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Sample records for electroweak scalar bosons

  1. Electroweak Baryogenesis and Colored Scalars

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Timothy; Pierce, Aaron; /Michigan U., MCTP

    2012-02-15

    We consider the 2-loop finite temperature effective potential for a Standard Model-like Higgs boson, allowing Higgs boson couplings to additional scalars. If the scalars transform under color, they contribute 2-loop diagrams to the effective potential that include gluons. These 2-loop effects are perhaps stronger than previously appreciated. For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV, they can increase the strength of the phase transition by as much as a factor of 3.5. It is this effect that is responsible for the survival of the tenuous electroweak baryogenesis window of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We further illuminate the importance of these 2-loop diagrams by contrasting models with colored scalars to models with singlet scalars. We conclude that baryogenesis favors models with light colored scalars. This motivates searches for pair-produced di-jet resonances or jet(s) + = E{sub T}.

  2. Higgs Boson Signatures of MSSM Electroweak Baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Arjun; Morrissey, David

    2010-02-10

    Electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM can account for the cosmological baryon asymmetry, but only with a very light scalar top and a SM-like Higgs boson. We investigate the effects of this light scalar top on Higgs boson production and decay. Relative to the standard model Higgs boson, we find a large enhancement of the Higgs production rate through gluon fusion and a suppression of the Higgs branching fraction into photon pairs. These modifications in the properties of the Higgs boson are large enough that they can potentially be tested at the Tevatron and the LHC.

  3. Higgs boson signatures of MSSM electroweak baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Arjun; Morrissey, David E.

    2009-06-01

    Electroweak baryogenesis in the minimal supersymmetric standard model can account for the cosmological baryon asymmetry, but only within a restricted region of the parameter space. In particular, minimal supersymmetric standard model electroweak baryogenesis requires a mostly right-handed stop that is lighter than the top quark and a standard model-like light Higgs boson. In the present work we investigate the effects of the light stop on Higgs boson production and decay. Relative to the standard model Higgs boson, we find a large enhancement of the Higgs production rate through gluon fusion and a suppression of the Higgs branching fraction into photon pairs. These modifications in the properties of the Higgs boson are directly related to the effect of the light stop on the electroweak phase transition, and are large enough that they can potentially be tested at the Tevatron and the LHC.

  4. Structure functions of electroweak boson and leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Slominski, W; Szwed, J. |

    1996-04-02

    The QCD structure of the electroweak bosons is reviewed and the lepton structure function is defined and calculated. The leading order splitting functions of electron into quarks are extracted, showing an important contribution from {gamma}-Z interference. Leading logarithmic QCD evolution equations are constructed and solved in the asymptotic region where log{sup 2} behavior of the Parton densities is observed. Possible applications with clear manifestation of ``resolved`` photon and weak bosons are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Tevatron Measurements of Electroweak Boson Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Ryan J.; /Lewis U.

    2011-08-01

    With a large and still increasing dataset, W and Z boson physics studies at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider are particularly useful for testing many aspects of the Standard Model. In this proceeding, we present measurements of electroweak boson properties, distributions, and charge asymmetries. We examine both solitary W and Z production as well as production in association with jets. These measurements are compared to NLO QCD predictions, are used to extract fundamental Standard Model parameters, and constrain parton distribution functions.

  6. Electroweak baryogenesis in a scalar-assisted vectorlike fermion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ming-Lei; Yu, Jiang-Hao

    2016-07-01

    We extend the standard model to a scalar-assisted vectorlike fermion model to realize electroweak baryogenesis. The extended Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, due to the mixing among the vectorlike quark and the standard model quarks, provides additional sources of the C P violation. Together with the enhancement from a large vectorlike quark mass, a large enough baryon-to-photon ratio could be obtained. The strongly first-order phase transition could be realized via the potential barrier which separates the broken minimum and the symmetric minimum in the scalar potential. We investigate in detail the one loop temperature-dependent effective potential and perform a random parameter scan to study the allowed parameter region that satisfies the strongly first order phase transition criteria vc≥Tc. Several distinct patterns of phase transition are classified and discussed. Among these patterns, a large trilinear mass term between the Higgs boson and the scalar is preferred, for it controls the width of the potential barrier. Our results indicate large quartic scalar couplings and a moderate mixing angle between the Higgs boson and the new scalar. This parameter region could be further explored at the Run 2 LHC.

  7. Standard electroweak interactions and Higgs bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.; Gilman, F.J.

    1984-09-01

    In the standard model, only one basic component remains to be found: the Higgs boson. The specifics of Higgs boson production and detection, with decay to t anti t and a particular t quark mass range in mind, have not been examined in detail. As such, the working group on Standard Electroweak Interactions and Higgs Bosons at this meeting decided to concentrate on Higgs boson production and detection at SSC energies in the particular case where the Higgs mass is in the range so as to make t anti t quark-antiquark pairs the dominant decay mode. The study of this case, that of the so-called intermediate mass Higgs, had already been launched in the Berkeley PSSC Workshop on Electroweak Symmetry Breaking, and was continued and extended here. The problems of t quark jet identification and detection efficiency and the manner of rejection of background (especially from b quark jets) with realistic detectors then occupied much of the attention of the group. The subject of making precise measurements of parameters in the standard model at SSC energies is briefly examined. Then we delve into the Higgs sector, with an introduction to the neutral Higgs of the standard model together with its production cross-sections in various processes and the corresponding potential backgrounds. A similar, though briefer, discussion for a charged Higgs boson (outside the Standard Model) follows. The heart of the work on identifying and reconstructing the t and then the Higgs boson in the face of backgrounds is discussed. The problems with semileptonic decays, low energy jet fragments, mass resolution, and b-t discrimination all come to the fore. We have tried to make a serious step here towards a realistic assessment of the problems entailed in pulling a signal out of the background, including a rough simulation of calorimeter-detector properties. 25 references.

  8. A composite light scalar, electro-weak symmetry breaking and the recent LHC searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elander, Daniel; Piai, Maurizio

    2012-11-01

    We construct a model in which electro-weak symmetry breaking is induced by a strongly coupled sector, which is described in terms of a five-dimensional model in the spirit of the bottom-up approach to holography. We compute the precision electro-weak parameters, and identify regions of parameter space allowed by indirect tests. We compute the spectrum of scalar and vector resonances, which contains a set of parametrically light states that can be identified with the electro-weak gauge bosons and a light dilaton. There is then a little desert, up to 2-3 TeV, where towers of resonances of the vector, axial-vector and scalar particles appear.

  9. Production of Electroweak Bosons at Hadron Colliders: Theoretical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, Michelangelo L.

    2016-10-01

    Since the W± and Z0 discovery, hadron colliders have provided a fertile ground, in which continuously improving measurements and theoretical predictions allow to precisely determine the gauge boson properties, and to probe the dynamics of electroweak and strong interactions. This article will review, from a theoretical perspective, the role played by the study, at hadron colliders, of electroweak boson production properties, from the better understanding of the proton structure, to the discovery and studies of the top quark and of the Higgs, to the searches for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model.

  10. Electrophobic Scalar Boson and Muonic Puzzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Sheng; McKeen, David; Miller, Gerald A.

    2016-09-01

    A new scalar boson which couples to the muon and proton can simultaneously solve the proton radius puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Using a variety of measurements, we constrain the mass of this scalar and its couplings to the electron, muon, neutron, and proton. Making no assumptions about the underlying model, these constraints and the requirement that it solve both problems limit the mass of the scalar to between about 100 keV and 100 MeV. We identify two unexplored regions in the coupling constant-mass plane. Potential future experiments and their implications for theories with mass-weighted lepton couplings are discussed.

  11. Electrophobic Scalar Boson and Muonic Puzzles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Sheng; McKeen, David; Miller, Gerald A

    2016-09-01

    A new scalar boson which couples to the muon and proton can simultaneously solve the proton radius puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Using a variety of measurements, we constrain the mass of this scalar and its couplings to the electron, muon, neutron, and proton. Making no assumptions about the underlying model, these constraints and the requirement that it solve both problems limit the mass of the scalar to between about 100 keV and 100 MeV. We identify two unexplored regions in the coupling constant-mass plane. Potential future experiments and their implications for theories with mass-weighted lepton couplings are discussed. PMID:27636468

  12. Electroweak boson pair production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    CDF Collaboration

    1994-06-01

    Preliminary results from CDF on W + {gamma}, Z + {gamma} and W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, WZ, ZZ boson pair production in {radical}s = 1.8 TeV {anti p}-p collisions from the 1992--93 collider run are presented. Measurements of the production cross section {times} decay branching ratios {sigma} * B(W + {gamma}) and {sigma} * B(Z + {gamma}) have been obtained. The cross section ratios R(W{gamma}/W), R(Z{gamma}/Z), R(W{gamma}/Z{gamma}) and R(W/Z) are discussed. The authors extract direct limits on CP-conserving and CP-violating WW{gamma}, WWZ, ZZ{gamma} and Z{gamma}{gamma} anomalous couplings. In the static limit, the direct experimental limits on WW{gamma} and ZZ{gamma} anomalous couplings are related to bounds on the higher-order static (transition) EM moments of the W (Z) bosons. Expectations from the on-going and future Tevatron collider runs are discussed.

  13. Extra vectorlike matter and the lightest Higgs scalar boson mass in low-energy supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stephen P.

    2010-02-01

    The lightest Higgs scalar boson mass in supersymmetry can be raised significantly by extra vectorlike quark and lepton supermultiplets with large Yukawa couplings but dominantly electroweak-singlet masses. I consider models of this type that maintain perturbative gauge coupling unification. The impact of the new particles on precision electroweak observables is found to be moderate, with the fit to Z-pole data as good or better than that of the standard model even if the new Yukawa couplings are as large as their fixed-point values and the extra vectorlike quark masses are as light as 400 GeV. I study the size of corrections to the lightest Higgs boson mass, taking into account the fixed-point behavior of the scalar trilinear couplings. I also discuss the decay branching ratios of the lightest new quarks and leptons and general features of the resulting collider signatures.

  14. Mass of the Higgs boson in the standard electroweak model

    SciTech Connect

    Erler, Jens

    2010-03-01

    An updated global analysis within the standard model (SM) of all relevant electroweak precision and Higgs boson search data is presented with special emphasis on the implications for the Higgs boson mass, M{sub H}. Included are, in particular, the most recent results on the top quark and W boson masses, updated and significantly shifted constraints on the strong coupling constant, {alpha}{sub s}, from {tau} decays and other low-energy measurements such as from atomic parity violation and neutrino deep inelastic scattering. The latest results from searches for Higgs production and decay at the Tevatron are incorporated together with the older constraints from LEP 2. I find a trimodal probability distribution for M{sub H} with a fairly narrow preferred 90% C.L. window, 115 GeV{<=}M{sub H{<=}}148 GeV.

  15. Resonances at the LHC beyond the Higgs boson: The scalar/tensor case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Wolfgang; Ohl, Thorsten; Reuter, Jürgen; Sekulla, Marco

    2016-02-01

    We study in a bottom-up approach the theoretically consistent description of additional resonances in the electroweak sector beyond the discovered Higgs boson as simplified models. We focus on scalar and tensor resonances. Our formalism is suited for strongly coupled models, but can also be applied to weakly interacting theories. The spurious degrees of freedom of tensor resonances that would lead to bad high-energy behavior are treated using a generalization of the Stückelberg formalism. We calculate scattering amplitudes for vector-boson and Higgs boson pairs. The high-energy region is regulated by the T-matrix unitarization procedure, leading to amplitudes that are well behaved on the whole phase space. We present numerical results for complete partonic processes that involve resonant vector-boson scattering for the current and upcoming runs of LHC.

  16. Noninertial effects on the quantum dynamics of scalar bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Luis B.

    2016-02-01

    The noninertial effect of rotating frames on the quantum dynamics of scalar bosons embedded in the background of a cosmic string is considered. In this work, scalar bosons are described by the Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau (DKP) formalism. Considering the DKP oscillator in this background the combined effects of a rotating frames and cosmic string on the equation of motion, energy spectrum, and DKP spinor are analyzed and discussed in detail. Additionally, the effect of rotating frames on the scalar bosons' localization is studied.

  17. Gamma-ray constraints on dark-matter annihilation to electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Fedderke, Michael A.; Kolb, Edward W.; Lin, Tongyan; Wang, Lian-Tao E-mail: Rocky.Kolb@uchicago.edu E-mail: liantaow@uchicago.edu

    2014-01-01

    Dark-matter annihilation into electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons results in γ-ray emission. We use observational upper limits on the fluxes of both line and continuum γ-rays from the Milky Way Galactic Center and from Milky Way dwarf companion galaxies to set exclusion limits on allowed dark-matter masses. (Generally, Galactic Center γ-ray line search limits from the Fermi-LAT and the H.E.S.S. experiments are most restrictive.) Our limits apply under the following assumptions: a) the dark matter species is a cold thermal relic with present mass density equal to the measured dark-matter density of the universe; b) dark-matter annihilation to standard-model particles is described in the non-relativistic limit by a single effective operator O∝J{sub DM}⋅J{sub SM}, where J{sub DM} is a standard-model singlet current consisting of dark-matter fields (Dirac fermions or complex scalars), and J{sub SM} is a standard-model singlet current consisting of electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons; and c) the dark-matter mass is in the range 5 GeV to 20 TeV. We consider, in turn, the 34 possible operators with mass dimension 8 or lower with non-zero s-wave annihilation channels satisfying the above assumptions. Our limits are presented in a large number of figures, one for each of the 34 possible operators; these limits can be grouped into 13 classes determined by the field content and structure of the operators. We also identify three classes of operators (coupling to the Higgs and SU(2){sub L} gauge bosons) that can supply a 130 GeV line with the desired strength to fit the putative line signal in the Fermi-LAT data, while saturating the relic density and satisfying all other indirect constraints we consider.

  18. LIPSS results for photons coupling to light neutral scalar bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev; Oliver K. Baker; Kevin Beard; George Biallas; James Boyce; Minarni Minarni; Roopchan Ramdon; Michelle D. Shinn; Penny Slocum

    2008-06-01

    The LIPSS search for a light neutral scalar boson coupling to optical photons is reported. The search covers a region of parameter space of approximately 1.0 meV and coupling strength greater than 10^-6 GeV^-1. The LIPSS results show no evidence for scalar coupling in this region of parameter space.

  19. Scalar representations in the light of electroweak phase transition and cold dark matter phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    AbdusSalam, Shehu S.; Chowdhury, Talal Ahmed E-mail: chowdhu@sissa.it

    2014-05-01

    The extension of the standard model's minimal Higgs sector with an inert SU(2){sub L} scalar doublet can provide light dark matter candidate and simultaneously induce a strong phase transition for explaining Baryogenesis. There is however no symmetry reasons to prevent the extension using scalars with higher SU(2){sub L} representations. By making random scans over the models' parameters, we show that in the light of electroweak physics constraints, strong first order electroweak phase transition and the possibility of having sub-TeV cold dark matter candidate the higher representations are rather disfavored compared to the inert doublet. This is done by computing generic perturbativity behavior and impact on electroweak phase transitions of higher representations in comparison with the inert doublet model. Explicit phase transition and cold dark matter phenomenology within the context of the inert triplet and quartet representations are used for detailed illustrations.

  20. QCD and electroweak interference in Higgs production by gauge boson fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jeppe R.; Smillie, Jennifer M.

    2007-02-01

    We explicitly calculate the contribution to Higgs production at the LHC from the interference between gluon fusion and weak vector boson fusion, and compare it to the pure QCD and pure electroweak result. While the effect is small at tree level, we speculate it will be significantly enhanced by loop effects.

  1. Polarisation of electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, James; Vryonidou, Eleni

    2013-05-01

    We present results for the polarisation of gauge bosons produced at the LHC. Polarisation effects for W bosons manifest themselves in the angular distributions of the lepton and in the distributions of lepton transverse momentum and missing transverse energy. The polarisation is discussed for a range of different processes producing W bosons such as W+jets and W from top production. The relative contributions of the different polarisation states vary from process to process, reflecting the dynamics of the underlying hardscattering process. We also calculate the polarisation of the Z boson produced in association with QCD jets at the LHC.

  2. Boson stars: Gravitational equilibria of self-interacting scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Colpi, M.; Shapiro, S.L.; Wasserman, I.

    1986-11-17

    Spherically symmetric gravitational equilibria of self-interacting scalar fields phi with interaction potential V(phi) = (1/4)lambdachemically bondphichemically bond/sup 4/ are determined. Surprisingly, the resulting configurations may differ markedly from the noninteracting case even when lambda<<1. Contrary to generally accepted astrophysical folklore, it is found that the maximum masses of such boson stars may be comparable to the Chandrasekhar mass for fermions of mass m/sub fermion/--lambda/sup -1/4/m/sub boson/. .AE

  3. Electroweak and QCD corrections to Higgs production via vector-boson fusion at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccolini, M.; Denner, A.; Dittmaier, S.

    2008-01-01

    The radiative corrections of the strong and electroweak interactions are calculated at next-to-leading order for Higgs-boson production in the weak-boson-fusion channel at hadron colliders. Specifically, the calculation includes all weak-boson fusion and quark-antiquark annihilation diagrams to Higgs-boson production in association with two hard jets, including all corresponding interferences. The results on the QCD corrections confirm that previously made approximations of neglecting s-channel diagrams and interferences are well suited for predictions of Higgs production with dedicated vector-boson fusion cuts at the LHC. The electroweak corrections, which also include real corrections from incoming photons and leading heavy Higgs-boson effects at two-loop order, are of the same size as the QCD corrections, viz. typically at the level of 5%-10% for a Higgs-boson mass up to {approx}700 GeV. In general, both types of corrections do not simply rescale differential distributions, but induce distortions at the level of 10%. The discussed corrections have been implemented in a flexible Monte Carlo event generator.

  4. Light scalar as the messenger of electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Lykken, J. D.; Murdock, Z.; Nandi, S.

    2009-04-01

    We propose a new framework for understanding the hierarchies of fermion masses and mixings. The masses and mixings of all standard model (SM) charged fermions other than top arise from higher dimensional operators involving a messenger scalar S and flavon scalars F{sub i}. The flavons spontaneously break SM flavor symmetries at around the TeV scale. The SM singlet scalar S couples directly to the Higgs H and spontaneously breaks another U(1) at the electroweak scale. At the TeV scale, SM quarks and charged leptons have renormalizable couplings to S, but not to H or F{sub i}. These couplings involve new heavy vectorlike fermions. Integrating out these fermions produces a pattern of higher dimensional operators that reproduce the observed hierarchies of the SM masses and mixings in terms of powers of the 'little hierarchy': the ratio of the electroweak scale to the flavor-breaking scale. The framework has important phenomenological implications. Flavor-changing neutral currents are within experimental limits but D{sup 0}-D{sup 0} mixing and B{sub s}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} could be close to current sensitivities. The neutral scalar s of the messenger field mixes with the light Higgs of the SM, which can have strong effects on Higgs decay branching fractions. The s mass eigenstate may be lighter than the Higgs, and could be detected at the Tevatron or the LHC.

  5. Electroweak Baryogenesis and Higgs Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Timothy; Morrissey, David E.; Pierce, Aaron; /Michigan U., MCTP

    2012-03-13

    We explore the connection between the strength of the electroweak phase transition and the properties of the Higgs boson. Our interest is in regions of parameter space that can realize electroweak baryogenesis. We do so in a simplified framework in which a single Higgs field couples to new scalar fields charged under SU(3){sub c} by way of the Higgs portal. Such new scalars can make the electroweak phase transition more strongly first-order, while contributing to the effective Higgs boson couplings to gluons and photons through loop effects. For Higgs boson masses in the range 115 {approx}< m{sub h} {approx}< 130 GeV, whenever the phase transition becomes strong enough for successful electroweak baryogenesis, we find that Higgs boson properties are modified by an amount observable by the LHC. We also discuss the baryogenesis window of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), which appears to be under tension. Furthermore, we argue that the discovery of a Higgs boson with standard model-like couplings to gluons and photons will rule out electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM.

  6. Higher-order electroweak corrections to the partial widths and branching ratios of the Z boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Ayres

    2014-04-01

    Recently, the calculation of fermionic electroweak two-loop corrections to the total width of the Z boson and hadronic Z-peak cross-section in the Standard Model has been presented, where "fermionic" refers to diagrams with closed fermion loops. Here, these results are complemented by presenting contributions of the same order for the Z-boson partial widths, which are the last missing pieces for a complete description of Z-pole physics at the fermionic two-loop order. The definition of the relevant observables and the calculational techniques are described in detail. Numerical results are presented conveniently in terms of simple parametrization formulae. Finally, the remaining theoretical uncertainties from missing higher-order corrections are analyzed and found to be small compared to the current experimental errors.

  7. One-loop electroweak and QCD corrections to vector boson scattering into top pairs and application to the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Bouayed, N.; Boudjema, F.

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the electroweak and QCD corrections to W{sup -}W{sup +}{yields}tt and ZZ{yields}tt. We also consider the interplay of these corrections with the effect of anomalous interactions that affect the massive weak bosons and the top. The results at the VV level fusion are convoluted with the help of the effective vector boson approximation to give predictions for a high energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  8. Polarized lepton-nucleon elastic scattering and a search for a light scalar boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Sheng; Miller, Gerald A.

    2015-09-01

    Lepton-nucleon elastic scattering, using the one-photon and one-scalar-boson exchange mechanisms considering all possible polarizations, is used to study searches for a new scalar boson and suggest new measurements of the nucleon form factors. A new light scalar boson, which feebly couples to leptons and nucleons, may account for the proton radius and muon g -2 puzzles. We show that the scalar boson produces relatively large effects in a certain kinematic region when using sufficient control of lepton and nucleon spin polarization. We generalize current techniques to measure the ratio GE:GM and present a new method to separately measure GM2 and GE2 using polarized incoming and outgoing muons.

  9. NLO QCD and electroweak corrections to W + γ production with leptonic W-boson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Ansgar; Dittmaier, Stefan; Hecht, Markus; Pasold, Christian

    2015-04-01

    We present a calculation of the next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to W+γ production, including the leptonic decay of the W boson and taking into account all off-shell effects of the W boson, where the finite width of the W boson is implemented using the complex-mass scheme. Corrections induced by incoming photons are fully included and find particular emphasis in the discussion of phenomenological predictions for the LHC. The corresponding next-to-leading-order QCD corrections are reproduced as well. In order to separate hard photons from jets, a quark-to-photon fragmentation function á la Glover and Morgan is employed. Our results are implemented into Monte Carlo programs allowing for the evaluation of arbitrary differential cross sections. We present integrated cross sections for the LHC at 7 TeV, 8 TeV, and 14 TeV as well as differential distributions at 14 TeV for bare muons and dressed leptons. Finally, we discuss the impact of anomalous W W γ couplings.

  10. Electroweak Corrections to pp→μ^{+}μ^{-}e^{+}e^{-}+X at the LHC: A Higgs Boson Background Study.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, B; Denner, A; Dittmaier, S; Hofer, L; Jäger, B

    2016-04-22

    The first complete calculation of the next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to four-lepton production at the LHC is presented, where all off-shell effects of intermediate Z bosons and photons are taken into account. Focusing on the mixed final state μ^{+}μ^{-}e^{+}e^{-}, we study differential cross sections that are particularly interesting for Higgs boson analyses. The electroweak corrections are divided into photonic and purely weak corrections. The former exhibit patterns familiar from similar W- or Z-boson production processes with very large radiative tails near resonances and kinematical shoulders. The weak corrections are of the generic size of 5% and show interesting variations, in particular, a sign change between the regions of resonant Z-pair production and the Higgs signal.

  11. Electroweak Corrections to pp→μ^{+}μ^{-}e^{+}e^{-}+X at the LHC: A Higgs Boson Background Study.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, B; Denner, A; Dittmaier, S; Hofer, L; Jäger, B

    2016-04-22

    The first complete calculation of the next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to four-lepton production at the LHC is presented, where all off-shell effects of intermediate Z bosons and photons are taken into account. Focusing on the mixed final state μ^{+}μ^{-}e^{+}e^{-}, we study differential cross sections that are particularly interesting for Higgs boson analyses. The electroweak corrections are divided into photonic and purely weak corrections. The former exhibit patterns familiar from similar W- or Z-boson production processes with very large radiative tails near resonances and kinematical shoulders. The weak corrections are of the generic size of 5% and show interesting variations, in particular, a sign change between the regions of resonant Z-pair production and the Higgs signal. PMID:27152792

  12. Electroweak Corrections to p p →μ+μ-e+e-+X at the LHC: A Higgs Boson Background Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, B.; Denner, A.; Dittmaier, S.; Hofer, L.; Jäger, B.

    2016-04-01

    The first complete calculation of the next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to four-lepton production at the LHC is presented, where all off-shell effects of intermediate Z bosons and photons are taken into account. Focusing on the mixed final state μ+μ-e+e-, we study differential cross sections that are particularly interesting for Higgs boson analyses. The electroweak corrections are divided into photonic and purely weak corrections. The former exhibit patterns familiar from similar W - or Z -boson production processes with very large radiative tails near resonances and kinematical shoulders. The weak corrections are of the generic size of 5% and show interesting variations, in particular, a sign change between the regions of resonant Z -pair production and the Higgs signal.

  13. Charm production in association with an electroweak gauge boson at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Stirling, W J; Vryonidou, E

    2012-08-24

    The production of charm quark jets in association with electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC can be used as a tool to constrain quark parton distribution functions (PDFs). Motivated by recent measurements at the Tevatron and LHC, we calculate cross sections for W/Z+c, comparing these to W/Z+jet, for various PDF sets. The cross-section differences can be understood in terms of the different underlying PDFs, with the strange quark distribution being particularly important for W+c production. We suggest measurements of appropriately defined ratios and comment on how these measurements at the LHC can be used to extract information on the strange and charm content of the proton at high Q(2) scales.

  14. Complete NLO QCD corrections for tree level Δ F = 2 FCNC processes: colourless gauge bosons and scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Andrzej J.; Girrbach, Jennifer

    2012-03-01

    Anticipating the important role of tree level FCNC processes in the indirect search for new physics at distance scales as short as 10-19 - 10-21 m, we present complete NLO QCD corrections to tree level Δ F = 2 processes mediated by heavy colourless gauge bosons and scalars. Such contributions can be present at the fundamental level when the GIM mechanism is absent as in numerous Z' models, gauged flavour models with new very heavy neutral gauge bosons and Left-Right symmetric models with heavy neutral scalars. They can also be generated at one loop in models having GIM at the fundamental level and Minimal Flavour Violation of which Two-Higgs Doublet models with and without supersymmetry are the best known examples. In models containing vectorial heavy fermions that mix with the standard chiral quarks and models in which Z 0 and SM neutral Higgs H 0 mix with new heavy gauge bosons and scalars in the process of electroweak symmetry breaking also tree-level Z 0 and SM neutral Higgs H 0 contributions to Δ F = 2 processes are possible. In all these extensions new local operators absent in the SM are generated having Wilson coefficients that are generally much stronger affected by renormalization group QCD effects than it is the case of the SM operators. The new aspect of our work is the calculation of O( α s ) corrections to matching conditions for the Wilson coefficients of the contributing operators in the {text{NDR}} - overline {text{MS}} scheme that can be used in all models listed above. This allows to reduce certain unphysical scale and renormalization scheme dependences in the existing NLO calculations. We show explicitly how our results can be combined with the analytic formulae for the so-called P_i^a QCD factors that include both hadronic matrix elements of contributing operators and renormalization group evolution from high energy to low energy scales. For the masses of heavy gauge bosons and scalars O(1) TeV the remaining unphysical scale dependences for

  15. QCD and electroweak corrections to Z Z +jet production with Z -boson leptonic decays at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Zhang, Ren-You; Ma, Wen-Gan; Li, Xiao-Zhou; Guo, Lei

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present the full next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD +NLO electroweak (EW) corrections to the Z -boson pair production in association with a hard jet at the LHC. The subsequent Z -boson leptonic decays are included by adopting both the naive narrow-width approximation and madspin methods for comparison. Since the Z Z +jet production is an important background for single Higgs boson production and new physics searches at hadron colliders, the theoretical predictions with high accuracy for the hadronic production of Z Z +jet are necessary. We present the numerical results of the integrated cross section and various kinematic distributions of final particles, and conclude that it is necessary to take into account the spin correlation and finite-width effects from the Z -boson leptonic decays. We also find that the NLO EW correction is quantitatively non-negligible in matching the experimental accuracy at the LHC, particularly in the high-transverse-momentum region.

  16. Evolution of a massless test scalar field on boson star space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Lora-Clavijo, F. D.; Cruz-Osorio, A.; Guzman, F. S.

    2010-07-15

    We numerically solve the massless test scalar field equation on the space-time background of boson stars and black holes. In order to do so, we use a numerical domain that contains future null infinity. We achieve this construction using a scri-fixing conformal compactification technique based on hyperboloidal constant mean curvature foliations of the space-time and solve the conformally invariant wave equation. We present two results: the scalar field shows oscillations of the quasinormal mode type found for black holes only for boson star configurations that are compact; and no signs of tail decay are found in the parameter space we explored. Even though our results do not correspond to the master equation of perturbations of boson star solutions, they indicate that the parameter space of boson stars as black hole mimickers is restricted to compact configurations.

  17. Electroweak Sudakov Corrections using Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu Juiyu; Golf, Frank; Kelley, Randall; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2008-01-18

    Electroweak Sudakov corrections of the form {alpha}{sup n}log{sup m}s/M{sub W,Z}{sup 2} are summed using renormalization group evolution in soft-collinear effective theory. Results are given for the scalar, vector, and tensor form factors for fermion and scalar particles. The formalism for including massive gauge bosons in soft-collinear effective theory is developed.

  18. NLO QCD and electroweak corrections to Z + γ production with leptonic Z-boson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Ansgar; Dittmaier, Stefan; Hecht, Markus; Pasold, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to ppto {l}+{l}-/overline{ν}ν +\\upgamma +X production, including all off-shell effects of intermediate Z bosons in the complex-mass scheme, are calculated for LHC energies, revealing the typically expected large corrections of tens of percent in the TeV range. Contributions from quark-photon and photon-photon initial states are taken into account as well, but their impact is found to be moderate or small. Moreover, the known next-to-leading-order QCD corrections are reproduced. In order to separate hard photons from jets, both a quark-to-photon fragmentation function á la Glover/Morgan and Frixione's cone isolation are employed. The calculation is available in the form of Monte Carlo programs allowing for the evaluation of arbitrary differential cross sections. Predictions for integrated cross sections are presented for the LHC at 7 TeV, 8 TeV, and 14 TeV, and differential distributions are discussed at 14 TeV for bare muons and dressed leptons. Finally, we consider the impact of anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings.

  19. Spinning boson stars and Kerr black holes with scalar hair: The effect of self-interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen; Rúnarsson, Helgi F.

    2016-05-01

    Self-interacting boson stars (BSs) have been shown to alleviate the astrophysically low maximal mass of their nonself-interacting counterparts. We report some physical features of spinning self-interacting BSs, namely their compactness, the occurrence of ergo-regions and the scalar field profiles, for a sample of values of the coupling parameter. The results agree with the general picture that these BSs are comparatively less compact than the nonself-interacting ones. We also briefly discuss the effect of scalar self-interactions on the properties of Kerr black holes with scalar hair.

  20. Measurement of the electroweak production of dijets in association with a Z-boson and distributions sensitive to vector boson fusion in proton-proton collisions at = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Verzini, M. J. Alconada; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y. Amaral; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Santos, S. P. Amor Dos; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Bella, L. Aperio; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Mayes, J. Backus; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; da Costa, J. Barreiro Guimarães; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O. L.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Noccioli, E. Benhar; Garcia, J. A. Benitez; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Kuutmann, E. Bergeaas; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; De Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, G.; Brown, J.; de Renstrom, P. A. Bruckman; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Urbán, S. Cabrera; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Toro, R. Camacho; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Armadans, R. Caminal; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Garrido, M. D. M. Capeans; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Gimenez, V. Castillo; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Barajas, C. A. Chavez; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; El Moursli, R. Cherkaoui; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Muiño, P. Conde; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Ortuzar, M. Crispin; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Donszelmann, T. Cuhadar; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Hoffmann, M. Dano; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliot, F.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Wemans, A. Do Valle; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Anjos, A. Dos; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Yildiz, H. Duran; Düren, M.; Dwuznik, M.; Ebke, J.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Curull, X. Espinal; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Perez, S. Fernandez; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; de Lima, D. E. Ferreira; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Parodi, A. Ferretto; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, M. J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Castillo, L. R. Flores; Bustos, A. C. Florez; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Torregrosa, E. Fullana; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Walls, F. M. Garay; Garberson, F.; García, C.; Navarro, J. E. García; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giunta, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Fajardo, L. S. Gomez; Gonçalo, R.; Da Costa, J. Goncalves Pinto Firmino; Gonella, L.; de la Hoz, S. González; Parra, G. Gonzalez; Silva, M. L. Gonzalez; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grout, Z. J.; Grybel, K.; Guan, L.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Gunther, J.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Ortiz, N. G. Gutierrez; Gutschow, C.; Guttman, N.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageboeck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Heisterkamp, S.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Heller, C.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Correia, A. M. Henriques; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Herbert, G. H.; Jiménez, Y. Hernández; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hofmann, J. I.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holmes, T. R.; Hong, T. M.; van Huysduynen, L. Hooft; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P. 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F.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; De Bruin, P. H. Sales; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Ferrando, B. M. Salvachua; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Martinez, V. Sanchez; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Castillo, I. Santoyo; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savard, P.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaelicke, A.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Camillocci, E. Solfaroli; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramania, HS.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Delgado, A. Tavares; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Castanheira, M. Teixeira Dias; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Pastor, E. Torró; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Cakir, I. Turk; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Gallego, E. Valladolid; Vallecorsa, S.; Ferrer, J. A. Valls; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Schroeder, T. Vazquez; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Boeriu, O. E. Vickey; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Perez, M. Villaplana; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vaque, F. Vives; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Milosavljevic, M. Vranjes; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Wong, K. H. Yau; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; della Porta, G. Zevi; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2014-04-01

    Measurements of fiducial cross sections for the electroweak production of two jets in association with a Z-boson are presented. The measurements are performed using 20 .3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of = 8 TeV by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The electroweak component is extracted by a fit to the dijet invariant mass distribution in a fiducial region chosen to enhance the electroweak contribution over the dominant background in which the jets are produced via the strong interaction. The electroweak cross sections measured in two fiducial regions are in good agreement with the Standard Model expectations and the background-only hypothesis is rejected with significance above the 5 σ level. The electroweak process includes the vector boson fusion production of a Z-boson and the data are used to place limits on anomalous triple gauge boson couplings. In addition, measurements of cross sections and differential distributions for inclusive Z-boson-plus-dijet production are performed in five fiducial regions, each with different sensitivity to the electroweak contribution. The results are corrected for detector effects and compared to predictions from the Sherpa and Powheg event generators. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Vector and Scalar Bosons at DØ and ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Lammers, Sabine Sabine

    2014-09-26

    Vector Boson Fusion (VBF) has never been measured in hadron collisions, but it is one of the most sensitive modes for low mass Standard Model Higgs production at ATLAS. The objective of this proposal is to measure VBF production of W and Z bosons at the DØ Experiment taking place at the Tevatron Collider near Chicago, Illinois, and at the ATLAS Experiment, running at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland. The framework developed in these measurements will be used to discover and study the Higgs Boson produced through the same mechanism (VBF) at ATLAS. The 10 f b-1 dataset recently collected by the DØ experiment provides a unique opportunity to observe evidence of VBF production of W Bosons, which will provide the required theoretical knowledge - VBF cross sections - and experimental knowledge - tuning of measurement techniques - on which to base the VBF measurements at the LHC. At the time of this writing, the ATLAS experiment has recorded 5 fb-1 of data at √s = 7 TeV, and expects to collect at least another 5 in 2012. Assuming Standard Model cross sections, this dataset will allow for the observation of VBF production of W, Z and Higgs bosons. The major challenges for the first observation of VBF interactions are: developing highly optimized forward jet identification algorithms, and accurately modeling both rates and kinematics of background processes. With the research program outlined in this grant proposal, I plan to address each of these areas, paving the way for VBF observation. The concentration on VBF production for the duration of this grant will be at ATLAS where the anticipated high pileup rates necessitates a cleaner signal. My past experience with forward jet identification at the ZEUS experiment, and with W+(n)Jets measurements at DØ , puts me in a unique position to lead this effort. The proposed program will have a dual focus: on DØ where the VBF analysis effort is mature and efforts of a postdoc will be required to bring the VBF W

  2. Electroweak bosons in heavy-ion collisions with the CMS detector at =2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florent, Alice; Cms Collaboration

    2013-09-01

    Electroweak gauge bosons W and Z, do not interact strongly, and thus constitute clean probes of the initial state of nucleus-nucleus collisions. The comparison of their production cross-sections in pp and in nuclear collisions provides an estimate of the nuclear parton distribution functions. Despite the low production cross section of weak bosons compared to other nuclear processes, the relatively clean signal of their leptonic decay channel allows their detection. This paper reports measurements of Z and W bosons, produced in PbPb and pp collisions both at nucleon-nucleon center of mass energy =2.76 TeV with the CMS detector. The Z boson yield and the nuclear modification factor (RAA) corresponding to the integrated luminosity of 150 μb-1 for PbPb collisions are presented. The search for W bosons has been performed in the muon plus neutrino channel, using the data sample with integrated luminosity of 7.2 μb-1 for PbPb collisions. Event centrality an muon pseudorapidity dependencies are studied for the complete W candidate sample as well as samples separated by charge (W+ and W-).

  3. CP-even scalar boson production via gluon fusion at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Gehrmann, Thomas; Herzog, Franz; Lazopoulos, Achilleas; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    In view of the searches at the LHC for scalar particle resonances in addition to the 125 GeV Higgs boson, we present the cross-section for a CP-even scalar produced via gluon fusion at N3LO in perturbative QCD assuming that it couples directly to gluons in an effective theory approach. We refine our prediction by taking into account the possibility that the scalar couples to the top-quark and computing the corresponding contributions through NLO in perturbative QCD. We assess the theoretical uncertainties of the crosssection due to missing higher-order QCD effects and we provide the necessary information for obtaining the cross-section value and uncertainty from our results in specific scenarios beyond the Standard Model. We also give detailed results for the case of a 750 GeV scalar, which will be the subject of intense experimental studies.

  4. New Experimental limit on Optical Photon Coupling to Neutral, Scalar Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Afanaciev, Andrei; Afanasev, Andrei; Afanaciev, Andrei; Afanasev, Andrei; Baker, O.; Beard, Kevin; Biallas, George; Boyce, James; Minarni, Minarni; Ramdon, Roopchan; Michelle D. Shinn; Slocum, P.

    2008-09-01

    We report on the first results of a sensitive search for scalar coupling of photons to a light neutral boson in the mass range of approximately 1.0 milli-electron volts and coupling strength greater than 10$^-6$ GeV$^-1$ using optical photons. This was a photon regeneration experiment using the "light shining through a wall" technique in which laser light was passed through a strong magnetic field upstream of an optical beam dump; regenerated laser light was then searched for downstream of a second magnetic field region optically shielded from the former. Our results show no evidence for scalar coupling in this region of parameter space.

  5. Strong and Electroweak Corrections to the Production of a Higgs Boson+2 Jets via Weak Interactions at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccolini, M.; Denner, A.; Dittmaier, S.

    2007-10-19

    Radiative corrections of strong and electroweak interactions are presented at next-to-leading order for the production of a Higgs boson plus two hard jets via weak interactions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The calculation includes all weak-boson fusion and quark-antiquark annihilation diagrams as well as the corresponding interferences. The electroweak corrections, which are discussed here for the first time, reduce the cross sections by 5% and thus are of the same order of magnitude as the QCD corrections.

  6. Higgs bosons, electroweak symmetry breaking, and the physics of the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, a 7 {circle_plus} 7 TeV proton-proton collider under construction at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva), will take experiments squarely into a new energy domain where mysteries of the electroweak interaction will be unveiled. What marks the 1-TeV scale as an important target? Why is understanding how the electroweak symmetry is hidden important to our conception of the world around us? What expectations do we have for the agent that hides the electroweak symmetry? Why do particle physicists anticipate a great harvest of discoveries within reach of the LHC?

  7. Electroweak Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    The test of the electroweak corrections has played a major role in providing evidence for the gauge and the Higgs sectors of the Standard Model. At the same time the consideration of the electroweak corrections has given significant indirect information on the masses of the top and the Higgs boson before their discoveries and important orientation/constraints on the searches for new physics, still highly valuable in the present situation. The progression of these contributions is reviewed.

  8. Hyperscaling violation and electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elander, Daniel; Lawrance, Robert; Piai, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    We consider a class of simplified models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking built in terms of their five-dimensional weakly-coupled gravity duals, in the spirit of bottom-up holography. The sigma-model consists of two abelian gauge bosons and one real, non-charged scalar field coupled to gravity in five dimensions. The scalar potential is a simple exponential function of the scalar field. The background metric resulting from solving the classical equations of motion exhibits hyperscaling violation, at least at asymptotically large values of the radial direction. We study the spectrum of scalar composite states of the putative dual field theory by fluctuating the sigma-model scalars and gravity, and discuss in which cases we find a parametrically light scalar state in the spectrum. We model the spontaneous breaking of the (weakly coupled) gauge symmetry to the diagonal subgroup by the choice of IR boundary conditions. We compute the mass spectrum of spin-1 states, and the precision electroweak parameter S as a function of the hyperscaling coefficient. We find a general bound on the mass of the lightest spin-1 resonance, by requiring that the indirect bounds on the precision parameters be satisfied, that implies that precision electroweak physics excludes the possibility of a techni-rho meson with mass lighter than several TeV.

  9. Have we observed the Higgs boson (imposter)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Ian; Lykken, Joseph; Shaughnessy, Gabe

    2012-11-01

    We interpret the new particle at the Large Hadron Collider as a CP-even scalar and investigate its electroweak quantum number. Assuming an unbroken custodial invariance as suggested by precision electroweak measurements, only four possibilities are allowed if the scalar decays to pairs of gauge bosons, as exemplified by a dilaton/radion, a nondilatonic electroweak singlet scalar, an electroweak doublet scalar, and electroweak triplet scalars. We show that current LHC data already strongly disfavor both the “plain-vanilla” dilatonic and nondilatonic singlet imposters. On the other hand, a generic Higgs doublet gives excellent fits to the measured event rates of the newly observed scalar resonance, while the Standard Model Higgs boson gives a slightly worse overall fit due to the lack of a signal in the ττ channel. The triplet imposter exhibits some tension with the data. The global fit indicates that the enhancement in the diphoton channel could be attributed to an enhanced partial decay width, while the production rates are consistent with the Standard Model expectations. We emphasize that more precise measurements of the ratio of event rates in the WW over ZZ channels, as well as the event rates in bb¯ and ττ channels, are needed to further distinguish the Higgs doublet from the triplet imposter.

  10. Experimental Limit on Optical-Photon Coupling to Light Neutral Scalar Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Afanaciev, Andrei; Afanasev, Andrei; Baker, O.; Beard, Kevin; Biallas, George; Boyce, James; Minarni, Minarni; Ramdon, Roopchan; Michelle D. Shinn; Slocum, P.

    2008-09-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.120401
    We report on the first results of a sensitive search for scalar coupling of photons to a light neutral boson in the mass range of approximately 1.0 meV (milli-electron volts) and coupling strength greater than 10^-6 GeV^-1 using optical photons. This was a photon regeneration experiment using the "light shining through a wall" technique in which laser light was passed through a strong magnetic field upstream of an optical beam dump; regenerated laser light was then searched for downstream of a second magnetic field region optically shielded from the former. Our results show no evidence for scalar coupling in this region of parameter space.

  11. First-order electroweak phase transition powered by additional F-term loop effects in an extended supersymmetric Higgs sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemura, Shinya; Senaha, Eibun; Shindou, Tetsuo

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the one-loop effect of new charged scalar bosons on the Higgs potential at finite temperatures in the supersymmetric standard model with four Higgs doublet chiral superfields as well as a pair of charged singlet chiral superfields. In this model, the mass of the lightest Higgs boson h is determined only by the D-term in the Higgs potential at the tree-level, while the triple Higgs boson coupling for hhh can receive a significant radiative correction due to nondecoupling one-loop contributions of the additional charged scalar bosons. We find that the same nondecoupling mechanism can also contribute to realize stronger first order electroweak phase transition than that in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, which is definitely required for a successful scenario of electroweak baryogenesis. Therefore, this model can be a new candidate for a model in which the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is explained at the electroweak scale.

  12. Radiative corrections to the Higgs boson couplings in the model with an additional real singlet scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemura, Shinya; Kikuchi, Mariko; Yagyu, Kei

    2016-06-01

    We calculate renormalized Higgs boson couplings with gauge bosons and fermions at the one-loop level in the model with an additional isospin singlet real scalar field. These coupling constants can deviate from the predictions in the standard model due to tree-level mixing effects and one-loop contributions of the extra neutral scalar boson. We investigate how they can be significant under the theoretical constraints from perturbative unitarity and vacuum stability and also the condition of avoiding the wrong vacuum. Furthermore, comparing with the predictions in the Type I two Higgs doublet model, we numerically demonstrate how the singlet extension model can be distinguished and identified by using precision measurements of the Higgs boson couplings at future collider experiments.

  13. The Higgs boson in the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djouadi, Abdelhak; Grazzini, Massimiliano

    2016-10-01

    The major goal of the Large Hadron Collider is to probe the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism and the generation of the elementary particle masses. In the Standard Model this mechanism leads to the existence of a scalar Higgs boson with unique properties. We review the physics of the Standard Model Higgs boson, discuss its main search channels at hadron colliders and the corresponding theoretical predictions. We also summarize the strategies to study its basic properties.

  14. Electroweak corrections and unitarity in linear moose models

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; He, H.-J.; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2005-02-01

    We calculate the form of the corrections to the electroweak interactions in the class of Higgsless models which can be deconstructed to a chain of SU(2) gauge groups adjacent to a chain of U(1) gauge groups, and with the fermions coupled to any single SU(2) group and to any single U(1) group along the chain. The primary advantage of our technique is that the size of corrections to electroweak processes can be directly related to the spectrum of vector bosons ('KK modes'). In Higgsless models, this spectrum is constrained by unitarity. Our methods also allow for arbitrary background 5D geometry, spatially dependent gauge-couplings, and brane kinetic energy terms. We find that, due to the size of corrections to electroweak processes in any unitary theory, Higgsless models with localized fermions are disfavored by precision electroweak data. Although we stress our results as they apply to continuum Higgsless 5D models, they apply to any linear moose model including those with only a few extra vector bosons. Our calculations of electroweak corrections also apply directly to the electroweak gauge sector of 5D theories with a bulk scalar Higgs boson; the constraints arising from unitarity do not apply in this case.

  15. Indications for an extra neutral gauge boson in electroweak precision data

    PubMed

    Erler; Langacker

    2000-01-10

    A new analysis of the hadronic peak cross section at LEP 1 implies a small amount of missing invisible width in Z decays, while the effective weak charge in atomic parity violation has been determined recently to 0.6% accuracy, indicating a significantly negative S parameter. As a consequence, the data are described well if the presence of an extra Z' boson, such as predicted in grand unified theories, is assumed. Moreover, the data are now rich enough to study an arbitrary extra Z' boson and to determine its couplings in a model independent way. An excellent fit to the data is obtained in this case, suggestive of a family nonuniversal Z' similar to those predicted in a class of superstring theories. PMID:11015875

  16. Associated production of heavy quarkonia and electroweak bosons at present and future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniehl, Bernd A.; Palisoc, Caesar P.; Zwirner, Lennart

    2002-12-01

    We investigate the associated production of heavy quarkonia, with angular-momentum quantum numbers 2S+1LJ=1S0,3S1,1P1,3PJ (J=0,1,2), and photons, Z bosons, and W bosons in photon-photon, photon-hadron, and hadron-hadron collisions within the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics providing all contributing partonic cross sections in analytic form. In the case of photoproduction, we also include the resolved-photon contributions. We present numerical results for the processes involving J/ψ and χcJ mesons appropriate for the Fermilab Tevatron, CERN LHC, DESY TESLA, operated in the e+e- and γγ modes, and DESY THERA.

  17. Neutral triple electroweak gauge boson production in the large extra-dimension model at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.; Seth, Satyajit

    2012-05-01

    We study the prospects of probing large extra-dimension models at the LHC through neutral triple gauge boson production processes. In theories with extra dimensions these processes result from the exchange of a tower of massive graviton modes between the SM particles. We consider γγγ, γγZ, γZZ, and ZZZ production processes, and present our results for various kinematic distributions at the LHC for S=14TeV.

  18. VBFNLO: A parton level Monte Carlo for processes with electroweak bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, K.; Bähr, M.; Bozzi, G.; Campanario, F.; Englert, C.; Figy, T.; Greiner, N.; Hackstein, C.; Hankele, V.; Jäger, B.; Klämke, G.; Kubocz, M.; Oleari, C.; Plätzer, S.; Prestel, S.; Worek, M.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2009-09-01

    VBFNLO is a fully flexible parton level Monte Carlo program for the simulation of vector boson fusion, double and triple vector boson production in hadronic collisions at next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant. VBFNLO includes Higgs and vector boson decays with full spin correlations and all off-shell effects. In addition, VBFNLO implements CP-even and CP-odd Higgs boson via gluon fusion, associated with two jets, at the leading-order one-loop level with the full top- and bottom-quark mass dependence in a generic two-Higgs-doublet model. A variety of effects arising from beyond the Standard Model physics are implemented for selected processes. This includes anomalous couplings of Higgs and vector bosons and a Warped Higgsless extra dimension model. The program offers the possibility to generate Les Houches Accord event files for all processes available at leading order. Program summaryProgram title:VBFNLO Catalogue identifier: AEDO_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDO_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 339 218 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 620 847 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran, parts in C++ Computer: All Operating system: Linux, should also work on other systems Classification: 11.1, 11.2 External routines: Optionally Les Houches Accord PDF Interface library and the GNU Scientific library Nature of problem: To resolve the large scale dependence inherent in leading order calculations and to quantify the cross section error induced by uncertainties in the determination of parton distribution functions, it is necessary to include NLO corrections. Moreover, whenever stringent cuts are required on decay products and/or identified jets the question arises whether the scale dependence and a k-factor, defined

  19. Directly Measuring the Tensor Structure of the Scalar Coupling to Gauge Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Stolarski, Daniel; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Kinematic distributions in the decays of the newly discovered resonance to four leptons can provide a direct measurement of the tensor structure of the particle's couplings to gauge bosons. Even if the particle is shown to be a parity even scalar, measuring this tensor structure is a necessary step in determining if this particle is responsible for giving mass to the Z. We consider a Standard Model like coupling as well as coupling via a dimension five operator to either ZZ or Z\\gamma. We show that using full kinematic information from each event allows discrimination between renormalizable and higher dimensional coupling to ZZ at the 95% confidence level with O(50) signal events, and coupling to Z\\gamma can be distinguished with as few as 20 signal events. This shows that these measurements can be useful even with this year's LHC data.

  20. A study of multi-jet production in association with an electroweak vector boson

    DOE PAGES

    Frederix, R.; Frixione, S.; Papaefstathiou, A.; Prestel, S.; Torrielli, P.

    2016-02-19

    Here, we consider the production of a single Z or W boson in association with jets at the LHC. We compute the corresponding cross sections by matching NLO QCD predictions with the Herwig++ and Pythia8 parton showers, and by merging all of the underlying matrix elements with up to two light partons at the Born level. We compare our results with several 7-TeV measurements by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, and overall we find a good agreement between theory and data.

  1. Crucial role of neutrinos in the electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Smetana, Adam

    2013-12-30

    Not only the top-quark condensate appears to be the natural significant source of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. Provided the seesaw scenario, the neutrinos can have their Dirac masses large enough so that their condensates contribute significantly to the electroweak scale as well. We address the question of a phenomenological feasibility of the top-quark and neutrino condensation conspiracy against the electroweak symmetry within the simplifying two-composite-Higgs-doublet model. Mandatory is to reproduce the masses of electroweak gauge bosons, the top-quark mass and the recently observed scalar mass of 125 GeV, and to satisfy the upper limits on absolute value of active neutrino masses. To accomplish that, the number of right-handed neutrinos participating on the seesaw mechanism turns out to be rather large, O(100–1000)

  2. Electroweak and QCD corrections to top-pair hadroproduction in association with heavy bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frixione, S.; Hirschi, V.; Pagani, D.; Shao, H.-S.; Zaro, M.

    2015-06-01

    We compute the contribution of order α {/S 2} α 2 to the cross section of a top-antitop pair in association with at least one heavy Standard Model boson — Z, W ±, and Higgs — by including all effects of QCD, QED, and weak origin and by working in the automated M adG raph5_ aMC@NLO framework. This next-to-leading order contribution is then combined with that of order α {/S 3} α, and with the two dominant lowest-order ones, α {/S 2} α and α S α 2, to obtain phenomenological results relevant to a 8, 13, and 100 TeV pp collider.

  3. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs research of the CDF Electroweak Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Electroweak group studies production and properties of W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  4. Searches for electroweak production of charginos, neutralinos, and sleptons decaying to leptons and W, Z, and Higgs bosons in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-26

    Our searches for the direct electroweak production of supersymmetric charginos, neutralinos, and sleptons in a variety of signatures with leptons and W, Z, and Higgs bosons are presented. Results are based on a sample of proton-proton collision data collected at center-of-mass energy √s=8TeV with the CMS detector in 2012, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. These observed event rates are in agreement with expectations from the standard model. Finally, these results probe charginos and neutralinos with masses up to 720 GeV, and sleptons up to 260 GeV, depending on the model details.

  5. Boson stars in a theory of complex scalar fields coupled to the U(1) gauge field and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kulshreshtha, Usha; Shankar Kulshreshtha, Daya

    2014-08-01

    We study boson shells and boson stars in a theory of a complex scalar field coupled to the U(1) gauge field {{A}_{\\mu }} and Einstein gravity with the potential V(|\\Phi |)\\;:=\\frac{1}{2}{{m}^{2}}{{\\left( |\\Phi |+a \\right)}^{2}}. This could be considered either as a theory of a massive complex scalar field coupled to an electromagnetic field and gravity in a conical potential, or as a theory in the presence of a potential that is an overlap of a parabolic and conical potential. Our theory has a positive cosmological constant (\\Lambda :=4\\pi G{{m}^{2}}{{a}^{2}}). Boson stars are found to come in two types, having either ball-like or shell-like charge density. We studied the properties of these solutions and also determined their domains of existence for some specific values of the parameters of the theory. Similar solutions have also been obtained by Kleihaus, Kunz, Laemmerzahl and List, in a V-shaped scalar potential.

  6. Generation of families of spectra in PT-symmetric quantum mechanics and scalar bosonic field theory.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Steffen; Klevansky, S P

    2013-04-28

    This paper explains the systematics of the generation of families of spectra for the -symmetric quantum-mechanical Hamiltonians H=p(2)+x(2)(ix)(ε), H=p(2)+(x(2))(δ) and H=p(2)-(x(2))(μ). In addition, it contrasts the results obtained with those found for a bosonic scalar field theory, in particular in one dimension, highlighting the similarities to and differences from the quantum-mechanical case. It is shown that the number of families of spectra can be deduced from the number of non-contiguous pairs of Stokes wedges that display PT symmetry. To do so, simple arguments that use the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation are used, and these imply that the eigenvalues are real. However, definitive results are in most cases presently only obtainable numerically, and not all eigenvalues in each family may be real. Within the approximations used, it is illustrated that the difference between the quantum-mechanical and the field-theoretical cases lies in the number of accessible regions in which the eigenfunctions decay exponentially. This paper reviews and implements well-known techniques in complex analysis and PT-symmetric quantum theory.

  7. Standard model false vacuum inflation: correlating the tensor-to-scalar ratio to the top quark and Higgs boson masses.

    PubMed

    Masina, Isabella; Notari, Alessio

    2012-05-11

    For a narrow band of values of the top quark and Higgs boson masses, the standard model Higgs potential develops a false minimum at energies of about 10(16)  GeV, where primordial inflation could have started in a cold metastable state. A graceful exit to a radiation-dominated era is provided, e.g., by scalar-tensor gravity models. We pointed out that if inflation happened in this false minimum, the Higgs boson mass has to be in the range 126.0±3.5  GeV, where ATLAS and CMS subsequently reported excesses of events. Here we show that for these values of the Higgs boson mass, the inflationary gravitational wave background has be discovered with a tensor-to-scalar ratio at hand of future experiments. We suggest that combining cosmological observations with measurements of the top quark and Higgs boson masses represent a further test of the hypothesis that the standard model false minimum was the source of inflation in the universe.

  8. Standard model false vacuum inflation: correlating the tensor-to-scalar ratio to the top quark and Higgs boson masses.

    PubMed

    Masina, Isabella; Notari, Alessio

    2012-05-11

    For a narrow band of values of the top quark and Higgs boson masses, the standard model Higgs potential develops a false minimum at energies of about 10(16)  GeV, where primordial inflation could have started in a cold metastable state. A graceful exit to a radiation-dominated era is provided, e.g., by scalar-tensor gravity models. We pointed out that if inflation happened in this false minimum, the Higgs boson mass has to be in the range 126.0±3.5  GeV, where ATLAS and CMS subsequently reported excesses of events. Here we show that for these values of the Higgs boson mass, the inflationary gravitational wave background has be discovered with a tensor-to-scalar ratio at hand of future experiments. We suggest that combining cosmological observations with measurements of the top quark and Higgs boson masses represent a further test of the hypothesis that the standard model false minimum was the source of inflation in the universe. PMID:23003024

  9. Electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Renton, P.

    1990-01-01

    The central part of the book consists of a comprehensive discussion of many scattering and decay processes involving electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions. A list of topics includes electron-proton scattering, Compton scattering, muon decay, electron-positron annihilation, photon and hadron structure functions, neutrino-nucleus scattering, Cabibbo theory, tau-lepton decays, W and Z boson decays, mixing phenomena and many others. For most processes, the author presents the appropriate Feynman diagrams, first-order matrix elements and the resulting cross sections or decay rates. The last section of Electroweak Interactions discusses some of the open or unanswered questions in the standard model, including the undiscovered top quark, the Higgs mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and detailed tests involving radiative effects. The book concludes with a brief account of ideas that extend beyond the standard model, such as left-right symmetric models, grand unified theories, compositeness, supersymmetry and string theory.

  10. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  11. Searches for a heavy scalar boson H decaying to a pair of 125 GeV Higgs bosons hh or for a heavy pseudoscalar boson A decaying to Zh, in the final states with h → ττ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; El Sawy, M.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sudhakar, K.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Dini, P.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Ryu, M. S.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. 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V.; Vinogradov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. 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T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Jung, A. W.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Demortier, L.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-04-01

    A search for a heavy scalar boson H decaying into a pair of lighter standard-model-like 125 GeV Higgs bosons hh and a search for a heavy pseudoscalar boson A decaying into a Z and an h boson are presented. The searches are performed on a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, collected by CMS in 2012. A final state consisting of two τ leptons and two b jets is used to search for the H → hh decay. A final state consisting of two τ leptons from the h boson decay, and two additional leptons from the Z boson decay, is used to search for the decay A → Zh. The results are interpreted in the context of two-Higgs-doublet models. No excess is found above the standard model expectation and upper limits are set on the heavy boson production cross sections in the mass ranges 260

  12. Top Quark Produced Through the Electroweak Force: Discovery Using the Matrix Element Analysis and Search for Heavy Gauge Bosons Using Boosted Decision Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Pangilinan, Monica

    2010-05-01

    The top quark produced through the electroweak channel provides a direct measurement of the Vtb element in the CKM matrix which can be viewed as a transition rate of a top quark to a bottom quark. This production channel of top quark is also sensitive to different theories beyond the Standard Model such as heavy charged gauged bosons termed W'. This thesis measures the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark using a technique based on using the matrix elements of the processes under consideration. The technique is applied to 2.3 fb-1 of data from the D0 detector. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the signal and background model using Bayesian statistics, we measure the cross section of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.30-1.20+0.98 pb. The measured result corresponds to a 4.9σ Gaussian-equivalent significance. By combining this analysis with other analyses based on the Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) and Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) method, the measured cross section is 3.94 ± 0.88 pb with a significance of 5.0σ, resulting in the discovery of electroweak produced top quarks. Using this measured cross section and constraining |Vtb| < 1, the 95% confidence level (C.L.) lower limit is |Vtb| > 0.78. Additionally, a search is made for the production of W' using the same samples from the electroweak produced top quark. An analysis based on the BDT method is used to separate the signal from expected backgrounds. No significant excess is found and 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section are set for W' with masses within 600-950 GeV. For four general models of W{prime} boson production using decay channel W' → t$\\bar{p}$, the lower mass limits are the following: M(W'L with SM couplings) > 840 GeV; M(W'R) > 880 GeV or 890 GeV if the right-handed neutrino is

  13. Electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Haidt, D.; Pietschmann, H

    1988-01-01

    This volume aims at a consistent presentation of the relevant experimental data in the theoretical context of Quantum Flavor Dynamics (QFD). QFD stems from research in the last 15 years and describes successfully all phenomena of so-called electroweak interactions. This allows for a natural and efficient ordering of the vast body of data resulting from many different types of experiments. After an outline of the theoretical foundations, several chapters deal with the three sectors of QFD, i.e. fermions, gauge bosons and Higgs bosons as far as their properties (quantum numbers, lifetime etc.) are concerned. The largest chapter examines the structure of the electromagnetic, the weak neutral and the weak charged currents. Best values for the basic parameters of QFD are suggested, and open questions and new directions are discussed.

  14. Detection prospects of light NMSSM Higgs pseudoscalar via cascades of heavier scalars from vector boson fusion and Higgs-strahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomark, N.-E.; Moretti, S.; Roszkowski, L.

    2016-10-01

    A detection at the large hadron collider of a light Higgs pseudoscalar would, if interpreted in a supersymmetric framework, be a smoking gun signature of non-minimal supersymmetry. In this work in the framework of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model we focus on vector boson fusion and Higgs-strahlung production of heavier scalars that subsequently decay into pairs of light pseudoscalars. We demonstrate that although these channels have in general very limited reach, they are viable for the detection of light pseudoscalars in some parts of parameter space and can serve as an important complementary probe to the dominant gluon-fusion production mode. We also demonstrate that in a Higgs factory these channels may reach sensitivities comparable to or even exceeding the gluon fusion channels at the Large Hadron Collider, thus possibly rendering this our best option to discover a light pseudoscalar. It is also worth mentioning that for the singlet dominated scalar this may be the only way to measure its couplings to gauge bosons. Especially promising are channels where the initial scalar is radiated off a W as these events have relatively high rates and provide substantial background suppression due to leptons from the W. We identify three benchmark points that well represent the above scenarios. Assuming that the masses of the scalars and pseudoscalars are already measured in the gluon-fusion channel, the event kinematics can be further constrained, hence significantly improving detection prospects. This is especially important in the Higgs-strahlung channels with rather heavy scalars, and results in possible detection at 200 fb-1 for the most favoured parts of the parameter space.

  15. Creating the Fermion Mass Hierarchies with Multiple Higgs Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Gemmler, Katrin

    2015-12-10

    After the Higgs boson discovery, it is established that the Higgs mechanism explains electroweak symmetry breaking and generates the masses of all particles in the Standard Model, with the possible exception of neutrino masses. The hierarchies among fermion masses and mixing angles remain however unexplained. We propose a new class of two Higgs doublet models in which a flavor symmetry broken at the electroweak scale addresses this problem. The models are strongly constrained by electroweak precision tests and the fact that they produce modifications to Higgs couplings and flavor changing neutral currents; they are also constrained by collider searches for extra scalar bosons. The surviving models are very predictive, implying unavoidable new physics signals at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, e.g. extra Higgs Bosons with masses $M < 700$ GeV.

  16. Search for dimuon decays of a light scalar boson in radiative transitions Upsilon-->gammaA0.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Petigura, E; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolku, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-08-21

    We search for evidence of a light scalar boson in the radiative decays of the Upsilon(2S) and Upsilon(3S) resonances: Upsilon(2S,3S)-->gammaA0, A0-->mu+mu-. Such a particle appears in extensions of the standard model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range 0.212 < or = mA0 < or = 9.3 GeV in the samples of 99 x 10(6) Upsilon(2S) and 122 x 10(6) Upsilon(3S) decays collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory and set stringent upper limits on the effective coupling of the b quark to the A0. We also limit the dimuon branching fraction of the etab meson: B(etab-->mu+mu-)<0.9% at 90% confidence level.

  17. Search for Dimuon Decays of a Light Scalar Boson in Radiative Transitions Υ→γA0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Petigura, E.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Ongmongkolku, P.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Esteve, L.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-08-01

    We search for evidence of a light scalar boson in the radiative decays of the Υ(2S) and Υ(3S) resonances: Υ(2S,3S)→γA0, A0→μ+μ-. Such a particle appears in extensions of the standard model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range 0.212≤mA0≤9.3GeV in the samples of 99×106 Υ(2S) and 122×106 Υ(3S) decays collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory and set stringent upper limits on the effective coupling of the b quark to the A0. We also limit the dimuon branching fraction of the ηb meson: B(ηb→μ+μ-)<0.9% at 90% confidence level.

  18. Possible Effects of a Composite Iso-Scalar Weak Boson in a Left-Right Symmetric Preon Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, S.; Sekiguchi, M.

    1991-08-01

    We assume that a fundamental gauge symmetry is never broken, and any short range interactions should be secondary, appearing as residual effects of some fundamental gauge interactions. On this assumption the weak interaction is considered to be a secondary effective one among composite quarks, leptons and weak bosons with respective appropriate preon and/or anti-preon configurations bounded by a new fundamental gauge interaction. In this work, applying a fermion-boson type preon scheme and supposing confinement and a preon line rule (like the OZI-rule) for the confining force, we concentrate to investigate lower mass limit of the additional iso-scalar particle, whose existence is naturally expected in our scheme, permitted by a low energy experiment.

  19. Searches for electroweak production of charginos, neutralinos, and sleptons decaying to leptons and W, Z, and Higgs bosons in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-26

    Our searches for the direct electroweak production of supersymmetric charginos, neutralinos, and sleptons in a variety of signatures with leptons and W, Z, and Higgs bosons are presented. Results are based on a sample of proton-proton collision data collected at center-of-mass energy √s=8TeV with the CMS detector in 2012, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. These observed event rates are in agreement with expectations from the standard model. Finally, these results probe charginos and neutralinos with masses up to 720 GeV, and sleptons up to 260 GeV, depending on the model details.

  20. The electroweak theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2001-08-10

    After a short essay on the current state of particle physics, the author reviews the antecedents of the modern picture of the weak and electromagnetic interactions and then undertakes a brief survey of the SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} U(1){sub Y} electroweak theory. The authors reviews the features of electroweak phenomenology at tree level and beyond, presents an introduction to the Higgs boson and the 1-TeV scale, and examines arguments for enlarging the electroweak theory. The author concludes with a brief look at low-scale gravity.

  1. Measurement of electroweak production of two jets in association with a Z boson in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8\\,\\text {TeV}$

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-02-10

    The purely electroweak (EW) cross section for the production of two jets in association with a Z boson, in proton–proton collisions at √s=8TeV, is measured using data recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb-1. We also defined the electroweak cross section for the ℓℓjj final state (with ℓ=e or μ and j representing the quarks produced in the hard interaction) in the kinematic region by Mℓℓ>50 GeV, Mjj>120GeV, transverse momentum pTj>25 GeV, and pseudorapidity |ηj|<5, is found to be σEW(ℓℓjj)=174±15(stat)±40(syst)\\,fb, in agreement with the standard model prediction. Finallly, the associated jet activity of the selected events is studied, in particular in a signal-enriched region of phase space, and the measurements are found to be in agreement with QCD predictions.

  2. Measurement of electroweak production of two jets in association with a Z boson in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=8\\,\\text {TeV}$$

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-02-10

    The purely electroweak (EW) cross section for the production of two jets in association with a Z boson, in proton–proton collisions at √s=8TeV, is measured using data recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb-1. We also defined the electroweak cross section for the ℓℓjj final state (with ℓ=e or μ and j representing the quarks produced in the hard interaction) in the kinematic region by Mℓℓ>50 GeV, Mjj>120GeV, transverse momentum pTj>25 GeV, and pseudorapidity |ηj|<5, is found to be σEW(ℓℓjj)=174±15(stat)±40(syst)\\,fb, in agreement with the standard model prediction. Finallly, the associated jetmore » activity of the selected events is studied, in particular in a signal-enriched region of phase space, and the measurements are found to be in agreement with QCD predictions.« less

  3. Discriminative phenomenological features of scale invariant models for electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashino, Katsuya; Kanemura, Shinya; Orikasa, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Classical scale invariance (CSI) may be one of the solutions for the hierarchy problem. Realistic models for electroweak symmetry breaking based on CSI require extended scalar sectors without mass terms, and the electroweak symmetry is broken dynamically at the quantum level by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. We discuss discriminative features of these models. First, using the experimental value of the mass of the discovered Higgs boson h (125), we obtain an upper bound on the mass of the lightest additional scalar boson (≃ 543 GeV), which does not depend on its isospin and hypercharge. Second, a discriminative prediction on the Higgs-photon-photon coupling is given as a function of the number of charged scalar bosons, by which we can narrow down possible models using current and future data for the di-photon decay of h (125). Finally, for the triple Higgs boson coupling a large deviation (˜ + 70%) from the SM prediction is universally predicted, which is independent of masses, quantum numbers and even the number of additional scalars. These models based on CSI can be well tested at LHC Run II and at future lepton colliders.

  4. Unanswered Questions in the Electroweak Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2009-11-01

    This article is devoted to the status of the electroweak theory on the eve of experimentation at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. A compact summary of the logic and structure of the electroweak theory precedes an examination of what experimental tests have established so far. The outstanding unconfirmed prediction of the electroweak theory is the existence of the Higgs boson, a weakly interacting spin-zero particle that is the agent of electroweak symmetry breaking, the giver of mass to the weak gauge bosons, the quarks, and the leptons. General arguments imply that the Higgs boson or other new physics is required on the TeV energy scale. Indirect constraints from global analyses of electroweak measurements suggest that the mass of the standard-model Higgs boson is less than 200 GeV. Once its mass is assumed, the properties of the Higgs boson follow from the electroweak theory, and these inform the search for the Higgs boson. Alternative mechanisms for electroweak symmetry breaking are reviewed, and the importance of electroweak symmetry breaking is illuminated by considering a world without a specific mechanism to hide the electroweak symmetry. For all its triumphs, the electroweak theory has many shortcomings.

  5. Flavor from the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Gemmler, Katrin

    2015-11-04

    We discuss the possibility that flavor hierarchies arise from the electroweak scale in a two Higgs doublet model, in which the two Higgs doublets jointly act as the flavon. Quark masses and mixing angles are explained by effective Yukawa couplings, generated by higher dimensional operators involving quarks and Higgs doublets. Modified Higgs couplings yield important effects on the production cross sections and decay rates of the light Standard Model like Higgs. In addition, flavor changing neutral currents arise at tree-level and lead to strong constraints from meson-antimeson mixing. Remarkably, flavor constraints turn out to prefer a region in parameter space that is in excellent agreement with the one preferred by recent Higgs precision measurements at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Direct searches for extra scalars at the LHC lead to further constraints. Precise predictions for the production and decay modes of the additional Higgs bosons are derived, and we present benchmark scenarios for searches at the LHC Run II. As a result, flavor breaking at the electroweak scale as well as strong coupling effects demand a UV completion at the scale of a few TeV, possibly within the reach of the LHC.

  6. Flavor from the electroweak scale

    DOE PAGES

    Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Gemmler, Katrin

    2015-11-04

    We discuss the possibility that flavor hierarchies arise from the electroweak scale in a two Higgs doublet model, in which the two Higgs doublets jointly act as the flavon. Quark masses and mixing angles are explained by effective Yukawa couplings, generated by higher dimensional operators involving quarks and Higgs doublets. Modified Higgs couplings yield important effects on the production cross sections and decay rates of the light Standard Model like Higgs. In addition, flavor changing neutral currents arise at tree-level and lead to strong constraints from meson-antimeson mixing. Remarkably, flavor constraints turn out to prefer a region in parameter spacemore » that is in excellent agreement with the one preferred by recent Higgs precision measurements at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Direct searches for extra scalars at the LHC lead to further constraints. Precise predictions for the production and decay modes of the additional Higgs bosons are derived, and we present benchmark scenarios for searches at the LHC Run II. As a result, flavor breaking at the electroweak scale as well as strong coupling effects demand a UV completion at the scale of a few TeV, possibly within the reach of the LHC.« less

  7. Minimal semi-annihilating Bbb ZN scalar dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bélanger, Geneviève; Kannike, Kristjan; Pukhov, Alexander; Raidal, Martti

    2014-06-01

    We study the dark matter from an inert doublet and a complex scalar singlet stabilized by Bbb ZN symmetries. This field content is the minimal one that allows dimensionless semi-annihilation couplings for N > 2. We consider explicitly the Bbb Z3 and Bbb Z4 cases and take into account constraints from perturbativity, unitarity, vacuum stability, necessity for the electroweak Bbb ZN preserving vacuum to be the global minimum, electroweak precision tests, upper limits from direct detection and properties of the Higgs boson. Co-annihilation and semi-annihilation of dark sector particles as well as dark matter conversion significantly modify the cosmic abundance and direct detection phenomenology.

  8. Electroweak Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschos, E. A.

    2005-01-01

    The electroweak theory unifies two basic forces of nature: the weak force and electromagnetism. This book is a concise introduction to the structure of the electroweak theory and its applications. It describes the structure and properties of field theories with global and local symmetries, leading to the construction of the standard model. It describes the new particles and processes predicted by the theory, and compares them with experimental results. It also covers neutral currents, the properties of W and Z bosons, the properties of quarks and mesons containing heavy quarks, neutrino oscillations, CP-asymmetries in K, D, and B meson decays, and the search for Higgs particles. Each chapter contains problems, stemming from the long teaching experience of the author, to supplement the text. This will be of great interest to graduate students and researchers in elementary particle physics. Password protected solutions are available to lecturers at www.cambridge.org/9780521860987. Each chapter has an introduction highlighting its contents and giving a historical perspective. Chapters are cross-referenced, interrelating concepts and sections of the book. Contains 49 exercises

  9. Electroweak asymmetries from SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Bellodi, G.

    2002-06-01

    We present a summary of the results on electroweak asymmetries performed by the SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Most of these results are final and are based, unless otherwise stated, on the full 1993-1998 data set of approximately 550,000 hadronic decays of Z{sup 0} bosons, produced with an average electron beam polarization of 73%.

  10. Scalar correlator at [symbol: see text](alpha(s)4), Higgs boson decay into bottom quarks, and bounds on the light-quark masses.

    PubMed

    Baikov, P A; Chetyrkin, K G; Kühn, J H

    2006-01-13

    We compute, for the first time, the absorptive part of the massless correlator of two quark scalar currents in five loops. As physical applications, we consider the [symbol: see text](alpha(s)4) corrections to the decay rate of the standard model Higgs boson into quarks, as well as the constraints on the strange quark mass following from QCD sum rules.

  11. On concise hypotheses for the interpretation of a wide scalar resonance as gauge boson binary in QCD → some new analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkowski, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This work aims to give some answers to questions raised at QCD2008 [P. Minkowski, 'On concise hypotheses for the interpretation of a wide scalar resonance as gauge boson binary in QCD', contribution to QCD2008, Montpellier, 6.-13. July 2008, URL : http://www.mink.itp.unibe.ch in variationsQCD2008.pdf].

  12. A few words about resonances in the electroweak effective Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosell, Ignasi; Pich, Antonio; Santos, Joaquín; Sanz-Cillero, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to a widely spread believe, we have demonstrated that strongly coupled electroweak models including both a light Higgs-like boson and massive spin-1 resonances are not in conflict with experimental constraints on the oblique S and T parameters. We use an effective Lagrangian implementing the chiral symmetry breaking SU (2)L ⊗ SU (2)R → SU (2)L + R that contains the Standard Model gauge bosons coupled to the electroweak Goldstones, one Higgs-like scalar state h with mass mh = 126 GeV and the lightest vector and axial-vector resonance multiplets V and A. We have considered the one-loop calculation of S and T in order to study the viability of these strongly-coupled scenarios, being short-distance constraints and dispersive relations the main ingredients of the calculation. Once we have constrained the resonance parameters, we do a first approach to the determination of the low energy constants of the electroweak effective theory at low energies (without resonances). We show this determination in the case of the purely Higgsless bosonic Lagrangian.

  13. Gauge-free electroweak theory: Radiative effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit; Majumdar, Parthasarathi

    2011-04-15

    A recent reformulation of the scalar-vector sector of standard electroweak theory (without a Higgs potential), in terms of manifestly SU(2){sub W} gauge-invariant variables, is extended so that all field variables in the action are manifestly free of the residual U(1){sub em} gauge transformations as well. Functional evaluation of the one-loop gauge-free effective Higgs potential is shown to precisely cancel effects due to the local functional measure of the Higgs field found earlier. The implications for the classical interpretation of the Higgs scalar as the dilaton field in a background conformal gravity theory are discussed. The Higgs scalar is shown to radiatively acquire a one-loop vacuum expectation value which gives masses to the W and Z bosons but not to photons, without any notion of ''spontaneous gauge symmetry breaking'' appearing anywhere. Further, the renormalization scale is fixed in this theory by requiring that W and Z boson masses coincide with their experimentally measured values, thereby precluding any ''naturalness'' problem usually associated with uncontrolled running of such a scale.

  14. Diphoton decay for a 750 GeV scalar boson in a SU(6)⊗U(1)X model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, S. F.; Martinez, R.; Ochoa, F.; Sierra, C. F.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a new SU (6) ⊗ U(1)X GUT model free from anomalies, with a 750 GeV scalar candidate which can decay into two photons, compatible with the recent diphoton signal reported by ATLAS and CMS collaborations. This model gives masses to all fermions and may explain the 750 GeV signal through one loop decays to γγ with charged vector and charged Higgs bosons, as well as up- and electron-like exotic particles that arise naturally from the condition of cancellation of anomalies of the SU (6) ⊗ U(1)X group. We obtain, for different width approximations, allowed mass regions from 900 GeV to 3 TeV for the exotic up-like quark, in agreement with ATLAS and CMS collaborations data.

  15. Amplitudes for massive vector and scalar bosons in spontaneously-broken gauge theory from the CHY representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naculich, Stephen G.

    2015-09-01

    In the formulation of Cachazo, He, and Yuan, tree-level amplitudes for massless particles in gauge theory and gravity can be expressed as rational functions of the Lorentz invariants k a · k b , ɛ a · k b , and ɛ a · ɛ b , valid in any number of spacetime dimensions. We use dimensional reduction of higher-dimensional amplitudes of particles with internal momentum κ to obtain amplitudes for massive particles in lower dimensions. In the case of gauge theory, we argue that these massive amplitudes belong to a theory in which the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken by an adjoint Higgs field. Consequently, we show that tree-level n-point amplitudes containing massive vector and scalar bosons in this theory can be obtained by simply replacing k a · k b with k a · k b - κ a κ b in the corresponding massless amplitudes, where the masses of the particles are given by | κ a |.

  16. Search for dimuon decays of a light scalar boson in radiative transitions Upsilon-->gammaA0.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Petigura, E; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolku, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-08-21

    We search for evidence of a light scalar boson in the radiative decays of the Upsilon(2S) and Upsilon(3S) resonances: Upsilon(2S,3S)-->gammaA0, A0-->mu+mu-. Such a particle appears in extensions of the standard model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in the mass range 0.212 < or = mA0 < or = 9.3 GeV in the samples of 99 x 10(6) Upsilon(2S) and 122 x 10(6) Upsilon(3S) decays collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory and set stringent upper limits on the effective coupling of the b quark to the A0. We also limit the dimuon branching fraction of the etab meson: B(etab-->mu+mu-)<0.9% at 90% confidence level. PMID:19792717

  17. Electroweak baryogenesis with anomalous Higgs couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Wu, Lei; Yue, Jason

    2016-04-01

    We investigate feasibility of efficient baryogenesis at the electroweak scale within the effective field theory framework based on a non-linear realisation of the electroweak gauge symmetry. In this framework the LHC Higgs boson is described by a singlet scalar field, which, therefore, admits new interactions. Assuming that Higgs couplings with the eletroweak gauge bosons are as in the Standard Model, we demonstrate that the Higgs cubic coupling and the CP-violating Higgs-top quark anomalous couplings alone may drive the a strongly first-order phase transition. The distinguished feature of this transition is that the anomalous Higgs vacuum expectation value is generally non-zero in both phases. We identify a range of anomalous couplings, consistent with current experimental data, where sphaleron rates are sufficiently fast in the `symmetric' phase and are suppressed in the `broken' phase and demonstrate that the desired baryon asymmetry can indeed be generated in this framework. This range of the Higgs anomalous couplings can be further constrained from the LHC Run 2 data and be probed at high luminosity LHC and beyond.

  18. On the renormalization of the electroweak chiral Lagrangian with a Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavela, M. B.; Kanshin, K.; Machado, P. A. N.; Saa, S.

    2015-03-01

    We consider the scalar sector of the effective non-linear electroweak Lagrangian with a light "Higgs" particle. For a leading order Lagrangian, the complete one-loop off-shell renormalization procedure is performed, including the effects of a finite Higgs mass. This determines the complete set of independent chiral invariant scalar counterterms required for consistency; these include bosonic operators often disregarded. A novel general parametrization of the Goldstone boson matrix is proposed, which reduces to the various usual ones for specific values of its parameter. Furthermore, new counterterms involving the Higgs field which are apparently chiral non-invariant are identified in the perturbative analysis. A redefinition of the Goldstone boson fields which absorbs all chiral non-invariant counterterms is then explicitly determined. The physical results translate into renormalization group equations which may be useful when comparing future Higgs data at different energies.

  19. Dark matter as the trigger of strong electroweak phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Talal Ahmed; Nemevšek, Miha; Senjanović, Goran; Zhang, Yue E-mail: miha@ictp.it E-mail: yuezhang@ictp.it

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new possible connection between dark matter relic density and baryon asymmetry of the universe. The portal between standard model sector and dark matter not only controls the relic density and detections of dark matter, but also allows the dark matter to trigger the first order electroweak phase transition. We discuss systematically possible scalar dark matter candidates, starting from a real singlet to arbitrary high representations. We show that the simplest realization is provided by a doublet, and that strong first-order electroweak phase transition implies a lower bound on the dark matter direct detection rate. The mass of dark matter lies between 45 and 80 GeV, allowing for an appreciable invisible decay width of the Standard Model Higgs boson, which is constrained to be lighter than 130 GeV for the sake of the strong phase transition.

  20. Light dark matter, naturalness, and the radiative origin of the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bardeen, William A.; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph D.

    2015-01-09

    We study classically scale invariant models in which the Standard Model Higgs mass term is replaced in the Lagrangian by a Higgs portal coupling to a complex scalar field of a dark sector. We focus on models that are weakly coupled with the quartic scalar couplings nearly vanishing at the Planck scale. The dark sector contains fermions and scalars charged under dark SU(2) × U(1) gauge interactions. Radiative breaking of the dark gauge group triggers electroweak symmetry breaking through the Higgs portal coupling. Requiring both a Higgs boson mass of 125.5 GeV and stability of the Higgs potential up to the Planck scale implies that the radiative breaking of the dark gauge group occurs at the TeV scale. We present a particular model which features a long-range abelian dark force. The dominant dark matter component is neutral dark fermions, with the correct thermal relic abundance, and in reach of future direct detection experiments. The model also has lighter stable dark fermions charged under the dark force, with observable effects on galactic-scale structure. Collider signatures include a dark sector scalar boson with mass ≲ 250 GeV that decays through mixing with the Higgs boson, and can be detected at the LHC. As a result, the Higgs boson, as well as the new scalar, may have significant invisible decays into dark sector particles.

  1. Light dark matter, naturalness, and the radiative origin of the electroweak scale

    DOE PAGES

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bardeen, William A.; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph D.

    2015-01-09

    We study classically scale invariant models in which the Standard Model Higgs mass term is replaced in the Lagrangian by a Higgs portal coupling to a complex scalar field of a dark sector. We focus on models that are weakly coupled with the quartic scalar couplings nearly vanishing at the Planck scale. The dark sector contains fermions and scalars charged under dark SU(2) × U(1) gauge interactions. Radiative breaking of the dark gauge group triggers electroweak symmetry breaking through the Higgs portal coupling. Requiring both a Higgs boson mass of 125.5 GeV and stability of the Higgs potential up tomore » the Planck scale implies that the radiative breaking of the dark gauge group occurs at the TeV scale. We present a particular model which features a long-range abelian dark force. The dominant dark matter component is neutral dark fermions, with the correct thermal relic abundance, and in reach of future direct detection experiments. The model also has lighter stable dark fermions charged under the dark force, with observable effects on galactic-scale structure. Collider signatures include a dark sector scalar boson with mass ≲ 250 GeV that decays through mixing with the Higgs boson, and can be detected at the LHC. As a result, the Higgs boson, as well as the new scalar, may have significant invisible decays into dark sector particles.« less

  2. Unparticles and electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong-Phil

    2008-11-23

    We investigate a scalar potential inspired by the unparticle sector for the electroweak symmetry breaking. The scalar potential contains the interaction between the standard model fields and unparticle sector. It is described by the non-integral power of fields that originates from the nontrivial scaling dimension of the unparticle operator. It is found that the electroweak symmetry is broken at tree level when the interaction is turned on. The scale invariance of unparticle sector is also broken simultaneously, resulting in a physical Higgs and a new lighter scalar particle.

  3. Dynamical Electroweak Symmetry Breaking with a Heavy Fermion in Light of Recent LHC Results

    DOE PAGES

    Hung, Pham Q.

    2013-01-01

    The recent announcement of a discovery of a possible Higgs-like particle—its spin and parity are yet to be determined—at the LHC with a mass of 126 GeV necessitates a fresh look at the nature of the electroweak symmetry breaking, in particular if this newly-discovered particle will turn out to have the quantum numbers of a Standard Model Higgs boson. Even if it were a 0 + scalar with the properties expected for a SM Higgs boson, there is still the quintessential hierarchy problem that one has to deal with and which, by itself, suggests a new physics energy scale aroundmore » 1 TeV. This paper presents a minireview of one possible scenario: the formation of a fermion-antifermion condensate coming from a very heavy fourth generation, carrying the quantum number of the SM Higgs field, and thus breaking the electroweak symmetry.« less

  4. Search for a very light NMSSM Higgs boson produced in decays of the 125 GeV scalar boson and decaying into τ leptons in pp collisions at √{s}=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Rougny, R.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Awad, A.; Mahrous, A.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.

    2016-01-01

    A search for a very light Higgs boson decaying into a pair of τ leptons is presented within the framework of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. This search is based on a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions collected by the CMS experiment at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The signal is defined by the production of either of the two lightest scalars, h1 or h2, via gluon-gluon fusion and subsequent decay into a pair of the lightest Higgs bosons, a1 or h1. The h1 or h2 boson is identified with the observed state at a mass of 125 GeV. The analysis searches for decays of the a1 (h1) states into pairs of τ leptons and covers a mass range for the a1 (h1) boson of 4 to 8 GeV. The search reveals no significant excess in data above standard model background expectations, and an upper limit is set on the signal production cross section times branching fraction as a function of the a1 (h1) boson mass. The 95% confidence level limit ranges from 4.5 pb at {m}_{{a}_1} ({m}_{{h}_1})=8 GeV to 10.3 pb at {m}_{{a}_1} ({m}_{{h}_1})=5 GeV. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Search for a very light NMSSM Higgs boson produced in decays of the 125 GeV scalar boson and decaying into $$\\tau$$ leptons in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-01-13

    Our search for a very light Higgs boson decaying into a pair of t leptons is presented within the framework of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. This search is based on a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions collected by the CMS experiment at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The signal is defined by the production of either of the two lightest scalars, h1 or h2, via gluon-gluon fusion and subsequent decay into a pair of the lightest Higgs bosons, a1 or h1. The h1 or h2 boson is identified with themore » observed state at a mass of 125 GeV. The analysis searches for decays of the a1 (h1) states into pairs of t leptons and covers a mass range for the a1 (h1) boson of 4 to 8 GeV. Furthermore, the search reveals no significant excess in data above standard model background expectations, and an upper limit is set on the signal production cross section times branching fraction as a function of the a1 (h1) boson mass. The 95% confidence level limit ranges from 4.5 pb at ma1 (mh1 ) = 8 GeV to 10.3 pb at ma1 (mh1 ) = 5 GeV.« less

  6. Fit to Electroweak Precision Data

    SciTech Connect

    Erler, Jens

    2006-11-17

    A brief review of electroweak precision data from LEP, SLC, the Tevatron, and low energies is presented. The global fit to all data including the most recent results on the masses of the top quark and the W boson reinforces the preference for a relatively light Higgs boson. I will also give an outlook on future developments at the Tevatron Run II, CEBAF, the LHC, and the ILC.

  7. Enabling electroweak baryogenesis through dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, Marek; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Wells, James D.

    2016-06-01

    We study the impact on electroweak baryogenesis from a swifter cosmological expansion induced by dark matter. We detail the experimental bounds that one can place on models that realize it, and we investigate the modifications of these bounds that result from a non-standard cosmological history. The modifications can be sizeable if the expansion rate of the Universe increases by several orders of magnitude. We illustrate the impact through the example of scalar field dark matter, which can alter the cosmological history enough to enable a strong-enough first-order phase transition in the Standard Model when it is supplemented by a dimension six operator directly modifying the Higgs boson potential. We show that due to the modified cosmological history, electroweak baryogenesis can be realized, while keeping deviations of the triple Higgs coupling below HL-LHC sensitivies. The required scale of new physics to effectuate a strong-enough first order phase transition can change by as much as twenty percent as the expansion rate increases by six orders of magnitude.

  8. Associated production of the doubly-charged scalar pair with the Higgs boson in the Georgi-Machacek model at the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yi; Bi, Yan-Ping; Shen, Jie-Fen

    2016-08-01

    Besides the SM-like Higgs boson h, the Georgi-Machacek (GM) model predicts the existence of doubly-charged Higgs bosons H5±± in the 5-plet representation, which can be seen the typical particles in this model. We first used the latest Higgs boson diphoton signal strength data to find the allowed region at 2σ confidence level on the plane of the scalar mass values mH and the triple scalar coupling parameter ghHH, and then focus on the study of the triple Higgs production process e+e- → h H5++ H5-- at the future International Linear collider (ILC). Our numerical results show that, the values of the production cross section are very sensitive to the triple Higgs coupling strength ghHH and can reach the level several fb in the reasonable parameter space. Considering the same-sign diboson decay H5±± →W±W±, the expected discovery reach at the future ILC experiments are also studied.

  9. Next-to-leading log resummation of scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs boson differential cross sections at the CERN LHC and Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Field, B.

    2004-09-01

    The region of small transverse momentum in qq- and gg-initiated processes must be studied in the framework of resummation to account for the large, logarithmically enhanced contributions to physical observables. In this paper, we will calculate the fixed order next-to-leading order perturbative total and differential cross sections for both a Standard Model scalar Higgs boson and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model's pseudoscalar Higgs boson in the Heavy Quark Effective Theory where the mass of the top quark is taken to be infinite. Resummation coefficients B{sub g}{sup (2)},C{sub gg}{sup (2)} for the total cross-section resummation for the pseudoscalar case are given, as well as C{sub gg}{sup (1)} for the differential cross section.

  10. Latest Electroweak Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, Mark

    2010-05-01

    The latest results in electroweak physics from proton anti-proton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron recorded by the CDF detector are presented. The results provide constraints on parton distribution functions, the mass of the Higgs boson and beyond the Standard Model physics.

  11. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.L.; Burdman, G.; Chivukula, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models.

  12. Top, Higgs and Electroweak Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, Paul L.

    2006-11-17

    Hadron colliders are, and will continue to be, an excellent venue for testing the standard model of particle physics. We describe the status of top-quark physics and the direct search for a standard model Higgs boson. We briefly describe the use of Tevatron and LEP data to indirectly infer the standard model Higgs mass through precision electroweak measurements.

  13. Stealth dark matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X.-Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; Rinaldi, E.; Schaich, D.; Schroeder, C.; Syritsyn, S.; Vranas, P.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.; Lattice Strong Dynamics LSD Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    We present a new model of stealth dark matter: a composite baryonic scalar of an S U (ND) strongly coupled theory with even ND≥4 . All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vectorlike representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to S U (4 ), and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass mB≳300 GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. We briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.

  14. Effects of Scalar and Pseudoscalar Higgs Bosons in the Process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} bb-bar{nu}{nu}-bar at the LEP II Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Likhoded, A.A.; Chalov, A.E.

    2005-12-01

    The possibility of setting constraints on the couplings of the scalar or pseudoscalar Higgs boson to b quarks on the basis of data on the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} bb-bar{nu}{nu}-bar at the LEP II collider is investigated. The mixing of the scalar and the hypothetical pseudoscalar Higgs boson in the Hbb-bar vertex is parametrized in the form (m{sub b}/v)(a + i{gamma}{sub 5}b). An analysis of the differential distributions for the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} bb-bar{nu}{nu}-bar reveals that the contribution of the fusion subprocess WW {yields} H in the channel involving an electron neutrino enhances the sensitivity of data to the parameters under analysis. It is shown that the LEP II data at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV and {integral} Ldt = 600 pb{sup -1} per experiment would make it possible to constrain the parameters {delta}a=a - 1 and b as follows: -0.75 {<=} {delta}a {<=} 1.4 at b = 0 and free {delta}a and -0.97 {<=} b {<=} 0.97 at {delta}a = 0 and free b.

  15. Cosmological Higgs-Axion Interplay for a Naturally Small Electroweak Scale.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, J R; Grojean, C; Panico, G; Pomarol, A; Pujolàs, O; Servant, G

    2015-12-18

    Recently, a new mechanism to generate a naturally small electroweak scale has been proposed. It exploits the coupling of the Higgs boson to an axionlike field and a long era in the early Universe where the axion unchains a dynamical screening of the Higgs mass. We present a new realization of this idea with the new feature that it leaves no sign of new physics at the electroweak scale, and up to a rather large scale, 10^{9}  GeV, except for two very light and weakly coupled axionlike states. One of the scalars can be a viable dark matter candidate. Such a cosmological Higgs-axion interplay could be tested with a number of experimental strategies.

  16. Probing the μνSSM with light scalars, pseudoscalars and neutralinos from the decay of a SM-like Higgs boson at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pradipta; López-Fogliani, Daniel E.; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Muñoz, Carlos; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz

    2014-11-01

    The " μ from ν" supersymmetric standard model ( μνSSM) can accommodate the newly discovered Higgs-like scalar boson with a mass around 125 GeV. This model provides a solution to the μ-problem and simultaneously reproduces correct neutrino physics by the simple use of right-handed neutrino superfields. These new superfields together with the introduced R-parity violation can produce novel and characteristic signatures of the μνSSM at the LHC. We explore the signatures produced through two-body Higgs decays into the new states, provided that these states lie below in the mass spectrum. For example, a pair produced light neutralinos depending on the associated decay length can give rise to displaced multi-leptons/taus/jets/photons with small/moderate missing transverse energy. In the same spirit, a Higgs-like scalar decaying to a pair of scalars/pseudoscalars can produce final states with prompt multi-leptons/taus/jets/photons.

  17. Particle Physics after the Higgs-Boson Discovery: Opportunities for the Large Hadron Collider

    DOE PAGES

    Quigg, Chris

    2015-08-24

    The first run of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN brought the discovery of the Higgs boson, an apparently elementary scalar particle with a mass of 125 GeV, the avatar of the mechanism that hides the electroweak symmetry. Then, a new round of experimentation is beginning, with the energy of the proton–proton colliding beams raised to 6.5 TeV per beam, from 4 TeV at the end of the first run. I summarize what we have learned about the Higgs boson, and calls attention to some issues that will be among our central concerns in the near future.

  18. The electroweak axion, dark energy, inflation and baryonic matter

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    2015-03-15

    In a previous paper [1], the standard model was generalized to include an electroweak axion which carries baryon plus lepton number, B + L. It was shown that such a model naturally gives the observed value of the dark energy, if the scale of explicit baryon number violation A was chosen to be of the order of the Planck mass. In this paper, we consider the effect of the modulus of the axion field. Such a field must condense in order to generate the standard Goldstone boson associated with the phase of the axion field. This condensation breaks baryon number. We argue that this modulus might be associated with inflation. If an additional B − L violating scalar is introduced with a mass similar to that of the modulus of the axion field, we argue that decays of particles associated with this field might generate an acceptable baryon asymmetry.

  19. Electroweak vacuum stability and diphoton excess at 750 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jue; Zhou, Shun

    2016-08-01

    Recently, both ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) announced their observations of an excess of diphoton events around the invariant mass of 750 GeV with a local significance of 3.6σ and 2.6σ, respectively. In this paper, we interpret the diphoton excess as the on-shell production of a real singlet scalar in the pp → S → γγ channel. To accommodate the observed production rate, we further introduce a vector-like fermion F, which carries both color and electric charges. The viable regions of model parameters are explored for this simple extension of the Standard Model (SM). Moreover, we revisit the problem of electroweak vacuum stability in the same scenario, and find that the requirement for the electroweak vacuum stability up to high energy scales imposes serious constraints on the Yukawa coupling of the vector-like fermion and the quartic couplings of the SM Higgs boson and the new singlet scalar. Consequently, a successful explanation for the diphoton excess and the absolute stability of electroweak vacuum cannot be achieved simultaneously in this economical setup. Supported by Innovation Program of the Institute of High Energy Physics (Y4515570U1), National Youth Thousand Talents Program, and CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP)

  20. Electroweak Baryogenesis with Anomalous Higgs Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Wu, Lei; Yue, Jason

    2016-07-01

    In non-linear realisation of the electroweak gauge symmetry, the LHC Higgs boson can be assumed to be a singlet under SU(2)L ⊗ U(1)Y. In such scenario, the Standard Model particle content can be kept but new sets of couplings are allowed. We identify a range of anomalous Higgs cubic and the 𝒞𝒫-violating Higgs-top quark couplings that leads to first order phase transition and successful baryogenesis at the electroweak scale.

  1. Higgs boson as a top-mode pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukano, Hidenori S.; Kurachi, Masafumi; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2014-09-01

    In the spirit of the top-quark condensation, we propose a model which has a naturally light composite Higgs boson, "tHiggs" (ht0), to be identified with the 126 GeV Higgs discovered at the LHC. The tHiggs, a bound state of the top quark and its flavor (vectorlike) partner, emerges as a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (NGB), "top-mode pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson," together with the exact NGBs to be absorbed into the W and Z bosons as well as another (heavier) top-mode pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons (CP-odd composite scalar, At0). Those five composite (exact/pseudo-) NGBs are dynamically produced simultaneously by a single supercritical four-fermion interaction having U(3)×U(1) symmetry which includes the electroweak symmetry, where the vacuum is aligned by a small explicit breaking term so as to break the symmetry down to a subgroup, U(2)×U(1)', in a way not to retain the electroweak symmetry, in sharp contrast to the little Higgs models. The explicit breaking term for the vacuum alignment gives rise to a mass of the tHiggs, which is protected by the symmetry and hence naturally controlled against radiative corrections. Realistic top-quark mass is easily realized similarly to the top-seesaw mechanism by introducing an extra (subcritical) four-fermion coupling which explicitly breaks the residual U(2)'×U(1)' symmetry with U(2)' being an extra symmetry besides the above U(3)L×U(1). We present a phenomenological Lagrangian of the top-mode pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons along with the Standard Model particles, which will be useful for the study of the collider phenomenology. The coupling property of the tHiggs is shown to be consistent with the currently available data reported from the LHC. Several phenomenological consequences and constraints from experiments are also addressed.

  2. Electroweak results from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.; D0 Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    Preliminary results from D0 are presented on properties of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} electroweak gauge bosons, using final states containing electrons and muons. In particular, preliminary measurements of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections with decay into final states containing electrons are shown and a status report on the determination of M{sub w}/M{sub z} is given.

  3. Low-energy electroweak model from E6×E'6 preons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Sutapa

    1988-03-01

    A low-energy electroweak symmetry group is proposed from an E6×E'6 preon model which leads to SU(3)C×SU(2)L×SU(2)R×U(1)YL×U(1)YR where SU(2)R can either be the usual left-right-symmetric model group or an ``inert SU(2)R'' with electromagnetically neutral gauge bosons. Additional discrete symmetries proposed in E6 models are obtained as a transformation of preons and conservation of quantum numbers. Among the results of this model are (i) the existence of two effective scales, metacolor (ΛM~1014 GeV) and hypercolor ΛH (1 TeV), (ii) preon substructures for vector leptons (both right and left handed), (iii) B-L number (1/3 for the g quark, (iv) neutral composite Higgs scalar bosons, and (v) small mixing angles between (E-d,e-),(d,g) states and neutrino mixing.

  4. Electroweak physics results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    An overview of recent electroweak physics results from the Tevatron is given. Properties of the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities are presented. In particular, measurements of the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections, the W-charge asymmetry and the measurement of the W-mass are summarized. Gauge boson self interactions are measured by studying gauge boson pair production and Emits on anomalous gauge boson couplings are discussed.

  5. Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons in Weak Boson Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hollik, Wolfgang; Plehn, Tilman; Rauch, Michael; Rzehak, Heidi

    2009-03-06

    We compute the complete supersymmetric next-to-leading-order corrections to the production of a light Higgs boson in weak-boson fusion. The size of the electroweak corrections is of similar order as the next-to-leading-order corrections in the standard model. The supersymmetric QCD corrections turn out to be significantly smaller than expected and than their electroweak counterparts. These corrections are an important ingredient to a precision analysis of the (supersymmetric) Higgs sector at the LHC, either as a known correction factor or as a contribution to the theory error.

  6. Electroweak relaxation from finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Edward

    2015-11-01

    We study theories which naturally select a vacuum with parametrically small Electroweak Scale due to finite temperature effects in the early universe. In particular, there is a scalar with an approximate shift symmetry broken by a technically natural small coupling to the Higgs, and a temperature dependent potential. As the temperature of the universe drops, the scalar follows the minimum of its potential altering the Higgs mass squared parameter. The scalar also has a periodic potential with amplitude proportional to the Higgs expectation value, which traps it in a vacuum with a small Electroweak Scale. The required temperature dependence of the potential can occur through strong coupling effects in a hidden sector that are suppressed at high temperatures. Alternatively, it can be generated perturbatively from a one-loop thermal potential. In both cases, for the scalar to be displaced, a hidden sector must be reheated to temperatures significantly higher than the visible sector. However this does not violate observational constraints provided the hidden sector energy density is transferred to the visible sector without disrupting big bang nucleosynthesis. We also study how the mechanism can be implemented when the visible sector is completed to the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model at a high scale. Models with a UV cutoff of 10 TeV and no fields taking values over a range greater than 1012 GeV are possible, although the scalar must have a range of order 108 times the effective decay constant in the periodic part of its potential.

  7. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron. Electroweak Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Schellman, Heidi; Sekaric, Jadranka

    2015-02-17

    We summarize an extensive Tevatron (1984–2011) electroweak physics program that involves a variety of W and Z boson precision measurements. The relevance of these studies using single and associated gauge boson production to our understanding of the electroweak sector, quantum chromodynamics and searches for new physics is emphasized. Furthermore,we discuss the importance of the W boson mass measurement, the W/Z boson distributions and asymmetries, and diboson studies. We also highlight the recent Tevatron measurements and prospects for the final Tevatron measurements.

  8. The W Boson Mass Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.

    2016-10-01

    The measurement of the W boson mass has been growing in importance as its precision has improved, along with the precision of other electroweak observables and the top quark mass. Over the last decade, the measurement of the W boson mass has been led at hadron colliders. Combined with the precise measurement of the top quark mass at hadron colliders, the W boson mass helped to pin down the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson through its induced radiative correction on the W boson mass. With the discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its mass, the electroweak sector of the Standard Model is over-constrained. Increasing the precision of the W boson mass probes new physics at the TeV-scale. We summarize an extensive Tevatron (1984-2011) program to measure the W boson mass at the CDF and Dø experiments. We highlight the recent Tevatron measurements and prospects for the final Tevatron measurements.

  9. Warped electroweak breaking without custodial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrer, Joan A.; von Gersdorff, Gero; Quirós, Mariano

    2011-03-01

    We propose an alternative to the introduction of an extra gauge (custodial) symmetry to suppress the contribution of KK modes to the T parameter in warped theories of electroweak breaking. The mechanism is based on a general class of warped 5D metrics and a Higgs propagating in the bulk. The metrics are nearly AdS in the UV region but depart from AdS in the IR region, towards where KK fluctuations are mainly localized, and have a singularity outside the slice between the UV and IR branes. This gravitational background is generated by a bulk stabilizing scalar field which triggers a natural solution to the hierarchy problem. Depending on the model parameters, gauge-boson KK modes can be consistent with present bounds on EWPT for mKK≳1 TeV at 95% CL. The model contains a light Higgs mode which unitarizes the four-dimensional theory. The reduction in the precision observables can be traced back to a large wave function renormalization for this mode.

  10. The scalar singlet-triplet dark matter model

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, O.; Van der Bij, J.J. E-mail: vdbij@physik.uni-freiburg.de

    2014-01-01

    We consider a model for cold dark matter, which combines a real scalar singlet and a real scalar SU(2){sub L} triplet field, both of which are residing in the odd representation of a global Z{sub 2} symmetry. The parameter space of the model is constrained by the inferred dark matter abundance from the WMAP and Planck data, the most recent results from the direct dark matter search experiment LUX, the Z boson decay width from LEP-I and perturbativity of the coupling parameters. The phenomenology of the remaining parameter space is studied. We find that the model allows for DM masses near the electroweak scale and a variety of decay scenarios.

  11. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking in Historical Perspective

    DOE PAGES

    Quigg, Chris

    2015-10-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson is a major milestone in our progress toward understanding the natural world. A particular aim of my review is to show how diverse ideas came together in the conception of electroweak symmetry breaking that led up to the discovery. Furthermore, I survey what we know now that we did not know before, what properties of the Higgs boson remain to be established, and what new questions we may now hope to address.

  12. Pursuing the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking: a 'Bayesian Physics' argument for sqrt(s) <~; 600 GeV e+e- collider

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, G.L.; Wells, James D.

    2000-08-09

    High-energy data has been accumulating over the last ten years, and it should not be ignored when making decisions about the future experimental program. In particular, we argue that the electroweak data collected at LEP, SLC and Tevatron indicate a light scalar particle with mass less than 500 GeV. This result is based on considering a wide variety of theories including the Standard Model, supersymmetry, large extra dimensions, and composite models. We argue that a high luminosity, 600 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider would then be the natural choice to feel confident about finding and studying states connected to electroweak symmetry breaking. We also argue from the data that worrying about resonances at multi-TeV energies as the only signal for electroweak symmetry breaking is not as important a discovery issue for the next generation of colliders. Such concerns should perhaps be replaced with more relevant discovery issues such as a Higgs boson that decays invisibly, and ''new physics'' that could conspire with a heavier Higgs boson to accommodate precision electroweak data. An e{sup +}e{sup -} collider with {radical}s {approx}< 600 GeV is ideally suited to cover these possibilities.

  13. Search for Di-Muon Decays of a Light Scalar Higgs Boson in Radiative Upsilon(1S) Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Vindhyawasini

    2013-08-01

    We search for di-muon decays of a low-mass Higgs boson (A0) in the fully reconstructed decay chain of Υ(2S, 3S ) → π+π-Υ(1S ), Υ(1S ) → γA0, A0 → μ+μ+. The A0 is predicted by several extensions of the Standard Model (SM), including the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM). NMSSM introduces a CP-odd light Higgs boson whose mass could be less than 10 GeV/c2. The data samples used in this analysis contain 92.8 × 106 Υ(2S ) and 116.8 × 106 Υ(3S ) events collected by the BABAR detector. The Υ(1S ) sample is selected by tagging the pion pair in the Υ(2S, 3S ) → π+π-Υ(1S ) transitions. We find no evidence for A0 production and set 90% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits on the product branching fraction B(Υ(1S ) → γA0) × B(A0 → μ+μ-) in the range of (0.28 - 9.7) × 10-6 for 0.212 ≤ mA0 ≤ 9.20 GeV/c2. We also combine our results with previous BABAR results of Υ(2S, 3S ) → γA0, A0 → μ+μ- to set limits on the effective coupling ( fΥ) of the b-quark to the A0, f 2 Υ × B(A0 → μ+μ-), at the level of (0.29- 40) × 10-6 for 0.212 ≤ mA0 ≤ 9.2 GeV/c2.

  14. Synergy between measurements of gravitational waves and the triple-Higgs coupling in probing the first-order electroweak phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashino, Katsuya; Kakizaki, Mitsuru; Kanemura, Shinya; Matsui, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    Probing the Higgs potential and new physics behind the electroweak symmetry breaking is one of the most important issues of particle physics. In particular, the nature of the electroweak phase transition is essential for understanding the physics of the early Universe, such that the strongly first-order phase transition is required for a successful scenario of electroweak baryogenesis. The strongly first-order phase transition is expected to be tested by precisely measuring the triple Higgs boson coupling at future colliders like the International Linear Collider. It can also be explored via the spectrum of stochastic gravitational waves to be measured at future space-based interferometers such as eLISA and DECIGO. We discuss the complementarity of both the methods in testing the strongly first-order phase transition of the electroweak symmetry in models with additional isospin singlet scalar fields with and without classical scale invariance. We find that they are synergetic in identifying specific models of electroweak symmetry breaking in more detail.

  15. SU(8) family unification with boson-fermion balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Stephen L.

    2014-08-01

    We formulate an SU(8) family unification model motivated by requiring that the theory should incorporate the graviton, gravitinos, and the fermions and gauge fields of the standard model, with boson-fermion balance. Gauge field SU(8) anomalies cancel between the gravitinos and spin ½ fermions. The 56 of scalars breaks SU(8) to SU(3)family × SU(5) × U(1)/Z5, with the fermion representation content needed for "flipped" SU(5) with three families, and with residual scalars in the 10 and /line{10} representations that break flipped SU(5) to the standard model. Dynamical symmetry breaking can account for the generation of 5 representation scalars needed to break the electroweak group. Yukawa couplings of the 56 scalars to the fermions are forbidden by chiral and gauge symmetries, so in the first stage of SU(8) breaking fermions remain massless. In the limit of vanishing gauge coupling, there are N = 1 and N = 8 supersymmetries relating the scalars to the fermions, which restrict the form of scalar self-couplings and should improve the convergence of perturbation theory, if not making the theory finite and "calculable." In an Appendix we give an analysis of symmetry breaking by a Higgs component, such as the (1, 1)(-15) of the SU(8) 56 under SU(8) ⊃ SU(3) × SU(5) × U(1), which has nonzero U(1) generator.

  16. SU(8) Family Unification with Boson Fermion Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Stephen L.

    2015-03-01

    We formulate an SU(8) family unification model motivated by requiring that the theory should incorporate the graviton, gravitinos, and the fermions and gauge fields of the standard model, with boson.fermion balance. Gauge field SU(8) anomalies cancel between the gravitinos and spin 1/2 fermions. The 56 of scalars breaks SU(8) to SU(3)family×SU(5)×U(1)/Z5, with the fermion representation content needed for "flipped" SU(5) with three families, and with residual scalars in the 10 and overline {10} representations that break flipped SU(5) to the standard model. Dynamical symmetry breaking can account for the generation of 5 representation scalars needed to break the electroweak group. Yukawa couplings of the 56 scalars to the fermions are forbidden by chiral and gauge symmetries, so in the first stage of SU(8) breaking fermions remain massless. In the limit of vanishing gauge coupling, there are N = 1 and N = 8 supersymmetries relating the scalars to the fermions, which restrict the form of scalar self-couplings and should improve the convergence of perturbation theory, if not making the theory finite and "calculable." In an Appendix we give an analysis of symmetry breaking by a Higgs component, such as the (1, 1)(-15) of the SU(8) 56 under SU(8) ⊃ SU(3) × SU(5) × U(1), which has nonzero U(1) generator.

  17. Stealth Dark Matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    DOE PAGES

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X. -Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; et al

    2015-10-23

    We present a new model of "Stealth Dark Matter": a composite baryonic scalar of an SU(ND) strongly coupled theory with even ND ≥ 4. All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vectorlike representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to SU(4), and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements,more » basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass mB ≳ 300 GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. Furthermore, we briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.« less

  18. Stealth Dark Matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    SciTech Connect

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X. -Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; Rinaldi, E.; Schaich, D.; Schroeder, C.; Syritsyn, S.; Vranas, P.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.

    2015-10-23

    We present a new model of "Stealth Dark Matter": a composite baryonic scalar of an SU(ND) strongly coupled theory with even ND ≥ 4. All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vectorlike representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to SU(4), and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass mB ≳ 300 GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. Furthermore, we briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.

  19. Is radiative electroweak symmetry breaking consistent with a 125 GeV Higgs mass?

    PubMed

    Steele, T G; Wang, Zhi-Wei

    2013-04-12

    The mechanism of radiative electroweak symmetry breaking occurs through loop corrections, and unlike conventional symmetry breaking where the Higgs mass is a parameter, the radiatively generated Higgs mass is dynamically predicted. Padé approximations and an averaging method are developed to extend the Higgs mass predictions in radiative electroweak symmetry breaking from five- to nine-loop order in the scalar sector of the standard model, resulting in an upper bound on the Higgs mass of 141 GeV. The mass predictions are well described by a geometric series behavior, converging to an asymptotic Higgs mass of 124 GeV consistent with the recent ATLAS and CMS Collaborations observations. Similarly, we find that the Higgs self-coupling converges to λ=0.23, which is significantly larger than its conventional symmetry breaking counterpart for a 124 GeV Higgs mass. In addition to this significant enhancement of the Higgs self-coupling and HH→HH scattering, we find that Higgs decays to gauge bosons are unaltered and the scattering processes WL(+)WL(+)→HH, ZLZL→HH are also enhanced, providing signals to distinguish conventional and radiative electroweak symmetry breaking mechanisms.

  20. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2015-11-30

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb-1 of pp collision data at √s=7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at √s=8 TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the γγ, ZZ, W W , Zγ, bb, τ τ , and μμ decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplingsmore » with mass. The limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the γγ and ZZ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of mA > 370 GeV in the “hMSSM” simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Results from direct searches for heavy Higgs bosons are also interpreted in the hMSSM. Finally, direct searches for invisible Higgs boson decays in the vector-boson fusion and associated production of a Higgs boson with W/Z (Z → ℓℓ, W/Z → jj) modes are statistically combined to set an upper limit on the Higgs boson invisible branching ratio of 0.25. As a result, the use of the measured visible decay rates in a more general coupling fit improves the upper limit to 0.23, constraining a Higgs portal model of dark matter.« less

  1. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-11-30

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb-1 of pp collision data at √s=7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at √s=8 TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the γγ, ZZ, W W , Zγ, bb, τ τ , and μμ decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplings with mass. The limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the γγ and ZZ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of mA > 370 GeV in the “hMSSM” simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Results from direct searches for heavy Higgs bosons are also interpreted in the hMSSM. Finally, direct searches for invisible Higgs boson decays in the vector-boson fusion and associated production of a Higgs boson with W/Z (Z → ℓℓ, W/Z → jj) modes are statistically combined to set an upper limit on the Higgs boson invisible branching ratio of 0.25. As a result, the use of the measured visible decay rates in a more general coupling fit improves the upper limit to 0.23, constraining a Higgs portal model of dark matter.

  2. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. 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J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. 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X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henkelmann, S.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. 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F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-11-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb-1 of pp collision data at √{s}=7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at √{s}=8 TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the γγ, ZZ, W W , Zγ, bb, τ τ , and μμ decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplings with mass. Limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the γγ and ZZ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of m A > 370 GeV in the "hMSSM" simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Results from direct searches for heavy Higgs bosons are also interpreted in the hMSSM. Direct searches for invisible Higgs boson decays in the vector-boson fusion and associated production of a Higgs boson with W/Z ( Z → ℓℓ, W/Z → jj) modes are statistically combined to set an upper limit on the Higgs boson invisible branching ratio of 0.25. The use of the measured visible decay rates in a more general coupling fit improves the upper limit to 0.23, constraining a Higgs portal model of dark matter. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Minimal semi-annihilating ℤ{sub N} scalar dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bélanger, Geneviève; Kannike, Kristjan; Pukhov, Alexander; Raidal, Martti

    2014-06-10

    We study the dark matter from an inert doublet and a complex scalar singlet stabilized by ℤ{sub N} symmetries. This field content is the minimal one that allows dimensionless semi-annihilation couplings for N>2. We consider explicitly the ℤ{sub 3} and ℤ{sub 4} cases and take into account constraints from perturbativity, unitarity, vacuum stability, necessity for the electroweak ℤ{sub N} preserving vacuum to be the global minimum, electroweak precision tests, upper limits from direct detection and properties of the Higgs boson. Co-annihilation and semi-annihilation of dark sector particles as well as dark matter conversion significantly modify the cosmic abundance and direct detection phenomenology.

  4. History of electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, T. W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In this talk, I recall the history of the development of the unified electroweak theory, incorporating the symmetry-breaking Higgs mechanism, as I saw it from my standpoint as a member of Abdus Salam's group at Imperial College. I start by describing the state of physics in the years after the Second World War, explain how the goal of a unified gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions emerged, the obstacles encountered, in particular the Goldstone theorem, and how they were overcome, followed by a brief account of more recent history, culminating in the historic discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012.

  5. Top and Electroweak Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark mass and electroweak measurements from the Tevatron. Since the world combination of top-quark mass measurements was done, CDF and D0 experiments improved the precision of several results. Some of them reach the relative precition below 1% for a single measurement. From the electroweak results, we report on the WW and WZ production cross section, measurements of the weak mixing angle and indirect measurements of W boson mass. The Tevatron results of the weak mixing angle are still the most precise ones of hadron colliders.

  6. Inflation at the electroweak scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, Lloyd; Turner, Michael S.

    1993-01-01

    We present a model for slow-rollover inflation where the vacuum energy that drives inflation is of the order of G(F) exp -2; unlike most models, the conversion of vacuum energy to radiation ('reheating') is moderately efficient. The scalar field responsible for inflation is a standard-model singlet, develops a vacuum expectation value of 4 x 10 exp 6 GeV, has a mass of about 1 GeV, and can play a role in electroweak phenomena. We also discuss models where the energy scale of inflation is somewhat larger, but still well below the unification scale.

  7. Searches for electroweak neutralino and chargino production in channels with Higgs, Z , and W bosons in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.

    2014-11-01

    Searches for supersymmetry (SUSY) are presented based on the electroweak pair production of neutralinos and charginos, leading to decay channels with Higgs, Z, and W bosons and undetected lightest SUSY particles (LSPs). The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of about 19.5 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected in 2012 with the CMS detector at the LHC. The main emphasis is neutralino pair production in which each neutralino decays either to a Higgs boson (h) and an LSP or to a Z boson and an LSP, leading to hh, hZ, and ZZ states with missing transverse energy (E$miss\\atop{T}$). A second aspect is chargino-neutralino pair production, leading to hW states with E$miss\\atop{T}$. The decays of a Higgs boson to a bottom-quark pair, to a photon pair, and to final states with leptons are considered in conjunction with hadronic and leptonic decay modes of the Z and W bosons. No evidence is found for supersymmetric particles, and 95% confidence level upper limits are evaluated for the respective pair production cross sections and for neutralino and chargino mass values.

  8. Physics Beyond the Standard Model, search for non-perturbative models of electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The Standard Model provides an elegant mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) via the introduction of a scalar Higgs field. However, the Standard Model Higgs mechanism is not the only way to explain EWSB. A class of models, broadly known as Technicolor, postulates the existence of a new strongly-interacting gauge sector at the TeV scale, coupled to the Standard Model through technifermions charged under electroweak. In technicolor, the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry triggers EWSB, with the resulting Goldstone bosons ``eaten'' by the massive W, Z gauge bosons. Because they are strongly-coupled and inherently non-perturbative, numerical lattice gauge theory provides an ideal arena in which technicolor can be explored. The maturation of lattice methods and availability of sufficient computing power has spurred the investigation of technicolor using lattice gauge theory techniques, in particular one variant known as ``walking'' technicolor. A technicolor model that resembles QCD is problematic that it does not satisfy the constraints of precision electro-weak observables, most notably those encapsulated by the Peskin-Takeuchi parameters, as well as the contraints on flavor-changing neutral currents. Walking technicolor is a class of models where the theory is near-conformal, i.e. the gauge coupling runs very slowly (``walks'') over some large range of energy scales. This walking behavior produces a large separation of scales between the natural cut-off for the theory and the EWSB scale, allowing one to naturally generate fermion masses without violating contrainsts on flavor-changing neutral currents. The dynamics of walking theories may also allow it to satisfy the bounds on the Peskin-Takeuchi parameters. We discuss the results of recent lattice calculations that explore the properties of walking technicolor models and the its implications on possible physics beyond the Standard Model.

  9. Electroweak symmetry breaking from the soft portal into dark matter and prediction for direct detection.

    PubMed

    Kadastik, Mario; Kannike, Kristjan; Racioppi, Antonio; Raidal, Martti

    2010-05-21

    Scalar dark matter (DM) can have dimensionful coupling to the Higgs boson-the soft portal into DM-which is predicted to be unsuppressed by the underlying SO(10) grand unified theory (GUT). The dimensionful coupling can be large, μ/v>1, without spoiling the perturbativity of low energy theory up to the GUT scale. We show that the soft portal into DM naturally triggers radiative electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) via large 1-loop DM corrections to the effective potential. In this scenario, EWSB, the DM thermal freeze-out cross section, and DM scattering on nuclei are all dominated by the same coupling, predicting the DM mass range to be 700  GeV

  10. Non-minimal CW inflation, electroweak symmetry breaking and the 750 GeV anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzola, L.; Racioppi, A.; Raidal, M.; Urban, F. R.; Veermäe, H.

    2016-03-01

    We study whether the hinted 750 GeV resonance at the LHC can be a Coleman-Weinberg inflaton which is non-minimally coupled to gravity. Since the inflaton must couple to new charged and coloured states to reproduce the LHC diphoton signature, the same interaction can generate its effective potential and trigger the electroweak symmetry breaking via the portal coupling to the Higgs boson. This inflationary scenario predicts a lower bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r ≳ 0.006, where the minimal value corresponds to the measured spectral index n s ≃ 0.97. However, we find that the compatibility with the LHC diphoton signal requires exotic new physics at energy scales accessible at the LHC. We study and quantify the properties of the predicted exotic particles.

  11. Radiative Effects and Electroweak Symmetry Breaking in a Supersymmetric Preon Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongbae

    We construct the low energy effective theory of composite quarks, leptons, and Higgs bosons for a supersymmetric preon model and study the effects of renormalization-group based radiative corrections. The study on the evolution of scalar masses for avoiding color and charge breakings leads us to conclude that Yukawa couplings are bounded from above. The implementation of electroweak symmetry breaking requires that only the purely dynamical symmetry breaking should be needed for the model, but the combined scheme of dynamical and radiative symmetry breaking as well as the purely radiative symmetry breaking scheme be disfavored. Our analysis of (mb)/(m_τ ) including radiative effects shows that, should a discrepancy be found between the observed and the theoretical value of (mb)/(m_τ ) after experimental determination of supersymmetric particle masses, it would imply that the complete quark-lepton universality in the supersymmetric preon model does not hold either for the Yukawa couplings, or for the condensates, or for both.

  12. Electroweak Physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Sekaric, J.; /Kansas U.

    2011-06-08

    The most recent Electroweak results from the Tevatron are presented. The importance of precise Standard Model measurements in the Higgs sector, quantum chromodynamics and searches for new physics is emphasized. Analyzed data correspond to 1-7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity recorded by the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during the period between 2002-2010. The main goal of the Electroweak (EW) physics is to probe the mechanism of the EW symmetry breaking. An important aspect of these studies is related to precise measurements of the Standard Model (SM) parameters and tests of the SU(2) x U(1) gauge symmetry. Deviations from the SM may be indicative of new physics. Thus, the interplay between the tests of the 'standard' physics and searches for a 'nonstandard' physics is an important aspect of the EW measurements. The observables commonly used in these measurements are cross sections, gauge boson couplings, differential distributions, asymmetries, etc. Besides, many EW processes represent a non-negligible background in a Higgs boson and top quark production, and production of supersymmetric particles. Therefore, the complete and detailed understanding of EW processes is a mandatory precondition for early discoveries of very small new physics signals. Furthermore, several EW analyses represent a proving ground for analysis techniques and statistical treatments used in the Tevatron Higgs searches.

  13. Third generation sfermion decays into Z and W gauge bosons: Full one-loop analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid

    2005-05-01

    The complete one-loop radiative corrections to third-generation scalar fermions into gauge bosons Z and W{sup {+-}} is considered. We focus on f-tilde{sub 2}{yields}Zf-tilde{sub 1} and f-tilde{sub i}{yields}W{sup {+-}}f-tilde{sub j}{sup '}, f,f{sup '}=t,b. We include SUSY-QCD, QED, and full electroweak corrections. It is found that the electroweak corrections can be of the same order as the SUSY-QCD corrections. The two sets of corrections interfere destructively in some region of parameter space. The full one-loop correction can reach 10% in some supergravity scenario, while in model independent analysis like general the minimal supersymmetric standard model, the one-loop correction can reach 20% for large tan{beta} and large trilinear soft breaking terms A{sub b}.

  14. Automation of electroweak corrections for LHC processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, Mauro; Greiner, Nicolas; Tramontano, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Next-to-leading order (NLO) electroweak corrections will play an important role in Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Even though they are typically moderate at the level of total cross sections, they can lead to substantial deviations in the shapes of distributions. In particular, for the search for new physics, but also for a precise determination of Standard Model observables, their inclusion in theoretical predictions is mandatory for a reliable estimation of the Standard Model contribution. In this article we review the status and recent developments in electroweak calculations and their automation for LHC processes. We discuss general issues and properties of NLO electroweak corrections and present some examples, including the full calculation of the NLO corrections to the production of a W-boson in association with two jets computed using GoSam interfaced to MadDipole.

  15. Novel effects in electroweak breaking from a hidden sector

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, Jose Ramon

    2007-10-01

    The Higgs boson offers a unique window to hidden sector fields S{sub i}, singlets under the standard model gauge group, via the renormalizable interactions |H|{sup 2}S{sub i}{sup 2}. We prove that such interactions can provide new patterns for electroweak breaking, including radiative breaking by dimensional transmutation consistent with CERN LEP bounds, and trigger the strong enough first-order phase transition required by electroweak baryogenesis.

  16. Electroweak fragmentation functions for dark matter annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cavasonza, Leila Ali; Krämer, Michael; Pellen, Mathieu

    2015-02-18

    Electroweak corrections can play a crucial role in dark matter annihilation. The emission of gauge bosons, in particular, leads to a secondary flux consisting of all Standard Model particles, and may be described by electroweak fragmentation functions. To assess the quality of the fragmentation function approximation to electroweak radiation in dark matter annihilation, we have calculated the flux of secondary particles from gauge-boson emission in models with Majorana fermion and vector dark matter, respectively. For both models, we have compared cross sections and energy spectra of positrons and antiprotons after propagation through the galactic halo in the fragmentation function approximation and in the full calculation. Fragmentation functions fail to describe the particle fluxes in the case of Majorana fermion annihilation into light fermions: the helicity suppression of the lowest-order cross section in such models cannot be lifted by the leading logarithmic contributions included in the fragmentation function approach. However, for other classes of models like vector dark matter, where the lowest-order cross section is not suppressed, electroweak fragmentation functions provide a simple, model-independent and accurate description of secondary particle fluxes.

  17. Electroweak results from the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Dorage, T., Padova University and I.N.F.N.

    1998-08-01

    We present the latest results on electroweak physics obtained from the analysis of p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s=1.8 TeV. The large data samples collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron collider allow measurements of the top quark mass to a 3% accuracy and of the W boson to a 0.1% accuracy. Many precision measurements that test the Standard Model and probe its possible extensions are also described.

  18. Cosmological Relaxation of the Electroweak Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Kaplan, David E.; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2015-11-01

    A new class of solutions to the electroweak hierarchy problem is presented that does not require either weak-scale dynamics or anthropics. Dynamical evolution during the early Universe drives the Higgs boson mass to a value much smaller than the cutoff. The simplest model has the particle content of the standard model plus a QCD axion and an inflation sector. The highest cutoff achieved in any technically natural model is 108 GeV .

  19. Strongly first-order electroweak phase transition and classical scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzinnia, Arsham; Ren, Jing

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we examine the possibility of realizing a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition within the minimal classically scale-invariant extension of the standard model (SM), previously proposed and analyzed as a potential solution to the hierarchy problem. By introducing one complex gauge-singlet scalar and three (weak scale) right-handed Majorana neutrinos, the scenario was successfully rendered capable of achieving a radiative breaking of the electroweak symmetry (by means of the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism), inducing nonzero masses for the SM neutrinos (via the seesaw mechanism), presenting a pseudoscalar dark matter candidate (protected by the CP symmetry of the potential), and predicting the existence of a second CP-even boson (with suppressed couplings to the SM content) in addition to the 125 GeV scalar. In the present treatment, we construct the full finite-temperature one-loop effective potential of the model, including the resummed thermal daisy loops, and demonstrate that finite-temperature effects induce a first-order electroweak phase transition. Requiring the thermally driven first-order phase transition to be sufficiently strong at the onset of the bubble nucleation (corresponding to nucleation temperatures TN˜100-200 GeV) further constrains the model's parameter space; in particular, an O(0.01) fraction of the dark matter in the Universe may be simultaneously accommodated with a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition. Moreover, such a phase transition disfavors right-handed Majorana neutrino masses above several hundreds of GeV, confines the pseudoscalar dark matter masses to ˜1-2 TeV, predicts the mass of the second CP-even scalar to be ˜100-300 GeV, and requires the mixing angle between the CP-even components of the SM doublet and the complex singlet to lie within the range 0.2≲sinω ≲0.4. The obtained results are displayed in comprehensive exclusion plots, identifying the viable regions of the parameter space

  20. Proceedings of the 1992 workshops on high-energy physics with colliding beams. Volume 3, Electroweak symmetry breaking at colliding-beam facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.

    1992-12-31

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: Introduction to Electroweak Symmetry Breaking: Intermediate-Mass Higgs Bosons; Extended Higgs Sectors and Novel Searches; and Heavy Higgs Bosons and Strong WW Scattering.

  1. Higgs boson production with heavy quarks at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher B.

    2005-11-01

    One of the remaining puzzles in particle physics is the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. In the Standard Model (SM), a single doublet of complex scalar fields is responsible for breaking the SU(2) L x U(1)Y gauge symmetry thus giving mass to the electroweak gauge bosons via the Higgs mechanism and to the fermions via Yukawa couplings. The remnant of the process is a vet to he discovered scalar particle, the Higgs boson (h). However, current and future experiments at hadron colliders hold great promise. Of particular interest at hadron colliders is the production of a Higgs boson in association with a pair of heavy quarks, pp¯(pp) → QQ¯h, where Q can be either a top or a bottom quark. Indeed, the production of a Higgs boson with a pair of top quarks provides a very distinctive signal in hadronic collisions where background processes are formidable, and it will be instrumental in the discovery of a Higgs boson below about 130 GeV at the LHC. On the other hand, the production of a Higgs boson with bottom quarks can be strongly enhanced in models of new physics beyond the SM, e.g. supersymmetric models. If this is the case, bb¯h production will play a crucial role at the Tevatron where it could provide the first signal of new physics. Given the prominent role that Higgs production with heavy quarks can play at hadron colliders, it becomes imperative to have precise theoretical predictions for total and differential cross sections. In this dissertation, we outline and present detailed results for the next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation of the Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD) corrections to QQ¯h production at both the Tevatron and the LHC. This calculation involves several difficult issues due to the three massive particles in the final state, a situation which is at the frontier of radiative correction calculations in quantum field theory. We detail the novel techniques developed to deal with these challenges. The calculation of pp¯(pp) → bb¯h at NLO in

  2. Electroweak and B physics results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, K.T.

    2001-01-30

    This writeup is an introduction to some of the experimental issues involved in performing electroweak and b physics measurements at the Fermilab Tevatron. In the electroweak sector, we discuss W and Z boson cross section measurements as well as the measurement of the mass of the W boson. For b physics, we discuss measurements of B{sup 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} mixing and CP violation. This paper is geared towards nonexperts who are interested in understanding some of the issues and motivations for these measurements and how the measurements are carried out.

  3. Holographic renormalization and the electroweak precision parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Round, Mark

    2010-09-01

    We study the effects of holographic renormalization on an AdS/QCD inspired description of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. Our model is a 5D slice of AdS{sub 5} geometry containing a bulk scalar and SU(2)xSU(2) gauge fields. The scalar field obtains a vacuum expectation value (VEV) which represents a condensate that triggers electroweak symmetry breaking. Fermion fields are constrained to live on the UV brane and do not propagate in the bulk. The two-point functions are holographically renormalized through the addition of boundary counterterms. Measurable quantities are then expressed in terms of well-defined physical parameters, free from any spurious dependence on the UV cutoff. A complete study of the precision parameters is carried out and bounds on physical quantities derived. The large-N scaling of results is discussed.

  4. Probing a light CP-odd scalar in di-top-associated production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Farooque, Trisha; Juste, Aurelio; Liu, Tao; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-10-01

    CP-odd scalars are an integral part of many extensions of the Standard Model. Recently, electroweak-scale pseudoscalars have received increased attention in explaining the diffuse gamma-ray excess from the Galactic Centre. Elusive due to absence of direct couplings to gauge bosons, these particles receive only weak constraints from direct searches at LEP or searches performed during the first LHC runs. We investigate the LHC's sensitivity in probing a CP-odd scalar in the mass range 20 ≤ m_A ≤ 100 GeV via di-top-associated production using jet-substructure-based reconstruction techniques. We parameterise the scalar's interactions using a simplified model approach and relate the obtained upper limits to couplings within type-I and type-II 2HDMs as well as the NMSSM. We find that in di-top-associated production, experiments at the LHC can set tight limits on CP-odd scalars that fit the Galactic Centre excess. However, direct sensitivity to light CP-odd scalars from the NMSSM remains challenging.

  5. Can the new resonance at LHC be a CP-odd Higgs boson?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bečirević, D.; Bertuzzo, E.; Sumensari, O.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.

    2016-06-01

    A plausible explanation of the recent experimental indication of a resonance in the two-photon spectrum at LHC is that it corresponds to the CP-odd Higgs boson. We explore such a possibility in a generic framework of the two Higgs doublet models (2HDM), and combine mA ≈ 750 GeV with the known mh = 125.7 (4) GeV to show that the charged Higgs boson and the other CP-even scalar masses become bounded from bellow and from above. We show that this possibility is also consistent with the electroweak precision data and the low energy observables, which we test in a few leptonic and semileptonic decay modes.

  6. Precision experiments in electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, M.L.

    1990-03-01

    The electroweak theory of Glashow, Weinberg, and Salam (GWS) has become one of the twin pillars upon which our understanding of all particle physics phenomena rests. It is a brilliant achievement that qualitatively and quantitatively describes all of the vast quantity of experimental data that have been accumulated over some forty years. Note that the word quantitatively must be qualified. The low energy limiting cases of the GWS theory, Quantum Electrodynamics and the V-A Theory of Weak Interactions, have withstood rigorous testing. The high energy synthesis of these ideas, the GWS theory, has not yet been subjected to comparably precise scrutiny. The recent operation of a new generation of proton-antiproton (p{bar p}) and electron-positron (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) colliders has made it possible to produce and study large samples of the electroweak gauge bosons W{sup {plus minus}} and Z{sup 0}. We expect that these facilities will enable very precise tests of the GWS theory to be performed in the near future. In keeping with the theme of this Institute, Physics at the 100 GeV Mass Scale, these lectures will explore the current status and the near-future prospects of these experiments.

  7. Composite scalar dark matter from vector-like SU(2) confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasechnik, Roman; Beylin, Vitaly; Kuksa, Vladimir; Vereshkov, Grigory

    2016-03-01

    A toy-model with SU(2)TC dynamics confined at high scales ΛTC ≫ 100GeV enables to construct Dirac UV completion from the original chiral multiplets predicting a vector-like nature of their weak interactions consistent with electroweak precision tests. In this work, we investigate a potential of the lightest scalar baryon-like (T-baryon) state B0 = UD with mass mB ≳ 1TeV predicted by the simplest two-flavor vector-like confinement model as a dark matter (DM) candidate. We show that two different scenarios with the T-baryon relic abundance formation before and after the electroweak (EW) phase transition epoch lead to symmetric (or mixed) and asymmetric DM, respectively. Such a DM candidate evades existing direct DM detection constraints since its vector coupling to Z boson absents at tree level, while one-loop gauge boson mediated contribution is shown to be vanishingly small close to the threshold. The dominating spin-independent (SI) T-baryon-nucleon scattering goes via tree-level Higgs boson exchange in the t-channel. The corresponding bound on the effective T-baryon-Higgs coupling has been extracted from the recent LUX data and turns out to be consistent with naive expectations from the light technipion case mπ˜ ≪ ΛTC. The latter provides the most stringent phenomenological constraint on strongly-coupled SU(2)TC dynamics so far. Future prospects for direct and indirect scalar T-baryon DM searches in astrophysics as well as in collider measurements have been discussed.

  8. Gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Kimm, Kyoungtae; Yoon, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a family of gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole solutions in Einstein-Weinberg-Salam theory. Our result confirms the existence of globally regular gravitating electroweak monopole which changes to the magnetically charged black hole as the Higgs vacuum value approaches to the Planck scale. Moreover, our solutions could provide a more accurate description of the monopole stars and magnetically charged black holes.

  9. A strong electroweak phase transition from the inflaton field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenkanen, Tommi; Tuominen, Kimmo; Vaskonen, Ville

    2016-09-01

    We study a singlet scalar extension of the Standard Model. The singlet scalar is coupled non-minimally to gravity and assumed to drive inflation, and also couple sufficiently strongly with the SM Higgs field in order to provide for a strong first order electroweak phase transition. Requiring the model to describe inflation successfully, be compatible with the LHC data, and yield a strong first order electroweak phase transition, we identify the regions of the parameter space where the model is viable. We also include a singlet fermion with scalar coupling to the singlet scalar to probe the sensitivity of the constraints on additional degrees of freedom and their couplings in the singlet sector. We also comment on the general feasibility of these fields to act as dark matter.

  10. Spin-independent interferences and spin-dependent interactions with scalar dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, R.; Ochoa, F.

    2016-05-01

    We explore mechanisms of interferences under which the spin-independent interaction in the scattering of scalar dark matter with nucleus is suppressed in relation to the spin-dependent one. We offer a detailed derivation of the nuclear amplitudes based on the interactions with quarks in the framework of a nonuniversal U(1)' extension of the standard model. By assuming a range of parameters compatible with collider searches, electroweak observables and dark matter abundance, we find scenarios for destructive interferences with and without isospin symmetry. The model reveals solutions with mutually interfering scalar particles, canceling the effective spin-independent coupling with only scalar interactions, which requires an extra Higgs boson with mass M H > 125 GeV. The model also possesses scenarios with only vector interactions through two neutral gauge bosons, Z and Z', which do not exhibit interference effects. Due to the nonuniversality of the U(1)' symmetry, we distinguish two family structures of the quark sector with different numerical predictions. In one case, we obtain cross sections that pass all the Xenon-based detector experiments. In the other case, limits from LUX experiment enclose an exclusion region for dark matter between 9 and 800 GeV. We examine a third scenario with isospin-violating couplings where interferences between scalar and vector boson exchanges cancel the scattering. We provide solutions where interactions with Xenon-based detectors is suppressed for light dark matter, below 6 GeV, while interactions with Germanium- and Silicon-based detectors exhibit solutions up to the regions of interest for positive signals reported by CoGeNT and CDMS-Si experiments, and compatible with the observed DM relic density for DM mass in the range 8 .3-10 GeV. Spin-dependent interactions become the dominant source of scattering around the interference regions, where Maxwellian speed distribution is considered.

  11. Sakurai Prize Lecture: Thirty Years of Precision Electroweak Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirlin, Alberto

    2002-04-01

    We discuss the development of the theory of electroweak radiative corrections and its role in testing the Standard Model, predicting the top quark mass, constraining the Higgs boson mass, and searching for deviations that may signal the presence of new physics.

  12. TeV scale dark matter and electroweak radiative corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Ciafaloni, Paolo; Urbano, Alfredo

    2010-08-15

    Recent anomalies in cosmic rays data, namely, from the PAMELA Collaboration, can be interpreted in terms of TeV scale decaying/annihilating dark matter. We analyze the impact of radiative corrections coming from the electroweak sector of the standard model on the spectrum of the final products at the interaction point. As an example, we consider virtual one loop corrections and real gauge bosons emission in the case of a very heavy vector boson annihilating into fermions. We find electroweak corrections that are relevant, but not as big as sometimes found in the literature; we relate this mismatch to the issue of gauge invariance. At scales much higher than the symmetry breaking scale, one loop electroweak effects are so big that eventually higher orders/resummations have to be considered: we advocate for the inclusion of these effects in parton shower Monte Carlo models aiming at the description of TeV scale physics.

  13. Combined QCD and electroweak analysis of HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    A simultaneous fit of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and electroweak parameters to HERA data on deep inelastic scattering is presented. The input data are the neutral current and charged current inclusive cross sections which were previously used in the QCD analysis leading to the HERAPDF2.0 PDFs. In addition, the polarization of the electron beam was taken into account for the ZEUS data recorded between 2004 and 2007. Results on the vector and axial-vector couplings of the Z boson to u - and d -type quarks, on the value of the electroweak mixing angle and the mass of the W boson are presented. The values obtained for the electroweak parameters are in agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  14. Scalar dark matter search at the LHC through flavor-changing neutral current top decay

    SciTech Connect

    Li Tong; Shafi, Qaisar

    2011-05-01

    We discuss an extended standard model electroweak sector which contains a stable scalar dark matter particle, the D boson. To search for the D boson at the LHC we exploit the flavor-changing neutral current top quark decay, t{yields}cDD, mediated by the lightest standard model-like Higgs h{sup 0} in a two Higgs doublet model framework. The branching ratio for t{yields}cDD in this case can be as high as 10{sup -3}, after taking into account constraints arising from the D boson relic abundance. With an integrated luminosity of 10(100) fb{sup -1}, the 14 TeV LHC can explore values of this branching ratio that are one (two) order of magnitude smaller in tt production with tt{yields}cbl{sup -}(cbl{sup +})+Ee{sub T}. For a D boson mass < or approx. 60 GeV, m{sub h}{sup 0} < or approx. 2M{sub Z}, 10 fb{sup -1} luminosity and a branching ratio BR(t{yields}cDD){approx}10{sup -4}, the estimated number of signal events at the 14 TeV LHC is of order 80.

  15. A vector model for electroweak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifler, Frank

    1985-03-01

    In this paper we present a vector model for the electroweak interactions. The Cartan map gives an isomorphism between Dirac bispinors and an isotropic class of Yang-Mills vector fields. The isotropic Yang-Mills vector fields Fk =Ek +iHk with k=1,2,3, satisfy the condition that the matrix of scalar invariants (Fj ṡFk) equals a scalar multiple of the identity matrix. We show that all the bispinor observables commute with the Cartan isomorphism, including all gauge transformations, as well as Lorentz transformations. We derive the Yang-Mills equivalent Dirac equation. As a consequence of the vector model, we obtain a new Lagrangian for electroweak interactions, which is an alternative to the Weinberg-Salam Lagrangian. Moreover, we show that the vector model predicts that the Weinberg angle θw satisfies sin2 θw =0.25, which is close to the measured value of sin2 θw =0.23. The vector model accommodates all the lepton and quark flavors. Furthermore, it predicts the conservation of baryon number and lepton number, as well as electric charge in electroweak interactions. The vector model also gives a new interpretation to antiparticles. In the vector model, an antiparticle is characterized by its opposite baryon number, lepton number, and electric charge; yet both particles and antiparticles propagate forward in time with positive energies.

  16. Production Cross-Section Estimates for Strongly-Interacting Electroweak-Symmetry Breaking Sector Resonances at Particle Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobado, Antonio; Guo, Feng-Kun; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2015-12-01

    We are exploring a generic strongly-interacting Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Sector (EWSBS) with the low-energy effective field theory for the four experimentally known particles (W±L, ZL, h) and its dispersion-relation based unitary extension. In this contribution we provide simple estimates for the production cross-section of pairs of the EWSBS bosons and their resonances at proton-proton colliders as well as in a future e-e+ (or potentially a μ-μ+) collider with a typical few-TeV energy. We examine the simplest production mechanisms, tree-level production through a W (dominant when quantum numbers allow) and the simple effective boson approximation (in which the electroweak bosons are considered as collinear partons of the colliding fermions). We exemplify with custodial isovector and isotensor resonances at 2 TeV, the energy currently being discussed because of a slight excess in the ATLAS 2-jet data. We find it hard, though not unthinkable, to ascribe this excess to one of these WLWL rescattering resonances. An isovector resonance could be produced at a rate smaller than, but close to earlier CMS exclusion bounds, depending on the parameters of the effective theory. The ZZ excess is then problematic and requires additional physics (such as an additional scalar resonance). The isotensor one (that would describe all charge combinations) has smaller cross-section. Supported by the Spanish Excellence Network on Hadronic Physics FIS2014-57026-REDT, by Spanish Grants Universidad Complutense UCM:910309 and Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad MINECO:FPA2011-27853-C02-01, MINECO:FPA2014-53375-C2-1-P, by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and National Natural Science Foundation of China through Funds Provided to the Sino-German CRC 110 “Symmetries and the Emergence of Structure in QCD” (NSFC Grant No. 11261130311) and by NSFC (Grant No. 11165005)

  17. Precision electroweak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    Recent electroweak precision measurements fro {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup -} and {ital p{anti p}} colliders are presented. Some emphasis is placed on the recent developments in the heavy flavor sector. The measurements are compared to predictions from the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. All results are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. The indirect constraint on the top quark mass from all measurements is in excellent agreement with the direct {ital m{sub t}} measurements. Using the world`s electroweak data in conjunction with the current measurement of the top quark mass, the constraints on the Higgs` mass are discussed.

  18. Viability of strongly coupled scenarios with a light Higgs-like boson.

    PubMed

    Pich, Antonio; Rosell, Ignasi; Sanz-Cillero, Juan José

    2013-05-01

    We present a one-loop calculation of the oblique S and T parameters within strongly coupled models of electroweak symmetry breaking with a light Higgs-like boson. We use a general effective Lagrangian, implementing the chiral symmetry breaking SU(2)(L) [Symbol: see text]SU(2)(R) → SU(2)(L+R) with Goldstone bosons, gauge bosons, the Higgs-like scalar, and one multiplet of vector and axial-vector massive resonance states. Using a dispersive representation and imposing a proper ultraviolet behavior, we obtain S and T at the next-to-leading order in terms of a few resonance parameters. The experimentally allowed range forces the vector and axial-vector states to be heavy, with masses above the TeV scale, and suggests that the Higgs-like scalar should have a WW coupling close to the standard model one. Our conclusions are generic and apply to more specific scenarios such as the minimal SO(5)/SO(4) composite Higgs model. PMID:23683189

  19. Diphoton rate in the inert doublet model with a 125 GeV Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świeżewska, Bogumiła; Krawczyk, Maria

    2013-08-01

    An improved analysis of the diphoton decay rate of the Higgs boson in the inert doublet model is presented together with a critical discussion of the results existing in the literature. For a Higgs boson mass Mh of 125 GeV and taking into account various constraints—vacuum stability, existence of the inert vacuum, perturbative unitarity, electroweak precision tests, and the LEP bounds—we find regions in the parameter space where the diphoton rate is enhanced. The resulting regions are confronted with the allowed values of the dark matter mass. We find that a significant enhancement in the two-photon decay of the Higgs boson is only possible for constrained values of the scalar couplings λ3˜hH+H-, λ345˜hHH and the masses of the charged scalar and the dark matter particle. The enhancement above 1.3 demands that the masses of H± and H be less than 135 GeV (and above 62.5 GeV) and -1.46<λ3, λ345<-0.24. In addition, we analyze the correlation of the diphoton and Zγ rates.

  20. Electroweak results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Waters

    2004-06-02

    Inclusive W and Z production cross-sections have been measured by CDF and certain electroweak parameters extracted with high precision from these measurements. New results on diboson production at the Tevatron are also presented.

  1. Quasi-exactly-solvable confining solutions for spin-1 and spin-0 bosons in (1+1)-dimensions with a scalar linear potential

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Luis B.; Castro, Antonio S. de

    2014-12-15

    We point out a misleading treatment in the recent literature regarding confining solutions for a scalar potential in the context of the Duffin–Kemmer–Petiau theory. We further present the proper bound-state solutions in terms of the generalized Laguerre polynomials and show that the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions depend on the solutions of algebraic equations involving the potential parameter and the quantum number.

  2. Minimal but non-minimal inflation and electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzola, Luca; Racioppi, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    We consider the most minimal scale invariant extension of the standard model that allows for successful radiative electroweak symmetry breaking and inflation. The framework involves an extra scalar singlet, that plays the rôle of the inflaton, and is compatibile with current experimental bounds owing to the non-minimal coupling of the latter to gravity. This inflationary scenario predicts a very low tensor-to-scalar ratio r ≈ 10‑3, typical of Higgs-inflation models, but in contrast yields a scalar spectral index ns simeq 0.97 which departs from the Starobinsky limit. We briefly discuss the collider phenomenology of the framework.

  3. Strongly Coupled Models with a Higgs-like Boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pich, Antonio; Rosell, Ignasi; José Sanz-Cillero, Juan

    2013-11-01

    Considering the one-loop calculation of the oblique S and T parameters, we have presented a study of the viability of strongly-coupled scenarios of electroweak symmetry breaking with a light Higgs-like boson. The calculation has been done by using an effective Lagrangian, being short-distance constraints and dispersive relations the main ingredients of the estimation. Contrary to a widely spread believe, we have demonstrated that strongly coupled electroweak models with massive resonances are not in conflict with experimentalconstraints on these parameters and the recently observed Higgs-like resonance. So there is room for these models, but they are stringently constrained. The vector and axial-vector states should be heavy enough (with masses above the TeV scale), the mass splitting between them is highly preferred to be small and the Higgs-like scalar should have a WW coupling close to the Standard Model one. It is important to stress that these conclusions do not depend critically on the inclusion of the second Weinberg sum rule. We wish to thank the organizers of LHCP 2013 for the pleasant conference. This work has been supported in part by the Spanish Government and the European Commission [FPA2010-17747, FPA2011- 23778, AIC-D-2011-0818, SEV-2012-0249 (Severo Ochoa Program), CSD2007-00042 (Consolider Project CPAN)], the Generalitat Valenciana [PrometeoII/2013/007] and the Comunidad de Madrid [HEPHACOS S2009/ESP-1473].

  4. Recent results in electroweak physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Giulia Manca

    2004-02-13

    The Run II physics program of CDF and D0 has just begun with the first 72 pb{sup -1} of analysis quality data collected at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Electroweak measurements are among the first and most important benchmarks for the best understanding of the detectors and testing the Standard Model. We present measurements of the W and Z inclusive cross sections and decays asymmetries, recent results in di-boson physics and searches for new physics which make use of distinct electroweak signatures.

  5. Heavy Higgs boson with a light sneutrino next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle in the MSSM with enhanced SU(2) D-terms.

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, A. D.; Shah, N. R.; Wagner, C. E. M.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of California at Davis; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-01-01

    The minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model provides a solution to the hierarchy problem and leads to the presence of a light Higgs. A Higgs boson with mass above the present experimental bound may only be obtained for relatively heavy third generation squarks, requiring a precise, somewhat unnatural balance between different contributions to the effective Higgs mass parameter. It was recently noticed that somewhat heavier Higgs bosons, which are naturally beyond the CERN LEP bound, may be obtained by enhanced weak SU(2) D-terms. Such contributions appear in models with an enhanced electroweak gauge symmetry, provided the supersymmetry breaking masses associated with the scalars responsible for the breakdown of the enhanced gauge symmetry group to the standard model one are larger than the enhanced symmetry breaking scale. In this article we emphasize that the enhanced SU(2) D-terms will not only raise the Higgs boson mass but also affect the spectrum of the nonstandard Higgs bosons, sleptons, and squarks, which therefore provide a natural contribution to the T parameter, compensating for the negative one coming from the heavy Higgs boson. The sleptons and nonstandard Higgs bosons of these models, in particular, may act in a way similar to the so-called inert Higgs doublet. The phenomenological properties of these models are emphasized, and possible cosmological implications as well as collider signatures are described.

  6. Minimal electroweak model for monopole annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Farris, T.H. ); Kephart, T.W.; Weiler, T.J. ); Yuan, T.C. )

    1992-02-03

    We construct the minimal (most economical in fields) extension of the standard model implementing the Langacker-Pi mechanism for reducing the grand unified theory (GUT) monopole cosmic density to an allowed level. The model contains just a single charged scalar field in addition to the standard Higgs doublet, and is easily embeddable in any GUT. We identify the region of parameter space where monopoles annihilate in the higher temperature early Universe. A particularly alluring possibility is that the demise of monopoles at the electroweak scale is in fact the origin of the Universe's net baryon number.

  7. Electroweak vacuum (in)stability in an inflationary universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Spencer-Smith, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    Recent analysis shows that if the 125-126 GeV LHC resonance turns out to be the Standard Model Higgs boson, the electroweak vacuum would be a metastable state at 98% C.L. In this Letter we argue that, during inflation, the electroweak vacuum can actually be very short-lived, contrary to the conclusion that follows from the flat spacetime analysis. Namely, in the case of a pure Higgs potential the electroweak vacuum decays via the Hawking-Moss transition, which has no flat spacetime analogue. As a result, the Higgs vacuum is unstable, unless the rate of inflation is low enough: Hinf ≲109-1012 GeV. Models of inflation with such a low rate typically predict negligible tensor perturbations in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). This is also true for models in which the perturbations are produced by a curvaton field. We also find that if the effective curvature of the Higgs potential at a local maximum (which may be induced by inflaton-Higgs interactions) is large enough, then the decay of the electroweak vacuum is dominated by the Coleman-de Luccia transition. The electroweak vacuum is also short-lived in this case, due to a negative effective self-interaction coupling. Based on our analysis of Higgs vacuum stability during inflation, we conclude that the observation of tensor perturbations by the Planck satellite would provide strong indirect evidence for new physics beyond the Standard Model responsible for stabilisation of the electroweak vacuum.

  8. Quartic gauge boson couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong-Jian

    1998-08-01

    We review the recent progress in studying the anomalous electroweak quartic gauge boson couplings (QGBCs) at the LHC and the next generation high energy e±e- linear colliders (LCs). The main focus is put onto the strong electroweak symmetry breaking scenario in which the non-decoupling guarantees sizable new physics effects for the QGBCs. After commenting upon the current low energy indirect bounds and summarizing the theoretical patterns of QGBCs predicted by the typical resonance/non-resonance models, we review our systematic model-independent analysis on bounding them via WW-fusion and WWZ/ZZZ-production. The interplay of the two production mechanisms and the important role of the beam-polarization at the LCs are emphasized. The same physics may be similarly and better studied at a multi-TeV muon collider with high luminosity.

  9. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking and Spin-0 Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Jared; Luty, Markus A.

    2009-09-04

    We argue that theories of the strong electroweak symmetry breaking sector necessarily contain new spin 0 states at the TeV scale in the tt and tb/bt channels, even if the third generation quarks are not composite at the TeV scale. These states couple sufficiently strongly to third generation quarks to have significant production at LHC via gg->phi{sup 0} or gb->tphi{sup -}. The existence of narrow resonances in QCD suggests that the strong electroweak breaking sector contains narrow resonances that decay to tt or tb/bt, with potentially significant branching fractions to 3 or more longitudinal W and Z bosons. These may give new 'smoking gun' signals of strong electroweak symmetry breaking.

  10. The electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, Nikita; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim

    2015-07-21

    We study the strength of a first-order electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model (IDM), where particle dark matter (DM) is comprised of the lightest neutral inert Higgs boson. We improve over previous studies in the description and treatment of the finite-temperature effective potential and of the electroweak phase transition. We focus on a set of benchmark models inspired by the key mechanisms in the IDM leading to a viable dark matter particle candidate, and illustrate how to enhance the strength of the electroweak phase transition by adjusting the masses of the yet undiscovered IDM Higgs states. We argue that across a variety of DM masses, obtaining a strong enough first-order phase transition is a generic possibility in the IDM. We find that due to direct dark matter searches and collider constraints, a sufficiently strong transition and a thermal relic density matching the universal DM abundance is possible only in the Higgs funnel regime.

  11. Eigenvalue-based determinants for scalar products and form factors in Richardson-Gaudin integrable models coupled to a bosonic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, Pieter W.; De Baerdemacker, Stijn; Van Raemdonck, Mario; Van Neck, Dimitri

    2015-10-01

    Starting from integrable su(2) (quasi-)spin Richardson-Gaudin (RG) XXZ models we derive several properties of integrable spin models coupled to a bosonic mode. We focus on the Dicke-Jaynes-Cummings-Gaudin models and the two-channel (p + ip)-wave pairing Hamiltonian. The pseudo-deformation of the underlying su(2) algebra is here introduced as a way to obtain these models in the contraction limit of different RG models. This allows for the construction of the full set of conserved charges, the Bethe ansatz state, and the resulting RG equations. For these models an alternative and simpler set of quadratic equations can be found in terms of the eigenvalues of the conserved charges. Furthermore, the recently proposed eigenvalue-based determinant expressions for the overlaps and form factors of local operators are extended to these models, linking the results previously presented for the Dicke-Jaynes-Cummings-Gaudin models with the general results for RG XXZ models.

  12. Electroweak physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Nodulman, L.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-06-01

    The CDF collaboration is engaged in a broad program of electroweak measurements. The production of WW, WZ, ZZ, W{sub {gamma}}, Z{sub {gamma}} and the high mass Drell Yan charge asymmetry will be discussed, along with a status report on extracting a new W mass from the most recent 90 pb{sup {minus}1} data sample.

  13. Electroweak bremsstrahlung for wino-like Dark Matter annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Ciafaloni, Paolo; Comelli, Denis; Simone, Andrea De; Riotto, Antonio; Urbano, Alfredo E-mail: comelli@fe.infn.it E-mail: antonio.riotto@unige.ch

    2012-06-01

    If the Dark Matter is the neutral Majorana component of a multiplet which is charged under the electroweak interactions of the Standard Model, its main annihilation channel is into W{sup +}W{sup −}, while the annihilation into light fermions is helicity suppressed. As pointed out recently, the radiation of gauge bosons from the initial state of the annihilation lifts the suppression and opens up an s-wave contribution to the cross section. We perform the full tree-level calculation of Dark Matter annihilations, including electroweak bremsstrahlung, in the context of an explicit model corresponding to the supersymmetric wino. We find that the fermion channel can become as important as the di-boson one. This result has significant implications for the predictions of the fluxes of particles originating from Dark Matter annihilations.

  14. Di-boson production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    De Lentdecker, Gilles; /Rochester U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present some precision measurements on electroweak physics performed at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. Namely they report on the boson-pair production cross sections and on triple gauge boson couplings using proton anti-proton collisions collected by the CDF and D0 experiments at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 324 pb{sup -1}.

  15. Search for the standard model higgs boson in its associated production with a W vector boson in pp collisions at √s= 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hegab, Hatim H.

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation, results from a search for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson is shown. The SM is the theoretical framework which describes particles of matter and force carrier gauge bosons. To solve the mass problem in the SM, the Higgs mechanism was introduced in 1963. The Higgs mechanism causes an electroweak symmetry breaking and a new massive scalar boson was postulated. This particle is the Higgs boson. A search for the Higgs boson has been ongoing at the Tevatron where protons and antiprotons were allowed to collide at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. For a low mass Higgs, that is a Higgs with a mass lower than 135 GeV, the dominant decay mode is Higgs to a pair of b-quarks (H →b $\\bar{b}$ ). This work concentrated on a Higgs whose mass is in the range of 100 150 GeV, with a W vector boson produced with the Higgs boson. The final state chosen is the one which contains a lepton a neutrino and a pair of b-quarks. This study used data provided by the DZERO experiment. Results presented here are the outcome of analyzing 5.3 fb-1 of data from RunII period. The analysis used different techniques to increase the sensitivity of the study. Data were subdivided based on lepton flavor, number of jets in sample, jets identified as b-jets and dates of collected data. A multivariate analysis technique based on boosted decision trees were used to separate signal from background processes, physical and instrumental. A good agreement between data and simulated events was observed.

  16. Higgs boson hunting

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.; Haber, H.E.; Rindani, S.D.

    1989-05-01

    This is the summary report of the Higgs Boson Working Group. We discuss a variety of search techniques for a Higgs boson which is lighter than the Z. The processes K /yields/ /pi/H, /eta//prime/ /yields/ /eta/H,/Upsilon/ /yields/ H/gamma/ and e/sup +/e/sup /minus// /yields/ ZH are examined with particular attention paid to theoretical uncertainties in the calculations. We also briefly examine new features of Higgs phenomenology in a model which contains Higgs triplets as well as the usual doublet of scalar fields. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Symmetry inheritance of scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolić, Ivica

    2015-07-01

    Matter fields do not necessarily have to share the symmetries with the spacetime they live in. When this happens, we speak of the symmetry inheritance of fields. In this paper we classify the obstructions of symmetry inheritance by the scalar fields, both real and complex, and look more closely at the special cases of stationary and axially symmetric spacetimes. Since the symmetry noninheritance is present in the scalar fields of boson stars and may enable the existence of the black hole scalar hair, our results narrow the possible classes of such solutions. Finally, we define and analyse the symmetry noninheritance contributions to the Komar mass and angular momentum of the black hole scalar hair.

  18. On the trail of the Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, Michael E.

    2015-09-11

    I review theoretical issues associated with the Higgs boson and the mystery of spontaneous breaking of the electroweak gauge symmetry. In addition, this essay is intended as an introduction to the special issue of Annalen der Physik, “Particle Physics after the Higgs”.

  19. Boson-boson effective nonrelativistic potential for higher-derivative electromagnetic theories in D dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Accioly, Antonio; Dias, Marco

    2004-11-15

    The problem of computing the effective nonrelativistic potential U{sub D} for the interaction of charged-scalar bosons, within the context of D-dimensional electromagnetism with a cutoff, is reduced to quadratures. It is shown that U{sub 3} cannot bind a pair of identical charged-scalar bosons; nevertheless, numerical calculations indicate that boson-boson bound states do exist in the framework of three-dimensional higher-derivative electromagnetism augmented by a topological Chern-Simons term.

  20. Precision Electroweak Measurements on the Z Presonance

    SciTech Connect

    Aleph,Delphi,L3,Opal,SLD , Collaborations

    2005-09-08

    The authors report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. the data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarized beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarized asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, m{sub Z} and {Lambda}{sub Z}, and its couplings to fermions, for example the {rho} parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: m{sub Z} = 91.1875 {+-} 0.0021 GeV; {Lambda}{sub Z} = 2.4952 {+-} 0.0023 GeV; {rho}{sub {ell}} = 1.0050 {+-} 0.0010; sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup lept} = 0.23153 {+-} 0.00016. The number of light neutrino species is determined to be 2.9840 {+-} 0.0082, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. At the Z-pole, electroweak radiative corrections beyond the running of the QED and QCD coupling constants are observed with a significance of five standard deviations, and in agreement with the Standard Model. of the many Z-pole measurements, the forward-backward asymmetry in b-quark production shows the largest difference with respect to its Standard Model expectation, at the level of 2.8 standard deviations. Through radiative corrections evaluated in the framework of the Standard Model, the Z-pole data are also used to predict the mass of the top quark, m{sub t} = 173{sub -10}{sup +13} GeV, and the mass of the W boson, m{sub W} = 80.363 {+-} 0.032 GeV. These indirect constraints are compared to the direct measurements, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model. Using in addition the direct measurements of m{sub t} and m{sub W}, the mass of the as yet unobserved Standard Model Higgs boson is predicted with a

  1. Higgs Boson Mass, Neutrino Oscillations and Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Shafi, Qaisar

    2008-11-23

    Finding the Standard Model scalar (Higgs) boson is arguably the single most important mission of the LHC. I review predictions for the Higgs boson mass based on stability and perturbativity arguments, taking into account neutrino oscillations. Primordial inflation based on the Coleman-Weinberg potential is briefly discussed.

  2. The search for the pair production of second-generation scalar leptoquarks and measurements of the differential cross sections of the W boson produced in association with jets with the CMS detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartel, Darin C.

    generation, and this thesis describes searches for leptoquarks produced in pairs and decaying to final states containing either two muons and two jets, or one muon, one muon-neutrino, and two jets. Searches are conducted with collision data at center-of-mass energies of both 7 TeV and 8 TeV. No compelling evidence for the existence of leptoquarks is found, and upper limits on the leptoquark mass and cross section are placed at the 95% confidence level. These limits are the most stringent to date, and are several times larger than limits placed previously at hadron collider experiments. While the pair production of massive leptoquark bosons yields final states which have strong kinematic differences from the Standard Model processes, the ability to exploit these differences is limited by the ability to accurately model the backgrounds. The most notable of these backgrounds is the production of a W boson in association with one or more jets. Since the W+jets process has a very large cross section and a final state containing missing energy, its contribution to the total Standard Model background is both nominally large and more difficult to discriminate against than backgrounds with only visible final state objects. Furthermore, estimates of this background are not easily improved by comparisons with data in control regions, and simulations of the background are often limited to leading-order predictions. To improve the understanding and modeling of this background for future endeavors, this thesis also presents measurements of the W+jets process differentially as a function of several variables, including the jet multiplicity, the individual jet transverse momenta and pseudorapidities, the angular separation between the jets and the muon, and the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of all jets. The agreement of these measurements with respect to predictions from event leading-order generators and next-to-leading-order calculations is assessed.

  3. Electroweak supersymmetry in the NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Taoli; Li, Tianjun

    2013-07-01

    To explain all the available experimental results, we have proposed the electroweak supersymmetry (EWSUSY) previously, where the squarks and/or gluino are heavy around a few TeVs while the sleptons, sneutrinos, bino, winos, and/or Higgsinos are light within 1 TeV. In the next to minimal supersymmetric Standard Model, we perform the systematic χ2 analyses on parameter space scan for three EWSUSY scenarios: (I) R-parity conservation and one dark matter candidate, (II) R-parity conservation and multicomponent dark matter, (III) R-parity violation. We obtain the minimal χ2/(degreeoffreedom) of 10.2/15, 9.6/14, and 9.2/14 respectively for scenarios I, II, and III. Considering the constraints from the LHC neutralino/chargino and slepton searches, we find that the majority of viable parameter space preferred by the muon anomalous magnetic moment has been excluded except for the parameter space with moderate to large tan⁡β(≳8). Especially, the most favorable parameter space has relatively large tan⁡β, moderate λ, small μeff, heavy squarks/gluino, and the second lightest CP-even neutral Higgs boson with mass around 125 GeV. In addition, if the left-handed smuon is nearly degenerate with or heavier than wino, there is no definite bound on wino mass. Otherwise, the wino with mass up to ˜450GeV has been excluded. Furthermore, we present several benchmark points for scenarios I and II, and briefly discuss the prospects of the EWSUSY searches at the 14 TeV LHC and ILC.

  4. Standard model Higgs boson-inflaton and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T. E.; Liu Boyang; Love, S. T.; Veldhuis, T. ter

    2009-10-01

    The standard model Higgs boson can serve as the inflaton field of slow roll inflationary models provided it exhibits a large nonminimal coupling with the gravitational scalar curvature. The Higgs boson self interactions and its couplings with a standard model singlet scalar serving as the source of dark matter are then subject to cosmological constraints. These bounds, which can be more stringent than those arising from vacuum stability and perturbative triviality alone, still allow values for the Higgs boson mass which should be accessible at the LHC. As the Higgs boson coupling to the dark matter strengthens, lower values of the Higgs boson mass consistent with the cosmological data are allowed.

  5. Boson stars and oscillatons in an inflationary universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Gyula; Forgács, Péter; Mezei, Márk

    2010-08-01

    Spherically symmetric gravitationally bound, oscillating scalar lumps (boson stars and oscillatons) are considered in Einstein’s gravity coupled to massive scalar fields in 1+D-dimensional de Sitter-type inflationary space-times. We show that due to inflation bosons stars and oscillatons lose mass through scalar radiation, but at a rate that is exponentially small when the expansion rate is slow.

  6. Higgs boson spectra in supersymmetric left-right models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. S.; Patra, Ayon

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the Higgs boson spectra in several versions of the supersymmetric left-right model based on the gauge symmetry S U (3 )c×S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R×U (1 )B-L. A variety of symmetry breaking sectors are studied, with a focus on the constraints placed on model parameters by the lightest neutral C P even Higgs boson mass Mh. The breaking of S U (2 )R symmetry is achieved by Higgs fields transforming either as triplets or doublets, and the electroweak symmetry breaking is triggered by either bi-doublets or doublets. The Higgs potential is analyzed with or without a gauge singlet Higgs field present. Seesaw models of Type I and Type II, inverse seesaw models, universal seesaw models and an E6 inspired alternate left-right model are included in our analysis. Several of these models lead to the tree-level relation Mh≤√{2 }mW (rather than Mh≤mZ that arises in the MSSM), realized when the S U (2 )R symmetry breaking scale is of order TeV. With such an enhanced upper limit, it becomes possible to accommodate a Higgs boson of mass 126 GeV with relatively light stops that mix negligibly. In models with Higgs triplets, a doubly charged scalar remains light below a TeV with its mass arising entirely from radiative corrections. We carry out the complete one-loop calculation for its mass induced by the Majorana Yukawa couplings and show the consistency of the framework. We argue that these models prefer a low S U (2 )R breaking scale. Other theoretical and phenomenological implications of these models are briefly discussed.

  7. Electroweak and QCD Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Junjie

    2011-09-01

    The Tevatron collider has been remarkably successful and has so far delivered more than 11 fb{sup -1} of data to both the CDF and D0 experiments. Though the LHC has replaced the Tevatron as the world's most powerful collider, years of detector calibration, the huge size of the dataset and the nature of pp collisions will keep the Tevatron competitive in many selected topics in the near future. More than 10 fb{sup -1} of data has been collected by each experiment. Good understanding of the detector performance has been demonstrated by the high precision W boson mass ({Delta}M{sub W} = 31 MeV) and top quark mass ({Delta}M{sub t} = 1.06 GeV) measurements. We report the latest electroweak and QCD results from both experiments. Most analyses presented here used 4-6 fb{sup -1} of data.

  8. Electroweak symmetry breaking: Higgs/whatever

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1989-10-16

    In the first of these two lectures the Higgs mechanism is reviewed in its most general form, which does not necessarily require the existence of Higgs bosons. The general consequences of the hypothesis that electroweak symmetry breaking is due to the Higgs mechanism are deduced just from gauge invariance and unitarity. In the second lecture the general properties are illustrated with three specific models: the Weinberg-Salam model, its minimal supersymmetric extension, and technicolor. The second lecture concludes with a discussion of the experiment signals for strong WW scattering, whose presence or absence will allow us to determine whether the symmetry breaking sector lies above or below 1 TeV. 57 refs.

  9. Contraction of electroweak model and neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, N. A.

    2012-10-15

    The electroweak model, which lepton sector correspond to the contracted gauge group SU(2; j) Multiplication-Sign U(1), j {yields} 0, whereas boson and quark sectors are standard one, is suggested. The field space of the model is fibered under contraction in such a way that neutrino fields are in the fiber and all other fields are in the base. Properties of the fibered field space are understood in context of semi-Riemannian geometry. This model describes in a natural manner why neutrinos so rarely interact with matter, as well as why neutrino cross section increase with the energy. Dimensionfull parameter of the model is interpreted as neutrino energy. Dimensionless contraction parameter j at low energy is connected with the Fermi constant of weak interactions and is approximated as j{sup 2} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -5}.

  10. Diphotons from electroweak triplet-singlet mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Kiel; Knapen, Simon; Robinson, Dean J.

    2016-08-01

    The neutral component of a real pseudoscalar electroweak (EW) triplet can produce a diphoton excess at 750 GeV, if it is somewhat mixed with an EW singlet pseudoscalar. This triplet-singlet mixing allows for greater freedom in the diboson branching ratios than the singlet-only case, but it is still possible to probe the parameter space extensively with 300 fb-1 . The charged component of the triplet is pair produced at the LHC, which results in a striking signal in the form of a pair of W γ resonances with an irreducible rate of 0.27 fb. Other signatures include multiboson final states from cascade decays of the triplet-singlet neutral states. A large class of composite models feature both EW singlet and triplet pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons in their spectrum, with the diboson couplings generated by axial anomalies.

  11. Electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1990-09-01

    The Higgs mechanism is reviewed in its most general form, requiring the existence of a new symmetry-breaking force and associated particles, which need not however be Higgs bosons. The first lecture reviews the essential elements of the Higgs mechanism, which suffice to establish low energy theorems for the scattering of longitudinally polarized W and Z gauge bosons. An upper bound on the scale of the symmetry-breaking physics then follows from the low energy theorems and partial wave unitarity. The second lecture reviews particular models, with and without Higgs bosons, paying special attention to how the general features discussed in lecture 1 are realized in each model. The third lecture focuses on the experimental signals of strong WW scattering that can be observed at the SSC above 1 TeV in the WW subenergy, which will allow direct measurement of the strength of the symmetry-breaking force. 52 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Higgs couplings and precision electroweak data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batell, Brian; Gori, Stefania; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-01-01

    In light of the discovery of a Higgs-like particle at the LHC, we revisit the status of the precision electroweak data, focusing on two discrepant observables: 1) the long-standing 2.4 σ deviation in the forward-backward asymmetry of the bottom quark A_{FB}^b , and 2) the 2.3 σ deviation in R b , the ratio of the Z to boverline{b} partial width to the inclusive hadronic width, which is now in tension after a recent calculation including new two-loop electroweak corrections. We consider possible resolutions of these discrepancies. Taking the data at face value, the most compelling scenario is that new physics directly affects A_{FB}^b and R b , bringing the prediction into accord with the measured values. We propose a modified `Beautiful Mirrors' scenario which contains new vector-like quarks that mix with the b quark, modifying the Zboverline{b} vertex and thus correcting A_{FB}^b and R b . We show that this scenario can lead to modifications to the production rates of the Higgs boson in certain channels, and in particular a sizable enhancement in the diphoton channel. We also describe additional collider tests of this scenario.

  13. Dark light Higgs bosons.

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, P.; Liu, T.; Wagner, C. E. M.; Wang, L.-T.; Zhang, H.

    2011-03-24

    We study a limit of the nearly Peccei-Quinn-symmetric next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model possessing novel Higgs and dark matter (DM) properties. In this scenario, there naturally coexist three light singletlike particles: a scalar, a pseudoscalar, and a singlinolike DM candidate, all with masses of order 0.1-10 GeV. The decay of a standard model-like Higgs boson to pairs of the light scalars or pseudoscalars is generically suppressed, avoiding constraints from collider searches for these channels. For a certain parameter window annihilation into the light pseudoscalar and exchange of the light scalar with nucleons allow the singlino to achieve the correct relic density and a large direct-detection cross section consistent with the DM direct-detection experiments, CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, preferred region simultaneously. This parameter space is consistent with experimental constraints from LEP, the Tevatron, ?, and flavor physics.

  14. Precision Tests of Electroweak Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Akhundov, Arif

    2008-04-21

    The status of the precision tests of the electroweak interactions is reviewed in this paper. An emphasis is put on the Standard Model analysis based on measurements at LEP/SLC and the Tevatron. The results of the measurements of the electroweak mixing angle in the NuTeV experiment and the future prospects are discussed.

  15. Electroweak Baryogenesis in R-symmetric Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, R.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate that electroweak baryogenesis can occur in a supersymmetric model with an exact R-symmetry. The minimal R-symmetric supersymmetric model contains chiral superfields in the adjoint representation, giving Dirac gaugino masses, and an additional set of "R-partner" Higgs superfields, giving R-symmetric \\mu-terms. New superpotential couplings between the adjoints and the Higgs fields can simultaneously increase the strength of the electroweak phase transition and provide additional tree-level contributions to the lightest Higgs mass. Notably, no light stop is present in this framework, and in fact, we require both stops to be above a few TeV to provide sufficient radiative corrections to the lightest Higgs mass to bring it up to 125 GeV. Large CP-violating phases in the gaugino/higgsino sector allow us to match the baryon asymmetry of the Universe with no constraints from electric dipole moments due to R-symmetry. We briefly discuss some of the more interesting phenomenology, particularly of the of the lightest CP-odd scalar.

  16. LHC Higgs signatures from extended electroweak gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Chen, Ning; He, Hong-Jian

    2013-01-01

    We study LHC Higgs signatures from the extended electroweak gauge symmetry SU(2) ⊗ SU(2) ⊗ U(1). Under this gauge structure, we present an effective UV completion of the 3-site moose model with ideal fermion delocalization, which contains two neutral Higgs states ( h, H) plus three new gauge bosons ( W ' , Z '). We study the unitarity, and reveal that the exact E 2 cancellation in the longitudinal V L V L scattering amplitudes is achieved by the joint role of exchanging both spin-1 new gauge bosons W ' /Z ' and spin-0 Higgs bosons h/H. We identify the lighter Higgs state h with mass 125 GeV, and derive the unitarity bound on the mass of heavier Higgs boson H. The parameter space of this model is highly predictive. We study the production and decay signals of this 125 GeV Higgs boson h at the LHC. We demonstrate that the h Higgs boson can naturally have enhanced signals in the diphoton channel gg → h → γγ, while the event rates in the reactions gg → h → W W ∗ and gg → h → ZZ ∗ are generally suppressed relative to the SM expectation. Searching the h Higgs boson via the associated production and the vector boson fusions are also discussed for our model. We further analyze the LHC signals of the heavier Higgs boson H as a new physics discriminator from the SM. For wide mass-ranges of H, we derive constraints from the existing LHC searches, and study the discovery potential of H at the LHC (8 TeV) and LHC (14 TeV).

  17. Electroweak radiative effects in the single $W$-production at Tevatron and LHC

    SciTech Connect

    I. Akushevich; A. Ilyichev; N. Shumeiko; V. Zykunov

    2003-08-01

    An alternative calculation of the lowest order electroweak radiative corrections to the single W-boson production in hadron-hadron collision in the framework of the quark parton model without any absorption of the collinear quark singularity into the parton distributions is carried out. Numerical analysis under Tevatron and LHC kinematic conditions is performed.

  18. Weyl gauge-vector and complex dilaton scalar for conformal symmetry and its breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohanian, Hans C.

    2016-03-01

    Instead of the scalar "dilaton" field that is usually adopted to construct conformally invariant Lagrangians for gravitation, we here propose a hybrid construction, involving both a complex dilaton scalar and a Weyl gauge-vector, in accord with Weyl's original concept of a non-Riemannian conformal geometry with a transport law for length and time intervals, for which this gauge vector is required. Such a hybrid construction permits us to avoid the wrong sign of the dilaton kinetic term (the ghost problem) that afflicts the usual construction. The introduction of a Weyl gauge-vector and its interaction with the dilaton also has the collateral benefit of providing an explicit mechanism for spontaneous breaking of the conformal symmetry, whereby the dilaton and the Weyl gauge-vector acquire masses somewhat smaller than {m}_{P} by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Conformal symmetry breaking is assumed to precede inflation, which occurs later by a separate GUT or electroweak symmetry breaking, as in inflationary models based on the Higgs boson.

  19. Precision Studies of Hadronic and Electro-Weak Interactions for Collider Physics. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, Scott A

    2014-04-02

    This project was directed toward developing precision computational tools for proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, focusing primarily on electroweak boson production and electroweak radiative corrections. The programs developed under this project carried the name HERWIRI, for High Energy Radiation With Infra-Red Improvements, and are the first steps in an ongoing program to develop a set of hadronic event generators based on combined QCD and QED exponentiation. HERWIRI1 applied these improvements to the hadronic shower, while HERWIRI2 will apply the electroweak corrections from the program KKMC developed for electron-positron scattering to a hadronic event generator, including exponentiated initial and final state radiation together with first-order electroweak corrections to the hard process. Some progress was also made on developing differential reduction techniques for hypergeometric functions, for application to the computation of Feynman diagrams.

  20. A Combination of Preliminary Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dong

    2003-05-15

    This note presents a combination of published and preliminary electroweak results from the four LEP collaborations and the SLD collaboration which were prepared for the 1997 summer conferences. Averages are derived for hadronic and leptonic cross-sections, the leptonic forward-backward asymmetries, the {tau} polarisation asymmetries, the b{bar b} and c{bar c} partial widths and forward-backward asymmetries and the q{bar q} charge asymmetry. The major changes with respect to results presented last year are updated results of A{sub LR} from SLD, and the inclusion of the first direct measurements of the W mass and triple-gauge-boson couplings performed at LEP. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments. The parameters of the Standard Model are evaluated, first using the combined LEP electroweak measurements, and then using the full set of electroweak results.

  1. Hidden sector dark matters and elusive Higgs boson(s) at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, P.

    2012-07-27

    We consider two types of hidden sector dark matters (DM's), with and without QCD-like new strong interaction with confinement properties, and their interplays with the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson. Assuming the hidden sector has only fermions (and gauge bosons in case of strongly interacting hidden sector), we have to introduce a real singlet scalar boson S as a messenger between the SM and the hidden sector dark matters. This singlet scalar will mix with the SM Higgs boson h, and we expect there are two Higgs-like scalar bosons H{sub 1} and H{sub 2}. Imposing all the relevant constraints from collider search bounds on Higgs boson, DM scattering cross section on proton and thermal relic density, we find that one of the two Higgs-like scalar bosons can easily escape the detections at the LHC. Recent results on the Higgs-like new boson with mass around with 125 GeV from the LHC will constrain this class of models, which is left for future study.

  2. A new boson with a mass of 125 GeV observed with the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    2012-12-21

    The Higgs boson was postulated nearly five decades ago within the framework of the standard model of particle physics and has been the subject of numerous searches at accelerators around the world. Its discovery would verify the existence of a complex scalar field thought to give mass to three of the carriers of the electroweak force-the W(+), W(-), and Z(0) bosons-as well as to the fundamental quarks and leptons. The CMS Collaboration has observed, with a statistical significance of five standard deviations, a new particle produced in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The evidence is strongest in the diphoton and four-lepton (electrons and/or muons) final states, which provide the best mass resolution in the CMS detector. The probability of the observed signal being due to a random fluctuation of the background is about 1 in 3 × 10(6). The new particle is a boson with spin not equal to 1 and has a mass of about 125 [corrected] giga-electron volts. Although its measured properties are, within the uncertainties of the present data, consistent with those expected of the Higgs boson, more data are needed to elucidate the precise nature of the new particle.

  3. A new boson with a mass of 125 GeV observed with the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    2012-12-21

    The Higgs boson was postulated nearly five decades ago within the framework of the standard model of particle physics and has been the subject of numerous searches at accelerators around the world. Its discovery would verify the existence of a complex scalar field thought to give mass to three of the carriers of the electroweak force-the W(+), W(-), and Z(0) bosons-as well as to the fundamental quarks and leptons. The CMS Collaboration has observed, with a statistical significance of five standard deviations, a new particle produced in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The evidence is strongest in the diphoton and four-lepton (electrons and/or muons) final states, which provide the best mass resolution in the CMS detector. The probability of the observed signal being due to a random fluctuation of the background is about 1 in 3 × 10(6). The new particle is a boson with spin not equal to 1 and has a mass of about 125 [corrected] giga-electron volts. Although its measured properties are, within the uncertainties of the present data, consistent with those expected of the Higgs boson, more data are needed to elucidate the precise nature of the new particle. PMID:23258887

  4. Pinning down electroweak dipole operators of the top quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Markus; Soreq, Yotam

    2016-08-01

    We consider hadronic top quark pair production and pair production in association with a photon or a Z boson to probe electroweak dipole couplings in tbar{b}W, t bar{t}γ , and t bar{t}Z interactions. We demonstrate how measurements of these processes at the 13 TeV LHC can be combined to disentangle and constrain anomalous dipole operators. The construction of cross section ratios allows us to significantly reduce various uncertainties and exploit orthogonal sensitivity between the t bar{t}γ and t bar{t}Z couplings. In addition, we show that angular correlations in tbar{t} production can be used to constrain the remaining tbar{b}W dipole operator. Our approach yields excellent sensitivity to the anomalous couplings and can be a further step toward precise and direct measurements of the top quark electroweak interactions.

  5. Precision Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-11

    This note presents constraints on Standard Model parameters using published and preliminary precision electroweak results measured at the electron-positron colliders LEP and SLC. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably CDF and D0 at the Tevatron. Constraints on the input parameters of the Standard Model are derived from the results obtained in high-Q{sup 2} interactions, and used to predict results in low-Q{sup 2} experiments, such as atomic parity violation, Moller scattering, and neutrino-nucleon scattering. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in 2007 are new combinations of results on the W-boson mass and width and the mass of the top quark.

  6. Precision electroweak measurements and constraints on the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This note presents constraints on Standard Model parameters using published and preliminary precision electroweak results obtained at the electron-positron colliders LEP and SLC. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably CDF and D0 at the Tevatron. Constraints on the input parameters of the Standard Model are derived from the combined set of results obtained in high-Q{sup 2} interactions, and used to predict results in low-Q{sup 2} experiments, such as atomic parity violation, Moeller scattering, and neutrino-nucleon scattering. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in 2009 are new combinations of results on the width of the W boson and the mass of the top quark.

  7. Precision Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-11-01

    This note presents constraints on Standard Model parameters using published and preliminary precision electroweak results measured at the electron-positron colliders LEP and SLC. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably CDF and D0 at the Tevatron. Constraints on the input parameters of the Standard Model are derived from the combined set of results obtained in high-Q{sup 2} interactions, and used to predict results in low-Q{sup 2} experiments, such as atomic parity violation, Moeller scattering, and neutrino-nucleon scattering. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in 2008 are new combinations of results on the W-boson mass and the mass of the top quark.

  8. Precision Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    The , ALEPH, CDF, D0, ...

    2009-12-11

    This note presents constraints on Standard Model parameters using published and preliminary precision electroweak results measured at the electron-positron colliders LEP and SLC. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably CDF and D0 at the Tevatron. Constraints on the input parameters of the Standard Model are derived from the combined set of results obtained in high-Q{sup 2} interactions, and used to predict results in low-Q{sup 2} experiments, such as atomic parity violation, Moeller scattering, and neutrino-nucleon scattering. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in 2008 are new combinations of results on the W-boson mass and the mass of the top quark.

  9. Electroweak and flavor dynamics at hadron colliders - I

    SciTech Connect

    Elchtent, E.; Lane, K.

    1998-02-01

    This is the first of two reports cataloging the principal signatures of electroweak and flavor dynamics at {anti p}p and pp colliders. Here, we discuss some of the signatures of dynamical electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking. The framework for dynamical symmetry breaking we assume is technicolor, with a walking coupling {alpha}{sub TC}, and extended technicolor. The reactions discussed occur mainly at subprocess energies {radical}{cflx s}{approx_lt} 1 TeV. They include production of color-singlet and octet technirhos and their decay into pairs of technipions, longitudinal weak bosons, or jets. Technipions, in turn, decay predominantly into heavy fermions. This report will appear in the Proceedings of the 1996 DPF/DPB Summer Study on New Directions for High Energy Physics (Snowmass 96).

  10. Standard model CP violation and cold electroweak baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tranberg, Anders

    2011-10-15

    Using large-scale real-time lattice simulations, we calculate the baryon asymmetry generated at a fast, cold electroweak symmetry breaking transition. CP-violation is provided by the leading effective bosonic term resulting from integrating out the fermions in the Minimal Standard Model at zero-temperature, and performing a covariant gradient expansion [A. Hernandez, T. Konstandin, and M. G. Schmidt, Nucl. Phys. B812, 290 (2009).]. This is an extension of the work presented in [A. Tranberg, A. Hernandez, T. Konstandin, and M. G. Schmidt, Phys. Lett. B 690, 207 (2010).]. The numerical implementation is described in detail, and we address issues specifically related to using this CP-violating term in the context of Cold Electroweak Baryogenesis.

  11. Jets and Vector Bosons in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, Begoña

    2013-11-01

    This paper reviews experimental results on jets and electroweak boson (photon,Wand Z) production in heavy-ion collisions, from the CMS and ATLAS detectors, using data collected during 2011 PbPb run and pp data collected at an equivalent energy. By comparing the two collision systems, the energy loss of the partons propagating through the medium produced in PbPb collisions can be studied. Its characterization is done using dijet events and isolated photon-jet pairs. Since the electroweak gauge bosons do not participate in the strong interaction, and are thus unmodified by the nuclear medium, they serve as clean probes of the initial state in the collision.

  12. Electroweak breaking and neutrino mass: ‘invisible’ Higgs decays at the LHC (type II seesaw)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Romão, Jorge C.; Valle, José W. F.

    2016-03-01

    Neutrino mass generation through the Higgs mechanism not only suggests the need to reconsider the physics of electroweak symmetry breaking from a new perspective, but also provides a new theoretically consistent and experimentally viable paradigm. We illustrate this by describing the main features of the electroweak symmetry breaking sector of the simplest type-II seesaw model with spontaneous breaking of lepton number. After reviewing the relevant ‘theoretical’ and astrophysical restrictions on the Higgs sector, we perform an analysis of the sensitivities of Higgs Boson searches at the ongoing ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC, including not only the new contributions to the decay channels present in the standard model (SM) but also genuinely non-SM Higgs Boson decays, such as ‘invisible’ Higgs Boson decays to majorons. We find sensitivities that are likely to be reached at the upcoming run of the experiments.

  13. Multistate boson stars

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, A.; Barranco, J.; Alic, D.; Palenzuela, C.

    2010-02-15

    Motivated by the increasing interest in models which consider scalar fields as viable dark matter candidates, we have constructed a generalization of relativistic boson stars (BS) composed of two coexisting states of the scalar field, the ground state and the first excited state. We have studied the dynamical evolution of these multistate boson stars (MSBS) under radial perturbations, using numerical techniques. We show that stable MSBS can be constructed, when the number of particles in the first excited state, N{sup (2)}, is smaller than the number of particles in the ground state, N{sup (1)}. On the other hand, when N{sup (2)}>N{sup (1)}, the configurations are initially unstable. However, they evolve and settle down into stable configurations. In the stabilization process, the initially ground state is excited and ends in a first excited state, whereas the initially first excited state ends in a ground state. During this process, both states emit scalar field radiation, decreasing their number of particles. This behavior shows that even though BS in the first excited state are intrinsically unstable under finite perturbations, the configuration resulting from the combination of this state with the ground state produces stable objects. Finally we show in a qualitative way, that stable MSBS could be realistic models of dark matter galactic halos, as they produce rotation curves that are flatter at large radii than the rotation curves produced by BS with only one state.

  14. Gravitational waves from the electroweak phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Leitao, Leonardo; Mégevand, Ariel; Sánchez, Alejandro D. E-mail: megevand@mdp.edu.ar

    2012-10-01

    We study the generation of gravitational waves in the electroweak phase transition. We consider a few extensions of the Standard Model, namely, the addition of scalar singlets, the minimal supersymmetric extension, and the addition of TeV fermions. For each model we consider the complete dynamics of the phase transition. In particular, we estimate the friction force acting on bubble walls, and we take into account the fact that they can propagate either as detonations or as deflagrations preceded by shock fronts, or they can run away. We compute the peak frequency and peak intensity of the gravitational radiation generated by bubble collisions and turbulence. We discuss the detectability by proposed spaceborne detectors. For the models we considered, runaway walls require significant fine tuning of the parameters, and the gravitational wave signal from bubble collisions is generally much weaker than that from turbulence. Although the predicted signal is in most cases rather low for the sensitivity of LISA, models with strongly coupled extra scalars reach this sensitivity for frequencies f ∼ 10{sup −4} Hz, and give intensities as high as h{sup 2}Ω{sub GW} ∼ 10{sup −8}.

  15. Electroweak properties of light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Saori

    2016-03-01

    In this talk, I will review the present understanding of nuclear electroweak properties of light nuclei, including electromagnetic moments, form factors and transitions, as well as selected beta decays in A <= 10 nuclei. Emphasis will be on calculations based on nuclear Hamiltonians that include two- and three-nucleon realistic potentials, along with one- and two-body electroweak currents. Work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  16. One-Loop β Functions for Yukawa Couplings in the Electroweak-Scale Right-Handed Neutrino Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhu Le, Nguyen; Quang Hung, Pham

    2014-09-01

    Fermions in the model of electroweak-scale right-handed neutrinos (EWRH) with masses of the order of 300 GeV or more could result in dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking by forming condensates through the exchange of a fundamental Higgs scalar doublet or triplet. These condensates are dynamically studied within the framework of the Schwinger- Dyson equation. With the electroweak symmetry broken by condensates, the fully worked-out model of EWRH in which there are two doublets and two triplets, one of which is composite and the others being the original fundamental scalar doublet and triplet could be suitable for recent LHC discovery of the 125 GeV scalar particle.

  17. Explaining the Higgs decays at the LHC with an extended electroweak model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Alexandre; Ramirez Barreto, E.; Dias, A. G.; de S. Pires, C. A.; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Rodrigues da Silva, P. S.

    2013-02-01

    We show that the observed enhancement in the diphoton decays of the recently discovered new boson at the LHC, which we assume to be a Higgs boson, can be naturally explained by a new doublet of charged vector bosons from extended electroweak models with SU(3) C ⊗SU(3) L ⊗U(1) X symmetry. These models are also rather economical in explaining the measured signal strengths, within the current experimental errors, demanding fewer assumptions and less parameters tuning. Our results show a good agreement between the theoretical expected sensitivity to a 126-125 GeV Higgs boson, and the experimental significance observed in the diphoton channel at the 8 TeV LHC. Effects of an invisible decay channel for the Higgs boson are also taken into account, in order to anticipate a possible confirmation of deficits in the branching ratios into ZZ ∗, WW ∗, bottom quarks, and tau leptons.

  18. Top quark and Electroweak measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrito, L.

    2010-10-01

    We present recent preliminary measurements at the Tevatron of t{bar t} and single top production cross section, top quark mass and width, top pair spin correlations and forward-backward asymmetry. In the electroweak sector, we present the Tevatron average of the W boson width, and preliminary measurements of the W and Z forward-backward asymmetries and WZ, ZZ diboson production cross sections. All measurements are based on larger amount of collision data than previously used and are in agreement with the standard model.

  19. SUL(4) × U(1) model for electroweak unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayyazuddin; Riazuddin

    2004-12-01

    After some general remarks about SUL(4) electroweak unification, the model is extended to SUL(4) × UX(1) to accomodate fractionally charged quarks. The unification scale is expected to be in TeV region. A right-handed Majorana neutrino along with known lepton are put in the fundamental representation of SUL(4) with YX = 0. The see-saw mechanism for neutrino masses and flavor mixing in neutrino sector is a natural feature of the model. The lepton number violating processes can occure through dilepton gauge bosons contained in the model.

  20. Electroweak and b-physics at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, K.

    1994-04-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments have collected integrated luminosities of 21 pb{sup {minus}1} and 16 pb{sup {minus}1}, respectively, in the 1992--1993 run (Run Ia) at the Fermilab Tevatron. Preliminary results on electroweak physics are reported from both experiments: the W mass, the leptonic branching ratios {Tau}(W {yields} {ell}{nu}), the total W width, gauge boson couplings, W decay asymmetry and W{prime}/Z{prime} search. Preliminary new results on b physics are presented: B{sup o} {minus} {bar B}{sup o} mixing from D0, and masses and lifetimes of B{minus}mesons from CDF.

  1. A strong electroweak phase transition in the 2HDM after LHC8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsch, G. C.; Huber, S. J.; No, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    The nature of the electroweak phase transition in two-Higgs-doublet models is revisited in light of the recent LHC results. A scan over an extensive region of their parameter space is performed, showing that a strongly first-order phase transition favours a light neutral scalar with SM-like properties, together with a heavy pseudo-scalar ( ≳ 400 GeV) and a mass hierarchy in the scalar sector, . We also investigate the h 0 → γγ decay channel and find that an enhancement in the branching ratio is allowed, and in some cases even preferred, when a strongly first-order phase transition is required.

  2. Global Fits of the Electroweak Standard Theory: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baak, M.; Haller, J.; Mönig, K.

    2016-10-01

    The last decades have seen tremendous progress in the experimental techniques for measuring key observables of the Standard Theory (ST) as well as in theoretical calculations that has led to highly precise predictions of these observables. Global electroweak fits of the ST compare the precision measurements of electroweak observables from lepton and hadron colliders at CERN and elsewhere with accurate theoretical predictions of the ST calculated at multi-loop level. For a long time, global fits have been used to assess the validity of the ST and to constrain indirectly (by exploiting contributions from quantum loops) the remaining free ST parameters, like the masses of the top quark and Higgs boson before their direct discovery. With the discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the electroweak sector of the ST is now complete and all fundamental ST parameters are known. Hence the global fits are a powerful tool to probe the internal consistency of the ST, to predict ST parameters with high precision, and to constrain theories describing physics beyond the ST. In this chapter we review the global fits of the electroweak sector of the ST from an experimentalist's perspective. We briefly recall the most important achievements from the past (mainly driven by the precise measurements of Z pole observables), discuss the present situation after the accurate measurements of the top quark and Higgs boson masses, and present prospects of the fits as expected from new measurements at the LHC and future lepton colliders.

  3. Change of Electroweak Nuclear Reaction Rates by CP- and Isospin Symmetry Breaking - A Model Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Harald

    2006-09-01

    Based on the assumption that electroweak bosons, leptons and quarks possess a substructure of elementary fermionic constituents, in previous papers the effect of CP-symmetry breaking on the effective dynamics of these particles was calculated. Motivated by the phenomenological procedure in this paper, isospin symmetry breaking will be added and the physical consequences of these calculations will be discussed. The dynamical law of the fermionic constituents is given by a relativistically invariant nonlinear spinor field equation with local interaction, canonical quantization, selfregularization and probability interpretation. The corresponding effective dynamics is derived by algebraic weak mapping theorems. In contrast to the commonly applied modifications of the quark mass matrices, CP-symmetry breaking is introduced into this algebraic formalism by an inequivalent vacuum with respect to the CP-invariant case, represented by a modified spinor field propagator. This leads to an extension of the standard model as effective theory which contains besides the "electric" electroweak bosons additional "magnetic" electroweak bosons and corresponding interactions. If furthermore the isospin invariance of the propagator is broken too, it will be demonstrated in detail that in combination with CP-symmetry breaking this induces a considerable modification of electroweak nuclear reaction rates.

  4. Higgs Boson Physics at Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, Richard St.

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of a new boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC proton-proton collider is confirmed using the full data set collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The spin and parity properties of the boson are consistent with that of a scalar particle with positive parity. Comparison of the JP = 0+ hypothesis to alternatives JP = 0-, 1+, 1-, 2+ result in exclusion of these other choices at 97.8%, 99.97%, 99.7%, and 99.3% CL. The Higgs boson mass is m_H = 125.5 pm 0.2l( {stat. right)_{ - 0.5}^{ + 0.5} l( {syst.} right)GeV. Evidence for production of the Higgs boson by vector boson fusion is obtained in a model-independent approach by comparing the signal strengths μ of vector boson fusion and production associated with a vector boson to that for gluon fusion including associated production of top quark pairs: μ _{VBF + VH /μ _{gg F + ttH = 1.4_{ - 0.3}^{ + 0.4} l( {stat.} right)_{ - 0.4}^{ + 0.6} l( {syst.} right) which is 3.3 Gaussian standard deviations from zero.

  5. Wormholes and Goldstone bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.

    1988-07-18

    The quantum theory of a complex scalar field coupled to gravity is considered. A formalism for the semiclassical approach in Euclidean time is developed and used to study wormhole physics. The conserved global charge plays an essential role. Wormhole physics turns on only after the symmetry is spontaneously broken. An effective self-interaction for Goldstone bosons due to wormholes and child universes is shown to be a cosine potential, whose vacuum energy will be reduced by the cosmic expansion. Some implications and questions are discussed.

  6. Phenomenology of a light scalar: The dilaton

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchi, Luca

    2010-10-01

    We make use of the language of nonlinear realizations to analyze electroweak symmetry breaking scenarios in which a light dilaton emerges from the breaking of a nearly conformal strong dynamics and compare the phenomenology of the dilaton to that of the well-motivated light composite Higgs scenario. We argue that - in addition to departures in the decay/production rates into massless gauge bosons mediated by the conformal anomaly - characterizing features of the light dilaton scenario are enhancements in off-shell events at high invariant mass involving two longitudinally polarized vector bosons and a dilaton, and tree-level flavor violating processes. Accommodating both electroweak precision measurements and flavor constraints appears especially challenging in the ambiguous scenario in which the Higgs and the dilaton fields strongly mix. We show that warped higgsless models of electroweak symmetry breaking are explicit and tractable realizations of this limiting case. The relation between the naive radion profile often adopted in the study of holographic realizations of the light dilaton scenario and the actual dynamical dilaton field is clarified in the Appendix.

  7. Higgs-like boson at 750 GeV and genesis of baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Giardino, Pier Paolo; Zhang, Cen

    2016-07-01

    We propose that the diphoton excess at 750 GeV reported by ATLAS and CMS is due to the decay of an exo-Higgs scalar η associated with the breaking of a new S U (2 )e symmetry, dubbed exo-spin. New fermions, exo-quarks and exo-leptons, get TeV-scale masses through Yukawa couplings with η and generate its couplings to gluons and photons at one loop. The matter content of our model yields a B -L anomaly under S U (2 )e, whose breaking we assume entails a first-order phase transition. A nontrivial B -L asymmetry may therefore be generated in the early Universe, potentially providing a baryogenesis mechanism through the Standard Model (SM) sphaleron processes. The spontaneous breaking of S U (2 )e can, in principle, directly lead to electroweak symmetry breaking, thereby accounting for the proximity of the mass scales of the SM Higgs and the exo-Higgs. Our model can be distinguished from those comprising a singlet scalar and vector fermions by the discovery of TeV scale exo-vector bosons, corresponding to the broken S U (2 )e generators, at the LHC.

  8. Electroweak scale invariant models with small cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, Robert; Kobakhidze, Archil

    2015-07-01

    We consider scale invariant models where the classical scale invariance is broken perturbatively by radiative corrections at the electroweak scale. These models potentially offer an elegant and simple solution to the hierarchy problem. If we further require the cosmological constant to be small then such models are also highly predictive. Indeed, the minimal such model, comprizing a Higgs doublet and a real singlet, has the same number of parameters as the standard model. Although this minimal model is disfavored by recent LHC data, we show that two specific extensions incorporating neutrino masses and dark matter are fully realistic. That is, consistent with all experiments and observations. These models predict a light pseudo-Goldstone boson, h, with mass around 10 GeV or less. A fermionic-bosonic mass relation is also predicted. The specific models considered, as well as more generic scale invariant models, can be probed at the LHC.

  9. Electroweak Prospects for Tevatron RunII

    SciTech Connect

    D. Glenzinski

    2002-10-21

    In RunI each experiment collected about 100 pb{sup -1} of data. During RunIIa, each experiment is expected to collect about 2 fb{sup -1} of data. The center-of-mass energy for RunII, {radical}s = 2.0 TeV, is a bit larger than the 1.8 TeV of RunI and results in an increase of about 10% (35%) in the production cross-sections for W and Z (t{bar t}) events. Additional gains in the event yield are expected due to improvements in the detector acceptance and performance. Taken together, the RunIIa upgrades are expected to yield 2300k (800) W (t{bar t}) events per experiment, including the effects of event selection and triggering, which can be compared to the RunI yields of 77k (20) events. With the RunI data-set, CDF and D0 produced a breadth of electroweak results and obtained the world's only sample of top quarks. While the RunII electroweak physics program is very similar, the RunII upgrade improvements should yield many precision results. The Tevatron began delivering steady data in about June, 2001. The first six months of data taking was ''commissioning dominated'' for CDF and D0. Starting around January, 2002, the experiments were largely commissioned and began taking ''analysis quality'' data. The physics results reported at this conference are based on about 10-20pb{sup -1} (depending on the data-set) per experiment. Thus, the presently available event samples are smaller than those available in RunI. At this early stage of RunII, it is interesting to compare the present detector performance to that assumed when making the RunII physics projections. In the following sections the author discusses some RunII projections for a few electroweak measurements of particular importance, namely the precision determinations of the W-boson mass, M{sub W}, and the top-quark mass, M{sub t}.

  10. Electroweak Interactions in the Nuclear Domain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Steven James

    1988-12-01

    We consider a variety of electroweak interactions with nucleons and nuclei as a means to yield tests of the Standard Model, to provide measurements of hadronic structure, and to serve as a guide to experimental efforts. In Part I, we study single nucleon elastic electroweak processes. The general formalism is outlined, and we present formulae for cross section for e^- and upsilon neutral current processes, upsilon charge-changing events, and parity violation. We have found means to extract both vector and axial form factors from experiment, at arbitrary q ^2. We present numerical predictions for these processes, assuming a set of phenomenological form factors. Low energy structure in charge-changing reactions would provide tests of CVC and a measurement of the pseudoscalar form factor. We present relations between the processes which yield tests of the Standard Model and provide an experimental means to determine the effects of intrinsic parity violation, isospin breaking, and heavy quark content. We discuss parity violation as a means to measure sin ^2theta_{W} in the low energy quark-lepton sector, and to measure the weak form factors of the nucleon. We consider sources of uncertainty, including poorly known electromagnetic neutron form factors, and axial weak form factors. We provide a means to detect anomalous effective axial isoscalar currents, and discuss the bounds on extra heavy neutral Z bosons a CEBAF parity experiment would provide. In Part II, we study coincidence cross sections. The formalism for electroweak single-particle coincidence experiments is outlined. We derive the general angular distribution for single-nucleon coincidence measurements on a deuterium (spin 1) target. We derive a general expression for single pion electroproduction on the nucleon, including the asymmetry in the inclusive cross section. We present numerical predictions in the region of the Delta(1232) in the hopes of providing another measurement of sin ^2theta_{W}. We derive

  11. A Combination of Preliminary Electroweak Measurements And Constraints on the Standard Model (2004)

    SciTech Connect

    Abbaneo, D.

    2005-03-07

    This note presents a combination of published and preliminary electroweak results from the four LEP collaborations and the SLD collaboration which were prepared for the 2004 summer conferences. Averages from Z resonance results are derived for hadronic and leptonic cross sections, the leptonic forward-backward asymmetries, the {tau} polarization asymmetries, the b{bar b} and c{bar c} partial widths and forward-backward asymmetries and the q{bar q} charge asymmetry. Above the Z resonance, averages are derived for di-fermion cross sections and forward-backward asymmetries, photon-pair, W-pair, Z-pair, single-W and single-Z cross sections, electroweak gauge boson couplings, W mass and width and W decay branching ratios. Also, an investigation of the interference of photon and Z-boson exchange is presented, and colour reconnection and Bose-Einstein correlation analyses in W-pair production are combined. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in summer 2003 are updates to the W branching fractions and four-fermion cross sections measured at LEP-2, and the SLD/LEP heavy-flavour results measured at the Z pole. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably the final result on the electroweak mixing angle determined in neutrino-nucleon scattering by the NuTeV collaboration, the latest result in atomic parity violation in Caesium, and the measurement of the electroweak mixing angle in Moller scattering. The parameters of the Standard Model are evaluated, first using the combined LEP electroweak measurements, and then using the full set of high-Q{sup 2} electroweak results.

  12. Feynman propagator for a free scalar field on a causal set.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Steven

    2009-10-30

    The Feynman propagator for a free bosonic scalar field on the discrete spacetime of a causal set is presented. The formalism includes scalar field operators and a vacuum state which define a scalar quantum field theory on a causal set. This work can be viewed as a novel regularization of quantum field theory based on a Lorentz invariant discretization of spacetime.

  13. Is the Higgs boson composed of neutrinos?

    DOE PAGES

    Krog, Jens; Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-11-09

    We show that conventional Higgs compositeness conditions can be achieved by the running of large Higgs-Yukawa couplings involving right-handed neutrinos that become active at ~1013–1014 GeV. Together with a somewhat enhanced quartic coupling arising by a Higgs portal interaction to a dark matter sector, we can obtain a Higgs boson composed of neutrinos. Furthermore, this is a “next-to-minimal” dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking scheme.

  14. Is the Higgs boson composed of neutrinos?

    SciTech Connect

    Krog, Jens; Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-11-09

    We show that conventional Higgs compositeness conditions can be achieved by the running of large Higgs-Yukawa couplings involving right-handed neutrinos that become active at ~1013–1014 GeV. Together with a somewhat enhanced quartic coupling arising by a Higgs portal interaction to a dark matter sector, we can obtain a Higgs boson composed of neutrinos. Furthermore, this is a “next-to-minimal” dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking scheme.

  15. Boson shells harboring charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Laemmerzahl, Claus; List, Meike

    2010-11-15

    We consider boson shells in scalar electrodynamics coupled to Einstein gravity. The interior of the shells can be empty space, or harbor a black hole or a naked singularity. We analyze the properties of these types of solutions and determine their domains of existence. We investigate the energy conditions and present mass formulae for the composite black hole-boson shell systems. We demonstrate that these types of solutions violate black hole uniqueness.

  16. Higgs in bosonic channels (CMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Valentina

    2015-05-01

    The main Higgs boson decays into bosonic channels will be considered, presenting and discussing results from the latest reprocessing of data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, using the full dataset recorded at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. For this purpose, results from the final Run-I papers for the H → ZZ → 4ℓ, H → γγ and H → WW analyses are presented, focusing on the Higgs boson properties, like the mass, the signal strenght, the couplings to fermions and vector bosons, the spin and parity properties. Furthermore, the Higgs boson width measurement exploiting the on-shell versus the off-shell cross section (in the H → ZZ → 4ℓ and H → ZZ → 2ℓ2ν decay channels) will be shown. All the investigated properties result to be fully consistent with the SM predictions: the signal strength and the signal strength modifiers are consistent with unity in all the bosonic channels considered; the hypothesis of a scalar particle is strongly favored, against the pseudoscalar or the vector/pseudovector or the spin-2 boson hypotheses (all excluded at 99% CL or higher in the H → ZZ → 4ℓ channel). The Higgs boson mass measurement from the combination of H → ZZ → 4ℓ and H → γγ channels gives a value mH = 125.03+0.26-0.27 (stat.) +0.13-0.15 (syst.). An upper limit ΓH < 22 MeV can be put on the Higgs boson width thanks to the new indirect method.

  17. Electroweak results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1995-10-01

    Results from the CDF and D{O} experiments are presented on properties of the W{plus_minus} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities. In particular, measurements of the W{plus_minus} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections, the W-charge asymmetry and the CDF measurement of the W-mass are summarized. Gauge boson self interactions axe measured by studying di-gauge boson production and limits on anomalous gauge boson couplings axe discussed.

  18. Electroweak symmetry breaking without the μ2 term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goertz, Florian

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that from a low-energy perspective a viable breaking of the electroweak symmetry, as present in nature, can be achieved without the (negative sign) μ2 mass term in the Higgs potential, thereby avoiding completely the appearance of relevant operators, featuring coefficients with a positive mass dimension, in the theory. We show that such a setup is self-consistent and not ruled out by Higgs physics. In particular, we point out that it is the lightness of the Higgs boson that allows for the electroweak symmetry to be broken dynamically via operators of D ≥4 , consistent with the power expansion. Beyond that, we entertain how this scenario might even be preferred phenomenologically compared to the ordinary mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, as realized in the Standard Model, and argue that it can be fully tested at the LHC. In the Appendix, we classify UV completions that could lead to such a setup, considering also the option of generating all scales dynamically.

  19. Screening of heavy scalars beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Einhorn, M.B. Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1120 ); Wudka, J. )

    1993-06-01

    Spontaneously broken gauge models generically present large radiative corrections when the masses of the scalars are larger than the symmetry-breaking scale(s). This is not necessary, however, and we determine, based on the symmetry and renormalization properties of the theory, the most general conditions under which scalar radiative effects are screened. Barring fine tuning, the properties of the Goldstone sector determine whether this type of screening is present or not, and this can be decided in most cases by inspection (given the pattern of symmetry breaking). We consider several examples. In particular we show that in left-right symmetric models the two requirements that all scalars be significantly heavier than the gauge bosons is inconsistent with screening; this implies either the presence of large radiative corrections produced by the heavy scalars, or the presence of scalars with masses similar to that of the (heaviest) gauge bosons in these models.

  20. Two-step electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Satoru; Ovanesyan, Grigory; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze electroweak baryogenesis during a two-step electroweak symmetry-breaking transition, wherein the baryon asymmetry is generated during the first step and preserved during the second. Focusing on the dynamics of C P violation required for asymmetry generation, we discuss general considerations for successful two-step baryogenesis. Using a concrete model realization, we illustrate in detail the viability of this scenario and the implications for present and future electric dipole moment (EDM) searches. We find that C P violation associated with a partially excluded sector may yield the observed baryon asymmetry while evading present and future EDM constraints.

  1. Fluctuation driven electroweak phase transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in the early Universe. For Higgs masses in the range 46 less than or = M sub H less than or = 150 GeV and top quark masses less than 200 GeV, regions of symmetric and asymmetric vacuum coexist to below the critical temperature, with thermal equilibrium between the two phases maintained by fluctuations of both phases. We propose that the transition to the asymmetric vacuum is completed by percolation of these subcritical fluctuations. Our results are relevant to scenarios of baryogenesis that invoke a weakly first-order phase transition at the electroweak scale.

  2. Some phenomenological predictions of charged Higgs bosons in electroweak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, C. A. García; Santangelo, E. M.

    1984-06-01

    Some phenomenological consequences of an extended Salam-Weinberg model are studied. In particular, the existence, or absence, of e-μ asymmetry in beam-dump experiments is analyzed and an increase in same sign dilepton cross sections is shown to exist due to the contribution of charged Higgs-mediated diagrams. The model is shown to be compatible with experimental results for other processes.

  3. Combined constraints on holographic bosonic technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Carone, Christopher D.; Primulando, Reinard

    2010-07-01

    We consider a model of strong electroweak symmetry breaking in which the expectation value of an additional, possibly composite, scalar field is responsible for the generation of fermion masses. The dynamics of the strongly coupled sector is defined and studied via its holographic dual, and does not correspond to a simple, scaled-up version of QCD. We consider the bounds from perturbative unitarity, the S parameter, and the mass of the Higgs-like scalar. We show that the combination of these constraints leaves a relatively limited region of parameter space viable, and suggests the qualitative features of the model that might be probed at the LHC.

  4. Electroweak Corrections at the LHC with MCFM

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Wackeroth, Doreen; Zhou, Jia

    2015-07-10

    Electroweak (EW) corrections at the LHC can be enhanced at high energies due to soft/collinear radiation of W and Z bosons, being dominated by Sudakov-like corrections in the form of $\\alpha_W^l\\log^n(Q^2/M_W^2)$ $(n \\le 2l, \\alpha_W = \\alpha/(4\\pi\\sin\\theta_W^2))$ when the energy scale $Q$ enters the TeV regime. Thus, the inclusion of EW corrections in LHC predictions is important for the search of possible signals of new physics in tails of kinematic distributions. EW corrections should also be taken into account in virtue of their comparable size ($\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$) to that of higher order QCD corrections ($\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s^2)$). We calculated the next-to-leading-order (NLO) weak corrections to the neutral-current (NC) Drell-Yan process, top-quark pair production and di-jet producion, and implemented them in the Monte-Carlo program MCFM. This enables a combined study with the corresponding NLO QCD corrections. We provide both the full NLO weak corrections and their weak Sudakov approximation valid at high energies. The latter is often used for a fast evaluation of weak effects, and having the exact result available as well allows to quantify the validity of the Sudakov approximation.

  5. Higgs Boson and New Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Shafi, Qaisar

    2008-04-21

    Finding the Standard Model scalar (Higgs) boson is arguably the single most important mission of the LHC. In addition, the LHC hopefully will do its utmost to uncover direct evidence for physics beyond the standard model. In this limited amount of space, in addition to the Higgs boson, I will very briefly discuss low energy supersymmetry and warped extra dimension.

  6. NLO Vector Boson Production With Light Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.; Diana, G.; Dixon, L.J.; Febres Cordero, F.; Forde, D.; Gleisberg, T.; Hoeche, S.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.; Ozeren, K.

    2012-02-15

    In this contribution we present recent progress in the computation of next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections for the production of an electroweak vector boson in association with jets at hadron colliders. We focus on results obtained using the virtual matrix element library BlackHat in conjunction with SHERPA, focusing on results relevant to understanding the background to top production. The production of a vector boson in association with several jets at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is an important background for other Standard Model processes as well as new physics signals. In particular, the production of a W boson in association with many jets is an important background for processes involving one or more top quarks. Precise predictions for the backgrounds are crucial to measurement of top-quark processes. Vector boson production in association with multiple jets is also a very important background for many SUSY searches, as it mimics the signatures of many typical decay chains. Here we will discuss how polarization information can be used as an additional handle to differentiate top pair production from 'prompt' W-boson production. More generally, ratios of observables, for example for events containing a W boson versus those containing a Z boson, are expected to be better-behaved as many uncertainties cancel in such ratios. Precise calculation of ratios, along with measurement of one of the two processes in the ratio, can be used in data-driven techniques for estimating backgrounds.

  7. Unitarity-controlled resonances after the Higgs boson discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph; Harris, Philip; Spannowsky, Michael; Takeuchi, Michihisa

    2015-07-01

    If the recently discovered Higgs boson's couplings deviate from the Standard Model expectation, we may anticipate new resonant physics in the weak boson fusion channels resulting from high scale unitarity sum rules of longitudinal gauge boson scattering. Motivated by excesses in analyses of multi-leptons + missing energy + jets final states during run 1, we perform a phenomenological investigation of these channels at the LHC bounded by current Higgs coupling constraints. Such an approach constrains the prospects to observe such new physics at the LHC as a function of very few and generic parameters and allows the investigation of the strong requirement of probability conservation in the electroweak sector to high energies.

  8. Moriond Electroweak 2006: Theory summary

    SciTech Connect

    Lykken, Joseph D.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    A concise look at the big picture of particle physics, including the status of the Standard Model, neutrinos, supersymmetry, extra dimensions and cosmology. Based upon the theoretical summary presented at the XLIst Rencontres de Moriond on Electroweak Interactions and Unified Theories, La Thuile, 11-18 March 2006.

  9. Spin and precision electroweak physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    A perspective on fundamental parameters and precision tests of the Standard Model is given. Weak neutral current reactions are discussed with emphasis on those processes involving (polarized) electrons. The role of electroweak radiative corrections in determining the top quark mass and probing for ``new physics`` is described.

  10. Dark light-Higgs bosons.

    PubMed

    Draper, Patrick; Liu, Tao; Wagner, Carlos E M; Wang, Lian-Tao; Zhang, Hao

    2011-03-25

    We study a limit of the nearly Peccei-Quinn-symmetric next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model possessing novel Higgs and dark matter (DM) properties. In this scenario, there naturally coexist three light singletlike particles: a scalar, a pseudoscalar, and a singlinolike DM candidate, all with masses of order 0.1-10 GeV. The decay of a standard model-like Higgs boson to pairs of the light scalars or pseudoscalars is generically suppressed, avoiding constraints from collider searches for these channels. For a certain parameter window annihilation into the light pseudoscalar and exchange of the light scalar with nucleons allow the singlino to achieve the correct relic density and a large direct-detection cross section consistent with the DM direct-detection experiments, CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, preferred region simultaneously. This parameter space is consistent with experimental constraints from LEP, the Tevatron, Υ, and flavor physics. PMID:21517303

  11. Dark Light-Higgs Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, Patrick; Liu Tao; Wagner, Carlos E. M.; Wang, Lian-Tao; Zhang Hao

    2011-03-25

    We study a limit of the nearly Peccei-Quinn-symmetric next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model possessing novel Higgs and dark matter (DM) properties. In this scenario, there naturally coexist three light singletlike particles: a scalar, a pseudoscalar, and a singlinolike DM candidate, all with masses of order 0.1-10 GeV. The decay of a standard model-like Higgs boson to pairs of the light scalars or pseudoscalars is generically suppressed, avoiding constraints from collider searches for these channels. For a certain parameter window annihilation into the light pseudoscalar and exchange of the light scalar with nucleons allow the singlino to achieve the correct relic density and a large direct-detection cross section consistent with the DM direct-detection experiments, CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, preferred region simultaneously. This parameter space is consistent with experimental constraints from LEP, the Tevatron, {Upsilon}, and flavor physics.

  12. Electroweak corrections to W+W-Z and ZZZ production at the linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, F.; Le, D. N.; Sun, H.; Weber, M. M.

    2010-07-01

    We calculate the electroweak corrections to the production of WWZ and ZZZ at the linear collider in the Standard Model. These processes are important for the extraction of the quartic couplings of the massive gauge bosons which can be a window on the mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. We find that the weak corrections to some kinematic distributions show new features and hence cannot be explained by an overall scale factor.

  13. On a Singular Solution in Higgs Field (1)- Basic equation and structure for SM Higgs boson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Kazuyoshi

    2011-04-01

    A formula for mass of SM Higgs boson (H0) is derived by considering certain asymptotic behavior for singular solution of EOM of Higgs field via Euler-Lagrange equation, in which MH0 is shown as a rest mass of Higgs boson mass of the field, which maintains Lorentz invariance. Where the asymptotic formula extracts a proper information near the singular solution. By modifying the mass formula with H0 production scheme of W/Z-fusion process, the value of MH0 is determined at 120.611 GeV/c2. Then the mass structure of H0 is discussed by top quark decay processes in electroweak and quark sectors with newly enlarged equation of motion (Non-Linear Klein-Gordon), calculating the mass value of top quark as 171.266 GeV/c2. And from the difference between the value by assuming that H0 is a virtual bound state of top quark- pair ((t t)*) itself with the mass formula obtained by requirement of minimal mass production and the theoretical mass value of H0 (120.611 GeV/c2), it is expected that H0 is to be a composite scalar meson after emitting one photon from the (t t)* through radiative decay. Finally, a mass structure of H0 which is composed of all spin 0 mesons' masses, is proposed. Where the truncated-Octahedron mass structure is recursively (doubly) seen.

  14. Classically conformal U(1 ) ' extended standard model, electroweak vacuum stability, and LHC Run-2 bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arindam; Oda, Satsuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2016-06-01

    We consider the minimal U(1 ) ' extension of the standard model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly-free U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1 ) ' Higgs field. Since the classically conformal symmetry forbids all dimensional parameters in the model, the U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is broken by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass terms of the U(1 ) ' gauge boson (Z' boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a mixing quartic coupling between the U(1 ) ' Higgs field and the SM Higgs doublet field, the radiative U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry breaking also triggers the breaking of the electroweak symmetry. In this model context, we first investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. Employing the renormalization group equations at the two-loop level and the central values for the world average masses of the top quark (mt=173.34 GeV ) and the Higgs boson (mh=125.09 GeV ), we perform parameter scans to identify the parameter region for resolving the electroweak vacuum instability problem. Next we interpret the recent ATLAS and CMS search limits at the LHC Run-2 for the sequential Z' boson to constrain the parameter region in our model. Combining the constraints from the electroweak vacuum stability and the LHC Run-2 results, we find a bound on the Z' boson mass as mZ'≳3.5 TeV . We also calculate self-energy corrections to the SM Higgs doublet field through the heavy states, the right-handed neutrinos and the Z' boson, and find the naturalness bound as mZ'≲7 TeV , in order to reproduce the right electroweak scale for the fine-tuning level better than 10%. The resultant mass range of 3.5 TeV ≲mZ'≲7 TeV will be explored at the LHC Run-2 in the near future.

  15. Kerr-Newman black holes with scalar hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Jorge F. M.; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen; Rúnarsson, Helgi

    2016-10-01

    We construct electrically charged Kerr black holes (BHs) with scalar hair. Firstly, we take an uncharged scalar field, interacting with the electromagnetic field only indirectly, via the background metric. The corresponding family of solutions, dubbed Kerr-Newman BHs with ungauged scalar hair, reduces to (a sub-family of) Kerr-Newman BHs in the limit of vanishing scalar hair and to uncharged rotating boson stars in the limit of vanishing horizon. It adds one extra parameter to the uncharged solutions: the total electric charge. This leading electromagnetic multipole moment is unaffected by the scalar hair and can be computed by using Gauss's law on any closed 2-surface surrounding (a spatial section of) the event horizon. By contrast, the first sub-leading electromagnetic multipole - the magnetic dipole moment -, gets suppressed by the scalar hair, such that the gyromagnetic ratio is always smaller than the Kerr-Newman value (g = 2). Secondly, we consider a gauged scalar field and obtain a family of Kerr-Newman BHs with gauged scalar hair. The electrically charged scalar field now stores a part of the total electric charge, which can only be computed by applying Gauss' law at spatial infinity and introduces a new solitonic limit - electrically charged rotating boson stars. In both cases, we analyze some physical properties of the solutions.

  16. Higgs bosons of a supersymmetric U(1)' model

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Seung Woo; Oh, Sun Kun

    2008-11-23

    The lightest scalar Higgs boson is predicted to be smaller than 162 GeV in the leptophobic {eta}-model, at the one-loop level, for a reasonable region of parameter space. In the NMSSM, the sum of the square of the normalized scalar Higgs coupling coefficients to a pair of Z bosons is unity, whereas the corresponding quantity in the leptophobic {eta}-model is less than unity. Thus, by measuring the scalar Higgs coupling coefficients at the ILC, the leptophobic {eta}-model might be distinguished from the NMSSM.

  17. Dark matter and strong electroweak phase transition in a radiative neutrino mass model

    SciTech Connect

    Ahriche, Amine; Nasri, Salah E-mail: snasri@uaeu.ac.ae

    2013-07-01

    We consider an extension of the standard model (SM) with charged singlet scalars and right handed (RH) neutrinos all at the electroweak scale. In this model, the neutrino masses are generated at three loops, which provide an explanation for their smallness, and the lightest RH neutrino, N{sub 1}, is a dark matter candidate. We find that for three generations of RH neutrinos, the model can be consistent with the neutrino oscillation data, lepton flavor violating processes, N{sub 1} can have a relic density in agreement with the recent Planck data, and the electroweak phase transition can be strongly first order. We also show that the charged scalars may enhance the branching ratio h→γγ, where as h→γZ get can get few percent suppression. We also discuss the phenomenological implications of the RH neutrinos at the collider.

  18. 750 GeV diphoton excess and strongly first-order electroweak phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelstein, Maxim; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-07-01

    A new scalar particle, coupled to photons and gluons via loops of vectorlike quarks, provides a simple theoretical interpretation of the 750 GeV diphoton excess reported by the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this paper, we show that this model contains a large, phenomenologically viable parameter space region in which the electroweak phase transition (EWPT) is strongly first order, opening the possibility that the electroweak baryogenesis mechanism can be realized in this context. A large coupling between the Higgs doublet and the heavy scalar, required for a strongly first-order EWPT, can arise naturally in composite Higgs models. The scenario makes robust predictions that will be tested in near-future experiments. The cross section of resonant di-Higgs production at the 13 TeV LHC is predicted to be at least 20 fb, while the Higgs cubic self-coupling is enhanced by 40% or more with respect to its Standard Model (SM) value.

  19. Iron Kα line of boson stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zheng; Cárdenas-Avendaño, Alejandro; Zhou, Menglei; Bambi, Cosimo; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen

    2016-10-01

    The present paper is a sequel to our previous work [1] in which we studied the iron Kα line expected in the reflection spectrum of Kerr black holes with scalar hair. These metrics are solutions of Einstein's gravity minimally coupled to a massive, complex scalar field. They form a continuous bridge between a subset of Kerr black holes and a family of rotating boson stars depending on one extra parameter, the dimensionless scalar hair parameter q, ranging from 0 (Kerr black holes) to 1 (boson stars). Here we study the limiting case q = 1, corresponding to rotating boson stars. For comparison, spherical boson stars are also considered. We simulate observations with XIS/Suzaku. Using the fact that current observations are well fit by the Kerr solution and thus requiring that acceptable alternative compact objects must be compatible with a Kerr fit, we find that some boson star solutions are relatively easy to rule out as potential candidates to explain astrophysical black holes, while other solutions, which are neither too dilute nor too compact are more elusive and we argue that they cannot be distinguished from Kerr black holes by the analysis of the iron line with current X-ray facilities.

  20. A composite model of quarks and bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    A composite model of quarks and bosons is proposed in which a spin 1/2 isospin doublet ψ is the basic building block of quarks and bosons in the standard model. The ψ has two components v and w with charges Q = (1)/(3)e and Q = 0, respectively, that combine to form the three generations of colored quark flavors. A strong force described by a triplet of massless gluons binds the constituents called geminis. The confining constituent non-Abelian SU(2)C field theory is called constituent dynamics with a confining energy scale ΛCD. The constituent dynamics condensate <\\bar {v}v+\\bar {w}w>!=q 0 spontaneously breaks the electroweak symmetry SU(2)L×U(1)Y→U(1)EM and a triplet of Nambu-Goldstone bosons make the gauge bosons W± and Z0 massive, while retaining a massless photon. A global custodial SU(2)L×SU(2)R symmetry guarantees that the symmetry breaking in the weak interaction sector agrees with electroweak data. The non-Abelian SU(2)C color dynamics satisfies asymptotic freedom, which resolves the gauge and Higgs mass hierarchy problems and makes the model ultraviolet complete. The composite constituent dynamics model can realize a SU(3)C×SU(2)L×U(1)Y electroweak and strong interaction model that satisfies the naturalness principle. The three generations of colorless quarks α and β with charges Q = +1e and Q = 0, respectively, which are predicted to exist in the composite model can form bound states which can be identified with the spectrum of exotic mesons.

  1. Electroweak Vortices and Gauge Equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowell, Samuel W.; Törnkvist, Ola

    Vortex configurations in the electroweak gauge theory are investigated. Two gauge-inequivalent solutions of the field equations, the Z and W vortices, have previously been found. They correspond to embeddings of the Abelian Nielsen-Olesen vortex solution into a U(1) subgroup of SU(2)×U(1). It is shown here that any electroweak vortex solution can be mapped into a solution of the same energy with a vanishing upper component of the Higgs field. The correspondence is a gauge equivalence for all vortex solutions except those for which the winding numbers of the upper and lower Higgs components add to zero. This class of solutions, which includes the W vortex, corresponds to a singular solution in the one-component gauge. The results, combined with numerical investigations, provide an argument against the existence of other vortex solutions in the gauge-Higgs sector of the Standard Model.

  2. Lepton-mediated electroweak baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Garbrecht, Bjorn; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Tulin, Sean

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the impact of the tau and bottom Yukawa couplings on the transport dynamics for electroweak baryogenesis in supersymmetric extensions of the standard model. Although it has generally been assumed in the literature that all Yukawa interactions except those involving the top quark are negligible, we find that the tau and bottom Yukawa interaction rates are too fast to be neglected. We identify an illustrative 'lepton-mediated electroweak baryogenesis' scenario in which the baryon asymmetry is induced mainly through the presence of a left-handed leptonic charge. We derive analytic formulas for the computation of the baryon asymmetry that, in light of these effects, are qualitatively different from those in the established literature. In this scenario, for fixed CP-violating phases, the baryon asymmetry has opposite sign compared to that calculated using established formulas.

  3. Family number non-conservation induced by the supersymmetric mixing of scalar leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, M.J.S.

    1987-08-01

    The most egregious aspect of (N = 1) supersymmetric theories is that each particle state is accompanied by a 'super-partner', a state with identical quantum numbers save that it differs in spin by one half unit. For the leptons these are scalars and are called ''sleptons'', or scalar leptons. These consist of the charged sleptons (selectron, smuon, stau) and the scalar neutrinos ('sneutrinos'). We examine a model of supersymmetry with soft breaking terms in the electroweak sector. Explicit mixing among the scalar leptons results in a number of effects, principally non-conservation of lepton family number. Comparison with experiment permits us to place constraints upon the model. 49 refs., 12 figs.

  4. Electroweak measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Jose E.; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-06-01

    Recent Electroweak measurements by the CDF and D0 collaborations in p{bar p} collisions {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are presented here. Measurements of W, Z and diboson production cross sections as well as W asymmetry using integrated luminosities up to 800 pb{sup -1} are reviewed. Limits on triple gauge anomalous couplings on diboson production are discussed elsewhere.

  5. Study of Several Potentials as Scalar Field Dark Matter Candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Vazquez-Gonzalez, Alberto; Magan a, Juan

    2008-12-04

    In this work we study several scalar field potentials as a plausible candidate to be the dark matter in the universe. The main idea is the following; if the scalar field is an ultralight boson particle, it condensates like a Bose-Einstein system at very early times and forms the basic structure of the Universe. Real scalar fields collapse in equilibrium configurations which oscillate in space-time (oscillatons). The cosmological behavior of the field equations are solved using the dynamical system formalism. We use the current cosmological parameters as constraints for the free parameters of the scalar field potentials. We are able to reproduce very well the cosmological predictions of the standard {lambda}CDM model with some scalar field potentials. Therefore, scalar field dark matter seems to be a good alternative to be the nature of the dark matter of the universe.

  6. Regular scalar collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasukov, V. V.

    2012-06-01

    It is shown that negative Scalars can claim to be the object referred to as black holes, therefore observation of black holes means observation of Scalars. In contrast to blackholes, negative Scalars contain no singularity inside. Negative Scalars can be observed from the effect of generation of ordinary matter by the Lemaître primordial atom.

  7. Search for the Higgs Boson and Technicolor Particles in p anti-p Colisions at sqrt(s) = 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Cortabitarte, Rocio Vilar; /Cantabria U., Santander

    1999-11-01

    In the Standard Model (SM) of the elementary particles, the interactions among the known fundamental fermions (leptons and quarks) are mediated through gauge bosons which obey the symmetry: SU(3) {circle_times} SU(2) {circle_times} U(1). More precisely, the electroweak interaction [4-6] is described by a gauge symmetry SU(2) {circle_times} U(1) which is broken spontaneously. The electroweak symmetry breaking is implemented by the introduction of a complex scalar Higgs field which has a non-zero vacuum expectation value (vev). This way, the lagrangian of the theory remains invariant under SU(2) transformations, but quantization of the fields must start from a ground state which does not exhibit this symmetry, and therefore the full symmetry of the lagrangian is not manifest. Invariance of the theory under local SU(2) transformations implies the presence of vectorial gauge fields which mediate the electroweak interactions. The so called spontaneous symmetry breaking allows the quanta of these gauge fields, the W and Z bosons, to acquire a finite mass. The photon, the particle which mediates the electromagnetic interaction, remains massless. The Higgs boson is one of only two particles in the SM which have not yet been directly observed (the other is the {nu}{sub {tau}}, although there is indirect evidence of its existence). Although the SM does not predict the Higgs mass, a lower limit {approx} 100 GeV/c{sup 2} is set by LEPII data, and theoretical considerations prefer Higgs masses not higher than a few hundred GeV/c{sup 2}. At the Tevatron, a search for the Higgs boson is hard due to the small production cross section and the huge backgrounds that do not allow to see the signal clearly. It is still interesting, however, to perform sensitivity studies at the Tevatron. The easiest production channel to observe at the Tevatron is the associated production of Higgs with weak (W or Z) bosons. The Higgs boson coupling to the fermions increases with fermion mass, so the

  8. Electroweak bremsstrahlung from neutron-neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yi; Liou, M. K.; Schreiber, W. M.

    2009-09-15

    Background: Nucleon-nucleon (NN) bremsstrahlung processes NN{gamma} (nn{gamma}, np{gamma}, and pp{gamma}) have been extensively investigated. Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung processes from nucleon-nucleon scattering NN{nu}{nu} (nn{nu}{nu}, np{nu}{nu}, and pp{nu}{nu}) have recently attracted attention in studies of neutrino emission in neutron stars. The calculated NN{nu}{nu} cross sections (or emissivities) are found to be sensitive to the two-nucleon dynamical model used in the calculations. Purpose and Method: A realistic one-boson-exchange (ROBE) model for NN interactions is used to construct the electroweak bremsstrahlung amplitudes using the well-known nucleon electromagnetic and weak interaction vertices. The constructed nn{gamma} and nn{nu}{nu} amplitudes are investigated by applying them to calculate nn{gamma} and nn{nu}{nu} cross sections, respectively. Results: (i) The 190-MeV ROBE nn{gamma} cross sections agree well with those calculated using the TuTts amplitude, but they are in disagreement with those calculated using the Low amplitude. (ii) The calculated nn{nu}{nu} cross sections using the ROBE amplitude at the neutrino-pair energy {omega} = 1 MeV are in quantitative agreement with those calculated by Timmermans et al.[Phys. Rev. C 65, 064007 (2002)], who used the leading-order term of the soft neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung amplitude. Conclusions: The nn{gamma} amplitude in the ROBE approach, which obeys the soft-photon theorem, has a predictive power similar to that of the TuTts amplitude. The nn{nu}{nu} amplitude in the ROBE approach, which is consistent with the soft neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung theorem, has a predictive power similar to that of the soft neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung amplitude of Timmermans et al. in the low neutrino-pair energy region.

  9. CDF electroweak studies and the search for the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J.; CDF Collaboration

    1994-02-01

    The second major run of the {bar p}p Fermilab Tevatron Collider ended on May 30. The CDF detector has accumulated almost five times the data sample of its previous 1988-1989 run. The author presents new results on electroweak physics, including the ratio of W to Z boson production cross-sections, and the charge asymmetry in W decay. He gives a progress report on the measurement of the W mass. New results from the 1988-1989 data on W-{gamma} production are also presented. The status of the search for the top quark in the dilepton modes is described. In addition a status report of the ongoing search in the lepton + jets mode is given.

  10. Electroweak Sudakov corrections to new physics searches at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Mauro; Montagna, Guido; Barzè, Luca; Moretti, Mauro; Nicrosini, Oreste; Piccinini, Fulvio; Tramontano, Francesco

    2013-09-20

    We compute the one-loop electroweak Sudakov corrections to the production process Z(νν)+n jets, with n=1, 2, 3, in pp collisions at the LHC. It represents the main irreducible background to new physics searches at the energy frontier. The results are obtained at the leading and next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy by implementing the general algorithm of Denner and Pozzorini in the event generator for multiparton processes alpgen. For the standard selection cuts used by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations, we show that the Sudakov corrections to the relevant observables can grow up to -40% at sqrt[s ]= 14 TeV. We also include the contribution due to undetected real radiation of massive gauge bosons, to show to what extent the partial cancellation with the large negative virtual corrections takes place in realistic event selections.

  11. Dynamics Behind the Quark Mass Hierarchy and Electroweak Symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Miransky, Vladimir A.

    2011-05-24

    I review the dynamics in a new class of models describing the quark mass hierarchy, suggested recently by Michio Hashimoto and the author. In this class, the dynamics primarily responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) leads to the mass spectrum of quarks with no (or weak) isospin violation. Moreover, the values of these masses are of the order of the observed masses of the down-type quarks. Then, strong (although subcritical) horizontal diagonal interactions for the t quark plus horizontal flavor-changing neutral interactions between different families lead (with no fine tuning) to a realistic quark mass spectrum. In this scenario, many composite Higgs bosons occur. A concrete model with the dynamical EWSB with the fourth family is described in detail.

  12. Dynamics Behind the Quark Mass Hierarchy and Electroweak Symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miransky, Vladimir A.

    2011-05-01

    I review the dynamics in a new class of models describing the quark mass hierarchy, suggested recently by Michio Hashimoto and the author. In this class, the dynamics primarily responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) leads to the mass spectrum of quarks with no (or weak) isospin violation. Moreover, the values of these masses are of the order of the observed masses of the down-type quarks. Then, strong (although subcritical) horizontal diagonal interactions for the t quark plus horizontal flavor-changing neutral interactions between different families lead (with no fine tuning) to a realistic quark mass spectrum. In this scenario, many composite Higgs bosons occur. A concrete model with the dynamical EWSB with the fourth family is described in detail.

  13. Search for doubly charged Higgs bosons through vector boson fusion at the LHC and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambhaniya, G.; Chakrabortty, J.; Gluza, J.; Jeliński, T.; Szafron, R.

    2015-07-01

    Production and decays of doubly charged Higgs bosons at the LHC and future hadron colliders triggered by a vector boson fusion mechanism are discussed in the context of the minimal left-right symmetric model. Our analysis is based on the Higgs boson mass spectrum compatible with available constraints which include flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) effects and vacuum stability of the scalar potential. Though the parity breaking scale vR is large (˜ few TeV) and scalar masses which contribute to FCNC effects are even larger, a consistent Higgs boson mass spectrum still allows us to keep doubly charged scalar masses below 1 TeV which is an interesting situation for LHC and future circular collider (FCC). We have shown that the allowed Higgs boson mass spectrum constrains the splittings (MH1±±-MH1± ), closing the possibility of H1±±→W1±H1± decays. Assuming that doubly charged Higgs bosons decay predominantly into a pair of same-sign charged leptons through the process p p →H1/2 ±±H1/2 ∓∓j j →ℓ±ℓ±ℓ∓ℓ∓j j , we find that for the LHC operating at √{s }=14 TeV with an integrated luminosity at the level of 3000 fb-1 (HL-LHC), there is practically no chance to detect such particles at the reasonable significance level through this channel. However, at 33 TeV HE-LHC and (or) 100 TeV FCC-hh, a wide region opens up for exploring the doubly charged Higgs boson mass spectrum. In FCC-hh, the doubly charged Higgs bosons mass up to 1 TeV can be easily probed.

  14. Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to electroweak Zjj production in the POWHEG BOX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Barbara; Schneider, Steven; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2012-09-01

    We present an implementation of electroweak Z-boson production in association with two jets at hadron colliders in the POWHEG framework, a method that allows the interfacing of NLO-QCD calculations with parton-shower Monte Carlo programs. We focus on the leptonic decays of the weak gauge boson, and take photonic and non-resonant contributions to the matrix elements fully into account. We provide results for observables of particular importance for the suppression of QCD backgrounds to vector-boson fusion processes by means of central-jet-veto techniques. While parton-shower effects are small for most observables associated with the two hardest jets, they can be more pronounced for distributions that are employed in central-jet-veto studies.

  15. Complete one-loop electroweak corrections to ZZZ production at the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji-Juan, Su; Wen-Gan, Ma; Ren-You, Zhang; Shao-Ming, Wang; Lei, Guo

    2008-07-01

    We study the complete O(αew) electroweak (EW) corrections to the production of three Z0 bosons in the framework of the standard model (SM) at the ILC. The leading-order and the EW next-to-leading-order corrected cross sections are presented, and their dependence on the colliding energy s and Higgs-boson mass mH is analyzed. We investigate also the LO and one-loop EW corrected distributions of the transverse momentum of the final Z0 boson, and the invariant mass of the Z0Z0 pair. Our numerical results show that the EW one-loop correction generally suppresses the tree-level cross section, and the relative correction with mH=120GeV(150GeV) varies between -15.8%(-13.9%) and -7.5%(-6.2%) when s goes up from 350 GeV to 1 TeV.

  16. ELECTROWEAK PHYSICS AND PRECISION STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    MARCIANO, W.

    2005-10-24

    The utility of precision electroweak measurements for predicting the Standard Model Higgs mass via quantum loop effects is discussed. Current values of m{sub W}, sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}(m{sub Z}){sub {ovr MS}} and m{sub t} imply a relatively light Higgs which is below the direct experimental bound but possibly consistent with Supersymmetry expectations. The existence of Supersymmetry is further suggested by a 2{sigma} discrepancy between experiment and theory for the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Constraints from precision studies on other types of ''New Physics'' are also briefly described.

  17. Searches for a High mass Higgs boson produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pagan Griso, Simone

    2010-03-01

    In this Thesis the electro-weak spontaneous symmetry breaking of the Standard Model (SM) is studied by searching for the scalar Higgs particle in the proton antiproton collisions of the Tevatron collider, at the center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. We report on the inclusive search for the Higgs boson decaying to two W bosons in the final state characterized by two charged leptons (e or μ) and two neutrinos. The analysis of 4.8 fb$^{-1}$ of data recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) shows no evidence of its production. We set 95% Confidence Level upper limits on the production cross section as a function of the mass $m_H$ in the range 110 to 200 GeV/$c^2$. For $m_H$ = 165 GeV/$c^2$ the observed limit is 1.3 times the SM predicted cross section (σH); the expected limit, in absence of signal, is 1.2+0.6 -0.4σ(H). These limits are the most stringent ones set by a single experiment up to date, for $m_H$ > 130 GeV/c2.

  18. All one-loop scalar vertices in the effective potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo-Molina, José Eliel; Morais, António P.; Pasechnik, Roman; Sampaio, Marco O. P.; Wessén, Jonas

    2016-08-01

    Using the one-loop Coleman-Weinberg effective potential, we derive a general analytic expression for all the derivatives of the effective potential with respect to any number of classical scalar fields. The result is valid for a renormalisable theory in four dimensions with any number of scalars, fermions or gauge bosons. This result corresponds to the zero-external momentum contribution to a general one-loop diagram with N scalar external legs. We illustrate the use of the general result in two simple scalar singlet extensions of the Standard Model, to obtain the dominant contributions to the triple couplings of light scalar particles under the zero external momentum approximation.

  19. Electroweak-scale resonant leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Underwood, Thomas E.J.

    2005-12-01

    We study minimal scenarios of resonant leptogenesis near the electroweak phase transition. These models offer a number of testable phenomenological signatures for low-energy experiments and future high-energy colliders. Our study extends previous analyses of the relevant network of Boltzmann equations, consistently taking into account effects from out of equilibrium sphalerons and single lepton flavors. We show that the effects from single lepton flavors become very important in variants of resonant leptogenesis, where the observed baryon asymmetry in the Universe is created by lepton-to-baryon conversion of an individual lepton number, for example, that of the {tau}-lepton. The predictions of such resonant {tau}-leptogenesis models for the final baryon asymmetry are almost independent of the initial lepton-number and heavy neutrino abundances. These models accommodate the current neutrino data and have a number of testable phenomenological implications. They contain electroweak-scale heavy Majorana neutrinos with appreciable couplings to electrons and muons, which can be probed at future e{sup +}e{sup -} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} high-energy colliders. In particular, resonant {tau}-leptogenesis models predict sizable 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay, as well as e- and {mu}-number-violating processes, such as {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and {mu}{yields}e conversion in nuclei, with rates that are within reach of the experiments proposed by the MEG and MECO collaborations.

  20. Electroweak vacuum stability and inflation via nonminimal derivative couplings to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vita, Stefano; Germani, Cristiano

    2016-02-01

    We show that the standard model vacuum can be stabilized if all particle propagators are nonminimally coupled to gravity. This is due to a Higgs-background dependent redefinition of the standard model fields: in terms of canonical variables and in the large Higgs field limit, the quantum fluctuations of the redefined fields are suppressed by the Higgs background. Thus, in this regime, quantum corrections to the tree-level electroweak potential are negligible. Finally, we show that in this framework the Higgs boson can be responsible for inflation. Due to a numerical coincidence that originates from the CMB data, inflation can happen if the Higgs boson mass, the top mass, and the QCD coupling lie in a region of the parameter space approximately equivalent than the one allowing for electroweak vacuum stability in the standard Model. We find some (small) regions in the standard model parameter space in which the new interaction "rescues" the electroweak vacuum, which would not be stable in the standard model.

  1. Effect of Vacuum Properties on Electroweak Processes - A Theoretical Interpretation of Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Harald

    2008-06-01

    Recently for discharges in fluids induced nuclear transmutations have been observed. It is our hypothesis that these reactions are due to a symmetry breaking of the electroweak vacuum by the experimental arrangement. The treatment of this hypothesis is based on the assumption that electroweak bosons, leptons and quarks possess a substructure of elementary fermionic constituents. The dynamical law of these fermionic constituents is given by a relativistically invariant nonlinear spinor field equation with local interaction, canonical quantization, selfregularization and probability interpretation. Phenomenological quantities of electroweak processes follow from the derivation of corresponding effective theories obtained by algebraic weak mapping theorems where the latter theories depend on the spinor field propagator, i. e. a vacuum expectation value. This propagator and its equation are studied for conserved and for broken discrete symmetries. For combined CP- and isospin symmetry breaking it is shown that the propagator corresponds to the experimental arrangements under consideration. The modifications of the effective electroweak theory due to this modified propagator are discussed. Based on these results a mechanism is sketched which offers a qualitative interpretation of the appearance of induced nuclear transmutations. A numerical estimate of electron capture is given.

  2. NLO QCD corrections to tri-boson production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binoth, T.; Ossola, G.; Papadopoulos, C. G.; Pittau, R.

    2008-06-01

    We present a calculation of the NLO QCD corrections for the production of three vector bosons at the LHC, namely ZZZ, W+W-Z, W+ZZ, and W+W-W+ production. The virtual corrections are computed using the recently proposed method of reduction at the integrand level (OPP reduction). Concerning the contributions coming from real emission we used the dipole subtraction to treat the soft and collinear divergences. We find that the QCD corrections for these electroweak processes are in the range between 70 and 100 percent. As such they have to be considered in experimental studies of triple vector boson production at the LHC.

  3. Electro-Weak, QCD and top physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, H.T.

    1993-09-01

    The 1992--1993 Tevatron collider run ended yesterday. {approx}21 (16)pb{sup {minus}1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}S = 1800 GeV were collected at CDF (D0). New measurements of the W and Z cross section x branching ratios indicate that {Gamma}(W) is 2.033 {plus_minus} 0.069 {plus_minus} 0.057 GeV. The upper limit for the top quark mass, if it is produced in W decays, is 62 GeV/c{sup 3}. Gauge boson pair production studies are beginning to constrain electro-weak parameters. No neutral gauge bosons with mass > M{sub z} have appeared. Inclusive jet production and angular distribution studies are compared to NLO perturbative QCD predictions. A new topological jet analysis from CDF is sensitive to the low x gluon distribution. The direct photon cross section shows a steeper fall-off with E{sub t} than does the theory prediction. D0 has one candidate t{bar t} event in the dilepton mode. The lower limit on M{sub T{sub op}} has been raised to 99 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  4. Neutrino signals from electroweak bremsstrahlung in solar WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nicole F.; Brennan, Amelia J.; Jacques, Thomas D. E-mail: a.brennan@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au

    2012-10-01

    Bremsstrahlung of W and Z gauge bosons, or photons, can be an important dark matter annihilation channel. In many popular models in which the annihilation to a pair of light fermions is helicity suppressed, these bremsstrahlung processes can lift the suppression and thus become the dominant annihilation channels. The resulting dark matter annihilation products contain a large, energetic, neutrino component. We consider solar WIMP annihilation in the case where electroweak bremsstrahlung dominates, and calculate the resulting neutrino spectra. The flux consists of primary neutrinos produced in processes such as χχ→ν-bar νZ and χχ→ν-bar lW, and secondary neutrinos produced via the decays of gauge bosons and charged leptons. After dealing with the neutrino propagation and flavour evolution in the Sun, we consider the prospects for detection in neutrino experiments on Earth. We compare our signal with that for annihilation to W{sup +}W{sup −}, and show that, for a given annihilation rate, the bremsstrahlung annihilation channel produces a larger signal by a factor of a few.

  5. Signatures of a nonstandard Higgs boson from flavor physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catà, Oscar; Jung, Martin

    2015-09-01

    We examine the constraints coming from incorporating the full Standard Model gauge symmetry into the effective field theory description of flavor processes, using semileptonic decays as paradigmatic examples. Depending on the dynamics triggering electroweak symmetry breaking, different patterns of correlations between the Wilson coefficients arise. Interestingly, this implies that flavor experiments are capable of shedding light upon the nature of the Higgs boson without actually requiring Higgs final states. Furthermore, the observed correlations can simplify model-independent analyses of these decays.

  6. Spectrum-doubled heavy vector bosons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, Thomas; Bai, Yang; Ingoldby, James; Piai, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    We study a simple effective field theory incorporating six heavy vector bosons together with the standard-model field content. The new particles preserve custodial symmetry as well as an approximate left-right parity symmetry. The enhanced symmetry of the model allows it to satisfy precision electroweak constraints and bounds from Higgs physics in a regime where all the couplings are perturbative and where the amount of fine-tuning is comparable to that in the standard model itself.

  7. D0 results on W boson properties

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, K.

    1997-06-01

    The D0 experiment collected {approx} 15 pb{sup -1} in run 1A (1992- 1993) and {approx}89 pb{sup -1} in run 1B (1994-1995) of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider using p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. Results from analyses of events with W and Z bosons are presented for the run 1B data samples. From W {yields} e{nu}, {mu}{nu} and Z {yields} ee, {mu}{mu} decays, the W and Z production cross sections and the W width are determined. Events with W {yields} {tau}{nu} decays are used to determine the ratio of the electroweak gauge coupling constants as a measure of lepton universality. Using W {yields} e{nu} and Z {yields} ee decays, the W boson mass is measured.

  8. Approximate gauge symemtry of composite vector bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2010-06-01

    It can be shown in a solvable field theory model that the couplings of the composite vector mesons made of a fermion pair approach the gauge couplings in the limit of strong binding. Although this phenomenon may appear accidental and special to the vector bosons made of a fermion pair, we extend it to the case of bosons being constituents and find that the same phenomenon occurs in more an intriguing way. The functional formalism not only facilitates computation but also provides us with a better insight into the generating mechanism of approximate gauge symmetry, in particular, how the strong binding and global current conservation conspire to generate such an approximate symmetry. Remarks are made on its possible relevance or irrelevance to electroweak and higher symmetries.

  9. Standard model bosons as composite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, D.E. . Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility); Kahana, S.H. )

    1990-01-01

    The Standard model of electro-weak interactions is derived from a Nambu, Jona-Lasinio type four-fermion interaction, which is assumed to result from a more basic theory valid above a very high scale {Lambda}. The masses of the gauge bosons and the Higgs are then produced by dynamical symmetry breaking of the Nambu model at an intermediate scale {mu}, and are evolved back to experimental energies via the renormalisation group equations of the Standard model. The weak angle sin{sup 2} ({theta}{sub W}) is predicted to be 3/8 at the scale {mu}, as in grand unified theories, and is evolved back to the experimental value at scale M{sub W}, thus determining {mu} {approximately}10{sup 13}GeV. Predictions for the ratios of the masses of the gauge and the Higgs bosons to the top quark mass, at experimental energies, are also obtained.

  10. Scalar field dark matter and the Higgs field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolami, O.; Cosme, Catarina; Rosa, João G.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the possibility that dark matter corresponds to an oscillating scalar field coupled to the Higgs boson. We argue that the initial field amplitude should generically be of the order of the Hubble parameter during inflation, as a result of its quasi-de Sitter fluctuations. This implies that such a field may account for the present dark matter abundance for masses in the range 10-6-10-4eV, if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is within the range of planned CMB experiments. We show that such mass values can naturally be obtained through either Planck-suppressed non-renormalizable interactions with the Higgs boson or, alternatively, through renormalizable interactions within the Randall-Sundrum scenario, where the dark matter scalar resides in the bulk of the warped extra-dimension and the Higgs is confined to the infrared brane.

  11. A gravitating electroweak bag model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burinskii, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Gravitational and electromagnetic (EM) field of electron is described by the Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole solution with a topological defect. Regularization of this defect by the Higgs field leads to the smooth source which shares much in common with the known MIT- and SLAC- bag models, but has the advantage, of matching gravitational and electromagnetic fields of the electron. This model is flexible, and the rotating KN bag takes the shape of a thin disk with a circular string positioned on the sharp border of the disk. We consider the lowest excitations of the KN solution and the corresponding deformations of the bag surface, setting a preliminary correspondence with electroweak sector of the SM.

  12. Bubble expansion and the viability of singlet-driven electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozaczuk, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    The standard picture of electroweak baryogenesis requires slowly expanding bubbles. This can be difficult to achieve if the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of a gauge singlet scalar field changes appreciably during the electroweak phase transition. It is important to determine the bubble wall velocity in this case, since the predicted baryon asymmetry can depend sensitively on its value. Here, this calculation is discussed and illustrated in the real singlet extension of the Standard Model. The friction on the bubble wall is computed using a kinetic theory approach and including hydrodynamic effects. Wall velocities are found to be rather large ( v w ≳ 0.2) but compatible with electroweak baryogenesis in some portions of the parameter space. If the phase transition is strong enough, however, a subsonic solution may not exist, precluding non-local electroweak baryogenesis altogether. The results presented here can be used in calculating the baryon asymmetry in various singlet-driven scenarios, as well as other features related to cosmological phase transitions in the early Universe, such as the resulting spectrum of gravitational radiation.

  13. PARTICLES AND FIELDS Two loop electroweak corrections from heavy fermions to b → s + γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiu-Yi; Feng, Tai-Fu

    2010-12-01

    Applying an effective Lagrangian method and an on-shell scheme, we analyze the electroweak corrections to the rare decay b → s + γ from some special two loop diagrams in which a closed heavy fermion loop is attached to the virtual charged gauge bosons or Higgs. At the decoupling limit where the virtual fermions in the inner loop are much heavier than the electroweak scale, we verify the final results satisfying the decoupling theorem explicitly when the interactions among Higgs and heavy fermions do not contain the nondecoupling couplings. Adopting the universal assumptions on the relevant couplings and mass spectrum of new physics, we find that the relative corrections from those two loop diagrams to the SM theoretical prediction on the branching ratio of B → Xsγ can reach 5% as the energy scale of new physics ΛNP = 200 GeV.

  14. Heavy fermions and two loop electroweak corrections to b → s + γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiu-Yi; Feng, Tai-Fu

    2010-05-01

    Applying effective Lagrangian method and on-shell scheme, we analyze the electroweak corrections to the rare decay b → s + γ from some special two loop diagrams in which a closed heavy fermion loop is attached to the virtual charged gauge bosons or Higgs. At the decoupling limit where the virtual fermions in inner loop are much heavier than the electroweak scale, we verify the final results satisfying the decoupling theorem explicitly when the interactions among Higgs and heavy fermions do not contain the nondecoupling couplings. Adopting the universal assumptions on the relevant couplings and mass spectrum of new physics, we find that the relative corrections from those two loop diagrams to the SM theoretical prediction on the branching ratio of B → X s γ can reach 5% as the energy scale of new physics ΛNP = 200GeV.

  15. Possible futures of electroweak precision: ILC, FCC-ee, and CEPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, JiJi; Reece, Matthew; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-09-01

    The future of high-precision electroweak physics lies in e + e - collider measurements of properties of the Z boson, the W boson, the Higgs boson, and the top quark. We estimate the expected performance of three possible future colliders: the ILC, FCC-ee (formerly known as TLEP), and CEPC. In particular, we present the first estimates of the possible reach of CEPC, China's proposed Circular Electron-Positron Collider, for the oblique parameters S and T and for seven-parameter fits of Higgs couplings. These results allow the physics potential for CEPC to be compared with that of the ILC and FCC-ee. We also show how the constraints on S and T would evolve as the uncertainties on each of the most important input measurements change separately. This clarifies the basic physics goals for future colliders. To improve on the current precision, the highest priorities are improving the uncertainties on m W and sin2 θ eff . At the same time, improved measurements of the top mass, the Z mass, the running of α, and the Z width will offer further improvement which will determine the ultimate reach. Each of the possible future colliders we consider has strong prospects for probing TeV-scale electroweak physics.

  16. Higgs and gravitational scalar fields together induce Weyl gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Erhard

    2015-02-01

    A common biquadratic potential for the Higgs field and an additional scalar field , non minimally coupled to gravity, is considered in a locally scale symmetric approach to standard model fields in curved spacetime. A common ground state of the two scalar fields exists and couples both fields to gravity, more precisely to Weyl geometric scalar curvature . In Einstein gauge (, often called "Einstein frame"), also is scaled to a constant. This condition makes perfect sense, even in the general case, in the Weyl geometric approach. There it has been called Weyl gauge, because it was first considered by Weyl in the different context of his original scale geometric theory of gravity of 1918. Now it may get new meaning as a combined effect of electroweak theory and gravity, and their common influence on atomic frequencies.

  17. Invisible decays of Higgs bosons in supersymmetric models

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, K.; Haber, H.E.

    1988-02-01

    We point out that the dominant decay of the light scalar Higgs boson in a supersymmetric model may be into a pair of the lightest neutralinos (assumed to be the lightest supersymmetric particles), which would result in an invisible final state. Thus, in the search at the Stanford Linear Collider and the CERN collider LEP for a Higgs scalar produced in association with a real or virtual Z boson, it is important not to cut out events with significant missing energy recoiling against the Z.

  18. Estimates of Z boson and J/ψ production cross sections at the large hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Alexopoulos, T.; Leontsinis, S.

    2015-05-15

    We calculate the leading-order cross section for the associated production of Z and J/ψ. Processes that include associated production of electroweak bosons and heavy quarkonium can give valuable insight into the production mechanism of quarkonia. We conclude that this process is accessible by the LHC statistics.

  19. Azimuthal angle correlation in vector-boson fusion processes at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Kaoru; Li Qiang; Mawatari, Kentarou

    2008-11-23

    Higgs boson and massive-graviton plus two jet productions via vector-boson fusion (VBF) processes at hadron colliders are studied. They include scalar and tensor boson production processes via weak-boson fusion in quark-quark collisions, gluon fusion in quark-quark, quark-gluon and gluon-gluon collisions. We show that the VBF amplitudes dominate the exact matrix elements not only for the weak-boson fusion processes but also for all the gluon fusion processes when selection cuts to enhance the VBF events are applied, such as a large rapidity separation between two jets.

  20. New strong interactions above the electroweak scale

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.R.

    1994-08-09

    Theoretical arguments for a new higher-color quark sector, based on Pomeron physics in QCD, are briefly described. The electroweak symmetry-breaking, Strong CP conservation, and electroweak scale CP violation, that is naturally produced by this sector is also outlined. A further consequence is that above the electroweak scale there will be a radical change in the strong interaction. Electroweak states, in particular multiple W`s and Z`s, and new, semi-stable, very massive, baryons, will be commonly produced. The possible correlation of expected phenomena with a wide range of observed Cosmic Ray effects at and above the primary spectrum knee is described. Related phenomena that might be seen in the highest energy hard scattering events at the Fermilab Tevatron, some of which could be confused with top production, are also briefly discussed.

  1. CP-Violating Sources for Electroweak Baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Christopher

    2008-11-23

    In this talk I derive the CP-violating sources for the squark number density in the MSSM generated by interactions with the spacetime-varying Higgs vev during a first-order electroweak phase transition.

  2. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Our proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. We demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.

  3. Radiative and Electroweak Penguins at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, HyoJung

    2010-02-01

    Radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B mesons are a sensitive probe of new physics beyond the Standard Model. We study the inclusive and exclusive radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B meson and also search an exotic particle seen by the HyperCP experiment. The measurements are based on a large data sample of 605 fb-1 containing 657 millions BB¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy asymmetric e+e- collider.

  4. Electroweak Gauge-Higgs Unification Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Hosotani, Yutaka

    2008-11-23

    In the gauge-Higgs unification scenario 4D Higgs fields are unified with gauge fields in higher dimensions. The electroweak model is constructed in the Randall-Sundrum warped space. The electroweak symmetry is dynamically broken by the Hosotani mechanism due to the top quark contribution. The Higgs mass is predicted to be around 50 GeV with the vanishing ZZH and WWH couplings so that the LEP2 bound for the Higgs mass is evaded.

  5. Bounds on the nonminimal coupling of the Higgs boson to gravity.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Michael; Calmet, Xavier

    2013-02-01

    We derive the first bound on the value of the Higgs boson nonminimal coupling to the Ricci scalar. We show that the recent discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN implies that the nonminimal coupling is smaller than 2.6×10(15).

  6. CDF results on electroweak physics

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J.; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    The second major run of the {bar p}p Fermilab Tevatron collider has just ended on June 1. The CDF detector has accumulated almost five times the data sample of its previous 1988--1989 run. We present new results on the ratio of W to Z boson production cross-sections and on the charge asymmetry in W decay. We give a progress report on the measurement of the W mass. New results from the 1988--1989 data on Drell-Yan production and on W {gamma} production are also presented.

  7. Theory and phenomenology of electroweak phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Hiren H.

    An open problem in cosmology is to explain the origin of baryon abundance implied by observational cosmology. Among the many proposed explanations, electroweak baryogenesis is particularly attractive in that its ingredients is discoverable by modern experiments. The analysis of the electroweak phase transition in the early universe comprises an integral component within the larger study of electroweak baryogenesis. In this work, I make a detailed investigation of the conventional analysis of the electroweak phase transition commonly found in literature, and explicitly demonstrate that results are not independent of the choice of gauge. In its place, I provide a manifestly gauge-independent method for the analysis, review sources of theoretical and numerical uncertainties, and explore avenues for further development. Next, I explore the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in two minimal extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics. Within these simple models, I describe a novel pattern of electroweak symmetry breaking favorable for baryogenesis that can serve as a paradigm for phase transition analysis in more complicated models.

  8. Gaussian effective potential for the standard model SU(2)xU(1) electroweak theory

    SciTech Connect

    Siringo, Fabio; Marotta, Luca

    2008-07-01

    The Gaussian effective potential is derived for the non-Abelian SU(2)xU(1) gauge theory of electroweak interactions. At variance with naive derivations, the Gaussian effective potential is proven to be a genuine variational tool in any gauge. The role of ghosts is discussed and the unitarity gauge is shown to be the only choice which allows calculability without insertion of further approximations. The full non-Abelian calculation confirms the existence of a light Higgs boson in the nonperturbative strong coupling regime of the Higgs sector.

  9. Bulk Randall-Sundrum models, electroweak precision tests, and the 125 GeV Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Abhishek M.; Sridhar, K.; Vempati, Sudhir K.

    2016-04-01

    We present up-to-date electroweak fits of various Randall-Sundrum (RS) models. We consider the bulk RS, deformed RS, and the custodial RS models. For the bulk RS case we find the lightest Kaluza-Klein (KK) mode of the gauge boson to be ˜8 TeV , while for the custodial case it is ˜3 TeV . The deformed model is the least fine-tuned of all which can give a good fit for KK masses <2 TeV depending on the choice of the model parameters. We also comment on the fine-tuning in each case.

  10. Boson dominance in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Fabrizio

    2005-07-01

    We present a new method of bosonization of fermion systems applicable when the partition function is dominated by composite bosons. By restricting the partition function to such states, we obtain a Euclidean bosonic action from which we derive the Hamiltonian. Such a procedure respects all the fermion symmetries, particularly the fermion number conservation, and provides a boson mapping of all fermion operators.

  11. MAPLE Procedures For Boson Fields System On Curved Space - Time

    SciTech Connect

    Murariu, Gabriel

    2007-04-23

    Systems of interacting boson fields are an important subject in the last years. From the problem of dark matter to boson stars' study, boson fields are involved. In the general configuration, it is considered a Klein-Gordon-Maxwell-Einstein fields system for a complex scalar field minimally coupled to a gravitational one. The necessity of studying a larger number of space-time configurations and the huge volume of computations for each particular situation are some reasons for building a MAPLE procedures set for this kind of systems.

  12. Color sextet vector bosons and same-sign top quark pairs at the LHC.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Berger, E. L.; Cao, Q.-H.; Chen, C.-R.; Shaughnessy, G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Tokyo; Northwestern Univ.; Peking Univ.

    2010-12-08

    We investigate the production of beyond-the-standard-model color sextet vector bosons at the Large Hadron Collider and their decay into a pair of same-sign top quarks. We demonstrate that the energy of the charged lepton from the top quark semi-leptonic decay serves as a good measure of the top quark polarization, which, in turn determines the quantum numbers of the boson and distinguishes vector bosons from scalars.

  13. Next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to pp → W+W- → 4 leptons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, B.; Billoni, M.; Denner, A.; Dittmaier, S.; Hofer, L.; Jäger, B.; Salfelder, L.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of the first calculation of next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to W-boson pair production at the LHC that fully takes into account leptonic W-boson decays and off-shell effects. Employing realistic event selections, we discuss the corrections in situations that are typical for the study of W-boson pairs as a signal process or of Higgs-boson decays H → WW∗, to which W-boson pair production represents an irreducible background. In particular, we compare the full off-shell results, obtained treating the W-boson resonances in the complex-mass scheme, to previous results in the so-called double-pole approximation, which is based on an expansion of the loop amplitudes about the W resonance poles. At small and intermediate scales, i.e. in particular in angular and rapidity distributions, the two approaches show the expected agreement at the level of fractions of a percent, but larger differences appear in the TeV range. For transverse-momentum distributions, the differences can even exceed the 10% level in the TeV range where "background diagrams" with one instead of two resonant W bosons gain in importance because of recoil effects.

  14. Scalar Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottola, Emil

    2016-03-01

    General Relativity receives quantum corrections relevant at macroscopic distance scales and near event horizons. These arise from the conformal scalar degree of freedom in the extended effective field theory (EFT) of gravity generated by the trace anomaly of massless quantum fields in curved space. Linearized around flat space this quantum scalar degree of freedom combines with the conformal part of the metric and predicts the existence of scalar spin-0 ``breather'' propagating gravitational waves in addition to the transverse tensor spin-2 waves of classical General Relativity. Estimates of the expected strength of scalar gravitational radiation from compact astrophysical sources are given.

  15. Kerr black holes with scalar hair.

    PubMed

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R; Radu, Eugen

    2014-06-01

    We present a family of solutions of Einstein's gravity minimally coupled to a complex, massive scalar field, describing asymptotically flat, spinning black holes with scalar hair and a regular horizon. These hairy black holes (HBHs) are supported by rotation and have no static limit. Besides mass M and angular momentum J, they carry a conserved, continuous Noether charge Q measuring the scalar hair. HBHs branch off from the Kerr metric at the threshold of the superradiant instability and reduce to spinning boson stars in the limit of vanishing horizon area. They overlap with Kerr black holes for a set of (M, J) values. A single Killing vector field preserves the solutions, tangent to the null geodesic generators of the event horizon. HBHs can exhibit sharp physical differences when compared to the Kerr solution, such as J/M^{2}>1, a quadrupole moment larger than J^{2}/M, and a larger orbital angular velocity at the innermost stable circular orbit. Families of HBHs connected to the Kerr geometry should exist in scalar (and other) models with more general self-interactions.

  16. Electroweak precision data and the Lee-Wick standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Thomas E. J.; Zwicky, Roman

    2009-02-01

    We investigate the electroweak precision constraints on the recently proposed Lee-Wick standard model at tree level. We analyze low-energy, Z-pole (LEP1/SLC) and LEP2 data separately. We derive the exact tree-level low-energy and Z-pole effective Lagrangians from both the auxiliary field and higher derivative formulation of the theory. For the LEP2 data we use the fact that the Lee-Wick standard model belongs to the class of models that assumes a so-called 'universal' form which can be described by seven oblique parameters at leading order in m{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub 1,2}{sup 2}. At tree level we find that Y=-m{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub 1}{sup 2} and W=-m{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub 2}{sup 2}, where the negative sign is due to the presence of the negative norm states. All other oblique parameters (S,X) and (T,U,V) are found to be zero. In the addendum we show how our results differ from previous investigations, where contact terms, which are found to be of leading order, have been neglected. The LEP1/SLC constraints are slightly stronger than LEP2 and much stronger than the low-energy ones. The LEP1/SLC results exclude gauge boson masses of M{sub 1}{approx_equal}M{sub 2}{approx}3 TeV at the 99% confidence level. Somewhat lower masses are possible when one of the masses assumes a large value. Loop corrections to the electroweak observables are suppressed by the standard {approx}1/(4{pi}){sup 2} factor and are therefore not expected to change the constraints on M1 and M{sub 2}. This assertion is most transparent from the higher derivative formulation of the theory.

  17. Fermion boson metamorphosis in field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Y.K.

    1982-01-01

    In two-dimensional field theories many features are especially transparent if the Fermi fields are represented by non-local expressions of the Bose fields. Such a procedure is known as boson representation. Bilinear quantities appear in the Lagrangian of a fermion theory transform, however, as simple local expressions of the bosons so that the resulting theory may be written as a theory of bosons. Conversely, a theory of bosons may be transformed into an equivalent theory of fermions. Together they provide a basis for generating many interesting equivalences between theories of different types. In the present work a consistent scheme for constructing a canonical Fermi field in terms of a real scalar field is developed and such a procedure is valid and consistent with the tenets of quantum field theory is verified. A boson formulation offers a unifying theme in understanding the structure of many theories. This is illustrated by the boson formulation of a multifermion theory with chiral and internal symmetries. The nature of dynamical generation of mass when the theory undergoes boson transmutation and the preservation of continuous chiral symmetry in the massive case are examined. The dynamics of the system depends to a great extent on the specific number of fermions and different models of the same system can have very different properties. Many unusual symmetries of the fermion theory, such as hidden symmetry, duality and triality symmetries, are only manifest in the boson formulation. The underlying connections between some models with U(N) internal symmetry and another class of fermion models built with Majorana fermions which have O(2N) internal symmetry are uncovered.

  18. Nonrelativistic approach for cosmological scalar field dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ureña-López, L. Arturo

    2014-07-01

    We derive nonrelativistic equations of motion for the formation of cosmological structure in a scalar field dark matter (SFDM) model corresponding to a complex scalar field endowed with a quadratic scalar potential. Starting with the equations of motion written in the Newtonian gauge of scalar perturbations, we separate out the involved fields into relativistic and nonrelativistic parts and find the equations of motion for the latter that can be used to build up the full solution. One important assumption will be that the SFDM field is in the regime of fast oscillations, under which its behavior in the homogeneous regime is exactly that of cold dark matter. The resultant equations are quite similar to the Schrödinger-Poisson system of Newtonian boson stars plus relativistic leftovers, and they can be used to study the formation of cosmological structure in SFDM models, and others alike, to ultimately prove their viability as complete dark matter models.

  19. Quartic gauge boson couplings at linear colliders. Interplay of WWZ/ZZZ production and WW-fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; He, Hong-Jian; Yuan, C.-P.

    1998-03-01

    We study new physics effects to the quartic gauge boson couplings formulated by the electroweak chiral Lagrangian. Five next-to-leading order operators characterize the anomalous quartic gauge interactions which involve pure Goldstone boson dynamics for the electroweak symmetry breaking. We estimate the typical size of these couplings in different strongly-interacting models and examine the sensitivity to directly probing them via the WWZ/ZZZ triple gauge boson production at the high energy linear colliders. The important roles of polarized e- and e+ beams are stressed. We then compare the results with those from the W-pair production of the WW-fusion processes, and analyze the interplay of these two production mechanisms for an improved probe of the quartic gauge boson interactions.

  20. Collider search at the LHC for new physics in electroweak symmetry breaking sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guiyu

    The turn-on of the Large Hadron Collider this year provides great opportunities to explore physics beyond Standard Model. We examine a few scenarios in the electroweak sector and study their LHC phenomenologies. First we assess the prospect of observing neutral Higgs bosons of mass 90--130 GeV produced with W/Z in its decay to two spin-zero states, a, which cascades into bottom or tau pairs. We show that LHC observation is possible, especially in channel h → aa → bbb b with large statistical significance. Next we study signals for Kaluza-Klein excitations of electroweak gauge bosons where SM fields propagate in a warped extra dimension. Fermionic decays of these states are overwhelmed by KK gluons decays. We show that due to enhanced couplings to longitudinal W/Z and Higgs, bosonic final states can give significant sensitivity at the LHC to 3 TeV KK scale with projected LHC luminosity. Finally, we demonstrate how to systematically test Type-II seesaw mechanism for neutrino mass generation at the LHC, which introduces a Higgs triplet. For small Higgs triplet vacuum expectation value vDelta , one can look for clean signals of lepton number violation in decays of doubly and singly charged Higgs bosons, thus distinguishing different neutrino mass spectrum. For large vDelta, one needs to observe the decays H+ → W +H1 and H+ → tb to confirm the triplet-doublet mixing and the implied interaction between lepton doublet and Higgs triplet responsible for the neutrino mass generation.

  1. Direct search for the Standard Model Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janot, Patrick; Kado, Marumi

    2002-11-01

    For twelve years, LEP revolutionized the knowledge of electroweak symmetry breaking within the standard model, and the direct discovery of the Higgs boson would have been the crowning achievement. Searches at the Z resonance and above the W +W - threshold allowed an unambiguous lower limit on the mass of the standard model Higgs boson to set be at 114.1 GeV· c-2. After years of efforts to push the LEP performance far beyond the design limits, hints of what could be the first signs of the existence of a 115 GeV· c-2 Higgs boson appeared in June 2000, were confirmed in September, and were then confirmed again in November. An additional six-month period of LEP operation was enough to provide a definite answer, with an opportunity to make a fundamental discovery of prime importance. To cite this article: P. Janot, M. Kado, C. R. Physique 3 (2002) 1193-1202.

  2. Discovering the Higgs boson with low mass muon pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.

    2009-06-01

    Many models of electroweak symmetry breaking have an additional light pseudoscalar. If the Higgs boson can decay to a new pseudoscalar, LEP searches for the Higgs can be significantly altered and the Higgs can be as light as 86 GeV. Discovering the Higgs boson in these models is challenging when the pseudoscalar is lighter than 10 GeV because it decays dominantly into tau leptons. In this paper, we discuss discovering the Higgs in a subdominant decay mode where one of the pseudoscalars decays to a pair of muons. This search allows for potential discovery of a cascade-decaying Higgs boson with the complete Tevatron data set or early data at the LHC.

  3. Electroweak theory based on S U (4 )L⊗U (1 )X gauge group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, H. N.; Hue, L. T.; Loi, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    This paper includes two main parts. In the first part, we present generalized gauge models based on the S U (3 )C⊗S U (4 )L⊗U (1 )X (3-4-1) gauge group with arbitrary electric charges of exotic leptons. The mixing matrix of neutral gauge bosons is analyzed, and the eigenmasses and eigenstates are obtained. The anomaly-free as well as matching conditions are discussed precisely. In the second part, we present a new development of the original 3-4-1 model [R. Foot, H. N. Long, and T. A. Tran, Phys. Rev. D 50, R34 (1994), F. Pisano and V. Pleitez, Phys. Rev. D 51, 3865 (1995).]. Different from previous works, in this paper the neutrinos, with the help of the scalar decuplet H , get the Dirac masses at the tree level. The vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the Higgs boson field in the decuplet H acquiring the VEV responsible for neutrino Dirac mass leads to mixing in separated pairs of singly charged gauge bosons, namely the Standard Model (SM) W boson and K , the new gauge boson acting in the right-handed lepton sector, as well as the singly charged bileptons X and Y . Due to the mixing, there occurs a right-handed current carried by the W boson. From the expression of the electromagnetic coupling constant, ones get the limit of the sine-squared of the Weinberg angle, sin2θW<0.25 , and a constraint on electric charges of extra leptons. In the limit of lepton number conservation, the Higgs sector contains all massless Goldstone bosons for massive gauge bosons and the SM-like Higgs boson. Some phenomenology is discussed.

  4. Long range correlation in Higgs boson plus two jets production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; Yuan, C.-P.; Yuan, Feng

    2016-11-01

    We study Higgs boson plus two high energy jets production at the LHC in the kinematics where the two jets are well separated in rapidity. The partonic processes are dominated by the t-channel weak boson fusion (WBF) and gluon fusion (GF) contributions. We derive the associated QCD resummation formalism for the correlation analysis where the total transverse momentum q⊥ of the Higgs boson and two jets is small. Because of different color structures, the resummation results lead to distinguished behaviors: the WBF contribution peaks at relative low q⊥ while all GF channel contributions are strongly de-correlated and spread to a much wider q⊥ range. By applying a kinematic cut on q⊥, one can effectively increase the WBF signal to the GF background by a significant factor. This greatly strengthens the ability to investigate the WBF channel in Higgs boson production and study the couplings of Higgs to electroweak bosons.

  5. Probing strongly-interacting electroweak dynamics through W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}/ZZ ratios at future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, V.; Cheung, K.; Han, T.; Phillips, R.J.N.

    1995-01-01

    The authors point out that the ratio of W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} and W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} {yields} ZZ cross sections is a sensitive probe of the dynamics of electroweak symmetry breaking, in the CM energy region {radical}s{sub ww} {approx_gt} 1 TeV where vector boson scattering may well become strong. They suggest ways in which this ratio can be extracted at a 1.5 TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider, using W{sup {+-}}, Z {yields} jj hadronic decays and relying on dijet mass resolution to provide statistical discrimination between W{sup {+-}} and Z. WW fusion processes studied here are unique for exploring scalar resonances of mass about 1 TeV and are complementary to studies via the direct channel e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} for the vector and non-resonant cases. With an integrated luminosity of 200 fb{sup {minus}1}, the signals obtained are statistically significant. Comparison with a study of e{sup {minus}}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{nu}W{sup {minus}}W{sup {minus}} process is made. Enhancements of the signal rate from using a polarized electron beam, or at a 2 TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider and possible higher energy {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders, are also presented.

  6. Interaction between bosonic dark matter and stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Okawa, Hirotada; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of how bosonic dark matter "condensates" interact with compact stars, extending significantly the results of a recent Letter [1]. We focus on bosonic fields with mass mB , such as axions, axion-like candidates and hidden photons. Self-gravitating bosonic fields generically form "breathing" configurations, where both the spacetime geometry and the field oscillate, and can interact and cluster at the center of stars. We construct stellar configurations formed by a perfect fluid and a bosonic condensate, and which may describe the late stages of dark matter accretion onto stars, in dark-matter-rich environments. These composite stars oscillate at a frequency which is a multiple of f =2.5 ×1014(mBc2/eV ) Hz . Using perturbative analysis and numerical relativity techniques, we show that these stars are generically stable, and we provide criteria for instability. Our results also indicate that the growth of the dark matter core is halted close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We thus dispel a myth concerning dark matter accretion by stars: dark matter accretion does not necessarily lead to the destruction of the star, nor to collapse to a black hole. Finally, we argue that stars with long-lived bosonic cores may also develop in other theories with effective mass couplings, such as (massless) scalar-tensor theories.

  7. Vacuum stability and radiative electroweak symmetry breaking in an SO(10) dark matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambrini, Yann; Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A.; Zheng, Jiaming

    2016-06-01

    Vacuum stability in the Standard Model is problematic as the Higgs quartic self-coupling runs negative at a renormalization scale of about 1010 GeV . We consider a nonsupersymmetric SO(10) grand unification model for which gauge coupling unification is made possible through an intermediate scale gauge group, Gint=SU (3 )C⊗SU (2 )L⊗SU (2 )R⊗U (1 )B -L . Gint is broken by the vacuum expectation value of a 126 of SO(10) which not only provides for neutrino masses through the seesaw mechanism but also preserves a discrete Z2 that can account for the stability of a dark matter candidate, here taken to be the Standard Model singlet component of a bosonic 16 . We show that in addition to these features the model insures the positivity of the Higgs quartic coupling through its interactions to the dark matter multiplet and 126 . We also show that the Higgs mass squared runs negative, triggering electroweak symmetry breaking. Thus, the vacuum stability is achieved along with radiative electroweak symmetry breaking and captures two more important elements of supersymmetric models without low-energy supersymmetry. The conditions for perturbativity of quartic couplings and for radiative electroweak symmetry breaking lead to tight upper and lower limits on the dark matter mass, respectively, and this dark matter mass region (1.35-2 TeV) can be probed in future direct detection experiments.

  8. Workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1984-10-01

    A theoretical workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking at the Superconducting Supercollider was held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, June 4-22, 1984. The purpose of the workshop was to focus theoretical attention on the ways in which experimentation at the SSC could reveal manifestations of the phenomenon responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. This issue represents, at present, the most compelling scientific argument for the need to explore the energy region to be made accessible by the SSC, and a major aim of the workshop was to involve a broad cross section of particle theorists in the ongoing process of sharpening the requirements for both accelerator and detector design that will ensure detection and identification of meaningful signals, whatever form the electroweak symmetry breaking phenomenon should actually take. Separate entries were prepared for the data base for the papers presented.

  9. Electroweak phase transition in ultraminimal technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Jaervinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco; Ryttov, Thomas A.

    2009-05-01

    We unveil the temperature-dependent electroweak phase transition in new extensions of the standard model in which the electroweak symmetry is spontaneously broken via strongly coupled, nearly conformal dynamics achieved by the means of multiple matter representations. In particular, we focus on the low energy effective theory introduced to describe ultra minimal walking technicolor at the phase transition. Using the one-loop effective potential with ring improvement, we identify regions of parameter space, which yield a strong first-order transition. A striking feature of the model is the existence of a second phase transition associated to the electroweak-singlet sector. The interplay between these two transitions leads to an extremely rich phase diagram.

  10. Comparison of associated Higgs boson-radion and Higgs boson pair production processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boos, E.; Keizerov, S.; Rakhmetov, E.; Svirina, K.

    2016-07-01

    Many models—in particular, the brane-world models with two branes—predict the existence of the scalar radion, whose mass can be somewhat smaller than those of all the Kaluza-Klein modes of the graviton and Standard Model (SM) particles. Due to its origin the radion interacts with the trace of the energy-momentum tensor of the SM. The fermion part of the radion interaction Lagrangian is different from that for the SM Higgs boson due to the presence of additional terms playing a role for off-shell fermions. It was shown previously [Phys. Rev. D 90, 095026 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.095026] that for the case of the single radion and single Higgs boson production processes in association with an arbitrary number of SM gauge bosons all the contributions to the perturbative amplitudes appearing due to these additional terms were canceled out, making the processes similar up to a replacement of masses and overall coupling constants. For the case of the associated Higgs boson-radion and the Higgs boson pair-production processes involving the SM gauge bosons, the similarity property also appears. However, a detailed consideration shows that in this case it is not enough to simply replace the masses and the constants (mh→mr and v →Λr). One should also rescale the triple Higgs coupling by the factor ξ ≡1 +m/r2-mh2 3 mh2 .

  11. Quadratic electroweak corrections for polarized Moller scattering

    SciTech Connect

    A. Aleksejevs, S. Barkanova, Y. Kolomensky, E. Kuraev, V. Zykunov

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses the two-loop (NNLO) electroweak radiative corrections to the parity violating electron-electron scattering asymmetry induced by squaring one-loop diagrams. The calculations are relevant for the ultra-precise 11 GeV MOLLER experiment planned at Jefferson Laboratory and experiments at high-energy future electron colliders. The imaginary parts of the amplitudes are taken into consideration consistently in both the infrared-finite and divergent terms. The size of the obtained partial correction is significant, which indicates a need for a complete study of the two-loop electroweak radiative corrections in order to meet the precision goals of future experiments.

  12. Electroweak naturalness and deflected mirage mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Vernon; Everett, Lisa L.; Garon, Todd S.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the question of electroweak naturalness within the deflected mirage mediation (DMM) framework for supersymmetry breaking in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. The class of DMM models considered are nine-parameter theories that fall within the general classification of the 19-parameter phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model. Our results show that these DMM models have regions of parameter space with very low electroweak fine-tuning, at levels comparable to the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model. These parameter regions should be probed extensively in the current LHC run.

  13. Radiative and Electroweak Penguins at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, Hyo Jung

    2010-02-10

    Radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B mesons are a sensitive probe of new physics beyond the Standard Model. We study the inclusive and exclusive radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B meson and also search an exotic particle seen by the HyperCP experiment. The measurements are based on a large data sample of 605 fb{sup -1} containing 657 millions BB-bar pairs collected at the UPSILON(4S) with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  14. Bosonized noncommutative bi-fundamental fermion and S-duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Harold

    2005-06-01

    We perform the path-integral bosonization of the recently proposed noncommutative massive Thirring model (NCMT1) [JHEP 0503 (2005) 037]. This model presents two types of current-current interaction terms related to the bi-fundamental representation of the group U(1). Firstly, we address the bosonization of a bi-fundamental free Dirac fermion defined on a noncommutative (NC) euclidean plane Bbb Rθ2. In this case we show that the fermion system is dual to two copies of the NC Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten model. Next, we apply the bosonization prescription to the NCMT1 model living on Bbb Rθ2 and show that this model is equivalent to two-copies of the WZNW model and a two-field potential defined for scalar fields corresponding to the global U(1) × U(1) symmetry plus additional bosonized terms for the four fermion interactions. The bosonic sector resembles to the one proposed by Lechtenfeld et al. [Nucl. Phys. B 705 (2005) 477] as the noncommutative sine-Gordon for a pair of scalar fields. The bosonic and fermionic couplings are related by a strong-weak duality. We show that the couplings of the both sectors for some representations satisfy similar relationships up to relevant re-scalings, thus the NC bi-fundamental couplings are two times the corresponding ones of the NC fundamental (anti-fundamental) and eight times the couplings of the ordinary massive Thirring and sine-Gordon models.

  15. The Higgs Boson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veltman, Martinus J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Reports recent findings related to the particle Higgs boson and examines its possible contribution to the standard mode of elementary processes. Critically explores the strengths and uncertainties of the Higgs boson and proposed Higgs field. (ML)

  16. Singlet-catalyzed electroweak phase transitions in the 100 TeV frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; No, Jose Miguel; Winslow, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We study the prospects for probing a gauge singlet scalar-driven strong first-order electroweak phase transition with a future proton-proton collider in the 100 TeV range. Singlet-Higgs mixing enables resonantly enhanced di-Higgs production, potentially aiding discovery prospects. We perform Monte Carlo scans of the parameter space to identify regions associated with a strong first-order electroweak phase transition, analyze the corresponding di-Higgs signal, and select a set of benchmark points that span the range of di-Higgs signal strengths. For the b b ¯γ γ and 4 τ final states, we investigate discovery prospects for each benchmark point for the high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider and for a future p p collider with √{s }=50 , 100, or 200 TeV. We find that any of these future collider scenarios could significantly extend the reach beyond that of the high-luminosity LHC, and that with √{s }=100 TeV (200 TeV) and 30 ab-1 , the full region of parameter space favorable to strong first-order electroweak phase transitions is almost fully (fully) discoverable.

  17. Electroweak and top physics at CDF in Run II

    SciTech Connect

    A. Taffard

    2003-06-12

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron has used p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV to measure the production cross sections of W and Z bosons using several leptonic final states. An indirect measurement of the W width and the ratio of tau and electron electroweak couplings have been extracted. The forward-backward charge asymmetry, A{sub FB}, in Drell-Yan dilectron production has been measured up to an invariant mass of 600 GeV/c{sup 2}. CDF has also started looking for WW production in the dilepton channel, WW{prime} {yields} ll{prime}vv, with the aim of measuring its cross section and derive limits on the anomalous WWZ and WW{gamma} couplings. The presence of a top quark signal in the Tevatron data has been reestablished by measuring the top quark pair production cross section in the dilepton channel, t{bar t} {yields} WbW{bar b} {yields} {bar l}v{sub l}bl{prime}{bar v}{sub l{prime}}{bar b} and in the lepton plus jets channel, t{bar t} {yields} WbW{bar b} {yields} q{bar q}lbl{bar b}{sub l}{bar b} + {bar l}v{sub l}bq{bar q}{prime}{bar b}. A pre-tagged lepton plus jets sample has also been used to reconstruct the top quark mass.

  18. Gravitational waves from a very strong electroweak phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitao, Leonardo; Mégevand, Ariel

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves in the electroweak phase transition. We consider extensions of the Standard Model which can give very strongly first-order phase transitions, such that the transition fronts either propagate as detonations or run away. To compute the bubble wall velocity, we estimate the friction with the plasma and take into account the hydrodynamics. We track the development of the phase transition up to the percolation time, and we calculate the gravitational wave spectrum generated by bubble collisions, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, and sound waves. For the kinds of models we consider, we find parameter regions for which the gravitational waves are potentially observable at the planned space-based interferometer eLISA. In such cases, the signal from sound waves is generally dominant, while that from bubble collisions is the least significant of them. Since the sound waves and turbulence mechanisms are diminished for runaway walls, the models with the best prospects of detection at eLISA are those which do not have such solutions. In particular, we find that heavy extra bosons provide stronger gravitational wave signals than tree-level terms.

  19. Two-loop virtual top-quark effect on Higgs-boson decay to bottom quarks.

    PubMed

    Butenschön, Mathias; Fugel, Frank; Kniehl, Bernd A

    2007-02-16

    In most of the mass range encompassed by the limits from the direct search and the electroweak precision tests, the Higgs boson of the standard model preferably decays to bottom quarks. We present, in analytic form, the dominant two-loop electroweak correction, of O(GF2mt4), to the partial width of this decay. It amplifies the familiar enhancement due to the O(GFmt2) one-loop correction by about +16% and thus more than compensates the screening by about -8% through strong-interaction effects of order O(alphasGFmt2).

  20. NLO electroweak corrections to off-shell top-antitop production with leptonic decays at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Ansgar; Pellen, Mathieu

    2016-08-01

    For the first time the next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to the full off-shell production of two top quarks that decay leptonically are presented. This calculation includes all off-shell, non-resonant, and interference effects for the 6-particle phase space. While the electroweak corrections are below one per cent for the integrated cross section, they reach up to 15% in the high-transverse-momentum region of distributions. To support the results of the complete one-loop calculation, we have in addition evaluated the electroweak corrections in two different pole approximations, one requiring two on-shell top quarks and one featuring two on-shell W bosons. While the former deviates by up to 10% from the full calculation for certain distributions, the latter provides a very good description for most observables. The increased centre-of-mass energy of the LHC makes the inclusion of electroweak corrections extremely relevant as they are particularly large in the Sudakov regime where new physics is expected to be probed.

  1. Composite boson mapping for lattice boson systems.

    PubMed

    Huerga, Daniel; Dukelsky, Jorge; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2013-07-26

    We present a canonical mapping transforming physical boson operators into quadratic products of cluster composite bosons that preserves matrix elements of operators when a physical constraint is enforced. We map the 2D lattice Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian into 2×2 composite bosons and solve it within a generalized Hartree-Bogoliubov approximation. The resulting Mott insulator-superfluid phase diagram reproduces well quantum Monte Carlo results. The Higgs boson behavior in the superfluid phase along the unit density line is unraveled and in remarkable agreement with experiments. Results for the properties of the ground and excited states are competitive with other state-of-the-art approaches, but at a fraction of their computational cost. The composite boson mapping here introduced can be readily applied to frustrated many-body systems where most methodologies face significant hurdles. PMID:23931383

  2. Bosonic seesaw mechanism in a classically conformal extension of the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-03-01

    We suggest the so-called bosonic seesaw mechanism in the context of a classically conformal U(1) B - L extension of the Standard Model with two Higgs doublet fields. The U(1) B - L symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, which also generates the mass terms for the two Higgs doublets through quartic Higgs couplings. Their masses are all positive but, nevertheless, the electroweak symmetry breaking is realized by the bosonic seesaw mechanism. Analyzing the renormalization group evolutions for all model couplings, we find that a large hierarchy among the quartic Higgs couplings, which is crucial for the bosonic seesaw mechanism to work, is dramatically reduced toward high energies. Therefore, the bosonic seesaw is naturally realized with only a mild hierarchy, if some fundamental theory, which provides the origin of the classically conformal invariance, completes our model at some high energy, for example, the Planck scale. We identify the regions of model parameters which satisfy the perturbativity of the running couplings and the electroweak vacuum stability as well as the naturalness of the electroweak scale.

  3. Age Crises, Scalar Fields, and the Apocalypse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, J. C.

    Recent observations suggest that Hubble's constant is large, to the extent that the oldest stars appear to have ages which are greater than the Hubble time, and that the Hubble expansion is slowing down, so that according to conventional cosmology the age of the Universe is less than the Hubble time. The concepts of weak and strong age crises (respectively t0<1/H0 but longer than the age inferred from some lower limit on q0, and t0>1/H0 and q0>0) are introduced. These observations are reconciled in models which are dynamically dominated by a homogeneous scalar field, corresponding to an ultra-light boson whose Compton wavelength is of the same order as the Hubble radius. Two such models are considered, an open one with vacuum energy comprising a conventional cosmological term and a scalar field component, and a flat one with a scalar component only, aimed respectively at weak and strong age crises. Both models suggest that anti-gravity plays a significant role in the evolution of the Universe.

  4. Towards completing the standard model: Vacuum stability, electroweak symmetry breaking, and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, Emidio; Heikinheimo, Matti; Kannike, Kristjan; Racioppi, Antonio; Raidal, Martti; Spethmann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We study the standard model (SM) in its full perturbative validity range between ΛQCD and the U(1)Y Landau pole, assuming that a yet unknown gravitational theory in the UV does not introduce additional particle thresholds, as suggested by the tiny cosmological constant and the absence of new stabilizing physics at the electroweak scale. We find that, due to dimensional transmutation, the SM Higgs potential has a global minimum at 1026 GeV, invalidating the SM as a phenomenologically acceptable model in this energy range. We show that extending the classically scale invariant SM with one complex singlet scalar S allows us to (i) stabilize the SM Higgs potential, (ii) induce a scale in the singlet sector via dimensional transmutation that generates the negative SM Higgs mass term via the Higgs portal, (iii) provide a stable CP-odd singlet as the thermal relic dark matter due to CP-conservation of the scalar potential, and (iv) provide a degree of freedom that can act as an inflaton in the form of the CP-even singlet. The logarithmic behavior of dimensional transmutation allows one to accommodate the large hierarchy between the electroweak scale and the Landau pole, while understanding the latter requires a new nonperturbative view on the SM.

  5. Higgs bosons in extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiros, Mariano

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, motivated by the recent discovery of a Higgs-like boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with a mass mH≃125 GeV, we review different models where the hierarchy problem is solved by means of a warped extra dimension. In the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model electroweak observables provide very strong bounds on the mass of KK modes which motivates extensions to overcome this problem. Two extensions are briefly discussed. One particular extension is based on the deformation of the metric such that it strongly departs from the AdS5 structure in the IR region while it goes asymptotically to AdS5 in the UV brane. This model has the IR brane close to a naked metric singularity (which is outside the physical interval) characteristic of soft-walls constructions. The proximity of the singularity provides a strong wave function renormalization for the Higgs field which suppresses the T and S parameters. The second class of considered extensions are based on the introduction of an extra gauge group in the bulk such that the custodial SU(2)R symmetry is gauged and protects the T parameter. By further enlarging the bulk gauge symmetry one can find models where the Higgs is identified with the fifth component of gauge fields and for which the Higgs potential along with the Higgs mass can be dynamically determined by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism.

  6. Magnetic fields from the electroweak phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Tornkvist, O.

    1998-02-01

    I review some of the mechanisms through which primordial magnetic fields may be created in the electroweak phase transition. I show that no magnetic fields are produced initially from two-bubble collisions in a first-order transition. The initial field produced in a three-bubble collision is computed. The evolution of fields at later times is discussed.

  7. On the Ambjorn-Olesen electroweak condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolucci, Daniele; De Marchis, Francesca

    2012-07-01

    We obtain sufficient conditions for the existence of the Ambjorn-Olesen ["On electroweak magnetism," Nucl. Phys. B315, 606-614 (1989), 10.1016/0550-3213(89)90004-7] electroweak N-vortices in case N ⩾ 1 and therefore generalize earlier results [D. Bartolucci and G. Tarantello, "Liouville type equations with singular data and their applications to periodic multivortices for the electroweak theory," Commun. Math. Phys. 229, 3-47 (2002), 10.1007/s002200200664; J. Spruck and Y. Yang, "On multivortices in the electroweak theory I: Existence of periodic solutions," Commun. Math. Phys. 144, 1-16 (1992), 10.1007/BF02099188] which handled the cases N ∈ {1, 2, 3, 4}. The variational argument provided here has its own independent interest as it generalizes the one adopted by Ding et al. ["Existence results for mean field equations," Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare, Anal. Non Lineaire 16, 653-666 (1999), 10.1016/S0294-1449(99)80031-6] to obtain solutions for Liouville-type equations on closed 2-manifolds. In fact, we obtain at once a second proof of the existence of supercritical conformal metrics on surfaces with conical singularities and prescribed Gaussian curvature recently established by Bartolucci, De Marchis and Malchiodi [Int. Math. Res. Not. 24, 5625-5643 (2011), 10.1093/imrn/rnq285].

  8. Fermionic dark matter with pseudo-scalar Yukawa interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbani, Karim

    2015-01-01

    We consider a renormalizable extension of the standard model whose fermionic dark matter (DM) candidate interacts with a real singlet pseudo-scalar via a pseudo-scalar Yukawa term while we assume that the full Lagrangian is CP-conserved in the classical level. When the pseudo-scalar boson develops a non-zero vacuum expectation value, spontaneous CP-violation occurs and this provides a CP-violated interaction of the dark sector with the SM particles through mixing between the Higgs-like boson and the SM-like Higgs boson. This scenario suggests a minimal number of free parameters. Focusing mainly on the indirect detection observables, we calculate the dark matter annihilation cross section and then compute the DM relic density in the range up to m{sub DM} = 300 GeV.We then find viable regions in the parameter space constrained by the observed DM relic abundance as well as invisible Higgs decay width in the light of 125 GeV Higgs discovery at the LHC. We find that within the constrained region of the parameter space, there exists a model with dark matter mass m{sub DM} ∼ 38 GeV annihilating predominantly into b quarks, which can explain the Fermi-LAT galactic gamma-ray excess.

  9. Fermionic dark matter with pseudo-scalar Yukawa interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, Karim

    2015-01-01

    We consider a renormalizable extension of the standard model whose fermionic dark matter (DM) candidate interacts with a real singlet pseudo-scalar via a pseudo-scalar Yukawa term while we assume that the full Lagrangian is CP-conserved in the classical level. When the pseudo-scalar boson develops a non-zero vacuum expectation value, spontaneous CP-violation occurs and this provides a CP-violated interaction of the dark sector with the SM particles through mixing between the Higgs-like boson and the SM-like Higgs boson. This scenario suggests a minimal number of free parameters. Focusing mainly on the indirect detection observables, we calculate the dark matter annihilation cross section and then compute the DM relic density in the range up to mDM = 300 GeV.We then find viable regions in the parameter space constrained by the observed DM relic abundance as well as invisible Higgs decay width in the light of 125 GeV Higgs discovery at the LHC. We find that within the constrained region of the parameter space, there exists a model with dark matter mass mDM ~ 38 GeV annihilating predominantly into b quarks, which can explain the Fermi-LAT galactic gamma-ray excess.

  10. The generalized Coulomb interactions for relativistic scalar bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarrinkamar, S.; Panahi, H.; Rezaei, M.

    2016-07-01

    Approximate analytical solutions of Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau (DKP) equation are obtained for the truncated Coulomb, generalized Cornell, Richardson and Song-Lin potentials via the quasi-exact analytical ansatz approach.

  11. Multiscale renormalization group methods for effective potentials with multiple scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Wei; Steele, Tom; McKeon, Gerry

    2015-04-01

    Conformally symmetric scalar extensions of the Standard Model are particular appealing to reveal the underlying mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking and to provide dark matter candidates. The Gildener & Weinberg (GW) method is widely used in these models, but is limited to weakly coupled theories. In this talk, multi-scale renormalization group (RG) methods are reviewed and applied to the analysis of the effective potential for radiative symmetry breaking with multiple scalar fields, allowing an extension of the GW method beyond the weak coupling limit. A model containing two interacting real scalar fields is used as an example to illustrate these multi-scale RG methods. Extensions of these multi-scale methods for effective potentials in models containing multiple scalars with O(M) × O(N) symmetry will also be discussed. Reseach funded by NSERC (Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada).

  12. Regarding the scalar mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yunhu; Shao Jianxin; Wang Xiaogang; Zhang Ziying; Li Demin

    2008-02-01

    Based on the main assumption that the D{sub sJ}(2860) belongs to the 2{sup 3}P{sub 0} qq multiplet, the masses of the scalar meson nonet are estimated in the framework of the relativistic independent quark model, Regge phenomenology, and meson-meson mixing. We suggest that the a{sub 0}(1005), K{sub 0}*(1062), f{sub 0}(1103), and f{sub 0}(564) constitute the ground scalar meson nonet; it is supposed that these states would likely correspond to the observed states a{sub 0}(980), {kappa}(900), f{sub 0}(980), and f{sub 0}(600)/{sigma}, respectively. Also a{sub 0}(1516), K{sub 0}*(1669), f{sub 0}(1788), and f{sub 0}(1284) constitute the first radial scalar meson nonet, it is supposed that these states would likely correspond to the observed states a{sub 0}(1450), K{sub 0}*(1430), f{sub 0}(1710), and f{sub 0}(1370), respectively. The scalar state f{sub 0}(1500) may be a good candidate for the ground scalar glueball. The agreement between the present findings and those given by other different approaches is satisfactory.

  13. Searching for displaced Higgs boson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáki, Csaba; Kuflik, Eric; Lombardo, Salvator; Slone, Oren

    2015-10-01

    We study a simplified model of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson decaying to a degenerate pair of scalars which travel a macroscopic distance before decaying to SM particles. This is the leading signal for many well-motivated solutions to the hierarchy problem that do not propose additional light colored particles. Bounds for displaced Higgs boson decays below 10 cm are found by recasting existing tracker searches from Run I. New tracker search strategies, sensitive to the characteristics of these models and similar decays, are proposed with sensitivities projected for Run II at √{s }=13 TeV . With 20 fb-1 of data, we find that Higgs branching ratios down to 2 ×1 0-4 can be probed for centimeter decay lengths.

  14. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay mode H→ W+W-→ ℓ+vℓ-v

    SciTech Connect

    Penning, Bjorn

    2009-09-07

    The question of the nature and principles of the universe and our place in it is the driving force of science since Mesopotamian astronomers glanced for the first time at the starry sky and Greek atomism has been formulated. During the last hundred years modern science was able to extend its knowledge tremendously, answering many questions, opening entirely new fields but as well raising many new questions. Particularly Astronomy, Astroparticle Physics and Particle Physics lead the race to answer these fundamental and ancient questions experimentally. Today it is known that matter consists of fermions, the quarks and leptons. Four fundamental forces are acting between these particles, the electromagnetic, the strong, the weak and the gravitational force. These forces are mediated by particles called bosons. Our confirmed knowledge of particle physics is based on these particles and the theory describing their dynamics, the Standard Model of Particles. Many experimental measurements show an excellent agreement between observation and theory but the origin of the particle masses and therefore the electroweak symmetry breaking remains unexplained. The mechanism proposed to solve this issue involves the introduction of a complex doublet of scalar fields which generates the masses of elementary particles via their mutual interactions. This Higgs mechanism also gives rise to a single neutral scalar boson with an unpredicted mass, the Higgs boson. During the last twenty years several experiments have searched for the Higgs boson but so far it escaped direct observation. Nevertheless these studies allow to further constrain its mass range. The last experimental limits on the Higgs mass have been set in 2001 at the LEP collider, an electron positron machine close to Geneva, Switzerland. The lower limit set on the Higgs boson mass is mH > 114.4 GeV/c2 and remained for many years the last experimental constraint on the Standard Model Higgs Boson due to

  15. Lattice study of an electroweak phase transition at m{sub h} ≅ 126 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, M.; Nardini, G.; Rummukainen, K. E-mail: germano@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2013-01-01

    We carry out lattice simulations of a cosmological electroweak phase transition for a Higgs mass m{sub h} ≅ 126 GeV. The analysis is based on a dimensionally reduced effective theory for an MSSM-like scenario including a relatively light coloured SU(2)-singlet scalar, referred to as a right-handed stop. The non-perturbative transition is stronger than in 2-loop perturbation theory, and may offer a window for electroweak baryogenesis. The main remaining uncertainties concern the physical value of the right-handed stop mass which according to our analysis could be as high as m{sub t-tilde{sub R}} ≅ 155 GeV; a more precise effective theory derivation and vacuum renormalization than available at present are needed for confirming this value.

  16. Probing charged Higgs boson couplings at a future circular hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćakır, I. T.; Kuday, S.; Saygın, H.; Şenol, A.; ćakır, O.

    2016-07-01

    Many of the new physics models predict a light Higgs boson similar to the Higgs boson of the Standard Model (SM) and also extra scalar bosons. Beyond the search channels for a SM Higgs boson, the future collider experiments will explore additional channels that are specific to extended Higgs sectors. We study the charged Higgs boson production within the framework of two Higgs doublet models (THDM) in the proton-proton collisions at a future circular hadron collider (FCC-hh). With an integrated luminosity of Lint=500 fb-1 at very high energy frontier (√{s }=100 TeV ), we obtain a significant coverage of the parameter space and distinguish the charged Higgs-top-bottom interaction within the THDM or other new physics models with charged Higgs boson mass up to 1.5 TeV.

  17. Higher order QCD predictions for associated Higgs production with anomalous couplings to gauge bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimasu, Ken; Sanz, Verónica; Williams, Ciaran

    2016-08-01

    We present predictions for the associated production of a Higgs boson at NLO+PS accuracy, including the effect of anomalous interactions between the Higgs and gauge bosons. We present our results in different frameworks, one in which the interaction vertex between the Higgs boson and Standard Model W and Z bosons is parameterized in terms of general Lorentz structures, and one in which Electroweak symmetry breaking is manifestly linear and the resulting operators arise through a six-dimensional effective field theory framework. We present analytic calculations of the Standard Model and Beyond the Standard Model contributions, and discuss the phenomenological impact of the higher order pieces. Our results are implemented in the NLO Monte Carlo program MCFM, and interfaced to shower Monte Carlos through the Powheg box framework.

  18. Electroweak instantons/sphalerons at VLHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringwald, A.

    2003-03-01

    There is a close analogy between electroweak instanton-induced baryon plus lepton number (B+L) violating processes in Quantum Flavor Dynamics (QFD) and hard QCD instanton-induced chirality violating processes in deep-inelastic scattering. In view of the recent information about the latter both from lattice simulations and from the H1 experiment at HERA, it seems worthwhile to reconsider electroweak B+L violation at high energies. We present a state of the art evaluation of QFD instanton-induced parton-parton cross-sections, as relevant at future high energy colliders in the hundreds of TeV regime, such as the projected Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We find that the cross-sections are unobservably small in a conservative fiducial kinematical region inferred from the above mentioned QFD-QCD analogy. An extrapolation—still compatible with lattice results and HERA—beyond this conservative limit indicates possible observability at VLHC.

  19. Vacuum stability of a general scalar potential of a few fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannike, Kristjan

    2016-06-01

    We calculate analytical vacuum stability or bounded from below conditions for general scalar potentials of a few fields. After a brief review of copositivity, we show how to find positivity conditions for more complicated potentials. We discuss the vacuum stability conditions of the general potential of two real scalars, without and with the Higgs boson included in the potential. As further examples, we give explicit vacuum stability conditions for the two Higgs doublet model with no explicit CP breaking, and for the mathbb {Z}3 scalar dark matter with an inert doublet and a complex singlet. We give a short overview of positivity conditions for tensors of quartic couplings via tensor eigenvalues.

  20. On stability of electroweak vacuum during inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkerin, A.; Sibiryakov, S.

    2015-06-01

    We study Coleman-De Luccia tunneling of the Standard Model Higgs field during inflation in the case when the electroweak vacuum is metastable. We verify that the tunneling rate is exponentially suppressed. The main contribution to the suppression is the same as in flat space-time. We analytically estimate the corrections due to the expansion of the universe and an effective mass term in the Higgs potential that can be present at inflation.

  1. Probing dark matter at the LHC using vector boson fusion processes.

    PubMed

    Delannoy, Andres G; Dutta, Bhaskar; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Will; Kamon, Teruki; Luiggi, Eduardo; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Sinha, Kuver; Wang, Kechen; Wu, Sean

    2013-08-01

    Vector boson fusion processes at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) provide a unique opportunity to search for new physics with electroweak couplings. A feasibility study for the search of supersymmetric dark matter in the final state of two vector boson fusion jets and large missing transverse energy is presented at 14 TeV. Prospects for determining the dark matter relic density are studied for the cases of wino and bino-Higgsino dark matter. The LHC could probe wino dark matter with mass up to approximately 600 GeV with a luminosity of 1000  fb(-1).

  2. Identification of extra neutral gauge bosons at the LHC using b and t quarks.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Stephen; Martin, Travis A W

    2008-10-10

    New neutral gauge bosons (Z' 's) are predicted by many models of physics beyond the standard electroweak theory. It is possible that a Z' will be discovered by the Large Hadron Collider program. The next step would be to measure its properties to identify the underlying theory that gave rise to the Z'. Heavy quarks have the unique property that they can be identified in the final states. In this Letter we demonstrate that measuring Z' decays to b- and t-quark final states can act as an effective means of discriminating between models with extra gauge bosons.

  3. Probing Dark Matter at the LHC Using Vector Boson Fusion Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delannoy, Andres G.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Will; Kamon, Teruki; Luiggi, Eduardo; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Sinha, Kuver; Wang, Kechen; Wu, Sean

    2013-08-01

    Vector boson fusion processes at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) provide a unique opportunity to search for new physics with electroweak couplings. A feasibility study for the search of supersymmetric dark matter in the final state of two vector boson fusion jets and large missing transverse energy is presented at 14 TeV. Prospects for determining the dark matter relic density are studied for the cases of wino and bino-Higgsino dark matter. The LHC could probe wino dark matter with mass up to approximately 600 GeV with a luminosity of 1000fb-1.

  4. Combined Analysis of CP Properties of Higgs Boson in Effective Higgs Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    CP violation effects of the Higgs stem from not only the CP mixing state but also the CP-violation couplings to electroweak bosons. The two CPV sources are combinedly studied based on an effective Higgs Lagrangian. The constraints from unitarity limits for WW and ZZ scatterings are investigated. We classify free parameters into five cases to analyze CP properties of the Boson. The allowed ranges are shown from fitting results to the signal strengths of the Higgs measured by ATLAS and CMS. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11105152

  5. W boson studies in pPb and PbPb collisions with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapon, Émilien; CMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The electroweak W bosons do not participate in the strong interaction, and thus constitute clean probes of the initial state of nuclear collisions. They provide a unique constraint on the nuclear parton distributions, in particular on the antiquarks from the sea. A first analysis of PbPb data has confirmed the medium-blind characteristic of the electroweak bosons. With the new pPb data collected at the beginning of 2013, nuclear matter without the creation of a hot medium can hence be studied. Being 10 times more prevalent than Z bosons, the yield of W bosons recorded from pPb collisions allows precise comparisons to theoretical predictions. A yield of approximately 20 000 W is observed in pPb collisions in both the muon and electron channels. In this paper the CMS measurements of W bosons in PbPb at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of \\sqrt{sNN} = 2.76 TeV and from the new pPb data at \\sqrt{sNN} = 5.02 TeV are reported. The charge asymmetry, forward/backward asymmetry and fully corrected yields will be shown.

  6. Higgs Discovery in the Presence of Light CP-Odd Scalars

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2009-06-19

    Many models of electroweak symmetry breaking have an additional light pseudoscalar. If the Higgs boson can decay to a new pseudoscalar, LEP searches for the Higgs can be significantly altered and the Higgs can be as light as 86 GeV. Discovering the Higgs boson in these models is challenging when the pseudoscalar is lighter than 10 GeV because it decays dominantly into tau leptons. In this paper, we discuss discovering the Higgs in a subdominant decay mode where one of the pseudoscalars decays to a pair of muons. This search allows for potential discovery of a cascade-decaying Higgs boson with the complete Tevatron data set or early data at the LHC.

  7. D-Zero results on W boson properties

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.

    1997-10-01

    The D0 experiment collected {approx} 15 pb{sup -1} in run 1A (1992- 1993) and {approx} 89 pb{sup -1} in run 1B (1994-1995) of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider using p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. Results from analyses of events with W and Z bosons are presented for the run 1B data samples. From W {yields} e{nu}, {mu}{nu} and Z {yields} ee, {mu}{mu} decays, the W and Z production cross sections and the W width are determined. Events with W {yields} {tau}{nu} decays are used to determine the ratio of the electroweak gauge coupling constants as a measure of lepton universality. Using W {yields} e{nu} and Z {yields} ee decays, the W boson mass is measured.

  8. First Run II Measurement of the W Boson Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    We describe a measurement of the W boson mass m{sub W} using 200 pb{sup -1} of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collision data taken with the CDF II detector. With a sample of 63,964 W {yields} e{nu} candidates and 51,128 W {yields} {mu}{nu} candidates, we measure m{sub W} = [80.413 {+-} 0.034(stat.) {+-} 0.034 (sys.) = 80.413 {+-} 0.048] GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the single most precise m{sub W} measurement to date. When combined with other measured electroweak parameters, this result further constrains the properties of new unobserved particles coupling to W and Z bosons.

  9. Invisible Higgs boson, continuous mass fields, and unparticle Higgs mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Calmet, X.; Deshpande, N. G.; Hsu, S. D. H.; He, X. G.

    2009-03-01

    We explore the consequences of an electroweak symmetry breaking sector which exhibits approximately scale invariant dynamics, i.e., nontrivial fixed point behavior, as in unparticle models. One can think of an unparticle Higgs as a composite Higgs boson with a continuous mass distribution. We find it convenient to represent the unparticle Higgs in terms of a Kaellen-Lehmann spectral function, from which it is simple to verify the generation of gauge boson and fermion masses, and unitarization of WW scattering. We show that a spectral function with broad support, which corresponds to approximate fixed point behavior over an extended range of energy, can lead to an effectively invisible Higgs particle, whose decays at CERN LEP or LHC could be obscured by background.

  10. Higgs boson search in the WW → lvqq final state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govoni, Pietro; Sandström, Rikard

    2016-10-01

    Among proton-proton collision events at the LHC where two Wbosons are produced, the region defined by large masses of their system is sensitive to the presence of SM-like Higgs boson resonances. The final state with one Wboson decaying leptonically and the other one hadronically features both the purity granted by the presence of a lepton, and the large cross section due to the hadronic branching ratio of the Wboson. The ATLAS and CMS analyses of this final state performed with the LHC data acquired at 7TeV and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy are presented, in the frame of Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson searches: besides excluding high mass resonances beyond the one found at a mass of around 125 GeV, these studies pave the way for the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking that will be carried on in the forthcoming runs of the LHC.

  11. Scalar triplet flavored leptogenesis: a systematic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sierra, D. Aristizabal; Dhen, Mikaël; Hambye, Thomas E-mail: mikadhen@ulb.ac.be

    2014-08-01

    Type-II seesaw is a simple scenario in which Majorana neutrino masses are generated by the exchange of a heavy scalar electroweak triplet. When endowed with additional heavy fields, such as right-handed neutrinos or extra triplets, it also provides a compelling framework for baryogenesis via leptogenesis. We derive in this context the full network of Boltzmann equations for studying leptogenesis in the flavored regime. To this end we determine the relations which hold among the chemical potentials of the various particle species in the thermal bath. This takes into account the standard model Yukawa interactions of both leptons and quarks as well as sphaleron processes which, depending on the temperature, may be classified as faster or slower than the Universe Hubble expansion. We find that when leptogenesis is enabled by the presence of an extra triplet, lepton flavor effects allow the production of the B-L asymmetry through lepton number conserving CP asymmetries. This scenario becomes dominant as soon as the triplets couple more to leptons than to standard model scalar doublets. In this case, the way the B-L asymmetry is created through flavor effects is novel: instead of invoking the effect of L-violating inverse decays faster than the Hubble rate, it involves the effect of L-violating decays slower than the Hubble rate. We also analyze the more general situation where lepton number violating CP asymmetries are present and actively participate in the generation of the B-L asymmetry, pointing out that as long as L-violating triplet decays are still in thermal equilibrium when the triplet gauge scattering processes decouple, flavor effects can be striking, allowing to avoid all washout suppression effects from seesaw interactions. In this case the amount of B-L asymmetry produced is limited only by a universal gauge suppression effect, which nevertheless goes away for large triplet decay rates.

  12. Pragmatic Aspects of Scalar Modifiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawada, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the pragmatic aspects of scalar modifiers from the standpoint of the interface between semantics and pragmatics, focusing on (i) the (non) parallelism between the truth-conditional scalar modifiers and the non-truth-conditional scalar modifiers, (ii) the compositionality and dimensionality of non-truth-conditional…

  13. Long-lived, colour-triplet scalars from unnaturalness

    DOE PAGES

    Barnard, James; Cox, Peter; Gherghetta, Tony; Spray, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    We study that long-lived, colour-triplet scalars are a generic prediction of unnatural, or split, composite Higgs models where the spontaneous global-symmetry breaking scale f ≳ 10TeV and an unbroken SU(5) symmetry is preserved. Since the triplet scalars are pseudo Nambu- Goldstone bosons they are split from the much heavier composite-sector resonances and are the lightest exotic, coloured states. This makes them ideal to search for at colliders. Due to discrete symmetries the triplet scalar decays via a dimension-six term and given the large suppression scale f is often metastable. We show that existing searches for collider-stable R-hadrons from Run-I atmore » the LHC forbid a triplet scalar mass below 845 GeV, whereas with 300 fb-1 at 13TeV triplet scalar masses up to 1.4TeV can be discovered. For shorter lifetimes displaced-vertex searches provide a discovery reach of up to 1.8TeV. Also, we present exclusion and discovery reaches of future hadron colliders as well as indirect limits that arise from modi cations of the Higgs couplings.« less

  14. Iron Kα line of Kerr black holes with scalar hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yueying; Zhou, Menglei; Cárdenas-Avendaño, Alejandro; Bambi, Cosimo; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a family of hairy black holes in 4-dimensional Einstein gravity minimally coupled to a complex, massive scalar field was discovered [1]. Besides the mass M and spin angular momentum J, these objects are characterized by a Noether charge Q, measuring the amount of scalar hair, which is not associated to a Gauss law and cannot be measured at spatial infinity. Introducing a dimensionless scalar hair parameter q, ranging from 0 to 1, we recover (a subset of) Kerr black holes for q = 0 and a family of rotating boson stars for q = 1. In the present paper, we explore the possibility of measuring q for astrophysical black holes with current and future X-ray missions. We study the iron Kα line expected in the reflection spectrum of such hairy black holes and we simulate observations with Suzaku and eXTP. As a proof of concept, we point out, by analyzing a sample of hairy black holes, that current observations can already constrain the scalar hair parameter q, because black holes with q close to 1 would have iron lines definitively different from those we observe in the available data. We conclude that a detailed scanning of the full space of solutions, together with data from the future X-ray missions, like eXTP, will be able to put relevant constraints on the astrophysical realization of Kerr black holes with scalar hair.

  15. Circular geodesics and thick tori around rotating boson stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliani, Z.; Vincent, F. H.; Grandclément, P.; Gourgoulhon, E.; Monceau-Baroux, R.; Straub, O.

    2015-12-01

    Accretion disks play an important role in the evolution of their relativistic inner compact objects. The emergence of a new generation of interferometers will allow us to resolve these accretion disks and provide more information about the properties of the central gravitating object. Due to this instrumental leap forward it is crucial to investigate the accretion disk physics near various types of inner compact objects now to deduce later constraints on the central objects from observations. A possible candidate for the inner object is the boson star. Here, we will try to analyze the differences between accretion structures surrounding boson stars and black holes. We aim at analysing the physics of circular geodesics around boson stars and study simple thick accretion tori (so-called Polish doughnuts) in the vicinity of these stars. We realize a detailed study of the properties of circular geodesics around boson stars. We then perform a parameter study of thick tori with constant angular momentum surrounding boson stars. This is done using the boson star models computed by a code constructed with the spectral solver library KADATH. We demonstrate that all the circular stable orbits are bound. In the case of a constant angular momentum torus, a cusp in the torus surface exists only for boson stars with a strong gravitational scalar field. Moreover, for each inner radius of the disk, the allowed specific angular momentum values lie within a constrained range which depends on the boson star considered. We show that the accretion tori around boson stars have different characteristics than in the vicinity of a black hole. With future instruments it could be possible to use these differences to constrain the nature of compact objects.

  16. Neutrino masses in the SU(4)L ⊗ U(1)X electroweak extension of the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacio, Guillermo

    2016-09-01

    We study the neutrino mass generation in the SU(4)L ⊗ U(1)X electroweak extension of the Standard Model by considering nonrenormalizable dimension 5 effective operators. It is shown that there exist two topologies for the realizations of such an operator at the tree-level and for one of the three-family models the neutrino phenomenology is explored after extending its particle content with an SU(4)L fermion singlet and a scalar decuplet. Constraints in the available parameters space of the model are partially discussed.

  17. Shadow Higgs boson from a scale-invariant hidden U(1){sub s} model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W.-F.; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2007-06-01

    We study a scale-invariant SU(2)xU(1){sub Y}xU(1){sub s} model which has only dimensionless couplings. The shadow U(1){sub s} is hidden, and it interacts with the standard model (SM) solely through mixing in the scalar sector and kinetic mixing of the U(1) gauge bosons. The gauge symmetries are broken radiatively by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Lifting of the flat direction in the scalar potential gives rise to a light scalar, the scalon, or the shadow Higgs, and a heavier scalar which we identify as the SM Higgs boson. The phenomenology of this model is discussed. In particular, the constraints on the shadow Higgs in different mass ranges, and the possibility of discovering a shadow Higgs with a mass a few tens of GeV in precision t-quark studies at the LHC, are investigated.

  18. Schwinger-Dyson approach and its application to generate a light composite scalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doff, A.; Natale, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the possibility of generating a light composite scalar boson, in a scenario that we may generically call Technicolor, or in any variation of a strongly interacting theory, where by light we mean a scalar composite mass about one order of magnitude below the characteristic scale of the strong theory. Instead of most of the studies about a composite Higgs boson, which are based on effective Lagrangians, we consider this problem in the framework of nonperturbative solutions of the fermionic Schwinger-Dyson and Bethe-Salpeter equations. We study a range of mechanisms proposed during the recent years to form such light composite boson, and verify that such possibility seems to be necessarily associated to a fermionic self-energy that decreases slowly with the momentum.

  19. Leptogenesis with high-scale electroweak symmetry breaking and an extended Higgs sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covi, Laura; Kim, Jihn E.; Kyae, Bumseok; Nam, Soonkeon

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new scenario for baryogenesis through leptogenesis, where the C P phase relevant for leptogenesis is connected directly to the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakada (PMNS) phase(s) in the light neutrino mixing matrix. The scenario is realized in the case when only one C P phase appears in the full theory, originating from the complex vacuum expextation value of a standard model singlet field. In order to realize this scheme, the electroweak symmetry is required to be broken during the leptogenesis era, and a new loop diagram with an intermediate W boson exchange including the low-energy neutrino mixing matrix should play the dominant contribution to the C P violation for leptogenesis. In this article, we discuss the new basic mechanism, which we call type-II leptogenesis, and give an estimate for maximally reachable baryon asymmetry depending on the PMNS phases.

  20. Extra neutral scalars with vectorlike fermions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Mukherjee, Tuhin Subhra; Sadhukhan, Soumya

    2016-03-01

    Many theories beyond the standard model (BSM) contain new C P -odd and C P -even neutral scalars ϕ ={A ,H } , and new vectorlike fermions (ψV L). The couplings of the C P -odd scalar A to two standard model (SM) gauge bosons cannot occur from renormalizable operators in a C P -conserving sector, but can be induced at the quantum loop level. We compute these effective couplings at the 1-loop level induced by the SM fermions and vectorlike fermions, present analytical expressions for them, and plot them numerically. Using the 8 TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC) γ γ , τ+τ- and t t ¯ channel data, we derive constraints on the effective couplings of the ϕ to standard model gauge bosons and fermions. We present the gluon-fusion channel cross sections of the ϕ at the 8 and 14 TeV LHC, and its branching ratios into SM fermion and gauge-boson pairs. We first present our results in a model independent manner, and then we provide results for some simple models containing ϕ and ψV L in the singlet and doublet representations of S U (2 ). In the doublet case, we focus on the two-Higgs-doublet (2HDM) Type-II and Type-X models in the alignment limit.

  1. RESEARCH NOTE FROM COLLABORATION: Dimensionless coupling of bulk scalars at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchemin, P.-H.; Azuelos, G.; Burgess, C. P.

    2004-10-01

    We identify the lowest-dimension interaction which is possible between standard model brane fields and bulk scalars in six dimensions. The lowest-dimension interaction is unique and involves a trilinear coupling between the standard model Higgs boson and the bulk scalar. Because this interaction has a dimensionless coupling, it depends only logarithmically on ultraviolet mass scales and heavy physics need not decouple from it. We compute its influence on Higgs physics at ATLAS and identify how large a coupling can be detected at the LHC. Besides providing a potentially interesting signal in Higgs-boson searches, such couplings provide a major observational constraint on 6D large-extra-dimensional models with scalars in the bulk.

  2. Z' bosons, the NuTeV anomaly, and the Higgs boson mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M. S.

    2010-04-15

    Fits to the precision electroweak data that include the NuTeV measurement are considered in family universal, anomaly free U(1) extensions of the Standard Model. In data sets from which the hadronic asymmetries are excluded, some of the Z' models can double the predicted value of the Higgs boson mass, from {approx}60 to {approx}120 GeV, removing the tension with the LEP II lower bound, while also modestly improving the {chi}{sup 2} confidence level. The effect of the Z' models on both m{sub H} and the {chi}{sup 2} confidence level is increased when the NuTeV measurement is included in the fit. Both the original NuTeV data and a revised estimate by the PDG are considered.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: General relativistic boson stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, Franz E.; Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2003-10-01

    There is accumulating evidence that (fundamental) scalar fields may exist in nature. The gravitational collapse of such a boson cloud would lead to a boson star (BS) as a new type of a compact object. As with white dwarfs and neutron stars, a limiting mass exists similarly, below which a BS is stable against complete gravitational collapse to a black hole. According to the form of the self-interaction of the basic constituents and spacetime symmetry, we can distinguish mini-, axidilaton, soliton, charged, oscillating and rotating BSs. Their compactness prevents a Newtonian approximation; however, modifications of general relativity, as in the case of Jordan Brans Dicke theory as a low-energy limit of strings, would provide them with gravitational memory. In general, a BS is a compact, completely regular configuration with structured layers due to the anisotropy of scalar matter, an exponentially decreasing 'halo', a critical mass inversely proportional to the constituent mass, an effective radius and a large particle number. Due to the Heisenberg principle, a completely stable branch exists, and as a coherent state, it allows for rotating solutions with quantized angular momentum. In this review, we concentrate on the fascinating possibilities of detecting the various subtypes of (excited) BSs: possible signals include gravitational redshift and (micro-)lensing, emission of gravitational waves, or, in the case of a giant BS, its dark matter contribution to the rotation curves of galactic halos.

  4. Conformal scalar field wormholes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Jonathan J.; Laflamme, Raymond

    1989-01-01

    The Euclidian Einstein equations with a cosmological constant and a conformally coupled scalar field are solved, taking the metric to be of the Robertson-Walker type. In the case Lambda = 0, solutions are found which represent a wormhole connecting two asymptotically flat Euclidian regions. In the case Lambda greater than 0, the solutions represent tunneling from a small Tolman-like universe to a large Robertson-Walker universe.

  5. Scalar and Pseudoscalar Glueballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang

    We employ two simple and robust results to constrain the mixing matrix of the isosinglet scalar mesons f0(1710), f0(1500), f0(1370): one is the approximate SU(3) symmetry empirically observed in the scalar sector above 1 GeV and confirmed by lattice QCD, and the other is the scalar glueball mass at 1710 MeV in the quenched approximation. In the SU(3) symmetry limit, f0(1500) becomes a pure SU(3) octet and is degenerate with a0(1450), while f0(1370) is mainly an SU(3) singlet with a slight mixing with the scalar glueball which is the primary component of f0(1710). These features remain essentially unchanged even when SU(3) breaking is taken into account. The observed enhancement of ωf0(1710) production over ɸf0(1710) in hadronic J/ψ decays and the copious f0(1710) production in radiative J/ψ decays lend further support to the prominent glueball nature of f0(1710). We deduce the mass of the pseudoscalar glueball G from an η-η‧-G mixing formalism based on the anomalous Ward identity for transition matrix elements. With the inputs from the recent KLOE experiment, we find a solution for the pseudoscalar glueball mass around (1.4±0.1) GeV, which is fairly insensitive to a range of inputs with or without Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-rule violating effects. This affirms that η(1405), having a large production rate in the radiative J/ψ decay and not seen in γγ reactions, is indeed a leading candidate for the pseudoscalar glueball. It is much lower than the results from quenched lattice QCD (> 2.0 GeV) due to the dynamic fermion effect. It is thus urgent to have a full QCD lattice calculation of pseudoscalar glueball masses.

  6. Imploding scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.D.

    1996-09-01

    Static spherically symmetric uncoupled scalar space{endash}times have no event horizon and a divergent Kretschmann singularity at the origin of the coordinates. The singularity is always present so that nonstatic solutions have been sought to see if the singularities can develop from an initially singular free space{endash}time. In flat space{endash}time the Klein{endash}Gordon equation {D`Alembertian}{var_phi}=0 has the nonstatic spherically symmetric solution {var_phi}={sigma}({ital v})/{ital r}, where {sigma}({ital v}) is a once differentiable function of the null coordinate {ital v}. In particular, the function {sigma}({ital v}) can be taken to be initially zero and then grow, thus producing a singularity in the scalar field. A similar situation occurs when the scalar field is coupled to gravity via Einstein{close_quote}s equations; the solution also develops a divergent Kretschmann invariant singularity, but it has no overall energy. To overcome this, Bekenstein{close_quote}s theorems are applied to give two corresponding conformally coupled solutions. One of these has positive ADM mass and has the following properties: (i) it develops a Kretschmann invariant singularity, (ii) it has no event horizon, (iii) it has a well-defined source, (iv) it has well-defined junction condition to Minkowski space{endash}time, and (v) it is asymptotically flat with positive overall energy. This paper presents this solution and several other nonstatic scalar solutions. The properties of these solutions which are studied are limited to the following three: (i) whether the solution can be joined to Minkowski space{endash}time, (ii) whether the solution is asymptotically flat, (iii) and, if so, what the solutions{close_quote} Bondi and ADM masses are. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Probable or improbable universe? Correlating electroweak vacuum instability with the scale of inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Anson; Kearney, John; Shakya, Bibhushan; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the Higgs boson and top quark masses indicate that the Standard Model Higgs potential becomes unstable around Λ I ˜ 1011 GeV. This instability is cosmologically relevant since quantum fluctuations during inflation can easily destabilize the electroweak vacuum if the Hubble parameter during inflation is larger than Λ I (as preferred by the recent BICEP2 measurement). We perform a careful study of the evolution of the Higgs field during inflation, obtaining different results from those currently in the literature. We consider both tunneling via a Coleman-de Luccia or Hawking-Moss instanton, valid when the scale of inflation is below the instability scale, as well as a statistical treatment via the Fokker-Planck equation appropriate in the opposite regime. We show that a better understanding of the post-inflation evolution of the unstable AdS vacuum regions is crucial for determining the eventual fate of the universe. If these AdS regions devour all of space, a universe like ours is indeed extremely unlikely without new physics to stabilize the Higgs potential; however, if these regions crunch, our universe survives, but inflation must last a few e-folds longer to compensate for the lost AdS regions. Lastly, we examine the effects of generic Planck-suppressed corrections to the Higgs potential, which can be sufficient to stabilize the electroweak vacuum during inflation.

  8. Probing new physics in electroweak penguins through Bd and Bs decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Lars; Scherer, Dominik; Vernazza, Leonardo

    2011-12-01

    An enhanced electroweak penguin amplitude due to the presence of unknown new physics can explain the discrepancies found between theory and experiment in the B → πK decays, in particular in ACP(B- → π0K-) - ACP(bar B0 → π+K-), but the current precision of the theoretical and experimental results does not allow to draw a firm conclusion. We argue that the bar Bs → phiρ0 and bar Bs → phiπ0 decays offer an additional tool to investigate this possibility. These purely isospin-violating decays are dominated by electroweak penguins and we show that in presence of a new physics contribution their branching ratio can be enhanced by about an order of magnitude, without violating any constraints from other hadronic B decays. This makes them very interesting modes for LHCb and future B factories. In [1] we have performed both a model-independent analysis and a study within realistic New Physics models such as a modified-Z0-penguin scenario, a model with an additional Z' boson and the MSSM. In this article we summarise the most important results of our study.

  9. Precision electroweak physics with the SLD/SLC: The left-right polarization asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Rowson, P.C.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-12-01

    Following a brief review of a commonly used general framework for the analysis of radiative corrections and possible new physics, the recent precision results from the SLD/SLC are discussed and used to test the standard electroweak model. In the 1993 SLD/SLC run, the SLD recorded 50,000 Z events produced by the collision of longitudinally polarized electrons on unpolarized positrons at a center-of-mass energy of 91.26 GeV. The luminosity-weighted average polarization of the SLC electron beam was (63.0 {plus_minus} 1.1)%. We measure the left-right cross-section asymmetry in Z boson production, A{sub LR}, to be 0.1628 {plus_minus} 0.0071 (stat) {plus_minus} 0.0028 (syst) which determines the effective weak mixing angle to be sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2292 {plus_minus} 0.0009 (stat) {plus_minus} 0.0004 (syst). When averaged with our 1992 result, we obtain sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2294 {plus_minus} 0. 0010. This result differs from analogous LEP results at the level of about 2.5 {sigma}. The world averages of electroweak data are comfortably in agreement with the standard model.

  10. Scalar multi-wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, A. I.; Kashargin, P. E.; Sushkov, Sergey V.

    2016-09-01

    In 1921 Bach and Weyl derived the method of superposition to construct new axially symmetric vacuum solutions of general relativity. In this paper we extend the Bach–Weyl approach to non-vacuum configurations with massless scalar fields. Considering a phantom scalar field with the negative kinetic energy, we construct a multi-wormhole solution describing an axially symmetric superposition of N wormholes. The solution found is static, everywhere regular and has no event horizons. These features drastically tell the multi-wormhole configuration from other axially symmetric vacuum solutions which inevitably contain gravitationally inert singular structures, such as ‘struts’ and ‘membranes’, that keep the two bodies apart making a stable configuration. However, the multi-wormholes are static without any singular struts. Instead, the stationarity of the multi-wormhole configuration is provided by the phantom scalar field with the negative kinetic energy. Anther unusual property is that the multi-wormhole spacetime has a complicated topological structure. Namely, in the spacetime there exist 2 N asymptotically flat regions connected by throats.

  11. Scalar multi-wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, A. I.; Kashargin, P. E.; Sushkov, Sergey V.

    2016-09-01

    In 1921 Bach and Weyl derived the method of superposition to construct new axially symmetric vacuum solutions of general relativity. In this paper we extend the Bach-Weyl approach to non-vacuum configurations with massless scalar fields. Considering a phantom scalar field with the negative kinetic energy, we construct a multi-wormhole solution describing an axially symmetric superposition of N wormholes. The solution found is static, everywhere regular and has no event horizons. These features drastically tell the multi-wormhole configuration from other axially symmetric vacuum solutions which inevitably contain gravitationally inert singular structures, such as ‘struts’ and ‘membranes’, that keep the two bodies apart making a stable configuration. However, the multi-wormholes are static without any singular struts. Instead, the stationarity of the multi-wormhole configuration is provided by the phantom scalar field with the negative kinetic energy. Anther unusual property is that the multi-wormhole spacetime has a complicated topological structure. Namely, in the spacetime there exist 2 N asymptotically flat regions connected by throats.

  12. First Lhc Constraints on Anomalously Interacting New Vector Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhov, Mikhail; Bednyakov, Vadim; Boyko, Igor; Budagov, Julian; Demichev, Mikhail; Yeletskikh, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    It was recently proposed to extend the Standard Model by means of new spin-1 chiral Z* and W*± bosons with the internal quantum numbers of the electroweak Higgs doublets. These bosons have unique signatures in transverse momentum, angular and pseudorapidity distributions of the final leptons, which allow one to distinguish them from other heavy resonances. With 40 pb-1 of the LHC proton-proton data at the energy 7 TeV, the ATLAS detector was used to search for narrow resonances in the invariant mass spectrum of e+e- and μ+μ- final states and high-mass charged states decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino. From the search exclusion mass limits of 1.15 TeV/c2 and 1.35 TeV/c2 were obtained for the chiral neutral Z* and charged W* bosons, respectively. These are the first direct limits on the W* and Z* boson production.

  13. A light NMSSM pseudoscalar Higgs boson at the LHC redux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomark, N.-E.; Moretti, S.; Munir, S.; Roszkowski, L.

    2015-02-01

    The Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) contains a singlet-like pseudoscalar Higgs boson in addition to the doublet-like pseudoscalar of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. This new pseudoscalar can have a very low mass without violating the LEP exclusion constraints and it can potentially provide a hallmark signature of non-minimal supersymmetry at the LHC. In this analysis we revisit the light pseudoscalar in the NMSSM with partial universality at some high unification scale. We delineate the regions of the model's parameter space that are consistent with the up-to-date theoretical and experimental constraints, from both Higgs boson searches and elsewhere (most notably b-physics), and examine to what extent they can be probed by the LHC. To this end we review the most important production channels of such a Higgs state and assess the scope of its observation at the forthcoming Run-2 of the LHC. We conclude that the -associated production of the pseudoscalar, which has been emphasised in previous studies, does not carry much promise anymore, given the measured mass of the Higgs boson at the LHC. However, the decays of one of the heavier scalar Higgs bosons of the NMSSM can potentially lead to the discovery of its light pseudoscalar. Especially promising are the decays of one or both of the two lightest scalar states into a pseudoscalar pair and of the heaviest scalar into a pseudoscalar and a Z boson. Since the latter channel has not been explored in detail in the literature so far, we provide details of some benchmark points which can be probed for establishing its signature.

  14. WIMP dark matter and unitarity-conserving inflation via a gauge singlet scalar

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlhoefer, Felix; McDonald, John E-mail: j.mcdonald@lancaster.ac.uk

    2015-11-01

    A gauge singlet scalar with non-minimal coupling to gravity can drive inflation and later freeze out to become cold dark matter. We explore this idea by revisiting inflation in the singlet direction (S-inflation) and Higgs Portal Dark Matter in light of the Higgs discovery, limits from LUX and observations by Planck. We show that large regions of parameter space remain viable, so that successful inflation is possible and the dark matter relic abundance can be reproduced. Moreover, the scalar singlet can stabilise the electroweak vacuum and at the same time overcome the problem of unitarity-violation during inflation encountered by Higgs Inflation, provided the singlet is a real scalar. The 2-σ Planck upper bound on n{sub s} imposes that the singlet mass is below 2 TeV, so that almost the entire allowed parameter range can be probed by XENON1T.

  15. PRECISION ELECTROWEAK MEASUREMENTS AND THE HIGGS MASS.

    SciTech Connect

    MARCIANO, W.J.

    2004-08-02

    The utility of precision electroweak measurements for predicting the Standard Model Higgs mass via quantum loop effects is discussed. Current constraints from m{sub w} and sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w} (m{sub z}){sub {ovr MS}} imply a relatively light Higgs {approx}< 154 GeV which is consistent with Supersymmetry expectations. The existence of Supersymmetry is further suggested by a discrepancy between experiment and theory for the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Constraints from precision studies on other types of ''New Physics'' are also briefly described.

  16. Electro-weak reactions for astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schiavilla

    2000-06-01

    The status of ''ab initio'' microscopic calculations of the {sup 2}H(p,{gamma}){sup 3}He and {sup 3}He(p,e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}){sup 4}He reactions is reviewed. The methods used to generate accurate nuclear ground- and scattering-state wave functions, and to construct realistic electro-weak transition operators are described. The uncertainties in the theoretical predictions, particularly those relevant to the p-{sup 3}He weak capture, are discussed. For the dp radiative capture, the theoretical results are compared with the TUNL data in the energy range 0--100 keV.

  17. Electroweak Baryogenesis from a Classical Force

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, M.; Prokopec, T.; Turok, N.

    1995-08-28

    We describe a new effect that produces baryons at a first order electroweak phase transition. It operates when there is a {ital CP}-violating field present on propagating bubble walls. The novel aspect is that it involves a purely classical force, which alters the motion of particles across the wall and through diffusion creates a chiral asymmetry in front of the wall. We develop a technique for computing the baryon asymmetry using the Boltzmann equation, and a fluid approximation which allows us to model strong scattering effects. The final formula for the baryon asymmetry has a remarkably simple form.

  18. Topics on Nuclear Structure with Electroweak Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya de Guerra, E.; Moreno, O.; Sarriguren, P.; Ramon, M.

    2012-05-01

    We study some relevant aspects of complex nuclei structure using electroweak probes within the framework of self-consistent mean field theories with Skyrme density-dependent two-body interactions, including pairing and spin-isospin RPA correlations where necessary. We apply the formalism to the study of single and double beta decays as normal modes of the system, as well as to the analysis of parity-violating electron scattering by nuclei. Finally, we profit from the studied processes to draw some conclusions on the neutrino nature (eigenstates mixing).

  19. LHC diphoton resonance at 750 {GeV} as an indication of SU(3)_L× U(1)_X electroweak symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, A. E. Cárcamo; Nišandžić, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    The LHC collaborations ATLAS and CMS recently reported on the excess of the events in the diphoton final states at the invariant mass of about 750 {GeV}. In this article we speculate on the possibility that the excess arises from the neutral CP-even component φ of the scalar triplet Φ of the SU(3)c× SU(3)L× U(1)X (3{-}3{-} 1) model that has a U(1)X charge equal to X=-1/3 and acquires a vacuum expectation value larger than the electroweak symmetry breaking scale. The interactions of the scalar field φ with the photon and gluon pairs are mediated by the virtual vector-like fermions which appear as components of the anomaly-free chiral fermion representations of the 3{ -}3{-}1 gauge group.

  20. Invisible Decays of Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Aparicio Mendez, M. del R; Guevara, J. E. Barradas; Beltran, O. Felix

    2009-04-20

    We study the detection of the complete spectrum of Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, through their decays into chargino ({chi}-tilde{sub i}{sup {+-}}) and neutralinos ({chi}-tilde{sub i}{sup o}), for several parametric scenarios. In the minimal supersymmetric model there are two charginos and four neutralinos, and the Higgs boson spectrum contains three neutral scalars, two CP-even (h{sup 0} and H{sup 0} with m{sub H{sup 0}}>m{sub h{sup 0}}) and one CP-odd (A{sup 0}, with m{sub A{sup 0}} as a free parameter); as well as a charged pair (H{sup {+-}}). An interesting signal comes from the decays of the Higgs bosons into invisible SUSY modes (h{sup 0}, H{sup 0},A{sup 0}{yields}{chi}-tilde{sub 1}{sup o}{chi}-tilde{sub 1}{sup o}), which could be detected at present and future high energy machines.

  1. Kinetic Description of Vacuum Creation of Massive Vector Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Blaschke, D.B.; Prozorkevich, A.V.; Smolyansky, S.A.; Reichel, A.V.

    2005-06-01

    In the simple model of massive vector field in a flat spacetime, we derive the kinetic equation of non-Markovian type describing the vacuum pair creation under action of external fields of different nature. We use for this aim the nonperturbative methods of kinetic theory in combination with a new element when the transition of the instantaneous quasiparticle representation is realized within the oscillator (holomorphic) representation. We study in detail the process of vacuum creation of vector bosons generated by a time-dependent boson mass in accordance with the framework of a conformal-invariant scalar-tensor gravitational theory and its cosmological application. It is indicated that the choice of the equation of state allows one to obtain a number density of vector bosons that is sufficient to explain the observed number density of photons in the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  2. Multiple production of MSSM neutral Higgs bosons at high-energy e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djouadi, A.; Haber, H. E.; Zerwas, P. M.

    1996-02-01

    The cross sections for the multiple production of the lightest neutral Higgs boson at high-energy e+e- colliders are presented in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM). We consider production through Higgs-strahlung, associated production of the scalar and the pseudoscalar bosons, and the fusion mechanisms for which we use the effective longitudinal vector-boson approximation. These cross sections allow one to determine trilinear Higgs couplings λHhh and λhhh, which are theoretically determined by the Higgs potential.

  3. Electroweak constraints on flavorful effective theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efrati, Aielet; Falkowski, Adam; Soreq, Yotam

    2015-07-01

    We derive model-independent constraints arising from the Z and W boson observables on dimension six operators in the effective theory beyond the Standard Model. In particular, we discuss the generic flavor structure for these operators as well as several flavor patterns motivated by simple new physics scenarios.

  4. The inverse seesaw in conformal electro-weak symmetry breaking and phenomenological consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humbert, Pascal; Lindner, Manfred; Smirnov, Juri

    2015-06-01

    We study the inverse seesaw mechanism for neutrino masses and phenomenological consequences in the context of conformal electro-weak symmetry breaking. The main difference to the usual case is that all explicit fermion mass terms including Majorana masses for neutrinos are forbidden. All fermion mass terms arise therefore from vacuum expectation values of suitable scalars times some Yukawa couplings. This leads to interesting consequences for model building, neutrino mass phenomenology and the Dark Matter abundance. In the context of the inverse seesaw we find a favoured scenario with heavy pseudo-Dirac sterile neutrinos at the TeV scale, which in the conformal framework conspire with the electro-weak scale to generate keV scale warm Dark Matter. The mass scale relations provide naturally the correct relic abundance due to a freeze-in mechanism. We demonstrate also how conformal symmetry decouples the right-handed neutrino mass scale and effective lepton number violation. We find that lepton flavour violating processes can be well within the reach of modern experiments. Furthermore, interesting decay signatures are expected at the LHC.

  5. A note on gauge-fixing in the electroweak sector of non-minimal UED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Anindya; Shaw, Avirup

    2016-09-01

    Electroweak observables are highly sensitive to the loop corrections. Therefore, a proper gauge-fixing mechanism is always needed to define the propagators which are involved in Feynman loop amplitude. With this spirit, we compute gauge-fixing mechanism in five-dimensional (5D) universal extra-dimensional (UED) model with boundary localized terms (BLTs). These BLTs are not 5D operators in four-dimensional (4D) effective theory but some sort of boundary conditions on the respective fields at the fixed points of S1/Z 2 orbifold. Furthermore, these BLTs nontrivially modify the Kaluza-Klein (KK) spectra and some of the interactions among the KK-excitations compared to the minimal UED (mUED), in which, these BLTs are absent. In this note, we calculate the gauge-fixing mechanism in the electroweak sector of such nontrivial UED scenario. Moreover, we discuss the composition and masses of Goldstone and any physical scalar that emerge after the symmetry breaking in this set up with different choices of gauge.

  6. Modified magnetohydrodynamics around the electroweak transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlović, Petar; Leite, Natacha; Sigl, Günter

    2016-06-01

    We analyse solutions of the MHD equations around the electroweak transition taking into account the effects of the chiral anomaly. It is shown that a transition that is not of the first order has direct consequences on the evolution of the asymmetry between left- and right-handed leptons. Assuming an initial chiral asymmetry in the symmetric phase at temperatures higher than the transition temperature, as well as the existence of magnetic fields, it is demonstrated that the asymmetry typically grows with time, until it undergoes a fast decrease at the transition, and then eventually gets damped at lower temperatures in the broken phase. We argue that it is unlikely to have any significant magnetic field amplification as a consequence of the electroweak transition in the Standard model, even when the chiral anomaly is introduced. The presence of a chiral asymmetry between left- and right-handed charge carriers naturally leads to the creation of helical magnetic fields from non-helical fields and this can have consequences on their subsequent evolution. Similarly, an initially vanishing chiral asymmetry is naturally created in the presence of a helical magnetic field.

  7. Study of the mass and spin-parity of the Higgs boson candidate via its decays to Z boson pairs.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Aguilo, E; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, C; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Luyckx, S; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Mohammadi, A; Reis, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Garcia, G; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Selvaggi, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Malek, M; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Soares Jorge, L; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Anjos, T S; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Morovic, S; Tikvica, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Kuotb Awad, A M; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Millischer, L; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A-C; 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Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Green, D; Gutsche, O; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kunori, S; Kwan, S; Leonidopoulos, C; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wu, W; Yang, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Hugon, J; Kim, B; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Remington, R; Rinkevicius, A; Skhirtladze, N; Snowball, M; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Gaultney, V; Hewamanage, S; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Chen, J; Diamond, B; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Dorney, B; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Vodopiyanov, I; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Bai, Y; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Callner, J; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Lacroix, F; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Strom, D; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Duru, F; Griffiths, S; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Hu, G; Maksimovic, P; Swartz, M; Whitbeck, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Kenny Iii, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Tinti, G; Wood, J S; Barfuss, A F; Bolton, T; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Peterman, A; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Bauer, G; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Dutta, V; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Velicanu, D; Wenger, E A; Wolf, R; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Franzoni, G; Gude, A; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Sasseville, M; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Wan, Z; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Lusito, L; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Ofierzynski, R A; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Berry, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Antonelli, L; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Smith, G; Vuosalo, C; Williams, G; Winer, B L; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hegeman, J; Hunt, A; Jindal, P; Koay, S A; Lopes Pegna, D; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Raval, A; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zenz, S C; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Alagoz, E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Everett, A; Hu, Z; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Kress, M; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Vidal Marono, M; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Guragain, S; Parashar, N; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Boulahouache, C; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Chung, Y S; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Rekovic, V; Robles, J; Rose, K; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Seitz, C; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Walker, M; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Sengupta, S; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Akchurin, N; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Jeong, C; Kovitanggoon, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Florez, C; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Kurt, P; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Belknap, D A; Borrello, L; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Friis, E; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Mozer, M U; Ojalvo, I; Palmonari, F; Pierro, G A; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J

    2013-02-22

    A study is presented of the mass and spin-parity of the new boson recently observed at the LHC at a mass near 125 GeV. An integrated luminosity of 17.3 fb(-1), collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, is used. The measured mass in the ZZ channel, where both Z bosons decay to e or μ pairs, is 126.2 ± 0.6(stat) ± 0.2(syst) GeV. The angular distributions of the lepton pairs in this channel are sensitive to the spin-parity of the boson. Under the assumption of spin 0, the present data are consistent with the pure scalar hypothesis, while disfavoring the pure pseudoscalar hypothesis.

  8. Study of the mass and spin-parity of the Higgs boson candidate via its decays to Z boson pairs.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Aguilo, E; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, C; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Luyckx, S; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Mohammadi, A; Reis, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Garcia, G; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Selvaggi, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Malek, M; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Soares Jorge, L; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Anjos, T S; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Morovic, S; Tikvica, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Kuotb Awad, A M; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Millischer, L; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Brochet, S; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Calpas, B; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Caudron, J; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L

    2013-02-22

    A study is presented of the mass and spin-parity of the new boson recently observed at the LHC at a mass near 125 GeV. An integrated luminosity of 17.3 fb(-1), collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, is used. The measured mass in the ZZ channel, where both Z bosons decay to e or μ pairs, is 126.2 ± 0.6(stat) ± 0.2(syst) GeV. The angular distributions of the lepton pairs in this channel are sensitive to the spin-parity of the boson. Under the assumption of spin 0, the present data are consistent with the pure scalar hypothesis, while disfavoring the pure pseudoscalar hypothesis. PMID:23473131

  9. Diphoton channel at the LHC experiments to find a hint for a new heavy gauge boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneta, Kunio; Kang, Subeom; Lee, Hye-Sung

    2016-09-01

    Recently there has been a huge interest in the diphoton excess around 750 GeV reported by both ATLAS and CMS collaborations, although the newest analysis with more statistics does not seem to support the excess. Nevertheless, the diphoton channel at the LHC experiments are a powerful tool to probe a new physics. One of the most natural explanations of a diphoton excess, if it occurs, could be a new scalar boson with exotic colored particles. In this setup, it would be legitimate to ask what is the role of this new scalar in nature. A heavy neutral gauge boson (Z‧) is one of the traditional targets of the discovery at the collider experiments with numerous motivations. While the Landau-Yang theorem dictates the diphoton excess cannot be this spin-1 gauge boson, there is a strong correlation of a new heavy gauge boson and a new scalar boson which provides a mass to the gauge boson being at the same mass scale. In this paper, we point out a simple fact that a new scalar with a property similar to the recently highlighted 750 GeV would suggest an existence of a TeV scale Z‧ gauge boson that might be within the reach of the LHC Run 2 experiments. We take a scenario of the well-motivated and popular gauged B - L symmetry and require the gauge coupling unification to predict the mass and other properties of the Z‧ and illustrate the discovery of the Z‧ would occur during the LHC experiments.

  10. Geometric scalar theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Novello, M.; Bittencourt, E.; Goulart, E.; Salim, J.M.; Toniato, J.D.; Moschella, U. E-mail: eduhsb@cbpf.br E-mail: egoulart@cbpf.br E-mail: toniato@cbpf.br

    2013-06-01

    We present a geometric scalar theory of gravity. Our proposal will be described using the ''background field method'' introduced by Gupta, Feynman, Deser and others as a field theory formulation of general relativity. We analyze previous criticisms against scalar gravity and show how the present proposal avoids these difficulties. This concerns not only the theoretical complaints but also those related to observations. In particular, we show that the widespread belief of the conjecture that the source of scalar gravity must be the trace of the energy-momentum tensor — which is one of the main difficulties to couple gravity with electromagnetic phenomenon in previous models — does not apply to our geometric scalar theory. From the very beginning this is not a special relativistic scalar gravity. The adjective ''geometric'' pinpoints its similarity with general relativity: this is a metric theory of gravity. Some consequences of this new scalar theory are explored.

  11. Inferring the nature of the boson at 125-126Â GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Arjun; Modak, Tanmoy; Sahoo, Dibyakrupa; Sinha, Rahul; Cheng, Hai-Yang

    2014-05-01

    The presence of a bosonic resonance near 125 GeV has been firmly established at the Large Hadron Collider. Understanding the exact nature of this boson is a priority. The task now is to verify whether the boson is indeed the scalar Higgs as proposed in the Standard Model of particle physics, or something more esoteric as proposed in the plethora of extensions to the Standard Model. This requires a verification that the boson is a JPC=0++ state with couplings precisely as predicted by the Standard Model. Since a non-Standard Model boson can in some cases mimic the Standard Model Higgs in its couplings to gauge bosons, it is essential to rule out any anomalous behavior in its gauge couplings. We present a step by step methodology to determine the properties of this resonance without making any assumptions about its couplings. We present the analysis in terms of uniangular distributions which lead to angular asymmetries that allow for the extraction of the couplings of the 125-126 GeV resonance to Z bosons. We show analytically and numerically, that these asymmetries can unambiguously confirm whether the new boson is indeed the Standard Model Higgs boson.

  12. Baryogenesis from baryon-number-violating scalar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, J. P.; Volkas, R. R.

    1997-03-01

    In the following work we consider the possibility of explaining the observed baryon-number asymmetry in the universe from simple baryon-number-violating modifications, involving massive scalar bosons, to the standard model. In these cases baryon-number violation is mediated through a combination of Yukawa and scalar self-coupling interactions. Starting with a previously compiled catalogue of baryon-number-violating extensions of the standard model, we identify the minimal subsets which can induce a B-L asymmetry and thus be immune to sphaleron washout. For each of these models, we identify the region of parameter space that leads to the production of a baryon number asymmetry of the correct order of magnitude.

  13. Viable dark matter via radiative symmetry breaking in a scalar singlet Higgs portal extension of the standard model.

    PubMed

    Steele, T G; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Contreras, D; Mann, R B

    2014-05-01

    We consider the generation of dark matter mass via radiative electroweak symmetry breaking in an extension of the conformal standard model containing a singlet scalar field with a Higgs portal interaction. Generating the mass from a sequential process of radiative electroweak symmetry breaking followed by a conventional Higgs mechanism can account for less than 35% of the cosmological dark matter abundance for dark matter mass M(s)>80 GeV. However, in a dynamical approach where both Higgs and scalar singlet masses are generated via radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, we obtain much higher levels of dark matter abundance. At one-loop level we find abundances of 10%-100% with 106 GeVscalar-singlet self-coupling, providing a natural explanation for the astrophysical observations that place upper bounds on dark matter self-interaction. The predictions in all three approaches are within the M(s)>80 GeV detection region of the next generation XENON experiment.

  14. Fermion-scalar conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we compute the conformal blocks associated with scalar-scalar-fermionfermion 4-point functions in 3D CFTs. Together with the known scalar conformal blocks, our result completes the task of determining the so-called ‘seed blocks’ in three dimensions. In addition, conformal blocks associated with 4-point functions of operators with arbitrary spins can now be determined from these seed blocks by using known differential operators.

  15. Experimental scattershot boson sampling

    PubMed Central

    Bentivegna, Marco; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Vitelli, Chiara; Flamini, Fulvio; Viggianiello, Niko; Latmiral, Ludovico; Mataloni, Paolo; Brod, Daniel J.; Galvão, Ernesto F.; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Boson sampling is a computational task strongly believed to be hard for classical computers, but efficiently solvable by orchestrated bosonic interference in a specialized quantum computer. Current experimental schemes, however, are still insufficient for a convincing demonstration of the advantage of quantum over classical computation. A new variation of this task, scattershot boson sampling, leads to an exponential increase in speed of the quantum device, using a larger number of photon sources based on parametric down-conversion. This is achieved by having multiple heralded single photons being sent, shot by shot, into different random input ports of the interferometer. We report the first scattershot boson sampling experiments, where six different photon-pair sources are coupled to integrated photonic circuits. We use recently proposed statistical tools to analyze our experimental data, providing strong evidence that our photonic quantum simulator works as expected. This approach represents an important leap toward a convincing experimental demonstration of the quantum computational supremacy. PMID:26601164

  16. Experimental scattershot boson sampling.

    PubMed

    Bentivegna, Marco; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Vitelli, Chiara; Flamini, Fulvio; Viggianiello, Niko; Latmiral, Ludovico; Mataloni, Paolo; Brod, Daniel J; Galvão, Ernesto F; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Boson sampling is a computational task strongly believed to be hard for classical computers, but efficiently solvable by orchestrated bosonic interference in a specialized quantum computer. Current experimental schemes, however, are still insufficient for a convincing demonstration of the advantage of quantum over classical computation. A new variation of this task, scattershot boson sampling, leads to an exponential increase in speed of the quantum device, using a larger number of photon sources based on parametric down-conversion. This is achieved by having multiple heralded single photons being sent, shot by shot, into different random input ports of the interferometer. We report the first scattershot boson sampling experiments, where six different photon-pair sources are coupled to integrated photonic circuits. We use recently proposed statistical tools to analyze our experimental data, providing strong evidence that our photonic quantum simulator works as expected. This approach represents an important leap toward a convincing experimental demonstration of the quantum computational supremacy.

  17. Scalar sector of two-Higgs-doublet models: A minireview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Das, Dipankar

    2016-09-01

    A vast literature on the theory and phenomenology of Two-Higgs-Doublet models (2HDM) exists since long. However, the present situation demands a revisit of some 2HDM properties. Now that a 125 GeV scalar resonance has been discovered at the LHC, with its couplings to other particles showing increasing affinity to the Standard Model Higgs-like behavior, the 2HDM parameter space is more squeezed than ever. We briefly review the different parametrizations of the 2HDM potential and discuss the constraints on the parameter space arising from the unitarity and stability of the potential together with constraints from the oblique electroweak $T$-parameter. We also differentiate the consequences of imposing a global continuous U(1) symmetry on the potential from a discrete $Z_2$ symmetry.

  18. Scalar dark matter and its connection with neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peinado, E.

    2015-11-01

    The existence of non-baryonic Dark Matter is well established by cosmological and astrophysical probes, however its detailed nature still remains elusive. Among the extensions of the Standard Model (SM) explaining the DM relic abundance, the simplest one is the inert dark matter, where a scalar field is added to the Standard Model which is stabilized by a Z2 symmetry. We intend to give a brief review of this scenario and its possible connection with neutrino physics. In particular the discrete dark matter mechanism will be outlined. This mechanism consists in an extended SM with a non-Abelian flavor symmetry. When the flavor symmetry is spontaneously broken by the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism, it explains the neutrino mixing patterns and at the same time renders the dark matter stable.

  19. Toward electroweak scale cold dark matter with local dark gauge symmetry and beyond the DM EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Pyungwon

    2016-06-01

    In this talk, I describe a class of electroweak (EW) scale dark matter (DM) models where its stability or longevity are the results of underlying dark gauge symmetries: stable due to unbroken local dark gauge symmetry or topology, or long-lived due to the accidental global symmetry of dark gauge theories. Compared with the usual phenomenological dark matter models (including DM EFT or simplified DM models), DM models with local dark gauge symmetries include dark gauge bosons, dark Higgs bosons and sometimes excited dark matter. And dynamics among these fields are completely fixed by local gauge principle. The idea of singlet portals including the Higgs portal can thermalize these hidden sector dark matter very efficiently, so that these DM could be easily thermal DM. I also discuss the limitation of the usual DM effective field theory or simplified DM models without the full SM gauge symmetry, and emphasize the importance of the full SM gauge symmetry and renormalizability especially for collider searches for DM.

  20. Long-lived bino and wino in supersymmetry with heavy scalars and higgsinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Sakurai, Kazuki

    2015-11-01

    We point out that there is a parameter region in supersymmetry with heavy scalars and higgsinos, in which the heavier of bino and wino becomes long-lived as a consequence of the heavy higgsinos. In this region these electroweak gaugino sectors are secluded from each other with very small mixings that are inversely proportional to the higgsino mass, μ. We revisit the bino and bino decays and provide simple formulae for the partial decay rates and the lifetimes in the limit of heavy higgsinos. The scale of μ required for the long-lived electroweak gauginos highly depends on the mass hierarchy between bino and wino. The neutral wino can be long-lived ( cτ ≳ 1cm) even with | μ| ≳ 10 TeV if {m}_{tilde{W}}-{m}_{tilde{B}}˜ 20 GeV. We discuss the collider signatures of the long-lived binos and winos in this scenario.

  1. Effective potential (in)stability and lower bounds on the scalar (Higgs) mass

    SciTech Connect

    Branchina, Vincenzo; Faivre, Hugo

    2005-09-15

    It is widely believed that the top loop corrections to the Higgs effective potential destabilize the electroweak vacuum and that, imposing stability, lower bounds on the Higgs mass can be derived. With the help of a scalar-Yukawa model, we show that this apparent instability is due to the extrapolation of the potential into a region where it is no longer valid. Stability turns out to be an intrinsic property of the theory (rather than an additional constraint to be imposed on it). However, lower bounds for the Higgs mass can still be derived with the help of a criterion dictated by the properties of the potential itself. If the scale of new physics lies in the TeV region, sizable differences with the usual bounds are found. Finally, our results exclude the alternative metastability scenario, according to which we might be living in a sufficiently long lived metastable electroweak vacuum.

  2. Myers-Perry black holes with scalar hair and a mass gap: Unequal spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdeiro, Carlos; Kunz, Jutta; Radu, Eugen; Subagyo, Bintoro

    2015-09-01

    We construct rotating boson stars and Myers-Perry black holes with scalar hair (MPBHsSH) as fully non-linear solutions of five dimensional Einstein gravity minimally coupled to a complex, massive scalar field. The MPBHsSH are, in general, regular on and outside the horizon, asymptotically flat, and possess angular momentum in a single rotation plane. They are supported by rotation and have no static limit. Such hairy BHs may be thought of as bound states of boson stars and singly spinning, vacuum MPBHs and inherit properties of both these building blocks. When the horizon area shrinks to zero, the solutions reduce to (in a single plane) rotating boson stars; but the extremal limit also yields a zero area horizon, as for singly spinning MPBHs. Similarly to the case of equal angular momenta, and in contrast to Kerr black holes with scalar hair, singly spinning MPBHsSH are disconnected from the vacuum black holes, due to a mass gap. We observe that for the general case, with two unequal angular momenta, the equilibrium condition for the existence of MPBHsSH is w =m1Ω1 +m2Ω2, where Ωi are the horizon angular velocities in the two independent rotation planes and w ,mi, i = 1 , 2, are the scalar field's frequency and azimuthal harmonic indices.

  3. The Higgs Boson as a Window to Beyond the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    The recent discovery of a Higgs boson at the LHC with properties resembling those predicted by the Standard Model (SM) gives strong indication that the final missing piece of the SM is now in place. In particular, the mechanism responsible for Electroweak Symmetry Breaking (EWSB) and generating masses for the Z and W vector bosons appears to have been established. Even with this amazing discovery there are still many outstanding theoretical and phenomenological questions which suggest that there must be physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM). As we investigate in this thesis, the Higgs boson offers the exciting possibility of acting as a window to this new physics through various avenues which are experimentally testable in the coming years. We investigate a subset of these possibilities and begin by discussing them briefly below before a detailed examination in the following chapters.

  4. Estimations for the single diffractive production of the Higgs boson at the Tevatron and the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gay Ducati, M. B.; Machado, M. M.; Silveira, G. G.

    2011-04-01

    The single diffractive production of the standard model Higgs boson is computed using the diffractive factorization formalism, taking into account a parametrization for the Pomeron structure function provided by the H1 Collaboration. We compute the cross sections at next-to-leading order accuracy for the gluon fusion process, which includes QCD and electroweak (EW) corrections. The gap survival probability (<|S|{sup 2}>) is also introduced to account for the rescattering corrections due to spectator particles present in the interaction, and to this end we compare two different models for the survival factor. The diffractive ratios are predicted for proton-proton collisions at the Tevatron and the LHC for the Higgs boson mass of M{sub H}=120 GeV. Therefore, our results provide updated estimations for the diffractive ratios of the single diffractive production of the Higgs boson in the Tevatron and LHC kinematical regimes.

  5. Scalar Resonance at 750 GeV as Composite of Heavy Vector-Like Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wei; Zheng, Han-Qing

    2016-08-01

    We study a model of scalars which includes both the SM Higgs and a scalar singlet as composites of heavy vector-like fermions. The vector-like fermions are bounded by the super-strong four-fermion interactions. The scalar singlet decays to SM vector bosons through loop of heavy vector-like fermions. We show that the surprisingly large production cross section of di-photon events at 750 GeV resonance and the odd decay properties can all be explained. This model serves as a good model for both SM Higgs and a scalar resonance at 750 GeV. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under Grant Nos. 11135009, 11375065 and 10925522

  6. Nonorientable one-loop amplitudes for the bosonic open string: Electrostatics on a Moebius strip

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, J.P.

    1987-11-01

    The partition function, N-point scalar, and four-point vector nonorientable one-loop amplitudes for the bosonic open string in the critical dimension are obtained using a first quantized path integral treatment of Polyakov's string that assumes scale independence.

  7. PHYSICS OF ELECTROWEAK INTERACTIONS WITH NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Orlandini, Giuseppina

    2010-04-26

    In this series of lectures it is illustrated how one can study the strong dynamics of nuclei by means of the electroweak probe. In particular, the most important steps to derive the cross sections in first order perturbation theory are reviewed. In the derivation the focus is put on the main ingredients entering the hadronic part (response functions), i.e. the initial and final states of the system and the operators relevant for the reaction. Emphasis is put on the electromagnetic interaction with few-nucleon systems. The Lorentz integral transform method to calculate the response functions ab initio is described. A few examples of the comparison between theoretical and experimental results are shown. The dependence of the response functions on the nuclear interaction and in particular on three-body forces is emphasized.

  8. Neutrino dynamics below the electroweak crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate the thermal masses and damping rates of active (m < eV) and sterile (M ~ GeV) neutrinos with thermal momenta k~ 3T at temperatures below the electroweak crossover (5 GeV < T < 160 GeV) . These quantities fix the equilibration or ``washout'' rates of Standard Model lepton number densities. Sterile neutrinos interact via direct scatterings mediated by Yukawa couplings, and via their overlap with active neutrinos. Including all leading-order reactions we find that the washout rate generally exceeds the Hubble rate for 5 GeV < T < 30 GeV . Therefore it is challenging to generate a large lepton asymmetry facilitating dark matter computations operating at T < 5 GeV, whereas the generation of a baryon asymmetry at T > 130 GeV remains an option. Our differential rates are tabulated in a form suitable for studies of specific scenarios with given neutrino Yukawa matrices.

  9. Electroweak Gauge Models and Lepton Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsuji, N.; Ito, I.; Tsai, S. Y.; Kimura, T.; Furuya, K.

    1982-04-01

    We discuss, in the framework of the spontaneously broken electroweak gauge theory, the connection between the two non-standard lepton conservation laws, i.e., the Konopinski-Mahmoud (KM) scheme and the multiplicative scheme. For this purpose, we take SU(3) as a gauge group and start with KM triplets ({μ}^+,{ν},e^-)_L and (e^+,{ν}^c,{μ}^-)_L. We then point out that the idea of mass generation through the Higgs mechanism naturally gives rise to {μ}-e mixing which, supplemented by the requirement of a {μ}-e symmetry, results in a model of leptons which obeys the multiplicative scheme. This model also provides a mechanism for giving an asymmetrical masses to the electron and muon which otherwise behave symmetrically. An extension of the model to include the heavy lepton and quark sectors is suggested.

  10. Mirror cosmological relaxation of the electroweak scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii

    2016-01-01

    The cosmological relaxation mechanism proposed in [1] allows for a dynamically generated large separation between the weak scale and a theory cutoff, using a sharp change of theory behaviour upon crossing the limit between unbroken and broken symmetry phases. In this note we present a variation of this scenario, in which stabilization of the electroweak scale in the right place is ensured by the Z 2 symmetry exchanging the Standard Model (SM) with its mirror copy. We sketch the possible ways to produce viable thermal evolution of the Universe and discuss experimental accessibility of the new physics effects. We show that in this scenario the mirror SM can either have sizeable couplings with the ordinary one, or, conversely, can interact with it with a negligible strength. The overall cutoff allowed by such a construction can reach 109 GeV.

  11. Radiative And Electroweak Penguin Decays of B

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, Jeffrey D.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-11-09

    Radiative and electroweak penguin decays of B mesons are flavor-changing-neutral-current processes that provide powerful ways to test the Standard Model at the one-loop level, to search for the effects of new physics, and to extract Standard Model parameters such as CKM matrix elements and quark masses. The large data samples obtained by the B-factory experiments BaBar and Belle, together with an intensive theoretical effort, have led to significant progress towards understanding these rare decays. Recent experimental results include the measurements of the b {yields} d{gamma} decays B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, the observation of B {yields} K(*){ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} decays (together with studies of the associated kinematic distributions), and improved measurements of the inclusive B {yields} Xs{gamma} rate and photon energy spectrum.

  12. Search for the electroweak production of supersymmetric particles in √{s }=8 TeV p p collisions with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; da Cunha Sargedas de Sousa, M. J.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Benedetti, A.; de Castro, S.; de Cecco, S.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. 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E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. 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C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The ATLAS experiment has performed extensive searches for the electroweak production of charginos, neutralinos, and staus. This article summarizes and extends the search for electroweak supersymmetry with new analyses targeting scenarios not covered by previously published searches. New searches use vector-boson fusion production, initial-state radiation jets, and low-momentum lepton final states, as well as multivariate analysis techniques to improve the sensitivity to scenarios with small mass splittings and low-production cross sections. Results are based on 20 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √{s }=8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess beyond Standard Model expectations is observed. The new and existing searches are combined and interpreted in terms of 95% confidence-level exclusion limits in simplified models, where a single production process and decay mode is assumed, as well as within phenomenological supersymmetric models.

  13. Hiding a Heavy Higgs Boson at the 7 TeV LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yang; Fan, JiJi; Hewett, JoAnne L.

    2012-03-20

    A heavy Standard Model Higgs boson is not only disfavored by electroweak precision observables but is also excluded by direct searches at the 7 TeV LHC for a wide range of masses. Here, we examine scenarios where a heavy Higgs boson can be made consistent with both the indirect constraints and the direct null searches by adding only one new particle beyond the Standard Model. This new particle should be a weak multiplet in order to have additional contributions to the oblique parameters. If it is a color singlet, we find that a heavy Higgs with an intermediate mass of 200-300 GeV can decay into the new states, suppressing the branching ratios for the standard model modes, and thus hiding a heavy Higgs at the LHC. If the new particle is also charged under QCD, the Higgs production cross section from gluon fusion can be reduced significantly due to the new colored particle one-loop contribution. Current collider constraints on the new particles allow for viable parameter space to exist in order to hide a heavy Higgs boson. We categorize the general signatures of these new particles, identify favored regions of their parameter space and point out that discovering or excluding them at the LHC can provide important indirect information for a heavy Higgs. Finally, for a very heavy Higgs boson, beyond the search limit at the 7 TeV LHC, we discuss three additional scenarios where models would be consistent with electroweak precision tests: including an additional vector-like fermion mixing with the top quark, adding another U(1) gauge boson and modifying triple-gauge boson couplings.

  14. Precision Higgs Boson Physics and Implications for Beyond the Standard Model Physics Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, James

    2015-06-10

    The discovery of the Higgs boson is one of science's most impressive recent achievements. We have taken a leap forward in understanding what is at the heart of elementary particle mass generation. We now have a significant opportunity to develop even deeper understanding of how the fundamental laws of nature are constructed. As such, we need intense focus from the scientific community to put this discovery in its proper context, to realign and narrow our understanding of viable theory based on this positive discovery, and to detail the implications the discovery has for theories that attempt to answer questions beyond what the Standard Model can explain. This project's first main object is to develop a state-of-the-art analysis of precision Higgs boson physics. This is to be done in the tradition of the electroweak precision measurements of the LEP/SLC era. Indeed, the electroweak precision studies of the past are necessary inputs to the full precision Higgs program. Calculations will be presented to the community of Higgs boson observables that detail just how well various couplings of the Higgs boson can be measured, and more. These will be carried out using state-of-the-art theory computations coupled with the new experimental results coming in from the LHC. The project's second main objective is to utilize the results obtained from LHC Higgs boson experiments and the precision analysis, along with the direct search studies at LHC, and discern viable theories of physics beyond the Standard Model that unify physics to a deeper level. Studies will be performed on supersymmetric theories, theories of extra spatial dimensions (and related theories, such as compositeness), and theories that contain hidden sector states uniquely accessible to the Higgs boson. In addition, if data becomes incompatible with the Standard Model's low-energy effective lagrangian, new physics theories will be developed that explain the anomaly and put it into a more unified framework beyond

  15. Monopole non-annihilation at the electroweak scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Evalyn; Krauss, Lawrence M.; Terning, John

    1992-06-01

    We examine the issue of monopole annihilation at the electroweak scale induced by flux tube confinement, concentrating first on the simplest possibility - one which requires no new physics beyond the standard model. Monopoles existing at the time of the electroweak phase transition may trigger W condensation which can confine magnetic flux into flux tubes. However, we show on very general grounds, using several independent estimates, that such a mechanism is impotent. We then present several general dynamical arguments limiting the possibility of monopole annihilation through any confining phase near the electroweak scale.

  16. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D.

    2015-03-27

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis.

  17. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D. E-mail: membiela@mdp.edu.ar

    2015-03-01

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis.

  18. Observation of $t$-channel electroweak top quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle, with a mass of 172.0+0.9-1.3GeV. This is nearly twice the mass of the second heaviest known particle, the Z boson, and roughly the mass of a gold atom. Because of its unusually large mass, studying the top quark may provide insight into the Higgs mechanism and other beyond the standard model physics. Only two accelerators in the world are powerful enough to produce top quarks. The Tevatron, which first accelerated protons in 1983, has produced almost 400,000 top quarks, roughly half at each of its two detectors: DO and CDF. The LHC is a much newer accelerator which currently has accumulated about 0.5% as much data as the Tevatron. However, when running at full luminosity, the LHC is capable of producing a top quark about once every second and will quickly surpass the Tevatron as the leading producer of top quarks. This analysis uses data from the DØ detector at the Tevatron, which are described in chapter 3. Top quarks are produced most often in pairs of top and anti-top quarks through an interaction of the strong force. This production mode was first observed in 1995 at the Tevatron. However, top quarks can also be produced though an electroweak interaction, which produces just one top quark. This production mode was first observed at the Tevatron in 2008. Single top quark production can occur in different channels. In this analysis, a measurement of the cross section of the t-channel production mode is performed. This measurement uses 5.4 fb-1 of data and uses the technique of boosted decision trees in order to separate signal from background events. The t-channel cross section is measured to be: σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tqb + X) = 3.03+0.78-0.66 pb (0.0.1). Additional cross section measurements were also performed for the s-channel as well as the s + t-channel. The measurement of each one of these three cross sections was repeated three times using

  19. Measurement of W Boson Polarization in Top Quark Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Vickey, Trevor Neil

    2004-01-01

    A measurement of the polarization of the W boson from top quark decay is an excellent test of the V-A form of the charged-current weak interaction in the standard model. Since the longitudinal W boson is intimately related to the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism, and the standard model gives a specific prediction for the fraction of longitudinal W bosons from top decays, it is of particular interest for study. This thesis presents a measurement of W boson polarization in top quark decays through an analysis of the cosθ* distribution in the lepton-plus-jets channel of t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. This measurement uses an integrated luminosity of ~ 162 pb-1 of data collected with the CDF Run II detector, resulting in 31 t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events with at least one identified b jet. Using a binned likelihood fit to the cosθ* distribution from the t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events found in this sample, the fraction of W bosons with longitudinal polarization is determined to be F0 = 0.99$+0.29\\atop{-0.35}$stat.) ± 0.19(syst.), F0 > 0.33 @ 95% CL. This result is consistent with the standard model prediction, given a top quark mass of 174.3 GeV/c2, of F0 = 0.701 ± 0.012.

  20. Electroweak interactions and dark baryons in the sextet BSM model with a composite Higgs particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Zoltan; Holland, Kieran; Kuti, Julius; Mondal, Santanu; Nogradi, Daniel; Wong, Chik Him

    2016-07-01

    The electroweak interactions of a strongly coupled gauge theory are discussed with an outlook beyond the Standard Model (BSM) under global and gauge anomaly constraints. The theory is built on a minimal massless fermion doublet of the SU(2) BSM flavor group (bsm-flavor) with a confining gauge force at the TeV scale in the two-index symmetric (sextet) representation of the BSM SU(3) color gauge group (bsm-color). The intriguing possibility of near-conformal sextet gauge dynamics could lead to the minimal realization of the composite Higgs mechanism with a light 0++ scalar, far separated from strongly coupled resonances of the confining gauge force in the 2-3 TeV range, distinct from Higgsless technicolor. In previous publications we have presented results for the meson spectrum of the theory, including the light composite scalar, which is perhaps the emergent Higgs impostor. Here we discuss the critically important role of the baryon spectrum in the sextet model investigating its compatibility with what we know about thermal evolution of the early Universe including its galactic and terrestrial relics. For an important application, we report the first numerical results on the baryon spectrum of this theory from nonperturbative lattice simulations with baryon correlators in the staggered fermion implementation of the strongly coupled gauge sector. The quantum numbers of composite baryons and their spectroscopy from lattice simulations are required inputs for exploring dark matter contributions of the sextet BSM model, as outlined for future work.

  1. Testing the electroweak phase transition and electroweak baryogenesis at the LHC and a circular electron-positron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fa Peng; Gu, Pei-Hong; Yin, Peng-Fei; Yu, Zhao-Huan; Zhang, Xinmin

    2016-05-01

    We study the collider phenomenology of the electroweak phase transition and electroweak baryogenesis in the framework of the effective field theory. Our study shows that the effective theory using the dimension-6 operators can enforce strong first order phase transition and provide sizable C P violation to realize a successful electroweak baryogenesis. Such dimension-6 operators can induce interesting Higgs phenomenology that can be verified at colliders such as the LHC and the planning CEPC. We then demonstrate that this effective theory can originate from vectorlike quarks and the triplet Higgs.

  2. NLO QCD+EW predictions for V + jets including off-shell vector-boson decays and multijet merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallweit, S.; Lindert, J. M.; Maierhöfer, P.; Pozzorini, S.; Schönherr, M.

    2016-04-01

    We present next-to-leading order (NLO) predictions including QCD and electroweak (EW) corrections for the production and decay of off-shell electroweak vector bosons in association with up to two jets at the 13 TeV LHC. All possible dilepton final states with zero, one or two charged leptons that can arise from off-shell W and Z bosons or photons are considered. All predictions are obtained using the automated implementation of NLO QCD+EW corrections in the O penLoops matrix-element generator combined with the Munich and Sherpa Monte Carlo frameworks. Electroweak corrections play an especially important role in the context of BSM searches, due to the presence of large EW Sudakov logarithms at the TeV scale. In this kinematic regime, important observables such as the jet transverse momentum or the total transverse energy are strongly sensitive to multijet emissions. As a result, fixed-order NLO QCD+EW predictions are plagued by huge QCD corrections and poor theoretical precision. To remedy this problem we present an approximate method that allows for a simple and reliable implementation of NLO EW corrections in the MePs@Nlo multijet merging framework. Using this general approach we present an inclusive simulation of vector-boson production in association with jets that guarantees NLO QCD+EW accuracy in all phase-space regions involving up to two resolved jets.

  3. Higgs precision study of the 750 GeV diphoton resonance and the 125 GeV standard model Higgs boson with Higgs-singlet mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Kingman; Ko, P.; Lee, Jae Sik; Park, Jubin; Tseng, Po-Yan

    2016-08-01

    We interpret the potential observation of the 750 GeV diphoton resonance at the LHC in models, in which an S U (2 ) isospin-singlet scalar boson mixes with the standard model (SM) Higgs boson through an angle α . Allowing the singlet scalar boson to have renormalizable couplings to vectorlike leptons and quarks and introducing sizable decay width of the 750 GeV diphoton resonance into non-SM particles such as dark matters, we can explain the large production cross section σ (H2)×B (H2→γ γ ) as well as the apparent large total width of the boson without conflicts from the results obtained by previous global fits to the SM Higgs boson data.

  4. Models of little Higgs and electroweak precision tests

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    The little Higgs idea is an alternative to supersymmetry as a solution to the gauge hierarchy problem. In this note, the author reviews various little Higgs models and their phenomenology with emphasis on the precision electroweak constraints in these models.

  5. Electroweak contributions to squark pair production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Germer, Jan; Hollik, Wolfgang; Mirabella, Edoardo; Trenkel, Maike

    2010-02-10

    We present the tree-level and next-to-leading order (NLO) electroweak (EW) contributions to squark - squark production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) within the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM).

  6. Scalar-tensor theories with an external scalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvineau, Bertrand; Rodrigues, Davi C.; Fabris, Júlio C.

    2016-06-01

    Scalar-tensor (ST) gravity is considered in the case where the scalar is an external field. We show that general relativity (GR) and usual ST gravity are particular cases of the external scalar-tensor (EST) gravity. It is shown with a particular cosmological example that it is possible to join a part of a GR solution to a part of a ST one such that the complete solution neither belongs to GR nor to ST, but fully satisfies the EST field equations. We argue that external fields may effectively work as a type of screening mechanism for ST theories.

  7. Scalar-tensor gravity with a non-minimally coupled Higgs field and accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Jonghyun; Lee, Tae Hoon

    2016-03-01

    We consider general couplings, including non-minimal derivative coupling, of a Higgs boson field to scalar-tensor gravity and calculate their contributions to the energy density and pressure in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. In a special case where the kinetic term of the Higgs field is non-minimally coupled to the Einstein tensor, we seek de Sitter solutions for the cosmic scale factor and discuss the possibility that the late-time acceleration and the inflationary era of our universe can be described by means of scalar fields with self-interactions and the Yukawa potential.

  8. Black holes with scalar hair in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brihaye, Y.; Ducobu, L.

    2016-05-01

    The Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in five dimensions is extended by scalar fields and the corresponding equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear differential equations. A large family of regular solutions of these equations is shown to exist. Generically, these solutions are spinning black holes with scalar hairs. They can be characterized (but not uniquely) by an horizon and an angular velocity on this horizon. Taking particular limits, the black holes approach boson star or become extremal, in any case the limiting configurations remain hairy.

  9. Bosonization of Weyl Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Eduardo

    The electron, discovered by Thomson by the end of the nineteenth century, was the first experimentally observed particle. The Weyl fermion, though theoretically predicted since a long time, was observed in a condensed matter environment in an experiment reported only a few weeks ago. Is there any linking thread connecting the first and the last observed fermion (quasi)particles? The answer is positive. By generalizing the method known as bosonization, the first time in its full complete form, for a spacetime with 3+1 dimensions, we are able to show that both electrons and Weyl fermions can be expressed in terms of the same boson field, namely the Kalb-Ramond anti-symmetric tensor gauge field. The bosonized form of the Weyl chiral currents lead to the angle-dependent magneto-conductance behavior observed in these systems.

  10. Electroweak W+W- jj prodution at NLO in QCD matched with parton shower in the POWHEG-BOX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Barbara; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2013-04-01

    We present an implementation of electroweak W + W - jj production at hadron colliders in the POWHEG framework, a method that allows the interfacing of a next-to-leading order QCD calculation with parton shower Monte Carlo programs. We provide results for both, fully and semi-leptonic decay modes of the weak bosons, taking resonant and non-resonant contributions and spin correlations of the final-state particles into account. To illustrate the versatility of our implementation, we provide phenomenological results for two representative scenarios with a light and with a heavy Higgs boson, respectively, and in a kinematic regime of highly boosted gauge bosons. The impact of the parton shower is found to depend on the setup and the observable under investigation. In particular, distributions related to a central-jet veto are more sensitive to these effects. Therefore the impact of radiation by the parton shower on next-to-leading order predictions should be assessed carefully on a case-by-case basis.

  11. Anomalous gauge boson interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Barklow, T.; Baur, U. |

    1995-03-01

    We discuss the direct measurement of the trilinear vector boson couplings in present and future collider experiments. The major goals of such experiments will be the confirmation of the Standard Model (SM) predictions and the search for signals of new physics. We review our current theoretical understanding of anomalous trilinear gauge-boson self interactions. If the energy scale of the new physics is {approximately} 1 TeV, these low energy anomalous couplings are expected to be no larger than {Omicron}(10{sup {minus}2}). Constraints from high precision measurements at LEP and low energy charged and neutral current processes are critically reviewed.

  12. Consistency of scalar potentials from quantum de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, José R.; Fortin, Jean-François; Trépanier, Maxime

    2016-06-01

    Consistency of the unconventional view of de Sitter space as a quantum theory of gravity with a finite number of degrees of freedom requires that Coleman-De Luccia tunneling rates to vacua with negative cosmological constant should be interpreted as recurrences to low-entropy states. This demand translates into two constraints, or consistency conditions, on the scalar potential that are generically as follows: (1) the distance in field space between the de Sitter vacuum and any other vacuum with negative cosmological constant must be of the order of the reduced Planck mass or larger and (2) the fourth root of the vacuum energy density of the de Sitter vacuum must be smaller than the fourth root of the typical scale of the scalar potential. These consistency conditions shed a different light on both outstanding hierarchy problems of the standard model of particle physics: the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking and the scale of the cosmological constant. Beyond the unconventional interpretation of quantum de Sitter space, we complete the analytic understanding of the thin-wall approximation of Coleman-De Luccia tunneling, extend its numerical analysis to generic potentials and discuss the role of gravity in stabilizing the standard model potential.

  13. Scalar mode propagation in modified gravity with a scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Suyama, Teruaki

    2009-10-15

    We study the propagation of the scalar modes around a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe for general modifications of gravity in the presence of a real scalar field. In general, there will be two propagating scalar perturbation fields, which will have in total 4 degrees of freedom. Two of these degrees will have a superluminal propagation - with k-dependent speed of propagation - whereas the other two will have the speed of light. Therefore, the scalar degrees of freedom do not modify the general feature of modified gravity models: the appearance of modes whose frequency depends on the second power of the modulus of the wave vector. Constraints are given and special cases are discussed.

  14. Are stealth scalar fields stable?

    SciTech Connect

    Faraoni, Valerio; Moreno, Andres F. Zambrano

    2010-06-15

    Nongravitating (stealth) scalar fields associated with Minkowski space in scalar-tensor gravity are examined. Analytical solutions for both nonminimally coupled scalar field theory and for Brans-Dicke gravity are studied and their stability with respect to tensor perturbations is assessed using a covariant and gauge-invariant formalism developed for alternative gravity. For Brans-Dicke solutions, the stability with respect to homogeneous perturbations is also studied. There are regions of parameter space corresponding to stability and other regions corresponding to instability.

  15. Scalar cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggla, Claes; Wainwright, John

    2012-05-01

    Scalar perturbations of Friedmann-Lemaitre cosmologies can be analyzed in a variety of ways using Einstein’s field equations, the Ricci and Bianchi identities, or the conservation equations for the stress-energy tensor, and possibly introducing a timelike reference congruence. The common ground is the use of gauge invariants derived from the metric tensor, the stress-energy tensor, or from vectors associated with a reference congruence, as basic variables. Although there is a complication in that there is no unique choice of gauge invariants, we will show that this can be used to advantage. With this in mind our first goal is to present an efficient way of constructing dimensionless gauge invariants associated with the tensors that are involved, and of determining their inter-relationships. Our second goal is to give a unified treatment of the various ways of writing the governing equations in dimensionless form using gauge-invariant variables, showing how simplicity can be achieved by a suitable choice of variables and normalization factors. Our third goal is to elucidate the connection between the metric-based approach and the so-called 1 + 3 gauge-invariant approach to cosmological perturbations. We restrict our considerations to linear perturbations, but our intent is to set the stage for the extension to second-order perturbations.

  16. Dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking in the model of electroweak-scale right-handed neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Pham Quang; Le, Nguyen Nhu

    2016-04-01

    We present the Higgs mechanism in the context of the EW-scale νR model in which electroweak symmetry is dynamically broken by condensates of mirror quark and right-handed neutrino through the exchange of one fundamental Higgs doublet and one fundamental Higgs triplet, respectively. The formation of these condensates is dynamically investigated by using the Schwinger-Dyson approach. The occurrence of these condensates will give rise to the rich Higgs spectrum. In addition, the VEVs of Higgs fields is also discussed in this dynamical phenomenon.

  17. MSSM Electroweak Baryogenesis and LHC Data

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Nardini, Germano; Quiros, Mariano; Wagner, Carlos E.M.

    2013-02-01

    Electroweak baryogenesis is an attractive scenario for the generation of the baryon asymmetry of the universe as its realization depends on the presence at the weak scale of new particles which may be searched for at high energy colliders. In the MSSM it may only be realized in the presence of light stops, and with moderate or small mixing between the left- and right-handed components. Consistency with the observed Higgs mass around 125 GeV demands the heavier stop mass to be much larger than the weak scale. Moreover the lighter stop leads to an increase of the gluon-gluon fusion Higgs production cross section which seems to be in contradiction with indications from current LHC data. We show that this tension may be considerably relaxed in the presence of a light neutralino with a mass lower than about 60 GeV, satisfying all present experimental constraints. In such a case the Higgs may have a significant invisible decay width and the stop decays through a three or four body decay channel, including a bottom quark and the lightest neutralino in the final state. All these properties make this scenario testable at a high luminosity LHC.

  18. Nonperturbative QCD corrections to electroweak observables

    SciTech Connect

    Dru B Renner, Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Marcus Petschlies

    2011-12-01

    Nonperturbative QCD corrections are important to many low-energy electroweak observables, for example the muon magnetic moment. However, hadronic corrections also play a significant role at much higher energies due to their impact on the running of standard model parameters, such as the electromagnetic coupling. Currently, these hadronic contributions are accounted for by a combination of experimental measurements and phenomenological modeling but ideally should be calculated from first principles. Recent developments indicate that many of the most important hadronic corrections may be feasibly calculated using lattice QCD methods. To illustrate this, we will examine the lattice computation of the leading-order QCD corrections to the muon magnetic moment, paying particular attention to a recently developed method but also reviewing the results from other calculations. We will then continue with several examples that demonstrate the potential impact of the new approach: the leading-order corrections to the electron and tau magnetic moments, the running of the electromagnetic coupling, and a class of the next-to-leading-order corrections for the muon magnetic moment. Along the way, we will mention applications to the Adler function, the determination of the strong coupling constant and QCD corrections to muonic-hydrogen.

  19. Recent electroweak results from SLC/SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Raymond E.

    1997-06-15

    Key electroweak measurements performed by the SLD collaboration at the SLC are described and recent results given. The left-right cross-section asymmetry, A{sub LR}, has been updated to include the 1996 data. It remains the single most precise measurement of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} and it is compared to the LEP results. The polarized differential cross section for b-quarks is measured and is used to perform a unique direct measurement of the parity violation parameter for b quarks, A{sub b}. The excellent capability to perform secondary vertexing at SLC with CCD-based vertex detectors is described, including first physics results with the new detector VXD3. The vertexing is used to full advantage to make a highly pure B tag to measure the fraction of hadronic Z{sup 0} decays going to b quarks, R{sub b}. The vertexing, in combination with electron-beam polarization, is used to measure B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing. The prospects for making a B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing measurement are excellent given good SLC performance in the upcoming SLC run(s)

  20. Recent electroweak results from SLC/SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.E.

    1997-06-01

    Key electroweak measurements performed by the SLD collaboration at the SLC are described and recent results given. The left-right cross-section asymmetry, A{sub LR}, has been updated to include the 1996 data. It remains the single most precise measurement of sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} and it is compared to the LEP results. The polarized differential cross section for b-quarks is measured and is used to perform a unique direct measurement of the parity violation parameter for b quarks, A{sub b}. The excellent capability to perform secondary vertexing at SLC with CCD-based vertex detectors is described, including first physics results with the new detector VXD3. The vertexing is used to full advantage to make a highly pure B tag to measure the fraction of hadronic Z{sup 0} decays going to b quarks, R{sub b}. The vertexing, in combination with electron-beam polarization, is used to measure B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing. The prospects for making a B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing measurement are excellent given good SLC performance in the upcoming SLC run(s). {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Recent Electroweak Results from SLC/SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Raymond

    2003-06-06

    Key electroweak measurements performed by the SLD collaboration at the SLC are described and recent results given. The left-right cross-section asymmetry, A{sub LR}, has been updated to include the 1996 data. It remains the single most precise measurement of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff}, and it is compared to the LEP results. The polarized differential cross section for b-quarks is measured and is used to perform a unique direct measurement of the parity violation parameter for b quarks, A{sub b}. The excellent capability to perform secondary vertexing at SLC with CCD-based vertex detectors is described, including first physics results with the new detector VXD3. The vertexing is used to full advantage to make a highly pure B tag to measure the fraction of hadronic Z{sup 0} decays going to b quarks, R{sub b}. The vertexing, in combination with electron-beam polarization, is used to measure B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing. The prospects for making a B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing measurement are excellent given good SLC performance in the upcoming SLC run(s).

  2. Search for neutral Higgs bosons in events with multiple bottom quarks at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Álvarez González, B.; Alverson, G.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Bose, T.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Bu, X. B.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Cihangir, S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Croc, A.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; Dagenhart, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Das, A.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; d'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernandez, J. P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia, J. E.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Gomez, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, M.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hewamanage, S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, A. W.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kasper, P. A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Landsberg, G.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lysak, R.; Lys, J.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Maravin, Y.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patrick, J.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penning, B.; Penzo, A.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ranjan, N.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo, I.; Renkel, P.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Roser, R.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A. S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schlobohm, S.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, K. J.; Snider, F. D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Soha, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; Squillacioti, P.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stark, J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stelzer, B.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varganov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wahl, H. D.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warburton, A.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W. C., III; White, A.; Whiteson, D.; Wick, F.; Wicke, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, W.-C.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-11-01

    The combination of searches performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider for neutral Higgs bosons produced in association with b quarks is reported. The data, corresponding to 2.6fb-1 of integrated luminosity at CDF and 5.2fb-1 at D0, have been collected in final states containing three or more b jets. Upper limits are set on the cross section multiplied by the branching ratio varying between 44 pb and 0.7 pb in the Higgs boson mass range 90 to 300 GeV, assuming production of a narrow scalar boson. Significant enhancements to the production of Higgs bosons can be found in theories beyond the standard model, for example, in supersymmetry. The results are interpreted as upper limits in the parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model in a benchmark scenario favoring this decay mode.

  3. Observation of Electroweak Single Top-Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lueck, Jan

    2009-07-24

    The standard model of elementary particle physics (SM) predicts, besides the top-quark pair production via the strong interaction, also the electroweak production of single top-quarks [19]. Up to now, the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton-collider is the only place to produce and study top quarks emerging from hadron-hadron-collisions. Top quarks were directly observed in 1995 during the Tevatron Run I at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.8 TeV simultaneously by the CDF and D0 Collaborations via the strong production of top-quark pairs. Run II of the Tevatron data taking period started 2001 at √s = 1.96 TeV after a five year upgrade of the Tevatron accelerator complex and of both experiments. One main component of its physics program is the determination of the properties of the top quark including its electroweak production. Even though Run II is still ongoing, the study of the top quark is already a successful endeavor, confirmed by dozens of publications from both Tevatron experiments. A comprehensive review of top-quark physics can be found in reference. The reasons for searching for single top-quark production are compelling. As the electroweak top-quark production proceeds via a Wtb vertex, it provides the unique opportunity of the direct measurement of the CKM matrix element |Vtb|, which is expected to be |Vtb| ~ 1 in the SM. Significant deviations from unity could be an indication of a fourth quark generation, a production mode via flavor-changing neutral currents, and other new phenomena, respectively. There are two dominating electroweak top-quark production modes at the Fermilab Tevatron: the t-channel exchange of a virtual W boson striking a b quark and the s-channel production of a timelike W boson via the fusion of two quarks. In proton-antiproton-collisions the third electroweak production mode, the associated Wt production of an on-shell W boson in conjunction with a top quark has a comparatively negligible small

  4. Search for Electroweak Single-Top Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, Matthias; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-08-01

    prediction of the Standard Model or give hints towards physics beyond the Standard Model such as a fourth generation of quarks. In addition, electroweak single-top quark production is an important background for the Higgs boson search in the mass range of 90 GeV/c{sup 2} to 130 GeV/c{sup 2} at the Tevatron in the WH channel. Two single-top quark production modes are dominant at the Tevatron, the t-channel or W-gluon fusion and the s-channel or W* process. Since it is challenging to separate the signal from the various background events we use a neural network to combine several variables into one powerful discriminant. The simulated Monte Carlo sample outputs of the neural networks are used as templates for a likelihood fit to the outputs of the neural networks of the data. In this thesis CDF II data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 695 pb{sup -1} is discussed. As this analysis yields no significant evidence of electroweak single-top production it is not possible to measure any cross sections. Consequently we determine upper limits on the cross sections of the t- and s-channel production separately and combined.

  5. Scalar graviton as dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Pirogov, Yu. F.

    2015-06-15

    The basics of the theory of unimodular bimode gravity built on the principles of unimodular gauge invariance/relativity and general covariance are exposed. Besides the massless tensor graviton of General Relativity, the theory includes an (almost) massless scalar graviton treated as the gravitational dark matter. A spherically symmetric vacuum solution describing the coherent scalar-graviton field for the soft-core dark halos, with the asymptotically flat rotation curves, is demonstrated as an example.

  6. Search for a Higgs boson in the mass range from 145 to 1000 GeV decaying to a pair of W or Z bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-22

    A search for a heavy Higgs boson in the H → WW and H → ZZ decay channels is reported. The search is based upon proton-proton collision data samples corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb–1 at √s = 7 TeV and up to 19.7fb–1 at √s = 8 TeV, recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. Several final states of the H → WW and H → ZZ decays are analyzed. The combined upper limit at the 95% confidence level on the product of the cross section and branching fraction exclude a Higgs boson with standard model-like couplings and decays in the range 145 < mH < 1000 GeV. In addition, we interpret the results in the context of an electroweak singlet extension of the standard model.

  7. SUSY models under siege: LHC constraints and electroweak fine-tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Mickelson, Dan; Padeffke-Kirkland, Maren

    2014-06-01

    Recent null results from LHC8 supersymmetry (SUSY) searches along with the discovery of a standard model (SM)-like Higgs boson with mass mh≃125.5 GeV indicates sparticle masses in the TeV range, causing tension with conventional measures of electroweak fine-tuning. We propose a simple fine-tuning rule which should be followed under any credible evaluation of fine-tuning. We believe that overestimates of electroweak fine-tuning by conventional measures all arise from violations of this rule. We show that to gain accord with the fine-tuning rule, then both the Higgs mass and the traditional ΔBG fine-tuning measures reduce to the model-independent electroweak fine-tuning measure ΔEW. This occurs by combining dependent contributions to mZ or mh into independent units. Then, using ΔEW, we evaluate EW fine-tuning for a variety of SUSY models including mSUGRA, NUHM1, NUHM2, mGMSB, mAMSB, hyper-charged AMSB, gaugino AMSB and nine cases of mixed moduli-anomaly (mirage) mediated SUSY breaking models while respecting LHC Higgs mass and B-decay constraints (we do not impose LHC8 sparticle mass constraints due to the possibility of compressed spectra within many of these models). We find mSUGRA, mGMSB and the AMSB models all to be highly fine-tuned. The NUHM1 model is moderately fine-tuned while NUHM2 which allows for radiatively driven naturalness (RNS) allows for fine-tuning at a meager 10% level in the case where m(Higgsinos)˜100-200 GeV and the TeV-scale top squarks are well mixed. Models with RNS may or may not be detectable at LHC14. A √s ˜500 GeV e+e- collider will be required to make a definitive search for the requisite light Higgsinos.

  8. Lepton-flavored scalar dark matter with minimal flavor violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chao-Jung; Tandean, Jusak

    2015-04-01

    We explore scalar dark matter that is part of a lepton flavor triplet satisfying symmetry requirements under the hypothesis of minimal flavor violation. Beyond the standard model, the theory contains in addition three right-handed neutrinos that participate in the seesaw mechanism for light neutrino mass generation. The dark-matter candidate couples to standard-model particles via Higgs-portal renormalizable interactions as well as to leptons through dimension-six operators, all of which have minimal flavor violation built-in. We consider restrictions on the new scalars from the Higgs boson measurements, observed relic density, dark-matter direct detection experiments, LEP II measurements on e + e - scattering into a photon plus missing energy, and searches for flavor-violating lepton decays. The viable parameter space can be tested further with future data. Also, we investigate the possibility of the new scalars' couplings accounting for the tentative hint of Higgs flavor-violating decay h → μτ recently detected in the CMS experiment. They are allowed by constraints from other Higgs data to produce a rate of this decay roughly compatible with the CMS finding.

  9. Triple neutral gauge boson couplings in noncommutative Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, N. G.; He, Xiao-Gang

    2002-05-01

    It has been shown recently that the triple neutral gauge boson couplings are not uniquely determined in noncommutative extension of the Standard Model (NCSM). Depending on specific schemes used, the couplings are different and may even be zero. To distinguish different realizations of the NCSM, additional information either from theoretical or experimental considerations is needed. In this Letter we show that these couplings can be uniquely determined from considerations of unification of electroweak and strong interactions. Using SU(5) as the underlying theory and integrating out the heavy degrees of freedom, we obtain unique non-zero new triple γγγ, γγZ, γZZ, ZZZ, γGG, ZGG and GGG couplings at the leading order in the NCSM. We also briefly discuss experimental implications.

  10. Z' boson detection in the minimal quiver standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Berenstein, D.; Martinez, R.; Ochoa, F.; Pinansky, S.

    2009-05-01

    We undertake a phenomenological study of the extra neutral Z' boson in the minimal quiver standard model and disc