 500 nm and spherical shape. The drug incorporation capacity was investigated using tamoxifen, a lipophilic anticancer drug, as model drug. The incorporation of the tamoxifen did not affect the shape and sizes of nanoparticles showing a drug loading of 40%. Tamoxifen-loaded nanoparticles exhibited a higher dose-dependent cytotoxicity than free tamoxifen, while blank nanoparticles did not show any cytotoxic effect at the same concentrations. The electrospray technique might be proposed to produce tamoxifen-loaded PAA-chol nanoparticle in powder form without any excipient in a single step. PMID:21785731

  19. The updated bottom up solution applied to atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Updated Bottom Up Solution (UBUS) was recently applied to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) of triacylglycerols (TAGs). This report demonstrates that the UBUS applies equally well to atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) MS and to electrospray ionizatio...

  20. A proposal of the diagnosis-dynamic characteristic (DDC) model describing the relation between search time and confidence levels for a dichotomous judgment, and its application to ROC curve generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Toru; Fukuda, Nobuo; Furukawa, Akira; Suwa, Koji; Wada, Shinichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuomi; Sone, Shusuke

    2006-03-01

    When physicians inspect an image, they make up a certain degree of confidence that the image are abnormal; p(t), or normal; n(t)[n(t)=1-p(t)]. After infinite time of the inspection, they reach the equilibrium levels of the confidence of p*=p(∞) and n*=n(∞). There are psychological conflicts between the decisions of normal and abnormal. We assume that the decision of "normal" is distracted by the decision of "abnormal" by a factor of k(1 + ap), and in an inverse direction by a factor of k(1 + bn), where k ( > 0) is a parameter that relates with image quality and skill of the physicians, and a and b are unknown constants. After the infinite time of inspection, the conflict reaches the equilibrium, which satisfies the equation, k(1 + ap*)n* = k(1 + bn*)p*. Here we define a parameter C, which is 2p*/[p*(1 - p*)]. After the infinite time of inspection, the conflict reaches the equilibrium, which satisfies t that changes in the confidence level with the time (dp/dt) is proportional to [k(1+ap)n - k(1+bn)p], i.e. k[-cp2 + (c - 2)p + 1]. Solving the differential equation, we derived the equation; t(p) and p(t) depending with the parameters; k, c, S. S (0-1) is the value arbitrary selected and related with probability of "abnormal" before the image inspection (S = p(0)). Image reading studies were executed for CT images. ROC curves were generated both by the traditional 4-step score-based method and by the confidence level; p estimated from the equation t(p) of the DDC model using observed judgment time. It was concluded that ROC curves could be generated by measuring time for dichotomous judgment without the subjective scores of diagnostic confidence and applying the DDC model.

  1. Analysis of triacetone triperoxide complexes with alkali metal ions by electrospray and extractive electrospray ionisation combined with ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hill, Alex R; Edgar, Mark; Chatzigeorgiou, Maria; Reynolds, James C; Kelly, Paul F; Creaser, Colin S

    2015-01-01

    The complexation of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) with a range of alkali metals has been studied by electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry yield [M+Cat](+) ions for all of the alkali metals. The formation of [2TATP+Li+LiX](+) (X = Br, Cl) sandwich complexes was also observed. Collision cross- sections for the lithium-containing complexes of TATP were measured by travelling wave ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry, and compared well with computationally determined structures. Extractive electrospray ionisation (EESI) using a lithium doped electrospray is demonstrated for the detection of TATP vapours desorbed from a metal surface. The limit of detection for EESI was shown to be 20 ng using the [TATP+Li](+) ion. PMID:26307706

  2. 3D combinational curves for accuracy and performance analysis of positive biometrics identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yingzi; Chang, Chein-I.

    2008-06-01

    The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve has been widely used as an evaluation criterion to measure the accuracy of biometrics system. Unfortunately, such an ROC curve provides no indication of the optimum threshold and cost function. In this paper, two kinds of 3D combinational curves are proposed: the 3D combinational accuracy curve and the 3D combinational performance curve. The 3D combinational accuracy curve gives a balanced view of the relationships among FAR (false alarm rate), FRR (false rejection rate), threshold t, and Cost. Six 2D curves can be derived from the 3D combinational accuracy curve: the conventional 2D ROC curve, 2D curve of (FRR, t), 2D curve of (FAR, t), 2D curve of (FRR, Cost), 2D curve of (FAR, Cost), and 2D curve of ( t, Cost). The 3D combinational performance curve can be derived from the 3D combinational accuracy curve which can give a balanced view among Security, Convenience, threshold t, and Cost. The advantages of using the proposed 3D combinational curves are demonstrated by iris recognition systems where the experimental results show that the proposed 3D combinational curves can provide more comprehensive information of the system accuracy and performance.

  3. Residual Agar Determination in Bacterial Spores by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Karen L.; Colburn, Heather A.; Wunschel, David S.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2010-02-15

    Presented here is an analytical method to detect residual agar from a bacterial spore sample as an indication of culturing on an agar plate. This method is based on the resolubilization of agar polysaccharide from a bacterial spore sample, enzymatic digestion, followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn) analysis for detection of a specific agar fragment ion. A range of Bacillus species and strains were selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The characteristic agar fragment ion was detected in the spores grown on agar that were washed from 1 to 5 times, irradiated or non-irradiated and not in the spores grown in broth. A sample containing approximately 108 spores is currently needed for confident detection of residual agar from culture on agar plates in the presence of bacterial spores with a limit of detection of approximately 1 ppm agar spiked into a broth-grown spore sample. The results of a proficiency test with 42 blinded samples are presented demonstrating the utility of this method with no false positives and only 3 false negatives for samples that were below the detection level of the method as documented.

  4. Quantitative analysis of clenbuterol in meat products using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guy, P A; Savoy, M C; Stadler, R H

    1999-12-24

    A method is presented that allows quantitation of clenbuterol in meat and liver products at the ng/kg level by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESIMS-MS) using a stable isotopically labeled internal standard. The practical procedure involves acid extraction followed by two solid-phase clean-up steps with C18 and strong cation-exchange (SCX) resins. The typical recovery of the analyte spiked at 0.4 microg/kg in meat and liver samples was at 63+/-7%. Mass spectral acquisition was done in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) to provide a high degree of sensitivity, achieving a limit of detection and quantitation at 10 and 15 ng/kg, respectively. Two precursor ions at m/z 277 and 279, corresponding to the characteristic isotopic cluster of the two chlorine atoms of clenbuterol, were monitored by LC-ESIMS-MS to provide unambiguous identity of the analyte. Samples of meat and liver of various origins with either incurred residues or spiked with known amounts of clenbuterol were used to validate the method.

  5. Silver (Ι)-assisted enantiomeric analysis of ginsenosides using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing; Yu, Binbin; Yang, Hongmei; Li, Xue; Liu, Shuying

    2012-10-01

    For identification of ginsenoside enantiomers, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used to generate silver complexes of the type [ginsenoside + Ag](+). Collision induced dissociation of the silver-ginsenoside complexes produced fragment ions by dehydration, allowing differentiation of ginsenoside enantiomers by the intensity of [M + Ag - H(2)O](+) ion. In the meanwhile, an approach based on the distinct profiles of enantiomer-selective fragment ion intensity varied with collision energy was introduced to refine the identification and quantitation of ginsenoside enantiomers. Five pairs of enantiomeric ginsenosides were distinguished and quantified on the basis of the distribution of fragment ion [M + Ag - H(2)O](+). This method was also extended to the identification of other type of ginsenoside isomers such as ginsenoside Rb2 and Rb3. For demonstrating the practicability of this novel approach, it was utilized to analyze the molar ratio of 20-(S) and 20-(R) type enantiomeric ginsenosides in enantiomer mixture in red ginseng extract. The generation of characteristic fragment ion [M + Ag - H(2)O](+) likely results from the reduction of potential energy barrier of dehydration because of the catalysis of silver ion. The mechanism of enantiomer identification of ginsenosides was discussed from the aspects of computational modeling and internal energy. PMID:23019162

  6. Identification tree based on fragmentation rules for structure elucidation of organophosphorus esters by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberg, Adrián; Ichou, Farid; Cole, Richard B; Machuron-Mandard, Xavier; Junot, Christophe; Lesage, Denis; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-05-01

    Organophosphorus compounds have played important roles as pesticides, chemical warfare agents and extractors of radioactive material. Structural elucidation of phosphonates poses a particular challenge because their initial forms can be hydrolyzed, thus, degradation products may predominate in samples acquired in the field. The analysis of non-volatile organophosphorus compounds and their degradation products is possible using electrospray tandem mass spectrometry ESI-MS/MS. Here, we present a generic strategy that allows the unambiguous identification of substituents for two families of organophosphorus compounds: the phosphonates and phosphates. General fragmentation rules were deduced based on the study of decomposition pathways of 55 organophosphorus esters, including examples found in the literature. Multistage MS (MS(n)) experiments at high resolution in a hybrid mass spectrometer provide accurate mass measurements, whereas collision-induced dissociation experiments in a triple quadrupole give access to small fragment ions. The creation of a specific nomenclature for each possible structure of organophosphorus compound, depending on the alkyl side chain linked to the oxygen, was achieved by applying these fragmentation rules. This led to the creation of an 'identification tree' based upon the unique consecutive decomposition pathways uncovered for each individual compound. Hence, seven structural motifs were created that orient an unequivocal identification using the 'identification tree'. Despite the similar structures of the ensemble of phosphate and phosphonate esters, distinct identifications based upon characteristic neutral losses and diagnostic fragment ions were possible in all cases. PMID:23674282

  7. Fast quantitative detection of cocaine in beverages using nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Peng, Xuejiao; Yang, Shuiping; Gu, Haiwei; Chen, Huanwen; Huan, Yanfu; Zhang, Tingting; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2010-02-01

    Without any sample pretreatment, effervescent beverage fluids were manually sprayed into the primary ion plume created by using a nanoelectrospray ionization source for direct ionization, and the analyte ions of interest were guided into an ion trap mass spectrometer for tandem mass analysis. Functional ingredients (e.g., vitamins, taurine, and caffeine, etc.) and spiked impurity (e.g., cocaine) in various beverages, such as Red Bull energy drink, Coco-cola, and Pepsi samples were rapidly identified within 1.5 s. The limit of detection was found to be 7-15 fg (S/N = 3) for cocaine in different samples using the characteristic fragment (m/z 150) observed in the MS(3) experiments. Typical relative standard deviation and recovery of this method were 6.9%-8.6% and 104%-108% for direct analysis of three actual samples, showing that nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry is a useful technique for fast screening cocaine presence in beverages. PMID:19939702

  8. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) with atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry for drug detection.

    PubMed

    Roscioli, Kristyn M; Tufariello, Jessica A; Zhang, Xing; Li, Shelly X; Goetz, Gilles H; Cheng, Guilong; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H

    2014-04-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was coupled to an ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometer (IM-TOFMS) for the direct analysis of active ingredients in pharmaceutical samples. The DESI source was also coupled with a standalone IMS demonstrating potential of portable and inexpensive drug-quality testing platforms. The DESI-IMS required no sample pretreatment as ions were generated directly from tablets and cream formulations. The analysis of a range of over-the-counter and prescription tablet formations was demonstrated for amphetamine (methylphenidate), antidepressant (venlafaxine), barbiturate (Barbituric acid), depressant (alprazolam), narcotic (3-methylmorphine) and sympatholytic (propranolol) drugs. Active ingredients from soft and liquid formulations, such as Icy Hot cream (methyl salicylate) and Nyquil cold medicine (acetaminophen, dextromethorphan, doxylamine) were also detected. Increased sensitivity for selective drug responses was demonstrated through the formation of sodiated adduct ions by introducing small quantities of NaCl into the DESI solvent. Of the drugs and pharmaceuticals tested in this study, 68% (22 total samples) provided a clear ion mobility response at characteristic mobilities either as (M + H)(+), (M - H)(-), or (M + Na)(+) ions.

  9. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry fingerprinting of whisky: immediate proof of origin and authenticity.

    PubMed

    Møller, Jens K S; Catharino, Rodrigo R; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2005-06-01

    Authentic samples of whisky produced in Scotland and USA and counterfeit whisky samples commercialized in Brazil have been directly submitted to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis in both the negative and positive ion modes to assess the potential of this technique for simple and rapid quality control and proof of authenticity of whisky samples. ESI in the negative ion mode yields the most characteristic whisky fingerprinting mass spectra in just a few seconds by direct infusion of the samples, detecting the most polar or acidic components of each sample in their deprotonated anionic forms. No pre-treatment of the sample, such as extraction or derivatization or even dilution, is required. The analysis of the ESI(-)-MS data both by simple visual inspection but more particularly by chemometric data treatment enables separation of the whisky samples into three unequivocally distinct groups: Scotch, American and counterfeit whisky, whereas single malt and blended Scotch whiskies are also distinguished to some extent. As indicated by ESI-MS/MS analysis, the diagnostic anions are simple sugars, disaccharides and phenolic compounds. Direct infusion ESI-MS therefore provides immediate chemical fingerprinting of whisky samples for type, origin and quality control, as demonstrated herein for American, Scottish and counterfeit samples, whereas ESI-MS/MS analysis of diagnostic ions adds a second dimension of fingerprinting characterization when improved selectivity is desired.

  10. Characterization of N,N-dimethyl amino acids by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naresh Chary, V; Sudarshana Reddy, B; Kumar, Ch Dinesh; Srinivas, R; Prabhakar, S

    2015-05-01

    Methylation is an essential metabolic process for a number of critical reactions in the body. Methyl groups are involved in the healthy function of the body life processes, by conducting methylation process involving specific enzymes. In these processes, various amino acids are methylated, and the occurrence of methylated amino acids in nature is diverse. Nowadays, mass-spectrometric-based identification of small molecules as biomarkers for diseases is a growing research. Although all dimethyl amino acids are metabolically important molecules, mass spectral data are available only for a few of them in the literature. In this study, we report synthesis and characterization of all dimethyl amino acids, by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments on protonated molecules. The MS/MS spectra of all the studied dimethyl amino acids showed preliminary loss of H2O + CO to form corresponding immonium ions. The other product ions in the spectra are highly characteristic of the methyl groups on the nitrogen and side chain of the amino acids. The amino acids, which are isomeric and isobaric with the studied dimethyl amino acids, gave distinctive MS/MS spectra. The study also included MS/MS analysis of immonium ions of dimethyl amino acids that provide information on side chain structure, and it is further tested to determine the N-terminal amino acid of the peptides.

  11. Langevin Equation on Fractal Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satin, Seema; Gangal, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze random motion of a particle on a fractal curve, using Langevin approach. This involves defining a new velocity in terms of mass of the fractal curve, as defined in recent work. The geometry of the fractal curve, plays an important role in this analysis. A Langevin equation with a particular model of noise is proposed and solved using techniques of the Fα-Calculus.

  12. Study of superhydrophobic electrosprayed catalyst layers using a localized reference electrode technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparro, A. M.; Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Folgado, M. A.; Brightman, E.; Hinds, G.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of electrosprayed cathode catalyst layers in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is studied using a localized reference electrode technique. Single cells with an electrosprayed cathode catalyst layer show an increase of >20% in maximum power density under standard testing conditions, compared with identical cells assembled with a conventional, state-of-the-art, gas diffusion cathode. When operated at high current density (1.2 A cm-2) the electrosprayed catalyst layers show more homogeneous distribution of the localized cathode potential, with a standard deviation from inlet to outlet of <50 mV, compared with 79 mV for the conventional gas diffusion cathode. Higher performance and homogeneity of cell response is attributed to the superhydrophobic nature of the macroporous electrosprayed catalyst layer structure, which enhances the rate of expulsion of liquid water from the cathode. On the other hand, at low current densities (<0.5 A cm-2), the electrosprayed layers exhibit more heterogeneous distribution of cathode potential than the conventional cathodes; this behavior is attributed to less favorable kinetics for oxygen reduction in very hydrophobic catalyst layers. The optimum performance may be obtained with electrosprayed catalyst layers employing a high Pt/C catalyst ratio.

  13. Controlled release behaviour of protein-loaded microparticles prepared via coaxial or emulsion electrospray

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Xiaoping; Liu, Wentao; Zhang, Feng; Cai, Qing; Deng, Xuliang

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles are an effective way to achieve sustained drug release. In this study, we investigated a sustained release model of PLGA microparticles with incorporated protein via either emulsion or coaxial electrospray techniques. PLGA (75:25) was used as the carrier, and bovine serum albumin as a model protein. Coaxial electrospray resulted in a type of core–shell structure with mean diameters of 2.41 ± 0.60 µm and a centralised protein distribution within the core. Emulsion electrospray formed bigger microparticles with mean diameters of 22.75 ± 8.05 µm and a heterogeneous protein distribution throughout the microparticles. The coaxial electrospray microparticles presented a much slighter burst release than the emulsion electrospray microparticles. Loading efficiency was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the coaxial group than emulsion group. This indicated that both emulsion and coaxial electrospray could produce protein-loaded microparticles with sustained release behaviour, but the former revealed a superior approach for drug delivery. PMID:23346923

  14. Using the Electrochemistry of the Electrospray Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2007-01-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) is one of the more widely used analysis methods in science today, impacting fields as diverse as conventional chemistry to biotechnology and materials science. , Even 20 years after bursting onto the mass spectrometry scene, the underlying processes in ES ionization continue to be better understood exposing new opportunities for the technique. , , , , Such is the case for the improved understanding related to the electrochemical processes inherent to the operation of this ion source, , , which is the topic of this report. Electrospray ionization involves three main steps prior to mass analysis: the generation and charging of the ES droplets; droplet evaporation and the production of gas-phase ions; and secondary processes that modify the gas-phase ions in the atmosphere and the sub-atmospheric pressure sampling regions of the mass spectrometer. Integral to the generation and charging of the ES droplets are electrochemical reactions that occur at the conductive contact/solution interface within or near the ES emitter to maintain the quasi-continuous production of charged droplets and ultimately gas-phase ions. The basic electrochemical phenomena concerning the ES ion source were first brought to wide attention in the mass spectrometry community by Kebarle and co-workers in the early 1990's,8 but the electrochemistry of electrostatic spray devices and possible analytical consequences resulting from this phenomenon were realized and discussed in the literature at least as far back as the mid-1970's. When asked to intercede in a debate on the significance of electrochemistry in the ES ionization (ESI) process, 2002 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry John Fenn noted that to him " the idea that electrochemical reactions might be taking place in an ES ion source was too obvious to mention. That products of such reactions are of vital significance in the overall ESI process was much less obvious. Indeed, it seems fair to say that with few

  15. The wavelength dependence of Triton's light curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mcewen, A.

    1991-01-01

    Using Voyager observations, it is demonstrated that Triton's orbital light curve is strongly wavelength-dependent, a characteristic which readily explains some of the apparent discrepancies among pre-Voyager telescopic measurements. Specifically, a light curve amplitude (peak to peak) is found that decreases systematically with increasing wavelength from about 0.08 magnitude (peak to peak) near 200 nm to less than 0.02 magnitude near 1000 nm. Peak brightness occurs near 90 deg orbital longitude (leading hemisphere). The brightness variation across this hemisphere is close to sinusoidal; the variation across the darker hemisphere is more complex. The decrease in light curve amplitude with increasing wavelength appears to be due to a decrease in contrast among surface markings, rather than to atmospheric obscuration. The model also explains the observed decrease in the amplitude of Triton's light curve at visible wavelengths over the past decade, a decrease related to the current migration of the subsolar latitude toward the south pole; it is predicted that this trend will continue into the 1990s.

  16. Light extraction block with curved surface

    DOEpatents

    Levermore, Peter; Krall, Emory; Silvernail, Jeffrey; Rajan, Kamala; Brown, Julia J.

    2016-03-22

    Light extraction blocks, and OLED lighting panels using light extraction blocks, are described, in which the light extraction blocks include various curved shapes that provide improved light extraction properties compared to parallel emissive surface, and a thinner form factor and better light extraction than a hemisphere. Lighting systems described herein may include a light source with an OLED panel. A light extraction block with a three-dimensional light emitting surface may be optically coupled to the light source. The three-dimensional light emitting surface of the block may includes a substantially curved surface, with further characteristics related to the curvature of the surface at given points. A first radius of curvature corresponding to a maximum principal curvature k.sub.1 at a point p on the substantially curved surface may be greater than a maximum height of the light extraction block. A maximum height of the light extraction block may be less than 50% of a maximum width of the light extraction block. Surfaces with cross sections made up of line segments and inflection points may also be fit to approximated curves for calculating the radius of curvature.

  17. Electrospray Charging of Minerals: Surface Chemistry and Applications to High-Velocity Microparticle Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, T.; Call, S.; Austin, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Electrospray is a soft ionization technique commonly used to charge large biomolecules; it has, however, also been applied to inorganic compounds. We are extending this technique to mineral microparticles. Electrospray-charged mineral microparticles are interesting in the context of surface science because surface chemistry dictates where and how charge carriers can bond to mineral surfaces. In addition, using electrospray to charge mineral particles allows these particles to be electrostatically accelerated as projectiles in high- and hyper-velocity impacts. Since current techniques for producing high- and hyper-velocity microparticle impacts are largely limited to metal or metal-coated projectiles, using minerals as projectiles is a significant innovation. Electrospray involves three steps: creation of charged droplets containing solute/particles, evaporation and bifurcation of droplets, and desolvation of the solute/particles. An acidified solution is slowly pumped through a needle in a strong DC field, which causes the solution to break into tiny, charged droplets laden with protons. Solvent evaporates from the electrosprayed droplets as they move through the electric field toward a grounded plate, causing the charge on the droplet to increase relative to its mass. When the electrosprayed droplet’s charge becomes such that the droplet is no longer stable, it bifurcates, and each of the resulting droplets carries some of the original droplet’s charge. Evaporation and bifurcation continues until the solute particle is completely desolvated. The result is a protonated solute molecule or particle. We built an instrument that electrosprays particles into vacuum and measures them using an image charge detector. Mineral microparticles were prepared by grinding natural mineral samples to ~2 µm diameter. These microparticles are then added to a 4:1 methanol:water solution to create a 0.005% w/v suspension. The suspension is electrosprayed into vacuum, where the

  18. Quantitative Thin-Layer Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Caffeine Using a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Deibel, Michael A.; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 {mu}m/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 {mu}L) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by 8% or more) than the literature values.

  19. Quantitative thin-layer chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of caffeine using a surface sampling probe electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry system.

    PubMed

    Ford, Michael J; Deibel, Michael A; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-07-15

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 mum/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 muL) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by approximately 8% or more) than the literature values. PMID:16013850

  20. Mask-less patterning of organic light emitting diodes using electrospray and selective biasing on pixel electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangyeob; Koo, Hyun; Cho, Sunghwan

    2015-04-01

    Wet process of soluble organic light emitting diode (OLED) materials has attracted much attention due to its potential as a large-area manufacturing process with high productivity. Electrospray (ES) deposition is one of candidates of organic thin film formation process for OLED. However, to fabricate red, green, and blue emitters for color display, a fine metal mask is required during spraying emitter materials. We demonstrate a mask-less color pixel patterning process using ES of soluble OLED materials and selective biasing on pixel electrodes and a spray nozzle. We show red and green line patterns of OLED materials. It was found that selective patterning can be allowed by coulomb repulsion between nozzle and pixel. Furthermore, we fabricated blue fluorescent OLED devices by vacuum evaporation and ES processes. The device performance of ES processed OLED showed nearly identical current-voltage characteristics and slightly lower current efficiency compared to vacuum processed OLED.

  1. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  2. Tool For Making Curved Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, Robert; Calve, Andrew; Pastreck, Edwin; Padden, Edward

    1992-01-01

    Tool for use in electrical-discharge machining (EDM) guides EDM electrode in making curved holes. Guide rod fits in slot in arm, which moves through arc. Motion drives electrode into workpiece along desired curved path. Electrode burns into workpiece while arm rotates on spindle. Discharge cuts hole of same radius of curvature.

  3. Application and Analysis of Biological Electrospray in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yunmin, Ma; Yuanyuan, Liu; Haiping, Chen; Qingxi, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Nan-fiber scaffolds are suitable tools for tissue engineering. Electro spinning materials together with cells presents not adequate to obtain a high cellular zing tissue constructs as the shear force, tensile force, and other physical effects excited in the electro spinning process, which are harmful to cellular differentiation, development and function. However, this limitation has been overcome by a micro integration system of simultaneously bio-electro spraying human adipose stem cells (ASCs) and electro spinning Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Then it was compared to the single electro spinning nan-fiber scaffolds in relation to cell viability, which showed that the scaffolds by micro integration approach has a larger number of surviving cells and more suitable for cell growth and proliferation. In addition, the relationship between different parameters of biological electrospray (voltage, flow rate and distance of the needle from the collecting board) and droplet size of cell suspension was elucidated and the droplets with a near-mono distribution (<50um) could be generated to deposit a single living cell within a droplet. The association of bio-electro spraying with electro spinning (a scaffold preparation technique) has been demonstrated to be a promising and suitable tissue engineering approach in producing nan-fiber based three-dimensional (3-D) cell seeded scaffolds.

  4. Amorphization of hard crystalline materials by electrosprayed nanodroplet impact

    SciTech Connect

    Gamero-Castaño, Manuel Torrents, Anna; Borrajo-Pelaez, Rafael; Zheng, Jian-Guo

    2014-11-07

    A beam of electrosprayed nanodroplets impacting on single-crystal silicon amorphizes a thin surface layer of a thickness comparable to the diameter of the drops. The phase transition occurs at projectile velocities exceeding a threshold, and is caused by the quenching of material melted by the impacts. This article demonstrates that the amorphization of silicon is a general phenomenon, as nanodroplets impacting at sufficient velocity also amorphize other covalently bonded crystals. In particular, we bombard single-crystal wafers of Si, Ge, GaAs, GaP, InAs, and SiC in a range of projectile velocities, and characterize the samples via electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy to determine the aggregation state under the surface. InAs requires the lowest projectile velocity to develop an amorphous layer, followed by Ge, Si, GaAs, and GaP. SiC is the only semiconductor that remains fully crystalline, likely due to the relatively low velocities of the beamlets used in this study. The resiliency of each crystal to amorphization correlates well with the specific energy needed to melt it except for Ge, which requires projectile velocities higher than expected.

  5. Electrospray deposition of organic molecules on bulk insulator surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hinaut, Antoine; Pawlak, Rémy; Meyer, Ernst; Glatzel, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    Large organic molecules are of important interest for organic-based devices such as hybrid photovoltaics or molecular electronics. Knowing their adsorption geometries and electronic structures allows to design and predict macroscopic device properties. Fundamental investigations in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) are thus mandatory to analyze and engineer processes in this prospects. With increasing size, complexity or chemical reactivity, depositing molecules by thermal evaporation becomes challenging. A recent way to deposit molecules in clean conditions is Electrospray Ionization (ESI). ESI keeps the possibility to work with large molecules, to introduce them in vacuum, and to deposit them on a large variety of surfaces. Here, ESI has been successfully applied to deposit triply fused porphyrin molecules on an insulating KBr(001) surface in UHV environment. Different deposition coverages have been obtained and characterization of the surface by in-situ atomic force microscopy working in the non-contact mode shows details of the molecular structures adsorbed on the surface. We show that UHV-ESI, can be performed on insulating surfaces in the sub-monolayer regime and to single molecules which opens the possibility to study a variety of complex molecules.

  6. Micro-nano hierarchical superhydrophobic electrospray-synthesized silica layers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yeong; Kim, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Sang Sub

    2013-02-15

    This paper reports the preparation of superhydrophobic SiO(2) layers with a micro-nano hierarchical surface structure. SiO(2) layers, which were rough on the microscale, were prepared using an electrospraying method combined with a sol-gel chemical route. To create a nanoscale structure, the surface of the SiO(2) layers was coated with Au nanoparticles using an ultraviolet-enhanced chemical reduction process, resulting in a micro-nano hierarchical surface structure. A subsequent fluorination treatment with a solution containing trichloro(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)silane resulted in fluorination of the micro-nano hierarchical SiO(2) layers. The resulting SiO(2) layers showed outstanding repellency toward a range of liquid droplets, for example, a water-repellency of 170°. The surface fraction and work of adhesion of the fluorinated, micro-nano hierarchical SiO(2) layers were estimated using the Cassie-Baxter and Young-Dupre equations, respectively. The long-term durability and ultraviolet resistance of the superhydrophobic SiO(2) layers prepared in this study highlight their potential in a range of practical applications.

  7. A New Electrospray Aerosol Generator with High Particle Transmission Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huijing; Patel, Anand C; Holtzman, Michael J; Chen, Da-Ren

    2011-01-01

    A new single-capillary electrospray (ES) aerosol generator has been developed for monodisperse particle production with maximal transmission efficiency. The new generator consists of both a spray chamber in a point-to-orifice-plate configuration and a charge reduction chamber that can hold up to 4 Nuclespot ionizers (Model P-2042, NRD Inc.). The 2 chambers are partitioned by an orifice plate. To optimize the particle transmission efficiency of the prototype, a systematic study was performed on the generator by varying the system setup and operation. Two key dimensions of the generator setup, the orifice diameter and the distance from the capillary tip to the orifice plate, were varied. Fluorescence analysis was applied to characterize the loss of ES-generated particles at different locations of the prototype. It was found that particle loss in the generator could be reduced by either increasing the orifice diameter or decreasing the distance between the capillary tip and the orifice plate. Increasing either the total radioactivity of the ionizers or the flowrate of the particle carrier gas also further decreased the particle loss in the system. The maximum particle transmission efficiency of 88.0% was obtained with the spray chamber fully opened to the charge reduction chamber, the capillary tip at the same level as the orifice plate, and 4 bipolar ionizers installed.

  8. Transient Ion-Pair Separations for Electrospray Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanghui; Lam, Lily; Chi, Bert; Kadjo, Akinde F; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2016-02-16

    We report a novel ion-pair chromatography (IPC) approach for liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS), where the eluent does not contain any ion-pairing reagent (IPR). The IPR is injected on the column, much like the sample, and moves down the column. Significant amounts of a high retention factor IPR is injected, resulting in a transient but reproducible regional coating that progresses along the column. The sample is injected after a brief interval. The sample components interact with the IPR coated region during their passage; the chosen eluent gradient elutes the analytes of interest into the mass spectrometer before the IPR. Following analyte elution, the gradient is steeply raised, the IPR is washed out, and the effluent is sent to waste via a diverter valve until it is fully removed. As the nature of the analyte retention continuously changes along the column and with time, we call this transient ion-pair separation (TIPS). As the IPR never enters the MS, TIPS addresses two major drawbacks of IPC for ESI-MS: it avoids both ion suppression and ion source contamination. The potential of the generic approach for other modes of separation is discussed. An illustrative separation of two small inorganic ions, iodate and nitrate, is demonstrated on a reverse phase column by a transient prior injection of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride as IPR. PMID:26765166

  9. Electrospray of multifunctional microparticles for image-guided drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leilei; Yan, Yan; Mena, Joshua; Sun, Jingjing; Letson, Alan; Roberts, Cynthia; Zhou, Chuanqing; Chai, Xinyu; Ren, Qiushi; Xu, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    Anti-VEGF therapies have been widely explored for the management of posterior ocular disease, like neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Loading anti-VEGF therapies in biodegradable microparticles may enable sustained drug release and improved therapeutic outcome. However, existing microfabrication processes such as double emulsification produce drug-loaded microparticles with low encapsulation rate and poor antibody bioactivity. To overcome these limitations, we fabricate multifunctional microparticles by both single needle and coaxial needle electrospray. The experimental setup for the process includes flat-end syringe needles (both single needle and coaxial needle), high voltage power supplies, and syringe pumps. Microparticles are formed by an electrical field between the needles and the ground electrode. Droplet size and morphology are controlled by multiple process parameters and material properties, such as flow rate and applied voltage. The droplets are collected and freezing dried to obtain multifunctional microparticles. Fluorescent beads encapsulated poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) microparticles are injected into rabbits eyes through intravitreal injection to test the biodegradable time of microparticles.

  10. Next Generation of Electrosprayed Fibers for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jong Kyu

    2011-01-01

    Electrospinning is a widely established polymer-processing technology that allows generation of fibers (in nanometer to micrometer size) that can be collected to form nonwoven structures. By choosing suitable process parameters and appropriate solvent systems, fiber size can be controlled. Since the technology allows the possibility of tailoring the mechanical properties and biological properties, there has been a significant effort to adapt the technology in tissue regeneration and drug delivery. This review focuses on recent developments in adapting this technology for tissue regeneration applications. In particular, different configurations of nozzles and collector plates are summarized from the view of cell seeding and distribution. Further developments in obtaining thick layers of tissues and thin layered membranes are discussed. Recent advances in porous structure spatial architecture parameters such as pore size, fiber size, fiber stiffness, and matrix turnover are summarized. In addition, possibility of developing simple three-dimensional models using electrosprayed fibers that can be utilized in routine cell culture studies is described. PMID:21210761

  11. Advances in drug delivery via electrospun and electrosprayed nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Maedeh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2013-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) techniques refer to procedures that utilize electrostatic forces to fabricate fibers or particles of different shapes with sizes in the nano-range to a few microns through electrically charged fluid jet. Employing different techniques, such as blending, surface modification, and coaxial process, there is a great possibility of incorporating bioactive such molecules as drugs, DNA, and growth factors into the nanostructures fabricated via EHD techniques. By careful selection of materials and processing conditions, desired encapsulation efficiency as well as preserved bioactivity of the therapeutic agents can be achieved. The drug-loaded nanostructures produced can be applied via different routes, such as implantation, injection, and topical or oral administration for a wide range of disease treatment. Taking advantage of the recent developments in EHD techniques like the coaxial process or multilayered structures, individually controlled delivery of multiple drugs is achievable, which is of great demand in cancer therapy and growth-factor delivery. This review summarizes the most recent techniques and postmodification methods to fabricate electrospun nanofibers and electrosprayed particles for drug-delivery applications.

  12. Induction of protein conformational change inside the charged electrospray droplet.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shibdas

    2013-02-01

    The behavior of the analyte molecules inside the neutral core of the charged electrospray (ES) droplet is not unambiguously known to date. The possibility of protein conformational change inside the charged ES droplet has been investigated. The ES droplets encapsulating the protein molecules were exposed to the acetic acid vapor in the ionization chamber to absorb the acetic acid vapor. Because of the faster evaporation of water than that of acetic acid, the droplets became enriched with acetic acid and thus altered the solvent environment (e.g. pH and polarity) of the final charged droplets from where the naked charged analytes (proteins) are formed. Thus, the perturbation of the ES droplet solvent environment resulted in the protein conformational change (unfolding) during the short lifespan of the ES droplet and that is reflected by the multimodal charge state distribution in the corresponding mass spectra. Further, the extent of this conformational change inside the ES droplet was found to be related to the structural flexibility of the protein. Although the protein conformational change inside the ES droplet has been driven by using acetic acid vapor in the present study, the results would help in the near future to understand the spontaneity of the conformational change of the analyte on the millisecond timescale of phase transition in the natural way of ES process.

  13. [Theory and practice of electrospray crystallization in particle size reduction].

    PubMed

    Szunyogh, Tímea; Ambrus, Rita; Szabóné Révész, Piroska

    2015-01-01

    Nowdays, one of the most challenges for the researchers is the formulation of poorly water soluble drugs. Reduction of particle size of active agents to submicron range could result in a faster dissolution rate and higher bioavailability. Integration as crystallization process is an often used particle size decreasing technique. The aim of this study was to show the theoretical background and practical application of the electros pray crystallization as an innovative particle size decreasing technique. Our model drug was the niflumic acid (NIF), which belongs to the BCS Class II. After the optimization of the process parameters, the physico-chemical properties of the samples were characterized. Particle size and shape were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Crystalline state of NIF and the samples were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction. Physico-chemical properties were determined using dissolution test from simulated media. The electrospray crytallization resulted in particle size reduction but the aggregation of nanonized NIF crystals (NIF-nano) could not avoid without excipient. Aggregates with poor secondary forces are suitable for production of the interactive physical mixture. It was found that NIF-nano could be well distributed on the surface of the mannitol as carrier and the Poloxamer R protected the NIF-nano crystals (320 nm)from aggregation. Consequently, the physical mixture resulted in product with higher polarity, better wettability and faster dissolution rate of NIF as raw NIF or NIF-nano.

  14. Advances in drug delivery via electrospun and electrosprayed nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Maedeh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2013-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) techniques refer to procedures that utilize electrostatic forces to fabricate fibers or particles of different shapes with sizes in the nano-range to a few microns through electrically charged fluid jet. Employing different techniques, such as blending, surface modification, and coaxial process, there is a great possibility of incorporating bioactive such molecules as drugs, DNA, and growth factors into the nanostructures fabricated via EHD techniques. By careful selection of materials and processing conditions, desired encapsulation efficiency as well as preserved bioactivity of the therapeutic agents can be achieved. The drug-loaded nanostructures produced can be applied via different routes, such as implantation, injection, and topical or oral administration for a wide range of disease treatment. Taking advantage of the recent developments in EHD techniques like the coaxial process or multilayered structures, individually controlled delivery of multiple drugs is achievable, which is of great demand in cancer therapy and growth-factor delivery. This review summarizes the most recent techniques and postmodification methods to fabricate electrospun nanofibers and electrosprayed particles for drug-delivery applications. PMID:23976851

  15. [Theory and practice of electrospray crystallization in particle size reduction].

    PubMed

    Szunyogh, Tímea; Ambrus, Rita; Szabóné Révész, Piroska

    2015-01-01

    Nowdays, one of the most challenges for the researchers is the formulation of poorly water soluble drugs. Reduction of particle size of active agents to submicron range could result in a faster dissolution rate and higher bioavailability. Integration as crystallization process is an often used particle size decreasing technique. The aim of this study was to show the theoretical background and practical application of the electros pray crystallization as an innovative particle size decreasing technique. Our model drug was the niflumic acid (NIF), which belongs to the BCS Class II. After the optimization of the process parameters, the physico-chemical properties of the samples were characterized. Particle size and shape were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Crystalline state of NIF and the samples were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction. Physico-chemical properties were determined using dissolution test from simulated media. The electrospray crytallization resulted in particle size reduction but the aggregation of nanonized NIF crystals (NIF-nano) could not avoid without excipient. Aggregates with poor secondary forces are suitable for production of the interactive physical mixture. It was found that NIF-nano could be well distributed on the surface of the mannitol as carrier and the Poloxamer R protected the NIF-nano crystals (320 nm)from aggregation. Consequently, the physical mixture resulted in product with higher polarity, better wettability and faster dissolution rate of NIF as raw NIF or NIF-nano. PMID:26390735

  16. Application and Analysis of Biological Electrospray in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yunmin, Ma; Yuanyuan, Liu; Haiping, Chen; Qingxi, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Nan-fiber scaffolds are suitable tools for tissue engineering. Electro spinning materials together with cells presents not adequate to obtain a high cellular zing tissue constructs as the shear force, tensile force, and other physical effects excited in the electro spinning process, which are harmful to cellular differentiation, development and function. However, this limitation has been overcome by a micro integration system of simultaneously bio-electro spraying human adipose stem cells (ASCs) and electro spinning Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Then it was compared to the single electro spinning nan-fiber scaffolds in relation to cell viability, which showed that the scaffolds by micro integration approach has a larger number of surviving cells and more suitable for cell growth and proliferation. In addition, the relationship between different parameters of biological electrospray (voltage, flow rate and distance of the needle from the collecting board) and droplet size of cell suspension was elucidated and the droplets with a near-mono distribution (<50um) could be generated to deposit a single living cell within a droplet. The association of bio-electro spraying with electro spinning (a scaffold preparation technique) has been demonstrated to be a promising and suitable tissue engineering approach in producing nan-fiber based three-dimensional (3-D) cell seeded scaffolds. PMID:26089992

  17. Extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for uranium chemistry studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanwen; Luo, Mingbiao; Xiao, Saijin; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Zhou, Yafei; Zhang, Xinglei

    2013-01-01

    Uranium chemistry is of sustainable interest. Breakthroughs in uranium studies make serious impacts in many fields including chemistry, physics, energy and biology, because uranium plays fundamentally important roles in these fields. Substantial progress in uranium studies normally requires development of novel analytical tools. Extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) is a sensitive technique for trace detection of various analytes in complex matrices without sample pretreatment. EESI-MS shows excellent performance for monitoring uranium species in various samples at trace levels since it tolerates extremely complex matrices. Therefore, EESI-MS is an alternative choice for studying uranium chemistry, especially when it combines ion trap mass spectrometry. In this presentation, three examples of EESI-MS for uranium chemistry studies will be given, illustrating the potential applications of EESI-MS in synthesis chemistry, physical chemistry, and analytical chemistry of uranium. More specifically, case studies on EESI-MS for synthesis and characterization of novel uranium species, and for rapid detection of uranium and its isotope ratios in various samples will be presented. Novel methods based on EESI-MS for screening uranium ores and radioactive iodine-129 will be presented. PMID:24349940

  18. Is electrospray emission really due to columbic forces?

    SciTech Connect

    Aliotta, Francesco Ponterio, Rosina C.; Salvato, Gabriele; Vasi, Cirino; Calandra, Pietro; Pochylski, Mikolaj

    2014-09-15

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is a widely adopted soft ionization method for mass spectroscopy (MS). In spite of the undeniable success of the technique, its mechanisms are difficult to be analytically modelled because the process is characterized by non-equilibrium conditions. The common belief is that the formation of gas-phase ions takes place at the apex of the Taylor cone via electrophoretic charging. The charge balance implies that a conversion of electrons to ions should occur at the metal-liquid interface of the injector needle. We have detected that the above description is based on unproved assumptions which are not consistent with the correct evaluation of the problem. The comparison between experiments performed under the usual geometry and observations obtained under symmetric field configurations suggests that the emitted droplets cannot be significantly charged or, at least, that any possible ionization mechanism is so poorly efficient to ensure that columbic forces cannot play a major role in jet formation, even in cases where the liquid consists of a solution of ionic species. Further work is required to clearly understand how ionization occurs in ESI-MS.

  19. Electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry of intact intrinsic membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Whitelegge, J. P.; Gundersen, C. B.; Faull, K. F.

    1998-01-01

    Membrane proteins drive and mediate many essential cellular processes making them a vital section of the proteome. However, the amphipathic nature of these molecules ensures their detailed structural analysis remains challenging. A versatile procedure for effective electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) of intact intrinsic membrane proteins purified using reverse-phase chromatography in aqueous formic acid/isopropanol is presented. The spectra of four examples, bacteriorhodopsin and its apoprotein from Halobacterium and the D1 and D2 reaction-center subunits from spinach thylakoids, achieve mass measurements that are within 0.01% of calculated theoretical values. All of the spectra reveal lesser quantities of other molecular species that can usually be equated with covalently modified subpopulations of these proteins. Our analysis of bovine rhodopsin, the first ESI-MS study of a G-protein coupled receptor, yielded a complex spectrum indicative of extensive molecular heterogeneity. The range of masses measured for the native molecule agrees well with the range calculated based upon variable glycosylation and reveals further heterogeneity arising from other covalent modifications. The technique described represents the most precise way to catalogue membrane proteins and their post-translational modifications. Resolution of the components of protein complexes provides insights into native protein/protein interactions. The apparent retention of structure by bacteriorhodopsin during the analysis raises the potential of obtaining tertiary structure information using more developed ESI-MS experiments. PMID:9655347

  20. Electrospray ionization with aluminum foil: A versatile mass spectrometric technique.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2014-03-19

    In this study, we developed a novel electrospray ionization (ESI) technique based on household aluminum foil (Al foil) and demonstated the desirable features and applications of this technique. Al foil can be readily cut and folded into desired configuration for effective ionization and for holding sample solution in bulk to allowing acquisition of durable ion signals. The present technique was demonstrated to be applicable in analysis of a wide variety of samples, ranging from pure chemical and biological compounds, e.g., organic compounds and proteins, to complex samples in liquid, semi-solid, and solid states, e.g., beverages, skincare cream, and herbal medicines. The inert, hydrophobic and impermeable surface of Al foil allows convenient and effective on-target extraction of solid samples and on-target sample clean-up, i.e., removal of salts and detergents from proteins and peptides, extending ESI device from usually only for sample loading and ionization to including sample processing. Moreover, Al foil is an excellent heat-conductor and highly heat-tolerant, permitting direct monitoring of thermal reactions, e.g., thermal denaturation of proteins. Overall, the present study showed that Al-foil ESI could be an economical and versatile method that allows a wide range of applications. PMID:24594810

  1. Analytical Properties of Solid-substrate Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Conventional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) uses a capillary for sample loading and ionization. Along with the development of ambient ionization techniques, ESI-MS using noncapillary emitters has attracted more interest in recent years. Following our recent report on ESI-MS using wooden tips ( Anal. Chem. 83, 8201-8207 (2011)), the technique was further investigated and extended in this study. Our results revealed that the wooden tips could serve as a chromatographic column for separation of sample components. Sequential and exhaustive ionization was observed for proteins and salts on wooden tips with salts ionized sooner and proteins later. Nonconductive materials that contain microchannels/pores could be used as tips for ESI-MS analysis with sample solutions loaded to the sharp-ends only, since rapid diffusion of sample solutions by capillary action would enable the tips to become conductive. Tips of inert materials such as bamboo, fabrics, and sponge could be used for sample loading and ionization, while samples such as tissue, mushroom, and bone could form tips to induce ionization for direct analysis with application of a high voltage. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Imaging of Biological Tissues by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Facundo M.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) provides untargeted molecular information with the highest specificity and spatial resolution for investigating biological tissues at the hundreds to tens of microns scale. When performed under ambient conditions, sample pre-treatment becomes unnecessary, thus simplifying the protocol while maintaining the high quality of information obtained. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is a spray-based ambient MSI technique that allows for the direct sampling of surfaces in the open air, even in vivo. When used with a software-controlled sample stage, the sample is rastered underneath the DESI ionization probe, and through the time domain, m/z information is correlated with the chemical species' spatial distribution. The fidelity of the DESI-MSI output depends on the source orientation and positioning with respect to the sample surface and mass spectrometer inlet. Herein, we review how to prepare tissue sections for DESI imaging and additional experimental conditions that directly affect image quality. Specifically, we describe the protocol for the imaging of rat brain tissue sections by DESI-MSI. PMID:23892773

  3. A New Electrospray Aerosol Generator with High Particle Transmission Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huijing; Patel, Anand C; Holtzman, Michael J; Chen, Da-Ren

    2011-01-01

    A new single-capillary electrospray (ES) aerosol generator has been developed for monodisperse particle production with maximal transmission efficiency. The new generator consists of both a spray chamber in a point-to-orifice-plate configuration and a charge reduction chamber that can hold up to 4 Nuclespot ionizers (Model P-2042, NRD Inc.). The 2 chambers are partitioned by an orifice plate. To optimize the particle transmission efficiency of the prototype, a systematic study was performed on the generator by varying the system setup and operation. Two key dimensions of the generator setup, the orifice diameter and the distance from the capillary tip to the orifice plate, were varied. Fluorescence analysis was applied to characterize the loss of ES-generated particles at different locations of the prototype. It was found that particle loss in the generator could be reduced by either increasing the orifice diameter or decreasing the distance between the capillary tip and the orifice plate. Increasing either the total radioactivity of the ionizers or the flowrate of the particle carrier gas also further decreased the particle loss in the system. The maximum particle transmission efficiency of 88.0% was obtained with the spray chamber fully opened to the charge reduction chamber, the capillary tip at the same level as the orifice plate, and 4 bipolar ionizers installed. PMID:22829715

  4. Selective and sensitive detection of chromium(VI) in waters using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Weldy, Effie; Wolff, Chloe; Miao, Zhixin; Chen, Hao

    2013-09-01

    From 2000 through 2011, there were 14 criminal cases of violations of the Clean Water Act involving the discharge of chromium, a toxic heavy metal, into drinking and surface water sources. As chromium(VI), a potential carcinogen present in the environment, represents a significant safety concern, it is currently the subject of an EPA health risk assessment. Therefore, sensitive and selective detection of this species is highly desired. This study reports the analysis of chromium(VI) in water samples by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) following its reduction and complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The reduction and subsequent complexation produce a characteristic [Cr(III)O]-PDC complex which can be detected as a protonated ion of m/z 507 in the positive ion mode. The detection is selective to chromium(VI) under acidic pH, even in the presence of chromium(III) and other metal ions, providing high specificity. Different water samples were examined, including deionized, tap, and river waters, and sensitive detection was achieved. In the case of deionized water, quantification over the concentration range of 3.7 to 148ppb gave an excellent correlation coefficient of 0.9904 using the enhanced MS mode scan. Using the single-reaction monitoring (SRM) mode (monitoring the characteristic fragmentation of m/z 507 to m/z 360), the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.25ppb. The LOD of chromium(VI) for both tap and river water samples was determined to be 2.0ppb. A preconcentration strategy using simple vacuum evaporation of the aqueous sample was shown to further improve the ESI signal by 15 fold. This method, with high sensitivity and selectivity, should provide a timely solution for the real-world analysis of toxic chromium(VI). PMID:23937937

  5. Selective and sensitive detection of chromium(VI) in waters using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Weldy, Effie; Wolff, Chloe; Miao, Zhixin; Chen, Hao

    2013-09-01

    From 2000 through 2011, there were 14 criminal cases of violations of the Clean Water Act involving the discharge of chromium, a toxic heavy metal, into drinking and surface water sources. As chromium(VI), a potential carcinogen present in the environment, represents a significant safety concern, it is currently the subject of an EPA health risk assessment. Therefore, sensitive and selective detection of this species is highly desired. This study reports the analysis of chromium(VI) in water samples by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) following its reduction and complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The reduction and subsequent complexation produce a characteristic [Cr(III)O]-PDC complex which can be detected as a protonated ion of m/z 507 in the positive ion mode. The detection is selective to chromium(VI) under acidic pH, even in the presence of chromium(III) and other metal ions, providing high specificity. Different water samples were examined, including deionized, tap, and river waters, and sensitive detection was achieved. In the case of deionized water, quantification over the concentration range of 3.7 to 148ppb gave an excellent correlation coefficient of 0.9904 using the enhanced MS mode scan. Using the single-reaction monitoring (SRM) mode (monitoring the characteristic fragmentation of m/z 507 to m/z 360), the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.25ppb. The LOD of chromium(VI) for both tap and river water samples was determined to be 2.0ppb. A preconcentration strategy using simple vacuum evaporation of the aqueous sample was shown to further improve the ESI signal by 15 fold. This method, with high sensitivity and selectivity, should provide a timely solution for the real-world analysis of toxic chromium(VI).

  6. Deployment of a Curved Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Knarr, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Structures capable of deployment into complex, three-dimensional trusses have well known space technology applications such as the support of spacecraft payloads, communications antennas, radar reflectors, and solar concentrators. Such deployable trusses could also be useful in terrestrial applications such as the rapid establishment of structures in military and emergency service situations, in particular with regard to the deployment of enclosures for habitat or storage. To minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a single arch-shaped truss is preferable to multiple straight trusses arranged vertically and horizontally. To further minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a synchronous deployment with a single degree of freedom is also preferable. One method of synchronizing deployment of a truss is the use of a series of gears; this makes the deployment sequence predictable and testable, allows the truss to have a minimal stowage volume, and the deployed structure exhibits the excellent stiffness-to-mass and strength-to-mass ratios characteristic of a truss. A concept for using gears with varying ratios to deploy a truss into a curved shape has been developed and appears to be compatible with both space technology applications as well as potential use in terrestrial applications such as enclosure deployment. As is the case with other deployable trusses, this truss is formed using rigid elements (e.g., composite tubes) along the edges, one set of diagonal elements composed of either cables or folding/hinged rigid members, and the other set of diagonal elements formed by a continuous cable that is tightened by a motor or hand crank in order to deploy the truss. Gears of varying ratios are used to constrain the deployment to a single degree of freedom, making the deployment synchronous, predictable, and repeatable. The relative sizes of the gears and the relative dimensions of the diagonal elements determine the deployed geometry (e

  7. Analysis of nucleic acids by capillary ion-pair reversed-phase HPLC coupled to negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huber, C G; Krajete, A

    1999-09-01

    Ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography was successfully coupled to negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry by using 60 × 0.20 mm i.d. capillary columns packed with 2.3-μm micropellicular, octadecylated poly(styrene/divinylbenzene) particles as stationary phase and gradients of acetonitrile in 50 mM aqueous triethylammonium bicarbonate as mobile phase. Systematic variation of the eluent composition, such as concentration of ion-pair reagent, anion in the ion-pair reagent, solution pH, and acetonitrile concentration led to the conclusion that most parameters have opposite effects on chromatographic and mass spectrometric performances. The use of acetonitrile as sheath liquid enabled the rapid and highly efficient separation and detection of phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated oligonucleotides ranging in size from 8 to 40 nucleotides. High-quality full-scan mass spectra showing little cation adduction were acquired from which the molecular masses of the separated oligonucleotides were calculated with an accuracy of 0.011%. With calibration curves being linear over at least 2 orders of magnitude, the lower limits of detection for a oligodeoxythymidine 16-mer were 104 fmol with full scan and 710 amol with selected-ion-monitoring data acquisition. The potential of ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was demonstrated for mixed-sequence oligomers by the characterization of a reaction mixture from solid-phase synthesis of a 40-mer oligonucleotide.

  8. Development and validation of an ultra high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of selected flavonoids in Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Renu; Chandra, Preeti; Arya, Kamal Ram; Kumar, Brijesh

    2014-12-01

    A rapid and sensitive ultra high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of 13 flavonoids in leaf, stem, and fruit extracts of male and female trees of Ginkgo biloba to investigate gender- and age-related variations of flavonoids content. Chromatographic separation was accomplished on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column (50 mm × 2.1 mm id, 1.7 μm) in 5 min. Quantitation was performed using negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The calibration curves of all analytes showed a good linear relationship (r(2) ≥ 0.9977) over the concentration range of 1-1000 ng/mL. The precision evaluated by an intra- and interday study showed RSD ≤ 1.98% and good accuracy with overall recovery in the range from 97.90 to 101.09% (RSD ≤ 1.67%) for all analytes. The method sensitivity expressed as the limit of quantitation was typically 0.25-3.57 ng/mL. The results showed that the total content of 13 flavonoids was higher in the leaf extract of an old male Ginkgo tree compared to young female Ginkgo trees.

  9. Novel electrosprayed nanospherules for enhanced aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble fenofibrate

    PubMed Central

    Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Mustapha, Omer; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Dong Shik; Kim, Kyeong Soo; Jin, Sung Giu; Yong, Chul Soon; Youn, Yu Seok; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present research was to develop a novel electrosprayed nanospherule providing the most optimized aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability for poorly water-soluble fenofibrate. Methods Numerous fenofibrate-loaded electrosprayed nanospherules were prepared with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and Labrafil® M 2125 as carriers using the electrospray technique, and the effect of the carriers on drug solubility and solvation was assessed. The solid state characterization of an optimized formulation was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses. Oral bioavailability in rats was also evaluated for the formulation of an optimized nanospherule in comparison with free drug and a conventional fenofibrate-loaded solid dispersion. Results All of the electrosprayed nanospherule formulations had remarkably enhanced aqueous solubility and dissolution compared with free drug. Moreover, Labrafil M 2125, a surfactant, had a positive influence on the solubility and dissolution of the drug in the electrosprayed nanospherule. Increases were observed as the PVP/drug ratio increased to 4:1, but higher ratios gave no significant increases. In particular, an electrosprayed nanospherule composed of fenofibrate, PVP, and Labrafil M 2125 at the weight ratio of 1:4:0.5 resulted in a particle size of <200 nm with the drug present in the amorphous state. It demonstrated the highest solubility (32.51±2.41 μg/mL), an excellent dissolution (~85% in 10 minutes), and an oral bioavailability ~2.5-fold better than that of the free drug. It showed similar oral bioavailability compared to the conventional solid dispersion. Conclusion Electrosprayed nanospherules, which provide improved solubility and bioavailability, are promising drug delivery tools for oral administration of poorly water-soluble fenofibrate. PMID:26834471

  10. Fast imaging of intermittent electrospraying of water with positive corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongrác, B.; Kim, H. H.; Janda, M.; Martišovitš, V.; Machala, Z.

    2014-08-01

    The effect of the electrospraying of water in combination with a positive direct current (dc) streamer corona discharge generated in air was investigated in this paper. We employed high-speed camera visualizations and oscilloscopic discharge current measurements in combination with an intensified charge-coupled device camera for fast time-resolved imaging. The repetitive process of Taylor cone formation and droplet formation from the mass fragments of water during the electrospray was visualized. Depending on the applied voltage, the following intermittent modes of electrospraying typical for water were observed: dripping mode, spindle mode, and oscillating-spindle mode. The observed electrospraying modes were repetitive with a frequency of a few hundreds of Hz, as measured from the fast image sequences. This frequency agreed well with the frequency of the measured streamer current pulses. The presence of filamentary streamer discharges at relatively low voltages probably prevented the establishment of a continuous electrospray in the cone-jet mode. After each streamer, a positive glow corona discharge was established on the water filament tip, and it propagated from the stressed electrode along with the water filament elongation. The results show a reciprocal character of intermittent electrospraying of water, and the presence of corona discharge, where both the electrospray and the discharge affect each other. The generation of a corona discharge from the water cone depended on the repetitive process of the cone formation. Also, the propagation and curvature of the water filament were influenced by the discharge and its resultant space charge. Furthermore, these phenomena were partially influenced by the water conductivity.

  11. Formation of enriched black tea extract loaded chitosan nanoparticles via electrospraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Samuel James

    Creating nanoparticles of beneficial nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals has had a large surge of research due to the enhancement of absorption and bioavailability by decreasing their size. One of these ways is by electrohydrodynamic atomization, also known as electrospraying. In general, this novel process is done by forcing a liquid through a capillary nozzle and which is subjected to an electrical field. While there are different ways to create nanoparticles, the novel method of electrospraying can be beneficial over other types of nanoparticle formation. Reasons include high control over particle size and distribution by altering electrospray parameters (voltage, flow rate, distance, and time), higher encapsulation efficiency than other methods, and also it is a one step process without exposure to extreme conditions (Gomez-Estaca et. al. 2012, Jaworek and Sobcyzk 2008). The current study aimed to create a chitosan encapsulated theaflavin-2 enriched black tea extract (BTE) nanoparticles via electrospraying. The first step of this process was to create the smallest chitosan nanoparticles possible by altering the electrospray parameters and the chitosan-acetic acid solution parameters. The solution properties altered include chitosan molecular weight, acetic acid concentration, and chitosan concentration. Specifically, the electrospray parameters such as voltage, flow rate and distance from syringe to collector are the most important in determining particle size. After creating the smallest chitosan particles, the TF-2 enriched black tea extract was added to the chitosan-acetic acid solution to be electrosprayed. The particles were assessed with the following procedures: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for particle morphology and size, and loading efficiency with ultraviolet--visible spectrophotometer (UV-VIS). Chitosan-BTE nanoparticles were successfully created in a one step process. Diameter of the particles on average

  12. Poiseuille flow in curved spaces.

    PubMed

    Debus, J-D; Mendoza, M; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2016-04-01

    We investigate Poiseuille channel flow through intrinsically curved media, equipped with localized metric perturbations. To this end, we study the flux of a fluid driven through the curved channel in dependence of the spatial deformation, characterized by the parameters of the metric perturbations (amplitude, range, and density). We find that the flux depends only on a specific combination of parameters, which we identify as the average metric perturbation, and derive a universal flux law for the Poiseuille flow. For the purpose of this study, we have improved and validated our recently developed lattice Boltzmann model in curved space by considerably reducing discrete lattice effects.

  13. Magnetic Curves in Cosymplectic Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druţă-Romaniuc, Simona-Luiza; Inoguchi, Jun-ichi; Munteanu, Marian Ioan; Nistor, Ana Irina

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we classify the magnetic trajectories with respect to contact magnetic fields in cosymplectic manifolds of arbitrary dimension. We classify Killing magnetic curves in product spaces M2 × R , recalling also explicit description of magnetic curves in E3 , S2 × R and H2 × R . Finally, we prove a reduction theorem for magnetic curves in the cosymplectic space form M bar 2 n(k) × R , in order to show that the (2n+1)-dimensional case reduces to the 3-dimensional one.

  14. Remarks of Elliptic Curves Derived from Ant Colony Routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sangsu; Kim, Daeyeoul; Singh, Dhananjay

    2011-09-01

    We deal with an ant colony based routing model for wireless multi-hop networks. Our model adopts an elliptic curve equation, which is beneficial to design pheromone dynamics for load balancing and packet delivery robustness. Due to the attribute of an elliptic curve equation, our model prevents the over-utilization of a specific node, distinctively from conventional ant colony based schemes. Numerical simulations exhibit the characteristics of our model with respect to various parameters.

  15. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and its environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    An electrospray ionization (ESI) source was designed, fabricated and then installed on a VG TRIO-2 quadrupole mass spectrometer. A gold coated 50-[mu]m fused silica capillary was used instead of the conventional stainless steel needle. Analytes are desorbed into the gas phase via a heated metal transport capillary and are focused through a set of five electrostatic lenses into the analyzer region of the mass spectrometer. Environmentally significant compounds such as pesticides and herbicides that are polar, nonvolatile and thermally labile are not readily analyzed by conventional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Thirty pesticides from the 13 classes of carbamate, organophosphorus, organochlorine, bipyridyl, phthalimide, urea, carboxyllic acid, hydroxycoumarin, triazine, indandione, dinitroaniline, pyrethrin, and thiocarbamate were analyzed using this method. Analysis of these samples showed that addition of acid to the neat sample did not appreciably increase the protonated analyte signal nor the total ion current for any of the samples analyzed. This observation together with the extremely low pKa values of these pesticides, calculated by SPARC, indicates that the protonated analytes are formed in the gas rather than in the condensed phase. Sodium and ammonium ions were added to these pesticides but in no case was the total ion current increased over that from the neat sample. Solvent studies showed that 50/50 mixtures of methanol/water and acetonitrile/water are both suitable solvent systems but that a methanol fraction of 30% appears to be ideal for some of the pesticides studied. Evidence of radical cation formation was observed when pure acetonitrile was used. It was demonstrated, by spiking 5 carbamate pesticides into Yellowstone River water, that ESI/MS by the direct injection method is a potential candidate as a rapid screening method for pesticides in natural waters.

  16. Surface effects and electrochemical cell capacitance in desorption electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Volný, Michael; Venter, Andre; Smith, Scott A; Pazzi, Marco; Cooks, R Graham

    2008-04-01

    Time resolved measurements show that during a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) experiment, the current initially rises sharply, followed by an exponential decrease to a relatively steady current. When the high voltage on the spray emitter is switched off, the current drops to negative values, suggesting that the direction of current flow in the equivalent DESI circuit is reversed. These data demonstrate that the DESI source behaves as a dc capacitor and that the addition of a surface between the sprayer and the counter electrode in DESI introduces a new electrically active element into the system. The charging and discharging behavior was observed using different surfaces and it could be seen both by making current measurements on a plate at the entrance to the mass spectrometer as well as by measuring ion current in the linear ion trap within the vacuum system of the mass spectrometer. The magnitude of the steady state current obtained without analyte present on the surface is different for different surface materials, and different capacitor time constants of the equivalent RC circuits were calculated for different DESI surfaces. The PTFE surface has by far the greatest time constant and is also able to produce the highest DESI currents. Surface properties play a crucial role in charge transfer during DESI in addition to the effects of the chemical properties of the analyte. It is suggested that surface energy (wettability) is an important factor controlling droplet behavior on the surface. The experimental data are correlated with critical surface tension values of different materials. It is proposed, based on the results presented, that super-hydrophobic materials with extremely high contact angles have the potential to be excellent DESI substrates. It is also demonstrated, using the example of the neurotransmitter dopamine, that the surface charge that develops during a DESI-MS experiment can cause electrochemical oxidation of the analyte. PMID

  17. Aerosol Analysis via Electrostatic Precipitation-Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    He, Siqin; Li, Lin; Duan, Hongxu; Naqwi, Amir; Hogan, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is the preferred mode of ion generation for mass analysis of many organic species, as alternative ionization techniques can lead to appreciable analyte fragmentation. For this reason, ESI is an ideal method for the analysis of species within aerosol particles. However, because of their low concentrations (∼10 μg/m(3)) in most environments, ESI has been applied sparingly in aerosol particle analysis; aerosol mass spectrometers typically employ analyte volatilization followed by electron ionization or chemical ionization, which can lead to a considerable degree of analyte fragmentation. Here, we describe an approach to apply ESI to submicrometer and nanometer scale aerosol particles, which utilizes unipolar ionization to charge particles, electrostatic precipitation to collect particles on the tip of a Tungsten rod, and subsequently, by flowing liquid over the rod, ESI and mass analysis of the species composing collected particles. This technique, which we term electrostatic precipitation-ESI-MS (EP-ESI-MS), is shown to enable analysis of nanogram quantities of collected particles (from aerosol phase concentrations as low as 10(2) ng m(-3)) composed of cesium iodide, levoglucosan, and levoglucosan within a carbon nanoparticle matrix. With EP-ESI-MS, the integrated mass spectrometric signals are found to be a monotonic function of the mass concentration of analyte in the aerosol phase. We additionally show that EP-ESI-MS has a dynamic range of close to 5 orders of magnitude in mass, making it suitable for molecular analysis of aerosol particles in laboratory settings with upstream particle size classification, as well as analysis of PM 2.5 particles in ambient air. PMID:26024017

  18. Multistage Reactive Transmission-Mode Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Kevin C.; Comi, Troy J.; Perry, Richard H.

    2015-09-01

    Elucidating reaction mechanisms is important for advancing many areas of science such as catalyst development. It is often difficult to probe fast reactions at ambient conditions with high temporal resolution. In addition, systems involving reagents that cross-react require analytical methods that can minimize interaction time and specify their order of introduction into the reacting system. Here, we explore the utility of transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization (TM-DESI) for reaction monitoring by directing a microdroplet spray towards a series of meshes with micrometer-sized openings coated with reagents, an approach we call multistage reactive TM-DESI (TM n -DESI, where n refers to the number of meshes; n = 2 in this report). Various stages of the reaction are initiated at each mesh surface, generating intermediates and products in microdroplet reaction vessels traveling towards the mass spectrometer. Using this method, we investigated the reactivity of iron porphyrin catalytic hydroxylation of propranolol and other substrates. Our experimental results indicate that TM n -DESI provides the ability to spatially separate reagents and control their order of introduction into the reacting system, thereby minimizing unwanted reactions that lead to catalyst deactivation and degradation products. In addition, comparison with DESI-MS analyses (the Zare and Latour laboratories published results suggesting accessible reaction times <1 ms) of the reduction of dichlorophenolindophenol by L-ascorbic acid suggest that TM 1 -DESI can access reaction times less than 1 ms. Multiple meshes allow sequential stages of desorption/ionization per MS scan, increasing the number of analytes and reactions that can be characterized in a single experiment.

  19. Surface effects and electrochemical cell capacitance in desorption electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Volný, Michael; Venter, Andre; Smith, Scott A; Pazzi, Marco; Cooks, R Graham

    2008-04-01

    Time resolved measurements show that during a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) experiment, the current initially rises sharply, followed by an exponential decrease to a relatively steady current. When the high voltage on the spray emitter is switched off, the current drops to negative values, suggesting that the direction of current flow in the equivalent DESI circuit is reversed. These data demonstrate that the DESI source behaves as a dc capacitor and that the addition of a surface between the sprayer and the counter electrode in DESI introduces a new electrically active element into the system. The charging and discharging behavior was observed using different surfaces and it could be seen both by making current measurements on a plate at the entrance to the mass spectrometer as well as by measuring ion current in the linear ion trap within the vacuum system of the mass spectrometer. The magnitude of the steady state current obtained without analyte present on the surface is different for different surface materials, and different capacitor time constants of the equivalent RC circuits were calculated for different DESI surfaces. The PTFE surface has by far the greatest time constant and is also able to produce the highest DESI currents. Surface properties play a crucial role in charge transfer during DESI in addition to the effects of the chemical properties of the analyte. It is suggested that surface energy (wettability) is an important factor controlling droplet behavior on the surface. The experimental data are correlated with critical surface tension values of different materials. It is proposed, based on the results presented, that super-hydrophobic materials with extremely high contact angles have the potential to be excellent DESI substrates. It is also demonstrated, using the example of the neurotransmitter dopamine, that the surface charge that develops during a DESI-MS experiment can cause electrochemical oxidation of the analyte.

  20. Parabolic curves in Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Pauley, Michael

    2010-05-15

    To interpolate a sequence of points in Euclidean space, parabolic splines can be used. These are curves which are piecewise quadratic. To interpolate between points in a (semi-)Riemannian manifold, we could look for curves such that the second covariant derivative of the velocity is zero. We call such curves Jupp and Kent quadratics or JK-quadratics because they are a special case of the cubic curves advocated by Jupp and Kent. When the manifold is a Lie group with bi-invariant metric, we can relate JK-quadratics to null Lie quadratics which arise from another interpolation problem. We solve JK-quadratics in the Lie groups SO(3) and SO(1,2) and in the sphere and hyperbolic plane, by relating them to the differential equation for a quantum harmonic oscillator00.

  1. Electrospray deposition of carbon nanotube thin films for flexible transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yinan; Xin, Guoqing; Nam, Jaewook; Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Heeyeop

    2013-09-01

    Flexible transparent carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes were fabricated by electrospray deposition, a large-area scalable and cost-effective process. The carbon nanotubes were dispersed in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates by electrospray deposition process at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Major process variables were characterized and optimized for the electrospray process development such as electric field between nozzle and substrates, CNT solution flowrate, gap between nozzle and substrates, solution concentration, solvent properties and surface temperature. The sheet resistance of the electrospray deposited CNT films were reduced by HNO3 doping process. 169 Omega/sq sheet resistance and 86% optical transmittance was achieved with low surface roughness of 1.2 nm. The films showed high flexibility and transparency, making them potential replacements of ITO or ZnO in such as solid state lighting, touch panels, and solar cells. Electrospray process is a scalable process and we believe that this process can be applied for large area carbon nanotube film formation.

  2. Electrospray deposition of carbon nanotube thin films for flexible transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yinan; Xin, Guoqing; Nam, Jaewook; Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Heeyeop

    2013-09-01

    Flexible transparent carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes were fabricated by electrospray deposition, a large-area scalable and cost-effective process. The carbon nanotubes were dispersed in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates by electrospray deposition process at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Major process variables were characterized and optimized for the electrospray process development such as electric field between nozzle and substrates, CNT solution flowrate, gap between nozzle and substrates, solution concentration, solvent properties and surface temperature. The sheet resistance of the electrospray deposited CNT films were reduced by HNO3 doping process. 169 Omega/sq sheet resistance and 86% optical transmittance was achieved with low surface roughness of 1.2 nm. The films showed high flexibility and transparency, making them potential replacements of ITO or ZnO in such as solid state lighting, touch panels, and solar cells. Electrospray process is a scalable process and we believe that this process can be applied for large area carbon nanotube film formation. PMID:24205613

  3. Biases in Ion Transmission Through an Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry Capillary Inlet

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Jason S.; Marginean, Ioan; Baker, Erin Shammel; Kelly, Ryan T.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-12-01

    The standard heated capillary inlet of an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) interface was compared with shorter versions of the inlet to determine the effects on transmission and ionization efficiencies for low-flow electrosprays. The primary finding of the study was a large bias towards higher mobility species in the electrospray current losses to the inside walls of the inlet. The transmission efficiency increased with decreasing capillary length due to reduced losses along the capillary. A decrease in transmission efficiency was also confirmed for electrosprays of higher conductivity solvents. A direct correlation between mass spectrometry sensitivity and the transmitted electrospray current was not observed as some analytes showed little to no increase in sensitivity while others showed as high as a 15 – fold increase. The variation was shown to at least be partially dependent on the analytes’ mobilities. Higher mobility analytes demonstrated a larger increase in sensitivity when shorter inlets were used. The results indicate that considerable biases against higher mobility species can be produced by the use of long capillary inlets in the ESI-MS interface and strategies are provided to minimize the bias against higher mobility species for efficient ion transmission through the heated capillary interface.

  4. Elastomeric Microchip Electrospray Emitter for Stable Cone-Jet Mode Operation in the Nanoflow Regime.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Tang, Keqi; Irimia, Daniel; Toner, Mehmet; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-05-15

    Despite widespread interest in applying lab-on-a-chip technologies to mass spectrometry (MS)-based analyses, the coupling of microfluidics to electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS remains challenging. We report a robust, integrated poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchip interface for ESI-MS using simple and widely accessible microfabrication procedures. The interface uses an auxiliary channel to provide electrical contact in the Taylor cone of the electrospray without sample loss or dilution. The electric field at the channel terminus is enhanced by two vertical cuts that cause the interface to taper to a line rather than to a point, and the formation of small Taylor cones at the channel exit ensures sub-nL post-column dead volumes. While comparable ESI-MS sensitivities were achieved using both microchip and conventional fused silica capillary emitters, stable cone-jet mode electrospray could be established over a far broader range of flow rates (from 50–1000 nL/min) and applied potentials using the microchip emitters. This special feature of the microchip emitter should minimize the fine tuning required for electrospray optimization and make the stable electrospray more resistant to external perturbations.

  5. Fabrication of Polymeric Coatings with Controlled Microtopographies Using an Electrospraying Technique

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiongyu; Mather, Jason P.; Yang, Pine; Boden, Mark; Mather, Patrick T.

    2015-01-01

    Surface topography of medical implants provides an important biophysical cue on guiding cellular functions at the cell-implant interface. However, few techniques are available to produce polymeric coatings with controlled microtopographies onto surgical implants, especially onto implant devices of small dimension and with complex structures such as drug-eluting stents. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to develop a new strategy to fabricate polymeric coatings using an electrospraying technique based on the uniqueness of this technique in that it can be used to produce a mist of charged droplets with a precise control of their shape and dimension. We hypothesized that this technique would allow facile manipulation of coating morphology by controlling the shape and dimension of electrosprayed droplets. More specifically, we employed the electrospraying technique to coat a layer of biodegradable polyurethane with tailored microtopographies onto commercial coronary stents. The topography of such stent coatings was modulated by controlling the ratio of round to stretched droplets or the ratio of round to crumped droplets under high electric field before deposition. The shape of electrosprayed droplets was governed by the stability of these charged droplets right after ejection or during their flight in the air. Using the electrospraying technique, we achieved conformal polymeric coatings with tailored microtopographies onto conductive surgical implants. The approach offers potential for controlling the surface topography of surgical implant devices to modulate their integration with surrounding tissues. PMID:26090663

  6. Electrospray synthesis and properties of hierarchically structured PLGA TIPS microspheres for use as controlled release technologies.

    PubMed

    Malik, Salman A; Ng, Wing H; Bowen, James; Tang, Justin; Gomez, Alessandro; Kenyon, Anthony J; Day, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    Microsphere-based controlled release technologies have been utilized for the long-term delivery of proteins, peptides and antibiotics, although their synthesis poses substantial challenges owing to formulation complexities, lack of scalability, and cost. To address these shortcomings, we used the electrospray process as a reproducible, synthesis technique to manufacture highly porous (>94%) microspheres while maintaining control over particle structure and size. Here we report a successful formulation recipe used to generate spherical poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microspheres using the electrospray (ES) coupled with a novel thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) process with a tailored Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) collection scheme. We show how size, shape and porosity of resulting microspheres can be controlled by judiciously varying electrospray processing parameters and we demonstrate examples in which the particle size (and porosity) affect release kinetics. The effect of electrospray treatment on the particles and their physicochemical properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The microspheres manufactured here have successfully demonstrated long-term delivery (i.e. 1week) of an active agent, enabling sustained release of a dye with minimal physical degradation and have verified the potential of scalable electrospray technologies for an innovative TIPS-based microsphere production protocol. PMID:26803601

  7. Flow in a rotating curved circular pipe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinsuo; Li, Ning; Zhang, Benzhao

    2003-05-01

    The flow in a rotating curved pipe with circular cross section is investigated theoretically and numerically. A perturbation solution up to the second order is obtained. A numerical procedure is used to solve the full governing equations and the simplified governing equations in the small curvature limit. Comparisons are made between the numerical and perturbation results, elucidating the lost information due to simplification and the valid range of the perturbation solution. The flow characteristics, including the secondary flow, the axial flow, and the friction factor ratio, are examined in detail.

  8. Flow over riblet curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, J. B. R.; Silva Freire, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    The present work studies the mechanics of turbulent drag reduction over curved surfaces by riblets. The effects of surface modification on flow separation over steep and smooth curved surfaces are investigated. Four types of two-dimensional surfaces are studied based on the morphometric parameters that describe the body of a blue whale. Local measurements of mean velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained through laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  9. Determination of benzothiazole and benzotriazole derivates in tire and clothing textile samples by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Avagyan, Rozanna; Sadiktsis, Ioannis; Thorsén, Gunnar; Östman, Conny; Westerholm, Roger

    2013-09-13

    A high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method utilizing electrospray ionization in positive and negative mode has been developed for the separation and detection of benzothiazole and benzotriazole derivates. Ultra-sonication assisted solvent extraction of these compounds has also been developed and the overall method demonstrated on a selected clothing textile and an automobile tire sample. Matrix effects and extraction recoveries, as well as linearity and limits of detection have been evaluated. The calibration curves spanned over more than two orders of magnitude with coefficients of correlation R(2)>0.99 and the limits of detection and the limits of quantification were in the range 1.7-58pg injected and 18-140pg/g, respectively. The extraction recoveries ranged between 69% and 102% and the matrix effects between 75% and 101%. Benzothiazole and benzotriazole derivates were determined in the textile sample and benzothiazole derivatives determined in the tire sample with good analytical performance.

  10. PSD analysis of optical QSO light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simm, Torben; Salvato, M.; Saglia, R.; Ponti, G.; Lanzuisi, G.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Nandra, K.; Bender, R.

    2016-08-01

    One of the elementary properties of quasar activity is continuous variability in the UV/optical bands. The power spectral density (PSD) potentially contains information about the underlying processes connected to variability. We applied a novel method based on continuous-time autoregressive moving average (CARMA) models (Kelly et al. 2014) to derive the PSD even for irregularly sampled light curves. Using a sample of ~100 X-ray selected non-local QSOs from the XMM-COSMOS catalog and optical light curves provided by the Pan-STARRS1 MDF survey we find that the PSD resembles a broken power-law with a high-frequency slope significantly steeper than observed in X-ray studies. The PSD normalization is observed to scale inversely with bolometric luminosity and Eddington ratio, whereas there is no correlation between the characteristic bend timescale and black hole mass. We find a weak tendency for QSOs with higher black hole mass to have steeper high-frequency PSD slopes. In an ongoing work we extend these studies employing a sample of ~700 variable broad-line QSOs with high-quality black hole mass estimates and well-sampled light curves from the SDSS-RM project.

  11. Bayesian ROC curve estimation under verification bias.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiezhun; Ghosal, Subhashis; Kleiner, David E

    2014-12-20

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve has been widely used in medical science for its ability to measure the accuracy of diagnostic tests under the gold standard. However, in a complicated medical practice, a gold standard test can be invasive, expensive, and its result may not always be available for all the subjects under study. Thus, a gold standard test is implemented only when it is necessary and possible. This leads to the so-called 'verification bias', meaning that subjects with verified disease status (also called label) are not selected in a completely random fashion. In this paper, we propose a new Bayesian approach for estimating an ROC curve based on continuous data following the popular semiparametric binormal model in the presence of verification bias. By using a rank-based likelihood, and following Gibbs sampling techniques, we compute the posterior distribution of the binormal parameters intercept and slope, as well as the area under the curve by imputing the missing labels within Markov Chain Monte-Carlo iterations. Consistency of the resulting posterior under mild conditions is also established. We compare the new method with other comparable methods and conclude that our estimator performs well in terms of accuracy. PMID:25269427

  12. X-Ray Nova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrader, Chris; Titarchuk, Lev

    2002-04-01

    We describe recent work in which we revisit the database of historical X-Ray nova (XRN) light curves compiled by Chen, Shrader & Livio (1997, ApJ 491, 312), augmented by subsequent events recorded by RXTE, in an attempt to gain a better understanding of the outburst phenomenon. Previously, we demonstrated that, given the occurrence of an instability in the mass transfer rate from the secondary, a model based on viscous diffusion of matter through the disk (Wood et al, 2001, astro-ph/0108189) we could reproduce a large number of fast-rise exponential decay (FRED) type XRN light curves. We augment this effort by considering deviations from the FRED form, such as plateaus and power-law decay forms are also considered within this framework. More complex structures are, in a number of instances, successfully modeled as a superposition of mass- injection, diffusive propagation events. In addition, for a large number of cases, we perform a joint analysis of optical light curve data. In particular, we will attempt to characterize empirical characteristics such as possible tie lags, and relative decay time scales, and then interpret such effects withing the context of diffusive propagation in the disk.

  13. Characteristic crossing point (T(*)≈2.7 K) in specific heat curves of samples RuSr(2)Gd(1.5)Ce(0.5)Cu(2)O(10-δ) taken for different values of magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Belevtsev, B I; Krasovitsky, V B; Naugle, D G; Rathnayaka, K D D; Agnolet, G; Felner, I

    2009-11-11

    Magnetic properties of polycrystalline samples of RuSr(2)(Gd(1.5)Ce(0.5))Cu(2)O(10-δ), as-prepared (by solid-state reaction) and annealed (12 h at 845 °C) in pure oxygen at different pressure (30, 62 and 78 atm) are presented. The specific heat and magnetization were investigated in the temperature range 1.8-300 K with a magnetic field up to 8 T. The specific heat, C(T), shows a jump at the superconducting transition (with an onset at T≈37.5 K). Below 20 K, a Schottky-type anomaly becomes apparent in C(T). This low-temperature anomaly can be attributed to splitting of the ground term (8)S(7/2) of paramagnetic Gd(3+) ions by internal and external magnetic fields. It is found that curves C(T) taken for different values of magnetic field have the same crossing point (at T(*)≈2.7 K) for all the samples studied. At the same time, C(H) curves taken for different temperatures have a crossing point at a characteristic field H(*)≈3.7 T. These effects can be considered as a manifestation of the crossing point phenomenon which is supposed to be inherent for strongly correlated electron systems.

  14. Quantification of Tricyclic Antidepressants in Serum Using Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Crutchfield, Christopher A; Breaud, Autumn R; Clarke, William A

    2016-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) are used to treat major depressive disorder and other psychological conditions. The efficacy of these drugs is tied to a narrow therapeutic window. Inappropriately high drug concentrations can result in serious side effects such as hypotension, tachycardia, or coma. As a result, concentrations of tricyclic antidepressants are routinely monitored to ensure compliance and to prevent adverse side effects by dose adjustments. We describe a method for the determination of concentrations of amitriptyline, desipramine, imipramine, and nortriptyline in human serum using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). The method is rapid, requiring only 3.5 min per analysis. The method requires 100 μL of serum. Concentrations of each TCA were quantified by a calibration curve relating the peak area ratio of each TCA analyte to a deuterated internal standard (amitriptyline-D3, desipramine-D3, imipramine-D3, and nortriptyline-D3). The method was linear from ~70 ng/mL to ~1000 ng/mL for all TCAs, with imprecision ≤ 12%.

  15. Quantification of Docetaxel in Serum Using Turbulent Flow Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry (TFC-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Crutchfield, Christopher A; Marzinke, Mark A; Clarke, William A

    2016-01-01

    Docetaxel is a second-generation taxane and is used clinically as an anti-neoplastic agent in cancer chemotherapy via an anti-mitotic mechanism. Its efficacy is limited to a narrow therapeutic window. Inappropriately high concentrations may cause erythema, fluid retention, nausea, diarrhea, and neutropenia. As a result, dosing recommendations have changed from high dosage loading every 3 weeks to lower dosage loading weekly. We describe a method that can be used for therapeutic drug monitoring of docetaxel levels using turbulent flow liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (TFC-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). The method is rapid, requiring only 6.3 min per analytical run following a simple protein crash. The method requires only 100 μL of serum. Concentrations of docetaxel were quantified by a calibration curve relating the peak-area ratio of docetaxel to a deuterated internal standard (docetaxel-D9). The method was linear from 7.8 to 1000 ng/mL, with imprecision ≤6.2 %.

  16. Determination of tamsulosin in human aqueous humor and serum by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Pärssinen, Olavi; Leppänen, Esa; Mauriala, Timo; Lehtonen, Marko; Auriola, Seppo

    2007-01-17

    A simple, sensitive and selective LC-MS/MS method was developed for the determination of tamsulosin in human aqueous humor and serum to study the recently reported eye-related adverse effects of this alpha(1)-blocker drug. Aqueous humor samples were analyzed by direct injection, after addition of the internal standard, labetalol. Liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate was used for serum sample preparation. The chromatographic separation was performed on a reversed phase column by gradient elution with acetonitrile -0.1% formic acid at a flow-rate of 0.2 ml/min. Detection and quantification of the analytes were carried out with a linear ion trap mass spectrometer, using positive electrospray ionization (ESI) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The limit of quantification was 0.1 ng/ml for both aqueous humor and serum samples and linearity was obtained over the concentration ranges of 0.1-4.7 ng/ml and 0.1-19.3 ng/ml for aqueous humor and serum samples, respectively. Acceptable accuracy and precision were obtained for concentrations within the standard curve ranges. The method has been used for the determination of tamsulosin in aqueous humor and serum samples from patients that were on tamsulosin medication and underwent cataract surgery.

  17. Quantification of γ-Aminobutyric Acid in Cerebrospinal Fluid Using Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arning, Erland; Bottiglieri, Teodoro

    2016-01-01

    We describe a simple stable isotope dilution method for accurate and precise measurement of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a clinical diagnostic test. Determination of GABA in CSF (50 μL) was performed utilizing high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray positive ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Analysis of free and total GABA requires two individual sample preparations and mass spectrometry analyses. Free GABA in CSF is determined by a 1:2 dilution with internal standard (GABA-D2) and injected directly onto the HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system. Determination of total GABA in CSF requires additional sample preparation in order to hydrolyze all the bound GABA in the sample to the free form. This requires hydrolyzing the sample by boiling in acidic conditions (hydrochloric acid) for 4 h. The sample is then further diluted 1:10 with a 90 % acetonitrile/0.1 % formic acid solution and injected into the HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system. Each assay is quantified using a five-point standard curve and is linear from 6 nM to 1000 nM and 0.63 μM to 80 μM for free and total GABA, respectively.

  18. Direct analysis of nine pharmaceuticals in culture media by use of cartridge separation with electrospray mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Fang; Ma, Mingsheng; Tam, Yun K

    2002-09-01

    A 2-cm cartridge has been used for separation before electrospray mass spectrometric analysis of pharmaceutical compounds in cell culture media, alleviating the need for sample extraction and desalting procedures. Nine representative pharmaceuticals listed in the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) were chosen as the candidate compounds and Hank's balanced salt solution with Hepes buffer (HBSS-Hepes buffer) was used as the cell-culture medium in an effort to study permeability of chemicals through cell monolayers. Effects of several conditions, e.g. pH and buffer concentration in the mobile phase, flow rate, and temperature on separation efficiency were examined. The nine pharmaceuticals were separated within 2 min by use of a 2-cm C(8) cartridge. Relative standard deviations (RSD) from repeated analysis within the same day or over five days were 0.03-0.2% for retention times and 0.6-5.3% for peak areas; antipyrine was used as internal standard. Calibration curves based on peak-area measurements were linear over the range 0.1-20 micro mol L(-1). The HBSS-Hepes buffer did not interfere with separation and detection; identical separation and peak intensity were obtained when the samples were separately prepared in distilled water or in the culture medium. PMID:12207243

  19. Quantification of γ-Aminobutyric Acid in Cerebrospinal Fluid Using Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arning, Erland; Bottiglieri, Teodoro

    2016-01-01

    We describe a simple stable isotope dilution method for accurate and precise measurement of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a clinical diagnostic test. Determination of GABA in CSF (50 μL) was performed utilizing high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray positive ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Analysis of free and total GABA requires two individual sample preparations and mass spectrometry analyses. Free GABA in CSF is determined by a 1:2 dilution with internal standard (GABA-D2) and injected directly onto the HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system. Determination of total GABA in CSF requires additional sample preparation in order to hydrolyze all the bound GABA in the sample to the free form. This requires hydrolyzing the sample by boiling in acidic conditions (hydrochloric acid) for 4 h. The sample is then further diluted 1:10 with a 90 % acetonitrile/0.1 % formic acid solution and injected into the HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system. Each assay is quantified using a five-point standard curve and is linear from 6 nM to 1000 nM and 0.63 μM to 80 μM for free and total GABA, respectively. PMID:26602123

  20. Determination of pesticides in apples by liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and estimation of measurement uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wotherspoon, David

    2007-01-01

    A liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) method was developed and validated to determine 90 pesticides in apple samples. MS/MS data acquisition was achieved by applying multiple-reaction monitoring of 2 fragment ion transitions to provide a high degree of sensitivity and selectivity for both quantitation and confirmation. Matrix-matched standard calibration curves with the use of isotopically labeled standards (or a chemical analog) as internal standards were used to achieve the best accuracy for the method. Both a conventional method validation procedure and a designed experiment were applied to study the accuracy and precision of the method. A compiled computer program that provided a semiautomated procedure for handling a large number of calculations was used to calculate the overall recovery, intermediate precision, and measurement uncertainty (MU). In general, the overall recoveries from samples spiked at levels of 10, 50, and 80 microg/kg, ranged from 60.8 to 121.1%, intermediate precision was <10%, and MUs were <30%. Poor accuracy and/or repeatability was observed for pyridate and etofenprox. The method limits of detection based on a signal-to-noise ratio of >3 were usually <1 microg/kg (ppb), except those for aldicarb sulfoxide and pyridaphenthion, which were about 5 microg/kg.

  1. Determination of antimigraine compounds rizatriptan, zolmitriptan, naratriptan and sumatriptan in human serum by liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vishwanathan, K; Bartlett, M G; Stewart, J T

    2000-01-01

    Development of a rapid, sensitive and selective method for the determination of antimigraine drugs from human serum is essential for understanding the pharmacokinetics of these drugs when administered concurrently. Solid phase extraction (SPE) using Oasis HLB was used to extract the drugs (sumatriptan, naratriptan, zolmitriptan and rizatriptan) and the internal standard bufotenine from serum. A method based on liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was developed and validated to simultaneously quantitate these antimigraine drugs from human serum. The precursor and major product ions of the analytes were monitored on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with positive ion electrospray ionization (ESI) in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The base peak in all the analytes is formed by alpha cleavage associated with protonation of the secondary amine. Mechanisms for the formation of the collision-induced dissociation products of these antimigraine compounds are proposed. Linear calibration curves were generated from 1-100 ng/mL with all coefficients of determination greater than 0.99. The inter- and intraday precision (%RSD) were less than 9.3% and accuracy (%error) was less than 9.8% for all components. The limits of detection (LOD) for the method were 250 pg/mL for sumatriptan and 100 pg/mL for the remaining analytes based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. PMID:10637423

  2. Rapid determination of three anticoagulant rodenticides in whole blood by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jin, Mi-Cong; Chen, Xiao-Hong

    2006-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive and selective method for the simultaneous determination of bromadiolone, flocoumafen and brodifacoum in whole blood using warfarin as internal standard (IS) by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS) has been developed and validated. The target compounds were extracted from the whole blood with ethyl acetate and separated on an XDB C18 column (150 mm x 2.1 mm i.d. x 5 microm) by using a mobile phase consisting of 0.2% acetic acid/methanol (12/88, v/v) at a constant flow rate of 0.50 mL/min. The analytes were detected using negative ESI-MS in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The molecular ions [M-H]- of m/z 527, 541,523 and 307 were selected for the quantification for bromadiolone, flocoumafen, brodifacoum and the IS, respectively. The calibration curves were linear (r2 > 0.995) in the concentration range of 0.50-100.00 ng/mL. The method showed a satisfactory sensitivity (0.05-0.5 ng/mL using 200 microL blood), precision (RSD < 11.9%), accuracy (recovery: 82.0-96.1%) and selectivity. This method was successfully applied to the determination of the analytes for the diagnoses of poisoned human beings and animals. PMID:16921552

  3. Determination of conditional stability constants for some divalent transition metal ion-EDTA complexes by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boija, Susanne; Almesåker, Ann; Hedenström, Erik; Bylund, Dan; Edlund, Håkan; Norgren, Magnus

    2014-07-01

    Conditional stability constants of coordination complexes comprising divalent transition metals, Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Co(2+), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) were determined utilizing electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The deviation of signal response of a reference complex was monitored at addition of a second metal ion. The conditional stability constant for the competing metal was then determined through solution equilibria equations. The method showed to be applicable to a system where Co(2+) and Zn(2+) competed for EDTA at pH 5. When Cu(2+) and Ni(2+) competed for EDTA, the equilibrium changed over time. This change was shown to be affected in rate and size by the type of organic solvent added. In this work, 30% of either methanol or acetonitrile was used. It was found that if calibration curves are prepared for both metal complexes in solution and the measurements are repeated with sufficient time space, any change in equilibrium of sample solutions will be discovered. PMID:25044839

  4. Online Investigation of Aqueous-Phase Electrochemical Reactions by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mei; Liu, Yong; Helmy, Roy; Martin, Gary E.; Dewald, Howard D.; Chen, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Electrochemistry (EC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool for elucidation of electrochemical reaction mechanisms. However, direct online analysis of electrochemical reaction in aqueous phase was rarely explored. This paper presents the online investigation of several electrochemical reactions with biological relevance in the aqueous phase, such as nitrosothiol reduction, carbohydrate oxidation, and carbamazepine oxidation using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). It was found that electroreduction of nitrosothiols [e.g., nitrosylated insulin B (13-23)] leads to free thiols by loss of NO, as confirmed by online MS analysis for the first time. The characteristic mass shift of 29 Da and the reduced intensity provide a quick way to identify nitrosylated species. Equally importantly, upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the reduced peptide ion produces more fragment ions than its nitrosylated precursor ion (presumably the backbone fragmentation cannot compete with the facile NO loss for the precursor ion), thus facilitating peptide sequencing. In the case of saccharide oxidation, it was found that glucose undergoes electro-oxidation to produce gluconic acid at alkaline pH, but not at neutral and acidic pHs. Such a pH-dependent electrochemical behavior was also observed for disaccharides such as maltose and cellobiose. Upon electrochemical oxidation, carbamazepine was found to undergo ring contraction and amide bond cleavage, which parallels the oxidative metabolism observed for this drug in leucocytes. The mechanistic information of these redox reactions revealed by EC/DESI-MS would be of value in nitroso-proteome research and carbohydrate/drug metabolic studies.

  5. Online Investigation of Aqueous-Phase Electrochemical Reactions by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mei; Liu, Yong; Helmy, Roy; Martin, Gary E; Dewald, Howard D; Chen, Hao

    2015-10-01

    Electrochemistry (EC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool for elucidation of electrochemical reaction mechanisms. However, direct online analysis of electrochemical reaction in aqueous phase was rarely explored. This paper presents the online investigation of several electrochemical reactions with biological relevance in the aqueous phase, such as nitrosothiol reduction, carbohydrate oxidation, and carbamazepine oxidation using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). It was found that electroreduction of nitrosothiols [e.g., nitrosylated insulin B (13-23)] leads to free thiols by loss of NO, as confirmed by online MS analysis for the first time. The characteristic mass shift of 29 Da and the reduced intensity provide a quick way to identify nitrosylated species. Equally importantly, upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the reduced peptide ion produces more fragment ions than its nitrosylated precursor ion (presumably the backbone fragmentation cannot compete with the facile NO loss for the precursor ion), thus facilitating peptide sequencing. In the case of saccharide oxidation, it was found that glucose undergoes electro-oxidation to produce gluconic acid at alkaline pH, but not at neutral and acidic pHs. Such a pH-dependent electrochemical behavior was also observed for disaccharides such as maltose and cellobiose. Upon electrochemical oxidation, carbamazepine was found to undergo ring contraction and amide bond cleavage, which parallels the oxidative metabolism observed for this drug in leucocytes. The mechanistic information of these redox reactions revealed by EC/DESI-MS would be of value in nitroso-proteome research and carbohydrate/drug metabolic studies.

  6. Titanium dioxide thin film deposited on flexible substrate by multi-jet electrospraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Daihong; Yi, Wuming; Cao, Zhoubin; Gu, Wenhua

    2015-10-01

    Titanium dioxide thin film plays an important role in thin film solar cells, and has promising future in everyday applications including air cleaning and self-cleaning glass. With the concepts of flexible solar cells and wearable devices being more and more popular, there is increasing interest to coat titanium dioxide thin films on flexible substrates, such as aluminum foils. Many methods have been used to fabricate titanium dioxide thin films, such as dip-coating, spin coating, aerosol spray, plasma-assisted coating, electrospraying, and so on. Among them, electrospraying is especially suitable for thin film deposition on flexible substrates. This work reports fabrication of dense and uniform titanium dioxide thin films on glass as well as flexible aluminum foil using multi-jet electrospraying technique.

  7. Studies on the controlled morphology and wettability of PS surfaces by electrospinning or electrospraying.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianfen; He, Aihua; Han, Charles

    2007-03-01

    Electrospinning/electrospraying is a simple and effective way to fabricate various polymer surfaces such as beads, fibers and other shapes in the range of micro- to nanometer. Various surface morphologies have been produced by electrospinning or electrospraying: beads with different sizes and shapes, bead-on-string structure with different aspect ratios and fibers with different diameters and shapes. Physical properties of the PS solutions such as viscosity, surface tension and conductivity greatly influence the electrospun or electrosprayed PS morphology. The wettability of a solid surface is greatly influenced by its surface morphology: A spin-coated PS membrane has a water contact angle of 97^o, while electrospun PS membranes have water contact angles around 150^o. The most hydrophobic membrane has a water CA of 159.5^o.

  8. On-line micellar electrokinetic chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry using anodically migrating micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Harrata, A.K.; Lee, C.S. |

    1997-05-15

    On-line micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC)-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS) is demonstrated for the analysis of chlorotriazine herbicides and barbiturates. In this study, the micellar velocity is directly manipulated by the adjustment of electroosmosis rather than the electrophoretic velocity of the micelle. The electroosmotic flow is adjusted against the electrophoretic velocity of the micelle by changing the solution pH in MEKC. The elimination of MEKC surfactant introduction into ESIMS is achieved with an anodically migrating micelle, moving away from the electrospray interface. The effects of moving surfactant boundary in the MEKC capillary on separation efficiency and resolution of triazine herbicides and barbiturates are investigated. The mass detection of herbicides and barbiturates sequentially eluted from the MEKC capillary is acquired using the positive and negative electrospray modes, respectively. 30 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Secondary electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry of illicit drugs.

    PubMed

    Wu, C; Siems, W F; Hill, H H

    2000-01-15

    A secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) method was developed as a nonradioactive ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). This SESI method relied on the gas-phase interaction between charged particles created by electrospray ionization (ESI) and neutral gaseous sample molecules. Mass spectrometry (MS) was used as the detection method after ion mobility separation for ion identification. Preliminary investigations focussed on understanding the ionization process of SESI. The performance of ESI-IMS and SESI-IMS for illicit drug detection was evaluated by determining the analytical figures of merit. In general, SESI had a higher ionization efficiency for small volatile molecules compared with the electrospray method. The potential of developing a universal interface for both GC- and LC-MS with an addition stage of mobility separation was demonstrated.

  10. Analysis of solvent dyes in refined petroleum products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    Solvent dyes are used to color refined petroleum products to enable differentiation between gasoline, diesel, and jet fuels. Analysis for these dyes in the hydrocarbon product is difficult due to their very low concentrations in such a complex matrix. Flow injection analysis/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry in both negative and positive mode was used to optimize ionization of ten typical solvent dyes. Samples of hydrocarbon product were analyzed under similar conditions. Positive electrospray ionization produced very complex spectra, which were not suitably specific for targeting only the dyes. Negative electrospray ionization produced simple spectra because aliphatic and aromatic moieties were not ionized. This enabled screening for a target dye in samples of hydrocarbon product from a spill.

  11. Determination of nalmefene by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wenfang B; Andrenyak, David M; Moody, David E; Nuwayser, Elie S

    2005-04-01

    Nalmefene is an opioid antagonist used in the treatment of alcoholism and opioid overdose. A highly sensitive method was developed to measure nalmefene in human and rabbit plasma and rabbit serum. Nalbuphine was used as internal standard. Liquid-liquid extraction was applied using n-butyl chloride/acetonitrile (4:1). High-performance liquid chromatography interfaced by electrospray ionization to a tandem mass spectrometer was used for quantitation. Primary validation experiments were conducted using human plasma then it was cross-validated in rabbit plasma and rabbit serum. Specificity (peak-area ratio of blank plasma or serum to its internal standard as percent of peak-area ratio of blank plasma or serum fortified with 0.1 ng/mL nalmefene to its internal standard) ranged from 2.09 to 5.29 with a mean of 3.21% for human plasma and from 4.08 to 6.63 with a mean of 5.55% for rabbit plasma and from 2.47 to 6.17 with a mean of 3.62% for rabbit serum. The mean recovery for nalmefene was 80% in human plasma. The calibration range was from 0.1 to 100 ng/mL. Intrarun accuracy of the lower limit of quantitation (0.1 ng/mL) in all matrices was within 18.0% of target with intrarun precision within 13.6%. At 0.3, 35, and 75 ng/mL, the intrarun accuracy in all matrices was within 11.9% of target with intrarun precision within 6.6%. The inter-run accuracy in human plasma was within 8.0% of target with inter-run precision within 6.6%. Nalmefene was stable in human and rabbit plasma and rabbit serum for up to 24 h at room temperature and in human plasma after three freeze-thaw cycles. Following intravenous injection of 5 mg/kg nalmefene to rabbits, the mean area under curve for 0 to 24 h was 1116 (ng)(mL)(-1)(h), and the mean plasma clearance was 67.9 (mL)(min)(-1)(kg)(-1).

  12. OPTICAL PHASE CURVES OF KEPLER EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves, Lisa J.; De Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Jayawardhana, Ray E-mail: demooij@astro.utoronto.ca

    2013-07-20

    We conducted a comprehensive search for optical phase variations of all close-in (a/R{sub *} < 10) planet candidates in 15 quarters of Kepler space telescope data. After correcting for systematics, we found eight systems that show secondary eclipses as well as phase variations. Of these, five (Kepler-5, Kepler-6, Kepler-8, KOI-64, and KOI-2133) are new and three (TrES-2, HAT-P-7, and KOI-13) have published phase curves, albeit with many fewer observations. We model the full phase curve of each planet candidate, including the primary and secondary transits, and derive their albedos, dayside and nightside temperatures, ellipsoidal variations, and Doppler beaming. We find that KOI-64 and KOI-2133 have nightside temperatures well above their equilibrium values (while KOI-2133 also has an albedo, >1), so we conclude that they are likely to be self-luminous objects rather than planets. The other six candidates have characteristics consistent with their being planets with low geometric albedos (<0.3). For TrES-2 and KOI-13, the Kepler bandpass appears to probe atmospheric layers hotter than the planet's equilibrium temperature. For KOI-13, we detect a never-before-seen third cosine harmonic with an amplitude of 6.7 {+-} 0.3 ppm and a phase shift of -1.1 {+-} 0.1 rad in the phase curve residual, possibly due to its spin-orbit misalignment. We report derived planetary parameters for all six planets, including masses from ellipsoidal variations and Doppler beaming, and compare our results to published values when available. Our results nearly double the number of Kepler exoplanets with measured phase curve variations, thus providing valuable constraints on the properties of hot Jupiters.

  13. Determination of error measurement by means of the basic magnetization curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankin, M. V.; Lankin, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    The article describes the implementation of the methodology for determining the error search by means of the basic magnetization curve of electric cutting machines. The basic magnetization curve of the integrated operation of the electric characteristic allows one to define a fault type. In the process of measurement the definition of error calculation of the basic magnetization curve plays a major role as in accuracies of a particular characteristic can have a deleterious effect.

  14. Enhanced Raman Scattering from Aromatic Dithiols Electrosprayed into Plasmonic Nanojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Johnson, Grant E.; Novikova, Irina V.; Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Evans, James E.; Zamkov, Mikhail; Laskin, Julia; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-12-01

    We describe surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) experiments in which molecular coverage is systematically varied from 3.8 x 105 to 3.8 x 102 to 0.38 molecules/μm2 using electrospray deposition of ethanolic 4,4’-dimercaptostilbene (DMS) solutions. The plasmonic SERS substrate used herein consists of a well-characterized 2-dimensional (2D) array of silver nanospheres [see El-Khoury et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 141, 214308], previously shown to feature uniform topography and plasmonic response, as well as intense SERS activity. When compared to their ensemble averaged analogues, the spatially and temporally averaged spectra of a single molecule exhibit several unique features including: (i) distinct relative intensities of the observable Raman-active vibrational states, (ii) more pronounced SERS backgrounds, and (iii) broader Raman lines indicative of faster vibrational dephasing. The first observation may be understood on the basis of an intuitive physical picture in which removal of averaging over multiple molecules exposes the tensorial nature of Raman scattering. When an oriented single molecule gives rise to the recorded SERS spectra, the relative orientation of the molecule with respect to vector components of the local electric field determines the relative intensities of the observable vibrational states. Using a single molecule SERS framework described herein, we derive a unique molecular orientation in which a single DMS molecule is isolated at a nanojunction formed between two silver nanospheres in the 2D array. The DMS molecule is found lying nearly flat with respect to the metal surface. The derived orientation of a single molecule at a plasmonic nanojunction is consistent with observations (ii) and (iii). In particular, a careful inspection of the temporal spectral variations along the recorded single molecule SERS time sequences reveals that the time-averaged SERS backgrounds arise from individual molecular events, marked by broadened SERS

  15. Rapid differentiation of refined fuels using negative electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Hostettler, F.D.

    2005-01-01

    An application of electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry for identification of various commercially refined fuels using the unique signature of polar components, was investigated. The samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry using negative electrospray on an Agilent Series 1100 liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer. These analysis were applied to hydrocarbon samples from a large, long-term fuel spill which were taken from the subsurface and different extent of biodegradation or weathering. The technique provided rapid identification of hydrocarbons released into the environment because these polar compounds are unique in different fuels.

  16. Relative Locality in Curved Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy; Rosati, Giacomo

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we construct the action describing dynamics of the particle moving in curved spacetime, with a nontrivial momentum space geometry. Curved momentum space is the core feature of theories where relative locality effects are present. So far aspects of nonlinearities in momentum space have been studied only for flat or constantly expanding (de Sitter) spacetimes, relying on their maximally symmetric nature. The extension of curved momentum space frameworks to arbitrary spacetime geometries could be relevant for the opportunities to test Planck-scale curvature/deformation of particles momentum space. As a first example of this construction we describe the particle with κ-Poincaré momentum space on a circular orbit in Schwarzschild spacetime, where the contributes of momentum space curvature turn out to be negligible. The analysis of this problem relies crucially on the solution of the soccer ball problem.

  17. Algebraic curves of maximal cyclicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caubergh, Magdalena; Dumortier, Freddy

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with analytic families of planar vector fields, studying methods to detect the cyclicity of a non-isolated closed orbit, i.e. the maximum number of limit cycles that can locally bifurcate from it. It is known that this multi-parameter problem can be reduced to a single-parameter one, in the sense that there exist analytic curves in parameter space along which the maximal cyclicity can be attained. In that case one speaks about a maximal cyclicity curve (mcc) in case only the number is considered and of a maximal multiplicity curve (mmc) in case the multiplicity is also taken into account. In view of obtaining efficient algorithms for detecting the cyclicity, we investigate whether such mcc or mmc can be algebraic or even linear depending on certain general properties of the families or of their associated Bautin ideal. In any case by well chosen examples we show that prudence is appropriate.

  18. Glycomics expression analysis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans of human colorectal cancer tissues and non-neoplastic mucosa by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Marolla, Ana Paula Cleto; Waisberg, Jaques; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Waisberg, Daniel Reis; Margeotto, Fernando Beani; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the presence of glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues, since it has a central role in tumor development and progression. Methods Tissue samples from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues were obtained from 64 operated patients who had colorectal carcinoma with no distant metastases. Expressions of heparan sulphate, chondroitin sulphate, dermatan sulphate and their fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, with the technique for extraction and quantification of glycosaminoglycans after proteolysis and electrophoresis. The statistical analysis included mean, standard deviation, and Student’s t test. Results The glycosaminoglycans extracted from colorectal tissue showed three electrophoretic bands in agarose gel. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed characteristic disaccharide fragments from glycosaminoglycans, indicating their structural characterization in the tissues analyzed. Some peaks in the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were not characterized as fragments of sugars, indicating the presence of fragments of the protein structure of proteoglycans generated during the glycosaminoglycan purification. The average amount of chondroitin and dermatan increased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p=0.01). On the other hand, the average amount of heparan decreased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p= 0.03). Conclusion The method allowed the determination of the glycosaminoglycans structural profile in colorectal tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissue. Neoplastic tissues showed greater amounts of chondroitin sulphate and dermatan sulphate compared to non-neoplastic tissues, while heparan sulphate was decreased in neoplastic tissues. PMID:26761548

  19. Electrospray deposition of chalcogenide glass films for gradient refractive index and quantum dot incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Spencer

    Chalcogenide glasses (ChGs) are well-known for their optical properties, making them ideal candidates for emerging applications of mid-infrared microphotonic devices, such as lab-on-a-chip chemical sensing devices, which currently demand additional flexibility in processing and materials available to realize new device designs. Solution-derived processing of ChG films, initially developed in the 1980s by Chern and Lauks, has consisted mainly of spin-coating and offers unique advantages over the more traditional physical vapor deposition techniques. In the present effort, the nanoparticles of interest are luminescent quantum dots (QDs), which can be used as an on-chip source of light for a planar chemical sensing device. Prior efforts of QD incorporation have exposed limitations of spin-coating of ChG solutions, namely QD aggregation and material waste, along with incompatibility with larger scale manufacturing methods such roll-to-roll processing. This dissertation has evaluated electrospray (ES) as an alternative method of solution-derived chalcogenide glass film deposition. While employed in other materials systems, deposition of optical quality ChG films via electrospray has not been previously attempted, nor have parameters until now, been defined. This study has defined pre-cursor solution chemistry, electrospray jet process parameters required for formation of stable films, annealing protocols and resulting film attributes, yielding important correlations needed to realize high optical quality films. Electrosprayed films attributes were compared to those seen for spin coating and trade-offs in processing route and resulting quality, were identified. Optical properties of importance to device applications were defined, including surface roughness, refractive index, and infrared transmission. The use of a serpentine path of the spray over the substrate was demonstrated to obtain uniform thickness, blanket films, and demonstrates process compatibility with roll

  20. Potential Energy Curves for CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Irwin; Fallon, Robert J.; Vanderslice, Joseph T.

    1960-01-01

    Potential energy curves for the Chi (sup 1) Epsilon (sup plus), alpha (sup 3) II (sub r), alpha prime (sup 3) epsilon (sup plus), d (sup 3) delta, e (sup 3) Epsilon (sup minus), Alpha (sup 1) II, and Beta (sup 1) Epsilon (sup plus), electronic states of the CO molecule have been calculated by the Rydberg-Klein-Rees method. The curve for the A III state will have to bend sharply in the range between 1.9 and 2.1 angstroms or it will have to pass through a maximum to reach the proper dissociation limit.

  1. Curved branes with regular support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Cotsakis, Spiros; Klaoudatou, Ifigeneia

    2016-09-01

    We study spacetime singularities in a general five-dimensional braneworld with curved branes satisfying four-dimensional maximal symmetry. The bulk is supported by an analog of perfect fluid with the time replaced by the extra coordinate. We show that contrary to the existence of finite-distance singularities from the brane location in any solution with flat (Minkowski) branes, in the case of curved branes there are singularity-free solutions for a range of equations of state compatible with the null energy condition.

  2. NEXT Performance Curve Analysis and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saripalli, Pratik; Cardiff, Eric; Englander, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Performance curves of the NEXT thruster are highly important in determining the thruster's ability in performing towards mission-specific goals. New performance curves are proposed and examined here. The Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator (EMTG) is used to verify variations in mission solutions based on both available thruster curves and the new curves generated. Furthermore, variations in BOL and EOL curves are also examined. Mission design results shown here validate the use of EMTG and the new performance curves.

  3. Propagation of Curved Detonation Waves Stabilized in Annular Channels with a Rectangular Cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Hisahiro; Takahiro Moriya; Kasahara, Jiro; Matsuo, Akiko; Sasamoto, Yuya; Funaki, Ikkoh

    Visualization experiments employing rectangular cross-section curved channels were performed in order to examine the fundamental characteristics of a curved detonation wave propagating stably through an annular channel. A stoichiometric ethylene-oxygen mixture gas and five types of curved channels with different inner radii of curvature were used. The detonation waves propagating in the curved channels were curved due to the expansion waves from the inner walls of the curved channels. The ratio of the inner radius of curved channel (ri) to the normal detonation cell width (λ) was an important factor determining the stability of the curved detonation waves. The detonation propagation mode in the curved channels transitioned from unstable to stable in the range 14 ≤ ri/λ ≤ 26. The normal detonation velocity (Dn) of the curved detonation wave propagating stably in a curved channel was approximately formulated. The approximated Dn given by the formula agreed well with the experimental results. The front shock shape of the curved detonation wave could be reconstructed accurately using the formula. The value of Dn nondimensionalized by the Chapman-Jouguet detonation velocity became a function of the local curvature of the curved detonation wave (κ) nondimensionalized by λ regardless of the shape of curved channel. The front shock shapes of the detonation waves in the stable mode became similar to each other under constant ri/λ conditions.

  4. Phase-ordering kinetics on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenborn, Oliver Lars

    I investigate phase-ordering kinetics on static curved surfaces, starting from a well-known time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation, known as model A and valid in flat two-dimensional systems, and generalizing this to apply on curved surfaces. I develop and implement an interface formalism for model A, valid in both curved and flat surfaces. This is based on an interface velocity equation explicitly showing how interface motion couples to local surface geometry. I discuss extensively both theoretical and numerical aspects of this formalism. I derive a coupled set of curvature equations and use them to obtain an approximate expression for the curvature autocorrelation function (CAF) in the flat case. This is compared for the first time to numerical simulation results and shows that the CAF provides dynamical information not readily available from the traditional order-parameter structure-factor, yet is far easier to compute than the latter. A dominant length-scale is observed for the first time, in the domain interface undulations, even in Euclidean model A dynamics. I discuss how this affects the interpretation of what is needed for a system to exhibit dynamical scaling. I look at the effect of surface Gauss curvature on the growth rate of domains and show that when the phase-ordering occurs on a corrugated surface, metastable long-range disorder may result. I show how these effects cause a break-down of dynamical scaling and power-law growth, how they bring about the elimination of the zero-temperature fixed point of Euclidean model A, and how phase-ordering in curved lipid-bilayer membranes should be affected. A new very-late stage regime appears for simulations of model A on sinusoid (i.e. egg-carton-like) surfaces. These features indicate that thermal noise should be included in future studies of phase ordering kinetics on curved surfaces. They also indicate that even before the order-parameter is explicitly coupled to surface quantities such as the local mean

  5. Variation of curve number with storm depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banasik, K.; Hejduk, L.

    2012-04-01

    The NRCS Curve Number (known also as SCS-CN) method is well known as a tool in predicting flood runoff depth from small ungauged catchment. The traditional way of determination the CNs, based on soil characteristics, land use and hydrological conditions, seemed to have tendency to overpredict the floods in some cases. Over 30 year rainfall-runoff data, collected in two small (A=23.4 & 82.4 km2), lowland, agricultural catchments in Center of Poland (Banasik & Woodward 2010), were used to determine runoff Curve Number and to check a tendency of changing. The observed CN declines with increasing storm size, which according recent views of Hawkins (1993) could be classified as a standard response of watershed. The analysis concluded, that using CN value according to the procedure described in USDA-SCS Handbook one receives representative value for estimating storm runoff from high rainfall depths in the analyzes catchments. This has been confirmed by applying "asymptotic approach" for estimating the watershed curve number from the rainfall-runoff data. Furthermore, the analysis indicated that CN, estimated from mean retention parameter S of recorded events with rainfall depth higher than initial abstraction, is also approaching the theoretical CN. The observed CN, ranging from 59.8 to 97.1 and from 52.3 to 95.5, in the smaller and the larger catchment respectively, declines with increasing storm size, which has been classified as a standard response of watershed. The investigation demonstrated also changeability of the CN during a year, with much lower values during the vegetation season. Banasik K. & D.E. Woodward (2010). "Empirical determination of curve number for a small agricultural watrshed in Poland". 2nd Joint Federal Interagency Conference, Las Vegas, NV, June 27 - July 1, 2010 (http://acwi.gov/sos/pubs/2ndJFIC/Contents/10E_Banasik_ 28_02_10. pdf). Hawkins R. H. (1993). "Asymptotic determination of curve numbers from data". Journal of Irrigation and Drainage

  6. Interpolation and Polynomial Curve Fitting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yajun; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2014-01-01

    Two points determine a line. Three noncollinear points determine a quadratic function. Four points that do not lie on a lower-degree polynomial curve determine a cubic function. In general, n + 1 points uniquely determine a polynomial of degree n, presuming that they do not fall onto a polynomial of lower degree. The process of finding such a…

  7. Supply Curves of Conserved Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan Kevin

    1982-05-01

    Supply curves of conserved energy provide an accounting framework that expresses the potential for energy conservation. The economic worthiness of a conservation measure is expressed in terms of the cost of conserved energy, and a measure is considered economical when the cost of conserved energy is less than the price of the energy it replaces. A supply curve of conserved energy is independent of energy prices; however, the economical reserves of conserved energy will depend on energy prices. Double-counting of energy savings and error propagation are common problems when estimating conservation potentials, but supply curves minimize these difficulties and make their consequences predictable. The sensitivity of the cost of conserved energy is examined, as are variations in the optimal investment strategy in response to changes in inputs. Guidelines are presented for predicting the consequences of such changes. The conservation supply curve concept can be applied to peak power, water, pollution, and other markets where consumers demand a service rather than a particular good.

  8. Elliptic curves and primality proving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, A. O. L.; Morain, F.

    1993-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the theory and implementation of the Elliptic Curve Primality Proving algorithm. Problema, numeros primos a compositis dignoscendi, hosque in factores suos primos resolvendi, ad gravissima ac utilissima totius arithmeticae pertinere, et geometrarum tum veterum tum recentiorum industriam ac sagacitatem occupavisse, tam notum est, ut de hac re copiose loqui superfluum foret.

  9. Breakpoint chlorination curves of greywater.

    PubMed

    March, J G; Gual, M

    2007-08-01

    A study on chlorination of raw greywater with hypochlorite is reported in this paper. Samples were chlorinated in a variety of conditions, and residual chlorine (Cl2) was measured spectrophotometrically. For each sample, the chlorination curve (chlorine residuals versus chlorine dose) was obtained. Curves showed the typical hump-and-dip profile attributable to the formation and destruction of chloramines. It was observed that, after reactions with strong reductants and chloramines-forming compounds, the remaining organic matter exerted a certain demand of chlorine. The evolution of chlorination curves with addition of ammonia and dodecylbencene sulfonate sodium salt and with dilution of the greywater sample were studied. In addition, chlorination curves at several contact times have been obtained, resulting in slower chlorine decay in the hump zone than in the dip zone. In addition, the decay of coliforms in chlorinated samples was also investigated. It was found that, for a chlorination dosage corresponding to the maximum of the hump zone (average 8.9 mg Cl2/ L), samples were negative in coliforms after 10 to 30 minutes of contact time. After-growth was not observed within 3 days after chlorination. Implications in chlorination treatments of raw greywater can be derived from these results. PMID:17824528

  10. Breakpoint chlorination curves of greywater.

    PubMed

    March, J G; Gual, M

    2007-08-01

    A study on chlorination of raw greywater with hypochlorite is reported in this paper. Samples were chlorinated in a variety of conditions, and residual chlorine (Cl2) was measured spectrophotometrically. For each sample, the chlorination curve (chlorine residuals versus chlorine dose) was obtained. Curves showed the typical hump-and-dip profile attributable to the formation and destruction of chloramines. It was observed that, after reactions with strong reductants and chloramines-forming compounds, the remaining organic matter exerted a certain demand of chlorine. The evolution of chlorination curves with addition of ammonia and dodecylbencene sulfonate sodium salt and with dilution of the greywater sample were studied. In addition, chlorination curves at several contact times have been obtained, resulting in slower chlorine decay in the hump zone than in the dip zone. In addition, the decay of coliforms in chlorinated samples was also investigated. It was found that, for a chlorination dosage corresponding to the maximum of the hump zone (average 8.9 mg Cl2/ L), samples were negative in coliforms after 10 to 30 minutes of contact time. After-growth was not observed within 3 days after chlorination. Implications in chlorination treatments of raw greywater can be derived from these results.

  11. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Nicholas B.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  12. Classification of isomonodromy problems on elliptic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, A. M.; Olshanetsky, M. A.; Zotov, A. V.

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes isomonodromy problems in terms of flat G-bundles over punctured elliptic curves \\Sigma_\\tau and connections with regular singularities at marked points. The bundles are classified by their characteristic classes, which are elements of the second cohomology group H^2(\\Sigma_\\tau,{\\mathscr Z}(G)), where {\\mathscr Z}(G) is the centre of G. For any complex simple Lie group G and any characteristic class the moduli space of flat connections is defined, and for them the monodromy-preserving deformation equations are given in Hamiltonian form together with the corresponding Lax representation. In particular, they include the Painlevé VI equation, its multicomponent generalizations, and the elliptic Schlesinger equations. The general construction is described for punctured complex curves of arbitrary genus. The Drinfeld-Simpson (double coset) description of the moduli space of Higgs bundles is generalized to the case of the space of flat connections. This local description makes it possible to establish the Symplectic Hecke Correspondence for a wide class of monodromy-preserving problems classified by the characteristic classes of the underlying bundles. In particular, the Painlevé VI equation can be described in terms of \\operatorname{SL}(2,{ C})-bundles. Since {\\mathscr Z}(\\operatorname{SL}(2,{ C}))={ Z}_2, the Painlevé VI equation has two representations related by the Hecke transformation: 1) as the well-known elliptic form of the Painlevé VI equation (for trivial bundles); 2) as the non-autonomous Zhukovsky-Volterra gyrostat (for non-trivial bundles). Bibliography: 123 titles.

  13. Revision of capillary cone-jet physics: electrospray and flow focusing.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Montanero, José M

    2009-06-01

    Capillary cone jets are natural microfluidic structures arising in steady capillary tip streaming, whose paradigms are electrospray and flow focusing phenomena. In this work, we make a profound revision of the basic underlying physics of generic cone jets from thousands of experimental measurements, most of them reported in the literature. First, the boundaries of the stability region of steady jetting are calculated. We describe these limitations by instability mechanisms associated with the local flow structure in the tip and the issuing jet and with the global behavior of the meniscus. Second, to undertake a general physical treatment of cone jets in steady regime, we analyze the energy balance taking place in the tips of both flow focusing and electrospray. This analysis yields a fundamental result: if the electrospray data are expressed in terms of an effective pressure drop, both phenomena satisfy the same scaling law for the droplet size, which exhibits nearly complete similarity in the parameter window where quasimonodisperse sprays are produced. That effective pressure drop is a function of the liquid properties exclusively, i.e., it does not depend on the operational parameters (flow rate and applied voltage). Moreover, the stability limits of the operational regimes are analyzed in detail, finding fundamental coincidences between flow focusing and electrospray as well. These results provide most useful general description and predictive scaling laws for nearly monodisperse microspraying or nanospraying based on steady cone jets, of immediate applicability in analytical chemistry, chemical engineering, biochemistry, pharmaceutical and food technologies, painting, and many other technological fields. PMID:19658592

  14. Electrospray painted article containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide and method for their manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A painted polymer part containing a conductive polymer composition containing at least one polymer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the painted polymer part has been electrospray painted.

  15. Design, simulation, and fabrication of a MEMS-based air amplifier for electrospray ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčíček, Petr; Zou, Helin; Gao, Shuai

    2013-04-01

    Recent developments in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) show that air amplifiers can be utilized to significantly enhance droplet desolvation and to focus gas-phase ions when provided between an electrospray (ES) source and the mass spectrometer (MS). However, these devices are bulky and expensive, which may be a factor prohibiting their broader utilization. We have developed a simple but effective method based on Bernoulli's principle, the Coanda effect and MEMS processing to focus electrosprayed droplets and liberated gas-phase ions. We demonstrate a computer simulation and fabrication process for a micromachined air amplifier. The simulation results are used to optimize the geometry and to meet performance requirements. The optimized results then provide a design guideline for the device's fabrication. The air amplifier is formed from two bonded polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) casts. Each PDMS cast is fabricated through a molding process using a micromachined two-layer SU-8 mold. Experimental results show a 30-fold improvement in the ES current for certain operation conditions while the air amplifier is incorporated in the nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI) process. Compared with traditional air amplifiers, the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based air amplifier provides good performance while keeping the fabrication process simple and cost effective.

  16. Hands-on Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Naomi L.; March, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for the detection, identification, and quantification of organic compounds. As mass spectrometers have become more user-friendly and affordable, many students--often with little experience in mass spectrometry--find themselves needing to incorporate mass spectrometry into…

  17. Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Heterogeneous Particles: Implications for Applications to Complex Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longin, T.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Wingen, L. M.; Lyster, K.; Anderson, C.; Kumbhani, S.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) is a direct, real time technique for obtaining mass spectra of gases, liquid droplets, solid particles, and aerosols with little sample processing. EESI-MS involves the interaction of charged electrospray droplets with a separate spray containing the analyte of interest, but the exact mechanism by which the solvent droplets extract analyte from the sample is unclear. Possible mechanisms include complete coalescence of the sample particle with the solvent droplet in which all of the analyte is incorporated into the solvent or a more temporary interaction such that only some of the analyte is transferred to the solvent. Previous studies of the mechanism of EESI-MS on homogeneous particles indicate that both mechanisms are possible. We studied the behavior of EESI-MS toward heterogeneous particles created by coating NaCl particles with various thicknesses of organic diacids. Our results indicate that the signal strength depends on the solubility of the organic acid in the electrospray solvent, in agreement with previous studies, and also that the outer 10-15 nm of the particles are most susceptible to extraction into the electrospray droplets. Our results combined with those of previous studies suggest that the mass spectra obtained with EESI will not necessarily reflect the overall particle composition, especially for particles that are spatially inhomogeneous, and hence caution in interpretation of the data is advised for application to complex atmospheric aerosol.

  18. Surface modification and characterization of electrosprayed Sn-doped In2O3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon-Ryul; Ahn, Hyo-Jin

    2014-12-01

    We synthesized Sn-doped In2O3 (Indium tin oxide, ITO) thin films using electrospray and spin-coating. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Hall-effect measurement, and UV-vis spectrophotometry measurements were performed to investigate the morphological, structural, chemical, electrical, and optical properties of the electrosprayed ITO films with a sol-layer coating for surface modification. To obtain the optimum performance of the resultant ITO thin films after surface modification, we heat-treated them at four different temperatures of 450 degrees C (sample A), 550 degrees C (sample B), 650 degrees C (sample C), and 750 degrees C (sample D) using microwave heating. Surface modified ITO thin films calcined at 550 degrees C (sample B) using electrospray and spin-coating are observed to have superior resistivity (9.9 x 10(-3) 2 Ω x cm) and optical transmittance (-92.08%) owing to the improved densification of the ITO surface by spin-coating and the formation of uniform ITO thin films by electrospraying. PMID:25971111

  19. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS-ELECTROSPRAY MASS SPECTRA OF THE HERBICIDES PARAQUAT AND DIQUAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The positive ion electrospray mass spectra of the quaternary ammonium salt herbicides paraquat and diquat are examined by on-line separation with capillary electrophoresis (CE) and by direct infusion of the analytes. The analytes are separated by CE in 7-10 min at pH 3.9 in 50% m...

  20. The analysis of aqueous mixtures using liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.

    1999-02-12

    The focus of this dissertation is the use of chromatographic methods coupled with electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) for the determination of both organic and inorganic compounds in aqueous solutions. The combination of liquid chromatography (LC) methods and ES-MS offers one of the foremost methods for determining compounds in complex aqueous solutions. In this work, LC-ES-MS methods are devised using ion exclusion chromatography, reversed phase chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography, as well as capillary electrophoresis (CE). For an aqueous sample, these LC-ES-MS and CE-ES-MS techniques require no sample preparation or analyte derivatization, which makes it possible to observe a wide variety of analytes as they exist in solution. The majority of this work focuses on the use of LC-ES-MS for the determination of unknown products and intermediates formed during electrochemical incineration (ECI), an experimental waste remediation process. This report contains a general introduction to the project and the general conclusions. Four chapters have been removed for separate processing. Titles are: Chapter 2: Determination of small carboxylic acids by ion exclusion chromatography with electrospray mass spectrometry; Chapter 3: Electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone in aqueous media using a quaternary metal oxide electrode in the absence of a soluble supporting electrolyte; Chapter 4: The determination of electrochemical incineration products of 4-chlorophenol by liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry; and Chapter 5: Determination of small carboxylic acids by capillary electrophoresis with electrospray mass spectrometry.

  1. Electrospray deposition of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Halimi, Siti Umairah Bakar, Noor Fitrah Abu Ismail, Siti Norazian Hashib, Syafiza Abd; Naim, M. Nazli

    2014-02-24

    Deposition of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles was conducted by using eletrospray method. 0.05wt% of titanium dioxide suspension was prepared and characterized by using Malvern Zetasizer prior to the experiment. From Zetasizer results, stable suspension condition was obtained which is at pH 2 with zeta potential value of ±29.0 mV. In this electrospraying, the suspension was pumped at flowrate of 5 ml/hr by using syringe pump. The input voltage of 2.1 kV was applied at the nozzle tip and counter electrode. Electrosprayed particles were collected on the grounded aluminium plate substrate which was placed at 10–20 cm from counter electrode. Particles were then characterized using FESEM and average size of electrosprayed particles obtained. Initial droplet size was calculated by scaling law and compared with FE-SEM results in order to prove droplet fission occur during electrospray. Due to the results obtained, as the working distance increase from 10–20 cm the deposited TiO{sub 2} droplet size decrease from 247–116 nm to show droplet fission occur during the experiment.

  2. Revision of capillary cone-jet physics: Electrospray and flow focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M.; Montanero, José M.

    2009-06-01

    Capillary cone jets are natural microfluidic structures arising in steady capillary tip streaming, whose paradigms are electrospray and flow focusing phenomena. In this work, we make a profound revision of the basic underlying physics of generic cone jets from thousands of experimental measurements, most of them reported in the literature. First, the boundaries of the stability region of steady jetting are calculated. We describe these limitations by instability mechanisms associated with the local flow structure in the tip and the issuing jet and with the global behavior of the meniscus. Second, to undertake a general physical treatment of cone jets in steady regime, we analyze the energy balance taking place in the tips of both flow focusing and electrospray. This analysis yields a fundamental result: if the electrospray data are expressed in terms of an effective pressure drop, both phenomena satisfy the same scaling law for the droplet size, which exhibits nearly complete similarity in the parameter window where quasimonodisperse sprays are produced. That effective pressure drop is a function of the liquid properties exclusively, i.e., it does not depend on the operational parameters (flow rate and applied voltage). Moreover, the stability limits of the operational regimes are analyzed in detail, finding fundamental coincidences between flow focusing and electrospray as well. These results provide most useful general description and predictive scaling laws for nearly monodisperse microspraying or nanospraying based on steady cone jets, of immediate applicability in analytical chemistry, chemical engineering, biochemistry, pharmaceutical and food technologies, painting, and many other technological fields.

  3. Revision of capillary cone-jet physics: electrospray and flow focusing.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Montanero, José M

    2009-06-01

    Capillary cone jets are natural microfluidic structures arising in steady capillary tip streaming, whose paradigms are electrospray and flow focusing phenomena. In this work, we make a profound revision of the basic underlying physics of generic cone jets from thousands of experimental measurements, most of them reported in the literature. First, the boundaries of the stability region of steady jetting are calculated. We describe these limitations by instability mechanisms associated with the local flow structure in the tip and the issuing jet and with the global behavior of the meniscus. Second, to undertake a general physical treatment of cone jets in steady regime, we analyze the energy balance taking place in the tips of both flow focusing and electrospray. This analysis yields a fundamental result: if the electrospray data are expressed in terms of an effective pressure drop, both phenomena satisfy the same scaling law for the droplet size, which exhibits nearly complete similarity in the parameter window where quasimonodisperse sprays are produced. That effective pressure drop is a function of the liquid properties exclusively, i.e., it does not depend on the operational parameters (flow rate and applied voltage). Moreover, the stability limits of the operational regimes are analyzed in detail, finding fundamental coincidences between flow focusing and electrospray as well. These results provide most useful general description and predictive scaling laws for nearly monodisperse microspraying or nanospraying based on steady cone jets, of immediate applicability in analytical chemistry, chemical engineering, biochemistry, pharmaceutical and food technologies, painting, and many other technological fields.

  4. Regiospecific analysis of diricinoleoylacylglycerols in castor (Ricinus communis L.) oil by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HPLC fractions of diricinoleoyl-acyl-glycerols containing one non-ricinoleoyl chain from castor oil were used to identify the regiospecific location of this non-ricinoleoyl chain on glycerol backbone using electrospray ionization-MS3 of lithium adducts. The regiospecific ions used were from the loss...

  5. Identification of tetraacylglycerols in lesquerella oil by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tetraacylglycerol (an acylglycerol estolide) contains an acyl chain attached to the hydroxyl group of another acyl chain attached to the glycerol backbone. Lequerolic acid (Ls, OH1420:111) is the main fatty acid in lequerella oil and can be used in industry. We have used electrospray ionization mass...

  6. Generation of naphthoquinone radical anions by electrospray ionization: solution, gas-phase, and computational chemistry studies.

    PubMed

    Vessecchi, Ricardo; Naal, Zeki; Lopes, José N C; Galembeck, Sérgio E; Lopes, Norberto P

    2011-06-01

    Radical anions are present in several chemical processes, and understanding the reactivity of these species may be described by their thermodynamic properties. Over the last years, the formation of radical ions in the gas phase has been an important issue concerning electrospray ionization mass spectrometry studies. In this work, we report on the generation of radical anions of quinonoid compounds (Q) by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The balance between radical anion formation and the deprotonated molecule is also analyzed by influence of the experimental parameters (gas-phase acidity, electron affinity, and reduction potential) and solvent system employed. The gas-phase parameters for formation of radical species and deprotonated species were achieved on the basis of computational thermochemistry. The solution effects on the formation of radical anion (Q(•-)) and dianion (Q(2-)) were evaluated on the basis of cyclic voltammetry analysis and the reduction potentials compared with calculated electron affinities. The occurrence of unexpected ions [Q+15](-) was described as being a reaction between the solvent system and the radical anion, Q(•-). The gas-phase chemistry of the electrosprayed radical anions was obtained by collisional-induced dissociation and compared to the relative energy calculations. These results are important for understanding the formation and reactivity of radical anions and to establish their correlation with the reducing properties by electrospray ionization analyses. PMID:21561138

  7. Examination and Manipulation of Protein Surface Charge in Solution with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Deborah S.; Van Ryswyk, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful tool for examining the charge of proteins in solution. The charge can be manipulated through choice of solvent and pH. Furthermore, solution-accessible, protonated lysine side chains can be specifically tagged with 18-crown-6 ether to form noncovalent adducts. Chemical derivatization…

  8. An electrodynamic ion funnel for electrospray ionization source based time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, K. G.; Rao, K. C.; Sule, U.; Reddy, P.; Rodrigues, S. M.; Gaikwad, D. T.; Mukundhan, R.; Gupta, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    An electrodynamic ion funnel has been developed for improving the sensitivity of electrospray ionization sources widely used in the mass spectrometric study of proteins and other biological macromolecules. The ion funnel consists of 52 electrodes and works under the combined influence of RF and DC voltages in the pressure range of 0.1 to 5 mbar. A novel feature of this ion funnel is the specific shape of the exit electrode that improves transmission of lower mass ions by reducing the depth of effective trapping potentials. In this paper, we report on the optimization of the ion funnel design using ion trajectory simulation software SIMION 8.0 especially in the mass range 500–5000 amu, followed by experimental observations of the ion transmission from the electrospray interface. It is seen that the electrospray-ion funnel combination greatly enhances the transmission when compared with an electrospray-skimmer interface. Ion currents > 1 nA could be obtained at the exit of the ion funnel for dilute Streptomycin Sulphate (~ 1500 amu) solution with the ion funnel operating in the 500–900 kHz frequency range, amplitude of 70 Vp‑p, under a DC gradient of about 20 Volts/cm at a background pressure of 0.3 mbar. Details of the construction of the ion funnel along with the experimental results are presented.

  9. Enhanced Raman scattering from aromatic dithiols electrosprayed into plasmonic nanojunctions.

    PubMed

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z; Johnson, Grant E; Novikova, Irina V; Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G; Evans, James E; Zamkov, Mikhail; Laskin, Julia; Hess, Wayne P

    2015-01-01

    We describe surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) experiments in which molecular coverage is systematically varied from 3.8 × 10(5) to 3.8 × 10(2) to 0.38 molecules per μm(2) using electrospray deposition of ethanolic 4,4'-dimercaptostilbene (DMS) solutions. The plasmonic SERS substrate used herein consists of a well-characterized 2-dimensional (2D) array of silver nanospheres (see El-Khoury et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 141, 214308), previously shown to feature uniform topography and plasmonic response, as well as intense SERS activity. When compared to their ensemble averaged analogues, the spatially and temporally averaged spectra of a single molecule exhibit several unique features including: (i) distinct relative intensities of the observable Raman-active vibrational states, (ii) more pronounced SERS backgrounds, and (iii) broader Raman lines indicative of faster vibrational dephasing. The first observation may be understood on the basis of an intuitive physical picture in which the removal of averaging over multiple molecules exposes the tensorial nature of Raman scattering. When an oriented single molecule gives rise to the recorded SERS spectra, the relative orientation of the molecule with respect to vector components of the local electric field determines the relative intensities of the observable vibrational states. Using a single molecule SERS framework, described herein, we derive a unique molecular orientation in which a single DMS molecule is isolated at a nanojunction formed between two silver nanospheres in the 2D array. The DMS molecule is found lying nearly flat with respect to the metal. The derived orientation of a single molecule at a plasmonic nanojunction is consistent with observations (ii) and (iii). In particular, a careful inspection of the temporal spectral variations along the recorded single molecule SERS time sequences reveals that the time-averaged SERS backgrounds arise from individual molecular events, marked by broadened

  10. Enhanced Raman scattering from aromatic dithiols electrosprayed into plasmonic nanojunctions.

    PubMed

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z; Johnson, Grant E; Novikova, Irina V; Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G; Evans, James E; Zamkov, Mikhail; Laskin, Julia; Hess, Wayne P

    2015-01-01

    We describe surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) experiments in which molecular coverage is systematically varied from 3.8 × 10(5) to 3.8 × 10(2) to 0.38 molecules per μm(2) using electrospray deposition of ethanolic 4,4'-dimercaptostilbene (DMS) solutions. The plasmonic SERS substrate used herein consists of a well-characterized 2-dimensional (2D) array of silver nanospheres (see El-Khoury et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 141, 214308), previously shown to feature uniform topography and plasmonic response, as well as intense SERS activity. When compared to their ensemble averaged analogues, the spatially and temporally averaged spectra of a single molecule exhibit several unique features including: (i) distinct relative intensities of the observable Raman-active vibrational states, (ii) more pronounced SERS backgrounds, and (iii) broader Raman lines indicative of faster vibrational dephasing. The first observation may be understood on the basis of an intuitive physical picture in which the removal of averaging over multiple molecules exposes the tensorial nature of Raman scattering. When an oriented single molecule gives rise to the recorded SERS spectra, the relative orientation of the molecule with respect to vector components of the local electric field determines the relative intensities of the observable vibrational states. Using a single molecule SERS framework, described herein, we derive a unique molecular orientation in which a single DMS molecule is isolated at a nanojunction formed between two silver nanospheres in the 2D array. The DMS molecule is found lying nearly flat with respect to the metal. The derived orientation of a single molecule at a plasmonic nanojunction is consistent with observations (ii) and (iii). In particular, a careful inspection of the temporal spectral variations along the recorded single molecule SERS time sequences reveals that the time-averaged SERS backgrounds arise from individual molecular events, marked by broadened

  11. Negative electrospray, ion trap multistage mass spectrometry of synthetic fragments of the O-PS of Vibrio cholerae O:1.

    PubMed

    Bekesová, Slávka; Kovácik, Vladimír; Chmelík, Josef; Kovác, Pavol

    2006-01-01

    Saccharides (mono through hexasaccharides) that mimic the terminal epitopes of O-antigens of Vibrio cholerae O:1, serotypes Ogawa and Inaba, were studied by electrospray ion trap (ESI IT) mass spectrometry (MS) in the negative mode. Anionized adducts are the characteristic ions formed by the capture of H(3)O(2)(-) under the condition of ESI MS analysis. The reactive species are produced by reaction of hydroxyl anions with the molecule of water. Thus the [M + H(3)O(2)](-) have the highest m/z value in the ESI IT negative mass spectra. After dissociation of adducts by loss of 2H(2)O the [M-H](-) ions are produced. The fragmentation pathways were confirmed by multistage measurements (MS(n)). The predominant pathway of fragmentation of the mono- and oligomers is the elimination of a molecule of alpha- hydroxy--gammabutyrolactone from the 4-(3-deoxy-L-glycero-tetronamido) group. The other characteristic pathway occurs by shortening the length of oligosaccharides. In this way, conversion of the Ogawa to Inaba fragments takes place under the conditions of measurement. Negative ESI MS/MS provided sufficient information about molecular mass, the number of saccharide residues, basic structure of saccharides, about the tetronamide part of the compounds investigated and allowed Ogawa and Inaba serotypes to be distinguished.

  12. Optical analysis of miniature lenses with curved imaging surfaces.

    PubMed

    Reshidko, Dmitry; Sasian, Jose

    2015-10-01

    Miniature cameras for consumer electronics and mobile phones have been, and continue to be, in fast development. The system level requirements, such as manufacturing cost, packaging, and sensor characteristics, impose unique challenges for optical designers. In this paper, we discuss the potential optical benefits of having a curved image surface rather than a flat one. We show that curved sensor technology allows for optically faster lens solutions. We discuss trade-offs of several relevant characteristics, such as packaging, chief ray angle, image quality, and tolerance sensitivity. A comparison of a benchmark flat field lens, and an evaluation design imaging on a curved surface and working at f/1.6, provides useful specific insights. For a given image quality, departing from a flat imaging surface does not allow significantly reducing the total length of a lens. PMID:26479656

  13. A Study of International Differences in Phillips Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Robert Joseph

    The objective of this study was to determine why the United States has experienced a higher rate of unemployment in the post-war period than other countries at similar stages of development. The study reviewed the Phillips Curve Theory--the theory underlying wage and price changes--and the development and post-war characteristics of labor market…

  14. A Graphical Approach to Evaluating Equating Using Test Characteristic Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Reckase, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    An essential concern in the application of any equating procedure is determining whether tests can be considered equated after the tests have been placed onto a common scale. This article clarifies one equating criterion, the first-order equity property of equating, and develops a new method for evaluating equating that is linked to this…

  15. Item Characteristic Curve Solutions to Three Intractable Testing Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marco, Gary L.

    1977-01-01

    This paper summarizes three studies that illustrate how application of the three-parameter logistic test model helped solve three relatively intractable testing problems. The three problems are: designing a multi-purpose test, evaluating an multi-level test, and equating a test on the basis of pretest statistics. (Author/JKS)

  16. Analysis of Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Rhodes, M. D.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Tüysüz, M.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    We have applied the close binary system analysis package WINFITTER to a variety of exoplanet transiting light curves taken both from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and our own ground-based observations. WINFitter has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity brightening and structural parameters derived from Kopal's applications of the relevant Radau equation, and it includes appropriate tests for determinacy and adequacy of its best fitting parameter sets. We discuss a number of issues related to empirical checking of models for stellar limb darkening, surface maculation, Doppler beaming, microvariability, and transit time variation (TTV) effects. The Radau coefficients used in the light curve modeling, in principle, allow structural models of the component stars to be tested.

  17. Quantum walking in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrighi, Pablo; Facchini, Stefano; Forets, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    A discrete-time quantum walk (QW) is essentially a unitary operator driving the evolution of a single particle on the lattice. Some QWs admit a continuum limit, leading to familiar PDEs (e.g., the Dirac equation). In this paper, we study the continuum limit of a wide class of QWs and show that it leads to an entire class of PDEs, encompassing the Hamiltonian form of the massive Dirac equation in (1+1) curved spacetime. Therefore, a certain QW, which we make explicit, provides us with a unitary discrete toy model of a test particle in curved spacetime, in spite of the fixed background lattice. Mathematically, we have introduced two novel ingredients for taking the continuum limit of a QW, but which apply to any quantum cellular automata: encoding and grouping.

  18. Flow Through Randomly Curved Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a computational study of the transport properties of campylotic (intrinsically curved) media. It is found that the relation between the flow through a campylotic media, consisting of randomly located curvature perturbations, and the average Ricci scalar of the system, exhibits two distinct functional expressions, depending on whether the typical spatial extent of the curvature perturbation lies above or below the critical value maximizing the overall scalar of curvature. Furthermore, the flow through such systems as a function of the number of curvature perturbations is found to present a sublinear behavior for large concentrations, due to the interference between curvature perturbations leading to an overall less curved space. We have also characterized the flux through such media as a function of the local Reynolds number and the scale of interaction between impurities. For the purpose of this study, we have also developed and validated a new lattice Boltzmann model. PMID:24173367

  19. Light curves of faint meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, Pavel; Borovička, Jiří

    2001-11-01

    The results of the light curves analysis of 234 meteors observed and recorded within the double-station image intensifier observations at the Ondřejov observatory are presented. Double-station observations allow to compute the meteor trajectory in the solar system and in the atmosphere as well as to determinate the absolute magnitude of meteor and its mass. Light curves and heights data of all major meteor showers - Lyrids, η-Aquarids, Perseids, Orionids, Leonids, Geminids as well as many sporadic meteors - were analysed. The differences between individual showers were found, e.g. Perseids appear to be more compact than Leonids. There is also difference between 1998 and 1999 Leonids. This suggests different composition or structure of parent bodies. Our data show that the beginning heights of Perseids, Orionids and Leonids are weakly dependent on meteor mass, although the dust-ball theory assumes they should be mass independent.

  20. Isoperformance curves in applied psychology.

    PubMed

    Jones, M B; Kennedy, R S

    1996-03-01

    Isoperformance is a technique for reading information out of a data-analytic model, comparable to expected mean square or omega squared analyses. It results in a trade-off function (an isoperformance curve) among the determinants of performance. The technique was developed primarily to generate trade-off functions between personnel aptitude and time in training or on the job. However, the technique is general and can be applied in any trade-off situation. In part, the purpose of this paper is to recall the antecedents of isoperformance in psychophysics and to recount the origins and development of the isoperformance readout. Its main purpose, however, is to present several examples of isoperformance curves in applied psychology and to make the case for their usefulness.

  1. Infinite swapping in curved spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curotto, E.; Mella, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    We develop an extension of the infinite swapping and partial infinite swapping techniques [N. Plattner, J. D. Doll, P. Dupuis, H. Wang, Y. Liu, and J. E. Gubernatis, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134111 (2011)] to curved spaces. Furthermore, we test the performance of infinite swapping and partial infinite swapping in a series of flat spaces characterized by the same potential energy surface model. We develop a second order variational algorithm for general curved spaces without the extended Lagrangian formalism to include holonomic constraints. We test the new methods by carrying out NVT classical ensemble simulations on a set of multidimensional toroids mapped by stereographic projections and characterized by a potential energy surface built from a linear combination of decoupled double wells shaped purposely to create rare events over a range of temperatures.

  2. Optical conductivity of curved graphene.

    PubMed

    Chaves, A J; Frederico, T; Oliveira, O; de Paula, W; Santos, M C

    2014-05-01

    We compute the optical conductivity for an out-of-plane deformation in graphene using an approach based on solutions of the Dirac equation in curved space. Different examples of periodic deformations along one direction translates into an enhancement of the optical conductivity peaks in the region of the far- and mid-infrared frequencies for periodicities ∼100 nm. The width and position of the peaks can be changed by dialling the parameters of the deformation profiles. The enhancement of the optical conductivity is due to intraband transitions and the translational invariance breaking in the geometrically deformed background. Furthermore, we derive an analytical solution of the Dirac equation in a curved space for a general deformation along one spatial direction. For this class of geometries, it is shown that curvature induces an extra phase in the electron wave function, which can also be explored to produce interference devices of the Aharonov-Bohm type.

  3. High speed curved position sensitive detector

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Robert W.; Wilson, Jack W.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed curved position sensitive porportional counter detector for use in x-ray diffraction, the detection of 5-20 keV photons and the like. The detector employs a planar anode assembly of a plurality of parallel metallic wires. This anode assembly is supported between two cathode planes, with at least one of these cathode planes having a serpentine resistive path in the form of a meander having legs generally perpendicular to the anode wires. This meander is produced by special microelectronic fabrication techniques whereby the meander "wire" fans outwardly at the cathode ends to produce the curved aspect of the detector, and the legs of the meander are small in cross-section and very closely spaced whereby a spatial resolution of about 50 .mu.m can be achieved. All of the other performance characteristics are about as good or better than conventional position sensitive proportional counter type detectors. Count rates of up to 40,000 counts per second with 0.5 .mu.s shaping time constants are achieved.

  4. Accelerating Around an Unbanked Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2006-02-01

    The December 2004 issue of TPT presented a problem concerning how a car should accelerate around an unbanked curve of constant radius r starting from rest if it is to avoid skidding. Interestingly enough, two solutions were proffered by readers.2 The purpose of this note is to compare and contrast the two approaches. Further experimental investigation of various turning strategies using a remote-controlled car and overhead video analysis could make for an interesting student project.

  5. Inferring asymmetric limb cloudiness on exoplanets from transit light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Paris, P.; Gratier, P.; Bordé, P.; Leconte, J.; Selsis, F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Clouds have been shown to be present in many exoplanetary atmospheres. Cloud formation modeling predicts considerable inhomogeneities of cloud cover, consistent with optical phase curve observations. However, optical phase curves cannot resolve some existing degeneracies between cloud location and cloud optical properties. Aims: We present a conceptually simple technique for detecting inhomogeneous cloud cover on exoplanets. Such an inhomogeneous cloud cover produces an asymmetric primary transit of the planet in front of the host star. Asymmetric transits produce characteristic residuals that are different from standard symmetric models. Furthermore, bisector spans can be used to determine asymmetries in the transit light curve. Methods: We apply a model of asymmetric transits to the light curves of HAT-P-7b, Kepler-7b, and HD 209458b and search for possible cloud signatures. The nearly uninterrupted Kepler photometry is particularly well suited for this method since it allows for a very high time resolution. Results: We do not find any statistically sound cloud signature in the data of the considered planets. For HAT-P-7b, a tentative detection of an asymmetric cloud cover is found, consistent with analysis of the optical phase curve. Based on Bayesian probability arguments, a symmetric model with an offset in the transit ephemeris is still the most viable model. This work demonstrates that for suitable targets, namely low-gravity planets around bright stars, the method can be used to constrain cloud cover characteristics and is thus a helpful additional tool for the study of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  6. Analysis of colorectal adenocarcinoma tissue by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric imaging.

    PubMed

    Gerbig, Stefanie; Golf, Ottmar; Balog, Julia; Denes, Julia; Baranyai, Zsolt; Zarand, Attila; Raso, Erzsebet; Timar, Jozsef; Takats, Zoltan

    2012-06-01

    Negative ion desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was used for the analysis of an ex vivo tissue sample set comprising primary colorectal adenocarcinoma samples and colorectal adenocarcinoma liver metastasis samples. Frozen sections (12 μm thick) were analyzed by means of DESI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) with spatial resolution of 100 μm using a computer-controlled DESI imaging stage mounted on a high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometer. DESI-IMS data were found to predominantly feature complex lipids, including phosphatidyl-inositols, phophatidyl-ethanolamines, phosphatidyl-serines, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine plasmalogens, phosphatidic acids, phosphatidyl-glycerols, ceramides, sphingolipids, and sulfatides among others. Molecular constituents were identified based on their exact mass and MS/MS fragmentation spectra. An identified set of molecules was found to be in good agreement with previously reported DESI imaging data. Different histological tissue types were found to yield characteristic mass spectrometric data in each individual section. Histological features were identified by comparison to hematoxylin-eosin stained neighboring sections. Ions specific to certain histological tissue types (connective tissue, smooth muscle, healthy mucosa, healthy liver parenchyma, and adenocarcinoma) were identified by semi-automated screening of data. While each section featured a number of tissue-specific species, no potential global biomarker was found in the full sample set for any of the tissue types. As an alternative approach, data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) which resulted in efficient separation of data points based on their histological types. A pixel-by-pixel tissue identification method was developed, featuring the PCA/LDA analysis of authentic data set, and localization of unknowns in the resulting 60D, histologically assigned LDA space. Novel approach was found to yield results which are

  7. Charge reduced electrospray size spectrometry of mega- and gigadalton complexes: whole viruses and virus fragments.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Christopher J; Kettleson, Eric M; Ramaswami, Bala; Chen, Da-Ren; Biswas, Pratim

    2006-02-01

    The ability to analyze and identify large macromolecular complexes whose molecular weight is beyond the analyzable range of mass spectrometry is of great interest. The size of such complexes makes them suitable for analysis via mobility size spectrometry. In this work, charge reduced electrospray size spectrometry was used for the analysis of bacteriophage viruses with total molecular masses ranging from 3.6 MDa up to the gigadalton range. The electrospray source used was operated in "cone jet" mode with a mean droplet diameter of 170.56 nm. Bacteriophage MS2 was found to have a mobility diameter of 24.13 +/- 0.06 nm and remain highly viable after the electrospray process. Larger bacteriophages T2 and T4 have lengths greater than the diameter of the electrospray jet and droplets; thus, they could not be completely enclosed and were found to fragment at the virus capsid head-tail noncovalent interface during either the jet formation or jet breakup process. No viable T2 or T4 virions were detectable after being electrosprayed. While the exact mechanism of fragmentation could not be determined, it is proposed here that macromolecular fragmentation at noncovalent interfaces occurs due to mechanically and electrically induced stresses during jet formation and jet breakup. Bacteriophage T4 capsid heads were found to be statistically significantly larger than bacteriophage T2 capsid heads, with a mean peak diameter of 88.32 +/- 1.02 nm for T4 and 87.03 +/- 0.18 nm for T2. While capsid head fragments were detectable, tail and tail-fiber fragments could not be detected by size spectrometric analysis. This is attributed to the fact that the contractile tails of bacteriophage T2 and T4 virions mechanically deform to a varying degree while confined within the smaller jet and droplets. Further evidence of contractile tail deformation during the electrospray process was found by measuring the size spectrum of bacteriophage lambda, which has a noncontractile tail. Bacteriophage

  8. An electro-osmotic micro-pump based on monolithic silica for micro-flow analyses and electro-sprays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zilin; Wang, Ping; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2005-06-01

    A high-pressure electro-osmotic micro-pump fabricated by a sol-gel process is reported as a fluid-driving unit in a flow-injection analysis (FIA) system. The micro FIA system consists of a monolithic micro-pump on a glass slide (2.5 x 7.5 cm), a micro-injector, and a micro-sensor (2.5 x 1.5 cm). The monolithic silica matrix has a continuous skeleton morphology with micrometer-sized through-pores. The micrometer-size pores with a large negative surface charge density build up a large pressure under a DC electric field to drive fluid through the downstream units. A novel Nafion joint for the downstream cathode eliminates flow into the electrode reservoir and further enhances pressure build-up. The measured pump-pressure curve indicated a maximum pressure of 0.4 MPa at flow rate of 0.4 microL min(-1) at 6 kV. Despite the large voltage, the small current transmission area through the monolith produced a negligible current (less than 100 microA) that did not generate bubbles or ion contaminants. The flow rate can be precisely controlled in the range 200 nL to 2.5 microL min(-1) by varying the voltage from 1 to 6 kV. The high pump pressure and the large current-free DC field also enabled the pump to act as an electro-spray interface with a downstream analytical instrument.

  9. Studying the reducing potencies of antioxidants with the electrochemistry inherently present in electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Sabine; Erb, Robert; Chervet, Jean-Pierre; Oberacher, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    In this proof-of-principle study, the applicability of electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to characterize the reducing potencies of natural antioxidants is demonstrated. The ESI source represents a controlled-current electrochemical cell. The interfacial potential at the emitter electrode will be at or near the electrochemical potential of those reactions that sufficiently supply all the required current for the ESI circuit. Indicator molecules prone to oxidation in ESI such as amodiaquine were used to visualize the impact of reducing compounds on the interfacial potential. The extent of inhibition of the oxidation of the indicator molecule was found to be dependent on the kind and amount of antioxidant added. Concentration-inhibition curves were constructed and used to compare reducing potencies and to rank antioxidants. This ranking was found to be dependent on the electrode material-indicator molecule combination applied. For fast and automated characterization of the reducing potencies of electrochemically active molecules, a flow-injection system was combined with ESI-MS. Liquid chromatography was used to process complex biological samples, such as red and white wine. Due to their high content of different polyphenols, red wine fractions were found to exhibit higher reducing potencies than the corresponding white wine fractions. Furthermore, for 14 important natural antioxidants, the results obtained with the controlled-current EC-ESI-MS assay were compared to those obtained with chemical antioxidant assays. Irrespectively of the kind of assay used to test the reducing potency, gallic acid, quercetin, and epicatechin were found to be potent reductants. Other antioxidants performed well in one particular assay only. This observation suggests that different kinds of redox and antioxidant chemistry were assessed with each of the assays applied. Therefore, several assays should be used to comprehensively study antioxidants and their reducing

  10. Trace element analysis of aqueous samples by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy based on pre-concentration of electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Kai; Lei, Yu; Yu, Quan; Li, Jianan; Qian, Xiang; Wang, Xiaohao

    2015-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is characterized as a powerful tool in in-situ online analysis with its fast and multiple detecting abilities. But in the area of detecting trace sample in aqueous solution of low concentration, the turbulence, scattering, absorbance and cooling effect of liquid medium limits its performance. Traditional method includes liquid jet, liquid-solid transformation and pre-concentration on other medium, yet the procedure of sample preparation is complicated and time consuming. In this work, we propose a new method to achieve pre-concentration, in which filter paper and electro-spray ionization (ESI) are used. In our experiment, we choose MnSO4 as sample. The surface of filter paper is sprayed with MnSO4 aqueous solution of different concentration by an ESI. The pulsed laser is focused on the surface of filter paper and the plasma is formed in the focusing area. Through an optical fiber the spectrum of plasma is detected by a spectrometer. The ESI system, pulses generator system and the UI on PC are home-made. The spectra lines of Mn at 257.6nm, 259.4nm and 260.6nm are analyzed. Results show that the limit of detection at 257.6nm is sub-ppb and the R2 of calibration curve is more than 0.93. Compared with traditional method, like soak and drip processing, our method can increase the concentration of the sample by simply expanding spraying time, achieving a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and a lower limit of detection (LOD). In addition, the consumption of sample solution is as low as several hundred μl in each detection.

  11. [Qualification and quantification of 10 sulfonamides in animal feedstuff by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Qin, Yan; Zhang, Meijin; Lin, Haidan

    2005-07-01

    The presence of sulfonamide (SA) residues in foods is largely due to the raising of animals with sulfonamide antibiotics added or polluted feedstuff. Because of interference from the matrices, the commonly used immunoassay or chromatographic method is not suitable for the analysis of multi-SAs in feedstuff. A high performance liquid chromatographic-electrospray tandem mass spectrometric (HPLC/ESI-MS-MS) method has been established for the simultaneous determination of multi-SAs including sulfadiazine (SD), sulfapyridine (SPD), sulfamerazine (SM1), sulfameter (SM), sulfamethazine (SM2), sulfamethoxypyridazine (SMP), sulfamethoxazole (SMZ), sulfamonomethoxine (SMM), sulfadimethoxine (SDM) and sulfaquinoxaline (SQX). After solvent extraction, solid phase extraction, dilution and reversed-phase HPLC separation, SAs were detected by ESI-MS-MS under multi-reaction monitoring mode. The qualification analysis was done by using retention time and distribution of diagnostic ion pairs, and the quantification was based on the peak intensity of common fragment ion m/z 156. The limits of quantification for 10 SAs were 0.5 - 2.0 microg/kg (S/N = 10). The correlation coefficient of linear calibration curve was over 0.9995 within the SAs concentration range 2.0 - 200 microg/L except for SDM and SQX. At the spiked level of 1.0 mg/kg, the average recoveries for the 10 SAs were between 70% and 92%, the relative standard deviations were under 10% for intra-day and under 15% for inter-day. Routine tests showed the method was fast, sensitive, specific, and practical for the SAs determination in feedstuff. PMID:16250451

  12. The quantitative surface analysis of an antioxidant additive in a lubricant oil matrix by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Caitlyn; Reynolds, James C; Whitmarsh, Samuel; Lynch, Tom; Creaser, Colin S

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE Chemical additives are incorporated into commercial lubricant oils to modify the physical and chemical properties of the lubricant. The quantitative analysis of additives in oil-based lubricants deposited on a surface without extraction of the sample from the surface presents a challenge. The potential of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) for the quantitative surface analysis of an oil additive in a complex oil lubricant matrix without sample extraction has been evaluated. METHODS The quantitative surface analysis of the antioxidant additive octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix was carried out by DESI-MS in the presence of 2-(pentyloxy)ethyl 3-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)propionate as an internal standard. A quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with an in-house modified ion source enabling non-proximal DESI-MS was used for the analyses. RESULTS An eight-point calibration curve ranging from 1 to 80 µg/spot of octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix and in the presence of the internal standard was used to determine the quantitative response of the DESI-MS method. The sensitivity and repeatability of the technique were assessed by conducting replicate analyses at each concentration. The limit of detection was determined to be 11 ng/mm2 additive on spot with relative standard deviations in the range 3–14%. CONCLUSIONS The application of DESI-MS to the direct, quantitative surface analysis of a commercial lubricant additive in a native oil lubricant matrix is demonstrated. © 2013 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24097398

  13. Particle filtering for dispersion curve tracking in ocean acoustics.

    PubMed

    Zorych, Ivan; Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni

    2008-08-01

    A particle filtering method is developed for dispersion curve extraction from spectrograms of broadband acoustic signals propagating in underwater media. The goal is to obtain accurate representation of modal dispersion which can be employed for source localization and geoacoustic inversion. Results are presented from the application of the method to synthetic data, demonstrating the potential of the approach for accurate estimation of waveguide dispersion characteristics. The method outperforms simple time-frequency analysis providing estimates that are very close to numerically calculated dispersion curves. The method also provides uncertainty information on modal arrival time estimates, typically unavailable when traditional methods are used.

  14. Compression of contour data through exploiting curve-to-curve dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalabik, N.; Cooper, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    An approach to exploiting curve-to-curve dependencies in order to achieve high data compression is presented. One of the approaches to date of along curve compression through use of cubic spline approximation is taken and extended by investigating the additional compressibility achievable through curve-to-curve structure exploitation. One of the models under investigation is reported on.

  15. STRUCTURAL DETERMINATION AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF BACTERIAL PHOSPHOLIPIDS USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a comprehensive spectral analysis of common bacterial phospholipids using electrospray/mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) under both negative and positive ionization conditions. Phospholipids under positive ionization yield sodium-adduct molecular ions which are mos...

  16. In-Situ Organic Compound Analysis of the Meteorite Surface by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Coupled with an Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naraoka, H.; Hashiguchi, M.

    2016-08-01

    It-situ analysis of organic compounds on the meteorite surface was performed by desorption electrospray ionization coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry. Indigenous peaks of meteorite origin were discriminated from the background.

  17. NLINEAR - NONLINEAR CURVE FITTING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    A common method for fitting data is a least-squares fit. In the least-squares method, a user-specified fitting function is utilized in such a way as to minimize the sum of the squares of distances between the data points and the fitting curve. The Nonlinear Curve Fitting Program, NLINEAR, is an interactive curve fitting routine based on a description of the quadratic expansion of the chi-squared statistic. NLINEAR utilizes a nonlinear optimization algorithm that calculates the best statistically weighted values of the parameters of the fitting function and the chi-square that is to be minimized. The inputs to the program are the mathematical form of the fitting function and the initial values of the parameters to be estimated. This approach provides the user with statistical information such as goodness of fit and estimated values of parameters that produce the highest degree of correlation between the experimental data and the mathematical model. In the mathematical formulation of the algorithm, the Taylor expansion of chi-square is first introduced, and justification for retaining only the first term are presented. From the expansion, a set of n simultaneous linear equations are derived, which are solved by matrix algebra. To achieve convergence, the algorithm requires meaningful initial estimates for the parameters of the fitting function. NLINEAR is written in Fortran 77 for execution on a CDC Cyber 750 under NOS 2.3. It has a central memory requirement of 5K 60 bit words. Optionally, graphical output of the fitting function can be plotted. Tektronix PLOT-10 routines are required for graphics. NLINEAR was developed in 1987.

  18. Seeing effects on occultation curves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1971-01-01

    Evaluation of seeing effects on the light curve of a stellar occultation by the moon. Some theoretical studies of Fried (1966) and Hulett (1967) on the linear size of the downward-looking seeing disk are cited, showing that the seeing blur amounts to a few centimeters for a star in the zenith and that the linear blur must grow approximately as (sec z) to the 3/2 power. For most observations the seeing blur will not exceed 8 to 10 cm. The limitation on angular resolution imposed by this seeing effect is calculated.

  19. Curved microchannels and bacterial streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial biofilms are commonly identified as microbial communities attached to a surface and encased in a self-secreted extracellular matrix. Due to their increased resistance to antimicrobial agents, biofilms have an enormous impact on health and medicine (e.g., wound healing, implant-associated infections, disease transmission). On the other hand, they constitute a major component of the stream ecosystem by increasing transport of nutrients and retention of suspended particles. In this talk, we present an experimental study of bacterial biofilm development in a microfluidic device. In particular, we show the formation of filamentous structures, or streamers, in curved channels and how these suspended biofilms are linked to the underlying hydrodynamics.

  20. Differentiation of oral bacteria in in vitro cultures and human saliva by secondary electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregy, Lukas; Müggler, Annick R.; Martinez-Lozano Sinues, Pablo; García-Gómez, Diego; Suter, Yannick; Belibasakis, Georgios N.; Kohler, Malcolm; Schmidlin, Patrick R.; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-10-01

    The detection of bacterial-specific volatile metabolites may be a valuable tool to predict infection. Here we applied a real-time mass spectrometric technique to investigate differences in volatile metabolic profiles of oral bacteria that cause periodontitis. We coupled a secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) source to a commercial high-resolution mass spectrometer to interrogate the headspace from bacterial cultures and human saliva. We identified 120 potential markers characteristic for periodontal pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (n = 13), Porphyromonas gingivalis (n = 70), Tanerella forsythia (n = 30) and Treponema denticola (n = 7) in in vitro cultures. In a second proof-of-principle phase, we found 18 (P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and T. denticola) of the 120 in vitro compounds in the saliva from a periodontitis patient with confirmed infection with P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and T. denticola with enhanced ion intensity compared to two healthy controls. In conclusion, this method has the ability to identify individual metabolites of microbial pathogens in a complex medium such as saliva.

  1. Differentiation of oral bacteria in in vitro cultures and human saliva by secondary electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bregy, Lukas; Müggler, Annick R; Martinez-Lozano Sinues, Pablo; García-Gómez, Diego; Suter, Yannick; Belibasakis, Georgios N; Kohler, Malcolm; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-01-01

    The detection of bacterial-specific volatile metabolites may be a valuable tool to predict infection. Here we applied a real-time mass spectrometric technique to investigate differences in volatile metabolic profiles of oral bacteria that cause periodontitis. We coupled a secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) source to a commercial high-resolution mass spectrometer to interrogate the headspace from bacterial cultures and human saliva. We identified 120 potential markers characteristic for periodontal pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (n = 13), Porphyromonas gingivalis (n = 70), Tanerella forsythia (n = 30) and Treponema denticola (n = 7) in in vitro cultures. In a second proof-of-principle phase, we found 18 (P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and T. denticola) of the 120 in vitro compounds in the saliva from a periodontitis patient with confirmed infection with P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and T. denticola with enhanced ion intensity compared to two healthy controls. In conclusion, this method has the ability to identify individual metabolites of microbial pathogens in a complex medium such as saliva.

  2. On the propagation of long waves in acoustically treated, curved ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1981-01-01

    A two dimensional study is presented on the behavior of long waves in lined, curved ducts. The analysis includes a comparison between the propagation in curved and straight lined ducts. A parametric study was conducted over a range of wall admittance and duct wall separation. The complex eigenvalues of the characteristic equation, which in the case of a curved duct are also the angular wavenumbers, were obtained by successive approximations.

  3. Fabrication of cross-linked alginate beads using electrospraying for adenovirus delivery.

    PubMed

    Park, Hongkwan; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Hwang, Taewon; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Park, Tae-Joon; Choi, Sung-Wook; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Jung Hyun

    2012-05-10

    Cross-linked alginate beads containing adenovirus (Ad) were successfully fabricated using an electrospraying method to achieve the protection and release of Ad in a controlled manner. An aqueous alginate solution containing Ad was electrosprayed into an aqueous phase containing a cross-linking agent (calcium chloride) at different process variables (voltages, alginate concentrations, and flow rates). Alginate beads containing Ad were used for transduction of U343 glioma cells and the transduction efficiency of the alginate beads was measured by quantification of gene expression using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter at different time points. In vitro results of gene expression revealed that the Ad encapsulated in the alginate beads with 0.5 wt% of alginate concentration exhibited a high activity for a long period (over 7 days) and was released in a sustained manner from the alginate beads. The Ad-encapsulating alginate beads could be promising materials for local delivery of Ad at a high concentration into target sites.

  4. Analysis of submicron-sized niflumic acid crystals prepared by electrospray crystallization.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, Rita; Radacsi, Norbert; Szunyogh, Tímea; van der Heijden, Antoine E D M; Ter Horst, Joop H; Szabó-Révész, Piroska

    2013-03-25

    Interest in submicron-sized drug particles has emerged from both laboratory and industrial perspectives in the last decade. Production of crystals in the nano size scale offers a novel way to particles for drug formulation solving formulation problems of drugs with low solubility in class II of the Biopharmaceutical Classification System. In this work niflumic acid nanoparticles with a size range of 200-800nm were produced by the novel crystallization method, electrospray crystallization. Their properties were compared to those from evaporative and anti-solvent crystallizations, using the same organic solvent, acetone. There is a remarkable difference in the product crystal size depending on the applied methods. The size and morphology were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction. The structure of the samples was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The particles produced using electrospray crystallization process were probably changing from amorphous to crystalline state after the procedure.

  5. The onset of electrospray: the universal scaling laws of the first ejection

    PubMed Central

    Gañán-Calvo, A. M.; López-Herrera, J. M.; Rebollo-Muñoz, N.; Montanero, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The disintegration of liquid drops with low electrical conductivity and subject to an electric field is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. This disintegration takes place through the development of a conical cusp that eventually ejects an ultrathin liquid ligament. A first tiny drop is emitted from the end of this ligament. Due to its exceptionally small size and large electric charge per unit volume, that drop has been the object of relevant recent studies. In this paper, universal scaling laws for the diameter and electric charge of the first issued droplet are proposed and validated both numerically and experimentally. Our analysis shows how charge relaxation is the mechanism that differentiates the onset of electrospray, including the first droplet ejection, from the classical steady cone-jet mode. In this way, our study identifies when and where charge relaxation and electrokinetic phenomena come into play in electrospray, a subject of live controversy in the field. PMID:27581554

  6. Application of probe electrospray to direct ambient analysis of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Nishidate, Kentaro; Saito, Yuta; Mori, Kunihiko; Asakawa, Daiki; Takeda, Sen; Kubota, Takeo; Terada, Nobuo; Hashimoto, Yutaka; Hori, Hirokazu; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2008-08-01

    Recently, we have developed probe electrospray ionization (PESI) that uses a solid needle. In this system, the probe needle moves up and down along the vertical axis by a motor-driven system. At the highest position of the probe needle, electrospray is generated by applying a high voltage. In this study, we applied PESI directly to biological samples such as urine, mouse brain, mouse liver, salmon egg, and fruits (orange, banana, etc.). Strong ion signals for almost all the samples were obtained. The amount of liquid sample picked up by the needle is as small as pL or less, making PESI a promising non-invasive technique for detecting biomolecules in living systems such as cells. Therefore, PESI may be useful as a versatile and ready-to-use semi-online analytical tool in the fields of medicine, pharmaceuticals, agriculture, food science, etc. PMID:18623622

  7. Determination of macrolide antibiotics in chicken tissues by liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salikin, Jamilah; Abdullah, Aminah

    2013-11-01

    A methodusingliquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-(ESI)MS) for the simultaneous determination of three macrolides (tylosin, spiramycin and tilmicosin) in poultry muscle has been developed. The drugs were extracted with EDTA McIlvaine buffer, filter through celite 545 and the extracts were cleaned up by SPE Oasis HLB cartridge. Separation was carried out in end-capped silica-based C18 column and mobile phases containing trifluoroacetic acid-acetonitrile with a binary gradient system at a flow rate 0.5 ml/min. Detection was performed by single mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization in the positive mode. Several parameters affecting the mass spectra were studied. Chicken samples from the market were analyzed to check the residue of macrolide antibiotics.

  8. Physical Continuity and Vertical Alignment of Block Copolymer Domains by Kinetically Controlled Electrospray Deposition.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hanqiong; Choo, Youngwoo; Feng, Xunda; Osuji, Chinedum O

    2015-07-01

    The fabrication of block copolymer (BCP) thin films is reported with vertically aligned cylindrical domains using continuous electrospray deposition onto bare wafer surfaces. The out-of-plane orientation of hexagonally packed styrene cylinders is achieved in the "fast-wet" deposition regime in which rapid evaporation of the solvent in deposited droplets of polymer solution drives the vertical alignment of the self-assembled structure. Thermally activated crosslinking of the polybutadiene matrix provides kinetic control of the morphology, freezing the vertical alignment and preventing relaxation of the system to its preferred parallel orientation on the nontreated substrate. Physically continuous vertically oriented domains can be achieved over several micrometers of film thickness. The ability of electrospray deposition to fabricate well-ordered and aligned BCP films on nontreated substrates, the low amount of material used relative to spin-coating, and the continuous nature of the deposition may open up new opportunities for BCP thin films. PMID:25959572

  9. The onset of electrospray: the universal scaling laws of the first ejection.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, A M; López-Herrera, J M; Rebollo-Muñoz, N; Montanero, J M

    2016-09-01

    The disintegration of liquid drops with low electrical conductivity and subject to an electric field is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. This disintegration takes place through the development of a conical cusp that eventually ejects an ultrathin liquid ligament. A first tiny drop is emitted from the end of this ligament. Due to its exceptionally small size and large electric charge per unit volume, that drop has been the object of relevant recent studies. In this paper, universal scaling laws for the diameter and electric charge of the first issued droplet are proposed and validated both numerically and experimentally. Our analysis shows how charge relaxation is the mechanism that differentiates the onset of electrospray, including the first droplet ejection, from the classical steady cone-jet mode. In this way, our study identifies when and where charge relaxation and electrokinetic phenomena come into play in electrospray, a subject of live controversy in the field.

  10. Rapid differentiation of refined fuels using negative electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Hostettler, F.D.

    2005-01-01

    Negative electrospray ionization/MS enabled rapid, specific, and selective screening for unique polar components at parts per million concentrations in commercial hydrocarbon products without extensive sample preparation, separation, chromatography, or quantitation. Commercial fuel types were analyzed with this method, including kerosene, jet fuel, white gas, charcoal lighter fluid, on-road and off-road diesel fuels, and various grades and brands of gasolines. The different types of fuels produced unique and relatively simple spectra. These analyses were then applied to hydrocarbon samples from a large, long-term fuel spill. Although the alkane, isoprenoid, and alkylcyclohexane portions began to biodegrade or weather, the polar components in these samples remained relatively unchanged. The type of fuel involved was readily identified by negative electrospray ionization/MS. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 230th ACS National Meeting (Washington, DC 8/28/2005-9/1/2005).

  11. Identification of explosives and explosive formulations using laser electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brady, John J; Judge, Elizabeth J; Levis, Robert J

    2010-06-15

    Mass analysis is demonstrated for the detection of sub-microgram quantities of explosive samples on a metallic surface at atmospheric pressure using laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS). A non-resonant femtosecond duration laser pulse vaporizes native samples for subsequent electrospray ionization and transfer into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. LEMS was used to detect 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane (DMNB), 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), 3,4,8,9,12,13-hexaoxa-1,6-diazabicyclo[4.4.4]tetradecane (HMTD), and 3,3,6,6,9,9-hexamethyl-1,2,4,5,7,8-hexaoxacyclononane (TATP) deposited on a steel surface. LEMS was also used to directly analyze composite propellant materials containing an explosive to determine the molecular composition of the explosive pellets at atmospheric pressure. PMID:20486263

  12. System and method for liquid extraction electrospray-assisted sample transfer to solution for chemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2016-07-12

    A system for sampling a surface includes a surface sampling probe comprising a solvent liquid supply conduit and a distal end, and a sample collector for suspending a sample collection liquid adjacent to the distal end of the probe. A first electrode provides a first voltage to solvent liquid at the distal end of the probe. The first voltage produces a field sufficient to generate electrospray plume at the distal end of the probe. A second electrode provides a second voltage and is positioned to produce a plume-directing field sufficient to direct the electrospray droplets and ions to the suspended sample collection liquid. The second voltage is less than the first voltage in absolute value. A voltage supply system supplies the voltages to the first electrode and the second electrode. The first electrode can apply the first voltage directly to the solvent liquid. A method for sampling for a surface is also disclosed.

  13. The onset of electrospray: the universal scaling laws of the first ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañán-Calvo, A. M.; López-Herrera, J. M.; Rebollo-Muñoz, N.; Montanero, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    The disintegration of liquid drops with low electrical conductivity and subject to an electric field is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. This disintegration takes place through the development of a conical cusp that eventually ejects an ultrathin liquid ligament. A first tiny drop is emitted from the end of this ligament. Due to its exceptionally small size and large electric charge per unit volume, that drop has been the object of relevant recent studies. In this paper, universal scaling laws for the diameter and electric charge of the first issued droplet are proposed and validated both numerically and experimentally. Our analysis shows how charge relaxation is the mechanism that differentiates the onset of electrospray, including the first droplet ejection, from the classical steady cone-jet mode. In this way, our study identifies when and where charge relaxation and electrokinetic phenomena come into play in electrospray, a subject of live controversy in the field.

  14. Development and Applications of Liquid Sample Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiuling; Chen, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is a recent advance in the field of analytical chemistry. This review surveys the development of liquid sample DESI-MS (LS-DESI-MS), a variant form of DESI-MS that focuses on fast analysis of liquid samples, and its novel analy-tical applications in bioanalysis, proteomics, and reaction kinetics. Due to the capability of directly ionizing liquid samples, liquid sample DESI (LS-DESI) has been successfully used to couple MS with various analytical techniques, such as microfluidics, microextraction, electrochemistry, and chromatography. This review also covers these hyphenated techniques. In addition, several closely related ionization methods, including transmission mode DESI, thermally assisted DESI, and continuous flow-extractive DESI, are briefly discussed. The capabilities of LS-DESI extend and/or complement the utilities of traditional DESI and electrospray ionization and will find extensive and valuable analytical application in the future.

  15. The onset of electrospray: the universal scaling laws of the first ejection.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, A M; López-Herrera, J M; Rebollo-Muñoz, N; Montanero, J M

    2016-01-01

    The disintegration of liquid drops with low electrical conductivity and subject to an electric field is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. This disintegration takes place through the development of a conical cusp that eventually ejects an ultrathin liquid ligament. A first tiny drop is emitted from the end of this ligament. Due to its exceptionally small size and large electric charge per unit volume, that drop has been the object of relevant recent studies. In this paper, universal scaling laws for the diameter and electric charge of the first issued droplet are proposed and validated both numerically and experimentally. Our analysis shows how charge relaxation is the mechanism that differentiates the onset of electrospray, including the first droplet ejection, from the classical steady cone-jet mode. In this way, our study identifies when and where charge relaxation and electrokinetic phenomena come into play in electrospray, a subject of live controversy in the field. PMID:27581554

  16. Encapsulation of folic acid in food hydrocolloids through nanospray drying and electrospraying for nutraceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Masiá, Rocío; López-Nicolás, Rubén; Periago, Maria Jesús; Ros, Gaspar; Lagaron, Jose M; López-Rubio, Amparo

    2015-02-01

    In this work, two different technologies (electrospraying and nanospray drying) were evaluated for the encapsulation of folic acid using both a whey protein concentrate (WPC) matrix and a commercial resistant starch. The morphology of the capsules, molecular organization of the matrices upon encapsulation, encapsulation efficiency, and stability of the folic acid within the capsules under different storage conditions and upon thermal exposure were studied. Results showed that spherical nano-, submicro- and microcapsules were obtained through both techniques, although electrospraying led to smaller capsule sizes and to an enhanced control over their size distribution. Greater encapsulation efficiency was observed using WPC as encapsulating matrix, probably related to interactions between the protein and folic acid which favoured the incorporation of the bioactive. The best results in terms of bioactive stabilization in the different conditions assayed were also obtained for the WPC capsules, although both materials and encapsulation techniques led to improved folic acid stability, especially under dry conditions.

  17. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Differentiates Protein Quaternary Structures Formed in Solution and in Electrospray Droplets.

    PubMed

    Han, Linjie; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2015-07-01

    Electrospray ionization coupled to mass spectrometry is a key technology for determining the stoichiometries of multiprotein complexes. Despite highly accurate results for many assemblies, challenging samples can generate signals for artifact protein-protein binding born of the crowding forces present within drying electrospray droplets. Here, for the first time, we study the formation of preferred protein quaternary structures within such rapidly evaporating nanodroplets. We use ion mobility and tandem mass spectrometry to investigate glutamate dehydrogenase dodecamers and serum amyloid P decamers as a function of protein concentration, along with control experiments using carefully chosen protein analogues, to both establish the formation of operative mechanisms and assign the bimodal conformer populations observed. Further, we identify an unprecedented symmetric collision-induced dissociation pathway that we link directly to the quaternary structures of the precursor ions selected.

  18. Pulsed voltage electrospray ion source and method for preventing analyte electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary

    2011-12-27

    An electrospray ion source and method of operation includes the application of pulsed voltage to prevent electrolysis of analytes with a low electrochemical potential. The electrospray ion source can include an emitter, a counter electrode, and a power supply. The emitter can include a liquid conduit, a primary working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, and a spray tip, where the liquid conduit and the working electrode are in liquid communication. The counter electrode can be proximate to, but separated from, the spray tip. The power system can supply voltage to the working electrode in the form of a pulse wave, where the pulse wave oscillates between at least an energized voltage and a relaxation voltage. The relaxation duration of the relaxation voltage can range from 1 millisecond to 35 milliseconds. The pulse duration of the energized voltage can be less than 1 millisecond and the frequency of the pulse wave can range from 30 to 800 Hz.

  19. Multiresidue analysis of seven anticoagulant rodenticides by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marek, LeEtta J; Koskinen, William C

    2007-02-01

    Mice and rat populations are commonly controlled by two classes of rodenticide anticoagulants, coumarins and indandiones. However, poisoning of nontarget animals also often occurs. For cases such as these, a rapid, multiresidue method, which provides positive confirmation for both classes of anticoagulant rodenticides, is needed by diagnostic laboratories. A method was developed for the determination of seven anticoagulant rodenticides, coumafuryl, pindone, warfarin, diphacinone, chlorophacinone, bromadiolone, and brodifacoum, in diverse matrices, animal feed, cooked beef, and fruit-flavored beverages using high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray/mass spectrometry. Detection was by MS/MS with electrospray ionization in negative mode. Confirmation was by retention time, m/z of molecular ion, and two parent-daughter transitions. Recoveries from selected the matrices ranged from 61 to 117%. Limits of quantitation were as low as 1.5-4.5 ng g-1. The developed method was rapid and provided the simultaneous confirmation and quantification of the seven anticoagulant rodenticides. PMID:17263443

  20. Applications of electrospray laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for document examination.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Lin, Yu-Shan; Huang, Ming-Zong; Shiea, Jentaie

    2010-01-01

    We have employed electrospray laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (ELDI-MS) to rapidly characterize certain classes of compounds--the inks within the characters made by inks and inkjet printer on regular paper and the chemical compounds within thermal papers. This ELDI-MS approach allowed the ink and paper samples to be distinguished in terms of their chemical compositions. Sample pretreatment was unnecessary and the documents were practically undamaged after examination. The ink chemicals on the documents were desorbed through laser irradiation (sampling spot area: <100 microm(2)); the desorbed molecules then entered an electrospray plume--prepared from an acidic methanol/water solution (50%)--where they became ionized through fusion or ion-molecule reactions with the charged solvent species and droplets in the plume.

  1. Curved-stem Hip Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Hip resurfacing is an attractive concept because it preserves rather than removes the femoral head and neck. Most early designs had high failure rates, but one unique design had a femoral stem. Because that particular device appeared to have better implant survival, this study assessed the clinical outcome and long-term survivorship of a hip resurfacing prosthesis. Four hundred forty-five patients (561 hips) were retrospectively reviewed after a minimum of 20 years’ followup or until death; 23 additional patients were lost to followup. Patients received a metal femoral prosthesis with a small curved stem. Three types of acetabular reconstructions were used: (1) cemented polyurethane; (2) metal-on-metal; and (3) polyethylene secured with cement or used as the liner of a two-piece porous-coated implant. Long-term results were favorable with the metal-on-metal combination only. The mean overall Harris hip score was 92 at 2 years of followup. None of the 121 patients (133 hips) who received metal-on-metal articulation experienced failure. The failure rate with polyurethane was 100%, and the failure rate with cemented polyethylene was 41%. Hip resurfacing with a curved-stem femoral component had a durable clinical outcome when a metal-on-metal articulation was used. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18338217

  2. Fourie-Mukai partners of singular genus one curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Martín, Ana Cristina

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the paper is to prove that, as it happens for smooth elliptic curves, any Fourie-Mukai partner of a projective reduced Gorenstein curve of genus one and trivial dualizing sheaf, is isomorphic to itself. either to a Kodaira curve (always with locally planar singularities), that is, a smooth elliptic curve; a rational curve with one node (following Kodaira's notation, that is a curve of type I1); a rational curve with one cusp (a curve of type I2); a cycle of N rational smooth curves (a curve of type IN) with N≥2; two rational smooth curves forming a tacnode curve (a curve of type II); or three concurrent rational smooth curves in the plane (a curve of type IV); or to a curve consisting of N≥4 rational smooth curves meeting at a point x where the tangents to the branches are linearly dependent, but any (N-1) of them are independent. Note that, by results of Kodaira and Miranda, the curves in (1) are exactly all the possible reduced fibers appearing in a smooth elliptic surface or in a smooth elliptic threefold. This explains why they are called Kodaira curves.The theorem was just known for smooth elliptic curves. In this case, it was proved by Hille and Van den Bergh in [2]. For the integral singular curves in the above list, that is, for X a rational curve with one node or a cusp, Burban and Kreußler study in [3] the derived category Dcb(X) and its group Aut(Dcb(X) of autoequivalences, but they do not tackle the question of Fourie-Mukai partners. Thus our contribution is to pass from the classical case of a smooth elliptic curve to the singular case generalizing the result to all singular curves of Catanese's list.In 1998, Bridgeland computes all Fourie-Mukai partners of a smooth elliptic surface. He proves in [4] that the partners of relatively minimal smooth elliptic surfaces are certain relative compactified Jacobians. Some recent works [5,6] are concerned about higher dimensional elliptic fibrations. But, for the moment there is not a

  3. Speciation of chromium and manganese using pneumatically assisted electrospray mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gwizdala, A.B. III

    1997-02-01

    It is not an exaggeration to say that much of chemistry involves ions in solution. A technique which allows for ions to be transferred from solution into the gas phase and subsequently analyzed by mass spectrometric detection would be of importance. If structural information, representative of the solution chemistry could be gained from these gas-phase ions, this would also be important. Electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) is such a technique.

  4. Matrix-assisted laser desorption and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of carminic acid isolated from cochineal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Marta S.; Parera, Sara D.; Seldes, Alicia M.

    2004-04-01

    Carminic acid, isolated from cochineal, was analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Application of both techniques to the analysis of carminic acid suspended in linseed oil and applied to a piece of canvas, demonstrated the ability of MALDI and ESI-MS to identify this organic dye in a mixture as those used in easel painting.

  5. On the preservation of non-covalent protein complexes during electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Chingin, Konstantin; Barylyuk, Konstantin; Chen, Huanwen

    2016-10-28

    The application range of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the quantitative determination of stoichiometries and binding constants for non-covalent protein complexes is broadly discussed. The underlying fundamental question is whether or not the original molecular equilibrium can be preserved during the ionization process and be revealed by subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we take a new look at this question by discussing recent studies in droplet chemistry.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. PMID:27644969

  6. Observation of micelle solution of decyltrimethylammonium bromide by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nohara, D; Bitoh, M

    2000-12-01

    A micelle solution of decyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) was analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Finding an appropriate range of a capillary-skimmer potential was a prerequisite for obtaining a satisfactory spectrum. The mean molecular weight of DTAB aggregates, 10,500, was deduced from a series of mass spectra acquired at different capillary-skimmer potentials. The value was comparable with the micelle weight, previously determined by the light-scattering method.

  7. Generation of gas-phase zirconium fluoroanions by electrospray of an ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold; James E. Delmore; Michael T. Benson; Tetsuya Tsuda; Rika Hagiwara

    2014-06-01

    RATIONALE: When measuring extremely wide isotope ratios (= 1 x 109) accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the instrument of choice, however it requires an anion for injection into the tandem accelerator. Since many elements do not have positive electronegativities they do not form stable negative atomic ions, and hence are not compatible for isotope ratio measurement using AMS. Thus new approaches for forming anions are sought; fluoroanions are particularly attractive because fluorine is monoisotopic, and thus will not have overlapping isobars with the isotope of interest. METHODS: An approach is described for making zirconium fluoroanions using the fluorinating ionic liquid (IL) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium fluorohydrogenate, which was used to generate abundant [ZrF5-] using electrospray ionization. The IL was dissolved in acetonitrile, combined with a dilute solution of either Zr4+ or ZrO2+, and then electrosprayed. Mass analysis and collision induced dissociation were conducted using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Cluster structures were predicted using density functional theory calculations. RESULTS: The fluorohydrogenate IL solutions generated abundant [ZrF5-] starting from solutions of both Zr4+ and ZrO2+. The mass spectra also contained IL-bearing cluster ions, whose compositions indicated the presence of [ZrF6]2- in solution, a conclusion supported by the structural calculations. Rinsing out the zirconium-IL solution with acetonitrile decreased the IL clusters, but enhanced [ZrF5]-, which was sorbed by the polymeric electrospray supply capillary, and then released upon rinsing. This reduced the ion background in the mass spectrum. CONCLUSIONS: The fluorohydrogenate-IL solutions are a facile way to form zirconium fluoroanions in the gas phase using electrospray. The approach has potential as a source of fluoroanions for injection into an AMS, which would enable high-sensitivity measurement of minor zirconium isotopes, and benefits from the absence of

  8. Relating chromatographic retention and electrophoretic mobility to the ion distribution within electrosprayed droplets.

    PubMed

    Bökman, C Fredrik; Bylund, Dan; Markides, Karin E; Sjöberg, Per J R

    2006-03-01

    Ions that are observed in a mass spectrum obtained with electrospray mass spectrometry can be assumed to originate preferentially from ions that have a high distribution to the surface of the charged droplets. In this study, a relation between chromatographic retention and electrophoretic mobility to the ion distribution (derived from measured signal intensities in mass spectra and electrospray current) within electrosprayed droplets for a series of tetraalkylammonium ions, ranging from tetramethyl to tetrapentyl, is presented. Chromatographic retention in a reversed-phase system was taken as a measure of the analyte's surface activity, which was found to have a large influence on the ion distribution within electrosprayed droplets. In addition, different transport mechanisms such as electrophoretic migration and diffusion can influence the surface partitioning coefficient. The viscosity of the solvent system is affected by the methanol content and will influence both diffusion and ion mobility. However, as diffusion and ion mobility are proportional to each other, we have, in this study, chosen to focus on the ion mobility parameter. It was found that the influence of ion mobility relative to surface activity on the droplet surface partitioning of analyte ions decreases with increasing methanol content. This effect is most probably coupled to the decrease in droplet size caused by the decreased surface tension at increasing methanol content. The same observation was made upon increasing the ionic strength of the solvent system, which is also known to give rise to a decreased initial droplet size. The observed effect of ionic strength on the droplet surface partitioning of analyte ions could also be explained by the fact that at higher ionic strength, a larger number of ions are initially closer to the droplet surface and, thus, the contribution of ionic transport from the bulk liquid to the liquid/air surface interface (jet and droplet surface), attributable to

  9. Evaluations of the stability of sheathless electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitters using electrochemical techniques.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, S; Svedberg, T M; Pettersson, J; Björefors, T F; Markides, K; Nyholm, L

    2001-10-01

    The processes that cause the failure of sheathless electrospray ionization (ESI) emitters, based on different kinds of gold coatings on fused-silica capillaries, are described and explained. The methods chosen for this study include electrochemical methods, ICPMS analysis of the electrolytes used, SEM studies, and electrospray experiments. Generally, the failure occurs by loss of the conductive coating. It is shown that emitters with sputter-coated gold lose their coatings because of mechanical stress caused by the gas evolution accompanying water oxidation or reduction. Emitters with gold coatings on top of adhesion layers of chromium and nickel alloy withstand this mechanical stress and have excellent durability when operating as cathodes. When operating as anodes, the adhesion layer is electrochemically dissolved through the gold film, and the gold film then flakes off. It is shown that the conductive coating behaves as a cathode even in the positive electrospray mode when the magnitude of a superimposed reductive electrophoretic current exceeds that of the oxidative electrospray current. Fairy-dust coatings developed in our laboratory (see Barnidge, D. R.; etal.Anal. Chem. 1999, 71, 4115-4118,) bygluing gold dust onto the emitter, are unaffected by the mechanical stress due to gas evolution. When oxidized, the fairy-dust coatings show an increased surface roughness and decreased conductivities due to the formation of gold oxide. The resistance of this oxide layer is however negligible in comparison with that of the gas phase in ESI. Furthermore, since no flaking and only negligible electrochemical etching of gold was found, practically unlimited emitter lifetimes may be achieved with fairy-dust coatings. PMID:11605837

  10. Rapid in situ detection of alkaloids in plant tissue under ambient conditions using desorption electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Talaty, Nari; Takáts, Zoltán; Cooks, R Graham

    2005-12-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry is applied to the in situ detection of alkaloids in the tissue of poison hemlock (Conium maculatum), jimsonweed (Datura stramonium) and deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna). The experiment is carried out by electrospraying micro-droplets of solvent onto native or freshly-cut plant tissue surfaces. No sample preparation is required and the mass spectra are recorded under ambient conditions, in times of a few seconds. The impact of the sprayed droplets on the surface produces gaseous ions from organic compounds originally present in the plant tissue. The effects of operating parameters, including the electrospray high voltage, heated capillary temperature, the solvent infusion rate and the carrier gas pressure on analytical performance are evaluated and optimized. Different types of plant material are analyzed including seeds, stems, leaves, roots and flowers. All the previously reported alkaloids have been detected in C. maculatum, while fifteen out of nineteen known alkaloids for D. stramonium and the principal alkaloids of A. belladonna were also identified. All identifications were confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry. Results obtained show similar mass spectra, number of alkaloids, and signal intensities to those obtained when extraction and separation processes are performed prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Evidence is provided that DESI ionization occurs by both a gas-phase ionization process and by a droplet pick-up mechanism. Quantitative precision of DESI is compared with conventional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (after sample workup) and the RSD values for the same set of 25 dicotyledonous C. maculatum seeds (one half of each seed analyzed by ESI and the other by DESI) are 9.8% and 5.2%, respectively.

  11. Improved characterization of tomato polyphenols using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization linear ion trap quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Jáuregui, Olga; Medina-Remón, Alexander; Andrés-Lacueva, Cristina; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M

    2010-10-30

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) is the second most important fruit crop worldwide. Tomatoes are a key component in the Mediterranean diet, which is strongly associated with a reduced risk of chronic degenerative diseases. In this work, we use a combination of mass spectrometry (MS) techniques with negative ion detection, liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization linear ion trap quadrupole-Orbitrap-mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS) and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) on a triple quadrupole, for the identification of the constituents of tomato samples. First, we tested for the presence of polyphenolic compounds through generic MS/MS experiments such as neutral loss and precursor ion scans on the triple quadrupole system. Confirmation of the compounds previously identified was accomplished by injection into the high-resolution system (LTQ-Orbitrap) using accurate mass measurements in MS, MS(2) and MS(3) modes. In this way, 38 compounds were identified in tomato samples with very good mass accuracy (<2 mDa), three of them, as far as we know, not previously reported in tomato samples.

  12. Shaping the learning curve: epigenetic dynamics in neural plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bronfman, Zohar Z.; Ginsburg, Simona; Jablonka, Eva

    2014-01-01

    A key characteristic of learning and neural plasticity is state-dependent acquisition dynamics reflected by the non-linear learning curve that links increase in learning with practice. Here we propose that the manner by which epigenetic states of individual cells change during learning contributes to the shape of the neural and behavioral learning curve. We base our suggestion on recent studies showing that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and RNA-mediated gene regulation are intimately involved in the establishment and maintenance of long-term neural plasticity, reflecting specific learning-histories and influencing future learning. Our model, which is the first to suggest a dynamic molecular account of the shape of the learning curve, leads to several testable predictions regarding the link between epigenetic dynamics at the promoter, gene-network, and neural-network levels. This perspective opens up new avenues for therapeutic interventions in neurological pathologies. PMID:25071483

  13. Rapid and sensitive determination of diacetylpolyamines in human fingernail by ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Min, Jun Zhe; Morota, Yuka; Jiang, Ying-Zi; Li, Gao; Kang, Dongzhou; Yu, Hai-fu; Inoue, Koichi; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2014-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for quantitatively determining diacetylpolyamines in the human fingernail. N(1),N(8)-diacetylspermidine (DiAct-Spd), N(1),N(12)- diacetylspermine (DiAct-Spm) and 1,6-diaminohexane (DAH) the [internal standard (IS)] were extracted from human fingernail samples by MeOH: 5 M HCl solution, followed by 4-(N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl)-7-fluoro- 2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (DBD-F) derivatization, and then separated on an ACQUITY BEH C18 column with a gradient elution of acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% formic acid. The derivatives of the diacetylpolyamines were fully separated within a short run time (3.0 min). The triple quadrupole mass spectrometric detection was performed in the multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode by the UPLC-ESI- MS/MS system in the positive ionization mode. MRM using the fragmentation transitions of m/z 455.20→ 100.07, 737.25 → 100.07 and 567.10 → 479.07 in the positive ESI mode was performed to quantify DiAct-Spd, DiAct-Spm and IS, respectively. The calibration curve is between 0.04 ng mL(-1) for DiAct-Spd and DiAct-Spm. The detection limits (signal to noise ratio of five) were 5-10 pg mL(-1). A good linearity was achieved from the calibration curves (r(2) >0.9999), and the intra-day and inter-day assay precisions were less than 7.06%. Furthermore, the recoveries (%) of the diacetylpolyamines spiked in the human fingernails were 79.18-97.11. The present method proved that the high sensitivity is characterized by the specificity and feasibility of the sample analysis. Consequently, the proposed method was used to analyze human fingernail samples from 15 lung- cancer patients and 22 healthy volunteers. Diacetylpolyamines were detected from the fingernails of the lung- cancer patients for the first time. The concentration of DiAct-Spd in the lung-cancer patient group

  14. Bioprocessing of crude oils and desulfurization using electro-spray reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, E.N.; Borole, A.P.

    1998-07-01

    Biological removal of organic sulfur from petroleum feedstocks offers an attractive alternative to conventional thermochemical treatment due to the mild operating conditions afforded by the biocatalyst. Electro-spray bioreactors were investigated for use in desulfurization due to their reported operational cost savings relative to mechanically agitated reactors and their capability of forming emulsions < 5 {micro}m. Here, the rates dibenzothiophene (DBT) oxidation to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) in hexadecane, by Rhodococcus sp. IGTS8 are compared in the two reactor systems. Desulfurization rates ranged from 1.0 and 5.0 mg 2-HBP/(dry g cells-h), independent of the reactor employed. The batch stirred reactor was capable of forming a very fine emulsion in the presence of the biocatalyst IGTS8, similar to that formed in the electro-spray reactors, presumably due to the fact that the biocatalyst produces its own surfactant. While electro-spray reactors did not prove to be advantageous for the IGTS8 desulfurization system, it may prove advantageous for systems which do not produce surface-active bioagents in addition to being mass transport limited.

  15. Online monitoring of chemical reactions by polarization-induced electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-09-21

    Polarization-induced electrospray ionization (PI-ESI) is a simple technique for instant generation of gas-phase ions directly from a microliter-sized droplet for mass spectrometric analysis. A sample droplet was placed over a dielectric substrate and in proximity (2-3 mm) to the inlet of a mass spectrometer. Owing to the polarization effect induced by the high electric field provided by the mass spectrometer, the droplet was polarized and the electrospray was generated from the apex of the droplet. The polarization-induced electrospray could last for tens of seconds, which was sufficiently long to monitor fast reactions occurring within few seconds. Thus, we demonstrated the feasibility of using the droplet-based PI-ESI MS for the online monitoring of fast reactions by simply mixing two droplets (5-10 μL) containing reactants on a dielectric substrate placed in front of a mass spectrometer applied with a high voltage (-4500 V). Schiff base reactions and oxidation reactions that can generate intermediates/products within a few seconds were selected as the model reactions. The ionic reaction species generated from intermediates and products can be simultaneously monitored by PI-ESI MS in real time. We also used this approach to selectively detect acetone from a urine sample, in which acetone was derivatized in situ. In addition, the possibility of using this approach for quantitative analysis of acetone from urine samples was examined.

  16. Corona discharges with water electrospray for Escherichia coli biofilm eradication on a surface.

    PubMed

    Kovalova, Zuzana; Leroy, Magali; Kirkpatrick, Michael J; Odic, Emmanuel; Machala, Zdenko

    2016-12-01

    Low-temperature plasma (cold), a new method for the decontamination of surfaces, can be an advantageous alternative to the traditional chemical methods, autoclave or dry heat. Positive and negative corona discharges in air were tested for the eradication of 48-h Escherichia coli biofilms grown on glass slides. The biofilms were treated by cold corona discharge plasma for various exposure times. Water electrospray from the high voltage electrode was applied in some experiments. Thermostatic cultivation of the biofilm, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) of the biofilm stained with fluorescent dyes were used for biocidal efficiency quantification. Up to 5 log10 reduction of bacterial concentration in the biofilm was measured by thermostatic cultivation after exposure to both corona discharges for 15min. This decontamination efficiency was significantly enhanced by simultaneous water electrospray through the plasma. CLSM showed that the live/dead ratio after treatment remained almost constant inside the biofilm; only cells on the top layers of the biofilm were affected. DAPI fluorescence showed that biofilm thickness was reduced by about 1/3 upon exposure to the corona discharges with electrospray for 15min. The biofilm biomass loss by about 2/3 was confirmed by crystal violet assay. PMID:27261097

  17. Corona discharges with water electrospray for Escherichia coli biofilm eradication on a surface.

    PubMed

    Kovalova, Zuzana; Leroy, Magali; Kirkpatrick, Michael J; Odic, Emmanuel; Machala, Zdenko

    2016-12-01

    Low-temperature plasma (cold), a new method for the decontamination of surfaces, can be an advantageous alternative to the traditional chemical methods, autoclave or dry heat. Positive and negative corona discharges in air were tested for the eradication of 48-h Escherichia coli biofilms grown on glass slides. The biofilms were treated by cold corona discharge plasma for various exposure times. Water electrospray from the high voltage electrode was applied in some experiments. Thermostatic cultivation of the biofilm, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) of the biofilm stained with fluorescent dyes were used for biocidal efficiency quantification. Up to 5 log10 reduction of bacterial concentration in the biofilm was measured by thermostatic cultivation after exposure to both corona discharges for 15min. This decontamination efficiency was significantly enhanced by simultaneous water electrospray through the plasma. CLSM showed that the live/dead ratio after treatment remained almost constant inside the biofilm; only cells on the top layers of the biofilm were affected. DAPI fluorescence showed that biofilm thickness was reduced by about 1/3 upon exposure to the corona discharges with electrospray for 15min. The biofilm biomass loss by about 2/3 was confirmed by crystal violet assay.

  18. Nanostructured biocomposite substrates by electrospinning and electrospraying for the mineralization of osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepika; Venugopal, J; Mitra, S; Giri Dev, V R; Ramakrishna, S

    2009-04-01

    Nanotechnology has enabled the engineering of nanostructured materials to meet current challenges in bone replacement therapies. Biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds of poly(l-lactic acid)-co-poly(epsilon-caprolactone), gelatin and hydroxyapatite (HA) were fabricated by combining the electrospinning and electrospraying techniques in order to create a better osteophilic environment for the growth and mineralization of osteoblasts. Electrospraying of HA nanoparticles on electrospun nanofibers helped to attain rough surface morphology ideal for cell attachment and proliferation and also achieve improved mechanical properties than HA blended nanofibers. Nanofibrous scaffolds showed high pore size and porosity up to 90% with fiber diameter in the range of 200-700 nm. Nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized for their functional groups and chemical structure by FTIR and XRD analysis. Studies on cell-scaffold interaction were carried out by culturing human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB) on both HA blended and sprayed PLACL/Gel scaffolds and assessing their growth, proliferation, mineralization and enzyme activity. The results of MTS, ALP, SEM and ARS studies confirmed, not only did HA sprayed biocomposite scaffolds showed better cell proliferation but also enhanced mineralization and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) proving that electrospraying in combination with electrospinning produced superior and more suitable biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration. PMID:19167752

  19. Development and characterization of drug-loaded biodegradable PLA microcarriers prepared by the electrospraying technique.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Hou, Ren; Yang, Zhenlei; Tang, Zhihong

    2015-07-01

    Biodegradable particles are extremely useful in the development of novel drug delivery systems. Recent studies have suggested that morphology can influence the mechanisms of drug delivery in many ways. In the present study, biodegradable microparticles with different morphologies were prepared from poly(L‑lactide) (PLA) using the electrospraying technique. The microparticles were then systematically examined by scanning using an electron microscope. The results revealed that the preparation of drug-loaded microspheres through electrospraying is a simple and efficient method, and the processing parameters, such as polymer molecular weight, concentration, surfactant and solvent play an important role in obtaining high quality microcarriers. The association between microcarrier morphology and the processing parameters used was also investigated. Rifampin-loaded PLA microspheres were also prepared according to the above-mentioned model. Our data demonstrate that the drug release from PLA microspheres can be sustained in vitro for over 60 h. Our study focused on obtaining electrosprayed medicated microparticles from complex polyester particles. Further studies are required to explore the potential commercial use of these microparticles. PMID:25955135

  20. Experimental design and instability analysis of coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of drugs and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Si, Ting; Zhang, Leilei; Li, Guangbin; Roberts, Cynthia J; Yin, Xiezhen; Xu, Ronald

    2013-07-01

    Recent developments in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy requires multilayered microparticles that encapsulate several imaging and therapeutic agents in the same carrier. However, commonly used microencapsulation processes have multiple limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency and loss of bioactivity for the encapsulated biological cargos. To overcome these limitations, we have carried out both experimental and theoretical studies on coaxial electrospray of multilayered microparticles. On the experimental side, an improved coaxial electrospray setup has been developed. A customized coaxial needle assembly combined with two ring electrodes has been used to enhance the stability of the cone and widen the process parameter range of the stable cone-jet mode. With this assembly, we have obtained poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles with fine morphology and uniform size distribution. On the theoretical side, an instability analysis of the coaxial electrified jet has been performed based on the experimental parameters. The effects of process parameters on the formation of different unstable modes have been studied. The reported experimental and theoretical research represents a significant step toward quantitative control and optimization of the coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of multiple drugs and imaging agents in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy.

  1. Stable association complex electrospray mass spectrometry for the determination of cyanuric acid.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, M L; Kelty, C A; Cantú, R

    2001-10-01

    Cyanuric acid, a suspected gastrointestinal or liver toxicant, has gained interest as a potential degradation product of triazine herbicides, such as simazine and atrazine. This paper investigates the determination of cyanuric acid by stable association complex electrospray mass spectrometry (cESI-MS). The cyanuric acid is extracted from the water through a microscale liquid-liquid extraction. The extract is evaporated to dryness, and an aqueous solution of quaternary ammonium cationic surfactant is added. When injected into the electrospray mass spectrometer, the surfactant and the cyanuric acid form a mass-selective stable association complex, which may be used for confident quantification of cyanuric acid. Several extraction solvents and surfactants were investigated. These studies provide insight into the mechanism of electrospray for the formation of these complexes, specifically with regard to the surface activity of the different surfactants and the chemistry of the surfactant-cyanuric acid complexes. From an analytical standpoint, the cESI-MS method detection limit for extraction of a 1 mL aqueous solution of cyanuric acid was 130 microg/L based on 3.14sigma(n-1) of seven replicate injections. Standard additions were used for quantification of eight aqueous samples. The cyanuric acid concentrations determined with cESI-MS were not significantly different at the 95% confidence level to those determined by conventional high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A recovery of 100% from a fortified urine sample illustrates the robustness of the technique.

  2. Online monitoring of chemical reactions by polarization-induced electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-09-21

    Polarization-induced electrospray ionization (PI-ESI) is a simple technique for instant generation of gas-phase ions directly from a microliter-sized droplet for mass spectrometric analysis. A sample droplet was placed over a dielectric substrate and in proximity (2-3 mm) to the inlet of a mass spectrometer. Owing to the polarization effect induced by the high electric field provided by the mass spectrometer, the droplet was polarized and the electrospray was generated from the apex of the droplet. The polarization-induced electrospray could last for tens of seconds, which was sufficiently long to monitor fast reactions occurring within few seconds. Thus, we demonstrated the feasibility of using the droplet-based PI-ESI MS for the online monitoring of fast reactions by simply mixing two droplets (5-10 μL) containing reactants on a dielectric substrate placed in front of a mass spectrometer applied with a high voltage (-4500 V). Schiff base reactions and oxidation reactions that can generate intermediates/products within a few seconds were selected as the model reactions. The ionic reaction species generated from intermediates and products can be simultaneously monitored by PI-ESI MS in real time. We also used this approach to selectively detect acetone from a urine sample, in which acetone was derivatized in situ. In addition, the possibility of using this approach for quantitative analysis of acetone from urine samples was examined. PMID:27590551

  3. Charge Competition and the Linear Dynamic Range of Detection in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Keqi; Page, Jason S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-10-02

    An experimental investigation and theoretical analysis are reported on charge competition in electrospray ionization (ESI) and its effects on the linear dynamic range of ESI mass spectrometric (MS) measurements. The experiments confirmed the expected increase of MS sensitivities as the ESI flow rate decreases. However, different compounds show somewhat different mass spectral peak intensities even at the lowest flow rates, the same concentration and electrospray operating conditions. MS response for each compound solution shows good linearity at lower concentrations and levels off at high concentration, consistent with analyte ''saturation'' in the ESI process. The extent of charge competition leading to saturation in the ESI process is consistent with the relative magnitude of excess charge in the electrospray compared to the total number of analyte molecules in the solution. This ESI capacity model allows one to predict the sample concentration limits for charge competition and the on-set of ionization suppression effects, as well as the linear dynamic range for ESI-MS. The implications for quantitative MS analysis and possibilities for effectively extending the dynamic range of ESI measurements are discussed.

  4. Experimental design and instability analysis of coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of drugs and imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Si, Ting; Zhang, Leilei; Li, Guangbin; Roberts, Cynthia J.; Yin, Xiezhen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Recent developments in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy requires multilayered microparticles that encapsulate several imaging and therapeutic agents in the same carrier. However, commonly used microencapsulation processes have multiple limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency and loss of bioactivity for the encapsulated biological cargos. To overcome these limitations, we have carried out both experimental and theoretical studies on coaxial electrospray of multilayered microparticles. On the experimental side, an improved coaxial electrospray setup has been developed. A customized coaxial needle assembly combined with two ring electrodes has been used to enhance the stability of the cone and widen the process parameter range of the stable cone-jet mode. With this assembly, we have obtained poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles with fine morphology and uniform size distribution. On the theoretical side, an instability analysis of the coaxial electrified jet has been performed based on the experimental parameters. The effects of process parameters on the formation of different unstable modes have been studied. The reported experimental and theoretical research represents a significant step toward quantitative control and optimization of the coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of multiple drugs and imaging agents in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy. PMID:23864011

  5. The general efficiency curve for air propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, Walter S

    1924-01-01

    This report presents a formula which may be used to obtain a "general efficiency curve" in addition to the well-known maximum efficiency curve. These two curves, when modified somewhat by experimental data, enable performance calculations to be made without detailed knowledge of the propeller. The curves may also be used to estimate the improvement in efficiency due to reduction gearing, or to judge the performance of a new propeller design.

  6. Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Curve Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Glaunès, Joan; Miller, Michael I.; Younes, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    We present a matching criterion for curves and integrate it into the large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM) scheme for computing an optimal transformation between two curves embedded in Euclidean space ℝd. Curves are first represented as vector-valued measures, which incorporate both location and the first order geometric structure of the curves. Then, a Hilbert space structure is imposed on the measures to build the norm for quantifying the closeness between two curves. We describe a discretized version of this, in which discrete sequences of points along the curve are represented by vector-valued functionals. This gives a convenient and practical way to define a matching functional for curves. We derive and implement the curve matching in the large deformation framework and demonstrate mapping results of curves in ℝ2 and ℝ3. Behaviors of the curve mapping are discussed using 2D curves. The applications to shape classification is shown and experiments with 3D curves extracted from brain cortical surfaces are presented. PMID:20419045

  7. Bacterial streamers in curved microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2009-11-01

    Biofilms, generally identified as microbial communities embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances, are involved in a wide variety of health-related problems ranging from implant-associated infections to disease transmissions and dental plaque. The usual picture of these bacterial films is that they grow and develop on surfaces. However, suspended biofilm structures, or streamers, have been found in natural environments (e.g., rivers, acid mines, hydrothermal hot springs) and are always suggested to stem from a turbulent flow. We report the formation of bacterial streamers in curved microfluidic channels. By using confocal laser microscopy we are able to directly image and characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of these filamentous structures. Such streamers, which always connect the inner corners of opposite sides of the channel, are always located in the middle plane. Numerical simulations of the flow provide evidences for an underlying hydrodynamic mechanism behind the formation of the streamers.

  8. AKLSQF - LEAST SQUARES CURVE FITTING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    The Least Squares Curve Fitting program, AKLSQF, computes the polynomial which will least square fit uniformly spaced data easily and efficiently. The program allows the user to specify the tolerable least squares error in the fitting or allows the user to specify the polynomial degree. In both cases AKLSQF returns the polynomial and the actual least squares fit error incurred in the operation. The data may be supplied to the routine either by direct keyboard entry or via a file. AKLSQF produces the least squares polynomial in two steps. First, the data points are least squares fitted using the orthogonal factorial polynomials. The result is then reduced to a regular polynomial using Sterling numbers of the first kind. If an error tolerance is specified, the program starts with a polynomial of degree 1 and computes the least squares fit error. The degree of the polynomial used for fitting is then increased successively until the error criterion specified by the user is met. At every step the polynomial as well as the least squares fitting error is printed to the screen. In general, the program can produce a curve fitting up to a 100 degree polynomial. All computations in the program are carried out under Double Precision format for real numbers and under long integer format for integers to provide the maximum accuracy possible. AKLSQF was written for an IBM PC X/AT or compatible using Microsoft's Quick Basic compiler. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2.1 using 23K of RAM. AKLSQF was developed in 1989.

  9. Caloric curve of star clusters.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Self-gravitating systems, such as globular clusters or elliptical galaxies, are the prototypes of many-body systems with long-range interactions, and should be the natural arena in which to test theoretical predictions on the statistical behavior of long-range-interacting systems. Systems of classical self-gravitating particles can be studied with the standard tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics, provided the potential is regularized at small length scales and the system is confined in a box. The confinement condition looks rather unphysical in general, so that it is natural to ask whether what we learn with these studies is relevant to real self-gravitating systems. In order to provide an answer to this question, we consider a basic, simple, yet effective model of globular clusters: the King model. This model describes a self-consistently confined system, without the need of any external box, but the stationary state is a nonthermal one. In particular, we consider the King model with a short-distance cutoff on the interactions, and we discuss how such a cutoff affects the caloric curve, i.e., the relation between temperature and energy. We find that the cutoff stabilizes a low-energy phase, which is absent in the King model without cutoff; the caloric curve of the model with cutoff turns out to be very similar to that of previously studied confined and regularized models, but for the absence of a high-energy gaslike phase. We briefly discuss the possible phenomenological as well as theoretical implications of these results. PMID:23005049

  10. Caloric curve of star clusters.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Self-gravitating systems, such as globular clusters or elliptical galaxies, are the prototypes of many-body systems with long-range interactions, and should be the natural arena in which to test theoretical predictions on the statistical behavior of long-range-interacting systems. Systems of classical self-gravitating particles can be studied with the standard tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics, provided the potential is regularized at small length scales and the system is confined in a box. The confinement condition looks rather unphysical in general, so that it is natural to ask whether what we learn with these studies is relevant to real self-gravitating systems. In order to provide an answer to this question, we consider a basic, simple, yet effective model of globular clusters: the King model. This model describes a self-consistently confined system, without the need of any external box, but the stationary state is a nonthermal one. In particular, we consider the King model with a short-distance cutoff on the interactions, and we discuss how such a cutoff affects the caloric curve, i.e., the relation between temperature and energy. We find that the cutoff stabilizes a low-energy phase, which is absent in the King model without cutoff; the caloric curve of the model with cutoff turns out to be very similar to that of previously studied confined and regularized models, but for the absence of a high-energy gaslike phase. We briefly discuss the possible phenomenological as well as theoretical implications of these results.

  11. Design of airborne imaging spectrometer based on curved prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yunfeng; Xiangli, Bin; Zhou, Jinsong; Wei, Xiaoxiao

    2011-11-01

    A novel moderate-resolution imaging spectrometer spreading from visible wavelength to near infrared wavelength range with a spectral resolution of 10 nm, which combines curved prisms with the Offner configuration, is introduced. Compared to conventional imaging spectrometers based on dispersive prism or diffractive grating, this design possesses characteristics of small size, compact structure, low mass as well as little spectral line curve (smile) and spectral band curve (keystone or frown). Besides, the usage of compound curved prisms with two or more different materials can greatly reduce the nonlinearity inevitably brought by prismatic dispersion. The utilization ratio of light radiation is much higher than imaging spectrometer of the same type based on combination of diffractive grating and concentric optics. In this paper, the Seidel aberration theory of curved prism and the optical principles of Offner configuration are illuminated firstly. Then the optical design layout of the spectrometer is presented, and the performance evaluation of this design, including spot diagram and MTF, is analyzed. To step further, several types of telescope matching this system are provided. This work provides an innovational perspective upon optical system design of airborne spectral imagers; therefore, it can offer theoretic guide for imaging spectrometer of the same kind.

  12. Theory and experiments on Peano and Hilbert curve RFID tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McVay, John; Hoorfar, Ahmad; Engheta, Nader

    2006-05-01

    Recently, there has been considerable interest in the area of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and Radio Frequency Tagging (RFTAG). This emerging area of interest can be applied for inventory control (commercial) as well as friend/foe identification (military) to name but a few. The current technology can be broken down into two main groups, namely passive and active RFID tags. Utilization of Space-Filling Curve (SFC) geometries, such as the Peano and Hilbert curves, has been recently investigated for use in completely passive RFID applications [1, 2]. In this work, we give an overview of our work on the space-filling curves and the potential for utilizing the electrically small, resonant characteristics of these curves for use in RFID technologies with an emphasis on the challenging issues involved when attempting to tag conductive objects. In particular, we investigate the possible use of these tags in conjunction with high impedance ground-planes made of Hilbert or Peano curve inclusions [3, 4] to develop electrically small RFID tags that may also radiate efficiently, within close proximity of large conductive objects [5].

  13. Acoustic propagation in curved ducts with extended reacting wall treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-element Galerkin formulation was employed to study the attenuation of acoustic waves propagating in two-dimensional S-curved ducts with absorbing walls without a mean flow. The reflection and transmission at the entrance and the exit of a curved duct were determined by coupling the finite-element solutions in the curved duct to the eigenfunctions of an infinite, uniform, hard wall duct. In the frequency range where the duct height and acoustic wave length are nearly equal, the effects of duct length, curvature (duct offset) and absorber thickness were examined. For a given offset in the curved duct, the length of the S-duct was found to significantly affect both the absorptive and reflective characteristics of the duct. A means of reducing the number of elements in the absorber region was also presented. In addition, for a curved duct, power attenuation contours were examined to determine conditions for maximum acoustic power absorption. Again, wall curvature was found to significantly effect the optimization process.

  14. Influence of precompensation curves on multidimensional color modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijn, Chris

    1996-03-01

    characterization of input devices. We point out how the choice of suitable input luts (gamma curves) and the dynamic range affect the quality of the scanned image. As a case study, we discuss some results we obtained in applying color corrections on scanned negative originals. In the third section, we discuss how the gamma curves used during scanning relate to the gamma characteristics of the monitor and will try to remove some confusion which currently exists in this area. In the fourth section, we summarize the discussed topics and discuss them from an application's point of view.

  15. Structure analysis of triterpene saponins in Polygala tenuifolia by electrospray ionization ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangyun; Yang, Xuedong; He, Jiuming; Xia, Min; Xu, Lizhen; Yang, Shilin

    2007-07-01

    Eighteen different triterpene saponins isolated from Polygala tenuifolia were investigated by electrospray ionization ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (ESI-ITMS(n)) in positive and negative ion modes. MS(1)-MS(3)/MS(4) spectra of the both modes were analyzed, and they all gave fragments in line and shared common fragmentation patterns. Key fragments from MS(n) spectra of both the modes and their proposed fragmentation pathways were constructed with examples illustrated for the formation of characteristic fragments in the saponins. Two special fragmentation patterns were proposed: (1) the formation of fragments by cleavage of CH(2)O from Delta(12)-14alpha-CH(2)OH of the oleanene-type saponin aglycone in both positive and negative MS(n) (n > or = 2) modes; (2) the occurrence of fragments by cleavage of CO(2) and 3-glucose as the characteristic structure feature of 23-COOH at the oleanene-type saponin aglycones coupled with 3-Glc substitutes in the negative MS(n) (n > or = 2) modes. Peak intensities in MS(n) spectra were also correlated with structural features and fragmentation preferences of the investigated saponins, which are discussed in detail. In general, fragments formed predominantly by cleavages of glycosidic bonds in the positive mode, while selective cleavages of acyl bonds preceded that of glycosidic bonds in negative MS(n) (n > or = 2) mode, both of which could well be applied to the structural analysis of these saponins. Interpretation of MS(n) spectra presented here provided diagnostic key fragment ions important for the structural elucidation of saponins in P.tenuifolia.

  16. Swelling-induced and controlled curving in layered gel beams

    PubMed Central

    Lucantonio, A.; Nardinocchi, P.; Pezzulla, M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe swelling-driven curving in originally straight and non-homogeneous beams. We present and verify a structural model of swollen beams, based on a new point of view adopted to describe swelling-induced deformation processes in bilayered gel beams, that is based on the split of the swelling-induced deformation of the beam at equilibrium into two components, both depending on the elastic properties of the gel. The method allows us to: (i) determine beam stretching and curving, once assigned the characteristics of the solvent bath and of the non-homogeneous beam, and (ii) estimate the characteristics of non-homogeneous flat gel beams in such a way as to obtain, under free-swelling conditions, three-dimensional shapes. The study was pursued by means of analytical, semi-analytical and numerical tools; excellent agreement of the outcomes of the different techniques was found, thus confirming the strength of the method. PMID:25383031

  17. Speciation of Selenium in Selenium-Enriched Sunflower Oil by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry/Electrospray-Orbitrap Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bierla, Katarzyna; Flis-Borsuk, Anna; Suchocki, Piotr; Szpunar, Joanna; Lobinski, Ryszard

    2016-06-22

    The reaction of sunflower oil with selenite produces a complex mixture of selenitriglycerides with antioxidant and anticancer properties. To obtain insight into the identity and characteristics of the species formed, an analytical approach based on the combination of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with (78)Se-specific selenium detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) and high-resolution (100 000), high mass accuracy (<1 ppm) molecule-specific detection by electrospray-Orbitrap MS(3) was developed. For the first time, a non-aqueous mobile phase gradient was used in reversed-phase HPLC-ICP MS for the separation of a complex mixture of selenospecies and a mathematical correction of the background signal was developed. The identical chromatographic conditions served for the sample introduction into electrospray MS. Two types of samples were analyzed: sunflower oil dissolved in isopropanol and methanol extract of the oil containing 65% selenium. HPLC-ICP MS showed 14 peaks, 11 of which could also be detected in the methanol extract. Isotopic patterns corresponding to molecules with one or two selenium atoms could be attributed by Orbitrap MS at the retention times corresponding to the HPLC-ICP MS peak apexes. Structural data for these species were acquired by MS(2) and MS(3) fragmentation of protonated or sodiated ions using high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD). A total of 11 selenium-containing triglycerol derivatives resulting from the oxidation of one or two double bonds of linoleic acid and analogous derivatives of glycerol-mixed linoleate(s)/oleinate(s) have been identified for the first time. The presence of these species was confirmed by the targeted analysis in the total oil isopropanol solution. Their identification corroborated the predicted elution order in reversed-phase chromatography: LLL (glycerol trilinoleate), LLO (glycerol dilinoleate-oleinate), LOO (glycerol linoleate-dioleinate), OOO (glycerol

  18. Speciation of Selenium in Selenium-Enriched Sunflower Oil by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry/Electrospray-Orbitrap Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bierla, Katarzyna; Flis-Borsuk, Anna; Suchocki, Piotr; Szpunar, Joanna; Lobinski, Ryszard

    2016-06-22

    The reaction of sunflower oil with selenite produces a complex mixture of selenitriglycerides with antioxidant and anticancer properties. To obtain insight into the identity and characteristics of the species formed, an analytical approach based on the combination of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with (78)Se-specific selenium detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) and high-resolution (100 000), high mass accuracy (<1 ppm) molecule-specific detection by electrospray-Orbitrap MS(3) was developed. For the first time, a non-aqueous mobile phase gradient was used in reversed-phase HPLC-ICP MS for the separation of a complex mixture of selenospecies and a mathematical correction of the background signal was developed. The identical chromatographic conditions served for the sample introduction into electrospray MS. Two types of samples were analyzed: sunflower oil dissolved in isopropanol and methanol extract of the oil containing 65% selenium. HPLC-ICP MS showed 14 peaks, 11 of which could also be detected in the methanol extract. Isotopic patterns corresponding to molecules with one or two selenium atoms could be attributed by Orbitrap MS at the retention times corresponding to the HPLC-ICP MS peak apexes. Structural data for these species were acquired by MS(2) and MS(3) fragmentation of protonated or sodiated ions using high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD). A total of 11 selenium-containing triglycerol derivatives resulting from the oxidation of one or two double bonds of linoleic acid and analogous derivatives of glycerol-mixed linoleate(s)/oleinate(s) have been identified for the first time. The presence of these species was confirmed by the targeted analysis in the total oil isopropanol solution. Their identification corroborated the predicted elution order in reversed-phase chromatography: LLL (glycerol trilinoleate), LLO (glycerol dilinoleate-oleinate), LOO (glycerol linoleate-dioleinate), OOO (glycerol

  19. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  20. Learning curve of speech recognition.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, Tomi A; Kaipio, Johanna; Koivikko, Mika P

    2013-12-01

    Speech recognition (SR) speeds patient care processes by reducing report turnaround times. However, concerns have emerged about prolonged training and an added secretarial burden for radiologists. We assessed how much proofing radiologists who have years of experience with SR and radiologists new to SR must perform, and estimated how quickly the new users become as skilled as the experienced users. We studied SR log entries for 0.25 million reports from 154 radiologists and after careful exclusions, defined a group of 11 experienced radiologists and 71 radiologists new to SR (24,833 and 122,093 reports, respectively). Data were analyzed for sound file and report lengths, character-based error rates, and words unknown to the SR's dictionary. Experienced radiologists corrected 6 characters for each report and for new users, 11. Some users presented a very unfavorable learning curve, with error rates not declining as expected. New users' reports were longer, and data for the experienced users indicates that their reports, initially equally lengthy, shortened over a period of several years. For most radiologists, only minor corrections of dictated reports were necessary. While new users adopted SR quickly, with a subset outperforming experienced users from the start, identification of users struggling with SR will help facilitate troubleshooting and support.