Science.gov

Sample records for element response surfaces

  1. Finite-element/progressive-lattice-sampling response surface methodology and application to benchmark probability quantification problems

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, V.J.; Bankston, S.D.

    1998-03-01

    Optimal response surface construction is being investigated as part of Sandia discretionary (LDRD) research into Analytic Nondeterministic Methods. The goal is to achieve an adequate representation of system behavior over the relevant parameter space of a problem with a minimum of computational and user effort. This is important in global optimization and in estimation of system probabilistic response, which are both made more viable by replacing large complex computer models with fast-running accurate and noiseless approximations. A Finite Element/Lattice Sampling (FE/LS) methodology for constructing progressively refined finite element response surfaces that reuse previous generations of samples is described here. Similar finite element implementations can be extended to N-dimensional problems and/or random fields and applied to other types of structured sampling paradigms, such as classical experimental design and Gauss, Lobatto, and Patterson sampling. Here the FE/LS model is applied in a ``decoupled`` Monte Carlo analysis of two sets of probability quantification test problems. The analytic test problems, spanning a large range of probabilities and very demanding failure region geometries, constitute a good testbed for comparing the performance of various nondeterministic analysis methods. In results here, FE/LS decoupled Monte Carlo analysis required orders of magnitude less computer time than direct Monte Carlo analysis, with no appreciable loss of accuracy. Thus, when arriving at probabilities or distributions by Monte Carlo, it appears to be more efficient to expend computer-model function evaluations on building a FE/LS response surface than to expend them in direct Monte Carlo sampling.

  2. Response Surface Analysis of Elemental Composition and Energy Properties of Corn Stover During Torrefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard D. Boardman; Christopher T. Wright

    2012-02-01

    This research studied the effects of torrefaction temperature (250-250 C) and time (30-120 minutes) on elemental composition and energy properties changes in corn stover. Torrefied material was analyzed for moisture content, moisture-free carbon (%), hydrogen (%), nitrogen (%), sulfur (%), and higher heating value (MJ/kg). Results at 350 C and 120 minutes indicated a steep decrease in moisture content to a final value of about 1.48% - a reduction of about 69%. With respect to carbon content, the increase was about 23%, while hydrogen and sulfur content decreased by about 46.82% and 66.6%, respectively. The hydrogen-to-carbon ratio decreased as torrefaction temperature and time increased, with the lowest value of 0.6 observed at 350 C and 120 minutes. Higher heating value measured at 350 C and 60 minutes increased by about 22% and the maximum degree of carbonization observed was about 1.21. Further, the regression models developed for chemical composition in terms of torrefaction temperature and time adequately described the process with coefficient of determination values (R2) in the range of 0.92-0.99 for the elemental composition and energy properties studied. Response surface plots indicated that increasing both torrefaction temperature and time resulted in decreased moisture content, hydrogen content, and the hydrogen to-carbon ratio, and increased carbon content and higher heating value. This effect was more significant at torrefaction temperatures and times >280 C and >30 minutes.

  3. Response Surface Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    methods . All three of these topics are usually combined into Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Also the experimenter may encounter situations where...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Response Surface Methodology 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...18 Keywords: Response Surface Methodology (RSM), regression analysis, linear

  4. Senescence responsive transcriptional element

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Judith; Testori, Alessandro

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant polynucleotides have expression control sequences that have a senescence responsive element and a minimal promoter, and which are operatively linked to a heterologous nucleotide sequence. The molecules are useful for achieving high levels of expression of genes in senescent cells. Methods of inhibiting expression of genes in senescent cells also are provided.

  5. Surface energies of elemental crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Richard; Xu, Zihan; Radhakrishnan, Balachandran; Winston, Donald; Sun, Wenhao; Persson, Kristin A.; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-09-01

    The surface energy is a fundamental property of the different facets of a crystal that is crucial to the understanding of various phenomena like surface segregation, roughening, catalytic activity, and the crystal’s equilibrium shape. Such surface phenomena are especially important at the nanoscale, where the large surface area to volume ratios lead to properties that are significantly different from the bulk. In this work, we present the largest database of calculated surface energies for elemental crystals to date. This database contains the surface energies of more than 100 polymorphs of about 70 elements, up to a maximum Miller index of two and three for non-cubic and cubic crystals, respectively. Well-known reconstruction schemes are also accounted for. The database is systematically improvable and has been rigorously validated against previous experimental and computational data where available. We will describe the methodology used in constructing the database, and how it can be accessed for further studies and design of materials.

  6. Surface energies of elemental crystals.

    PubMed

    Tran, Richard; Xu, Zihan; Radhakrishnan, Balachandran; Winston, Donald; Sun, Wenhao; Persson, Kristin A; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-09-13

    The surface energy is a fundamental property of the different facets of a crystal that is crucial to the understanding of various phenomena like surface segregation, roughening, catalytic activity, and the crystal's equilibrium shape. Such surface phenomena are especially important at the nanoscale, where the large surface area to volume ratios lead to properties that are significantly different from the bulk. In this work, we present the largest database of calculated surface energies for elemental crystals to date. This database contains the surface energies of more than 100 polymorphs of about 70 elements, up to a maximum Miller index of two and three for non-cubic and cubic crystals, respectively. Well-known reconstruction schemes are also accounted for. The database is systematically improvable and has been rigorously validated against previous experimental and computational data where available. We will describe the methodology used in constructing the database, and how it can be accessed for further studies and design of materials.

  7. Mars Surface Tunnel Element Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Mary, Natalie; Howe, A. Scott; Jeffries, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    How Mars surface crews get into their ascent vehicle has profound implications for Mars surface architecture. To meet planetary protection protocols, the architecture has get Intravehicular Activity (IVA)-suited crew into a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) without having to step outside into the Mars environment. Pushing EVA suit don/doff and EVA operations to an element that remains on the surface also helps to minimize MAV cabin volume, which in turn can reduce MAV cabin mass. Because the MAV will require at least seven kilograms of propellant to ascend each kilogram of cabin mass, minimal MAV mass is desired. For architectures involving more than one surface element-such as an ascent vehicle and a pressurized rover or surface habitat-a retractable tunnel is an attractive solution. Beyond addressing the immediate MAV access issue, a reusable tunnel may be useful for other surface applications once its primary mission is complete. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) team is studying the optimal balance between surface tunnel functionality, mass, and stowed volume as part of the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). The "Minimum Functional Tunnel" is a conceptual design that performs a single function. Having established this baseline configuration, the next step is to trade design options, evaluate other applications, and explore alternative solutions.

  8. Surface energies of elemental crystals

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Richard; Xu, Zihan; Radhakrishnan, Balachandran; Winston, Donald; Sun, Wenhao; Persson, Kristin A.; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-01-01

    The surface energy is a fundamental property of the different facets of a crystal that is crucial to the understanding of various phenomena like surface segregation, roughening, catalytic activity, and the crystal’s equilibrium shape. Such surface phenomena are especially important at the nanoscale, where the large surface area to volume ratios lead to properties that are significantly different from the bulk. In this work, we present the largest database of calculated surface energies for elemental crystals to date. This database contains the surface energies of more than 100 polymorphs of about 70 elements, up to a maximum Miller index of two and three for non-cubic and cubic crystals, respectively. Well-known reconstruction schemes are also accounted for. The database is systematically improvable and has been rigorously validated against previous experimental and computational data where available. We will describe the methodology used in constructing the database, and how it can be accessed for further studies and design of materials. PMID:27622853

  9. Mars Surface Tunnel Element Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    How crews get into or out of their ascent vehicle has profound implications for Mars surface architecture. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) hatches and Airlocks have the benefit of relatively low mass and high Technology Readiness Level (TRL), but waste consumables with a volume depressurization for every ingress/egress. Perhaps the biggest drawback to EVA hatches or Airlocks is that they make it difficult to keep Martian dust from being tracked back into the ascent vehicle, in violation of planetary protection protocols. Suit ports offer the promise of dust mitigation by keeping dusty suits outside the cabin, but require significant cabin real estate, are relatively high mass, and current operational concepts still require an EVA hatch to get the suits outside for the first EVA, and back inside after the final EVA. This is primarily because current designs don't provide enough structural support to protect the suits from ascent/descent loads or potential thruster plume impingement. For architectures involving more than one surface element-such as an ascent vehicle and a rover or surface habitat-a retractable tunnel is an attractive option. By pushing spacesuit don/doff and EVA operations to an element that remains on the surface, ascended vehicle mass and dust can be minimized. What's more, retractable tunnels provide operational flexibility by allowing surface assets to be re-configured or built up over time. Retractable tunnel functional requirements and design concepts being developed as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) work will add a new ingress/egress option to the surface architecture trade space.

  10. Mars Surface Tunnel Element Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Jefferies, Sharon; Howe, A. Scott; Howard, Robert; Mary, Natalie; Watson, Judith; Lewis, Ruthan

    2016-01-01

    When the first human visitors on Mars prepare to return to Earth, they will have to comply with stringent planetary protection requirements. Apollo Program experience warns that opening an EVA hatch directly to the surface will bring dust into the ascent vehicle. To prevent inadvertent return of potential Martian contaminants to Earth, careful consideration must be given to the way in which crew ingress their Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). For architectures involving more than one surface element-such as an ascent vehicle and a pressurized rover or surface habitat-a retractable tunnel that eliminates extravehicular activity (EVA) ingress is an attractive solution. Beyond addressing the immediate MAV access issue, a reusable tunnel may be useful for other surface applications, such as rover to habitat transfer, once its primary mission is complete. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) team is studying the optimal balance between surface tunnel functionality, mass, and stowed volume as part of the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). The study team began by identifying the minimum set of functional requirements needed for the tunnel to perform its primary mission, as this would presumably be the simplest design, with the lowest mass and volume. This Minimum Functional Tunnel then becomes a baseline against which various tunnel design concepts and potential alternatives can be traded, and aids in assessing the mass penalty of increased functionality. Preliminary analysis indicates that the mass of a single-mission tunnel is about 237 kg, not including mass growth allowance.

  11. Protein and DNA contact surfaces that mediate the selective action of the Phox1 homeodomain at the c-fos serum response element.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, K J; Grueneberg, D A; Gilman, M

    1997-01-01

    The human homeodomain protein Phox1 can impart serum-responsive transcriptional activity to the c-fos serum response element (SRE) by interacting with serum response factor (SRF). This activity is shared with other Paired class homeodomains but not with more distantly related homeodomains. To understand the mechanism of action of Phox1 at the SRE and the basis for the selective activity of Paired class homeodomains in this context, we performed a detailed mutagenesis of the Phox1 homeodomain. We found that amino acid residues that contact the major groove of the DNA are required for SRE activation in vivo, suggesting an in vivo requirement for major-groove DNA contact by the homeodomain. In contrast, substitution of a lysine residue in the N-terminal arm of the Phox1 homeodomain appeared to abolish DNA binding without affecting activity in vivo. Certain substitutions on the exposed surfaces of helices 1 and 2, not required for DNA binding, abolished activity in vivo, suggesting that these surfaces contact an accessory protein(s) required for this activity. We also found that transfer of a single amino acid residue from the surface of Phox1 helix 1 to the corresponding position in the distantly related Deformed (Dfd) homeodomain imparts to Dfd the ability to activate the SRE in vivo. We propose that Phox1 interacts with one or more factors at the SRE, in addition to SRF, and that the specificity of this interaction is determined by residues on the surfaces of helices 1 and 2. PMID:9343429

  12. Progressive Response Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, V. J.; Swiler, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Response surface functions are often used as simple and inexpensive replacements for computationally expensive computer models that simulate the behavior of a complex system over some parameter space. Progressive response surfaces are ones that are built up progressively as global information is added from new sample points in the parameter space. As the response surfaces are globally upgraded based on new information, heuristic indications of the convergence of the response surface approximation to the exact (fitted) function can be inferred. Sampling points can be incrementally added in a structured fashion, or in an unstructured fashion. Whatever the approach, at least in early stages of sampling it is usually desirable to sample the entire parameter space uniformly. At later stages of sampling, depending on the nature of the quantity being resolved, it may be desirable to continue sampling uniformly over the entire parameter space (Progressive response surfaces), or to switch to a focusing/economizing strategy of preferentially sampling certain regions of the parameter space based on information gained in early stages of sampling (Adaptive response surfaces). Here we consider Progressive response surfaces where a balanced indication of global response over the parameter space is desired.We use a variant of Moving Least Squares to fit and interpolate structured and unstructured point sets over the parameter space. On a 2-D test problem we compare response surface accuracy for three incremental sampling methods: Progressive Lattice Sampling; Simple-Random Monte Carlo; and Halton Quasi-Monte-Carlo sequences. We are ultimately after a system for constructing efficiently upgradable response surface approximations with reliable error estimates.

  13. Manned Mars mission surface transportation elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, S. Gregg; Mulqueen, Jack

    1986-01-01

    The necessity and advantage of surface transportation was well demonstrated by the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 missions. Baseline surface transportation elements for further studies are Lunar Rover, Elastic Loop Mobility System, Mobile Laboratory, Airplane, and Rocket Powered Flying Vehicles. These types of surface transportation are discussed. Starting points for further in-depth studies are identified.

  14. Boundary elements and surface plasmons

    SciTech Connect

    Goloskie, R.; Thio, T.; Ram-Mohan, L.R.

    1996-09-01

    We present an elementary introduction to the boundary element method (BEM). We use the BEM to calculate the electromagnetic field enhancements in the vicinity of metallic wires of arbitrary cross-section. The local electric field shows resonant peaks, as a function of the frequency of incident radiation, at the natural frequencies of the electronic plasma in the wires. We consider the effect of the shape of the cross-section of the wire on the resonant frequency, the proximity effect due to neighboring wires, and the influence of a substrate. The calculations are performed using enhanced continuity conditions at the boundaries. We discuss the advantages of such an approach. The field enhancements are predicted for a number of geometries. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Skin stiffness determined from occlusion of a horizontally running microvessel in response to skin surface pressure: a finite element study of sacral pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Inoue, Yoshiaki; Shimokawa, Yuki; Sakata, Keisuke

    2017-01-01

    Pressure ulcers occur following sustained occlusion of microvessels at bony prominences under skin surface pressure (SSP). However, the mechanical conditions of the surrounding soft tissue leading to microvascular occlusion are not fully understood. This study determined the stiffness of homogenized skin with microvasculature at the sacrum that occludes microvessels at an SSP of 10 kPa (consistent with a standard mattress) and recovers from occlusion at 5 kPa (consistent with a pressure-redistribution mattress). We conducted two-dimensional finite element analyses under plane stress and plane strain conditions to determine the stiffness of the skin. The results for plane stress conditions show that the microvessel was occluded with a Young's modulus of 23 kPa in response to an SSP of 10 kPa at the center of the sacrum and that the circulation recovered following a reduction in the SSP to 5 kPa. The resulting Young's modulus is consistent with reported data. Our study indicates that the critical value of the SSP for microvascular occlusion is determined not only by the stiffness of homogenized skin with microvasculature but also by the intraluminal pressure, microvascular wall stiffness, and body support conditions.

  16. Algebraic surface design and finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L.

    1992-01-01

    Some of the techniques are summarized which are used in constructing C sup 0 and C sup 1 continuous meshes of low degree, implicitly defined, algebraic surface patches in three dimensional space. These meshes of low degree algebraic surface patches are used to construct accurate computer models of physical objects. These meshes are also used in the finite element simulation of physical phenomena (e.g., heat dissipation, stress/strain distributions, fluid flow characteristics) required in the computer prototyping of both the manufacturability and functionality of the geometric design.

  17. p53 responsive elements in human retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Harris, CR; DeWan, A; Zupnick, A; Normart, R; Gabriel, A; Prives, C; Levine, AJ; Hoh, J

    2011-01-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (L1s) are highly repetitive DNA elements that are capable of altering the human genome through retrotransposition. To protect against L1 retroposition, the cell downregulates the expression of L1 proteins by various mechanisms, including high-density cytosine methylation of L1 promoters and DICER-dependent destruction of L1 mRNAs. In this report, a large number of p53 responsive elements, or p53 DNA binding sites, were detected in L1 elements within the human genome. At least some of these p53 responsive elements are functional and can act to increase the levels of L1 mRNA expression. The p53 protein can directly bind to a short 15-nucleotide sequence within the L1 promoter. This p53 responsive element within L1 is a recent addition to evolution, appearing ~20 million years ago. This suggests an interplay between L1 elements, which have a rich history of causing changes in the genome, and the p53 protein, the function of which is to protect against genomic changes. To understand these observations, a model is proposed in which the increased expression of L1 mRNAs by p53 actually increases, rather than decreases, the genomic stability through amplification of p53-dependent processes for genomic protection. PMID:19718052

  18. p53 responsive elements in human retrotransposons.

    PubMed

    Harris, C R; Dewan, A; Zupnick, A; Normart, R; Gabriel, A; Prives, C; Levine, A J; Hoh, J

    2009-11-05

    Long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (L1s) are highly repetitive DNA elements that are capable of altering the human genome through retrotransposition. To protect against L1 retroposition, the cell downregulates the expression of L1 proteins by various mechanisms, including high-density cytosine methylation of L1 promoters and DICER-dependent destruction of L1 mRNAs. In this report, a large number of p53 responsive elements, or p53 DNA binding sites, were detected in L1 elements within the human genome. At least some of these p53 responsive elements are functional and can act to increase the levels of L1 mRNA expression. The p53 protein can directly bind to a short 15-nucleotide sequence within the L1 promoter. This p53 responsive element within L1 is a recent addition to evolution, appearing approximately 20 million years ago. This suggests an interplay between L1 elements, which have a rich history of causing changes in the genome, and the p53 protein, the function of which is to protect against genomic changes. To understand these observations, a model is proposed in which the increased expression of L1 mRNAs by p53 actually increases, rather than decreases, the genomic stability through amplification of p53-dependent processes for genomic protection.

  19. The BepiColombo Mercury surface element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, M.

    2001-12-01

    Several versions of a Mercury surface element, part of the ESA BepiColombo Mercury Cornerstone mission to be launched in 2009, have been studied. The major constraint on system design has been the need to maximise the useful system mass on the surface of Mercury. The absence of atmosphere on the planet forces the adoption of a purely propulsive descent and landing system. The need to maintain the shock level at landing below limits which are acceptable to the payload imposes the adoption of a precise guidance, navigation & control system, which allows a drastic reduction of the landing speed, and therefore the adoption of an airbag landing system. Surface mobility is an obvious requirement for the purpose of geochemical exploration, since selected rocks have a much higher scientific yield than the average regolith. Geophysical investigations require that thermal, accelerometric, and densitometric probes be brought in contact with subsurface regions, to a depth of several metres. Magnetometric measurements may need deployment of sensors to some distance from the bulk of the lander body. The thermal environment on the surface of Mercury is extreme, even in the polar regions that will be targeted by the BepiColombo lander, while the solar flux rises seasonally to 10 times the one experienced in Earth orbit. The need to provide a low-temperature heat sink to sensors is particularly critical, if these are installed on a small-size, small-mass mobile deployment device. A consequence of the landing in a polar region will be the extremely variable lighting conditions, with extended portions of the surface shrouded in darkness by any small surface obstacle. Limitations on communications between Earth and the deployed payload will be caused by the low available data rate and by visibility windows (contact may be restricted to as little as <10 min every 9.5 h). This will impose a high degree of autonomy to be built into the payload systems.

  20. Cross-linking of surface Ig receptors on murine B lymphocytes stimulates the expression of nuclear tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-response element-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chiles, T.C.; Liu, J.L.; Rothstein, T.L. )

    1991-03-15

    Cross-linking of sIg on primary B lymphocytes leads to increased nuclear DNA-binding activity specific for the tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-response element (TRE), as judged by gel mobility shift assays. Stimulation of B cells to enter S phase of the cell cycle by treatment with the combination of phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore also stimulated nuclear TRE-binding activity within 2 h, with maximal expression at 4 h; however, phorbol ester and calcium ionophore were not as effective in stimulating binding activity when examined separately. Stimulated nuclear expression of TRE-binding activity appears to require protein synthesis. Fos- and Jun/AP-1-related proteins participate directly in the identified nucleoprotein complex, as shown by the ability of c-fos- and c-jun-specific antisera to either alter or completely abolish electrophoretic migration of the complex in native gels. Further, UV photo-cross-linking studies identified two major TRE-binding protein species, whose sizes correspond to TRE-binding proteins derived from HeLa cell nuclear extracts. The results suggest that in primary B cells nuclear TRE-binding activity represents a downstream signaling event that occurs subsequent to changes in protein kinase C activity and intracellular Ca2+ but that can be triggered physiologically through sIg.

  1. Response to Intervention in Mathematics: Critical Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lembke, Erica S.; Hampton, David; Beyers, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    While implementation efforts using a Response to Intervention (RtI) model to increase reading instruction are becoming widely used, more administrators and teachers are looking to learn effective RtI practices to support learning in mathematics. This article explores some of the key elements of RtI practices in mathematics, including screening for…

  2. Surface Water Response Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    During response to spills, or for facility planning, the vulnerability of downstream water resources is a major concern. How long and at what concentration do spilled contaminants reach downstream receptors? Models have the potential to answer these questions, but only if they ...

  3. Surface Water Response Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    During response to spills, or for facility planning, the vulnerability of downstream water resources is a major concern. How long and at what concentration do spilled contaminants reach downstream receptors? Models have the potential to answer these questions, but only if they ...

  4. Surface photovoltage measurements and finite element modeling of SAW devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Christine

    2012-03-01

    Over the course of a Summer 2011 internship with the MEMS department of Sandia National Laboratories, work was completed on two major projects. The first and main project of the summer involved taking surface photovoltage measurements for silicon samples, and using these measurements to determine surface recombination velocities and minority carrier diffusion lengths of the materials. The SPV method was used to fill gaps in the knowledge of material parameters that had not been determined successfully by other characterization methods. The second project involved creating a 2D finite element model of a surface acoustic wave device. A basic form of the model with the expected impedance response curve was completed, and the model is ready to be further developed for analysis of MEMS photonic resonator devices.

  5. Frequency selective surfaces with multiple periodic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jeffrey Alan

    A thorough computer design study using the method of Chen1,2,3 was undertaken for band-pass filters constructed from frequency selective surfaces (FSSs). The FSSs, modeled as thin, perfectly conducting surfaces with periodically arranged apertures, were designed to produce a transmission profile with a bandpass characteristic centered at 10.6 μm and to have various specified bandwidths. The effects of aperture shape and dimensions, configuration and periodicity of the aperture array, and presence of a dielectric substrate were examined in- depth. For comparison purposes, a complimentary array of metallic patches was also examined. The successful design (a thin, planar sheet of aluminum perforated with narrow rectangular apertures in a triangular array configuration on a thick zinc selenide substrate) provided a preliminary set of basic design rules for creating bandpass filters from FSSs. Dual resonance transmission profiles were generated by considering a FSS with a group of apertures as the periodic element. Chen's method1,2,3 was modified to work with periodic groups of up to four rectangular or circular shaped apertures (or metallic patches). Combinations of different length narrow slot apertures, combinations of square and narrow slot apertures, and variation of periodicity along alternating rows of narrow slot apertures, all produced a dual resonance transmission profile in the computer model. For the combination of different length narrow apertures, the dual resonance resulted from the natural resonance associated with the two different length narrow apertures, while for the combination of squares and narrow slots, an enhancement of the Wood's anomaly at the diffraction edge created the second resonance peak. Variation of the periodicity along alternating rows produced a dual resonance because each of the 'superimposed arrays' had a different periodicity. The presence of Wood's anomalies in the transmission profile was also examined. Finally, 'proof of

  6. LADEEView: Elemental Composition Analysis of Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, D.; Darrach, M.

    2016-10-01

    LadeeView is a comprehensive lunar data analyzer with modular architecture. Mass spectrometry module is designed to map elemental abundances along the LADEE spacecraft trajectories. These maps are useful input for future models of lunar exosphere.

  7. A robust, finite element model for hydrostatic surface water flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Casulli, V.

    1998-01-01

    A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.

  8. Response surface development using RETRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, R.E.; Sorensen, J.M.; May, R.S.; Doran, K.J. ); Trikouros, N.G.; Mozias, E.S. )

    1991-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and GPU Nuclear Corporation have completed a demonstration project that provides justification for relaxing the high-pressure setpoints for the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station. The project was undertaken because an undesirable overlap had been identified in the high-pressure setpoints when accounting for measurement uncertainties experienced during plant operation. The project employed a statistical combination of uncertainties (SCU) process to provide increased margin for measurement uncertainties. This approach was used because previous experience indicated that there was insufficient margin to justify the desired setpoints using conventional deterministic inputs to the safety analysis and plant performance analysis processes. Through the use of SCU methodology and other deterministic analyses, it is possible to provide comprehensive bases for the desired technical specification changes to the high-pressure setpoints. The SCU process is based on the EPRI setpoint analysis guidelines, and it requires the development of response surfaces to simulate RETRAN peak pressure calculations for the limiting transient event. The use of response surfaces adds an intermediate step to the SCU process, but reduces the number of RETRAN cases required to make appropriate statistical statements about the result probabilities. Basically, each response surface is an approximation of the RETRAN code for one particular event and one output variable of interest, which is valid over a limited region. The response surfaces can be sampled very inexpensively using simple Monte Carlo methods. The basic input to the development of a response surface is a set of results obtained from specific RETRAN cases.

  9. Evaluation of elemental enrichments in surface sediments off southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen-Tung; Kandasamy, Selvaraj

    2008-05-01

    Surface slices of 20 sediment cores, off southwestern Taiwan, and bed sediment of River Kaoping were measured for major and trace elements (Al, As, Ca, Cd, Cl, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Si, Ti, V, and Zn) to evaluate the geochemical processes responsible for their distribution, including elemental contamination. Major element/Al ratio and mean grain size indicate quartz-dominated, coarse grained sediments that likely derived from sedimentary rocks of Taiwan and upper crust of Yangtze Craton. Bi-plot of SiO2 versus Fe2O{3/T} suggests the possible iron enrichment in sediments of slag dumping sites. Highest concentrations of Cr, Mn, P, S, and Zn found in sediments of dumping sites support this. Correlation analysis shows dual associations, detrital and organic carbon, for Cr, P, S, and V with the latter association typical for sediments in dumping sites. Normalization of trace elements to Al indicates high enrichment factors (>2) for As, Cd, Pb, and Zn, revealing contamination. Factor analysis extracted four geochemical associations with the principal factor accounted for 25.1% of the total variance and identifies the combined effects of dumped iron and steel slag-induced C-S-Fe relationship owing to authigenic precipitation of Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides and/or metal sulfides, and organic matter complexation of Fe, Mn, Ca, Cr, P, and V. Factors 2, 3, and 4 reveal detrital association (Ti, Al, Ni, Pb, Cu, and V), effect of sea salt (Cl, Mg, Na, and K) and anthropogenic component (As and Zn)-carbonate link, respectively, in the investigated sediments.

  10. Active and responsive polymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jilin; Han, Yanchun

    2010-02-01

    A central challenge in polymer science today is creating materials that dynamically alter their structures and properties on demand, or in response to changes in their environment. Surfaces represent an attractive area of focus, since they exert disproportionately large effects on properties such as wettability, adhesiveness, optical appearance, and bioactivity, enabling pronounced changes in properties to be accomplished through subtle changes in interfacial structure or chemistry. In this critical review, we review the recent research progress into active and responsive polymer surfaces. The chief purpose of this article is to summarize the advanced preparation techniques and applications in this field from the past decade. This review should be of interest both to new scientists in this field and the interdisciplinary researchers who are working on "intelligent" polymer surfaces (117 references).

  11. Metallic surface states in elemental electrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Ivan I.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2017-07-01

    Recent high-pressure studies have uncovered an alternative class of materials, insulating electride phases created by compression of simple metals. These exotic insulating phases develop an unusual electronic structure: the valence electrons move away from the nuclei and condense at interstitial sites, thereby acquiring the role of atomic anions or even molecules. We show that they are also topological phases as they exhibit a wide diversity of metallic surface states (SSs) that are controlled by the bulk electronic structure. The electronic reconstruction occurs that involves charge transfer between the surfaces of opposite polarity making both of them metallic, resembling the appearance of the two-dimensional gas at the renowned SrTi O3 /LaAl O3 interface. Remarkably, these materials thus embody seemingly disparate physical concepts—chemical electron localization, topological control of bulk-surface conductivity, and the two-dimensional electron gas. Such metallic SSs could be probed by direct electrical resistance or by standard photoemission measurements on recovery to ambient conditions.

  12. Novel Piezoelectric Effect and Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Elements for MEMS Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ponelyte, Sigita; Palevicius, Arvydas

    2014-01-01

    This paper covers research on novel thin films with periodical microstructure—optical elements, exhibiting a combination of piezoelectric and surface plasmon resonance effects. The research results showed that incorporation of Ag nanoparticles in novel piezoelectric—plasmonic elements shift a dominating peak in the visible light spectrum. This optical window is essential in the design of optical elements for sensing systems. Novel optical elements can be tunable under defined bias and change its main grating parameters (depth and width) influencing the response of diffraction efficiencies. These elements allow opening new avenues in the design of more sensitive and multifunctional microdevices. PMID:24747733

  13. Surface faceting and elemental diffusion behaviour at atomic scale for alloy nanoparticles during in situ annealing

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Miaofang; Wang, Chao; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng; Li, Dongguo; More, Karren L.; Lupini, Andrew; Allard, Lawrence F.; Markovic, Nenad M.; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic performance of nanoparticles is primarily determined by the precise nature of the surface and near-surface atomic configurations, which can be tailored by post-synthesis annealing effectively and straightforwardly. Understanding the complete dynamic response of surface structure and chemistry to thermal treatments at the atomic scale is imperative for the rational design of catalyst nanoparticles. Here, by tracking the same individual Pt3Co nanoparticles during in situ annealing in a scanning transmission electron microscope, we directly discern five distinct stages of surface elemental rearrangements in Pt3Co nanoparticles at the atomic scale: initial random (alloy) elemental distribution; surface platinum-skin-layer formation; nucleation of structurally ordered domains; ordered framework development and, finally, initiation of amorphization. Furthermore, a comprehensive interplay among phase evolution, surface faceting and elemental inter-diffusion is revealed, and supported by atomistic simulations. This work may pave the way towards designing catalysts through post-synthesis annealing for optimized catalytic performance. PMID:26576477

  14. Thresholds in shock response across the elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, F. L.; Bourne, N. K.

    2017-01-01

    Compendia of shock data have been assembled across national laboratories across the world. Previous work has shown a threshold in behaviour for materials; the weak shock limit. This corresponds to the stress state at which the shock is overdriven in a single front. Here the shock velocity-particle velocity data for elements and compounds has been systematically analysed to note discontinuities in the data. A range of materials show such features and the form of the discontinuity in each case is analysed. Some of these are found to correspond to martensitic phase transformations as expected whilst others are more difficult to classify. Particular groups within the elements show characteristic forms according to their groupings within the periodic table. Typical datasets are presented and trends in behaviour are noted for a range of elements.

  15. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  16. Element segregation on the surfaces of pure aluminum foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinming; Liu, Jiancai; Tang, Jianguo; Li, Li; Chen, Mingan; Liu, Shengdan; Zhu, Bing

    2010-09-01

    The surface segregation trend of trace elements in pure aluminum foils was investigated by density functional theory. The model of nine-layer Al(1 0 0) slab substituted partially by trace element atoms was proposed for calculating surface segregation energy. The calculating results show that (i) B, Mg, Si, Ga, Ge, Y, In, Sn, Sb, Pb and Bi exhibit negative segregation energy and possibly move to the surface, while Be, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zr exhibit positive segregation energies and migrated into the bulk; (ii) the segregation energy was found to be related with the covalent radius, the relaxed position at the surface of the substituting atom and the surface energy; (iii) the segregation behavior of trace element generates lots of defects and dislocation, which can increase the initial pitting nucleation sites in the surface of aluminum foils; (iv) the impurity atom concentration was tested with Pb-doped surfaces, the calculated negative segregation energies in all coverage increases rapidly with the Pb coverage. These conclusions are helpful for designing of the chemical composition and to advance the tunnel etching of aluminum foils.

  17. Reliability Analyses of a Surface Mounted Package Using Finite Element Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    Surface Mount Devices Leadless Chip Carrier 09 02 Finite Element Method Finite Element Analysis 14 04 IThermal Stress Theral Analvsls 19. ABSTRACT...simulate the response of the package/board to various physical factors and thermal environments. The data needed to execute NISA is typed into an...temperature distribution throughout the package. The time step is calcu- lated by appropriate parametric evaluations using the device’s physical and material

  18. Heat Transfer Variation on Protuberances and Surface Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Robert C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of surface irregularities on local convective heat transfer, the variation in heat transfer coefficients on small (2-6 mm diam) hemispherical roughness elements on a flat plate has been studied in a wind funnel using IR techniques. Heat transfer enhancement was observed to vary over the roughness elements with the maximum heat transfer on the upstream face. This heat transfer enhancement increased strongly with roughness size and velocity when there was a laminar boundary layer on the plate. For a turbulent boundary layer, the heat transfer enhancement was relatively constant with velocity, but did increase with element size. When multiple roughness elements were studied, no influence of adjacent roughness elements on heat transfer was observed if the roughness separation was greater than approximately one roughness element radius. As roughness separation was reduced, less variation in heat transfer was observed on the downstream elements. Implications of the observed roughness enhanced heat transfer on ice accretion modeling are discussed.

  19. Computation of Schenberg response function by using finite element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frajuca, C.; Bortoli, F. S.; Magalhaes, N. S.

    2016-05-01

    Schenberg is a detector of gravitational waves resonant mass type, with a central frequency of operation of 3200 Hz. Transducers located on the surface of the resonating sphere, according to a distribution half-dodecahedron, are used to monitor a strain amplitude. The development of mechanical impedance matchers that act by increasing the coupling of the transducers with the sphere is a major challenge because of the high frequency and small in size. The objective of this work is to study the Schenberg response function obtained by finite element modeling (FEM). Finnaly, the result is compared with the result of the simplified model for mass spring type system modeling verifying if that is suitable for the determination of sensitivity detector, as the conclusion the both modeling give the same results.

  20. Surface temperatures in sliding systems - A finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, F. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Finite element equations are developed for studying surface temperatures resulting from frictional heating in sliding systems. The equations include the effect of velocity of moving components, an effect which is found to be quite significant, even at low sliding velocities. A program was written using the equations and it was applied to the study of surface temperatures in two different sliding systems: dry or boundary lubricated sleeve bearings and a labyrinth gas path seal configuration. Very good agreement was achieved between analytical predictions using the program and experimental temperature measurements. The program was used to study the influence of various material parameters on surface temperatures in the two sliding systems.

  1. Specificity of simple hormone response elements in androgen regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Marschke, K B; Tan, J A; Kupfer, S R; Wilson, E M; French, F S

    1995-11-01

    Androgen (AR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptors recognize a family of 15 base pair partial palindromic hormone response elements (HRE). We have studied receptor interactions with several HREs from androgen regulated genes to determine their potential to mediate a selective androgen response. Synthetic oligonucleotides corresponding to the elements were analysed for receptor binding and steroid dependent transcriptional enhancer activities. Each HRE contained the 3' half-site sequence (5'-TGTNCT-3') of the glucocorticoid response element (GRE) consensus sequence. HREs that countained the 5' half-site GRE consensus sequence (5'-A/GGNACA/G-3') had the strongest and-rogen response element (ARE) and GRE activities. In methylation interference assays, AR and GR interacted with identical base contact sites in the response elements. Two elements that deviated from the GRE consensus sequence by a single optimal base in the 5' half, had reduced ARE activity with no significant change in GRE activity and displayed lower binding of AR than GR in mobility shift assays using purified DNA binding domain peptides. Transfections with AR/GR and GR/AR chimeras containing the N-terminal domain of one receptor linked to the DNA-binding and C-terminal domains of the other suggested that N-terminal domain functions of GR also contributed to the greater GRE than ARE activities of the response elements.

  2. Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

  3. Surface deterioration and elemental composition of retrieved orthodontic miniscrews.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pradnya; Kharbanda, Om Prakash; Duggal, Ritu; Das, Taposh K; Kalyanasundaram, Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    This study provides insight into surface and elemental analyses of orthodontic retrieved miniscrew implants (MSIs). The sole purpose was to investigate the behavior of MSIs while they are in contact with bone and soft tissues, fluids, and food in the oral cavity. The information thus gathered may help to understand the underlying process of success or failure of MSIs and can be helpful in improving their material composition and design. The study was carried out on 28 titanium-alloy MSIs (all from the same manufacturer) split into 3 groups: 18 MSIs were retrieved after successful orthodontic treatment, 5 were failed MSIs, and 5 were as-received MSIs serving as the controls. All MSIs were subjected to energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis to investigate the changes in surface elemental composition and to scanning electron microscopy to analyze their surface topography. Data thus obtained were subjected to suitable statistical analyses. Scanning electron microscope analysis showed surface manufacturing imperfections of the as-received MSIs in the form of stripes. Their elemental composition was confirmed to the specifications of the American Society for Testing of Materials for surgical implants. Retrieved MSIs exhibited generalized surface dullness; variable corrosion; craters in the head, neck, body, and tip regions; and blunting on tips and threads. Energy dispersive x-ray analyses showed deposition of additional elements: calcium had greater significance in its proportion in the body region by 0.056 weight percent; iron was seen in greater proportion in the failed retrieved MSIs compared with the successful miniscrews; cerium was seen in greater proportions in the head region by 0.128 weight percent and in the neck region by 0.147 weight percent than in the body and tip regions of retrieved MSIs. Retrieved MSIs showed considerable surface and structural alterations such as dullness, corrosion, and blunting of threads and tips. Their surfaces showed interactions

  4. Asymptotic behavior of curvature of surface elements in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, S. S.

    1991-01-01

    The asymptotic behavior of the curvature of material elements in turbulence is investigated using Lagrangian velocity-gradient time series obtained from direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence. Several material-element ensembles of different initial curvatures and shapes are studied. It is found that, at long times, the (first five) moments of the logarithm of characteristic curvature and shape factor asymptote to values that are independent of the initial curvature or shape. This evidence strongly suggests that the asymptotic pdf's of the curvature and shape of material elements are stationary and independent of initial conditions. Irrespective of initial curvature or shape, the asymptotic shape of a material surface is cylindrical with a high probability.

  5. Finite element analysis of panels with surface cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, S. V.; Skvortsov, Yu. V.; Perov, S. N.; Chernyakin, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    With the aid of the ANSYS® FEM-packet, solution is offered with regard to the fracture mechanics for cylindrical panels with blind surface cracks of semi-elliptical shape. Obtained was distribution of the J-integral lengthwise the defect front, the values of which are calculated via the integration technique by area. Application of the cellular mesh with major number finite elements lengthwise the front line enables detection of the boundary effect near the crack front penetration to the surface. Offered are universal equations for estimating values of the stress intensify factor in the front characteristic points.

  6. Transposable elements in response to environmental stressors&

    PubMed Central

    Miousse, Isabelle R.; Chalbot, Marie-Cecile G.; Lumen, Annie; Ferguson, Alesia; Kavouras, Ilias G.; Koturbash, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) comprise a group of repetitive sequences that bring positive, negative, as well as neutral effects to the host organism. Earlier considered as “junk DNA,” TEs are now well-accepted driving forces of evolution and critical regulators the of expression of genetic information. Their activity is regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, including methylation of DNA and histone modifications. The loss of epigenetic control over TEs, exhibited as loss of DNA methylation and decondensation of the chromatin structure, may result in TEs reactivation, initiation of their insertional mutagenesis (retrotransposition) and has been reported in numerous human diseases, including cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that these alterations are not the simple consequences of the disease, but often may drive the pathogenesis, as they can be detected early during disease development. Knowledge derived from the in vitro, in vivo, and epidemiological studies, clearly demonstrates that exposure to ubiquitous environmental stressors, many of which are carcinogens or suspected carcinogens, are capable of causing alterations in methylation and expression of TEs and initiate retrotransposition events. Evidence summarized in this review suggests that TEs are the sensitive endpoints for detection of effects caused by such environmental stressors, as ionizing radiation (terrestrial, space, and UV-radiation), air pollution (including particulate matter [PM]-derived and gaseous), persistent organic pollutants, and metals. Furthermore, the significance of these effects is characterized by their early appearance, persistence and presence in both, target organs and peripheral blood. Altogether, these findings suggest that TEs may potentially be introduced into safety and risk assessment and serve as biomarkers of exposure to environmental stressors. Furthermore, TEs also show significant potential to become invaluable surrogate biomarkers in clinic and possible targets

  7. Response of transposable elements to environmental stressors.

    PubMed

    Miousse, Isabelle R; Chalbot, Marie-Cecile G; Lumen, Annie; Ferguson, Alesia; Kavouras, Ilias G; Koturbash, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) comprise a group of repetitive sequences that bring positive, negative, as well as neutral effects to the host organism. Earlier considered as "junk DNA," TEs are now well-accepted driving forces of evolution and critical regulators of the expression of genetic information. Their activity is regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, including methylation of DNA and histone modifications. The loss of epigenetic control over TEs, exhibited as loss of DNA methylation and decondensation of the chromatin structure, may result in TEs reactivation, initiation of their insertional mutagenesis (retrotransposition) and has been reported in numerous human diseases, including cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that these alterations are not the simple consequences of the disease, but often may drive the pathogenesis, as they can be detected early during disease development. Knowledge derived from the in vitro, in vivo, and epidemiological studies, clearly demonstrates that exposure to ubiquitous environmental stressors, many of which are carcinogens or suspected carcinogens, are capable of causing alterations in methylation and expression of TEs and initiate retrotransposition events. Evidence summarized in this review suggests that TEs are the sensitive endpoints for detection of effects caused by such environmental stressors, as ionizing radiation (terrestrial, space, and UV-radiation), air pollution (including particulate matter [PM]-derived and gaseous), persistent organic pollutants, and metals. Furthermore, the significance of these effects is characterized by their early appearance, persistence and presence in both, target organs and peripheral blood. Altogether, these findings suggest that TEs may potentially be introduced into safety and risk assessment and serve as biomarkers of exposure to environmental stressors. Furthermore, TEs also show significant potential to become invaluable surrogate biomarkers in clinic and possible targets for

  8. Finite element simulation for damage detection of surface rust in steel rebars using elastic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qixiang; Yu, Tzuyang

    2016-04-01

    Steel rebar corrosion reduces the integrity and service life of reinforced concrete (RC) structures and causes their gradual and sudden failures. Early stage detection of steel rebar corrosion can improve the efficiency of routine maintenance and prevent sudden failures from happening. In this paper, detecting the presence of surface rust in steel rebars is investigated by the finite element method (FEM) using surface-generated elastic waves. Simulated wave propagation mimics the sensing scheme of a fiber optic acoustic generator mounted on the surface of steel rebars. Formation of surface rust in steel rebars is modeled by changing material's property at local elements. In this paper, various locations of a fiber optic acoustic transducer and a receiver were considered. Megahertz elastic waves were used and different sizes of surface rust were applied. Transient responses of surface displacement and pressure were studied. It is found that surface rust is most detectable when the rust location is between the transducer and the receiver. Displacement response of intact steel rebar is needed in order to obtain background-subtracted response with a better signal-to-noise ratio. When the size of surface rust increases, reduced amplitude in displacement was obtained by the receiver.

  9. Water Detection Response Team Geophysics Element Case Histories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    34 on the surface by conducting one or more types of geophysical tests at that point. In the ideal case, the aquifer thickness and water quality would...The Geophysics Element has been deployed to participate in several major military exercises. Case historics of the Geophysics Element involvement in...ber who will advise the well drillers and reinterpret the geophysical survey results on the basis of drilling results, if necessary. This operating

  10. Baseline concentrations of 15 trace elements in Florida surface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Ma, L.Q.; Harris, W.G.

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish baseline concentrations for 15 potentially toxic elements (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, cu, Hg, Ma, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Zn) based on 448 representative Florida surface soils using microwave assisted HNO{sub 3}-HCl-HF digestion. Baseline concentrations of those elements were (mg kg{sup {minus}1}): Ag 0.07-2.50, As 0.02-7.01, Ba 1.67-112, Be 0.04-4.15, Cd 0-0.33, Cr 0.89-80.7, Cu 0.22-21.9, Hg 0.00075-0.0396, Mo 0.13-6.76, Ni 1.70-48.5, Pb 0.69-42.0, Sb 0.06-0.79, Se 0.01-1.11, and Zn 0.89-29.6, respectively. Upper baseline values for most elements corresponded with these reported in literature, except Ba, Hg, Mn, Sb, and Zn, which were 3 to 23 times lower. Soil properties, including pH, organic carbon (OC), particle size, cation-exchange capacity (CEC), available water, extractable base, extractable acidity, total Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, and Al concentrations, were related to metal concentrations using factorial analysis. Eight factors were identified (total Fe and Al, CEC, pH, clay, OC, total Ni and Mo, total Sb and Pb, and total Hg) and accounted for 87% of the total variance, suggesting that metal concentrations were primarily controlled by soil compositions. Multiple regression of elemental concentrations against total Fe, total Al, clay, OC, CEC, and pH was significant for all elements. Partial correlation coefficients indicated that total Fe and/or Al explained most of the variance for Mn, Ni, Ba, Be, Hg, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Pb, and Zn concentrations. Most of the variance in Se was related to clay, whereas those of Ag and Sb related to clay and total Al.

  11. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Charles M; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-11-07

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction-diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html.

  12. Pancreatic Secretion in Response to Jejunal Feeding of Elemental Diet

    PubMed Central

    Cassim, M. M.; Allardyce, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The instillation of elemental diet into the proximal jejunum of dogs results in a brisk pancreatic secretory response, but the fluid is watery and “enzyme-poor.” The administration of the caloric equivalent in a standard blenderized ward diet induces pancreatic enzyme secretion. Although elemental diet does not “rest” the pancreas, the failure of these preparations to stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion gives them a theoretical advantage as a nutritional source in the convalescent phase of acute pancreatitis. PMID:4210477

  13. Surface hardening of cutting elements agricultural machinery vibro arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifullin, S. N.; Adigamov, N. R.; Adigamov, N. N.; Solovev, R. Y.; Arakcheeva, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    At present, the state technical policy aimed at the modernization of worn equipment, including agriculture, based on the use of high-performance technology called nanotechnology. By upgrading worn-out equipment meant restoring it with the achievement of the above parameters passport. The existing traditional technologies are not suitable for the repair of worn-out equipment modernization. This is especially true of imported equipment. Out here alone - is the use of high-performance technologies. In this paper, we consider the use of vibro arc plasma for surface hardening of cutting elements of agricultural machinery.

  14. Diffractive micro-optical element with nonpoint response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, Victor A.; Golub, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    Common-use diffractive lenses have microrelief zones in the form of simple rings that provide only an optical power but do not contain any image information. They have a point-image response under point-source illumination. We must use a more complicated non-point response to focus a light beam into different light marks, letter-type images as well as for optical pattern recognition. The current presentation describes computer generation of diffractive micro- optical elements with complicated curvilinear zones of a regular piecewise-smooth structure and grey-level or staircase phase microrelief. The manufacture of non-point response elements uses the steps of phase-transfer calculation and orthogonal-scan masks generation or lithographic glass etching. Ray-tracing method is shown to be applicable in this task. Several working samples of focusing optical elements generated by computer and photolithography are presented. Using the experimental results we discuss here such applications as laser branding.

  15. Boundary element method for surface nonlinear optics of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mäkitalo, Jouni; Suuriniemi, Saku; Kauranen, Martti

    2011-11-07

    We present the frequency-domain boundary element formulation for solving surface second-harmonic generation from nanoparticles of virtually arbitrary shape and material. We use the Rao-Wilton-Glisson basis functions and Galerkin's testing, which leads to very accurate solutions for both near and far fields. This is verified by a comparison to a solution obtained via multipole expansion for the case of a spherical particle. The frequency-domain formulation allows the use of experimentally measured linear and nonlinear material parameters or the use of parameters obtained using ab-initio principles. As an example, the method is applied to a non-centrosymmetric L-shaped gold nanoparticle to illustrate the formation of surface nonlinear polarization and the second-harmonic radiation properties of the particle. This method provides a theoretically well-founded approach for modelling nonlinear optical phenomena in nanoparticles.

  16. Ca2+-Responsive cis-Elements in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Finkler, Aliza; Kaplan, Boaz

    2007-01-01

    External physical and chemical stimuli are transduced via second messengers, following primary interaction with specific membrane or soluble receptors. Ca2+ is an important second messenger in plants as in other eukaryotes, mediating responses to numerous environmental stimuli and affecting a multitude of cellular processes including gene expression. However, there is yet very little information concerning the cis-elements that mediate Ca2+-responsive gene expression. In this article we discuss a recent investigation combining bioinformatics with experimental data, revealing DNA regulatory elements that convey specific cytosolic Ca2+ transients to the transcription machinery. PMID:19704800

  17. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  18. Surface faceting and elemental diffusion behaviour at atomic scale for alloy nanoparticles during in situ annealing

    DOE PAGES

    Chi, Miaofang; Wang, Chao; Lei, Yinkai; ...

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic performance of nanoparticles is primarily determined by the precise nature of the surface and near-surface atomic configurations, which can be tailored by post-synthesis annealing effectively and straightforwardly. Understanding the complete dynamic response of surface structure and chemistry to thermal treatments at the atomic scale is imperative for the rational design of catalyst nanoparticles. Here, by tracking the same individual Pt3Co nanoparticles during in situ annealing in a scanning transmission electron microscope, we directly discern five distinct stages of surface elemental rearrangements in Pt3Co nanoparticles at the atomic scale: initial random (alloy) elemental distribution; surface platinum-skin-layer formation; nucleation ofmore » structurally ordered domains; ordered framework development and, finally, initiation of amorphization. Furthermore, a comprehensive interplay among phase evolution, surface faceting and elemental inter-diffusion is revealed, and supported by atomistic simulations. In conlcusion, this work may pave the way towards designing catalysts through post-synthesis annealing for optimized catalytic performance.« less

  19. Tribological thin films on steel rolling element bearing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ryan David

    Tribological thin films are of interest to designers and end-users of friction management and load transmission components such as steel rolling element bearings. This study sought to reveal new information about the properties and formation of such films, spanning the scope of their technical evolution from natural oxide films, to antiwear films from lubricant additives, and finally engineered nanocomposite metal carbide/amorphous hydrocarbon (MC/a-C:H) films. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on the near-surface material (depth < 500 nm) of tapered roller bearing inner rings (cones) that were tested at two levels of boundary-lubricated conditions in mineral oil with and without sulfur- and phosphorus-containing gear oil additives. Site-specific thinning of cross-section cone surface sections for TEM analyses was conducted using the focused ion beam milling technique. Two types of oxide surface films were characterized for the cones tested in mineral oil only, each one corresponding to a different lubrication severity. Continuous and adherent antiwear films were found on the cone surfaces tested with lubricant additives, and their composition depended on the lubrication conditions. A sharp interface separated the antiwear film and base steel. Various TEM analytical techniques were used to study the segregation of elements throughout the film volume. The properties of nanocomposite tantalum carbide/amorphous hydrocarbon (TaC/a-C:H) thin films depend sensitively on reactive magnetron sputtering deposition process conditions. TaC/a-C:H film growth was studied as a function of three deposition parameters in designed experiments: acetylene flow rate, applied d.c. bias voltage, and substrate carousel rotation rate. Empirical models were developed for the following film characteristics to identify process-property trend relationships: Ta/C atomic ratio, hydrogen content, film thickness. TaC crystallite size, Raman spectrum, compressive stress, hardness

  20. Bulk and surface electronic structure of actinide, rare earth, and transition metal elements and compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, J.W.; Eriksson, O.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report for a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to study of unusual magnetic and structural properties of rare earth, actinide, and transition metals through high-precision electronic structure calculations. Magnetic moment anisotropies in bulk and surface systems were studied, with emphasis on novel surfaces with unusual magnetic properties with possible applicability in magnetic recording. The structural stability, bonding properties, and elastic response of the actinides, as well as transition and rare earth elements and compounds, were also studied. The project sought to understand the unusual crystallographic and cohesive properties of the actinides and the importance of correlation to structural stability and the nature of the delocalization transition in these elements. Theoretical photoemission spectra, including surface effects, were calculated for rare earths and actinides.

  1. Nonlinear analysis of the forced response of structural elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Mook, D. T.; Sridhar, S.

    1974-01-01

    A general procedure is presented for the nonlinear analysis of the forced response of structural elements to harmonic excitations. Internal resonances (i.e., modal interactions) are taken into account. All excitations are considered, with special consideration given to resonant excitations. The general procedure is applied to clamped-hinged beams. The results reveal that exciting a higher mode may lead to a larger response in a lower interacting mode, contrary to the results of linear analyses.

  2. Deformation analysis of optical flat surface with finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Pengqiang; Ren, Boyuan; Wang, Yiwen; Zhang, Dewei; Zhang, Longjiang; Su, Xing

    2016-10-01

    Proposing a new method for testing the ultra-precision aerostatic spindle motion accuracy based on analyzing the online real-time dynamic interference image. Optical flat crystal as the testing standard will be installed at the end of the ultra precision aerostatic spindle and will motion along with the spindle. On the other end of the spindle, the tool will be installed for online processing. The image data of optical flat crystal collected by the high-precision dynamic interferometer will be processed for analyzing the spindle error. For collecting higher accuracy image data, the installation way of optical flat crystal is one of the key technologies. Base on this, the effects of the clamping means on the surface accuracy of optical flat crystal is studied. At first, the finite element model of the optical flat crystal`s clamping structure were established. Secondly, the influence of the material of the supporting annulus, preload lateral clamping and spindle speed on the surface accuracy of optical flat crystal had been analyzed. At last, the improved and optimized structure of the optical flat crystal has been presented. As the analysis results shown, the RMS value of reference surface is 9.47nm and the deformation values of the central region is 0.17nm which satisfies the requirement of surface accuracy and installation of optical flat crystal. It has a very important theoretical and practical significance to establish spindle online testing system and research rotary error generating mechanism of ultra-precision spindle to improve surface accuracy of ultra-precision machining.

  3. Thermal expansion compensator having an elastic conductive element bonded to two facing surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Determan, William (Inventor); Matejczyk, Daniel Edward (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A thermal expansion compensator is provided and includes a first electrode structure having a first surface, a second electrode structure having a second surface facing the first surface and an elastic element bonded to the first and second surfaces and including a conductive element by which the first and second electrode structures electrically and/or thermally communicate, the conductive element having a length that is not substantially longer than a distance between the first and second surfaces.

  4. Elemental mapping of planetary surfaces using gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    The gamma rays escaping from a planet can be used to map the concentrations of various elements in its surface. In a planet, the high-energy particles in the galactic cosmic rays induce a cascade of particles that includes many neutrons. The {gamma} rays are made by the nuclear excitations induced by these cosmic-ray particles and their secondaries (especially capture or inelastic-scattering reactions induced by neutrons) and decay of the naturally-occurring radioelements. After a short history of planetary {gamma}-ray spectroscopy and its applications, the {gamma}-ray spectrometer planned for the Mars Observer mission is presented. The results of laboratory experiments that simulate the cosmic-ray bombardments of planetary surfaces or measure cross sections for the production of {gamma} rays and the status of the theoretical calculations for the processes that make and transport neutrons and {gamma} rays will be reviewed. The emphasis here is on studies of Mars and on new ideas, concepts, and problems that have arisen over the last decade, such as Doppler broadening and peaks from neutron scattering with germanium nuclei in a high-resolution {gamma}-ray spectrometer. 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Dielectric constant and surface morphology of the elemental diffused polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Riyadh M. A. Abdul; Datar, A.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Alegaonkar, P. S.; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2006-11-01

    Polyimide (C22H10N2O5, PMDA-ODA, Kapton-H) samples were doped with phosphorous or boron and fluorine using the radiation assisted diffusion technique, with Co-60 gamma-rays over the dose range ~64 384 kGy, at room temperature. The diffusion of phosphorus and fluorine was confirmed by the RBS technique and that of boron by the neutron depth profiling technique. The elemental concentration on the surface was studied by the XPS technique. The relative concentration of phosphorus, fluorine and boron increased with increasing dose of gamma-rays. The dielectric constant, ɛ', of the polyimide increased by ~43% after phosphorus doping but decreased by ~33% after boron and fluorine doping. The increase in ɛ' is attributed to the radiation induced chemical coupling of the phosphorus atoms across the intra-molecular polyimide chains. The down shift in ɛ' is attributed to the decrease in the degree of electronic polarization and to the increase in the free volume due to the diffused boron or fluorine atoms. For all the doped samples the dielectric constant, ɛ', decreased very slowly with increasing frequency, over the range 100 Hz 7 MHz. AFM results reveal that the surface morphology and the roughness of the doped polyimide are appreciably different than that of virgin polyimide.

  6. Dual functionality of cis-regulatory elements as developmental enhancers and Polycomb response elements.

    PubMed

    Erceg, Jelena; Pakozdi, Tibor; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Ghavi-Helm, Yad; Girardot, Charles; Bracken, Adrian P; Furlong, Eileen E M

    2017-03-15

    Developmental gene expression is tightly regulated through enhancer elements, which initiate dynamic spatio-temporal expression, and Polycomb response elements (PREs), which maintain stable gene silencing. These two cis-regulatory functions are thought to operate through distinct dedicated elements. By examining the occupancy of the Drosophila pleiohomeotic repressive complex (PhoRC) during embryogenesis, we revealed extensive co-occupancy at developmental enhancers. Using an established in vivo assay for PRE activity, we demonstrated that a subset of characterized developmental enhancers can function as PREs, silencing transcription in a Polycomb-dependent manner. Conversely, some classic Drosophila PREs can function as developmental enhancers in vivo, activating spatio-temporal expression. This study therefore uncovers elements with dual function: activating transcription in some cells (enhancers) while stably maintaining transcriptional silencing in others (PREs). Given that enhancers initiate spatio-temporal gene expression, reuse of the same elements by the Polycomb group (PcG) system may help fine-tune gene expression and ensure the timely maintenance of cell identities. © 2017 Erceg et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Response Surface Modeling Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; DeLoach, Richard

    2001-01-01

    A nonlinear modeling technique was used to characterize response surfaces for non-dimensional longitudinal aerodynamic force and moment coefficients, based on wind tunnel data from a commercial jet transport model. Data were collected using two experimental procedures - one based on modem design of experiments (MDOE), and one using a classical one factor at a time (OFAT) approach. The nonlinear modeling technique used multivariate orthogonal functions generated from the independent variable data as modeling functions in a least squares context to characterize the response surfaces. Model terms were selected automatically using a prediction error metric. Prediction error bounds computed from the modeling data alone were found to be- a good measure of actual prediction error for prediction points within the inference space. Root-mean-square model fit error and prediction error were less than 4 percent of the mean response value in all cases. Efficacy and prediction performance of the response surface models identified from both MDOE and OFAT experiments were investigated.

  8. Finite Element Surface Layer Inheritable Condition Residual Stresses Model in Surface Plastic Deformation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalov, M. S.; Blumenstein, V. Yu

    2016-04-01

    The residual stresses (RS) research and computational algorithms creation in complex types of loading on the product lifecycle stages relevance is shown. The RS forming finite element model at surface plastic deformation strengthening machining, including technological inheritance effect, is presented. A model feature is the production previous stages obtained transformation properties consideration, as well as these properties evolution during metal particles displacement through the deformation space in the present loading step.

  9. Response of removable epoxy foam exposed to fire using an element death model.

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Michael L.

    2004-09-01

    Response of removable epoxy foam (REF) to high heat fluxes is described using a decomposition chemistry model [1] in conjunction with a finite element heat conduction code [2] that supports chemical kinetics and dynamic radiation enclosures. The chemistry model [1] describes the temporal transformation of virgin foam into carbonaceous residue by considering breakdown of the foam polymer structure, desorption of gases not associated with the foam polymer, mass transport of decomposition products from the reaction site to the bulk gas, and phase equilibrium. The finite element foam response model considers the spatial behavior of the foam by using measured and predicted thermophysical properties in combination with the decomposition chemistry model. Foam elements are removed from the computational domain when the condensed mass fractions of the foam elements are close to zero. Element removal, referred to as element death, creates a space within the metal confinement causing radiation to be the dominant mode of heat transfer between the surface of the remaining foam elements and the interior walls of the confining metal skin. Predictions were compared to front locations extrapolated from radiographs of foam cylinders enclosed in metal containers that were heated with quartz lamps [3,4]. The effects of the maximum temperature of the metal container, density of the foam, the foam orientation, venting of the decomposition products, pressurization of the metal container, and the presence or absence of embedded components are discussed.

  10. Influence of surface stresses on indentation response.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, J; Mayr, S G

    2015-03-27

    Surface stresses lead to an effective change in the elastic constants of thin films and at surfaces. The development of modern scanning probe techniques like contact resonance atomic force microscopy empowers the experimenter to measure at scales where these effects become increasingly relevant. In this paper we employ a computational multiscale approach where we compare density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics simulations as tools to calculate the thin-film/surface elastic behavior for silicon and strontiumtitanate. From the surface elastic constants gained by DFT calculations we develop a continuum finite-element multilayer model to study the impact of surface stresses on indentation experiments. In general the stress field of an indenter and thus the impact of surface stresses on the indentation modulus depends on its contact radius and on its particular shape. We propose an analytical model that describes the behavior of the indentation modulus as a function of the contact radius. We show that this model fits well to simulation results gained for a spherical and a flat punch indenter. Our results demonstrate a surface-stress-induced reduction of the indentation modulus of about 5% for strontiumtitanate and 6% for silicon for a contact radius of [Formula: see text], irrespective of the indenter shape.

  11. Influence of surface stresses on indentation response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, J.; Mayr, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    Surface stresses lead to an effective change in the elastic constants of thin films and at surfaces. The development of modern scanning probe techniques like contact resonance atomic force microscopy empowers the experimenter to measure at scales where these effects become increasingly relevant. In this paper we employ a computational multiscale approach where we compare density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics simulations as tools to calculate the thin-film/surface elastic behavior for silicon and strontiumtitanate. From the surface elastic constants gained by DFT calculations we develop a continuum finite-element multilayer model to study the impact of surface stresses on indentation experiments. In general the stress field of an indenter and thus the impact of surface stresses on the indentation modulus depends on its contact radius and on its particular shape. We propose an analytical model that describes the behavior of the indentation modulus as a function of the contact radius. We show that this model fits well to simulation results gained for a spherical and a flat punch indenter. Our results demonstrate a surface-stress-induced reduction of the indentation modulus of about 5% for strontiumtitanate and 6% for silicon for a contact radius of {{r}c}=5 \\text{nm}, irrespective of the indenter shape.

  12. Finite element analysis of true and pseudo surface acoustic waves in one-dimensional phononic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Graczykowski, B. Alzina, F.; Gomis-Bresco, J.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-14

    In this paper, we report a theoretical investigation of surface acoustic waves propagating in one-dimensional phononic crystal. Using finite element method eigenfrequency and frequency response studies, we develop two model geometries suitable to distinguish true and pseudo (or leaky) surface acoustic waves and determine their propagation through finite size phononic crystals, respectively. The novelty of the first model comes from the application of a surface-like criterion and, additionally, functional damping domain. Exemplary calculated band diagrams show sorted branches of true and pseudo surface acoustic waves and their quantified surface confinement. The second model gives a complementary study of transmission, reflection, and surface-to-bulk losses of Rayleigh surface waves in the case of a phononic crystal with a finite number of periods. Here, we demonstrate that a non-zero transmission within non-radiative band gaps can be carried via leaky modes originating from the coupling of local resonances with propagating waves in the substrate. Finally, we show that the transmission, reflection, and surface-to-bulk losses can be effectively optimised by tuning the geometrical properties of a stripe.

  13. Spectral response of multi-element silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Rossington, C.S.; Chapman, K.

    1997-04-01

    Multi-element silicon strip detectors, in conjunction with integrated circuit pulse-processing electronics, offer an attractive alternative to conventional lithium-drifted silicon Si(Li) and high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) for high count rate, low noise synchrotron x-ray fluorescence applications. One of the major differences between the segmented Si detectors and the commercially available single-element Si(Li) or HPGe detectors is that hundreds of elements can be fabricated on a single Si substrate using standard silicon processing technologies. The segmentation of the detector substrate into many small elements results in very low noise performance at or near, room temperature, and the count rate of the detector is increased many-fold due to the multiplication in the total number of detectors. Traditionally, a single channel of detector with electronics can handle {approximately}100 kHz count rates while maintaining good energy resolution; the segmented detectors can operate at greater than MHz count rates merely due to the multiplication in the number of channels. One of the most critical aspects in the development of the segmented detectors is characterizing the charge sharing and charge loss that occur between the individual detector strips, and determining how these affect the spectral response of the detectors.

  14. Dynamic bioactive stimuli-responsive polymeric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Heather Marie

    This dissertation focuses on the design, synthesis, and development of antimicrobial and anticoagulant surfaces of polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) polymers. Aliphatic polymeric surfaces of PE and PP polymers functionalized using click chemistry reactions by the attachment of --COOH groups via microwave plasma reactions followed by functionalization with alkyne moieties. Azide containing ampicillin (AMP) was synthesized and subsequently clicked into the alkyne prepared PE and PP surfaces. Compared to non-functionalized PP and PE surfaces, the AMP clicked surfaces exhibited substantially enhanced antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. To expand the biocompatibility of polymeric surface anticoagulant attributes, PE and PTFE surfaces were functionalized with pH-responsive poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (P2VP) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) polyelectrolyte tethers terminated with NH2 and COOH groups. The goal of these studies was to develop switchable stimuli-responsive polymeric surfaces that interact with biological environments and display simultaneous antimicrobial and anticoagulant properties. Antimicrobial AMP was covalently attached to --COOH terminal ends of protected PAA, while anticoagulant heparin (HEP) was attached to terminal --NH2 groups of P2VP. When pH < 2.3, the P2VP segments are protonated and extend, but for pH > 5.5, they collapse while the PAA segments extend. Such surfaces, when exposed to Staphylococcus aureus, inhibit bacterial growth due to the presence of AMP, as well as are effective anticoagulants due to the presence of covalently attached HEP. Comparison of these "dynamic" pH responsive surfaces with "static" surfaces terminated with AMP entities show significant enhancement of longevity and surface activity against microbial film formation. The last portion of this dissertation focuses on the covalent attachment of living T1 and Φ11 bacteriophages (phages) on PE and PTFE surface

  15. Technology of wear resistance increase of surface elements of friction couples using solid lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgunov, A. P.; Masyagin, V. B.; Derkach, V. V.; Matveev, N. A.

    2017-06-01

    Based on the results of experimental investigations in wear resistance increase using lamellar solid lubricants the technology of wear resistance increase of surface elements of friction couples by applying solid lubricants is developed with the following surface plastic deformation providing enough bond strength of solid lubricant with an element surface and increasing operational life.

  16. Trace elements in surface sediments of Navarino Bay, Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Varnavas, S.P. ); Panagos, A.G.; Laios, G. )

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of a number of trace elements in the Navarino Bay surface sediments is examined and their source and association with the major phases is determined. Cobalt follows Al in its distribution, having its highest values towards the center and deeper parts of the bay; Zn and Cu have their highest values at the effluent outfalls of a distillery and an olive oil and olive kernel factory being decreased away. The highest concentration of Ni is found near the town Pylos, while the highest concentrations of Rb and Y are observed at the mouths of rivers Yalovas and Xerias. Organic matter has its highest content at the port of Pylos, while no significant variations have been observed in the distribution of Sn and Ga. It is demonstrated that there is an anthropogenic input of Zn, Cu, and Corg in the bay. Zn and Cu are discharged by a distillery and an olive oil and olive kernel factory, at Yalova. Organic matter is mainly derived from domestic sewage. Ni enters the bay from its southern coasts and might be derived from weathering of bauxite deposits present in the adjacent limestones. Rb and Y are transported by the rivers Yalovas and Xerias from the northeastern adjacent land area: Ni, Co, and Cu show positive correlation with Al, suggesting their incorporation in clay minerals, while Rb show positive correlation with Si, suggesting its incorporation is silicate detrital minerals. The following areas in the bay are considered to be heavily polluted: (1) the port and a large zone near Pylos (domestic sewage); (2) the port and a small area near Yalova (domestic sewage and industrial effluents); and (3) the eastern coast of the island Sphaktiria (oil). The domestic sewage pollution in Navarino Bay is of the same level as that in other Greek bays.

  17. Trace elements in surface sediments of Navarino Bay, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnavas, S. P.; Panagos, A. G.; Laios, G.

    1987-10-01

    The distribution of a number of trace elements in the Navarino Bay surface sediments is examined and their source and association with the major phases is determined. Cobalt follows Al in its distribution, having its highest vaues towards the center and deeper parts of the bay; Zn and Cu have their highest values at the effluent outfalls of a distillery and an olive oil and olive kernel factory (at the port of Yalova), being decreased away. The highest concentration of Ni is found near the town Pylos, while the highest concentrations of Rb and Y are observed at the mouths of rivers Yalovas and Xerias. Organic matter has its highest content at the port of Pylos, while no significant variations have been observed in the distribution of Sn and Ga. It is demonstrated that there is an anthropogenic input of Zn, Cu, and Corg in the bay. Zn and Cu are discharged by a distillery and an olive oil and olive kernel factory, at Yalova. Organic matter is mainly derived from domestic sewage. Ni enters the bay from its southern coasts and might be derived from weathering of bauxite deposits present in the adjacent limestones. Rb and Y are transported by the rivers Yalovas and Xerias from the northeastern adjacent land area; Ni, Co, and Cu show positive correlation with Al, suggesting their incorporation in clay minerals, while Rb shows positive correlation with Si, suggesting its incorporation in silicate detrital minerals. The following areas in the bay are considered to be heavily polluted: (1) the port and a large zone near Pylos (domestic sewage); (2) the port and a small area near Yalova (domestic sewage and industrial effluents); and (3) the eastern coast of the island Sphaktiria (oil). The domestic sewage pollution in Navarino Bay is of the same level as that in other Greek bays.

  18. Timescales of Land Surface Evapotranspiration Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Russell; Entekhabi, Dara; Koster, Randal; Suarez, Max

    1997-01-01

    Soil and vegetation exert strong control over the evapotranspiration rate, which couples the land surface water and energy balances. A method is presented to quantify the timescale of this surface control using daily general circulation model (GCM) simulation values of evapotranspiration and precipitation. By equating the time history of evaporation efficiency (ratio of actual to potential evapotranspiration) to the convolution of precipitation and a unit kernel (temporal weighting function), response functions are generated that can be used to characterize the timescales of evapotranspiration response for the land surface model (LSM) component of GCMS. The technique is applied to the output of two multiyear simulations of a GCM, one using a Surface-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) scheme and the other a Bucket LSM. The derived response functions show that the Bucket LSM's response is significantly slower than that of the SVAT across the globe. The analysis also shows how the timescales of interception reservoir evaporation, bare soil evaporation, and vegetation transpiration differ within the SVAT LSM.

  19. A Finite Element Model of a MEMS-based Surface Acoustic Wave Hydrogen Sensor

    PubMed Central

    EL Gowini, Mohamed M.; Moussa, Walied A.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen plays a significant role in various industrial applications, but careful handling and continuous monitoring are crucial since it is explosive when mixed with air. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors provide desirable characteristics for hydrogen detection due to their small size, low fabrication cost, ease of integration and high sensitivity. In this paper a finite element model of a Surface Acoustic Wave sensor is developed using ANSYS12© and tested for hydrogen detection. The sensor consists of a YZ-lithium niobate substrate with interdigital electrodes (IDT) patterned on the surface. A thin palladium (Pd) film is added on the surface of the sensor due to its high affinity for hydrogen. With increased hydrogen absorption the palladium hydride structure undergoes a phase change due to the formation of the β-phase, which deteriorates the crystal structure. Therefore with increasing hydrogen concentration the stiffness and the density are significantly reduced. The values of the modulus of elasticity and the density at different hydrogen concentrations in palladium are utilized in the finite element model to determine the corresponding SAW sensor response. Results indicate that with increasing the hydrogen concentration the wave velocity decreases and the attenuation of the wave is reduced. PMID:22205865

  20. The PRE and PQ box are functionally distinct yeast pheromone response elements.

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, P; Cochran, B H

    1990-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating pheromones function by binding to cell surface receptors and activating signal transduction processes which regulate gene expression. In this report, we have analyzed the minimum sequence requirements for conferring both a and alpha mating pheromone inducibilities onto a heterologous promoter. Here we show that the repetitive pheromone response element (PRE) which binds to STE12 protein is sufficient to confer pheromone responsiveness only when present in multiple copies. Moreover, by itself, it is preferentially responsive to alpha factor in a cells. In contrast, a single copy of the PQ box of the STE3 upstream activation sequence (UAS) is sufficient to confer a-factor responsiveness in alpha cells. The PQ box binds both MCM1 and MAT alpha 1 in a cooperative manner, and neither the P nor Q site alone is sufficient to confer a-factor responsiveness. In a cells, however, even multiple copies of the PQ box fail to confer alpha-factor responsiveness. Therefore, the PRE and the PQ box are functionally distinct pheromone-responsive elements with opposite cell type specificities. Moreover, these results indicate that the MCM1 protein functions in a signal transduction pathway in a manner analogous to that of its mammalian homolog, the serum response factor, which regulates the expression of the c-fos proto-oncogene in mammals. PMID:2247085

  1. Response Surface Methodology: 1966-1986

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Chcynicr et al. (1983) were able to demonstate that a yeast isolated from the digestive tube of the larva of a parasite of eucalyptus trees was capable of...male broilers to examine quantitatively the protein levels in starter and Gnisher rations and the time of ration change to optimize body weight, carcass...1983). ’Akn Investigation of Protein Levels for Broiler Starter and Finisher Rations and the Time of Ration Change by Response Surface Methodology

  2. Response surface designs for experiments in bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Steven G

    2006-06-01

    Many processes in the biological industries are studied using response surface methodology. The use of biological materials, however, means that run-to-run variation is typically much greater than that in many experiments in mechanical or chemical engineering and so the designs used require greater replication. The data analysis which is performed may involve some variable selection, as well as fitting polynomial response surface models. This implies that designs should allow the parameters of the model to be estimated nearly orthogonally. A class of three-level response surface designs is introduced which allows all except the quadratic parameters to be estimated orthogonally, as well as having a number of other useful properties. These subset designs are obtained by using two-level factorial designs in subsets of the factors, with the other factors being held at their middle level. This allows their properties to be easily explored. Replacing some of the two-level designs with fractional replicates broadens the class of useful designs, especially with five or more factors, and sometimes incomplete subsets can be used. It is very simple to include a few two- and four-level factors in these designs by excluding subsets with these factors at the middle level. Subset designs can be easily modified to include factors with five or more levels by allowing a different pair of levels to be used in different subsets.

  3. Radiation Heat Transfer Between Diffuse-Gray Surfaces Using Higher Order Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents recent work on developing methods for analyzing radiation heat transfer between diffuse-gray surfaces using p-version finite elements. The work was motivated by a thermal analysis of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) wing structure which showed the importance of radiation heat transfer throughout the structure. The analysis also showed that refining the finite element mesh to accurately capture the temperature distribution on the internal structure led to very large meshes with unacceptably long execution times. Traditional methods for calculating surface-to-surface radiation are based on assumptions that are not appropriate for p-version finite elements. Two methods for determining internal radiation heat transfer are developed for one and two-dimensional p-version finite elements. In the first method, higher-order elements are divided into a number of sub-elements. Traditional methods are used to determine radiation heat flux along each sub-element and then mapped back to the parent element. In the second method, the radiation heat transfer equations are numerically integrated over the higher-order element. Comparisons with analytical solutions show that the integration scheme is generally more accurate than the sub-element method. Comparison to results from traditional finite elements shows that significant reduction in the number of elements in the mesh is possible using higher-order (p-version) finite elements.

  4. Rough surface contact analysis by means of the Finite Element Method and of a new reduced model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yastrebov, Vladislav A.; Durand, Julian; Proudhon, Henry; Cailletaud, Georges

    2011-07-01

    This article presents two approaches of a normal frictionless mechanical contact between an elastoplastic material and a rigid plane: a full scale finite element analysis (FEA) and a reduced model. Both of them use a representative surface element (RSE) of an experimentally measured surface roughness. The full scale FEA is performed with the Finite Element code Zset using its parallel solver. It provides the reference for the reduced model. The ingredients of the reduced model are a series of responses that are calibrated by means of FEA on a single asperity and phenomenological rules to account for asperity-asperity interaction. The reduced model is able to predict the load-displacement curve, the real contact area and the free volume between the contacting pair during the compression of a rough surface against a rigid plane. The CPU time is a few seconds for the reduced model, instead of a few days for the full FEA.

  5. Role of Estrogen Response Element in the Human Prolactin Gene: Transcriptional Response and Timing.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Anne V; Adamson, Antony D; Dunham, Lee S S; Semprini, Sabrina; Spiller, David G; McNeilly, Alan S; Mullins, John J; Davis, Julian R E; White, Michael R H

    2016-02-01

    The use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) reporter constructs in molecular physiology enables the inclusion of large sections of flanking DNA, likely to contain regulatory elements and enhancers regions that contribute to the transcriptional output of a gene. Using BAC recombineering, we have manipulated a 160-kb human prolactin luciferase (hPRL-Luc) BAC construct and mutated the previously defined proximal estrogen response element (ERE) located -1189 bp relative to the transcription start site, to assess its involvement in the estrogen responsiveness of the entire hPRL locus. We found that GH3 cell lines stably expressing Luc under control of the ERE-mutated hPRL promoter (ERE-Mut) displayed a dramatically reduced transcriptional response to 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment compared with cells expressing Luc from the wild-type (WT) ERE hPRL-Luc promoter (ERE-WT). The -1189 ERE controls not only the response to E2 treatment but also the acute transcriptional response to TNFα, which was abolished in ERE-Mut cells. ERE-WT cells displayed a biphasic transcriptional response after TNFα treatment, the acute phase of which was blocked after treatment with the estrogen receptor antagonist 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen. Unexpectedly, we show the oscillatory characteristics of hPRL promoter activity in individual living cells were unaffected by disruption of this crucial response element, real-time bioluminescence imaging showed that transcription cycles were maintained, with similar cycle lengths, in ERE-WT and ERE-Mut cells. These data suggest the -1189 ERE is the dominant response element involved in the hPRL transcriptional response to both E2 and TNFα and, crucially, that cycles of hPRL promoter activity are independent of estrogen receptor binding.

  6. Effects of surface removal on rolling-element fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1987-01-01

    The Lundberg-Palmgren equation was modified to show the effect on rolling-element fatigue life of removing by grinding a portion of the stressed volume of the raceways of a rolling-element bearing. Results of this analysis show that depending on the amount of material removed, and depending on the initial running time of the bearing when material removal occurs, the 10-percent life of the reground bearings ranges from 74 to 100 percent of the 10-percent life of a brand new bearing. Three bearing types were selected for testing. A total of 250 bearings were reground. Of this matter, 30 bearings from each type were endurance tested to 1600 hr. No bearing failure occurred related to material removal. Two bearing failures occurred due to defective rolling elements and were typical of those which may occur in new bearings.

  7. Iron Responsive-like Elements in the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Soto-Castro, Liliana; Plata-Guzman, Laura Yuliana; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Calla-Choque, Jaeson; Reyes-Lopez, Magda; DE LA Garza, Mireya; Leon-Sicairos, Nidia; Garzon-Tiznado, Jose Antonio; Arroyo, Rossana; Leon-Sicairos, Claudia

    2017-01-18

    In Entamoeba histolytica, iron modulates virulence and gene expression via unknown regulatory mechanisms. The existence of a posttranscriptional iron regulatory system parallel to the IRE/IRP (Iron-Responsive Element/Iron Regulatory Protein) system in the protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis has recently been reported. Due to their evolutionary closeness and the importance of iron for growth and virulence in these protozoa, we hypothesized the existence of an IRE/IRP-like mechanism in E. histolytica. To determine the presence of IRE-like elements in some mRNAs from this parasite, we performed in silico analyses of the 5'- and 3'-UTRs of mRNAs encoding virulence factors and cytoskeleton, ribosomal, and metabolism proteins. The Zuker mfold software predicted IRE-like secondary structures in 52 of the 135 mRNAs analysed. However, only nine structures shared sequence similarity with the apical loop sequence (CAGUGN) of the previously reported human IRE-ferritin, whereas the GUU/UUG protozoan-specific motif was detected in 23 stem-loop structures. A new motif, AUU/AUUU, was also observed in 23 structures, suggesting the possible existence of an amoeba-specific motif. Additionally, cross-linking and RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed specific RNA-protein interactions, using as a model two amoebic IRE-like elements from iron-regulated mRNAs and HeLa, T. vaginalis and E. histolytica cytoplasmic proteins. Our data suggest the presence of a posttranscriptional iron regulatory IRE/IRP-like mechanism in E. histolytica.

  8. Response of structural concrete elements to severe impulsive loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauthammer, T.; Shanaa, H. M.; Assadi, A.

    1994-10-01

    The behavior and response of structural concrete elements under severe short duration dynamic loads was investigated numerically. The analytical approach utilized the Timoshenko beam theory for the analysis of reinforced concrete beams and one-way slabs. Nonlinear material models were used to derive the flexural and shear resistances, and the differential equations of the Timoshenko beam theory were solved numerically by applying the finite difference technique. A simplified approach was developed for estimating the strain rate in structural concrete members, and the corresponding strain rate effects on the strength of the steel and concrete were incorporated into the analysis. Detailed failure criteria were established for predicting the collapse of structural concrete members. Five cases subjected to localized impact loads and eleven cases subjected to distributed explosive loads were analyzed, and the results were compared to experimental data obtained by other investigators.

  9. Trace element proxies for surface ocean conditions: A synthesis of culture calibrations with planktic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Katherine A.; Hönisch, Bärbel; Eggins, Stephen M.; Haynes, Laura L.; Rosenthal, Yair; Yu, Jimin

    2016-11-01

    The trace element composition of planktic foraminiferal calcite provides a useful means of determining past surface ocean conditions. We have assembled the results of culture experiments for three species of symbiont-bearing planktic foraminifera, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, and Orbulina universa, and one symbiont-barren species, Globigerina bulloides, to evaluate their responses to temperature, salinity, pH, carbonate ion, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) growth conditions. Trace element ratios (Li/Ca, B/Ca, Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Mn/Ca, Cd/Ca, Ba/Ca, Na/Ca, and U/Ca) were measured simultaneously on samples grown with the same culture techniques, which provides robust, relatable calibrations that may be used together in multi-proxy paleoceanographic studies. Our data confirm that temperature is the dominant control on foraminiferal Mg/Ca under the ranges of conditions studied and that the potential effects of salinity and CO32- on Mg/Ca of these tropical species across late Pleistocene glacial cycles are relatively small. Carbonate system experiments suggest that Sr/Ca may be useful for reconstructing large DIC changes. Na/Ca increases with salinity in G. ruber (pink), but not in G. sacculifer. As these emerging proxy relationships become more firmly established, the synthesis of multiple trace element ratios may help paleoceanographers isolate the effects of different environmental parameters in paleo records. Calcification rates (μg/day) vary among species and do not respond consistently to any experimental parameter. Comparison of our calcification rates with those observed in inorganic calcite precipitation experiments suggest that foraminifera calcify ∼100× more slowly than inorganic calcites grown in similar solutions. We suggest that calcification rate does not typically exert a dominant control on trace element partitioning in planktic foraminiferal calcite, though it may play a role for some elements under certain circumstances

  10. Electro-responsive polyelectrolyte-coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sénéchal, V; Saadaoui, H; Rodriguez-Hernandez, J; Drummond, C

    2017-07-01

    The anchoring of polymer chains at solid surfaces is an efficient way to modify interfacial properties like the stability and rheology of colloidal dispersions, lubrication and biocompatibility. Polyelectrolytes are good candidates for the building of smart materials, as the polyion chain conformation can often be tuned by manipulation of different physico-chemical variables. However, achieving efficient and reversible control of this process represents an important technological challenge. In this regard, the application of an external electrical stimulus on polyelectrolytes seems to be a convenient control strategy, for several reasons. First, it is relatively easy to apply an electric field to the material with adequate spatiotemporal control. In addition, in contrast to chemically induced changes, the molecular response to a changing electric field occurs relatively quickly. If the system is properly designed, this response can then be used to control the magnitude of surface properties. In this work we discuss the effect of an external electric field on the adhesion and lubrication properties of several polyelectrolyte-coated surfaces. The influence of the applied field is investigated at different pH and salt conditions, as the polyelectrolyte conformation is sensitive to these variables. We show that it is possible to fine tune friction and adhesion using relatively low applied fields.

  11. Effects of CO/CO2/NO on elemental lead adsorption on carbonaceous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhengyang; Yang, Weijie

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption processes of elemental lead on carbonaceous surfaces which adsorbed CO/CO2/NO flue gases were investigated to understand the effects of CO/CO2/NO on elemental lead adsorption on carbonaceous surfaces with density functional theory. All calculations including optimizations, energies, and frequencies were conducted at B3PW91 density functional theory level, utilizing SDD basis set for lead and 6-31G(d) Pople basis set for other atoms. The results indicate that CO, CO2, and NO can promote the adsorption of elemental lead on the carbonaceous surface, but probably compete for adsorption sites with elemental lead. The promotion effects on adsorption can be attributed to active sites on the carbonaceous surface rather than flue gas adsorption on the carbonaceous surface. In addition, the adsorption order of three kinds of flue gas on the carbonaceous surface is CO2 > NO > CO > Pb on average. Furthermore, the enhancement order of three kinds of flue gas on the elemental lead adsorption on carbonaceous surfaces is CO-CS > CO2-CS > NO-CS > CS in general. In particular, atomic charge and adsorption energy have good linear relationship in the process of elemental lead adsorption. Graphical Abstract Competitive adsorption between flue gas and elemental lead on carbonaceous surfaces.

  12. Effect of alloy surface composition on release of elements from dental casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Wataha, J C; Malcolm, C T

    1996-09-01

    The release of elements from dental casting alloys is a continuing concern because of the potentially harmful biological effects the elements may have on local tissues. The surfaces of the alloys appear to be most important in controlling the release of these elements. In the current study, the surfaces of high-, reduced-, and no-gold dental alloys were analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after they were exposed to a biological medium for up to 96 h. The goal was to relate the release of elements from these alloys to their surface composition, and to determine the depth of the effect of the medium. The depth of the effect of the exposure was determined by argon milling of the alloy surface after exposure to the medium. Elements that were released into the medium were measured by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy. The release of elements from alloys was greater when the atomic ratio of noble to non-noble elements at the surface was less than 1. The depth of the effect of the medium varied with the alloy, but was always less than 100 A. The surface composition was significantly different from layers only 5 A below. It was concluded that the surface concentration of noble elements is important in controlling the release of non-noble elements from these alloys, and the surface composition appeared to be only one or two atomic layers thick. Of the three types of alloys, the high-gold alloy appeared to develop the most stable surface composition which released the lowest levels of elements.

  13. Surface subsidence prediction by nonlinear finite-element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, Y. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Zaman, M. . School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science)

    1993-11-01

    An improved two-dimensional plane-strain numerical procedure based on the incremental-iterative nonlinear finite-element is developed to predict ground subsidence caused by underground mining. The procedure emphasizes the use of the following features: (1) an appropriate constitutive model that can accurately describe the nonlinear behavior of geological strata; and (2) an accurate algorithm for simulation of excavation sequences consistent with the actual underground mining process. The computer code is used to analyze a collapse that occurred in the Blue Goose Lease [number sign]1 Mine in northeastern Oklahoma. A parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of some selected factors on the shape and extent of subsidence profiles. Analyses of the numerical results indicate that the nonlinear finite-element technique can be employed to meaningfully predict and characterize the potential for ground subsidence due to underground mining.

  14. Development of multiple-surface optical elements for road lighting.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Sergey V; Byzov, Egor V; Moiseev, Mikhail A; Doskolovich, Leonid L

    2017-02-20

    The development of LED secondary optics for road illumination is quite a challenging problem. Optical elements developed for this kind of application should have maximal efficiency, provide high luminance and illuminance uniformity, and meet many other specific requirements. Here, we demonstrate that the usage of the supporting quadric method modification enables generating free-form optical solution satisfying all these requirements perfectly. As an example, two optical elements for different roadway types are computed, manufactured by injection molding, and then measured in a photometry bench. Experimental data demonstrate that the obtained light distributions meet ME1 class requirements of EN 13201 standard. The obtained directivity patterns are universal and provide high performance with different configurations of luminaires' arrangement: the ratio of pole altitude to distance can vary from 2.5 up to 3.6.

  15. Evaluation of flyash surface phenomena and the application of surface analysis technology. Summary report: Phase I. [44 elements; 86 references

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.

    1981-06-01

    The factors governing the formation of flyash surfaces during and following coal combustion are reviewed. The competing chemical and physical processes during the evolution of inorganic material in coal during combustion into flyash are described with respect to various surface segregation processes. Two mechanisms leading to surface enrichment are volatilization-condensation processes and diffusion processes within individual flyash particles. The experimental evidence for each of these processes is reviewed. It is shown that the volatilization-condensation process is the major factor leading to trace element enrichment in smaller flyash particles. Evidence also exists from surface analyses of flyash and representative mineral matter that diffusion processes may lead to surface enrichment of elements not volatilized or cause transport of surface-condensed elements into the flyash matrix. The semiquantitative determination of the relative importance of these two processes can be determined by comparison of concentration versus particle size profiles with surface-depth profiles obtained using surface analysis techniques. A brief description of organic transformations on flyash surfaces is also presented. The various surface analytical techniques are reviewed and the relatively new technique of Static-Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy is suggested as having significant advantages in studies of surfaces and diffusion processes in model systems. Several recommendations are made for research relevant to flyash formation and processes occurring on flyash surfaces.

  16. Bioadhesion to model thermally responsive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejewski, Brett Paul

    This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two surfaces: mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hexa(ethylene glycol) and alkyl thiolates (mixed SAM) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm). The synthesis of hexa(ethylene gylcol) alkyl thiol (C11EG 6OH) is presented along with the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance results. The gold substrates were imaged prior to SAM formation with atomic force micrscopy (AFM). Average surface roughness of the gold substrate was 0.44 nm, 0.67 nm, 1.65 nm for 15, 25 and 60 nm gold thickness, respectively. The height of the mixed SAM was measured by ellipsometry and varied from 13 to 28°A depending on surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH. The surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH for the mixed SAM was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with optimal thermal responsive behavior in the range of 0.4 to 0.6. The mixed SAM surface was confirmed to be thermally responsive by contact angle goniometry, 35° at 28°C and ˜55° at 40°C. In addition, the mixed SAM surfaces were confirmed to be thermally responsive for various aqueous mediums by tensiometry. Factors such as oxygen, age, and surface mole fraction and how they affect the thermal responsive of the mixed SAM are discussed. Lastly, rat fibroblasts were grown on the mixed SAM and imaged by phase contrast microscopy to show inhibition of attachment at temperatures below the molecular transition. Qualitative and quantitative measurements of the fibroblast adhesion data are provided that support the hypothesis of the mixed SAM exhibits a dominantly non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it exhibits a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. The adhesion of six model proteins: bovine serum albumin, collagen, pyruvate kinase, cholera toxin subunit B, ribonuclease, and lysozyme to the model thermally responsive mixed SAM were examined using AFM. All six proteins possessed adhesion to the pure component alkyl thiol, in

  17. Verification of Advective Bar Elements Implemented in the Aria Thermal Response Code.

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Brantley

    2016-01-01

    A verification effort was undertaken to evaluate the implementation of the new advective bar capability in the Aria thermal response code. Several approaches to the verification process were taken : a mesh refinement study to demonstrate solution convergence in the fluid and the solid, visually examining the mapping of the advective bar element nodes to the surrounding surfaces, and a comparison of solutions produced using the advective bars for simple geometries with solutions from commercial CFD software . The mesh refinement study has shown solution convergence for simple pipe flow in both temperature and velocity . Guidelines were provided to achieve appropriate meshes between the advective bar elements and the surrounding volume. Simulations of pipe flow using advective bars elements in Aria have been compared to simulations using the commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent (r) and provided comparable solutions in temperature and velocity supporting proper implementation of the new capability. Verification of Advective Bar Elements iv Acknowledgements A special thanks goes to Dean Dobranich for his guidance and expertise through all stages of this effort . His advice and feedback was instrumental to its completion. Thanks also goes to Sam Subia and Tolu Okusanya for helping to plan many of the verification activities performed in this document. Thank you to Sam, Justin Lamb and Victor Brunini for their assistance in resolving issues encountered with running the advective bar element model. Finally, thanks goes to Dean, Sam, and Adam Hetzler for reviewing the document and providing very valuable comments.

  18. Nanoscale surface structuring during ion bombardment of elemental semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzenberg, Eitan

    2013-01-01

    Nano-patterning of surfaces with uniform ion bombardment yields a rich phase-space of topographic patterns. Particle irradiation can cause surface ultra-smoothing or self-organized nanoscale pattern formation in surface topography. Topographic pattern formation has previously been attributed to the effects of the removal of target atoms by sputter erosion. In this thesis, the surface morphology evolution of Si(100) and Ge(100) during low energy ion bombardment of Ar+ and Kr+ ions, respectively, is studied. Our facilities for studies of surface processes at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) allow in-situ characterization of surface morphology evolution during ion bombardment using grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS). This technique is used to measure in reciprocal space the kinetics of formation or decay of correlated nanostructures on the surface, effectively measuring the height-height correlations. A linear model is used to characterize the early time kinetic behavior during ion bombardment as a function of ion beam incidence angle. The curvature coefficients predicted by the widely used erosive model of Bradley and Harper are quantitatively negligible and of the wrong sign when compared to the observed effect in both Si and Ge. A mass-redistribution model explains the observed ultra-smoothing at low angles, exhibits an instability at higher angles, and predicts the observed 45° critical angle separating these two regimes in Si. The Ge surface evolution during Kr+ irradiation is qualitatively similar to that observed for Ar+ irradiation of Si at the same ion energy. However, the critical angle for Ge cannot be quantitatively reproduced by the simple mass redistribution model. Crater function theory, as developed by Norris et al., incorporates both mass redistributive and erosive effects, and predicts constraining relationships between curvature coefficients. These constraints are compared to experimental data of both Si and Ge

  19. Fluidic biosensors with integrated surface bound hydrogel sensing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhan; Henthorn, David B.; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2009-05-01

    Optical sensors are a common tool to measure the dissolved oxygen concentration in environmental, industrial and medical areas. Much effort has been put on developing and using novel optical dyes and materials used as the immobilization matrixes. A poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG)-rich hydrogel was used as a fluorophore matrix. For optical sensor applications, this hydrogel was chemically anchored on negative-tone photopolymer SU-8 surface through a free radical reaction in which 1-hydroxycyclohexyl phenyl ketone (HCPK) served as the surface bound photoinitiator. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were detected based on the fluorescent intensity at emission wavelength of a fluorophore, dichlorotris (1, 10-phenanthroline) ruthenium (II) hydrate 98%, toward dissolved oxygen molecules. The normal characteristics of optical dissolved sensor were measured and recorded. All the results indicate the potential use of patternable polymerized PEGDA membranes, which is chemically anchored to SU-8 surface, as an ideal candidate matrix based on polymeric channel structures

  20. Damage Detection in Concrete Elements with Surface Wave Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Unlimited ERNEST A. HAYGOOD, Captain, USAF Executive Officer DTTC S ELECTE JUL 0 9 1992 33 Au 92-17924 188 DAMAGE DETECTION IN CONCRETE ELEMENTS WITH...RECOMMENDATIONS ON WIDOW LENGTH 2.7 PARAMETERS INVOLVED 3. ANALYTICAL FORMULATION 37 3.1 MODAL ANALYSIS OF SIMPLE SUPPORTED BEAM USING BEAM THEORY 3.1.1...4 1.0c ooo O S . ... - - --. ............. 4".?... 02 0 2.000 le~ 4.000 le~ 6.000 le~ 3.000 le~ 1.000 2C0 FnEQ1UENC-y (HZ) Fiur .1-2 rssPoe SetrmPhse

  1. Theoretical predictions of properties of group-2 elements including element 120 and their adsorption on noble metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pershina, V; Borschevsky, A; Anton, J

    2012-04-07

    Trends in properties of group-2 elements Ca through element 120 and their M(2) and MAu dimers were determined on the basis of atomic and molecular relativistic density functional theory calculations. The relativistic contraction and stabilization of the ns AO with increasing atomic number were shown to result in the inversion of trends both in atomic and molecular properties in group 2 beyond Ba, so that element 120 should be chemically similar to Sr. Due to the same reason, bonding in (120)(2) and 120Au should be the weakest among the considered here M(2) and MAu. Using calculated dissociation energies of M(2), the sublimation enthalpy, ΔH(sub), of element 120 of 150 kJ/mol was estimated via a correlation between these quantities in group 2. Using the M-Au binding energies, the adsorption enthalpies, ΔH(ads), of element 120 of 172 kJ/mol on gold, 127 kJ/mol on platinum, and 50 kJ/mol on silver were estimated via a correlation with known ΔH(ads) in the group. These moderate values of ΔH(ads) are indicative of a possibility of chromatography adsorption studies of element 120 on these noble metal surfaces.

  2. An in Situ Technique for Elemental Analysis of Lunar Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, K. Y.; Cremers, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An in situ analytical technique that can remotely determine the elemental constituents of solids has been demonstrated. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a form of atomic emission spectroscopy in which a powerful laser pulse is focused on a solid to generate a laser spark, or microplasma. Material in the plasma is vaporized, and the resulting atoms are excited to emit light. The light is spectrally resolved to identify the emitting species. LIBS is a simple technique that can be automated for inclusion aboard a remotely operated vehicle. Since only optical access to a sample is required, areas inaccessible to a rover can be analyzed remotely. A single laser spark both vaporizes and excites the sample so that near real-time analysis (a few minutes) is possible. This technique provides simultaneous multielement detection and has good sensitivity for many elements. LIBS also eliminates the need for sample retrieval and preparation preventing possible sample contamination. These qualities make the LIBS technique uniquely suited for use in the lunar environment.

  3. Relationship between tree bark surface temperature and selected meteorological elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Středa, Tomáš; Litschmann, Tomáš; Středová, Hana

    2015-12-01

    The results were obtained by measurements in 2014 and 2015 in an apple orchard in Starý Lískovec and Těšetice (South Moravia, Czech Republic, Central Europe) into fertile planting of apple trees. The results show that the bark surface temperature during the year slightly differs from the surrounding air temperature. In addition, it is in average a few tenths of a °C higher in the period before the onset of the vegetation and several tenths of a degree lower during vegetation. Causes of these differences appear to be associated with the flow of sap as well as with foliage. Although it can be reasonably assumed that the temperature of the bark surface on the south side will be significantly affected by the global radiation, our measurements did not demonstrate this dependency. It appears that the wind speed had significantly larger influence on the temperature differences in the non-vegetation period as at speeds over 3.5 m s-1, the drop of temperature is so significant that the bark surface is colder than the surrounding air. Comparison of the development of sums of daily and hourly effective temperatures above 10 °C has shown that where daily values do not show significant differences, hourly values differed so prominently that the calculated date of emergence of adult codling moth in the bark surface was approximately one week earlier than with the use of data for air temperatures.

  4. Two-Dimensional Finite Element Ablative Thermal Response Analysis of an Arcjet Stagnation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Laub, Bernard; Braun, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    The finite element ablation and thermal response (FEAtR, hence forth called FEAR) design and analysis program simulates the one, two, or three-dimensional ablation, internal heat conduction, thermal decomposition, and pyrolysis gas flow of thermal protection system materials. As part of a code validation study, two-dimensional axisymmetric results from FEAR are compared to thermal response data obtained from an arc-jet stagnation test in this paper. The results from FEAR are also compared to the two-dimensional axisymmetric computations from the two-dimensional implicit thermal response and ablation program under the same arcjet conditions. The ablating material being used in this arcjet test is phenolic impregnated carbon ablator with an LI-2200 insulator as backup material. The test is performed at the NASA, Ames Research Center Interaction Heating Facility. Spatially distributed computational fluid dynamics solutions for the flow field around the test article are used for the surface boundary conditions.

  5. Vibration Response of Multi Storey Building Using Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chik, T. N. T.; Zakaria, M. F.; Remali, M. A.; Yusoff, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between building, type of foundation and the geotechnical parameter of ground may trigger a significant effect on the building. In general, stiffer foundations resulted in higher natural frequencies of the building-soil system and higher input frequencies are often associated with other ground. Usually, vibrations transmitted to the buildings by ground borne are often noticeable and can be felt. It might affect the building and become worse if the vibration level is not controlled. UTHM building is prone to the ground borne vibration due to closed distance from the main road, and the construction activities adjacent to the buildings. This paper investigates the natural frequency and vibration mode of multi storey office building with the presence of foundation system and comparison between both systems. Finite element modelling (FEM) package software of LUSAS is used to perform the vibration analysis of the building. The building is modelled based on the original plan with the foundation system on the structure model. The FEM results indicated that the structure which modelled with rigid base have high natural frequency compare to the structure with foundation system. These maybe due to soil structure interaction and also the damping of the system which related to the amount of energy dissipated through the foundation soil. Thus, this paper suggested that modelling with soil is necessary to demonstrate the soil influence towards vibration response to the structure.

  6. Intergenic transcription through a polycomb group response element counteracts silencing.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Prestel, Matthias; Paro, Renato

    2005-03-15

    Polycomb group response elements (PREs) mediate the mitotic inheritance of gene expression programs and thus maintain determined cell fates. By default, PREs silence associated genes via the targeting of Polycomb group (PcG) complexes. Upon an activating signal, however, PREs recruit counteracting trithorax group (trxG) proteins, which in turn maintain target genes in a transcriptionally active state. Using a transgenic reporter system, we show that the switch from the silenced to the activated state of a PRE requires noncoding transcription. Continuous transcription through the PRE induced by an actin promoter prevents the establishment of PcG-mediated silencing. The maintenance of epigenetic activation requires transcription through the PRE to proceed at least until embryogenesis is completed. At the homeotic bithorax complex of Drosophila, intergenic PRE transcripts can be detected not only during embryogenesis, but also at late larval stages, suggesting that transcription through endogenous PREs is required continuously as an anti-silencing mechanism to prevent the access of repressive PcG complexes to the chromatin. Furthermore, all other PREs outside the homeotic complex we tested were found to be transcribed in the same tissue as the mRNA of the corresponding target gene, suggesting that anti-silencing by transcription is a fundamental aspect of the cellular memory system.

  7. Selective surface smoothening of 3D micro-optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schift, Helmut; Chidambaram, Nachiappan; Altana, Mirco; Kirchner, Robert

    2017-03-01

    We have established a non-contact polishing process for thermoplastic, polymeric microlenses and -prisms with dimensions of up to 50 μm, including sharp convex tips and rims with sub-μm details. The required 3D master structures were fabricated using direct laser-writing lithography with two-photon absorption. Master structures were replicated into poly(methyl methacrylate) through a poly(dimethyl siloxane) intermediate copying step and exposed with 172 nm UV light. Due to the reduction of glass transition temperature in a surface-confined layer, roughness in the range of more than 100 nm could subsequently be smoothed-out to below 10 nm by annealing the surface by heating.

  8. High-resolution Elemental Mapping of the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Bradley C.; Ameduri, Frank; Bloch, Jeffrey J.; Priedhorsky, William C.; Roussel-Dupre, Diane; Smith, Barham W.

    1992-01-01

    New instruments and missions are being proposed to study the lunar surface as a result of the resurgence of interest in returning to the Moon. One instrument recently proposed is similar in concept to the x-ray fluorescence detectors flown on Apollo, but utilizes fluorescence from the L- and M-shells rather than the K-shell. This soft X-Ray Flourescence Imager (XRFI) is discussed.

  9. The application of general aerodynamic lifting surface elements to problems in unsteady transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using combined subsonic and supersonic linear theory as a means for solving unsteady transonic flow problems in an economical and yet realistic manner. With some modification, existing linear theory methods are combined into a single program and a simple algorithm is derived for determining interference between lifting surface elements of different Mach number. The method is applied to a wide variety of problems for which measured unsteady pressure distributions and Mach number distributions are available. By comparing theory and experiment, the transonic method solutions show a significant improvement over uniform flow solutions. It is concluded that with these refinements the method will provide a means for performing realistic transonic flutter and dynamic response analyses at costs which are compatible with current linear theory based solutions.

  10. Surface profilometry with binary axicon-vortex and lens-vortex optical elements.

    PubMed

    Wojnowski, D; Jankowska, E; Masajada, J; Suszek, J; Augustyniak, I; Popiolek-Masajada, A; Ducin, I; Kakarenko, K; Sypek, M

    2014-01-01

    We report on the interesting effect observed with the diffractive binary element, which matches the property of an axicon and vortex lens. Binary phase coding simplifies the manufacturing process and gives additional advantages for metrology purposes. Under laser beam illumination, our element produces two waves: converging and diverging. Both waves carry a single optical vortex. We show that this special diffractive element can be used to set up a simple surface profilometer.

  11. Assessment of trace element accumulation in surface sediments off Chennai coast after a major flood event.

    PubMed

    Gopal, V; Krishnakumar, S; Simon Peter, T; Nethaji, S; Suresh Kumar, K; Jayaprakash, M; Magesh, N S

    2017-01-30

    The present study was conducted to assess the trace element concentration in marine surface sediments after major flood event of Chennai metropolis, India. Thirty surface samples were collected from off Chennai coast. Trace elements, organic matter, CaCO3, sand-silt-clay and C/N ratios were studied to understand the accumulation dynamics on sediments. The elemental concentration, calcium carbonate and OM distribution suggest that they are derived from urban runoff and transported through Adyar and Cooum Rivers. The enrichment factor reveals that the sediments are enriched by Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr, Co, Ni followed by Fe. The observed Igeo value shows that the samples are contaminated by Pb, Cu and Zn. The elemental concentration of the surface sediments is low when compared to other coastal region except Pb. The elevated level of Pb in the surface sediments is probably due to migration of contaminated urban soil from industrial and transportation sectors into marine environment.

  12. Surface Plasmon Resonance Investigations of Bioselective Element Based on the Recombinant Protein A for Immunoglobulin Detection.

    PubMed

    Bakhmachuk, A; Gorbatiuk, O; Rachkov, A; Dons'koi, B; Khristosenko, R; Ushenin, I; Peshkova, V; Soldatkin, A

    2017-12-01

    The developed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on the recombinant Staphylococcal protein A with an additional cysteine residue (SPA-Cys) used as a biorecognition component showed a good selectivity and sensitivity for the immunoglobulin detection. The developed biosensor with SPA-Cys-based bioselective element can also be used as a first step of immunosensor creation. The successful immobilization of SPA-Cys on the nanolayer gold sensor surface of the SPR spectrometer was performed. The efficiency of blocking nonspecific sorption sites on the sensor surface with milk proteins, gelatin, BSA, and HSA was studied, and a rather high efficiency of using gelatin was confirmed. The SPR biosensor selectively interacted with IgG and did not interact with the control proteins. The linear dependence of the sensor response on the IgG concentration in the range from 2 to 10 μg/ml was shown. Using the calibration curve, the IgG concentration was measured in the model samples. The determined concentrations are in good agreement (r (2) = 0.97) with the given concentration of IgG.

  13. Surface Plasmon Resonance Investigations of Bioselective Element Based on the Recombinant Protein A for Immunoglobulin Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmachuk, A.; Gorbatiuk, O.; Rachkov, A.; Dons'koi, B.; Khristosenko, R.; Ushenin, I.; Peshkova, V.; Soldatkin, A.

    2017-02-01

    The developed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on the recombinant Staphylococcal protein A with an additional cysteine residue (SPA-Cys) used as a biorecognition component showed a good selectivity and sensitivity for the immunoglobulin detection. The developed biosensor with SPA-Cys-based bioselective element can also be used as a first step of immunosensor creation. The successful immobilization of SPA-Cys on the nanolayer gold sensor surface of the SPR spectrometer was performed. The efficiency of blocking nonspecific sorption sites on the sensor surface with milk proteins, gelatin, BSA, and HSA was studied, and a rather high efficiency of using gelatin was confirmed. The SPR biosensor selectively interacted with IgG and did not interact with the control proteins. The linear dependence of the sensor response on the IgG concentration in the range from 2 to 10 μg/ml was shown. Using the calibration curve, the IgG concentration was measured in the model samples. The determined concentrations are in good agreement ( r 2 = 0.97) with the given concentration of IgG.

  14. Surface faceting and elemental diffusion behaviour at atomic scale for alloy nanoparticles during in situ annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Miaofang; Wang, Chao; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng; Li, Dongguo; More, Karren L.; Lupini, Andrew; Allard, Lawrence F.; Markovic, Nenad M.; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic performance of nanoparticles is primarily determined by the precise nature of the surface and near-surface atomic configurations, which can be tailored by post-synthesis annealing effectively and straightforwardly. Understanding the complete dynamic response of surface structure and chemistry to thermal treatments at the atomic scale is imperative for the rational design of catalyst nanoparticles. Here, by tracking the same individual Pt3Co nanoparticles during in situ annealing in a scanning transmission electron microscope, we directly discern five distinct stages of surface elemental rearrangements in Pt3Co nanoparticles at the atomic scale: initial random (alloy) elemental distribution; surface platinum-skin-layer formation; nucleation of structurally ordered domains; ordered framework development and, finally, initiation of amorphization. Furthermore, a comprehensive interplay among phase evolution, surface faceting and elemental inter-diffusion is revealed, and supported by atomistic simulations. Furthermore, this work may pave the way towards designing catalysts through post-synthesis annealing for optimized catalytic performance.

  15. Multidisciplinary design optimization using response surface analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit

    1992-01-01

    Aerospace conceptual vehicle design is a complex process which involves multidisciplinary studies of configuration and technology options considering many parameters at many values. NASA Langley's Vehicle Analysis Branch (VAB) has detailed computerized analysis capabilities in most of the key disciplines required by advanced vehicle design. Given a configuration, the capability exists to quickly determine its performance and lifecycle cost. The next step in vehicle design is to determine the best settings of design parameters that optimize the performance characteristics. Typical approach to design optimization is experience based, trial and error variation of many parameters one at a time where possible combinations usually number in the thousands. However, this approach can either lead to a very long and expensive design process or to a premature termination of the design process due to budget and/or schedule pressures. Furthermore, one variable at a time approach can not account for the interactions that occur among parts of systems and among disciplines. As a result, vehicle design may be far from optimal. Advanced multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) methods are needed to direct the search in an efficient and intelligent manner in order to drastically reduce the number of candidate designs to be evaluated. The payoffs in terms of enhanced performance and reduced cost are significant. A literature review yields two such advanced MDO methods used in aerospace design optimization; Taguchi methods and response surface methods. Taguchi methods provide a systematic and efficient method for design optimization for performance and cost. However, response surface method (RSM) leads to a better, more accurate exploration of the parameter space and to estimated optimum conditions with a small expenditure on experimental data. These two methods are described.

  16. Aerodynamic Properties of Rough Surfaces with High Aspect-Ratio Roughness Elements: Effect of Aspect Ratio and Arrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadique, Jasim; Yang, Xiang I. A.; Meneveau, Charles; Mittal, Rajat

    2017-05-01

    We examine the effect of varying roughness-element aspect ratio on the mean velocity distributions of turbulent flow over arrays of rectangular-prism-shaped elements. Large-eddy simulations (LES) in conjunction with a sharp-interface immersed boundary method are used to simulate spatially-growing turbulent boundary layers over these rough surfaces. Arrays of aligned and staggered rectangular roughness elements with aspect ratio >1 are considered. First the temporally- and spatially-averaged velocity profiles are used to illustrate the aspect-ratio effects. For aligned prisms, the roughness length (z_o) and the friction velocity (u_*) increase initially with an increase in the roughness-element aspect ratio, until the values reach a plateau at a particular aspect ratio. The exact value of this aspect ratio depends on the coverage density. Further increase in the aspect ratio changes neither z_o, u_* nor the bulk flow above the roughness elements. For the staggered cases, z_o and u_* continue to increase for the surface coverage density and the aspect ratios investigated. To model the flow response to variations in roughness aspect ratio, we turn to a previously developed phenomenological volumetric sheltering model (Yang et al., in J Fluid Mech 789:127-165, 2016), which was intended for low to moderate aspect-ratio roughness elements. Here, we extend this model to account for high aspect-ratio roughness elements. We find that for aligned cases, the model predicts strong mutual sheltering among the roughness elements, while the effect is much weaker for staggered cases. The model-predicted z_o and u_* agree well with the LES results. Results show that the model, which takes explicit account of the mutual sheltering effects, provides a rapid and reliable prediction method of roughness effects in turbulent boundary-layer flows over arrays of rectangular-prism roughness elements.

  17. Aerodynamic Properties of Rough Surfaces with High Aspect-Ratio Roughness Elements: Effect of Aspect Ratio and Arrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadique, Jasim; Yang, Xiang I. A.; Meneveau, Charles; Mittal, Rajat

    2016-12-01

    We examine the effect of varying roughness-element aspect ratio on the mean velocity distributions of turbulent flow over arrays of rectangular-prism-shaped elements. Large-eddy simulations (LES) in conjunction with a sharp-interface immersed boundary method are used to simulate spatially-growing turbulent boundary layers over these rough surfaces. Arrays of aligned and staggered rectangular roughness elements with aspect ratio >1 are considered. First the temporally- and spatially-averaged velocity profiles are used to illustrate the aspect-ratio effects. For aligned prisms, the roughness length (z_o ) and the friction velocity (u_* ) increase initially with an increase in the roughness-element aspect ratio, until the values reach a plateau at a particular aspect ratio. The exact value of this aspect ratio depends on the coverage density. Further increase in the aspect ratio changes neither z_o , u_* nor the bulk flow above the roughness elements. For the staggered cases, z_o and u_* continue to increase for the surface coverage density and the aspect ratios investigated. To model the flow response to variations in roughness aspect ratio, we turn to a previously developed phenomenological volumetric sheltering model (Yang et al., in J Fluid Mech 789:127-165, 2016), which was intended for low to moderate aspect-ratio roughness elements. Here, we extend this model to account for high aspect-ratio roughness elements. We find that for aligned cases, the model predicts strong mutual sheltering among the roughness elements, while the effect is much weaker for staggered cases. The model-predicted z_o and u_* agree well with the LES results. Results show that the model, which takes explicit account of the mutual sheltering effects, provides a rapid and reliable prediction method of roughness effects in turbulent boundary-layer flows over arrays of rectangular-prism roughness elements.

  18. Role of Oxygen as Surface-Active Element in Linear GTA Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadaiah, Nirsanametla; Bag, Swarup

    2013-11-01

    Although the surface-active elements such as oxygen and sulfur have an adverse effect on momentum transport in liquid metals during fusion welding, such elements can be used beneficially up to a certain limit to increase the weld penetration in the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The fluid flow pattern and consequently the weld penetration and width change due to a change in coefficient of surface tension from a negative value to a positive value. The present work is focused on the analysis of possible effects of surface-active elements to change the weld pool dimensions in linear GTA welding. A 3D finite element-based heat transfer and fluid flow model is developed to study the effect of surface-active elements on stainless steel plates. A velocity in the order of 180 mm/s due to surface tension force is estimated at an optimum concentration of surface-active elements. Further, the differential evolution-based global optimization algorithm is integrated with the numerical model to estimate uncertain model parameters such as arc efficiency, effective arc radius, and effective values of material properties at high temperatures. The effective values of thermal conductivity and viscosity are estimated to be enhanced nine and seven times, respectively, over corresponding room temperature values. An error analysis is also performed to find out the overall reliability of the computed results, and a maximum reliability of 0.94 is achieved.

  19. A finite element framework for computation of protein normal modes and mechanical response.

    PubMed

    Bathe, Mark

    2008-03-01

    A computational framework based on the Finite Element Method is presented to calculate the normal modes and mechanical response of proteins and their supramolecular assemblies. Motivated by elastic network models, proteins are treated as continuum elastic solids with molecular volume defined by their solvent-excluded surface. The discretized Finite Element representation is obtained using a surface simplification algorithm that facilitates the generation of models of arbitrary prescribed spatial resolution. The procedure is applied to a mutant of T4 phage lysozyme, G-actin, syntenin, cytochrome-c', beta-tubulin, and the supramolecular assembly filamentous actin (F-actin). Equilibrium thermal fluctuations of alpha-carbon atoms and their inter-residue correlations compare favorably with all-atom-based results, the Rotational-Translational Block procedure, and experiment. Additionally, the free vibration and compressive buckling responses of F-actin are in quantitative agreement with experiment. The proposed methodology is applicable to any protein or protein assembly and facilitates the incorporation of specific atomic-level interactions, including aqueous-electrolyte-mediated electrostatic effects and solvent damping. The procedure is equally applicable to proteins with known atomic coordinates as it is to electron density maps of proteins, protein complexes, and supramolecular assemblies of unknown atomic structure.

  20. Control elements in dynamically determined selectivity on a bifurcating surface.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jacqueline B; Waas, Jack R; Harmata, Michael; Singleton, Daniel A

    2008-11-05

    The mechanism and the nature of the dynamically determined product selectivity in Diels-Alder cycloadditions of 3-methoxycarbonylcyclopentadienone (2) with 1,3-dienes was studied by a combination of product studies, experimental kinetic isotope effects, standard theoretical calculations, and quasiclassical trajectory calculations. The low-energy transition structures in these reactions are structurally balanced between [4pi(diene) + 2pi(dienone)] and the [2pi(diene) + 4pi(dienone)] modes of cycloaddition. The accuracy of these structures and their bispericyclic nature is supported by the experimental isotope effects. Trajectories passing through these transition structures can lead to both [4pi(diene) + 2pi(dienone)] and [2pi(diene) + 4pi(dienone)] cycloadducts, and the mixture of products obtained varies with the structure of the diene. The factors affecting this selectivity are analyzed. The geometry of the transition structure is a useful predictor of the major product, but the selectivity is also guided by the shape of the energy surface as trajectories approach the products and by how trajectories cross the transition state ridge.

  1. Aspheric and diffractive surfaces in one, two and three element lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Michael Patrick

    The use of surfaces other than spheres in optical systems has become increasingly practical due to advances in manufacturing technology. Two such alternate surface types are aspheres and diffractives. Aspheric surfaces are typically used to control the Seidel (and higher order) aberrations. Diffractive surfaces, because of their high dispersion, can be used in broadband systems to provide chromatic aberration correction as well. The aim of this work is to develop general statements about the application of aspheric and diffractive surfaces to photographic and digital imaging lenses. The use of such complex surfaces can reduce the number of elements in an imaging system while maintaining equivalent image quality. General rules regarding this design tradeoff are developed. The improvement in performance achieved by adding aspheric and diffractive surfaces, alone or in combination, to one, two and three element lenses is examined. A measure of performance is defined based upon the transverse ray errors calculated from real ray tracing. Using this, lenses of equal performance are designed for various combinations of numerical aperture and field angle. Contours of equal performance are compared for lenses of different constructional parameters. As an example application of the use of aspheric and diffractive surfaces, the design of an objective lens for a digital still camera is considered. Possible configurations for one, two and three element lenses are discussed. The use of diffractive surfaces in broadband imaging systems brings with it the associated cost of stray light due to the variation of diffraction efficiency with wavelength. Under the condition of a low contrast object, the effect of diffraction efficiency is included in the measure of performance and the systems containing diffractive surface reevaluated. The single axis symmetry of the aspheric or diffractive surfaces used results in the inability to remove surface to surface decenter in the lens element

  2. A finite element surface impedance representation for steady-state problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalinowski, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    A procedure for determining the scattered pressure field resulting from a monochromatic harmonic wave that is incident upon a layer energy absorbing structure is treated. The situation where the structure is modeled with finite elements and the surrounding acoustic medium (water or air) is represented with either acoustic finite elements, or some type of boundary integral formulation, is considered. Finite element modeling problems arise when the construction of the structure, at the fluid structure interface, are nonhomogeneous and in particular, when the inhomogeneities are small relative to the acoustic wave length. An approximate procedure is presented for replacing the detailed microscopic representation of the layered surface configuration with an equivalent simple surface impedance finite element, which is especially designed to work only at limited frequencies. An example problem is presented using NASTRAN. However, the procedure is general enough to adapt to practically any finite element code having a steady state option.

  3. Response Predicting LTCC Firing Shrinkage: A Response Surface Analysis Study

    SciTech Connect

    Girardi, Michael; Barner, Gregg; Lopez, Cristie; Duncan, Brent; Zawicki, Larry

    2009-02-25

    The Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) technology is used in a variety of applications including military/space electronics, wireless communication, MEMS, medical and automotive electronics. The use of LTCC is growing due to the low cost of investment, short development time, good electrical and mechanical properties, high reliability, and flexibility in design integration (3 dimensional (3D) microstructures with cavities are possible)). The dimensional accuracy of the resulting x/y shrinkage of LTCC substrates is responsible for component assembly problems with the tolerance effect that increases in relation to the substrate size. Response Surface Analysis was used to predict product shrinkage based on specific process inputs (metal loading, layer count, lamination pressure, and tape thickness) with the ultimate goal to optimize manufacturing outputs (NC files, stencils, and screens) in achieving the final product design the first time. Three (3) regression models were developed for the DuPont 951 tape system with DuPont 5734 gold metallization based on green tape thickness.

  4. Anomalous surface segregation behaviour of some 3d elements in ferromagnetic iron.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Michèle; Gupta, Raju P

    2013-10-16

    The segregation of Cr in Fe is known to be anomalous since the barrier for surface segregation of Cr is not determined by the topmost surface layer, as one would expect, but rather by the subsurface layer where the energy of segregation is much larger and endothermic. This has been attributed to a complex interaction involving the antiferromagnetism of Cr and the ferromagnetism of Fe. We report in this paper the results of our ab initio electronic structure calculations on the segregation behaviour of all the 3d elements on the (1 0 0) surface of ferromagnetic iron in the hope of better understanding this phenomenon. We find a similar behaviour for the segregation of the next antiferromagnetic 3d element Mn in Fe, where the subsurface layer is also found to block the segregation of Mn to the surface. On the other hand, ferromagnetic Co exhibits a normal segregation behaviour. The elements Sc, Cu and Ni do not form solid solutions with ferromagnetic iron. The early elements Ti and V are non-magnetic in their metallic states, but are strongly polarized by Fe, and develop magnetic moments which are aligned antiferromagnetically to those of Fe atoms. While the subsurface layer blocks the segregation of Ti to the surface, no blocking behaviour is found for the segregation of V. The segregation behaviour of all these elements is strongly correlated with the displacement of the solute atoms on the surface of Fe. The elements showing anomalous segregation behaviour are all displaced upwards on the surface, while those showing normal segregation are pulled inwards. These results indicate that the antiferromagnetism of the segregating element plays the key role in the anomalous segregation behaviour in Fe.

  5. Electrochemical machining process for forming surface roughness elements on a gas turbine shroud

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Johnson, Robert Alan; Wei, Bin; Wang, Hsin-Pang

    2002-01-01

    The back side recessed cooling surface of a shroud defining in part the hot gas path of a turbine is electrochemically machined to provide surface roughness elements and spaces therebetween to increase the heat transfer coefficient. To accomplish this, an electrode with insulating dielectric portions and non-insulating portions is disposed in opposition to the cooling surface. By passing an electrolyte between the cooling surface and electrode and applying an electrical current between the electrode and a shroud, roughness elements and spaces therebetween are formed in the cooling surface in opposition to the insulating and non-insulating portions of the electrode, hence increasing the surface area and heat transfer coefficient of the shroud.

  6. Application of Goubau Surface Wave Transmission Line for Improved Bench Testing of Diagnostic Beamline Elements

    SciTech Connect

    John Musson, Keith Cole, Sheldon Rubin

    2009-05-01

    In-air test fixtures for beamline elements typically utilize an X-Y positioning stage, and a wire antenna excited by an RF source. In most cases, the antenna contains a standing wave, and is useful only for coarse alignment measurements in CW mode. A surface-wave (SW) based transmission line permits RF energy to be launched on the wire, travel through the beamline component, and then be absorbed in a load. Since SW transmission lines employ travelling waves, the RF energy can be made to resemble the electron beam, limited only by ohmic losses and dispersion. Although lossy coaxial systems are also a consideration, the diameter of the coax introduces large uncertainties in centroid location. A SW wire is easily constructed out of 200 micron magnet wire, which more accurately approximates the physical profile of the electron beam. Benefits of this test fixture include accurate field mapping, absolute calibration for given beam currents, Z-axis independence, and temporal response measurements of sub-nanosecond pulse structures. Descriptions of the surface wave launching technique, transmission line, and instrumentation are presented, along with measurement data.

  7. Autonomous Aerobraking Using Thermal Response Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Jill L.; Dec, John A.; Tolson, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    Aerobraking is a proven method of significantly increasing the science payload that can be placed into low Mars orbits when compared to an all propulsive capture. However, the aerobraking phase is long and has mission cost and risk implications. The main cost benefit is that aerobraking permits the use of a smaller and cheaper launch vehicle, but additional operational costs are incurred during the long aerobraking phase. Risk is increased due to the repeated thermal loading of spacecraft components and the multiple attitude and propulsive maneuvers required for successful aerobraking. Both the cost and risk burdens can be significantly reduced by automating the aerobraking operations phase. All of the previous Mars orbiter missions that have utilized aerobraking have increasingly relied on onboard calculations during aerobraking. Even though the temperature of spacecraft components has been the limiting factor, operational methods have relied on using a surrogate variable for mission control. This paper describes several methods, based directly on spacecraft component maximum temperature, for autonomously predicting the subsequent aerobraking orbits and prescribing apoapsis propulsive maneuvers to maintain the spacecraft within specified temperature limits. Specifically, this paper describes the use of thermal response surface analysis in predicting the temperature of the spacecraft components and the corresponding uncertainty in this temperature prediction.

  8. [XPS analysis of chromium element in chromate passivation film formed on tinplate in different surface state].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; An, Cheng-Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Zhong; Tan, Yong

    2009-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the content and chemical valence of chromium element, and the content of compounds in chromate passive film formed on commercial tinplate via a cathodic electrolytical treatment. The effect of the content and chemical valence for different surface state was studied by using ultrasonic process. From the results, it was shown that there existed Cr, O and Sn in the passivation film. The chromium element in the film was mainly in the forms of Cr(OH)3, Cr2O3, and Cr in the natural surface. The Cr(VI) changed to lower value in the process of cathodic electrolytical treatment. A small quantity of Cr(VI) was found in the defective surface besides Cr(OH)3 and Cr2O3. The content of chromium element in the defective surface was lower than that in the natural surface. When ultrasonic process was added, the content of chromium element in the defective surface was obviously lower than that when no ultrasonic process was added. When ultrasonic process was used, the small quantity of Cr(VI) originally adsorbed on the defective surface disappeared because of the strong elution produced by ultrasonic.

  9. Assessment of crown-of-thorns skeletal elements in surface sediment of the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, R. A.

    1992-07-01

    A total of 1655 crown-of-thorns starfish skeletal elements were recovered from 237 surface sediment samples from Davies, Centipede, Myrmidon, Hope, Holbourne Island, 22 110, Gannet Cay and Lady Musgrave Island Reefs of the central and southern sectors of the Great Barrier Reef. Three categories of reef may be recognised on the incidence of Acanthaster planci skeletal elements in surface sediment from these and previously studied reefs: category A (abundant, >12 elements kg1-), category C (common, 3 8 elements kg-1) and category C (rare, 0 0.1 elements kg-1). These categories parallel estimates of crown-of-thorns populations in the period 1986 1990. “A” reefs have generally experienced high intensity outbreaks, “C” reefs less intense or perhaps less frequent outbreaks and “R” reefs have had little or no crown-of-thorns presence. The incidence of crown-of-thorns skeletal elements in surface sediment potentially provides an indication of population densities and outbreaks over a time scale of several decades. A perspective of contemporary crown-of-thorns incidence on the many reefs of the GBR lacking direct observational records may thereby be obtained. For Holbourne Island a comparison was made of element incidence in an area of known mass mortality induced by poisoning with a control area that was undisturbed. The incidence of A. planci skeletal elements is comparable in the two areas and similar to the incidence established for other reefs such as Green Island and John Brewer where high intensity outbreaks are known to have occurred. A direct relationship between high incidence of elements in surface sediment and mass mortality following outbreak events is indicated.

  10. Mapping chemical elements on the surface of orthodontic appliance by SEM-EDX

    PubMed Central

    Mikulewicz, Marcin; Wołowiec, Paulina; Michalak, Izabela; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Czopor, Wojciech; Berniczei-Royko, Adam; Vegh, Andras; Gedrange, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background During orthodontic treatment, the various elements that constitute the fixed appliance undergo different processes. As a result of a change of the surface, elution/coverage of metals on the surface can be observed in the process of corrosion/passivation. Material/Methods Scanning electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive X-ray analytical system (SEM-EDX) was used to analyze the composition of stainless steel elements of orthodontic fixed appliances (before and after orthodontic treatment), to obtain the composition of the surface of the elements. The analyzed elements were: brackets (Victory Series APC PLUS 022, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA); wires (0.017×0.025, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA); and bands (37+, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA). Results The results showed a decrease of chromium and iron contribution to the surface, with increase of oxygen content in used vs. new elements of the appliance. Conclusions Our results confirm the formation of oxides (passivation layer) on the surface of stainless steel as a result of the presence of the orthodontic appliance in patients’ oral cavities. PMID:24857929

  11. Mapping chemical elements on the surface of orthodontic appliance by SEM-EDX.

    PubMed

    Mikulewicz, Marcin; Wołowiec, Paulina; Michalak, Izabela; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Czopor, Wojciech; Berniczei-Royko, Adam; Vegh, Andras; Gedrange, Thomas

    2014-05-25

    During orthodontic treatment, the various elements that constitute the fixed appliance undergo different processes. As a result of a change of the surface, elution/coverage of metals on the surface can be observed in the process of corrosion/passivation. Scanning electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive X-ray analytical system (SEM-EDX) was used to analyze the composition of stainless steel elements of orthodontic fixed appliances (before and after orthodontic treatment), to obtain the composition of the surface of the elements. The analyzed elements were: brackets (Victory Series APC PLUS 022, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA); wires (0.017×0.025, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA); and bands (37+, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA). The results showed a decrease of chromium and iron contribution to the surface, with increase of oxygen content in used vs. new elements of the appliance. Our results confirm the formation of oxides (passivation layer) on the surface of stainless steel as a result of the presence of the orthodontic appliance in patients' oral cavities.

  12. ELEMENTS OF WRITING ABOUT A LITERARY WORK--A STUDY OF RESPONSE TO LITERATURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PURVES, ALAN C.; RIPPERE, VICTORIA

    THIS RESEARCH REPORT DESCRIBES A DETAILED CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM FOR THE INDIVIDUAL "ELEMENTS," OR TYPES OF RESPONSES, WHICH MAKE UP THE READER'S TOTAL RESPONSE TO LITERATURE AS IT TAKES FORM IN WRITTEN COMMENTARY ON LITERARY WORKS. CHAPTER 1 DISCUSSES THE ORIGIN OF THE STUDY AND DEFINES ELEMENTS AND THE CATEGORICAL SYSTEM USED IN CLASSIFYING THEM.…

  13. Cut finite element methods for elliptic problems on multipatch parametric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Tobias; Larson, Mats G.; Larsson, Karl

    2017-09-01

    We develop a finite element method for the Laplace--Beltrami operator on a surface described by a set of patchwise parametrizations. The patches provide a partition of the surface and each patch is the image by a diffeomorphism of a subdomain of the unit square which is bounded by a number of smooth trim curves. A patchwise tensor product mesh is constructed by using a structured mesh in the reference domain. Since the patches are trimmed we obtain cut elements in the vicinity of the interfaces. We discretize the Laplace--Beltrami operator using a cut finite element method that utilizes Nitsche's method to enforce continuity at the interfaces and a consistent stabilization term to handle the cut elements. Several quantities in the method are conveniently computed in the reference domain where the mappings impose a Riemannian metric. We derive a priori estimates in the energy and $L^2$ norm and also present several numerical examples confirming our theoretical results.

  14. Frequency Modulated Translocational Oscillations of Nrf2 Mediate the Antioxidant Response Element Cytoprotective Transcriptional Response

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mingzhan; Momiji, Hiroshi; Rabbani, Naila; Barker, Guy; Bretschneider, Till; Shmygol, Anatoly; Rand, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Stress responsive signaling coordinated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) provides an adaptive response for protection of cells against toxic insults, oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction. Nrf2 regulates a battery of protective genes by binding to regulatory antioxidant response elements (AREs). The aim of this study was to examine how Nrf2 signals cell stress status and regulates transcription to maintain homeostasis. Results: In live cell microscopy we observed that Nrf2 undergoes autonomous translocational frequency-modulated oscillations between cytoplasm and nucleus. Oscillations occurred in quiescence and when cells were stimulated at physiological levels of activators, they decrease in period and amplitude and then evoke a cytoprotective transcriptional response. We propose a mechanism whereby oscillations are produced by negative feedback involving successive de-phosphorylation and phosphorylation steps. Nrf2 was inactivated in the nucleus and reactivated on return to the cytoplasm. Increased frequency of Nrf2 on return to the cytoplasm with increased reactivation or refresh-rate under stress conditions activated the transcriptional response mediating cytoprotective effects. The serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PGAM5, member of the Nrf2 interactome, was a key regulatory component. Innovation: We found that Nrf2 is activated in cells without change in total cellular Nrf2 protein concentration. Regulation of ARE-linked protective gene transcription occurs rather through translocational oscillations of Nrf2. We discovered cytoplasmic refresh rate of Nrf2 is important in maintaining and regulating the transcriptional response and links stress challenge to increased cytoplasmic surveillance. We found silencing and inhibition of PGAM5 provides potent activation of Nrf2. Conclusion: Frequency modulated translocational oscillations of Nrf2 mediate the ARE-linked cytoprotective transcriptional response. Antioxid. Redox

  15. Oxide formation and alloying elements enrichment on TRIP steel surface during inter-critical annealing.

    PubMed

    Gong, Y F; Birosca, S; Kim, H S; De Cooman, B C

    2008-06-01

    The gas atmosphere in continuous annealing and galvanizing lines alters both composition and microstructure of the surface and sub-surface of sheet steels. The alloying element enrichments and the oxide morphology on transformation-induced plasticity steel surfaces are strongly influenced by the dew point of the furnace atmosphere and annealing temperature. The formation of a thin oxide film and enrichment of the alloying elements during annealing may result in surface defects on galvanized sheet products. The present contribution reports on the use of microanalysis techniques such as electron backscatter diffraction, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and electron probe micro-analysis for the detailed surface analysis of inter-critically annealed transformation-induced plasticity steel such as oxide phase determination, microstructure and microtexture evolutions.

  16. The relation of stream sediment surface area, grain size and composition to trace element chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.; Elrick, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    Intensive studies of 17 geographically and hydrologically diverse stream bed sediments provide information on the relation between grain size, surface area, and operationally defined geochemical phases (e.g. Mn oxides, amorphous Fe oxides) to trace element concentrations. Of the size fractions investigated ( 125 ??m), each of the various phases contribute to overall sample surface area. For material having mean grain sizes in the very fine sand range and finer (<125 ??m), the same phases act as surface-area inhibitors by cementing fine grains together to form aggregates. This increases the mean grain size of the sample and reduces the surface area. The presence of these aggregates may explain why the <63 ??m or <125 ??m size fractions are more important to sediment-trace element levels and surface area than other finer fractions. ?? 1987.

  17. Elemental Analyses of Hanford Surface Neutron Moisture Measurement Calibration Standard Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    Elemental analyses have been performed on twenty samples taken from the moisture standards prepared to use in performing experimental calibrations of the surface neutron moisture measurement system. These standards consisted of mixtures of sand, hydrated alumina, and boron carbide. Elemental analyses were performed primarily to discover the quantities of any strong thermal neutron absorbers that may have been present in the mixture in unknown trace quantities.

  18. Optimum design criteria for a synchronous reluctance motor with concentrated winding using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Seong-June; Jeon, Su-Jin

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents an optimization procedure using response surface methodology (RSM) to determine design parameters for reducing torque ripple. The RSM has been achieved to use the experimental design method in combination with finite element method and well adapted to make analytical model for a complex problem considering a lot of interaction of design variables.

  19. Gamma-ray Emission from the Surface of Martian Satellites as a Function of Elemental Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kouhei; Naito, Masayuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Kusano, Hiroki; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Ishii, Junya; Aoki, Daisuke

    Mars has two satellites, Phobos and Deimos. The Martian satellites have never been explored from the aspect of elemental composition. Their origins are still mysterious. Gamma-ray spectroscopy from the orbit of spacecraft is a powerful method to investigate elemental distribution and abundance of planets with no or thin atmosphere. In this work, gamma-ray emission from the Martian satellites was calculated as a function of elemental composition. Both chondritic and Martian compositions, which represent captured origin and giant impact origin, respectively, were assumed as elemental composition of Martian satellites. The gamma-ray fluxes induced by galactic cosmic rays at their surface were calculated for both of them. It was found that the elemental compositions of Martian satellites are clearly distinguished between chondritic or Martian by the gamma-ray emission rate ratios of Si/Fe and Ca/Fe and enable us to give strong constraint to the idea for the origin of the Martian satellites.

  20. Estimating Groundwater Flow Parameters Using Response Surface Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Best Available Copy AD-A280 630 DTI ELECT’ JUN2 4 ESTIMATING GROUNDWATER FLOW PARAMETERS USING RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY THESIS Leo C. Adams...GROUNDWATER FLOW PARAMETERS USING RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute...Estimating Groundwater Flow Parameters Using Response Surface Methodology Committee Name/Department Signature dvisor. I Col Paul F. Auclair, Ph.D. j . j

  1. A direct evidence of vibrationally delocalized response at ice surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2014-11-14

    Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopic responses at isotope diluted ice and amorphous ice are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The intense response specific to the ordinary crystal ice surface is predicted to be significantly suppressed in the isotopically diluted and amorphous ices, demonstrating the vibrational delocalization at the ordinary ice surface. The collective vibration at the ice surface is also analyzed with varying temperature by the MD simulation.

  2. Finite-element impact response of debonded composite turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sudip; Karmakar, Amit

    2014-02-01

    This paper investigates on the transient behavior of debonded composite pretwisted rotating shallow conical shells which could be idealized as turbine blades subjected to low velocity normal impact using finite-element method. Lagrange's equation of motion is used to derive the dynamic equilibrium equation and the moderate rotational speeds are considered neglecting the Coriolis effect. An eight-noded isoparametric plate bending element is employed in the finite element formulation incorporating rotary inertia and effects of transverse shear deformation based on Mindlin's theory. The modified Hertzian contact law which accounts for permanent indentation is utilized to compute the impact parameters. The time-dependent equations are solved by using Newmark's time integration scheme. Parametric studies are performed to investigate the effects of triggering parameters like angle of twist, rotational speed, laminate configuration and location of debonding considering low velocity normal impact at the center of eight-layered graphite-epoxy composite cantilevered conical shells with bending stiff ([0o2/{±} 30o]s), torsion stiff ([45°/-45°/-45°/45°]s) and cross-ply ([0°/90°/0°/90°]s) laminate configurations.

  3. Fibrinogen adsorption and host tissue responses to plasma functionalized surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tang, L; Wu, Y; Timmons, R B

    1998-10-01

    The physical and chemical characteristics of material surfaces are thought to play important roles in biomaterial-mediated tissue responses. To understand the importance of discrete biomaterial chemical characteristics in modifying host tissue responses, we constructed surfaces bearing different functional groups using radio frequency glow discharge plasma polymerization. Surfaces evaluated included those having high concentrations of -OH, -NH2, -CF3, and siloxyl groups. These surfaces and polyethylene terephthalate controls were used to assess the importance of particular physicochemical characteristics in surface:protein:cell interactions both in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained show that surface functionalities do significantly affect both the adsorption and "denaturation" of adsorbed fibrinogen (which is an important mediator of inflammatory responses to biomaterial implants). In addition, these surfaces provoke different degrees of acute inflammatory responses. Interestingly, the amounts of "denatured" fibrinogen that spontaneously accumulate on the individual surfaces correlate closely with the extent of biomaterial-mediated inflammation. These results suggest that surfaces that tend to "irreversibly" bind fibrinogen prompt greater acute inflammatory responses. Unexpectedly, all test surfaces except those bearing a siloxyl group engender relatively similar biomaterial-mediated fibrotic responses. Thus surface functionalities alone may not be sufficient to affect subsequent fibrotic responses.

  4. Population responses to contour integration: early encoding of discrete elements and late perceptual grouping.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Ariel; Meirovithz, Elhanan; Slovin, Hamutal

    2013-04-24

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying perceptual grouping of discrete, similarly oriented elements are not well understood. To investigate this, we measured neural population responses using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in V1 of monkeys trained on a contour-detection task. By mapping the contour and background elements onto V1, we could study their neural processing. Population response early in time showed activation patches corresponding to the contour/background individual elements. However, late increased activity in the contour elements, along with suppressed activity in the background elements, enabled us to visualize in single trials a salient continuous contour "popping out" from a suppressed background. This modulated activity in the contour and in background extended beyond the cortical representation of individual contour or background elements. Finally, the late modulation was correlated with behavioral performance of contour saliency and the monkeys' perceptual report. Thus, opposing responses in the contour and background may underlie perceptual grouping in V1.

  5. Controlled Dissolution of Surface Layers for Elemental Analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lorge, Susan Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Determining the composition of thin layers is increasingly important for a variety of industrial materials such as adhesives, coatings and microelectronics. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are some of the techniques that are currently employed for the direct analysis of the sample surface. Although these techniques do not suffer from the contamination problems that often plague sample dissolution studies, they do require matrix matched standards for quantification. Often, these standards are not readily available. Despite the costs of clean hoods, Teflon pipette tips and bottles, and pure acids, partial sample dissolution is the primary method used in the semiconductor industry to quantify surface impurities. Specifically, vapor phase decomposition (VPD) coupled to ICP-MS or total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) provides elemental information from the top most surface layers at detection sensitivities in the 107-1010atoms/cm2 range. The ability to quantify with standard solutions is a main advantage of these techniques. Li and Houk applied a VPD-like technique to steel. The signal ratio of trace element to matrix element was used for quantification. Although controlled dissolution concentrations determined for some of the dissolved elements agreed with the certified values, concentrations determined for refractory elements (Ti, Nb and Ta) were too low. LA-ICP-MS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements indicated that carbide grains distributed throughout the matrix were high in these refractory elements. These elements dissolved at a slower rate than the matrix element, Fe. If the analyte element is not removed at a rate similar to the matrix element a true

  6. Comparison of Response Surface and Kriging Models in the Multidisciplinary Design of an Aerospike Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Timothy W.

    1998-01-01

    The use of response surface models and kriging models are compared for approximating non-random, deterministic computer analyses. After discussing the traditional response surface approach for constructing polynomial models for approximation, kriging is presented as an alternative statistical-based approximation method for the design and analysis of computer experiments. Both approximation methods are applied to the multidisciplinary design and analysis of an aerospike nozzle which consists of a computational fluid dynamics model and a finite element analysis model. Error analysis of the response surface and kriging models is performed along with a graphical comparison of the approximations. Four optimization problems are formulated and solved using both approximation models. While neither approximation technique consistently outperforms the other in this example, the kriging models using only a constant for the underlying global model and a Gaussian correlation function perform as well as the second order polynomial response surface models.

  7. Comparison of Response Surface and Kriging Models for Multidisciplinary Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Timothy W.; Korte, John J.; Mauery, Timothy M.; Mistree, Farrokh

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we compare and contrast the use of second-order response surface models and kriging models for approximating non-random, deterministic computer analyses. After reviewing the response surface method for constructing polynomial approximations, kriging is presented as an alternative approximation method for the design and analysis of computer experiments. Both methods are applied to the multidisciplinary design of an aerospike nozzle which consists of a computational fluid dynamics model and a finite-element model. Error analysis of the response surface and kriging models is performed along with a graphical comparison of the approximations, and four optimization problems m formulated and solved using both sets of approximation models. The second-order response surface models and kriging models-using a constant underlying global model and a Gaussian correlation function-yield comparable results.

  8. Controlled chemical modification of the internal surface of photonic crystal fibers for application as biosensitive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidenko, Sergey A.; Burmistrova, Natalia A.; Pidenko, Pavel S.; Shuvalov, Andrey A.; Chibrova, Anastasiya A.; Skibina, Yulia S.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.

    2016-10-01

    Photonic crystal fibers (PCF) are one of the most promising materials for creation of constructive elements for bio-, drug and contaminant sensing based on unique optical properties of the PCF as effective nanosized optical signal collectors. In order to provide efficient and controllable binding of biomolecules, the internal surface of glass hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCF) has been chemically modified with silanol groups and functionalized with (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES). The shift of local maxima in the HC-PCF transmission spectrum has been selected as a signal for estimating the amount of silanol groups on the HC-PCF inner surface. The relationship between amount of silanol groups on the HC-PCF inner surface and efficiency of following APTES functionalization has been evaluated. Covalent binding of horseradish peroxidase (chosen as a model protein) on functionalized PCF inner surface has been performed successively, thus verifying the possibility of creating a biosensitive element.

  9. Enhancing Surface Finish of Additively Manufactured Titanium and Cobalt Chrome Elements Using Laser Based Finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gora, Wojciech S.; Tian, Yingtao; Cabo, Aldara Pan; Ardron, Marcus; Maier, Robert R. J.; Prangnell, Philip; Weston, Nicholas J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers the possibility of creating a complex free form object as a single element, which is not possible using traditional mechanical machining. Unfortunately the typically rough surface finish of additively manufactured parts is unsuitable for many applications. As a result AM parts must be post-processed; typically mechanically machined and/or and polished using either chemical or mechanical techniques (both of which have their limitations). Laser based polishing is based on remelting of a very thin surface layer and it offers potential as a highly repeatable, higher speed process capable of selective area polishing, and without any waste problems (no abrasives or liquids). In this paper an in-depth investigation of CW laser polishing of titanium and cobalt chrome AM elements is presented. The impact of different scanning strategies, laser parameters and initial surface condition on the achieved surface finish is evaluated.

  10. Cis-element of the rice PDIL2-3 promoter is responsible for inducing the endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Wang, Shuyi; Hayashi, Shimpei; Wakasa, Yuhya; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2014-05-01

    A protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family oxidoreductase, PDIL2-3, is involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in rice. We identified a critical cis-element required for induction of the ER stress response. The activation of PDIL2-3 in response to ER stress strongly depends on the IRE1-OsbZIP50 signaling pathway.

  11. Measurements of Neutron-absorbing Elements on Mercury's Surface with the MESSENGER Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, David J.; Feldman, William C.; Goldsten, John O.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Blewett, David T.; Boynton, William V.; Evans, Larry G.; Nittler, Larry R.; Rhodes, Edgar A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2010-05-01

    The Neutron Spectrometer (NS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission has made measurements of cosmic-ray-generated thermal neutrons during each of MESSENGER's three Mercury flybys. These thermal neutron data have allowed us to make the first direct measurements of Mercury's surface elemental composition. Specifically, we show that Mercury's surface is enriched in neutron-absorbing elements and has a measured macroscopic neutron absorption cross section of (70-130) × 10^(-4) cm^2/g, which is similar to the neutron absorption of lunar basalts from Mare Fecunditatis. The expected neutron-absorbing elements are Fe and Ti, with possible trace amounts of Gd and Sm. Fe and Ti, in particular, are important for understanding Mercury's formation and how its surface may have changed over time through magmatic processes. With the neutron Doppler filter technique - a neutron energy separation technique based on spacecraft velocity - we demonstrate that Mercury's surface composition cannot be matched by prior models having characteristically low abundances of Fe, Ti, Gd, and Sm. While neutron spectroscopy alone cannot separate the relative contributions of individual neutron-absorbing elements, these results provide strong new constraints on the nature of Mercury's surface materials. For example, if all the measured neutron absorption were due to the presence of a Fe-Ti oxide and that oxide were ilmenite, then Mercury's surface would have an ilmenite content of 14 to 31 wt.%. This result is in agreement with the inference from color imaging and visible-near-infrared spectroscopy that Mercury's overall low reflectance is consistent with a surface composition that is enriched in Fe-Ti oxides. The incorporation of substantial Fe and Ti in oxides would imply that the oxygen fugacity of basalts on Mercury is at the upper range of oxygen fugacity inferred for basalts on the Moon.

  12. JPRS Report - Science & Technology; Japan Development of Basic Technology for Large Surface Circuit Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    VLSI (4) List of corporations participating in the project Electronics: Hitachi, Ltd. Sharp Corporation NEC Corporation Seiko- Epson Co., Ltd...measure Development of ion source shapes and scanning methods for the formation of substrates with a 40-inch diagonal An LC azimuthal delta angle...2 In the application of large-surface circuit elements to the operation of a large-surface high-fidelity thin-profile image display unit, scanning

  13. Long-term changes in elemental deposition at the earth's surface.

    PubMed

    Brimblecombe, P

    1994-01-01

    The rate of deposition of elements at a point on the earth's surface can change, quite dramatically, even on relatively short time-scales, as a function of weather patterns. On a global scale volcanoes (and more rarely large meteors) can overwhelm steadier sources of trace elements. In recent centuries human activities have increased emissions to the atmosphere to a point where they are above those of natural sources for some of the rarer elements. On a longer time-scale climate change can also alter the deposition of elements, although such changes are often slower than those brought about through anthropogenic emissions. Changes in climate can also alter the distribution of deposition, but there are few studies estimating such changes. This paper uses estimates of the balance of natural and anthropogenic sources of a range of elements to examine the likely variation in deposition at the earth's surface. It particularly focuses on those elements regarded as toxic, whose concentrations seem likely to go on increasing in industrial areas.

  14. Reconstruction of Caribbean Sea Surface Temperatures Using the Skeletal Elemental Composition of the Coral Siderastrea Siderea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowell, S.; Foster, G. L.; Ries, J. B.; Castillo, K.; Stewart, J.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has resulted in an increase in sea surface temperature (SST) of 0.1oC per decade from 1971-2010. Satellite data reveals that Southern Belize has experienced greater temperature increases of up to 0.9oC from 1982 to 2009. Recent investigations have demonstrated that this warming has had a negative impact on coral calcification [1,2]. Instrumental temperature records in this region prior to 2002 are sparse, and the coarse spatial resolution of the satellite temperature data from 1982 to 2009 present problems when comparing changes in SST to rates of coral calcification. This makes it necessary to reconstruct past ocean temperatures indirectly to more accurately assess the impact of SST changes on coral calcification. The trace element composition of coral skeletons has been widely used in palaeothermometery, based on the assumption that the incorporation of trace elements such as Li, Mg and Sr (expressed as a ratio to Ca) is temperature dependent. In this study, we investigate the elemental composition of two samples sets (i) Siderastrea siderea coral samples cultured at controlled temperatures and pH, and (ii) annual and monthly resolved field samples of S. siderea measured across three major reef zones. To explore the optimum method for SST reconstruction in this species, the widely used Sr/Ca temperature proxy is compared with the more recently described Li/Mg proxy [3,4]. We demonstrate that Li/Mg appears to be the most reliable temperature proxy, with a well-defined correlation with temperature such that it is able to provide more precise temperature reconstructions than the traditional Sr/Ca approach. The results of this study pave the way to using Li/Mg in S. siderea as a reliable palaeothermometer to further our understanding of the response of Caribbean reef systems to climate change. [1] Castillo et al., 2011. PLoS One, 6(2): e14615. [2] Castillo et al., 2012. Nature Climate Change, 2: 756-760 2. [3] Hathorne et al., 2013

  15. Elemental mass spectroscopy of remote surfaces from laser-induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Situ, W.; DeYoung, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The elemental mass analysis of laser-produced ions from Al, Cu, Ge, Ag, and a lunar simulant target when irradiated by a 400-mJ, 8-ns, Nd: YAG laser at 1 x 10(exp 9) W/cm(exp 2), is reported. Ions traveled down a 11.1-m evacuated tube to an ion-trap 1-m time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer where an elemental mass spectrum was recorded. The amount of target material removed per laser pulse and the ionization fraction were measured. The ion spatial distribution was measured at 11.1-m distance and found to be near a fourth-power cosine distribution. These results indicate the ability to mass analyze a surface over a distance of many kilometers for lunar and asteroid surface elemental mass analysis by a remote satellite or lunar rover.

  16. Elemental mass spectroscopy of remote surfaces from laser-induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Situ, W.; DeYoung, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The elemental mass analysis of laser-produced ions from Al, Cu, Ge, Ag, and a lunar simulant target when irradiated by a 400-mJ, 8-ns, Nd: YAG laser at 1 x 10(exp 9) W/cm(exp 2), is reported. Ions traveled down a 11.1-m evacuated tube to an ion-trap 1-m time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer where an elemental mass spectrum was recorded. The amount of target material removed per laser pulse and the ionization fraction were measured. The ion spatial distribution was measured at 11.1-m distance and found to be near a fourth-power cosine distribution. These results indicate the ability to mass analyze a surface over a distance of many kilometers for lunar and asteroid surface elemental mass analysis by a remote satellite or lunar rover.

  17. Transport of trace elements in runoff from unamended and pond-ash amended feedlot surfaces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of pond ash (fly ash that has been placed in evaporative ponds for storage and subsequently dewatered) for feedlot surfaces provides a drier environment for livestock and furnishes economic benefits. However, pond ash is known to have high concentrations of trace elements and the runoff wate...

  18. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  19. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  20. The effect of roughness elements on wind erosion: The importance of surface shear stress distribution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Representation of surface roughness effects on aeolian sediment transport is a key source of uncertainty in wind erosion models. Drag partitioning schemes are used to account for roughness by scaling the soil entrainment threshold by the ratio of shear stress on roughness elements to that on the veg...

  1. Effect of surface functionalization of metal wire on electrophysical properties of inductive elements.

    PubMed

    Voronin, Denis V; Borisova, Dimitriya; Belova, Valentina; Gorin, Dmitry A; Shchukin, Dmitry G

    2012-08-21

    The development of the microelectronics industry requires a new element basis with reduced size and increased functionality. The most important components in modern microelectronic integrated circuits are passive elements. One of the key challenges in order to improve the functionality of integrated circuits is to increase the quality of passive elements composing them. In this paper we suggest a novel approach to increase the quality factor Q of inductors by the surface modification and functionalization of the metal components. Ultrasound induced surface modification of metal wires led to the formation of a porous surface structure, which further can be functionalized with magnetite nanoparticles using layer-by-layer assembly technique. The surface modification and deposition of magnetite nanoparticles was investigated with SEM, XRD, and contact angle measurements. Additionally, inductance and resistance measurements, as the main parameters determining the Q-factor of inductors, were carried out. Samples with high number of magnetic nanoparticle-polyelectrolyte bilayers demonstrate a significant increase in inductance and a slight decrease in resistance in comparison to uncoated ones. The combination of these factors led to enhancement the Q-factor of the investigated inductive elements.

  2. Identification and measurement of neutron-absorbing elements on Mercury’s surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, David J.; Feldman, William C.; Goldsten, John O.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Blewett, David T.; Boynton, William V.; Evans, Larry G.; Nittler, Larry R.; Rhodes, Edgar A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2010-09-01

    MESSENGER Neutron Spectrometer (NS) observations of cosmic-ray-generated thermal neutrons provide the first direct measurements of Mercury's surface elemental composition. Specifically, we show that Mercury's surface is enriched in neutron-absorbing elements and has a measured macroscopic neutron-absorption cross section of 45-81 × 10 -4 cm 2/g, a range similar to the neutron absorption of lunar basalts from Mare Crisium. The expected neutron-absorbing elements are Fe and Ti, with possible trace amounts of Gd and Sm. Fe and Ti, in particular, are important for understanding Mercury's formation and how its surface may have changed over time through magmatic processes. With neutron Doppler filtering - a neutron energy separation technique based on spacecraft velocity - we demonstrate that Mercury's surface composition cannot be matched by prior models, which have characteristically low abundances of Fe, Ti, Gd, and Sm. While neutron spectroscopy alone cannot separate the relative contributions of individual neutron-absorbing elements, these results provide strong new constraints on the nature of Mercury's surface materials. For example, if all the measured neutron absorption were due to the presence of an Fe-Ti oxide and that oxide were ilmenite, then Mercury's surface would have an ilmenite content of 7-18 wt.%. This result is in general agreement with the inference from color imaging and visible-near-infrared spectroscopy that Mercury's overall low reflectance is consistent with a surface composition that is enriched in Fe-Ti oxides. The incorporation of substantial Fe and Ti in oxides would imply that the oxygen fugacity of basalts on Mercury is at the upper range of oxygen fugacities inferred for basalts on the Moon.

  3. a Finite Element Method for Flow Problems with Free Surfaces and Moving Fronts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerberg, Kenneth William

    A finite element technique to model a fluid flow with a liquid-gas free surface and/or a solid-liquid phase -change boundary has been developed. These types of problems are difficult because in addition to the flow and temperature fields, the domain boundaries are also unknown. Two specific applications where such a technique is needed are formulated and discussed. The first is the development of a model for the thermal printing of bar code labels. Thermal printer paper is heated by a moving print head and a heat-activated chemical reaction takes place to change the color of the paper. The extent of the region that has reacted is governed by the same equations that govern the melting of a pure material. The second application is building a model of an electron beam metal vaporizer. A beam of electrons strikes the surface of a pool of liquid metal causing the metal to vaporize. A pool of liquid metal forms in the vicinity of the beam impact area. The problem involves both a liquid-gas free surface and a solid-liquid phase -change front as well as a tri-junction point where solid, liquid and gas phases all meet. Both models two-dimensional and time-dependent. The technique is based on a deformable finite element mesh designed to keep the interfaces on element boundaries. There is a singularity in the force balance along the liquid-gas free interface due to surface tension and a singularity in the heat balance along the solid-liquid phase-change front due to the latent heat of the phase-change. These singularities are easily handled by the finite element method provided they are kept on element boundaries. The positions of the free and moving boundaries are tracked using spines. Special linear algebra techniques are developed to solve the equation system resulting from our finite element discretization of the free or moving boundary problem.

  4. A responsive finite element method to aid interactive geometric modeling.

    PubMed

    Umetani, N; Takayama, K; Mitani, J; Igarashi, T

    2011-01-01

    Current computer-aided engineering systems use numerical-simulation methods mainly as offline verification tools to reject designs that don't satisfy the required constraints, rather than as tools to guide users toward better designs. However, integrating real-time finite element method (FEM) into interactive geometric modeling can provide user guidance. During interactive editing, real-time feedback from numerical simulation guides users toward an improved design without tedious trial-and-error iterations. Careful reuse of previous computation results, such as meshes and matrices, on the basis of speed and accuracy trade-offs, have helped produce fast FEM analysis during interactive editing. Several 2D example applications and informal user studies show this approach's effectiveness. Such tools could help nonexpert users design objects that satisfy physical constraints and help those users understand the underlying physical properties.

  5. Speciation of adsorbed yttrium and rare earth elements on oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Wojciech; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.

    2008-08-01

    The distribution of yttrium and the rare earth elements (YREE) between natural waters and oxide mineral surfaces depends on adsorption reactions, which in turn depend on the specific way in which YREE are coordinated to mineral surfaces. Recent X-ray studies have established that Y 3+ is adsorbed to the rutile (1 1 0) surface as a distinctive tetranuclear species. However, the hydrolysis state of the adsorbed cation is not known from experiment. Previous surface complexation models of YREE adsorption have suggested two to four cation hydrolysis states coexisting on oxide surfaces. In the present study, we investigate the applicability of the X-ray results to rare earth elements and to several oxides in addition to rutile using the extended triple-layer surface complexation model. The reaction producing a hydrolyzed tetranuclear surface species 4>SOH+M+2HO=(>SOH)2_M(OH)2++4H was found to account for a significant fraction of the adsorbed Y 3+, La 3+, Nd 3+, Gd 3+, and Yb 3+ on rutile, hematite, alumina and silica over wide ranges of pH and ionic strength. Where adsorption data were available as a function of surface coverage for hematite and silica, an additional reaction involving a mononuclear species could be used to account for the higher surface coverages. However, it is also possible that some of the higher surface coverage data refer to surface precipitation rather than adsorption. The results of the present study provide an internally consistent basis for describing YREE adsorption which could be used to investigate more complex systems in which YREE compete both in aqueous solution and on mineral surfaces with alkaline earths and ligands such as carbonate, sulfate, chloride and organic species, in order to build a predictive adsorption model applicable to natural waters.

  6. Tuning a fuzzy controller using quadratic response surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schott, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Response surface methodology, an alternative method to traditional tuning of a fuzzy controller, is described. An example based on a simulated inverted pendulum 'plant' shows that with (only) 15 trial runs, the controller can be calibrated using a quadratic form to approximate the response surface.

  7. Autonomous Experimentation of Carbon Nanotube Using Response Surface Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENS-MS-15-M-113 AUTOMONOUS EXPERIMENTATION OF CARBON NANOTUBE GROWTH USING RESPONSE SURFACE...UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENS-MS-15-M-113 AUTOMONOUS EXPERIMENTATION OF CARBON NANOTUBE GROWTH USING RESPONSE SURFACE METHODS William Adorno III, BS...Laboratory (AFRL) utilizes the Adaptive Rapid Experimentation and Spectroscopy (ARES) system to synthesize carbon nanotubes . The AFRL researchers

  8. Geochemical Assessment of Trace Element Pollution in Surface Sediments from the Georges River, Southern Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    Alyazichi, Yasir M; Jones, Brian G; McLean, Errol; Pease, Joel; Brown, Heidi

    2017-02-01

    Measurement of elevated trace elements is an important component of environmental assessment and management of estuarine marine sediments in systems adjacent to concentrated human activity. The present study surveys the estuarine sediments in selected tributary bays, creeks, and the upper segments of the Georges River system, NSW, Australia, which flows into the Tasman Sea through Botany Bay. A total of 146 surface sediment samples were analysed by X-ray fluorescence. Potential pollution of sediments was evaluated using potential load index, modified degree of contamination, and potential ecological risk index. The spatial distribution of trace elements varies between sites. Variable sources of contamination, including runoff from catchment areas, and emissions from watercraft and boatyards are contributing sources. Bay morphologies and their interactions with catchment and tidal flows play significant roles in the distribution of trace elements. The greatest concentration of trace elements occurs around discharge points and in the inner parts of bays that have high percentages of mud particles and organic matter. The lowest contamination by trace elements was found in sandy sediments along the shoreline and edges of the bays. Trace element distributions decline in concentration in residential-free areas and reach background levels in deeper sediment cores. The concentrations of trace elements were controlled by discharge points from the catchment area, marine boat activities, bay morphology, and sediment types (sand, silt, and clay). The highest pollutant concentrations are the result of past legal, but uncontrolled, discharge of waste from manufacturing into Salt Pan Creek.

  9. An assessment of selected trace elements in intertidal surface sediments collected from the Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli, Syaizwan Zahmir; Mohamat-Yusuff, Ferdaus; Arai, Takaomi; Ismail, Ahmad; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki

    2010-10-01

    Concentrations of 11 trace elements (V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Ag, Cd, Pb, and U) were determined in the intertidal surface sediments of Peninsular Malaysia. The average trace element concentrations are ranked as follows: Zn>V>As>Cr>Pb>Cu>Ni>Co>U>g>Cd. Interim Sediment Quality Guidelines (ISQGs) employed in present study are the Australia and New Zealand joint guideline (ANZECC/ARMCANZ), and the Hong Kong authorities. From the pooled data, none of these trace elements have the average concentration above the ISQG-high values. However, As and Ag average concentrations were over the ISQG-low values. Some elements were found to have the average concentration above the ISQG-high and/or ISQG-low in certain locations, including Kampung Pasir Putih (JPP), Lumut Port (ALP), Kuala Perai (PKP), Port Dickson (NPD), and others. The lowest and highest concentrations in a specific sampling location and maritime area varied among the elements, variations that were greatly affected by natural and anthropogenic activities in a given area. For each trace element, there were various levels of concentration among the sampling locations and maritime areas. These patterns indicated pollutant sources of an element for each area perhaps derived from nearby areas and did not widely distributed to other locations. It is necessary for Malaysia to develop an ISQG for effective quick screening and evaluation of the coastal environment of Peninsular Malaysia.

  10. Moral Responsibility: The Missing Element in Educational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasillopulos, Christopher; Denney, Morgan

    2013-01-01

    We intend to deepen the understanding of leadership in general and educational leadership in particular by an analysis of Chester Barnard's (1938) concept of executive responsibility. By so doing we believe that we will reveal how an educational leader can foster the environment in which competent teachers can optimize their students' learning…

  11. Surface chemistry effects in finite element modeling of heat transfer in (micron)-fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Havstad, M

    2000-12-07

    Equations for modeling surface chemical kinetics by the interaction of gaseous and surface species are presented. The formulation is embedded in a finite element heat transfer code and an ordinary differential equation package is used to solve the surface system of chemical kinetic equations for each iteration within the heat transfer solver. The method is applied to a flow which includes methane and methanol in a microreactor on a chip. A simpler more conventional method, a plug flow reactor model, is then applied to a similar problem. Initial results for steam reforming of methanol are given.

  12. Superficial composition in binary solid solutions A(B): Drastic effect of pure element surface tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, A.; Aufray, B.

    1985-10-01

    This paper deals with a comparative study of surface segragation of Pb and Ni respectively from Ag(Pb)(111) and Ag(Ni)(111) solid solutions. A high level of segregation of the solute is observed for both systems characterized by very low solute solubility. However, the superficial composition strongly depends on the relative surface tensions of the pure elements: the solute atoms are strictly on superficial sites when γ solute is smaller than γ solvent; in contrast uppermost layer consists purely of solvent when γ solute is greater than γ solvent. Two schematic distributions in close proximity to the surface are proposed in the last case.

  13. Response surface method in geotechnical/structural analysis, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, F. S.

    1981-02-01

    In the response surface approach, an approximating function is fit to a long running computer code based on a limited number of code calculations. The approximating function, called the response surface, is then used to replace the code in subsequent repetitive computations required in a statistical analysis. The procedure of the response surface development and feasibility of the method are shown using a sample problem in slop stability which is based on data from centrifuge experiments of model soil slopes and involves five random soil parameters. It is shown that a response surface can be constructed based on as few as four code calculations and that the response surface is computationally extremely efficient compared to the code calculation. Potential applications of this research include probabilistic analysis of dynamic, complex, nonlinear soil/structure systems such as slope stability, liquefaction, and nuclear reactor safety.

  14. Physical and chemical analysis of elemental sulfur formation during galena surface oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Marc A; Plackowski, Chris; Nguyen, Anh V

    2011-04-05

    The surface oxidation of sulfide minerals, such as galena (PbS), in aqueous solutions is of critical importance in a number of applications. A comprehensive understanding of the formation of oxidation species at the galena surface is still lacking. Much controversy over the nature of these oxidation products exists. A number of oxidation pathways have been proposed, and experimental evidence for the formation of elemental sulfur, metal polysulfides, and metal-deficient lead sulfides in acidic conditions has been shown and argued. This paper provides further insight into the electrochemical behavior of galena at pH 4.5. Utilizing a novel experimental system that combines in situ electrochemical control and AC mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface imaging, the formation and growth of nanoscopic domains on the galena surface are detected and examined at anodic potentials. AFM phase images indicate that these domains have different material properties to the underlying galena. Continued oxidation results in nanoscopic pitting and the formation of microscopic surface domains, which are confirmed to be elemental sulfur by Raman spectroscopy. Further clarification of the presence of elemental sulfur is provided by Cryo-XPS. Polysulfide and metal-deficient sulfide could not be detected within this system.

  15. On the surface elemental composition of non-corroded and corroded dental ceramic materials in vitro.

    PubMed

    Milleding, P; Karlsson, S; Nyborg, L

    2003-06-01

    Dental ceramics are traditionally looked upon as inert materials. As many are glass phased, it may be hypothesized that they will be subjected to glass corrosion in aqueous environments. The aim of the study was therefore to analyze the surface elemental composition of glass-phased and all-crystalline ceramics, before and after low- and high-intensity, in vitro corrosion (milli-Q-water at 37+/-2 degrees C for 18 h and 4% acetic acid at 80+/-2 degrees C for 18 h, respectively). The analysis of the surface elemental composition was performed using ESCA. The hypothesis was confirmed. After high-intensity corrosion, the complete wash out of alkali ions, alkaline-earth ions and elemental alumina was found, leaving behind a surface totally dominated by silica. The all-crystalline ceramics, densely sintered alumina and yttria-partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia, displayed only minor surface changes, even after high-intensity corrosion. In comparison to the corrosion testing in acid, the corrosion process in milli-Q-water did not produce different results in principle, except for the lower magnitude of the depletion of alkali ions and the virtually unchanged level of elemental alumina. Unexpectedly, no substantial difference in surface degradation was found between the glass ceramic and the ordinary porcelain-fused-to-metal ceramic or between ceramics of higher sintering temperature and those of low or ultra-low sintering temperature. The composition and microstructure alone did not appear to provide a full explanation for the inter-individual differences in surface corrosion when exposed to comparable environmental conditions.

  16. 33 CFR Appendix D to Part 154 - Training Elements for Oil Spill Response Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Training Elements for Oil Spill... Appendix D to Part 154—Training Elements for Oil Spill Response Plans 1. General 1.1The portion of the plan... contracted oil spill removal organizations and the procedures to notify the activate such organizations....

  17. 33 CFR Appendix C to Part 155 - Training Elements for Oil Spill Response Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Training Elements for Oil Spill.... 155, App. C Appendix C to Part 155—Training Elements for Oil Spill Response Plans 1. General 1.1The... capabilities of the contracted oil spill removal organizations and the procedures to notify and activate...

  18. Zinc rapidly induces a metal response element-binding factor.

    PubMed Central

    Czupryn, M; Brown, W E; Vallee, B L

    1992-01-01

    Metal activation of metallothionein gene transcription is mediated by specific promoter sequences, termed metal regulatory elements (MREs). Nuclear extracts prepared from various human cell lines were assayed for their capacity to bind to a synthetic human MREa (hMREa) oligomer. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays with extracts from control cells detected a single hMREa-containing complex. Addition to the growth medium of zinc, cadmium, or copper--metals known to induce MT biosynthesis in vivo--resulted in the rapid but reversible appearance of a second distinct hMREa-protein complex in all cell lines studied. This result was not seen when the metals were added directly to the extracts from control cells. DNA-binding protein blotting, UV crosslinking, and electroelution experiments were used to characterize the two hMREa-binding factors, termed BF1 and BF2. MRE-BF1 has an apparent molecular mass of approximately 86 kDa and binds to the hMREa in control cells, whereas MRE-BF2 consists of two molecules of approximately 28 kDa and binds to the hMREa in metal-treated cells. EDTA and o-phenanthroline inhibited binding of both factors to hMREa in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that a metal atom or atoms are essential for interaction of the factors with DNA. Images PMID:1332048

  19. Isogeometric finite element approximation of minimal surfaces based on extended loop subdivision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qing; Chen, Chong; Xu, Guoliang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the formulation of isogeometric analysis for minimal surface models on planar bounded domains by extended Loop surface subdivision approach. The exactness of the physical domain of interest is fixed on the coarsest level of the triangular discretization with any topological structure, which is thought of as the initial control mesh of Loop subdivision. By performing extended Loop subdivision, the control mesh can be repeatedly refined, and the geometry is described as an infinite set of quartic box-spline while maintaining its original exactness. The limit function representation of extended Loop subdivision forms our finite element space, which possesses C1 smoothness and the flexibility of mesh topology. We establish its inverse inequalities which resemble the ones of general finite element spaces. We develop the approximation estimate with the aid of H1 convergence property of the corresponding linear models. It enables us to overcome the difficulty of proving the boundedness of the gradient of finite element solutions appearing in the coefficient of minimal surface models. Numerical examples are given with the comparison to the classical linear finite element method which is consistent with our theoretical results.

  20. The cycle of trace elements between surface waters and lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, T.; Amouroux, D.

    2003-04-01

    The accurate cycles of C, N or S between the surface of natural waters and the lower atmosphere is a priority being proposed by the Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Studies (SOLAS). This priority also provides a paradigm for analagous cycling of many volatile trace metals and metalloids (most notably Hg) with important biogeochemical processing and ecological consequences. The process of redox chemistry and alkylation is abundantly evidenced by an array of related trace elements that include As, Hg, I, Po, Sb, Se, and Sn. Atmospheric emission of volatile species of other trace elements such as Bi, Pb, Sb, and Zn can also include significant anthropogenic and natural sources from both high and low temperature emissions. Quantification of volatile metal fluxes is now possible, such as naturally from quiescent (fumurolic) volcanic process, or anthropogenically from landfill and sewage digestion practices. These elements also exhibit significant cycles with the atmosphere by virtue of documented natural alkylation to volatile species by both biotic and abiotic processes. The alkylation processes also provide for the biogeochemistry of these species once introduced to the aqueous environment. As such, these metals are introduced into the biosphere along with related global carbon cycles. Another sea to air transfer mechanism involves the concentration of trace elements in the marine surface micro layer and fractional enrichment in marine aerosols. This results in the exponential array of global enrichment factors in both aerosols and precipitation. Thus a fundamental question for SOLAS biogeochemists are ways to specify the processes this so called “global distillation” of heavier elements through the atmosphere. For example how to distinguish, or trace the importance of the sea to air transfer processes via vapor phase (gas exchange) versus surface micro-layer (aerosol generation) mechanisms should be a prime goal of SOLAS.

  1. Multi-elemental surface mapping and analysis of carbonaceous shale by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao; Liu, Jie; Shi, Qi; He, Yi; Niu, Guanghui; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    Gas shale is one of the important unconventional hydrocarbon source rocks, whose composition, such as mineral components and redox sensitive trace elements, has been proved as important geochemical proxies playing essential roles in indicating the gas potential and gas productivity in recent geological researches. Fast and accurate measurements for the shale composition, especially those with spatial resolution, will reveal rich information for the understanding and evaluation of gas shale reservoirs. In this paper, we demonstrated the potentiality as well as feasibility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy as an effective technique to perform spectrochemical analysis for shale samples. In case of the bulk analysis of pressed shale pellet, spectral analysis of the plasma emission revealed high sensitivity of LIBS for major, minor and even trace elements. More than 356 lines emitted by 19 different elements can be found. Among these species, redox sensitive trace elements such as V, Cr, and Ni were detected with high signal-to-ratios. Two-dimensional surface micro-analysis for the concerned major or minor elements with strong emissions was then applied to the smoothed shale slab. Local thermodynamic equilibrium for the plasma was first verified with a line profile point-by-point on the sample surface, the matrix effect was then assessed as negligible by the extracted electron density and temperature of the plasmas induced at each position on the same profile. Concentration mappings for the major elements of Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, Na and K were finally constructed with their measured relative variations of line emission intensities. The distribution and correlations of these elements in concentration may reflect changes of shale mineral components with respected to the variations of the depositional environments and provide an important clue in identifying sedimentary processes when combined with other geological or geochemical evidences. These results well

  2. Quantifying ecological thresholds from response surfaces

    Treesearch

    Heather E. Lintz; Bruce McCune; Andrew N. Gray; Katherine A. McCulloh

    2011-01-01

    Ecological thresholds are abrupt changes of ecological state. While an ecological threshold is a widely accepted concept, most empirical methods detect them in time or across geographic space. Although useful, these approaches do not quantify the direct drivers of threshold response. Causal understanding of thresholds detected empirically requires their investigation...

  3. Efficient Finite Element Modeling of Elastodynamic Scattering from Near Surface and Surface-Breaking Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    A robust and efficient technique for predicting the complete scattering behavior for an arbitrarily-shaped defect which is located near a free surface in an otherwise homogeneous anisotropic half-space is presented that can be implemented in a commercial FE package. The spatial size of the modeling domain around the defect is as small as possible to minimize computational expense and a minimum number of models are executed. Example results for 2D wave scattering in isotropic material are presented.

  4. An explicit Lagrangian finite element method for free-surface weakly compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonesi, Massimiliano; Meduri, Simone; Perego, Umberto; Frangi, Attilio

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, an explicit finite element approach to the solution of the Lagrangian formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations for weakly compressible fluids or fluid-like materials is investigated. The introduction of a small amount of compressibility is shown to allow for the formulation of a fast and robust explicit solver based on a particle finite element method. Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Bingham laws are considered. A barotropic equation of state completes the model relating pressure and density fields. The approach has been validated through comparison with experimental tests and numerical simulations of free surface fluid problems involving water and water-soil mixtures.

  5. Finite element based contact analysis of radio frequency MEMs switch membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin-Ya; Chalivendra, Vijaya; Huang, Wenzhen

    2017-10-01

    Finite element simulations were performed to determine the contact behavior of radio frequency (RF) micro-electro-mechanical (MEM) switch contact surfaces under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to capture the topography of RF-MEM switch membranes and later they were analyzed for multi-scale regular as well as fractal structures. Frictionless, non-adhesive contact 3D finite element analysis was carried out at different length scales to investigate the contact behavior of the regular-fractal surface using an elasto-plastic material model. Dominant micro-scale regular patterns were found to significantly change the contact behavior. Contact areas mainly cluster around the regular pattern. The contribution from the fractal structure is not significant. Under cyclic loading conditions, plastic deformation in the 1st loading/unloading cycle smooth the surface. The subsequent repetitive loading/unloading cycles undergo elastic contact without changing the morphology of the contacting surfaces. The work is expected to shed light on the quality of the switch surface contact as well as the optimum design of RF MEM switch surfaces.

  6. Insulin Regulation of the Glucagon Gene is Mediated by an Insulin- Responsive DNA Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, Jacques

    1991-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by insulin deficiency and high plasma glucagon levels, which can be normalized by insulin replacement. It has previously been reported that glucagon gene expression is negatively regulated by insulin at the transcriptional level. By transfection studies, I have now localized a DNA control element that mediates insulin effects on glucagon gene transcription. This element also confers insulin responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. DNA-binding proteins that specifically interact with this insulin-responsive element are found in both glucagon- and non-glucagon-producing cells; and the pattern of binding, as assessed by the gel retardation assay, is not modified by prior insulin treatment.

  7. Mechanisms regulating osteoblast response to surface microtopography and vitamin D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Bryan Frederick, Jr.

    A comprehensive understanding of the interactions between orthopaedic and dental implant surfaces with the surrounding host tissue is essential in the design of advanced biomaterials that better promote bone growth and osseointegration of implants. Dental implants with roughened surfaces and high surface energy are well known to promote osteoblast differentiation in vitro and promote increased bone-to-implant contact in vivo. In addition, increased surface roughness increases osteoblasts response to the vitamin D metabolite 1alpha,25(OH)2D3. However, the exact mechanisms mediating cell response to surface properties and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 are still being elucidated. The central aim of the thesis is to investigate whether integrin signaling in response to rough surface microtopography enhances osteoblast differentiation and responsiveness to 1alpha,25(OH)2D3. The hypothesis is that the integrin alpha5beta1 plays a role in osteoblast response to surface microtopography and that 1alpha,25(OH) 2D3 acts through VDR-independent pathways involving caveolae to synergistically enhance osteoblast response to surface roughness and 1alpha,25(OH) 2D3. To test this hypothesis the objectives of the studies performed in this thesis were: (1) to determine if alpha5beta 1 signaling is required for osteoblast response to surface microstructure; (2) to determine if increased responsiveness to 1alpha,25(OH)2D 3 requires the vitamin D receptor, (3) to determine if rough titanium surfaces functionalized with the peptides targeting integrins (RGD) and transmembrane proteoglycans (KRSR) will enhance both osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, and (4) to determine whether caveolae, which are associated with integrin and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 signaling, are required for enhance osteogenic response to surface microstructure and 1alpha,25(OH)2D 3. The results demonstrate that integrins, VDR, and caveolae play important roles in mediating osteoblast response to surface properties and 1alpha,25

  8. Global mapping of the elemental composition of the Moon surface with SELENE GRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Uston, C.; Hasebe, N.

    2007-08-01

    The major objectives of the SELENE mission are to obtain scientific data on lunar origins and evolution, and to develop the technology for future lunar exploration. The scientific data will be also used for exploring the possibility of future utilization of the Moon. The Moon has been observed and explored extensively as the most familiar body. Although the Moon is more thoroughly studied than any other planetary bodies in the solar system, its origin and evolution process are still controversial. The SELENE mission targets are the global characterization of lunar surface and detailed gravimetry. This mission will provide globally the high-quality and high-resolution data on element abundance, mineral assemblage, surface topography, sub-surface structure, magnetic and gravity field, and precession. It aims at better understanding the origin and evolution of the Moon by these observations. Determining the distribution of major and important trace elements in the lunar surface is essential in the lunar science. A lunar chemistry and the relative abundances of refractory and volatile elements provide clues to the conditions which prevailed during the formation of the Moon. Combining planetological studies with elemental study can help improve our understanding of the evolution of the Moon including the Earth. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is well suited for measuring elemental composition in the lunar surface. We present the high resolution Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) for the Japan's lunar explorer SELENE which will cover the whole lunar surface by its polar orbit at a nominal altitude of 100 km. A germanium semiconductor crystal cooled by a Stirling cryocooler to below -180°C, is used as a gamma-ray detector. This GRS has an excellent energy resolution 20 times superior to those used in past lunar missions. Thus, GRS can discriminate the incident gamma-ray energies with high precision and can determine abundances of materials (K, U, Th, O, Mg, Al, Si, Ti, Fe, Ca, H etc

  9. Eye surface temperature detects stress response in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Ikkatai, Yuko; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2015-08-05

    Previous studies have suggested that stressors not only increase body core temperature but also body surface temperature in many animals. However, it remains unclear whether surface temperature could be used as an alternative to directly measure body core temperature, particularly in birds. We investigated whether surface temperature is perceived as a stress response in budgerigars. Budgerigars have been used as popular animal models to investigate various neural mechanisms such as visual perception, vocal learning, and imitation. Developing a new technique to understand the basic physiological mechanism would help neuroscience researchers. First, we found that cloacal temperature correlated with eye surface temperature. Second, eye surface temperature increased after handling stress. Our findings suggest that eye surface temperature is closely related to cloacal temperature and that the stress response can be measured by eye surface temperature in budgerigars.

  10. Failure Behavior Characterization of Mo-Modified Ti Surface by Impact Test and Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong; Qin, Jianfeng; Zhang, Xiangyu; Lin, Naiming; Huang, Xiaobo; Tang, Bin

    2015-07-01

    Using the impact test and finite element simulation, the failure behavior of the Mo-modified layer on pure Ti was investigated. In the impact test, four loads of 100, 300, 500, and 700 N and 104 impacts were adopted. The three-dimensional residual impact dents were examined using an optical microscope (Olympus-DSX500i), indicating that the impact resistance of the Ti surface was improved. Two failure modes cohesive and wearing were elucidated by electron backscatter diffraction and energy-dispersive spectrometer performed in a field-emission scanning electron microscope. Through finite element forward analysis performed at a typical impact load of 300 N, stress-strain distributions in the Mo-modified Ti were quantitatively determined. In addition, the failure behavior of the Mo-modified layer was determined and an ideal failure model was proposed for high-load impact, based on the experimental and finite element forward analysis results.

  11. Location and characterization of two widely separated glucocorticoid response elements in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, D.D.; Magnuson, M.A.; Granner, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    Chimeric genes were constructed by fusion of various regions of the 5'-flanking sequence from the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK) gene to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase-coding sequence and to simian virus 40 splice and polyadenylation sequences. These were used to demonstrate that two glucocorticoid regulatory elements (GREs) combine to confer glucocorticoid responsiveness upon the PEPCK gene in H4IIE hepatoma cells. Both elements, distal one whose 5' boundary is located between -1264 and -1111 base pairs and a proximal one located between -468 and -420 base pairs relative to the transcription initiation site, act independently, in various positions and orientations, and upon the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter. Each element accounts for half of the maximal response of the chimeric genes. Therefore, two widely separated enhancerlike elements contribute equally to the response of the PEPCK gene to glucocorticoid hormones. Neither of the PEPCK GREs contains the TGTTCT consensus sequence associated with most other GREs.

  12. Location and characterization of two widely separated glucocorticoid response elements in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, D D; Magnuson, M A; Granner, D K

    1988-01-01

    Chimeric genes were constructed by fusion of various regions of the 5'-flanking sequence from the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK) gene to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase-coding sequence and to simian virus 40 splice and polyadenylation sequences. These were used to demonstrate that two glucocorticoid regulatory elements (GREs) combine to confer glucocorticoid responsiveness upon the PEPCK gene in H4IIE hepatoma cells. Both elements, a distal one whose 5' boundary is located between -1264 and -1111 base pairs and a proximal one located between -468 and -420 base pairs relative to the transcription initiation site, act independently, in various positions and orientations, and upon the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter. Each element accounts for half of the maximal response of the chimeric genes. Therefore, two widely separated enhancerlike elements contribute equally to the response of the PEPCK gene to glucocorticoid hormones. Neither of the PEPCK GREs contains the TGTTCT consensus sequence associated with most other GREs. Images PMID:3422101

  13. Optical frequency selective surface design using a GPU accelerated finite element boundary integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashbach, Jason A.

    Periodic metallodielectric frequency selective surface (FSS) designs have historically seen widespread use in the microwave and radio frequency spectra. By scaling the dimensions of an FSS unit cell for use in a nano-fabrication process, these concepts have recently been adapted for use in optical applications as well. While early optical designs have been limited to wellunderstood geometries or optimized pixelated screens, nano-fabrication, lithographic and interconnect technology has progressed to a point where it is possible to fabricate metallic screens of arbitrary geometries featuring curvilinear or even three-dimensional characteristics that are only tens of nanometers wide. In order to design an FSS featuring such characteristics, it is important to have a robust numerical solver that features triangular elements in purely two-dimensional geometries and prismatic or tetrahedral elements in three-dimensional geometries. In this dissertation, a periodic finite element method code has been developed which features prismatic elements whose top and bottom boundaries are truncated by numerical integration of the boundary integral as opposed to an approximate representation found in a perfectly matched layer. However, since no exact solution exists for the calculation of triangular elements in a boundary integral, this process can be time consuming. To address this, these calculations were optimized for parallelization such that they may be done on a graphics processor, which provides a large increase in computational speed. Additionally, a simple geometrical representation using a Bezier surface is presented which provides generality with few variables. With a fast numerical solver coupled with a lowvariable geometric representation, a heuristic optimization algorithm has been used to develop several optical designs such as an absorber, a circular polarization filter, a transparent conductive surface and an enhanced, optical modulator.

  14. Functional interaction of hybrid response elements with wild-type and mutant steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Truss, M; Chalepakis, G; Slater, E P; Mader, S; Beato, M

    1991-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors can be divided into two subfamilies according to the structure of their DNA binding domains and the nucleotide sequences which they recognize. The glucocorticoid receptor and the progesterone receptor (PR) recognize an imperfect palindrome (glucocorticoid responsive element/progesterone responsive element [GRE/PRE]) with the conserved half-sequence TGTYCY, whereas the estrogen receptor (ER) recognizes a palindrome (estrogen responsive element) with the half-sequence TGACC. A series of symmetric and asymmetric variants of these hormone responsive elements (HREs) have been tested for receptor binding and for the ability to mediate induction in vivo. High-resolution analysis demonstrates that the overall number and distribution of contacts with the N-7 position of guanines and with the phosphate backbone of various HREs are quite similar for PR and ER. However, PR and glucocorticoid receptor, but not ER, are able to contact the 5'-methyl group of thymines found in position 3 of HREs, as shown by potassium permanganate interference. The ER mutant HE84, which contains a single amino acid exchange, Glu-203 to Gly, in the knuckle of ER, creates a promiscuous ER that is able to bind to GRE/PREs by contacting this thymine. Elements with the sequence GGTCAcagTGTYCT that represent hybrids between an estrogen response element and a GRE/PRE respond to estrogens, glucocorticoids, and progestins in vivo and bind all three wild-type receptors in vitro. These hybrid HREs could serve to confer promiscuous gene regulation. Images PMID:2038329

  15. Instrument for elemental composition studies of solids on planetary surfaces with sub-ppm detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Iakovleva, M.; Neuland, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    Current space instruments prove to be successful for a global chemical mapping of the entire planetary body or to perform a local chemical analysis, helpful in determination of modal mineralogy. Nevertheless, the sensitivity and low spatial resolution of these spectroscopic instruments limit the chemical analysis to the most abundant elements with some exceptions (e.g., measurements of Th, K, and H elements by Gamma and neutron spectrometers). Furthermore, the spectroscopic analysis typically provides the chemical composition of 1 micrometer of the uppermost surface layers, which are frequently affected by space weathering effects, again, with the exception of Gamma/neutron investigation where the composition of up to 1 m thick subsurface can be measured. New and recently accepted space instruments, such as Laser Induced Breakdown (LIBS) and Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometers (LIMS) are thought to improve these chemical analysis providing more localised chemical sampling with higher sensitivity and accuracy. We will demonstrate the performance of a highly miniaturised laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer designed for space research for the elemental analysis of solid materials (Rohner et al., 2003). The instrument enables mass spectrometric analysis with sub-ppm detection limits and a typical mass resolution of ~700, sufficient to detect all elements and their isotopes. The studies of NIST standards, minerals and meteoritic samples will be reviewed to emphasize its capability for quantitative analysis and chemical mapping of the inhomogeneous samples with a high spatial (vertical and lateral) resolution. LIMS measurements provide means for investigation of principal elements (metals, non-metals) and allow an analysis of trace elements distributed within a suite of soils and rocks. Thus, LIMS measurements will allow the identification of the mineralogical context of planetary surface and better understanding of the geologic/geochemical structure

  16. Electric surface current model for the analysis of microstrip antennas with application to rectangular elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlmutter, P.; Shtrikman, S.; Treves, D.

    1985-03-01

    An approach to the analysis of microstrip antennas which is applicable also to relatively thick substrates using the relevant Green's function is presented. The Green's function is derived and closed form expressions for various antenna characteristics which explicity take into account the presence of the dielectric material are obtained in terms of the electric surface current density. For rectangular microstrip elements near resonance the current distribution is approximated using lossless transmission line analysis, thus enabling the complete evaluation of the characteristics of the element near resonance. The results obtained in this approach for the radiation resistance, surface wave resistance, radiation pattern, directivity, and bandwidth are presented in a detailed set of graphs for a representative set of parameters.

  17. On the transfer of protective coating elements on a metal surface from halide gaseous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraimov, N. V.

    2016-06-01

    The processes occurring during the formation of multicomponent diffusion coatings on nickel alloys at the stage of delivery of elements on the article surface when chlorine, bromine, and iodine halides are used as activators are considered. Balance equations and calculated values are given for the partial pressures in the composition of a gas phase of components participating in chemical transport reaction; the possible reactions of delivering elements on the article surfaces and the structures of Ni-Al, Ni-Cr, Ni-Cr-Al, Co-Cr-Al coatings deposited on the ZhS26, ZhS6U, ZhS32, and VZhL12U alloys are presented.

  18. Surface magnetic contribution in zinc ferrite thin films studied by element- and site-specific XMCD hysteresis-loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Zélis, P.; Pasquevich, G. A.; Salcedo Rodríguez, K. L.; Sánchez, F. H.; Rodríguez Torres, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    Element- and site-specific magnetic hysteresis-loops measurements on a zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) thin film were performed by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Results show that iron in octahedral and tetrahedral sites of spinel structure are coupled antiferromagnetically between them, and when magnetic field is applied the magnetic moment of the ion located at octahedral sites aligns along the field direction. The magnetic measurements reveal a distinctive response of the surface with in-plane anisotropy and an effective anisotropy constant value of 12.6 kJ/m3. This effective anisotropy is due to the combining effects of demagnetizing field and, volume and surface magnetic anisotropies KV =3.1 kJ/m3 and KS =16 μJ/m2.

  19. Ion microprobe elemental analyses of impact features on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, Jerry L.; Wortman, Jim J.; Griffis, Dieter P.

    1992-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact features from very small particles (less than 3 microns in diameter) on several of the electro-active dust sensors used in the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) were subjected to elemental analysis using an ion microscope. The same analytical techniques were applied to impact and containment features on a set of ultra-pure, highly polished single crystal germanium wafer witness plates that were mounted on tray B12. Very little unambiguously identifiable impactor debris was found in the central craters or shatter zones of small impacts in this crystalline surface. The surface contamination, ubiquitous on the surface of the Long Duration Exposure Facility, has greatly complicated data collection and interpretation from microparticle impacts on all surfaces.

  20. Ion microprobe elemental analyses of impact features on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, Jerry L.; Wortman, Jim J.; Griffis, Dieter P.

    1992-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact features from very small particles (less than 3 microns in diameter) on several of the electro-active dust sensors used in the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) were subjected to elemental analysis using an ion microscope. The same analytical techniques were applied to impact and containment features on a set of ultra-pure, highly polished single crystal germanium wafer witness plates that were mounted on tray B12. Very little unambiguously identifiable impactor debris was found in the central craters or shatter zones of small impacts in this crystalline surface. The surface contamination, ubiquitous on the surface of the Long Duration Exposure Facility, has greatly complicated data collection and interpretation from microparticle impacts on all surfaces.

  1. Engineering biomaterials surfaces to modulate the host response.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Mei, Yan; Hadjesfandiari, Narges; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2014-12-01

    Undesirable host response is responsible for the surface induced thrombus generation, activation of the complement system and the inflammatory reactions by the blood-contacting biomaterials. The surface interaction of biomaterials with different blood components is thought to be the critical factor that dictates the host response to biomaterials. Surface engineering can be utilized as a method to enhance the biocompatibility and tailor the biological response to biomaterials. This review provides a brief account of various polymer brush based approaches used for biomaterials surface modification, both passive and bioactive, to make the material surfaces biocompatible and antibacterial. Initially we discuss the utilization of polymer brushes with different structure and chemistry as a novel strategy to design the surface non-fouling that passively prevent the subsequent biological responses. Further we explore the utility of different bioactive agents including peptides, carbohydrates and proteins which can be conjugated the polymer brush to make the surface actively interact with the body and modulate the host response. A number of such avenues have also been explored in this review.

  2. Transport and dispersion of pollutants in surface impoundments: a finite element model

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1980-07-01

    A surface impoundment model in finite element (SIMFE) is presented to enable the simulation of flow circulations and pollutant transport and dispersion in natural or artificial lakes, reservoirs or ponds with any number of islands. This surface impoundment model consists of two sub-models: hydrodynamic and pollutant transport models. Both submodels are simulated by the finite element method. While the hydrodynamic model is solved by the standard Galerkin finite element scheme, the pollutant transport model can be solved by any of the twelve optional finite element schemes built in the program. Theoretical approximations and the numerical algorithm of SIMFE are described. Detail instruction of the application are given and listing of FORTRAN IV source program are provided. Two sample problems are given. One is for an idealized system with a known solution to show the accuracy and partial validation of the models. The other is applied to Prairie Island for a set of hypothetical input data, typifying a class of problems to which SIMFE may be applied.

  3. Intelligent dual-responsive cellulose surfaces via surface-initiated ATRP.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Josefina; Nyström, Daniel; Ostmark, Emma; Antoni, Per; Carlmark, Anna; Johansson, Mats; Hult, Anders; Malmström, Eva

    2008-08-01

    Novel thermo-responsive cellulose (filter paper) surfaces of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and pH-responsive cellulose surfaces of 4-vinylpyridine (4VP) have been achieved via surface-initiated ATRP. Dual-responsive (pH and temperature) cellulose surfaces were also obtained through the synthesis of block-copolymer brushes of PNIPAAm and P4VP. With changes in pH and temperature, these "intelligent" surfaces showed a reversible response to both individual triggers, as indicated by the changes in wettability from highly hydrophilic to highly hydrophobic observed by water contact angle measurements. Adjusting the composition of the grafted block-copolymer brushes allowed for further tuning of the wettability of these "intelligent" cellulose surfaces.

  4. Biological responses to immobilized microscale and nanoscale surface topographies.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Shelby A; Kumar, Girish; Narayan, Roger J; Goering, Peter L

    2017-07-16

    Cellular responses are highly influenced by biochemical and biomechanical interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Due to the impact of ECM architecture on cellular responses, significant research has been dedicated towards developing biomaterials that mimic the physiological environment for design of improved medical devices and tissue engineering scaffolds. Surface topographies with microscale and nanoscale features have demonstrated an effect on numerous cellular responses, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, gene expression, protein production, and differentiation; however, relationships between biological responses and surface topographies are difficult to establish due to differences in cell types and biomaterial surface properties. Therefore, it is important to optimize implant surface feature characteristics to elicit desirable biological responses for specific applications. The goal of this work was to review studies investigating the effects of microstructured and nanostructured biomaterials on in vitro biological responses through fabrication of microscale and nanoscale surface topographies, physico-chemical characterization of material surface properties, investigation of protein adsorption dynamics, and evaluation of cellular responses in specific biomedical applications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Surface analysis of all elements with isotopic resolution at high ambient pressures using ion spectroscopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smentkowski, V.S.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Holecek, J.C.; Schultz, J.A.

    1997-09-01

    The authors have developed a mass spectrometer capable of surface analysis using the techniques of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI). For SIMS, an energetic ion beam creates a collision cascade which results in the ejection of low kinetic energy secondary ions from the surface being analyzed. The low kinetic energy SIMS ions are very susceptible to charge neutralization with the surface, and as a result, the SIMS ion yield varies by orders of magnitude depending on the chemical state of the surface. SIM spectra contain elemental ions, and molecular ions. For MSRI, a pulsed ion beam induces a binary collision with the surface being analyzed and the surface species are recoiled into the forward scattering direction with a large kinetic energy. The violence of the binary collision results in complete molecular decomposition, and only elemental ions are detected. The high kinetic energy MSRI ions are much less susceptible to charge neutralization with the surface than the low kinetic energy SIMS ions. In MSRI, the ion yield typically varies by less than a factor of ten as the chemical state of the surface changes--simplifying quantitative analysis vs. SIMS. In this paper, they authors will demonstrate that the high kinetic energy MSRI ions are able to transverse high pressure paths with only a reduction in peak intensity--making MSRI an ideal tool for real-time, in-situ film growth studies. The use of a single analyzer for both MSRI and SIMS is unique and provides complimentary information.

  6. The three-dimensional elemental distribution based on the surface topography by confocal 3D-XRF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longtao; Qin, Min; Wang, Kai; Lin, Xue; Peng, Shiqi; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-09-01

    Confocal three-dimensional micro-X-ray fluorescence (3D-XRF) is a good surface analysis technology widely used to analyse elements and elemental distributions. However, it has rarely been applied to analyse surface topography and 3D elemental mapping in surface morphology. In this study, a surface adaptive algorithm using the progressive approximation method was designed to obtain surface topography. A series of 3D elemental mapping analyses in surface morphology were performed in laboratories to analyse painted pottery fragments from the Majiayao Culture (3300-2900 BC). To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, sample surface topography and 3D elemental mapping were simultaneously obtained. Besides, component and depth analyses were also performed using synchrotron radiation confocal 3D-XRF and tabletop confocal 3D-XRF, respectively. The depth profiles showed that the sample has a layered structure. The 3D elemental mapping showed that the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat contain a large amount of Fe, Mn, and Ca, respectively. From the 3D elemental mapping analyses at different depths, a 3D rendering was obtained, clearly showing the 3D distributions of the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat. Compared with conventional 3D scanning, this method is time-efficient for analysing 3D elemental distributions and hence especially suitable for samples with non-flat surfaces.

  7. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  8. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-14

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective.

  9. Examination of the surface coating removed from K-East Basin fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; Jenson, E.D.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides the results of studies conducted on coatings discovered on the surfaces of some N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) elements stored at the Hanford K-East Basin. These elements had been removed from the canisters and visually examined in-basin during FY 1996 as part of a series of characterization tests. The characterization tests are being performed to support the Integrated Process Strategy developed to package, dry, transport, and store the SNF in an interim storage facility on the Hanford site. Samples of coating materials were removed from K-East canister elements 2350E and 2540E, which had been sent, along with nine other elements, to the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (327 Building) for further characterization following the in-basin examinations. These coating samples were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory using various analytical methods. This report is part of the overall studies to determine the drying behavior of corrosion products associated with the K-Basin fuel elements. Altogether, five samples of coating materials were analyzed. These analyses suggest that hydration of the coating materials could be an additional source of moisture in the Multi-Canister Overpacks being used to contain the fuel for storage.

  10. Establishing geochemical background variation and threshold values for 59 elements in Australian surface soil.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Clemens; de Caritat, Patrice

    2017-02-01

    During the National Geochemical Survey of Australia over 1300 top (0-10cm depth) and bottom (~60-80cm depth) sediment samples (including ~10% field duplicates) were collected from the outlet of 1186 catchments covering 81% of the continent at an average sample density of 1 site/5200km(2). The <2mm fraction of these samples was analysed for 59 elements by ICP-MS following an aqua regia digestion. Results are used here to establish the geochemical background variation of these elements, including potentially toxic elements (PTEs), in Australian surface soil. Different methods of obtaining geochemical threshold values, which differentiate between background and those samples with unusually high element concentrations and requiring attention, are presented and compared to Western Australia's 'ecological investigation levels' (EILs) established for 14 PTEs. For Mn and V these EILs are so low that an unrealistically large proportion (~24%) of the sampled sites would need investigation in Australia. For the 12 remaining elements (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sn and Zn) few sample sites require investigation and as most of these are located far from human activity centres, they potentially suggest either minor local contamination or mineral exploration potential rather than pollution. No major diffuse source of contamination by PTEs affects Australian soil at the continental scale. Of the statistical methods used to establish geochemical threshold values, the most pertinent results come from identifying breaks in cumulative probability distributions, the Tukey inner fence and the 98th percentile. Geochemical threshold values for 59 elements, including emerging 'high-tech' critical elements such as lanthanides, Be, Ga or Ge, for which no EILs currently exist, are presented.

  11. Geochemical baseline distribution of harmful elements in the surface soils of Campania region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Stefano; Lima, Annamaria; Qu, Chengkai; Cicchella, Domenico; Buccianti, Antonella; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2015-04-01

    Environmental geochemical mapping has assumed an increasing relevance and the separation of values to discriminate between anthropogenic pollution and natural (geogenic) sources has become crucial to address environmental problems affecting the quality of life of human beings. In the last decade, a number of geochemical prospecting projects, mostly focused on surface soils (topsoils), were carried out at different scales (from regional to local) across the whole Campania region (Italy) to characterize the distribution of both harmful elements and persistent organic pollutants (POP) in the environment and to generating a valuable database to serve as reference in developing geomedical studies. During the 2014, a database reporting the distribution of 53 chemical elements in 3536 topsoil samples, collected across the whole region, was completed. The geochemical data, after necessary quality controls, were georeferenced and processed in a geochemistry dedicated GIS software named GEODAS. For each considered element a complete set of maps was generated to depict both the discrete and the spatially continuous (interpolated) distribution of elemental concentrations across the region. The interpolated maps were generated using the Multifractal Inverse Distance eighted (MIDW) algorithm. Subsequently, the S-A method, also implemented in GEODAS, was applied to MIDW maps to eliminate spatially limited anomalies from the original grid and to generate the distribution patterns of geochemical baselines for each element. For a selected group of elements geochemical data were also treated by means of a Compositional Data Analysis (CoDA) aiming at investigating the regionalised structure of the data by considering the joint behaviour of several elements constituting for each sample its whole composition. A regional environmental risk assessment was run on the basis of the regional distribution of heavy metals in soil, land use types and population. The risk assessment produced a

  12. Affective Responses to the Literary and Cinematic Elements in an Educational Film: A Descriptive Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Rhonda S.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference in cognitive and affective responses of eighth grade students to a short, educational film and to a videotape presentation of that film. The cognitive response involved students' understanding of such story elements of the film as plot, setting, character, mood, and theme. The affective…

  13. Some inconsistencies of the finite element method as applied to inelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.; Killian, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    The inadequacy of a two noded beam-column element with a linear axial and a cubic transverse displacement field for inelastic analysis is demonstrated. For complete equilibrium satisfaction in the linear elastic range a three noded beam-column element is shown to be consistent. Next, the sensitivity of the inelastic response to numerical solutions of the inelastic response of a cantilever beam resulting from approximate integration of strain energy are brought out and finally, consequences of this on the nonlinear transient response of structures are considered.

  14. Responses of trace elements to aerobic maximal exercise in elite sportsmen.

    PubMed

    Otag, Aynur; Hazar, Muhsin; Otag, Ilhan; Gürkan, Alper Cenk; Okan, Ilyas

    2014-02-21

    Trace elements are chemical elements needed in minute quantities for the proper growth, development, and physiology of the organism. In biochemistry, a trace element is also referred to as a micronutrient. Trace elements, such as nickel, cadmium, aluminum, silver, chromium, molybdenum, germanium, tin, titanium, tungsten, scandium, are found naturally in the environment and human exposure derives from a variety of sources, including air, drinking water and food. The Purpose of this study was investigated the effect of aerobic maximal intensity endurance exercise on serum trace elements as well-trained individuals of 28 wrestlers (age (year) 19.64±1.13, weight (Kg) 70.07 ± 15.69, height (cm) 176.97 ± 6.69) during and after a 2000 meter Ergometer test protocol was used to perform aerobic (75 %) maximal endurance exercise. Trace element serum levels were analyzed from blood samples taken before, immediately after and one hour after the exercise. While an increase was detected in Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni), Molybdenum (Mo) and Titanium (Ti) serum levels immediately after the exercise, a decrease was detected in Aluminum (Al), Scandium (Sc) and Tungsten (W) serum levels. Except for aluminum, the trace elements we worked on showed statistically meaningful responses (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001). According to the responses of trace elements to the exercise showed us the selection and application of the convenient sport is important not only in terms of sportsman performance but also in terms of future healthy life plans and clinically.

  15. Laer-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Instrument for Element Analysis of Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacic, J.; Pettit, D.; Cremers, D.; Roessler, N.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most fundamental pieces of information about any planetary body is the elemental and mineralogical composition of its surface materials. We are developing an instrument to obtain such data at ranges of up to several hundreds of meters using the technique of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). We envision our instrument being used from a spacecraft in close rendezvous with small bodies such as comets and asteroids, or deployed on surface-rover vehicles on large bodies such as Mars and the Moon. The elemental analysis is based on atomic emission spectroscopy of a laser-induced plasma or spark. A pulsed, diode pumped Nd:YAG laser of several hundred millijoules optical energy is used to vaporize and electronically excite the constituent elements of a rock surface remotely located from the laser. Light emitted from the excited plasma is collected and introduced to the entrance slit of a small grating spectrometer. The spectrally dispersed spark light is detected with either a linear photo diode array or area CCD array. When the latter detector is used, the optical and spectrometer components of the LIBS instrument can also be used in a passive imaging mode to collect and integrate reflected sunlight from the same rock surface. Absorption spectral analysis of this reflected light gives mineralogical information that provides a remote geochemical characterization of the rock surface. We performed laboratory calibrations in air and in vacuum on standard rock powders to quantify the LIBS analysis. We performed preliminary field tests using commercially available components to demonstrate remote LIBS analysis of terrestrial rock surfaces at ranges of over 25 m, and we have demonstrated compatibility with a six-wheeled Russian robotic rover vehicle. Based on these results, we believe that all major and most minor elements expected on planetary surfaces can be measured with absolute accuracy of 10-15 percent and much higher relative accuracy. We have

  16. Mechanisms Involved in Osteoblast Response to Implant Surface Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyan, Barbara D.; Lohmann, Christoph H.; Dean, David D.; Sylvia, Victor L.; Cochran, David L.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2001-08-01

    Osteoblasts respond to surface topography with altered morphology, proliferation, and differentiation. The effects observed vary with cell culture model and the topographical features of the surface. In general, increased surface roughness is associated with decreased proliferation and increased differentiation. Cell responses to hormones, growth factors, and cytokines are altered as well, as is autocrine production of these factors. The cells interact with the surface via integrin receptors, and their expression is also surface roughness-dependent. Integrin binding to cell attachment proteins activates signal transduction cascades, including those mediated by protein kinase C and phospholipase A2. These signaling pathways are also used by regulatory factors, which results in synergistic responses. Prostaglandins are important mediators of the surface effects, and both constitutive and inducible cyclooxygenase are involved.

  17. Tunnel flexibility effect on the ground surface acceleration response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baziar, Mohammad Hassan; Moghadam, Masoud Rabeti; Choo, Yun Wook; Kim, Dong-Soo

    2016-09-01

    Flexibility of underground structures relative to the surrounding medium, referred to as the flexibility ratio, is an important factor that influences their dynamic interaction. This study investigates the flexibility effect of a box-shaped subway tunnel, resting directly on bedrock, on the ground surface acceleration response using a numerical model verified against dynamic centrifuge test results. A comparison of the ground surface acceleration response for tunnel models with different flexibility ratios revealed that the tunnels with different flexibility ratios influence the acceleration response at the ground surface in different ways. Tunnels with lower flexibility ratios have higher acceleration responses at short periods, whereas tunnels with higher flexibility ratios have higher acceleration responses at longer periods. The effect of the flexibility ratio on ground surface acceleration is more prominent in the high range of frequencies. Furthermore, as the flexibility ratio of the tunnel system increases, the acceleration response moves away from the free field response and shifts towards the longer periods. Therefore, the flexibility ratio of the underground tunnels influences the peak ground acceleration (PGA) at the ground surface, and may need to be considered in the seismic zonation of urban areas.

  18. Finite-element analysis of earing using non-quadratic yield surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.

    1995-06-18

    During deep draw cupping, the phenomenon known as earing may occur as the cup wall is formed, resulting in a periodic variation of cup wall height around the perimeter of the finished cup. This is generally due to planar anisotropy of flow in rolled sheet product. It is generally observed that the anisotropy parameter R will vary in the plane of the sheet when ears are observed in cupping, with a parameter {Delta}R describing the variation of R in the plane of the sheet. For many common textures in face-centered and body-centered materials, the ears form relative to the sheet rolling direction at 0{degrees} and 90{degrees} around the perimeter if {Delta}R>0, and at -45{degrees} and +45{degrees} if {Delta}R<0. There is extensive experimental evidence that ear height shows a linear correlation with {Delta}R/R, but attempts to duplicate this using the finite-element method are highly dependent on both the methodology and yield surface used. It was shown previously that using a coarse mesh and the quadratic Hill yield surface tends to greatly under predict earing. In this study, we have used two different finite-element codes developed at LLNL to examine the predicted earing using both quadratic Hill and alternative non-quadratic yield surfaces. These results are compared to experimental data and conclusions drawn about the most desirable closed-form yield surfaces to duplicate the observed earing phenomena.

  19. Pliable DNA Conformation of Response Elements Bound to Transcription Factor p63

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chen; Gorlatova, Natalia; Herzberg, Osnat

    2012-05-02

    We show that changes in the nucleotide sequence alter the DNA conformation in the crystal structures of p63 DNA-binding domain (p63DBD) bound to its response element. The conformation of a 22-bp canonical response element containing an AT spacer between the two half-sites is unaltered compared with that containing a TA spacer, exhibiting superhelical trajectory. In contrast, a GC spacers abolishes the DNA superhelical trajectory and exhibits less bent DNA, suggesting that increased GC content accompanies increased double helix rigidity. A 19-bp DNA, representing an AT-rich response element with overlapping half-sites, maintains superhelical trajectory and reveals two interacting p63DBD dimers crossing one another at 120{sup o}. p63DBD binding assays to response elements of increasing length complement the structural studies. We propose that DNA deformation may affect promoter activity, that the ability of p63DBD to bind to superhelical DNA suggests that it is capable of binding to nucleosomes, and that overlapping response elements may provide a mechanism to distinguish between p63 and p53 promoters.

  20. A parametric finite element method for solid-state dewetting problems with anisotropic surface energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Weizhu; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Quan

    2017-02-01

    We propose an efficient and accurate parametric finite element method (PFEM) for solving sharp-interface continuum models for solid-state dewetting of thin films with anisotropic surface energies. The governing equations of the sharp-interface models belong to a new type of high-order (4th- or 6th-order) geometric evolution partial differential equations about open curve/surface interface tracking problems which include anisotropic surface diffusion flow and contact line migration. Compared to the traditional methods (e.g., marker-particle methods), the proposed PFEM not only has very good accuracy, but also poses very mild restrictions on the numerical stability, and thus it has significant advantages for solving this type of open curve evolution problems with applications in the simulation of solid-state dewetting. Extensive numerical results are reported to demonstrate the accuracy and high efficiency of the proposed PFEM.

  1. Escape of carbon element in surface ablation of cobalt cemented tungsten carbide with pulsed UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiejun; Lou, Qihong; Dong, Jingxing; Wei, Yunrong; Liu, Jingru

    2001-03-01

    Surface ablation of cobalt cemented tungsten carbide hardmetal has been carried out in this work using a 308 nm, 30 ns XeCl excimer laser. The surface phase transformation on different pulse number of laser shots has been investigated by means of XRD and microphotography as well as AES at laser fluence of 2.5 J/cm 2. The experimental results showed that the phase structure of irradiated area has partly transformed from original WC to β-WC 1- x, then to α-W 2C and CW 3, and finally to W crystal. It is suggested that the formation of non-stoichiometric tungsten carbide should result from the escaping of carbon element due to accumulated heating of surface by pulsed laser irradiation.

  2. A comparative analysis of finite element and finite difference methods for free surface transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.C.; Vafai, K. . Dept of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    The present work consists of the comparative evaluation of the finite element method (FEM) and the finite difference method (FDM) for the analysis of free surface transport within a hollow ampule. The phenomenon of motion reversal of the free surfaces obtained earlier by the FDM is also analyzed by the FEM. It is found that the times at which the motion reversal occurs are independent of the applied pressure difference for any fixed dimension of the hollow ampule. Furthermore, it appears that the displacement of the inner and outer free surfaces varies linearly with the magnitude of the applied pressure difference. Finally, detailed comparative discussion is presented on the differences between the results obtained by FDM and FEM.

  3. Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Ryan D.; Nixon, H. P.; Darragh, Craig V.; Howe, Jane Y; Coffey, Dorothy W

    2007-01-01

    Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

  4. The major-element composition of Mercury's surface from MESSENGER X-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nittler, Larry R; Starr, Richard D; Weider, Shoshana Z; McCoy, Timothy J; Boynton, William V; Ebel, Denton S; Ernst, Carolyn M; Evans, Larry G; Goldsten, John O; Hamara, David K; Lawrence, David J; McNutt, Ralph L; Schlemm, Charles E; Solomon, Sean C; Sprague, Ann L

    2011-09-30

    X-ray fluorescence spectra obtained by the MESSENGER spacecraft orbiting Mercury indicate that the planet's surface differs in composition from those of other terrestrial planets. Relatively high Mg/Si and low Al/Si and Ca/Si ratios rule out a lunarlike feldspar-rich crust. The sulfur abundance is at least 10 times higher than that of the silicate portion of Earth or the Moon, and this observation, together with a low surface Fe abundance, supports the view that Mercury formed from highly reduced precursor materials, perhaps akin to enstatite chondrite meteorites or anhydrous cometary dust particles. Low Fe and Ti abundances do not support the proposal that opaque oxides of these elements contribute substantially to Mercury's low and variable surface reflectance.

  5. Plant-soil distribution of potentially toxic elements in response to elevated atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Duval, Benjamin D; Dijkstra, Paul; Natali, Susan M; Megonigal, J Patrick; Ketterer, Michael E; Drake, Bert G; Lerdau, Manuel T; Gordon, Gwyneth; Anbar, Ariel D; Hungate, Bruce A

    2011-04-01

    The distribution of contaminant elements within ecosystems is an environmental concern because of these elements' potential toxicity to animals and plants and their ability to hinder microbial ecosystem services. As with nutrients, contaminants are cycled within and through ecosystems. Elevated atmospheric CO2 generally increases plant productivity and alters nutrient element cycling, but whether CO2 causes similar effects on the cycling of contaminant elements is unknown. Here we show that 11 years of experimental CO2 enrichment in a sandy soil with low organic matter content causes plants to accumulate contaminants in plant biomass, with declines in the extractable contaminant element pools in surface soils. These results indicate that CO2 alters the distribution of contaminant elements in ecosystems, with plant element accumulation and declining soil availability both likely explained by the CO2 stimulation of plant biomass. Our results highlight the interdependence of element cycles and the importance of taking a broad view of the periodic table when the effects of global environmental change on ecosystem biogeochemistry are considered.

  6. Implementation of structural response sensitivity calculations in a large-scale finite-element analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.; Rogers, J. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The implementation includes a generalized method for specifying element cross-sectional dimensions as design variables that can be used in analytically calculating derivatives of output quantities from static stress, vibration, and buckling analyses for both membrane and bending elements. Limited sample results for static displacements and stresses are presented to indicate the advantages of analytically calclating response derivatives compared to finite difference methods. Continuing developments to implement these procedures into an enhanced version of the system are also discussed.

  7. Elemental composition of the lunar surface: Analysis of gamma ray spectroscopy data from Lunar Prospector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, T. H.; Hagerty, J. J.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; McKinney, G. W.; Vaniman, D. T.

    2006-12-01

    Gamma ray spectroscopy data acquired by Lunar Prospector are used to determine global maps of the elemental composition of the lunar surface. Maps of the abundance of major oxides, MgO, Al2O3, SiO2, CaO, TiO2, and FeO, and trace incompatible elements, K and Th, are presented along with their geochemical interpretation. Linear spectral mixing is used to model the observed gamma ray spectrum for each map pixel. The spectral shape for each elemental constituent is determined by a Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation. Linearization of the mixing model is accomplished by scaling the spectral shapes with lunar surface parameters determined by neutron spectroscopy, including the number density of neutrons slowing down within the surface and the effective atomic mass of the surface materials. The association of the highlands with the feldspathic lunar meteorites is used to calibrate the mixing model and to determine backgrounds. A linear least squares approach is used to unmix measured spectra to determine the composition of each map pixel. The present analysis uses new gamma ray production cross sections for neutron interactions, resulting in improved accuracy compared to results previously submitted to the Planetary Data System. Systematic variations in lunar composition determined by the spectral unmixing analysis are compared with the lunar soil sample and meteorite collections. Significant results include improved accuracy for the abundance of Th and K in the highlands; identification of large regions, including western Procellarum, that are not well represented by the sample collection; and the association of relatively high concentrations of Mg with KREEP-rich regions on the lunar nearside, which may have implications for the concept of an early magma ocean.

  8. Effect of surface morphology on drag and roughness sublayer in flows over regular roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Marco; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2014-11-01

    The effects of systematically varied roughness morphology on bulk drag and on the spatial structure of turbulent boundary layers are examined by performing a series of wind tunnel experiments. In this study, rough surfaces consisting of regularly and uniformly distributed LEGO™ bricks are employed. Twelve different patterns are adopted in order to methodically examine the individual effects of frontal solidity (λF, frontal area of the roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area) and plan solidity (λP, plan area of roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area), on both the bulk drag and the turbulence structure. A floating element friction balance based on Krogstad & Efros (2010) was designed and manufactured to measure the drag generated by the different surfaces. In parallel, high resolution planar and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was applied to investigate the flow features. This talk will focus on the effects of each solidity parameter on the bulk drag and attempt to relate the observed trends to the flow structures in the roughness sublayer. Currently at City University London.

  9. The Effects of Surface Roughness on the NEAR XRS Elemental Results: Monte-Carlo Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Lucy F.; Nittler, Larry R.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the NEAR-Shoemaker X-ray Gamma-Ray Spec1roscopy ("XGRS") investigation was to determine the elemental composition of the near-Earth asteroid 433 Eros. The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) system measured the characteristic fluorescence of six major elements (Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Fe) in the 1-10 keV energy range excited by the interaction of solar X-rays with the upper 100 microns of the surface of 433 Eros. Various investigators, using both laboratory experiments and computer simulations have established that X-ray fluorescent line ratios can be influenced by small-scale surface roughness at high incidence or emission angles. The effect on the line ratio is specific to the geometry, excitation spectrum, and composition involved, In general, however, the effect is only substantial for ratios of lines with a significant energy difference between them: Fe/Si and Ca/Si are much more likely to be affected than AI/Si or Mg/Si. We apply a Monte-Carlo code to the specific geometry and spectrum of a major NEAR XRS solar flare observation, using an H chondrite composition as the substrate. The seventeen most abundant elements were included in the composition model, from oxygen to titanium.

  10. Ion microprobe elemental analyses of impact features on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Wortman, Jim J.; Griffis, Dieter P.; Simon, Charles G.

    1991-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact features on several of the electro-active dust sensors utilized in the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) were subjected to elemental analysis using an ion microprobe. The negatively biased dust sensor surfaces acted as ion traps for cations produced in the plasma plumes of impacting particles. Impactor residue surrounds most impact features to two or three feature diameters. After etching away a layer of carbonaceous/silicaceous surface contamination, low mass resolution elemental survey scans are used to tentatively identify the presence of impactor debris. High mass resolution two-dimensional elemental maps and three dimensional depth profiling of the feature and surrounding area show the distribution and relative composition of the debris. The location of these sensors on the six primary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) sides provides a unique opportunity to further define the debris environment. Researchers applied the same techniques to impact and contaminant features on a set of ultra-pure, highly polished single crystal germanium wafer witness plates that were mounted on row 12 and exposed to the environment during the entire mission.

  11. Ion microprobe elemental analyses of impact features on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Wortman, Jim J.; Griffis, Dieter P.; Simon, Charles G.

    1991-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact features on several of the electro-active dust sensors utilized in the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) were subjected to elemental analysis using an ion microprobe. The negatively biased dust sensor surfaces acted as ion traps for cations produced in the plasma plumes of impacting particles. Impactor residue surrounds most impact features to two or three feature diameters. After etching away a layer of carbonaceous/silicaceous surface contamination, low mass resolution elemental survey scans are used to tentatively identify the presence of impactor debris. High mass resolution two-dimensional elemental maps and three dimensional depth profiling of the feature and surrounding area show the distribution and relative composition of the debris. The location of these sensors on the six primary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) sides provides a unique opportunity to further define the debris environment. Researchers applied the same techniques to impact and contaminant features on a set of ultra-pure, highly polished single crystal germanium wafer witness plates that were mounted on row 12 and exposed to the environment during the entire mission.

  12. Elemental composition of surface waters in the Antarctic Peninsula and interactions with the environment.

    PubMed

    Préndez, Margarita; Carrasco, M Adriana

    2003-09-01

    The fast changes in chemical and biological properties of many coastal and inland waters in the last decades reflect the pressure of man on the environment. The surface waters of the Antarctic Peninsula, located far from industrial or populated areas, could eventually be used as background lines. Surface water samples were taken from five lagoons of King George Island, Antarctic Peninsula, and from the Kitiesh Lake. Sample pH and electrical conductivity were analysed in situ and in the laboratory, respectively. The dissolved fractions were analysed in 1997 and 1998. Total concentrations only for 1998 were determined in another fraction adjusted to pH 2. Aluminium, Ca, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, Bi, and Pb were quantified in all samples by means of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Total and dissolved elemental concentrations were discussed considering the composition of particulate material suspended in the waters removed by streams or by water runoff, or from atmospheric aerosols. Concentrations of dissolved elements change from one lagoon to another. Total and dissolved elemental concentrations could be related to water movement by windstorms, to chemical mechanisms in water and/or to natural and anthropogenic atmospheric factors.

  13. Implementation of an ANCF beam finite element for dynamic response optimization of elastic manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohar, B.; Kegl, M.; Ren, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Theoretical and practical aspects of an absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) beam finite element implementation are considered in the context of dynamic transient response optimization of elastic manipulators. The proposed implementation is based on the introduction of new nodal degrees of freedom, which is achieved by an adequate nonlinear mapping between the original and new degrees of freedom. This approach preserves the mechanical properties of the ANCF beam, but converts it into a conventional finite element so that its nodal degrees of freedom are initially always equal to zero and never depend explicitly on the design variables. Consequently, the sensitivity analysis formulas can be derived in the usual manner, except that the introduced nonlinear mapping has to be taken into account. Moreover, the adjusted element can also be incorporated into general finite element analysis and optimization software in the conventional way. The introduced design variables are related to the cross-section of the beam, to the shape of the (possibly) skeletal structure of the manipulator and to the drive functions. The layered cross-section approach and the design element technique are utilized to parameterize the shape of individual elements and the whole structure. A family of implicit time integration methods is adopted for the response and sensitivity analysis. Based on this assumption, the corresponding sensitivity formulas are derived. Two numerical examples illustrate the performance of the proposed element implementation.

  14. Element variability in lacustrine systems of Terra Nova Bay (Antarctica) and concentration evolution in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Zelano, Isabella; Malandrino, Mery; Giacomino, Agnese; Buoso, Sandro; Conca, Eleonora; Sivry, Yann; Benedetti, Marc; Abollino, Ornella

    2017-04-04

    Major, minor and trace elements were determined in freshwater of lacustrine systems in Terra Nova Bay, along Victoria Land coast, Antarctica, as well as in algae and mosses. The samples were collected during some of the sampling campaigns between 2007 and 2011 (and the one of 2002) within the framework of the Italian National Program of Research in Antarctica (PNRA). Data were processed with chemometric techniques. Results showed that elements typically considered as potential anthropogenic pollutants (e.g. As, Pb, Zn, Cu and Ni) present a strong correlation with the lithogenic elements (e.g. Al, Si, Fe) in all matrices, suggesting that their origin is connected to natural phenomena. Metal concentrations in vegetation samples are in the same range as previously published data. The obtained results were compared with older literature data (since the early '90s) from the same lacustrine systems, in order to present a historical overview of element concentrations. This approach furnishes important information on surface water evolution as a function of time. A considerable variability was observed in metal concentrations but no clear trend was identified. This suggests that their concentration evolution is hardly correlated to specific natural or anthropic phenomena. No evidence of an increase of concentrations over time was apparent. Our results represent new important data about metal concentrations in lacustrine systems in Antarctica, furnishing ranges of values that can be considered as a reference. These data, therefore, could be used to detect or monitor future local and/or global anthropogenic contaminations.

  15. SURFACE CHEMISTRY INFLUENCE IMPLANT MEDIATED HOST TISSUE RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Shwetha; Bhattacharyya, Dhiman; Padukudru, Chandana; Timmons, Richard B.; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Implant-mediated fibrotic reactions are detrimental to the performance of encapsulated cells, implanted drug release devices and sensors. To improve the implant function and longevity, research has emphasized altering cellular responses. Although material surface functional groups have been shown to be potent in affecting cellular activity in vitro and short term in vivo responses, these groups appear to have little influence on long-term in vivo fibrotic reactions, possibly as a result of insufficient interactions between recruited host cells and functional groups on the implants. To maximize the influence of functionality on cells, and to mimic drug release microspheres, functionalized micron-sized particles were created and tested for their ability in modulating tissue responses to biomaterial implants. In this work, the surfaces of polypropylene particles were controllably coated with four different functional groups, specifically –OH, -NH2, -CFx and –COOH, using a radio frequency glow discharge plasma polymerization technique. The effect of these surface functionalities on host tissue responses were then evaluated using a mice subcutaneous implantation model. Major differences were observed in contrasting tissue response to the different chemistries. Surfaces with –OH and –NH2 surface groups induced the thickest fibrous capsule accompanied with the greatest cellular infiltration into the implants. In contrast, surfaces with –CFx and –COOH exhibited the least inflammatory/fibrotic responses and cellular infiltrations. The present results clearly demonstrate that, by increasing the available functionalized surface area and spatial distribution, the effect of surface chemistry on tissue reactivity can be substantially enhanced. PMID:18022841

  16. Computational analysis of auxin responsive elements in the Arabidopsis thaliana L. genome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Auxin responsive elements (AuxRE) were found in upstream regions of target genes for ARFs (Auxin response factors). While Chip-seq data for most of ARFs are still unavailable, prediction of potential AuxRE is restricted by consensus models that detect too many false positive sites. Using sequence analysis of experimentally proven AuxREs, we revealed both an extended nucleotide context pattern for AuxRE itself and three distinct types of its coupling motifs (Y-patch, AuxRE-like, and ABRE-like), which together with AuxRE may form the composite elements. Computational analysis of the genome-wide distribution of the predicted AuxREs and their impact on auxin responsive gene expression allowed us to conclude that: (1) AuxREs are enriched around the transcription start site with the maximum density in 5'UTR; (2) AuxREs mediate auxin responsive up-regulation, not down-regulation. (3) Directly oriented single AuxREs and reverse multiple AuxREs are mostly associated with auxin responsiveness. In the composite AuxRE elements associated with auxin response, ABRE-like and Y-patch are 5'-flanking or overlapping AuxRE, whereas AuxRE-like motif is 3'-flanking. The specificity in location and orientation of the coupling elements suggests them as potential binding sites for ARFs partners. PMID:25563792

  17. Adsorption of inert gases including element 118 on noble metal and inert surfaces from ab initio Dirac-Coulomb atomic calculations.

    PubMed

    Pershina, V; Borschevsky, A; Eliav, E; Kaldor, U

    2008-10-14

    The interaction of the inert gases Rn and element 118 with various surfaces has been studied on the basis of fully relativistic ab initio Dirac-Coulomb CCSD(T) calculations of atomic properties. The calculated polarizability of element 118, 46.3 a.u., is the largest in group 18, the ionization potential is the lowest at 8.91 eV, and the estimated atomic radius is the largest, 4.55 a.u. These extreme values reflect, in addition to the general trends in the Periodic Table, the relativistic expansion and destabilization of the outer valence 7p(3/2) orbital. Van der Waals coefficients C(3) and adsorption enthalpies DeltaH(ads) of Ne through element 118 on noble metals and inert surfaces, such as quartz, ice, Teflon, and graphite, were calculated in a physisorption model using the atomic properties obtained. The C(3) coefficients were shown to steadily increase in group 18, while the increase in DeltaH(ads) from Ne to Rn does not continue to element 118: The large atomic radius of the latter element is responsible for a decrease in the interaction energy. We therefore predict that experimental distinction between Rn and 118 by adsorption on these types of surfaces will not be feasible. A possible candidate for separating the two elements is charcoal; further study is needed to test this possibility.

  18. [Response of a finite element model of the pelvis to different side impact loads].

    PubMed

    Ruan, Shijie; Zheng, Huijing; Li, Haiyan; Zhao, Wei

    2013-08-01

    The pelvis is one of the most likely affected areas of the human body in case of side impact, especially while people suffer from motor vehicle crashes. With the investigation of pelvis injury on side impact, the injury biomechanical behavior of pelvis can be found, and the data can help design the vehicle security devices to keep the safety of the occupants. In this study, a finite element (FE) model of an isolated human pelvis was used to study the pelvic dynamic response under different side impact conditions. Fracture threshold was established by applying lateral loads of 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000 and 5000 N, respectively, to the articular surface of the right acetabulum. It was observed that the smaller the lateral loads were, the smaller the von Mises stress and the displacement in the direction of impact were. It was also found that the failure threshold load was near 3000 N, based on the fact that the peak stress would not exceed the average compressive strength of the cortical bone. It could well be concluded that with better design of car-door and hip-pad so that the side impact force was brought down to 3000 N or lower, the pelvis would not be injured.

  19. Identification of a novel cis-acting element conferring sulfur deficiency response in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Maruyama-Nakashita, Akiko; Nakamura, Yumiko; Watanabe-Takahashi, Akiko; Inoue, Eri; Yamaya, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Hideki

    2005-05-01

    SULTR1;1 high-affinity sulfate transporter is highly regulated in the epidermis and cortex of Arabidopsis roots responding to sulfur deficiency (-S). We identified a novel cis-acting element involved in the -S-inducible expression of sulfur-responsive genes in Arabidopsis. The promoter region of SULTR1;1 was dissected for deletion and gain-of-function analysis using luciferase (LUC) reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis. The 16-bp sulfur-responsive element (SURE) from -2777 to -2762 of SULTR1;1 promoter was sufficient and necessary for the -S-responsive expression, which was reversed when supplied with cysteine and glutathione (GSH). The SURE sequence contained an auxin response factor (ARF) binding sequence (GAGACA). However, SURE was not responsive to naphthalene acetic acid, indicating its specific function in the sulfur response. The base substitution analysis indicated the significance of a 5-bp sequence (GAGAC) within the conserved ARF binding site as a core element for the -S response. Microarray analysis of early -S response in Arabidopsis roots indicated the presence of SURE core sequences in the promoter regions of -S-inducible genes on a full genome GeneChip array. It is suggested that SURE core sequences may commonly regulate the expression of a gene set required for adaptation to the -S environment.

  20. Determination of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, and iron group elements in lunar surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlenko, L. I.; Simonova, L. V.; Karyakin, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    Distribution regularities of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, and iron group elements were investigated in basaltoid rocks of lunar and terrestrial origin. Samples of various regolith zones taken in the area of the Sea of Fertility were analyzed, along with samples of basic and ultrabasic rocks of the East African Rift for their content of the trace admixtures listed. Data obtained on the abundance of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, cobalt, nickel, chromium, and vanadium in Luna 16 lunar surface material were compared with the abundance of these elements in samples of lunar rocks returned by Apollo 11, Apollo 12, and Apollo 14, with the exception of scandium; its content in the latter samples was considerably higher.

  1. Efficient directional excitation of surface plasmons by a single-element nanoantenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wenjie; Liu, Shang; Liao, Huimin; Li, Zhi; Sun, Chengwei; Chen, Jianjun; Gong, Qihuang

    Directional light scattering is important in basic research and real applications. This area has been successfully downscaled to wavelength and subwavelength scales with the development of optical antennas, especially single-element nanoantennas. Here we show, by adding an auxiliary resonant structure to a single-element plasmonic nanoantenna, the highly efficient lowest-order antenna mode can be effectively transferred into inactive higher-order modes. Based on this mode conversion, scattered optical fields can be well manipulated by utilizing the interference between different antenna modes. Both broadband directional excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and inversion of SPP launching direction at different wavelengths are experimentally demonstrated as typical examples. The proposed strategy based on mode conversion and mode interference provides new opportunities for the design of nanoscale optical devices, especially directional nanoantennas.

  2. Determination of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, and iron group elements in lunar surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlenko, L. I.; Simonova, L. V.; Karyakin, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    Distribution regularities of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, and iron group elements were investigated in basaltoid rocks of lunar and terrestrial origin. Samples of various regolith zones taken in the area of the Sea of Fertility were analyzed, along with samples of basic and ultrabasic rocks of the East African Rift for their content of the trace admixtures listed. Data obtained on the abundance of copper, scandium, molybdenum, tin, lead, cobalt, nickel, chromium, and vanadium in Luna 16 lunar surface material were compared with the abundance of these elements in samples of lunar rocks returned by Apollo 11, Apollo 12, and Apollo 14, with the exception of scandium; its content in the latter samples was considerably higher.

  3. Non-contact high precision measurement of surface form tolerances and central thickness for optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Ying

    2010-10-01

    The traditional contact measuring methods could not satisfy the current optical elements measuring requirements. Noncontact high precision measuring theory, principle and instrument of the surface form tolerances and central thickness for optical elements were studied in the paper. In comparison with other types of interferometers, such as Twyman-Green and Mach-Zehnder, a Fizeau interferometer has the advantages of having fewer optical components, greater accuracy, and is easier to use. Some relations among the 3/A(B/C), POWER/PV and N/ΔN were studied. The PV with POWER removed can be the reference number of ΔN. The chromatic longitudinal aberration of a special optical probe can be used for non-contanct central thickness measurement.

  4. Surface-active element effects on the shape of GTA, laser, and electron-beam welds

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Roper, J.R.; Stagner, R.T.; Aden, R.J.

    1983-03-01

    Laser and electron-beam welds were passed across selenium-doped zones in 21-6-9 stainless steel. The depth/width (d/w) ratio of a defocused laser weld with a weld pool shape similar to a GTA weld increased by over 200% in a zone where 66 ppm selenium had been added. Smaller increases were observed in selenium-doped zones for a moderately defocused electron beam weld with a higher d/w ratio in undoped base metal. When laser or electron beam weld penetration was by a keyhole mechanism, no change in d/w ratio occurred in selenium-doped zones. The results confirm the surface-tension-driven fluid-flow model for the effect of minor elements on GTA weld pool shape. Other experimental evidence bearing on the effect of minor elements on GTA weld penetration is summarized.

  5. Radioactive elements on Mercury's surface from MESSENGER: implications for the planet's formation and evolution.

    PubMed

    Peplowski, Patrick N; Evans, Larry G; Hauck, Steven A; McCoy, Timothy J; Boynton, William V; Gillis-Davis, Jeffery J; Ebel, Denton S; Goldsten, John O; Hamara, David K; Lawrence, David J; McNutt, Ralph L; Nittler, Larry R; Solomon, Sean C; Rhodes, Edgar A; Sprague, Ann L; Starr, Richard D; Stockstill-Cahill, Karen R

    2011-09-30

    The MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer measured the average surface abundances of the radioactive elements potassium (K, 1150 ± 220 parts per million), thorium (Th, 220 ± 60 parts per billion), and uranium (U, 90 ± 20 parts per billion) in Mercury's northern hemisphere. The abundance of the moderately volatile element K, relative to Th and U, is inconsistent with physical models for the formation of Mercury requiring extreme heating of the planet or its precursor materials, and supports formation from volatile-containing material comparable to chondritic meteorites. Abundances of K, Th, and U indicate that internal heat production has declined substantially since Mercury's formation, consistent with widespread volcanism shortly after the end of late heavy bombardment 3.8 billion years ago and limited, isolated volcanic activity since.

  6. Osteoblastic response to pectin nanocoating on titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna; Svava, Rikke; Yihua, Yu; Haugshøj, Kenneth Brian; Dirscherl, Kai; Levery, Steven B; Byg, Inge; Damager, Iben; Nielsen, Martin W; Jørgensen, Bodil; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    Osseointegration of titanium implants can be improved by organic and inorganic nanocoating of the surface. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of organic nanocoating of titanium surface with unmodified and modified pectin Rhamnogalacturonan-Is (RG-Is) isolated from potato and apple with respect to surface properties and osteogenic response in osteoblastic cells. Nanocoatings on titanium surfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of coated RG-Is on cell adhesion, cell viability, bone matrix formation and mineralization was tested using SaOS-2 cells. Nanocoating with pectin RG-Is affected surface properties and in consequence changed the environment for cellular response. The cells cultured on surfaces coated with RG-Is from potato with high content of linear 1.4-linked galactose produced higher level of mineralized matrix compared with control surfaces and surfaces coated with RG-I with low content of linear 1.4-linked galactose. The study showed that the pectin RG-Is nanocoating not only changed chemical and physical titanium surface properties, but also specific coating with RG-Is containing high amount of galactan increased mineralized matrix formation of osteoblastic cells in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Trace element speciation and origin of colloids in surface waters of subarctic zone (NW of Russia and Central Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, O. S.; Viers, J.; Prokushkin, A. S.; Vasukova, E. V.; Shirokova, L. S.; Dupre, B.

    2008-12-01

    Geochemistry of trace elements (TE) in boreal regions attracts large attention of researchers in view of on- going environmental changes that can affect both the fluxes of these elements to the ocean, their speciation and thus their bioavailability. Most of trace elements in waters of boreal zone are transported via organic and organo-mineral colloids. In order to better understand the processes of colloids formation in surface waters draining watersheds of various lithology and permafrost abundance, comparative study of TE speciation in various geographic zones is necessary. In this work we attempted to generalize the typical features of trace element speciation in boreal arctic and subarctic zones assessed via in-situ dialysis and ultrafiltration. Surface waters of three circumpolar regions in Arkhangelsk region, NW Russia and Central Siberia were studied using unique and rigorous procedure via combination of in-situ dialysis and ultrafiltration (1 kDa, 3.5 kDa, 10 kDa, 100 kDa, 0.22 µm, 0.45 µm, 1 μm, 5 µm). In both filtrates and dialysates, all major and trace elements and dissolved organic carbon were analyzed. In all studied regions, three typical features of colloid speciation have been revealed: i) high proportion of large-size colloids (10 kDa - 0.22 μm and 0.22 μm - 5 µm), mostly composed of Fe oxy(hydr)oxides stabilized by organic matter; ii) presence of organic-rich, small size colloids and conventionally "dissolved" substances (< 1 kDa and 1 - 10 kDa), presumably, fulvic acids, and iii) strong association of all trivalent and tetravalent elements with large-size mineral colloids. Results of the present work allow distinguishing between two possible pathways of colloids formation: 1) Groundwater-borne Fe(II) oxidation and TE coprecipitation in the presence of organic matter originated from plant litter and peat layers of surface horizons at the surface redox front between anoxic groundwaters and surficial OM-rich waters of the riparian zone, and

  8. Cellular responses of osteoblast-like cells to 17 elemental metals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongmei; Wong, Cynthia S; Wen, Cuie; Li, Yuncang

    2017-01-01

    Elemental metals have been widely used to alloy metallic orthopedic implants. However, there is still insufficient research data elucidating the cell responses of osteoblastic cells to alloying elemental metals, which impedes the development of new metallic implant materials. In this study, the cellular responses of osteoblast-like cells (SaOS2) to 17 pure alloying elemental metals, that is, titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), hafnium (Hf), vanadium (V), niobium (Nb), tantalum (Ta), chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), ruthenium (Ru), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), silicon (Si), and tin (Sn) were comparatively investigated in vitro. Cellular responses including intracellular total protein synthesis and collagen content, cell adhesion, cell proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity on these elemental metals were systematically assessed and compared. It was found that these elemental metals could be categorized into three groups based on the cellular functions on them. Group 1, including Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, Cr, Ru, and Si, showed excellent cell proliferation and varied ALP activity for SaOS2 cells. Cells exposed to Group 2, including Mo and Sn, although initially attached and grew, did not proliferate over time. In contrast, Group 3, including V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, showed severe cytotoxicity toward SaOS2 cells. It is vital to consider the cell responses to the elemental metals when designing a new metallic implant material and the findings of this study provide insights into the biological performance of the elemental metals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 148-158, 2017.

  9. Assessing hydrologic model nonlinearity using response surface plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuczera, George

    1990-10-01

    When a conceptual hydrologic model is calibrated to observed data, a posterior distribution summarizing uncertainty about model parameters can be derived. For models with more than two parameters, this distribution can be very awkward to work with. However, when a model is approximately linear over the region of parameter space with appreciable posterior density, the posterior distribution can be approximated by a multivariate normal distribution which provides a powerful tool for studying parameter uncertainty, testing hypotheses, and determining the reliability of model predictions. Model nonlinearity can be assessed using numerical measures such as those developed by Beale, and Bates and Watts. Complementing these measures are response surface plots. This study considers problems encountered when interpreting response surface plots for models with more than two parameters. It is argued that linearized conditional probability regions should be displayed on response surface plots to highlight the region of likely parameter values. Where significant parameter interaction exists, it is possible that only a small fraction of the response surface will display probable model parameter values. In such cases, generating the response surface in principal component planes is computationally more efficient. Two case studies using four-parameter conceptual hydrologic models illustrate these points and also demonstrate some of the pitfalls in relying solely on Beale's measure to assess model nonlinearity.

  10. Spatial Distribution and Fuzzy Health Risk Assessment of Trace Elements in Surface Water from Honghu Lake.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Qiu, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Jingdong; Liu, Chaoyang; Cai, Ying; Xiao, Minsi

    2017-09-04

    Previous studies revealed that Honghu Lake was polluted by trace elements due to anthropogenic activities. This study investigated the spatial distribution of trace elements in Honghu Lake, and identified the major pollutants and control areas based on the fuzzy health risk assessment at screening level. The mean total content of trace elements in surface water decreased in the order of Zn (18.04 μg/L) > Pb (3.42 μg/L) > Cu (3.09 μg/L) > Cr (1.63 μg/L) > As (0.99 μg/L) > Cd (0.14 μg/L), within limits of Drinking Water Guidelines. The results of fuzzy health risk assessment indicated that there was no obvious non-carcinogenic risk to human health, while carcinogenic risk was observed in descending order of As > Cr > Cd > Pb. As was regarded to have the highest carcinogenic risk among selected trace elements because it generally accounted for 64% of integrated carcinogenic risk. Potential carcinogenic risk of trace elements in each sampling site was approximately at medium risk level (10(-5) to 10(-4)). The areas in the south (S4, S13, and S16) and northeast (S8, S18, and S19) of Honghu Lake were regarded as the risk priority control areas. However, the corresponding maximum memberships of integrated carcinogenic risk in S1, S3, S10-S13, S15, and S18 were of relatively low credibility (50-60%), and may mislead the decision-makers in identifying the risk priority areas. Results of fuzzy assessment presented the subordinate grade and corresponding reliability of risk, and provided more full-scale results for decision-makers, which made up for the deficiency of certainty assessment to a certain extent.

  11. Androgen receptor stimulates bone sialoprotein (BSP) gene transcription via cAMP response element and activator protein 1/glucocorticoid response elements.

    PubMed

    Takai, Hideki; Nakayama, Youhei; Kim, Dong-Soon; Arai, Masato; Araki, Shouta; Mezawa, Masaru; Nakajima, Yu; Kato, Naoko; Masunaga, Hiroshi; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2007-09-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an early marker of osteoblast differentiation. Androgens are steroid hormones that are essential for skeletal development. The androgen receptor (AR) is a transcription factor and a member of the steroid receptor superfamily that plays an important role in male sexual differentiation and prostate cell proliferation. To determine the molecular mechanism involved in the stimulation of bone formation, we have analyzed the effects of androgens and AR effects on BSP gene transcription. AR protein levels were increased after AR overexpression in ROS17/2.8 cells. BSP mRNA levels were increased by AR overexpression. However, the endogenous and overexpressed BSP mRNA levels were not changed by DHT (10(-8) M, 24 h). Whereas luciferase (LUC) activities in all constructs, including a short construct (nts -116 to +60), were increased by AR overexpression, the basal and LUC activities enhanced by AR overexpression were not induced by DHT (10(-8)M, 24 h). The effect of AR overexpression was abrogated by 2 bp mutations in either the cAMP response element (CRE) or activator protein 1 (AP1)/glucocorticoid response element (GRE). Gel shift analyses showed that AR overexpression increased binding to the CRE and AP1/GRE elements. Notably, the CRE-protein complexes were supershifted by phospho-CREB antibody, and CREB, c-Fos, c-Jun, and AR antibodies disrupted the complexes formation. The AP1/GRE-protein complexes were supershifted by c-Fos antibody and c-Jun, and AR antibodies disrupted the complexes formation. These studies demonstrate that AR stimulates BSP gene transcription by targeting the CRE and AP1/GRE elements in the promoter of the rat BSP gene.

  12. Surface element-mapping of three dimensional structures by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresko, Christian; Kohns, Peter; Ankerhold, Georg

    2014-09-01

    During lateral mapping with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) the focal position of the plasma-generating laser needs to be kept stable on the sample surface area to be probed. Therefore, three-dimensional structures like edged surfaces require a permanent re-focusing. We describe a new auto-focusing technique to perform surface elemental mapping with LIBS by correcting the focusing lens-to-sample distance using a direct monitoring of the LIBS signal intensity. This method allows the scanning of surfaces with strong height fluctuations of several millimeters without the need of any additional devices. The auto-focusing method is valuable for LIBS applications made on complex-shaped samples or simply to improve the measurement reproducibility. Applications are LIBS analyses of samples exhibiting drill holes or steep edges. Our procedure does not need a constant focal plane and follows the topographic profile of the sample surface. Impurities and material inclusions are well detected. From the topographic information additionally obtained, a three-dimensional image of the sample can be deduced. Depth resolution is limited by the Rayleigh range of the LIBS laser light. The method is best suited for low energy laser pulses with high repetition rate and infrared emission.

  13. Interactive computer graphic surface modeling of three-dimensional solid domains for boundary element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perucchio, R.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    The establishment of the boundary element method (BEM) as a valid tool for solving problems in structural mechanics and in other fields of applied physics is discussed. The development of an integrated interactive computer graphic system for the application of the BEM to three dimensional problems in elastostatics is described. The integration of interactive computer graphic techniques and the BEM takes place at the preprocessing and postprocessing stages of the analysis process, when, respectively, the data base is generated and the results are interpreted. The interactive computer graphic modeling techniques used for generating and discretizing the boundary surfaces of a solid domain are outlined.

  14. Surface loop resonator design for in vivo EPR tooth dosimetry using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Jennifer D; Williams, Benjamin B; Sidabras, Jason W; Grinberg, Oleg; Salikhov, Ildar; Lesniewski, Piotr; Kmiec, Maciej; Swartz, Harold M

    2010-02-01

    Finite element analysis is used to evaluate and design L-band surface loop resonators for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tooth dosimetry. This approach appears to be practical and useful for the systematic examination and evaluation of resonator configurations to enhance the precision of dose estimates. The effects of loop positioning in the mouth are examined, and it is shown that the sensitivity to loop position along a row of molars is decreased as the loop is moved away from the teeth.

  15. Interactive computer graphic surface modeling of three-dimensional solid domains for boundary element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perucchio, R.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    The establishment of the boundary element method (BEM) as a valid tool for solving problems in structural mechanics and in other fields of applied physics is discussed. The development of an integrated interactive computer graphic system for the application of the BEM to three dimensional problems in elastostatics is described. The integration of interactive computer graphic techniques and the BEM takes place at the preprocessing and postprocessing stages of the analysis process, when, respectively, the data base is generated and the results are interpreted. The interactive computer graphic modeling techniques used for generating and discretizing the boundary surfaces of a solid domain are outlined.

  16. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces

    PubMed Central

    FERRAZ, Emanuela Prado; SVERZUT, Alexander Tadeu; FREITAS, Gileade Pereira; SÁ, Juliana Carvalho; ALVES, Clodomiro; BELOTI, Marcio Mateus; ROSA, Adalberto Luiz

    2015-01-01

    A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti) surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces. PMID:25760262

  17. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Emanuela Prado; Sverzut, Alexander Tadeu; Freitas, Gileade Pereira; Sá, Juliana Carvalho; Alves, Clodomiro; Beloti, Marcio Mateus; Rosa, Adalberto Luiz

    2015-01-01

    A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti) surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces.

  18. Stretch-dependent changes in surface profiles of the human crystalline lens during accommodation: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Pour, Hooman Mohammad; Kanapathipillai, Sangarapillai; Zarrabi, Khosrow; Manns, Fabrice; Ho, Arthur

    2015-03-01

    A non-linear isotropic finite element (FE) model of a 29-year-old human crystalline lens was constructed to study the effects of various geometrical parameters on lens accommodation. The model simulates dis-accommodation by stretching of the lens and predicts the change in surface profiles of the lens capsule, cortex and nucleus at select states of stretching/accommodation. Multiple regression analysis (MRA) is used to develop a stretch-dependent mathematical model relating the lens sagittal height to the radial position of the lens surface as a function of dis-accommodative stretch. A load analysis is performed to compare the finite element results to empirical results from lens stretcher studies. Using the predicted geometrical changes, the optical response of the whole eye during accommodation was analysed by ray-tracing. Aspects of lens shape change relative to stretch were evaluated, including change in diameter, central thickness and accommodation. Maximum accommodation achieved was 10.29 D. From the multiple regression analysis, the stretch-dependent mathematical model of the lens shape related lens curvatures as a function of lens ciliary stretch well (maximum mean-square residual error 2.5 × 10(-3 ) μm, p < 0.001). The results are compared with those from in vitro studies. The finite element and ray-tracing predictions are consistent with Ex Vivo Accommodation Simulator (EVAS) studies in terms of load and power change versus change in thickness. The mathematical stretch-dependent model of accommodation presented may have utility in investigating lens behaviour at states other than the relaxed or fully accommodated states. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  19. Modelling elements for the Moon s near surface dusty plasma environment characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriani, F.; Hilgers, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    F. Cipriani (1), A. Hilgers(1), D. Rodgers(1) (1) ESA/ESTEC, Noordwijk, The Netherlands (fabrice.cipriani@esa.int / Fax: +31-71-5654697) Characterizing the Moon's electrostatically charged regolith, the levitation and transport of charged dust grains and their role in the surface current balance, is of primary importance to prepare future lunar missions. Observations carried out during Apollo missions brought evidence for a dust levitation process [1] and allowed to study lunar grains charging characteristics [2]. Lately, Lunar Prospector electron reflectometry data allowed to gain insights into the magnitude and the variability of lunar surface charging, revealing significant electrostatic potentials under different plasma conditions, depending on the Moon's local environment (Solar Wind, tail lobes, Earth's plasma sheet) (see e.g. [3,4]). Although theoretical studies have tackled the problem of regolith and dust grains charging, numerical modeling tools can be useful to simulate dust charging and transport over the complex features of the lunar topography, including the effects of the near surface magnetic environment, and interaction with mission elements as a lunar lander [5]. In the present study we use on the one hand a 3D PIC simulation code to investigate, under simplifying assumptions: 1) charging of the lunar surface under different plasma conditions encountered along the Moon orbit, 2) charging of a complex surface feature (typically a crater), and 3) charging, levitation and transport of dust grains in the near surface environment. One the other hand, we analyze limitations of the current tool and the physics to be further implemented in order to address dust charging and transport processes at the Moon surface relevant to the exploration of the Moon. References [1] Stubbs et al, (2006) Advance in Space Research, 37, 59-66 [2] Horanyi et al, (1998) JGR, Volume 103, Issue E4 [3] Halekas et al, (2008) JGR, Volume 113, Issue A9 [4] Poppe et al, (2011) GRL

  20. Development and experimental verification of a finite element method for accurate analysis of a surface acoustic wave device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohibul Kabir, K. M.; Matthews, Glenn I.; Sabri, Ylias M.; Russo, Salvy P.; Ippolito, Samuel J.; Bhargava, Suresh K.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate analysis of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices is highly important due to their use in ever-growing applications in electronics, telecommunication and chemical sensing. In this study, a novel approach for analyzing the SAW devices was developed based on a series of two-dimensional finite element method (FEM) simulations, which has been experimentally verified. It was found that the frequency response of the two SAW device structures, each having slightly different bandwidth and center lobe characteristics, can be successfully obtained utilizing the current density of the electrodes via FEM simulations. The two SAW structures were based on XY Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3) substrates and had two and four electrode finger pairs in both of their interdigital transducers, respectively. Later, SAW devices were fabricated in accordance with the simulated models and their measured frequency responses were found to correlate well with the obtained simulations results. The results indicated that better match between calculated and measured frequency response can be obtained when one of the input electrode finger pairs was set at zero volts and all the current density components were taken into account when calculating the frequency response of the simulated SAW device structures.

  1. Autonomous Aerobraking: Thermal Analysis and Response Surface Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Thornblom, Mark N.

    2011-01-01

    A high-fidelity thermal model of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter was developed for use in an autonomous aerobraking simulation study. Response surface equations were derived from the high-fidelity thermal model and integrated into the autonomous aerobraking simulation software. The high-fidelity thermal model was developed using the Thermal Desktop software and used in all phases of the analysis. The use of Thermal Desktop exclusively, represented a change from previously developed aerobraking thermal analysis methodologies. Comparisons were made between the Thermal Desktop solutions and those developed for the previous aerobraking thermal analyses performed on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter during aerobraking operations. A variable sensitivity screening study was performed to reduce the number of variables carried in the response surface equations. Thermal analysis and response surface equation development were performed for autonomous aerobraking missions at Mars and Venus.

  2. Response Ant Colony Optimization of End Milling Surface Roughness

    PubMed Central

    Kadirgama, K.; Noor, M. M.; Abd Alla, Ahmed N.

    2010-01-01

    Metal cutting processes are important due to increased consumer demands for quality metal cutting related products (more precise tolerances and better product surface roughness) that has driven the metal cutting industry to continuously improve quality control of metal cutting processes. This paper presents optimum surface roughness by using milling mould aluminium alloys (AA6061-T6) with Response Ant Colony Optimization (RACO). The approach is based on Response Surface Method (RSM) and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO). The main objectives to find the optimized parameters and the most dominant variables (cutting speed, feedrate, axial depth and radial depth). The first order model indicates that the feedrate is the most significant factor affecting surface roughness. PMID:22294914

  3. Intelligent Detection of Cracks in Metallic Surfaces Using a Waveguide Sensor Loaded with Metamaterial Elements

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdulbaset; Hu, Bing; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a real-life experiment implementing an artificial intelligence model for detecting sub-millimeter cracks in metallic surfaces on a dataset obtained from a waveguide sensor loaded with metamaterial elements. Crack detection using microwave sensors is typically based on human observation of change in the sensor's signal (pattern) depicted on a high-resolution screen of the test equipment. However, as demonstrated in this work, implementing artificial intelligence to classify cracked from non-cracked surfaces has appreciable impacts in terms of sensing sensitivity, cost, and automation. Furthermore, applying artificial intelligence for post-processing the data collected from microwave sensors is a cornerstone for handheld test equipment that can outperform rack equipment with large screens and sophisticated plotting features. The proposed method was tested on a metallic plate with different cracks, and the experimental results showed good crack classification accuracy rates. PMID:25988871

  4. Revisiting the observed surface climate response to large volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, Fabian; Mitchell, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    In light of the range in presently available observational, reanalysis and model data, we revisit the surface climate response to large tropical volcanic eruptions from the end of the 19th century until present. We focus on the dynamically driven response of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the radiative-driven tropical temperature response. Using 10 different reanalysis products and the Hadley Centre Sea Level Pressure observational dataset (HadSLP2) we confirm a positive tendency in the phase of the NAO during boreal winters following large volcanic eruptions, although we conclude that it is not as clear cut as the current literature suggests. While different reanalyses agree well on the sign of the surface volcanic NAO response for individual volcanoes, the spread in the response is often large (˜ 1/2 standard deviation). This inter-reanalysis spread is actually larger for the more recent volcanic eruptions, and in one case does not encompass observations (El Chichón). These are all in the satellite era and therefore assimilate more atmospheric data that may lead to a more complex interaction for the surface response. The phase of the NAO leads to a dynamically driven warm anomaly over northern Europe in winter, which is present in all datasets considered. The general cooling of the surface temperature due to reduced incoming shortwave radiation is therefore disturbed by dynamical impacts. In the tropics, where less dynamically driven influences are present, we confirm a predominant cooling after most but not all eruptions. All datasets agree well on the strength of the tropical response, with the observed and reanalysis response being statistically significant but the modelled response not being significant due to the high variability across models.

  5. The Periosteal Bone Surface is Less Mechano-Responsive than the Endocortical

    PubMed Central

    Birkhold, Annette I.; Razi, Hajar; Duda, Georg N.; Weinkamer, Richard; Checa, Sara; Willie, Bettina M.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic processes modify bone micro-structure to adapt to external loading and avoid mechanical failure. Age-related cortical bone loss is thought to occur because of increased endocortical resorption and reduced periosteal formation. Differences in the (re)modeling response to loading on both surfaces, however, are poorly understood. Combining in-vivo tibial loading, in-vivo micro-tomography and finite element analysis, remodeling in C57Bl/6J mice of three ages (10, 26, 78 week old) was analyzed to identify differences in mechano-responsiveness and its age-related change on the two cortical surfaces. Mechanical stimulation enhanced endocortical and periosteal formation and reduced endocortical resorption; a reduction in periosteal resorption was hardly possible since it was low, even without additional loading. Endocortically a greater mechano-responsiveness was identified, evident by a larger bone-forming surface and enhanced thickness of formed bone packets, which was not detected periosteally. Endocortical mechano-responsiveness was better conserved with age, since here adaptive response declined continuously with aging, whereas periosteally the main decay in formation response occurred already before adulthood. Higher endocortical mechano-responsiveness is not due to higher endocortical strains. Although it is clear structural adaptation varies between different bones in the skeleton, this study demonstrates that adaptation varies even at different sites within the same bone. PMID:27004741

  6. The Periosteal Bone Surface is Less Mechano-Responsive than the Endocortical.

    PubMed

    Birkhold, Annette I; Razi, Hajar; Duda, Georg N; Weinkamer, Richard; Checa, Sara; Willie, Bettina M

    2016-03-23

    Dynamic processes modify bone micro-structure to adapt to external loading and avoid mechanical failure. Age-related cortical bone loss is thought to occur because of increased endocortical resorption and reduced periosteal formation. Differences in the (re)modeling response to loading on both surfaces, however, are poorly understood. Combining in-vivo tibial loading, in-vivo micro-tomography and finite element analysis, remodeling in C57Bl/6J mice of three ages (10, 26, 78 week old) was analyzed to identify differences in mechano-responsiveness and its age-related change on the two cortical surfaces. Mechanical stimulation enhanced endocortical and periosteal formation and reduced endocortical resorption; a reduction in periosteal resorption was hardly possible since it was low, even without additional loading. Endocortically a greater mechano-responsiveness was identified, evident by a larger bone-forming surface and enhanced thickness of formed bone packets, which was not detected periosteally. Endocortical mechano-responsiveness was better conserved with age, since here adaptive response declined continuously with aging, whereas periosteally the main decay in formation response occurred already before adulthood. Higher endocortical mechano-responsiveness is not due to higher endocortical strains. Although it is clear structural adaptation varies between different bones in the skeleton, this study demonstrates that adaptation varies even at different sites within the same bone.

  7. The Periosteal Bone Surface is Less Mechano-Responsive than the Endocortical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkhold, Annette I.; Razi, Hajar; Duda, Georg N.; Weinkamer, Richard; Checa, Sara; Willie, Bettina M.

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic processes modify bone micro-structure to adapt to external loading and avoid mechanical failure. Age-related cortical bone loss is thought to occur because of increased endocortical resorption and reduced periosteal formation. Differences in the (re)modeling response to loading on both surfaces, however, are poorly understood. Combining in-vivo tibial loading, in-vivo micro-tomography and finite element analysis, remodeling in C57Bl/6J mice of three ages (10, 26, 78 week old) was analyzed to identify differences in mechano-responsiveness and its age-related change on the two cortical surfaces. Mechanical stimulation enhanced endocortical and periosteal formation and reduced endocortical resorption; a reduction in periosteal resorption was hardly possible since it was low, even without additional loading. Endocortically a greater mechano-responsiveness was identified, evident by a larger bone-forming surface and enhanced thickness of formed bone packets, which was not detected periosteally. Endocortical mechano-responsiveness was better conserved with age, since here adaptive response declined continuously with aging, whereas periosteally the main decay in formation response occurred already before adulthood. Higher endocortical mechano-responsiveness is not due to higher endocortical strains. Although it is clear structural adaptation varies between different bones in the skeleton, this study demonstrates that adaptation varies even at different sites within the same bone.

  8. Chemical Weathering of Black Shales and Rare Earth Element Composition of Surface Waters and Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannigan, R. E.; Johannesson, K. H.

    2001-05-01

    Weathering processes dominate the dissolved and suspended loads of most of the world's major rivers. Among sedimentary rocks, black shales are particularly sensitive to chemical weathering. Therefore, shale systems are useful for investigating the partitioning of chemical elements during chemical weathering. Recent studies, such as those by Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Ravizza and others, link chemical weathering of black shales to changes in marine isotopic composition. Rare earth elements (REE) have a unique chemistry and are ideal for such tracer studies. We explored the effect of modern chemical weathering of black shales on the hydrochemistry of surface and groundwaters in the Mohawk Valley of New York State. This region provides an ideal site for the investigation of trace element remobilization during the chemical weathering of black shales. In this region, surface and groundwaters, in intimate contact with black shales and have high dissolved metal concentrations presumably due to water-rock interactions. The extent to which the dissolved REE composition of the surface and ground waters retains the rock signature is, in someway related to the length of time that the water remains in contact with the rock. We compared the REE compositions of surface and groundwaters in areas draining black shale to those of waters draining regions of dolostone-limestone to explore the extent of metal release due to chemical weathering. Shale normalized REE patterns for stream waters exhibit slight heavy REE enrichments and, at some locations, LREE depletion. REE patterns of the waters normalized to their respective sediments show some LREE depletion. However, waters associated with the Little Falls dolomite show fractionation predominantly enriched in the heavy REEs. Differences between the black shale sites, recorded as light REE depletion and/or middle REE enrichment, may be related to the discharge of the streams and the total dissolved solids. The dissolved REE chemistry of

  9. Investigation of the surface generation mechanism of mechanical polishing engineering ceramics using discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuesong

    2014-09-01

    Machining technology about ceramics has been developed very fast over recent years due to the growing industrial demand of higher machining accuracy and better surface quality of ceramic elements, while the nature of hard and brittle ceramics makes it difficult to acquire damage-free and ultra-smooth surface. Ceramic bulk can be treated as an assemblage of discrete particles bonded together randomly as the micro-structure of ceramics consists of crystal particles and pores, and the inter-granular fracture of the ceramics can be naturally represented by the separation of particles due to breakage of bonds. Discrete element method (DEM) provides a promising approach for constructing an effective model to describe the tool-workpiece interaction and can serve as a predicting simulation tool in analyzing the complicated surface generation mechanism and is employed in this research to simulate the mechanical polishing process of ceramics and surface integrity. In this work, a densely packed particle assembly system of the polycrystalline Si3N4 has been generated using bonded-particle model to represent the ceramic workpiece numerically. The simulation results justify that the common critical depth of cut cannot be used as the effective parameters for evaluating brittle to ductile transformation in ceramic polishing process. Therefore, a generalized criterion of defining the range of ductile regime machining has been developed based on the numerical results. Furthermore, different distribution of pressure chain is observed with different depth of cut which ought to have intense relationship with special structure of ceramics. This study also justified the advantage of DEM model in its capability of revealing the mechanical behaviors of ceramics at micro-scale.

  10. Elemental analyses of hypervelocity micro-particle impact sites on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. R.; Wortman, Jim J.

    1992-01-01

    The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity micro-particles that struck the active sensors with enough energy to breakdown the 0.4 to 1.0 micron thick SiO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. These discharge features, which include 50 micron diameter areas where the aluminum top layer has been vaporized, facilitate the location of the impacts. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allow detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of micro-particle impact sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts are corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results are used to classify the particles' origins as 'manmade', 'natural' or 'indeterminate'. The last classification results from the presence of too little impactor residue (a frequent occurrence on leading edge impacts), analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon residue, the limited usefulness of data on aluminum in the central craters, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters, of these features. A

  11. Elemental analyses of hypervelocity micro-particle impact sites on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. R.; Wortman, Jim J.

    1992-01-01

    The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity micro-particles that struck the active sensors with enough energy to breakdown the 0.4 to 1.0 micron thick SiO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. These discharge features, which include 50 micron diameter areas where the aluminum top layer has been vaporized, facilitate the location of the impacts. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allow detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of micro-particle impact sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts are corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results are used to classify the particles' origins as 'manmade', 'natural' or 'indeterminate'. The last classification results from the presence of too little impactor residue (a frequent occurrence on leading edge impacts), analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon residue, the limited usefulness of data on aluminum in the central craters, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters, of these features. A

  12. Pounding Effects on the Earthquake Response of Adjacent Reinforced Concrete Structures Strengthened by Cable Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liolios, Angelos; Liolios, Asterios; Hatzigeorgiou, George; Radev, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    A numerical approach for estimating the effects of pounding (seismic interaction) on the response of adjacent Civil Engineering structures is presented. Emphasis is given to reinforced concrete (RC) frames of existing buildings which are seismically strengthened by cable-elements. A double discretization, in space by the Finite Element Method and in time by a direct incremental approach is used. The unilateral behaviours of both, the cable-elements and the interfaces contact-constraints, are taken strictly into account and result to inequality constitutive conditions. So, in each time-step, a non-convex linear complementarity problem is solved. It is found that pounding and cable strengthening have significant effects on the earthquake response and, hence, on the seismic upgrading of existing adjacent RC structures.

  13. Simulation of Electromagnetic Wave Logging Response in Deviated Wells Based on Vector Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wei-Guo; Chu, Zhao-Tan; Zhao, Xiao-Qing; Fan, Yu-Xiu; Song, Ruo-Long; Han, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The vector finite element method of tetrahedral elements is used to model 3D electromagnetic wave logging response. The tangential component of the vector field at the mesh edges is used as a degree of freedom to overcome the shortcomings of node-based finite element methods. The algorithm can simulate inhomogeneous media with arbitrary distribution of conductivity and magnetic permeability. The electromagnetic response of well logging tools are studied in dipping bed layers with the borehole and invasion included. In order to simulate realistic logging tools, we take the transmitter antennas consisting of circular wire loops instead of magnetic dipoles. We also investigate the apparent resistivity of inhomogeneous formation for different dip angles.

  14. Response of hot element flush wall gauges in oscillating laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, T. A.; Cook, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The time dependent response characteristics of flush-mounted hot element gauges used as instruments to measure wall shear stress in unsteady periodic air flows were investigated. The study was initiated because anomalous results were obtained from the gauges in oscillating turbulent flows for the phase relation of the wall shear stress variation, indicating possible gauge response problems. Flat plate laminar oscillating turbulent flows characterized by a mean free stream velocity with a superposed sinusoidal variation were performed. Laminar rather than turbulent flows were studied, because a numerical solution for the phase angle between the free stream velocity and the wall shear stress variation that is known to be correct can be obtained. The focus is on comparing the phase angle indicated by the hot element gauges with corresponding numerical prediction for the phase angle, since agreement would indicate that the hot element gauges faithfully follow the true wall shear stress variation.

  15. Are collapsars responsible for some r-process elements? How could we tell?

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J

    2004-04-05

    We consider the possibility that supernovae which form hyper-accreting black holes might be responsible for synthesis of r-process elements with mass A {approx}< 130. Calculations are presented which show that these elements are naturally synthesized in neutron-rich magnetically-dominated bubbles born in the inner regions of a black hole accretion disk. Simple considerations suggest that the total mass ejected in the form of these bubbles is about that needed to account for the entire galactic inventory of the 2nd-peak r-process elements. We also argue that if collapsars are responsible for, e.g., Ag synthesis, then Ag abundances should be correlated with Sc and/or Zn abundances in metal-poor stars.

  16. Transient response of isotropic, orthotropic and anisotropic composite-sandwich shells with the superparametric element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallikarjuna; Kant, T.; Fafard, M.

    1992-09-01

    The first-order Reissner-Mindlin shear deformation theory is employed to investigate the transient response of isotropic, layered orthotropic and anisotropic composite and sandwich shells. The eight-noded Serendipity and nine-noded Lagrangian quadrilateral superparametric shell elements are used. Numerical convergence and stability of the elements are established using an explicit central difference technique with a special mass matrix diagonalization scheme. The effects of transverse shear modulii of stiff layers, length/thickness and radius/length ratios, time step, finite element mesh, orientation of fibers and degree of orthotropy on the transient response of shells are studied. The variety of results presented here, based on realistic material properties of more commonly used advanced laminated composite shells, should serve as references for future investigations.

  17. Responses of Trace Elements to Aerobic Maximal Exercise in Elite Sportsmen

    PubMed Central

    OTAĞ, Aynur; HAZAR, Muhsin; OTAĞ, İlhan; Gürkan, Alper Cenk; Okan, İlyas

    2014-01-01

    Trace elements are chemical elements needed in minute quantities for the proper growth, development, and physiology of the organism. In biochemistry, a trace element is also referred to as a micronutrient. Trace elements, such as nickel, cadmium, aluminum, silver, chromium, molybdenum, germanium, tin, titanium, tungsten, scandium, are found naturally in the environment and human exposure derives from a variety of sources, including air, drinking water and food. The Purpose of this study was investigated the effect of aerobic maximal intensity endurance exercise on serum trace elements as well-trained individuals of 28 wrestlers (age (year) 19.64±1.13, weight (Kg) 70.07 ± 15.69, height (cm) 176.97 ± 6.69) during and after a 2000 meter Ergometer test protocol was used to perform aerobic (75 %) maximal endurance exercise. Trace element serum levels were analyzed from blood samples taken before, immediately after and one hour after the exercise. While an increase was detected in Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni), Molybdenum (Mo) and Titanium (Ti) serum levels immediately after the exercise, a decrease was detected in Aluminum (Al), Scandium (Sc) and Tungsten (W) serum levels. Except for aluminum, the trace elements we worked on showed statistically meaningful responses (P<0.05 and P<0.001). According to the responses of trace elements to the exercise showed us the selection and application of the convenient sport is important not only in terms of sportsman performance but also in terms of future healthy life plans and clinically. PMID:24762350

  18. Receptive field focus of visual area V4 neurons determines responses to illusory surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Michele A.; Schmid, Michael C.; Peters, Andrew J.; Saunders, Richard C.; Leopold, David A.; Maier, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Illusory figures demonstrate the visual system’s ability to infer surfaces under conditions of fragmented sensory input. To investigate the role of midlevel visual area V4 in visual surface completion, we used multielectrode arrays to measure spiking responses to two types of visual stimuli: Kanizsa patterns that induce the perception of an illusory surface and physically similar control stimuli that do not. Neurons in V4 exhibited stronger and sometimes rhythmic spiking responses for the illusion-promoting configurations compared with controls. Moreover, this elevated response depended on the precise alignment of the neuron’s peak visual field sensitivity (receptive field focus) with the illusory surface itself. Neurons whose receptive field focus was over adjacent inducing elements, less than 1.5° away, did not show response enhancement to the illusion. Neither receptive field sizes nor fixational eye movements could account for this effect, which was present in both single-unit signals and multiunit activity. These results suggest that the active perceptual completion of surfaces and shapes, which is a fundamental problem in natural visual experience, draws upon the selective enhancement of activity within a distinct subpopulation of neurons in cortical area V4. PMID:24085849

  19. The Nrf2-antioxidant response element pathway: a target for regulating energy metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that responds to oxidative stress by binding to the antioxidant response element (ARE) in the promoter of genes coding for antioxidant enzymes like NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and proteins for glutathione synthesis. ...

  20. Synergistic action of thermoresponsive and hygroresponsive elements elicits rapid and directional response of a bilayer actuator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lidong; Desta, Israel; Naumov, Panče

    2016-05-01

    A bilayer actuator composed of thermoresponsive and thermo/hygroresponsive elements is developed, which undergoes fast, directional and autonomous curling with a speed of up to 0.7 m s(-1) and recovers its shape by hydration. In situ tensile testing of the thermal response of individual layers provided insights into the mechanism of actuation of thermo/hygromorphic bilayers.

  1. Investigating the functionality of an OCT4-short response element in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Crespo, Agustin; Truong, Brian; Hermann, Kip J; Awe, Jason P; Chang, Katherine M; Lee, Patrick C; Schoenberg, Benjamen E; Wu, Lily; Byrne, James A; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells offer great therapeutic promise for personalized treatment platforms for numerous injuries, disorders, and diseases. Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4) is a key regulatory gene maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal of mammalian cells. With site-specific integration for gene correction in cellular therapeutics, use of the OCT4 promoter may have advantages when expressing a suicide gene if pluripotency remains. However, the human OCT4 promoter region is 4 kb in size, limiting the capacity of therapeutic genes and other regulatory components for viral vectors, and decreasing the efficiency of homologous recombination. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the functionality of a novel 967bp OCT4-short response element during pluripotency and to examine the OCT4 titer-dependent response during differentiation to human derivatives not expressing OCT4. Our findings demonstrate that the OCT4-short response element is active in pluripotency and this activity is in high correlation with transgene expression in vitro, and the OCT4-short response element is inactivated when pluripotent cells differentiate. These studies demonstrate that this shortened OCT4 regulatory element is functional and may be useful as part of an optimized safety component in a site-specific gene transferring system that could be used as an efficient and clinically applicable safety platform for gene transfer in cellular therapeutics. PMID:27500178

  2. Linear and nonlinear responses to middle latitude surface temperature anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roads, John O.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear responses to fixed and seasonally varying surface temperature anomalies in a two-level hemispheric time-dependent coupled atmosphere-surface mixed layer model are described. Linear stationary models that are equivalent to the nonlinear time-dependent model are used to analyze these responses. A model linearized around the climatological zonal state of the time dependent model and forced by anomalous surface temperatures does not provide a reasonable estimate for the anomalous reponses, which are considerably underestimated. Better responses are obtained when the anomalous stationary nonlinear eddy fluxes are included in a model linearized around the full climatology. However, this latter model is overly sensitive, and anomalous responses are a small residual balance to the forcing by the surface temperature anomalies and the anomalous transient eddy fluxes. To better understand these linear responses, an eigenanalysis of the climatological state is performed. Seasonal anomalies appear to be dominated by one characteristic pattern near resonance which can be associated with a slowly growing coupled atmosphere-ocean instability.

  3. Experimental measurement of tympanic membrane response for finite element model validation of a human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tae-Soo; Baek, Moo-Jin; Lee, Dooho

    2013-01-01

    The middle ear consists of a tympanic membrane, ligaments, tendons, and three ossicles. An important function of the tympanic membrane is to deliver exterior sound stimulus to the ossicles and inner ear. In this study, the responses of the tympanic membrane in a human ear were measured and compared with those of a finite element model of the middle ear. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was used to measure the dynamic responses of the tympanic membrane, which had the measurement point on the cone of light of the tympanic membrane. The measured subjects were five Korean male adults and a cadaver. The tympanic membranes were stimulated using pure-tone sine waves at 18 center frequencies of one-third octave band over a frequency range of 200 Hz ~10 kHz with 60 and 80 dB sound pressure levels. The measured responses were converted into the umbo displacement transfer function (UDTF) with a linearity assumption. The measured UDTFs were compared with the calculated UDTFs using a finite element model for the Korean human middle ear. The finite element model of the middle ear consists of three ossicles, a tympanic membrane, ligaments, and tendons. In the finite element model, the umbo displacements were calculated under a unit sound pressure on the tympanic membrane. The UDTF of the finite element model exhibited good agreement with that of the experimental one in low frequency range, whereas in higher frequency band, the two response functions deviated from each other, which demonstrates that the finite element model should be updated with more accurate material properties and/or a frequency dependent material model.

  4. Modeling of electrohydrodynamic drying process using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Dalvand, Mohammad Jafar; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Rafiee, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Energy consumption index is one of the most important criteria for judging about new, and emerging drying technologies. One of such novel and promising alternative of drying process is called electrohydrodynamic (EHD) drying. In this work, a solar energy was used to maintain required energy of EHD drying process. Moreover, response surface methodology (RSM) was used to build a predictive model in order to investigate the combined effects of independent variables such as applied voltage, field strength, number of discharge electrode (needle), and air velocity on moisture ratio, energy efficiency, and energy consumption as responses of EHD drying process. Three-levels and four-factor Box–Behnken design was employed to evaluate the effects of independent variables on system responses. A stepwise approach was followed to build up a model that can map the entire response surface. The interior relationships between parameters were well defined by RSM. PMID:24936289

  5. Modeling of electrohydrodynamic drying process using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Dalvand, Mohammad Jafar; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Rafiee, Shahin

    2014-05-01

    Energy consumption index is one of the most important criteria for judging about new, and emerging drying technologies. One of such novel and promising alternative of drying process is called electrohydrodynamic (EHD) drying. In this work, a solar energy was used to maintain required energy of EHD drying process. Moreover, response surface methodology (RSM) was used to build a predictive model in order to investigate the combined effects of independent variables such as applied voltage, field strength, number of discharge electrode (needle), and air velocity on moisture ratio, energy efficiency, and energy consumption as responses of EHD drying process. Three-levels and four-factor Box-Behnken design was employed to evaluate the effects of independent variables on system responses. A stepwise approach was followed to build up a model that can map the entire response surface. The interior relationships between parameters were well defined by RSM.

  6. Development of an algorithm for the analysis of surface defects in mechanical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargione, Giovanna A.; Geraci, Alberto L.; Pennisi, Luigi; Risitano, Antonino

    1998-10-01

    The non-destructive tests allow to establish the physical and structural conditions of a mechanical part, to verify its condition, the superficial wear and tear and then evaluate its `remaining' efficiency. The non-destructive tests are applied in all those fields of engineering in which the determination of the mechanical and structural characteristics of elements in use is requested, without making them undergo destructive or damaging tests. In the present work an application program has been developed which, examining the surface of mechanical parts under an optical microscope and a blaster video, is able to characterize the material and to recognize and identify the possible presence of a superficial crack. The program constitutes the first step towards the realization of an industrial prototype which, thanks to the utilization of a plan moved by step-by-step motors, allowing the scanning of the whole surface of a part and the recognition of the crack in an automatic way, that is without the presence of an operator, and its characterization, in case it is identified, through the determination of some geometric parameters useful to ascertain the structural integrity of the element under examination. For the realization of the program different techniques of image analysis have been applied and the use of an artificial neural network preset for the recognition of the crack has been necessary. The program has been realized in C language and it works in Linux system.

  7. A boundary element approach to estimate the free surface in stratified two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shangjie; Dong, Feng; Tan, Chao; Xu, Yaoyuan

    2012-10-01

    Two-phase flows widely exist in many industries. Measuring the phase distribution in two-phase flow is important for the optimization and control of some industrial processes. Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is a promising non-intrusive visualization technique for monitoring the two-phase flow. However, due to its nonlinear and ill-posed character, high-quality image reconstruction is difficult and some iterative approach is time consuming. In this paper, a boundary element approach is presented for directly estimating the free-surface in two-phase flow using ERT. The unknown free surface is parameterized by a Bézier curve. Coefficients of its control points are estimated by minimizing a residual function using the iterative Levenberg-Marquardt method. To speed up the estimation process, the physical model of ERT is formulated using a boundary element method. Based on this formulation, the forward problem is fast solved through a small size system matrix and the Jacobian matrix is efficiently calculated using an analytic method. After several numerical experiments, this approach is proved fast and precise and several factors influencing the estimation quality are analyzed based on these simulations.

  8. Hydrophilic-oleophobic stimuli-responsive materials and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarter, John A.

    Due to their high surface energy, hydrophilic surfaces are susceptible to contamination which is difficult to remove and often ruins the surface. Hydrophilic-oleophobic coatings have a diverse engineering potential including applications as self-cleaning surfaces, extended life anti-fog coatings, and environmental remediation in the selective filtration of oil-in-water mixtures. A successful design model for hydrophilic-oleophobic behavior has been developed using perfluorinated surfactants covalently bound to a surface. Within this design model, a variety of materials have been explored which the surfactants are covalently bound to a substrate; similarly, the surfactants may also be incorporated as a monomer into bulk copolymers. Surfactant based surfaces exhibited simultaneous hydrophilicity, necessary for anti-fogging, and oleophobicity, necessary for contamination resistance. The combination of these features rendered the surface as self-cleaning. Surfactant based brushes, composed of polyethylene glycol and perfluorinated constituents were grafted on to silica surfaces. The relationship between brush density and stimuli-responsiveness was determined by varying grafting conditions. The resultant surfaces were characterized with respect to chemical composition, brush thickness, and wetting behavior of water and hexadecane. Optimized surfaces exhibited stimuli-responsive behavior such that the surfaces will be wetted by water but not by oil. Surfactants were incorporated into random copolymers to create self-cleaning polymers which could be easily coated on to surfaces post-synthesis. Acrylic acid, methyl methacrylate, and hydroxyethyl methacrylate were used as comonomers; feed ratio was varied to establish compositional limits of stimuli-responsive behavior. Polymer composition dictated coating durability and self-cleaning performance as determined by water and hexadecane contact angle. The ability of select coatings to mitigate fogging was assessed in two

  9. Assessment of Response Surface Models using Independent Confirmation Point Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights various advantages that confirmation-point residuals have over conventional model design-point residuals in assessing the adequacy of a response surface model fitted by regression techniques to a sample of experimental data. Particular advantages are highlighted for the case of design matrices that may be ill-conditioned for a given sample of data. The impact of both aleatory and epistemological uncertainty in response model adequacy assessments is considered.

  10. Will surface winds weaken in response to global warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Foltz, Gregory R.; Soden, Brian J.; Huang, Gang; He, Jie; Dong, Changming

    2016-12-01

    The surface Walker and tropical tropospheric circulations have been inferred to slow down from historical observations and model projections, yet analysis of large-scale surface wind predictions is lacking. Satellite measurements of surface wind speed indicate strengthening trends averaged over the global and tropical oceans that are supported by precipitation and evaporation changes. Here we use corrected anemometer-based observations to show that the surface wind speed has not decreased in the averaged tropical oceans, despite its reduction in the region of the Walker circulation. Historical simulations and future projections for climate change also suggest a near-zero wind speed trend averaged in space, regardless of the Walker cell change. In the tropics, the sea surface temperature pattern effect acts against the large-scale circulation slow-down. For higher latitudes, the surface winds shift poleward along with the eddy-driven mid-latitude westerlies, resulting in a very small contribution to the global change in surface wind speed. Despite its importance for surface wind speed change, the influence of the SST pattern change on global-mean rainfall is insignificant since it cannot substantially alter the global energy balance. As a result, the precipitation response to global warming remains ‘muted’ relative to atmospheric moisture increase. Our results therefore show consistency between projections and observations of surface winds and precipitation.

  11. Will Surface Winds Weaken in Response to Global Warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    A weakening of the tropical tropospheric circulation has been inferred from historical observations and model projections, but recent satellite-based trends in surface wind speed, precipitation, and evaporation offer a conflicting view. Here this apparent contradiction is reconciled through consideration of sea surface temperature (SST) pattern effects and differences between tropospheric and surface winds. The SST patterns are found to exert a strong influence on the surface winds, acting against the intrinsic large-scale circulation slow-down to produce a near-zero surface wind speed change averaged in space. The intrinsic slow-down and SST pattern effects combine to maintain a muted precipitation response despite the near-zero change in surface wind speed. Because the planetary boundary layer is decoupled from the free troposphere, the surface wind speed change cannot be regarded as an indicator for the trend of the tropical tropospheric circulation. As a result, there is no inconsistency between observed changes in surface winds and future projections of the atmospheric circulation: The total tropospheric circulation, dominated by the zonal wind (e.g., Walker cell), tends to slow down with global warming, while the meridional circulation (i.e. Hadley cell) and total surface winds are by no means predicted to weaken robustly.

  12. Analysis of discontinuities across thin inhomogeneities, groundwater/surface water interactions in river networks, and circulation about slender bodies using slit elements in the Analytic Element Method

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Groundwater and surface water contain interfaces across which hydrologic functions are discontinuous. Thin elements with high hydraulic conductivity in a porous media focus groundwater, which flows through such inhomogeneities and causes an abrupt change in stream function across their interfaces, a...

  13. Transport of dissolved trace elements in surface runoff and leachate from a coastal plain soil after poultry litter application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The application of poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus) litter to agricultural soils may exacerbate losses of trace elements in runoff water, an emerging concern to water quality. We evaluated trace elements (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese, mercury, selenium and zinc) in surface runoff and ...

  14. Global Geochemical Variation on the Lunar Surface: A Three-Element Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. R.; Lawrence, D. J.; Vaniman, D.; Feldman, W. C.; Elphic, R. C.; Barraclough, B. L.; Maurice, S.; Lucey, P. G.; Binder, A. B.

    1999-01-01

    We present a method for displaying the relative abundances of three important elements (Th, Fe, and Ti) on the same map projection of the lunar surface. Using Th-, Fe-, and Ti-elemental abundances from orbital geochemical data and assigning each element a primary color, a false-color map of the lunar surface was created. This approach is similar to the ternary diagram approach presented by Davis and Spudis with some important differences, discussed later. For the present maps, Th abundances were measured by the Lunar Prospector (LP) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer(GRS).The new LPGRS low-altitude dataset was used in this analysis. Iron and Ti weight percentages were based on Clementine spectral reflectance data smoothed to the LP low altitude footprint. This method of presentation was designed to aid in the location and recognition of three principal lunar compositions: ferroan anorthosite (FAN), mare basalts (MB), and the Mg suite/ KREEP-rich rocks on the lunar surface, with special emphasis on the highlands and specific impact basins. In addition to the recognition of these endmember rock compositions, this method is an attempt to examine the relationship between elemental compositions that do not conform readily to previously accepted or observed endmember rocks in various specific regions of interest, including eastern highlands regions centered on 150 deg longitude, and a northern highlands Th-rich region observed. The LP low-altitude data has full width at half-maximum spatial resolution of about 40 km. The Clementine spectral reflectance datasets were adapted using an equal-area, gaussian smoothing routine to this footprint. In addition, these datasets, reported in weight percent of FeO and of Ti02, were adjusted to Fe and Ti weight percentages. Each dataset was then assigned one of the three primary colors: blue for Th, red for Fe, and green for Ti. For each element, the data range was normalized to represent the ratio of each point to the maximum in the dataset. (To

  15. Global Geochemical Variation on the Lunar Surface: A Three-Element Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. R.; Lawrence, D. J.; Vaniman, D.; Feldman, W. C.; Elphic, R. C.; Barraclough, B. L.; Maurice, S.; Lucey, P. G.; Binder, A. B.

    1999-01-01

    We present a method for displaying the relative abundances of three important elements (Th, Fe, and Ti) on the same map projection of the lunar surface. Using Th-, Fe-, and Ti-elemental abundances from orbital geochemical data and assigning each element a primary color, a false-color map of the lunar surface was created. This approach is similar to the ternary diagram approach presented by Davis and Spudis with some important differences, discussed later. For the present maps, Th abundances were measured by the Lunar Prospector (LP) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer(GRS).The new LPGRS low-altitude dataset was used in this analysis. Iron and Ti weight percentages were based on Clementine spectral reflectance data smoothed to the LP low altitude footprint. This method of presentation was designed to aid in the location and recognition of three principal lunar compositions: ferroan anorthosite (FAN), mare basalts (MB), and the Mg suite/ KREEP-rich rocks on the lunar surface, with special emphasis on the highlands and specific impact basins. In addition to the recognition of these endmember rock compositions, this method is an attempt to examine the relationship between elemental compositions that do not conform readily to previously accepted or observed endmember rocks in various specific regions of interest, including eastern highlands regions centered on 150 deg longitude, and a northern highlands Th-rich region observed. The LP low-altitude data has full width at half-maximum spatial resolution of about 40 km. The Clementine spectral reflectance datasets were adapted using an equal-area, gaussian smoothing routine to this footprint. In addition, these datasets, reported in weight percent of FeO and of Ti02, were adjusted to Fe and Ti weight percentages. Each dataset was then assigned one of the three primary colors: blue for Th, red for Fe, and green for Ti. For each element, the data range was normalized to represent the ratio of each point to the maximum in the dataset. (To

  16. Glucocorticoids regulate the human occludin gene through a single imperfect palindromic glucocorticoid response element.

    PubMed

    Harke, Nina; Leers, Jörg; Kietz, Silke; Drenckhahn, Detlev; Förster, Carola

    2008-11-25

    The 65kDa protein occludin is an essential element of the blood-brain barrier. This integral membrane protein represents an important part of the tight junctions, which seal and protect the blood brain barrier against paracellular diffusion of solutes to the brain parenchyme and are therefore responsible for the high resistance and low permeability between cerebral capillary endothelial cells. However, the molecular basis for the regulation of occludin gene expression is only incompletely understood. In former projects we showed that treatment of a brain microvascular cell line, cEND, with glucocorticoids resulted in increased occludin expression in cell-cell-contacts [Förster, C., Silwedel, C., Golenhofen, N., Burek, M., Kietz, S., Mankertz, J., Drenckhahn, D., 2005. Occludin as direct target for glucocorticoid-induced improvement of blood-brain barrier properties in a murine in vitro system. J. Physiol. 565, Pt 2, 475-486]. Induction of occludin expression by glucocorticoids was shown to be dependent on the glucocorticoid receptor. This study aims to identify the underlying molecular mechanism of gene expression and to identify potential glucocorticoid receptor binding sites within the occludin promoter, the glucocorticoid response elements. We identified one candidate glucocorticoid response element within the distal part of the occludin promoter that differs from the consensus glucocorticoid response element by the presence of a 4-basepair instead of a 3-basepair spacer between two highly degenerate halfsites (5'-ACATGTGTTTACAAAT-3'). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed binding of the glucocorticoid receptor to this site. The need for glucocorticoid receptor dimerization to induce gene expression was further confirmed by transfection studies using wild type and glucocorticoid receptor dimerization-deficient expression vectors, indicating that transactivation of occludin occurs through the glucocorticoid response element

  17. Concussion in professional football: brain responses by finite element analysis: part 9.

    PubMed

    Viano, David C; Casson, Ira R; Pellman, Elliot J; Zhang, Liying; King, Albert I; Yang, King H

    2005-11-01

    Brain responses from concussive impacts in National Football League football games were simulated by finite element analysis using a detailed anatomic model of the brain and head accelerations from laboratory reconstructions of game impacts. This study compares brain responses with physician determined signs and symptoms of concussion to investigate tissue-level injury mechanisms. The Wayne State University Head Injury Model (Version 2001) was used because it has fine anatomic detail of the cranium and brain with more than 300,000 elements. It has 15 different material properties for brain and surrounding tissues. The model includes viscoelastic gray and white brain matter, membranes, ventricles, cranium and facial bones, soft tissues, and slip interface conditions between the brain and dura. The cranium of the finite element model was loaded by translational and rotational accelerations measured in Hybrid III dummies from 28 laboratory reconstructions of NFL impacts involving 22 concussions. Brain responses were determined using a nonlinear, finite element code to simulate the large deformation response of white and gray matter. Strain responses occurring early (during impact) and mid-late (after impact) were compared with the signs and symptoms of concussion. Strain concentration "hot spots" migrate through the brain with time. In 9 of 22 concussions, the early strain "hot spots" occur in the temporal lobe adjacent to the impact and migrate to the far temporal lobe after head acceleration. In all cases, the largest strains occur later in the fornix, midbrain, and corpus callosum. They significantly correlated with removal from play, cognitive and memory problems, and loss of consciousness. Dizziness correlated with early strain in the orbital-frontal cortex and temporal lobe. The strain migration helps explain coup-contrecoup injuries. Finite element modeling showed the largest brain deformations occurred after the primary head acceleration. Midbrain strain

  18. Emission-dominated gas exchange of elemental mercury vapor over natural surfaces in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xun; Lin, Che-Jen; Yuan, Wei; Sommar, Jonas; Zhu, Wei; Feng, Xinbin

    2016-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) emission from natural surfaces plays an important role in global Hg cycling. The present estimate of global natural emission has large uncertainty and remains unverified against field data, particularly for terrestrial surfaces. In this study, a mechanistic model is developed for estimating the emission of elemental mercury vapor (Hg0) from natural surfaces in China. The development implements recent advancements in the understanding of air-soil and air-foliage exchange of Hg0 and redox chemistry in soil and on surfaces, incorporates the effects of soil characteristics and land use changes by agricultural activities, and is examined through a systematic set of sensitivity simulations. Using the model, the net exchange of Hg0 between the atmosphere and natural surfaces of mainland China is estimated to be 465.1 Mg yr-1, including 565.5 Mg yr-1 from soil surfaces, 9.0 Mg yr-1 from water bodies, and -100.4 Mg yr-1 from vegetation. The air-surface exchange is strongly dependent on the land use and meteorology, with 9 % of net emission from forest ecosystems; 50 % from shrubland, savanna, and grassland; 33 % from cropland; and 8 % from other land uses. Given the large agricultural land area in China, farming activities play an important role on the air-surface exchange over farmland. Particularly, rice field shift from a net sink (3.3 Mg uptake) during April-October (rice planting) to a net source when the farmland is not flooded (November-March). Summing up the emission from each land use, more than half of the total emission occurs in summer (51 %), followed by spring (28 %), autumn (13 %), and winter (8 %). Model verification is accomplished using observational data of air-soil/air-water fluxes and Hg deposition through litterfall for forest ecosystems in China and Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast to the earlier estimate by Shetty et al. (2008) that reported large emission from vegetative surfaces using an evapotranspiration approach, the estimate in

  19. Regulation of expression of the stress response gene, Osp94: identification of the tonicity response element and intracellular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ryoji; Randall, Jeffrey D; Ito, Eri; Manshio, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Yoshio; Gullans, Steven R

    2004-06-15

    Osp94 (osmotic stress protein of 94 kDa) is known to be up-regulated by hypertonic and heat-shock stresses in mouse renal inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD3) cells. To investigate the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation of the Osp94 gene under these stresses, we cloned and characterized the 5'-flanking region of the gene. Sequence analysis of the proximal 4 kb 5'-flanking region revealed a TATA-less G/C-rich promoter region containing a cluster of Sp1 sites. We also identified upstream sequence motifs similar to the consensus TonE/ORE (tonicity-response element/osmotic response element) as well as the consensus HSE (heat-shock element). Luciferase activities in cells transfected with reporter constructs containing a TonE/ORE-like element (Osp94-TonE; 5'-TGGAAAGGACCAG-3') and HSE enhanced reporter gene expression under hypertonic stress and heat-shock stress respectively. Electrophoretic gel mobility-shift assay showed a slowly migrating band binding to the Osp94-TonE probe, probably representing binding of TonEBP (TonE binding protein) to this enhancer element. Furthermore, treatment of mIMCD3 cells with MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) inhibitors (SB203580, PD98059, U0126 and SP600125) and a proteasome inhibitor (MG132) suppressed the increase in Osp94 gene expression caused by hypertonic NaCl. These results indicate that the 5'-flanking region of Osp94 gene contains a hypertonicity sensitive cis -acting element, Osp94-TonE, which is distinct from a functional HSE. Furthermore, the MAPK and proteasome systems appear to be, at least in part, involved in hypertonic-stressmediated regulation of Osp94 through Osp94-TonE.

  20. Juvenile hormone regulation of an insect gene: a specific transcription factor and a DNA response element.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Saleh, D S; Wyatt, G R

    1996-08-30

    We have used locust fat body nuclear protein extracts and upstream DNA of the juvenile hormone (JH)-inducible locust gene, jhp21, to examine the regulation of specific transcription by JH. Promoter activity was assayed with G-free cassette reporter constructs. Nuclear extracts from adult female fat body, previously exposed to JH or an analog, actively transcribe from the jhp21 promoter and a control adenovirus major late (AdML) promoter, whereas extracts from JH-deprived female fat body, or other tissues, transcribe strongly from the AdML promoter but weakly or not at all from the jhp21 promoter. Transcription is enhanced by sequences between -140 and -211 nt from the jhp21 transcription start point (tsp), which include a CAAT box, and also by sequences between -1056 and -1200. A 15-nt partially palindromic sequence element found at -1152, resembling known hormone response elements, was shown to stimulate transcription when restored to truncated jhp21 DNA. Two very similar sequences occur further upstream. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), the same sequence element was shown to specifically bind a protein that was present in nuclear extracts from JH-exposed, but not from JH-deprived, fat body. Several lines of evidence suggest that the DNA element may be a JH response element (JHRE). The JH-induced protein that binds to it appears to be a transcription factor that activates the initiation of JH target gene (jhp21) transcription, and could be a JH receptor.

  1. The effect of loading time on flexible pavement dynamic response: a finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hao; Solaimanian, Mansour; Kumar, Tanmay; Stoffels, Shelley

    2007-12-01

    Dynamic response of asphalt concrete (AC) pavements under moving load is a key component for accurate prediction of flexible pavement performance. The time and temperature dependency of AC materials calls for utilizing advanced material characterization and mechanistic theories, such as viscoelasticity and stress/strain analysis. In layered elastic analysis, as implemented in the new Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG), the time dependency is accounted for by calculating the loading times at different AC layer depths. In this study, the time effect on pavement response was evaluated by means of the concept of “pseudo temperature.” With the pavement temperature measured from instrumented thermocouples, the time and temperature dependency of AC materials was integrated into one single factor, termed “effective temperature.” Via this effective temperature, pavement responses under a transient load were predicted through finite element analysis. In the finite element model, viscoelastic behavior of AC materials was characterized through relaxation moduli, while the layers with unbound granular material were assumed to be in an elastic mode. The analysis was conducted for two different AC mixtures in a simplified flexible pavement structure at two different seasons. Finite element analysis results reveal that the loading time has a more pronounced impact on pavement response in the summer for both asphalt types. The results indicate that for reasonable prediction of dynamic response in flexible pavements, the effect of the depth-dependent loading time on pavement temperature should be considered.

  2. Bacteria Responsive Antibacterial Surfaces for Indwelling Device Infections

    PubMed Central

    Traba, Christian; Liang, Jun F.

    2014-01-01

    Indwelling device infections now represents life-threatening circumstances as a result of the biofilms’ tolerance to antibiotic treatments. Current antibiotic impregnation approaches through sustained antibiotic release have some unsolved problems which include short life-span, narrowed antibacterial spectrum, ineffectiveness towards resistant mutants, and the potential to hasten the antibiotic resistance process. In this study, bacteria responsive anti-biofilm surfaces were developed using bioactive peptides with proved activity to antibiotic resistant bacteria and biofilms. Resulting surfaces were stable under physiological conditions and in the presence of high concentrations of salts (0.5 M NaCl) and biomacromolcules (1.0% DNA and 2.0% alginate), and thus showed good biocompatibility to various tissue cells. However, lytic peptide immobilized surfaces could sense bacteria adhesion and kill attached bacteria effectively and specifically, so biofilms were unable to develop on the lytic peptide immobilized surfaces. Bacteria responsive catheters remained biofilm free for up to a week. Therefore, the bacteria responsive antibacterial surfaces developed in this study represent new opportunities for indwelling device infections. PMID:25481445

  3. Optimizing hydrothermal pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse using response surface methodology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugarcane bagasse was characterized as a feedstock for production of ethanol using hydrothermal pretreatment. Reaction temperature and time were varied between 160-200 deg C and 5-20 min, respectively, using a response surface experimental design. The liquid fraction was analyzed for soluble carbohy...

  4. Response Surface Model Building Using Orthogonal Arrays for Computer Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit; Braun, Robert D.; Moore, Arlene A.; Lepsch, Roger A.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates response surface methods for computer experiments and discusses some of the approaches available. Orthogonal arrays constructed for computer experiments are studied and an example application to a technology selection and optimization study for a reusable launch vehicle is presented.

  5. Effect of design selection on response surface performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, William C.

    1993-01-01

    The mathematical formulation of the engineering optimization problem is given. Evaluation of the objective function and constraint equations can be very expensive in a computational sense. Thus, it is desirable to use as few evaluations as possible in obtaining its solution. In solving the equation, one approach is to develop approximations to the objective function and/or restraint equations and then to solve the equation using the approximations in place of the original functions. These approximations are referred to as response surfaces. The desirability of using response surfaces depends upon the number of functional evaluations required to build the response surfaces compared to the number required in the direct solution of the equation without approximations. The present study is concerned with evaluating the performance of response surfaces so that a decision can be made as to their effectiveness in optimization applications. In particular, this study focuses on how the quality of approximations is effected by design selection. Polynomial approximations and neural net approximations are considered.

  6. The Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM) for Seismic Response of Topographical Irregularities in Layered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Zazueta, M. A.; Perton, M.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Sánchez-Alvaro, E.

    2013-12-01

    The seismic hazard assessment of extended developments, such as a dam, a bridge or a pipeline, needs the strong ground motion simulation taking into account the effects of surface geology. In many cases the incoming wave field can be obtained from attenuation relations or simulations for layered media using Discrete Wave Number (DWN). Sometimes there is a need to include in simulations the seismic source as well. A number of methods to solve these problems have been developed. Among them the Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods (FEM and FDM) are generally preferred because of the facility of use. Nevertheless, the analysis of realistic dynamic loading induced by earthquakes requires a thinner mesh of the entire domain to consider high frequencies. Consequently this may imply a high computational cost. The Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM) can also be employed. Here it is used to study the response of a site to historical seismic activity. This method is particularly suited to model wave propagation through wide areas as it requires only the meshing of boundaries. Moreover, it is well suited to represent finely the diffraction that can occur on a fault. However, the IBEM has been applied mainly to simple geometrical configurations. In this communication significant refinements of the formulation are presented. Using IBEM we can simulate wave propagation in complex geometrical configurations such as a stratified medium crossed by thin faults or having a complex topography. Two main developments are here described; one integrates the DWN method inside the IBEM in order to represent the Green's functions of stratified media with relatively low computational cost but assuming unbounded parallel flat layers, and the other is the extension of IBEM to deal with multi-regions in contact which allows more versatility with a higher computational cost compared to the first one but still minor to an equivalent FEM formulation. The two approaches are fully

  7. Endothelial responses of magnesium and other alloying elements in magnesium-based stent materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable tailored magnesium (Mg) alloys are some of the most promising scaffolds for cardiovascular stents. During the course of degradation after implantation, all the alloying elements in the scaffold will be released to the surrounding vascular tissues. However, fundamental questions regarding the toxicity of alloying elements towards vascular cells, the maximum amount of each element that could be used in alloy design, or how each of the alloying elements affects vascular cellular activity and gene expression, are still not fully answered. This work systematically addressed these questions by revealing how application of different alloying elements commonly used in Mg stent materials influences several indices of human endothelial cell health, i.e., viability, proliferations, cytoskeletal reorganizations, migration, and the gene expression profile. The overall cell viability and proliferation showed a decreasing trend with increasing concentrations of the ions, and the half maximal effective concentrations (EC50) for each element were determined. When applied at a low concentration of around 10 mM, Mg had no adverse effects but improved cell proliferation and migration instead. Mg ions also altered endothelial gene expression significantly in a dose dependent manner. Most of the changed genes are related to angiogenesis and the cell adhesion signaling pathways. Findings from this work provide useful information on maximum safe doses of these ions for endothelial cells, endothelial responses towards these metal ions, and some guidance for future Mg stent design. PMID:25363018

  8. Polycomb/Trithorax response elements and epigenetic memory of cell identity.

    PubMed

    Ringrose, Leonie; Paro, Renato

    2007-01-01

    Polycomb/Trithorax group response elements (PRE/TREs) are fascinating chromosomal pieces. Just a few hundred base pairs long, these elements can remember and maintain the active or silent transcriptional state of their associated genes for many cell generations, long after the initial determining activators and repressors have disappeared. Recently, substantial progress has been made towards understanding the nuts and bolts of PRE/TRE function at the molecular level and in experimentally mapping PRE/TRE sites across whole genomes. Here we examine the insights, controversies and new questions that have been generated by this recent flood of data.

  9. CCQM Pilot Study CCQM-P140: Quantitative surface analysis of multi-element alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Joong; Jang, Jong Shik; Kim, An Soon; Suh, Jung Ki; Chung, Yong-Duck; Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan; Wirth, Thomas; Unger, Wolfgang; Kang, Hee Jae; Popov, Oleg; Popov, Inna; Kuselman, Ilya; Lee, Yeon Hee; Sykes, David E.; Wang, Meiling; Wang, Hai; Ogiwara, Toshiya; Nishio, Mitsuaki; Tanuma, Shigeo; Simons, David; Szakal, Christopher; Osborn, William; Terauchi, Shinya; Ito, Mika; Kurokawa, Akira; Fujimoto, Toshiyuki; Jordaan, Werner; Jeong, Chil Seong; Havelund, Rasmus; Spencer, Steve; Shard, Alex; Streeck, Cornelia; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Eicke, Axel; Terborg, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    A pilot study for a quantitative surface analysis of multi-element alloy films has been performed by the Surface Analysis Working Group (SAWG) of the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance (CCQM). The aim of this pilot study is to evaluate a protocol for a key comparison to demonstrate the equivalence of measures by National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and Designated Institutes (DI) for the mole fractions of multi-element alloy films. A Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) film with non-uniform depth distribution was chosen as a representative multi-element alloy film. The mole fractions of the reference and the test CIGS films were certified by isotope dilution—inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry. A total number counting (TNC) method was used as a method to determine the signal intensities of the constituent elements acquired in SIMS, XPS and AES depth profiling. TNC method is comparable with the certification process because the certified mole fractions are the average values of the films. The mole fractions of the CIGS films were measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analysis and Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDX). Fifteen laboratories from eight NMIs, one DI, and six non-NMIs participated in this pilot study. The average mole fractions of the reported data showed relative standard deviations from 5.5 % to 6.8 % and average relative expanded uncertainties in the range from 4.52 % to 4.86 % for the four test CIGS specimens. These values are smaller than those in the key comparison CCQM-K67 for the measurement of mole fractions of Fe-Ni alloy films. As one result it can be stated that SIMS, XPS and AES protocols relying on the quantification of CIGS films using the TNC method are mature to be used in a CCQM key comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The

  10. Response analysis of the lumbar spine during regular daily activities--a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Galbusera, Fabio; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2010-07-20

    A non-linear poroelastic finite element model of the lumbar spine was developed to investigate spinal response during daily dynamic physiological activities. Swelling was simulated by imposing a boundary pore pressure of 0.25 MPa at all external surfaces. Partial saturation of the disc was introduced to circumvent the negative pressures otherwise computed upon unloading. The loading conditions represented a pre-conditioning full day followed by another day of loading: 8h rest under a constant compressive load of 350 N, followed by 16 h loading phase under constant or cyclic compressive load varying in between 1000 and 1600 N. In addition, the effect of one or two short resting periods in the latter loading phase was studied. The model yielded fairly good agreement with in-vivo and in-vitro measurements. Taking the partial saturation of the disc into account, no negative pore pressures were generated during unloading and recovery phase. Recovery phase was faster than the loading period with equilibrium reached in only approximately 3h. With time and during the day, the axial displacement, fluid loss, axial stress and disc radial strain increased whereas the pore pressure and disc collagen fiber strains decreased. The fluid pressurization and collagen fiber stiffening were noticeable early in the morning, which gave way to greater compression stresses and radial strains in the annulus bulk as time went by. The rest periods dampened foregoing differences between the early morning and late in the afternoon periods. The forgoing diurnal variations have profound effects on lumbar spine biomechanics and risk of injury.

  11. Optimum surface roughness prediction for titanium alloy by adopting response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aimin; Han, Yang; Pan, Yuhang; Xing, Hongwei; Li, Jinze

    Titanium alloy has been widely applied in industrial engineering products due to its advantages of great corrosion resistance and high specific strength. This paper investigated the processing parameters for finish turning of titanium alloy TC11. Firstly, a three-factor central composite design of experiment, considering the cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut, are conducted in titanium alloy TC11 and the corresponding surface roughness are obtained. Then a mathematic model is constructed by the response surface methodology to fit the relationship between the process parameters and the surface roughness. The prediction accuracy was verified by the one-way ANOVA. Finally, the contour line of the surface roughness under different combination of process parameters are obtained and used for the optimum surface roughness prediction. Verification experimental results demonstrated that material removal rate (MRR) at the obtained optimum can be significantly improved without sacrificing the surface roughness.

  12. Elemental responses to subduction-zone metamorphism: Constraints from the North Qilian Mountain, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yuanyuan; Niu, Yaoling; Song, Shuguang; Davidson, Jon; Liu, Xiaoming

    2013-02-01

    Subduction zone metamorphism (SZM) and behaviors of chemical elements in response to this process are important for both arc magmatism and mantle compositional heterogeneity. In this paper, we report the results of our petrographic and geochemical studies on blueschist and eclogite facies rocks of sedimentary and basaltic protoliths from two metamorphic sub-belts with different metamorphic histories in the North Qilian Mountain, Northwest China. The protolith of low-grade blueschists is basaltic in composition and is most likely produced in a back-arc setting, while the protoliths of high-grade blueschists/eclogites geochemically resemble the present-day normal and enriched mid-oceanic ridge basalts plus some volcanic arc rocks. The meta-sedimentary rocks, including meta-graywacke, meta-pelite, meta-chert and marble, show geochemical similarity to global oceanic (subducted) sediments. Assuming that high field strength elements (HFSEs) are relatively immobile, the correlated variations of rare earth elements (REEs) and Th with HFSEs suggest that all these elements are probably also immobile, whereas Pb and Sr are mobile in rocks of both basaltic and sedimentary protoliths during SZM. Ba, Cs and Rb are immobile in rocks of sedimentary protoliths and mobile in rocks of basaltic protolith. The apparent mobility of U in rocks of basaltic protolith may be inherited from seafloor alterations rather than caused by SZM. On the basis of in situ mineral compositional analysis (both major and trace elements), the most significant trace element storage minerals in these subduction-zone metamorphic rocks are: lawsonite, pumpellyite, apatite, garnet and epidote group minerals for REEs, white micas (both phengite and paragonite) for large ion lithophile elements, rutile and titanite for HFSEs. The presence and stability of these minerals exert the primary controls on the geochemical behaviors of most of these elements during SZM. The immobility of REEs, Th and U owing to their

  13. Surface kinetic model for isotopic and trace element fractionation during precipitation of calcite from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    A surface reaction kinetic model is developed for predicting Ca isotope fractionation and metal/Ca ratios of calcite as a function of rate of precipitation from aqueous solution. The model is based on the requirements for dynamic equilibrium; i.e. proximity to equilibrium conditions is determined by the ratio of the net precipitation rate (Rp) to the gross forward precipitation rate (Rf), for conditions where ionic transport to the growing crystal surface is not rate-limiting. The value of Rp has been experimentally measured under varying conditions, but the magnitude of Rf is not generally known, and may depend on several factors. It is posited that, for systems with no trace constituents that alter the surface chemistry, Rf can be estimated from the bulk far-from-equilibrium dissolution rate of calcite (Rb or kb), since at equilibrium Rf = Rb, and Rp = 0. Hence it can be inferred that Rf ≈ Rp + Rb. The dissolution rate of pure calcite is measureable and is known to be a function of temperature and pH. At given temperature and pH, equilibrium precipitation is approached when Rp (=Rf - Rb) « Rb. For precipitation rates high enough that Rp » Rb, both isotopic and trace element partitioning are controlled by the kinetics of ion attachment to the mineral surface, which tend to favor more rapid incorporation of the light isotopes of Ca and discriminate weakly between trace metals and Ca. With varying precipitation rate, a transition region between equilibrium and kinetic control occurs near Rp ≈ Rb for Ca isotopic fractionation. According to this model, Ca isotopic data can be used to estimate Rf for calcite precipitation. Mechanistic models for calcite precipitation indicate that the molecular exchange rate is not constant

  14. Surface kinetic model for isotopic and trace element fractionation during precipitation of calcite from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, D.

    2010-10-15

    A surface reaction kinetic model is developed for predicting Ca isotope fractionation and metal/Ca ratios of calcite as a function of rate of precipitation from aqueous solution. The model is based on the requirements for dynamic equilibrium; i.e. proximity to equilibrium conditions is determined by the ratio of the net precipitation rate (R{sub p}) to the gross forward precipitation rate (R{sub f}), for conditions where ionic transport to the growing crystal surface is not rate-limiting. The value of R{sub p} has been experimentally measured under varying conditions, but the magnitude of R{sub f} is not generally known, and may depend on several factors. It is posited that, for systems with no trace constituents that alter the surface chemistry, R{sub f} can be estimated from the bulk far-from-equilibrium dissolution rate of calcite (R{sub b} or k{sub b}), since at equilibrium R{sub f} = R{sub b}, and R{sub p} = 0. Hence it can be inferred that R{sub f} {approx} R{sub p} + R{sub b}. The dissolution rate of pure calcite is measureable and is known to be a function of temperature and pH. At given temperature and pH, equilibrium precipitation is approached when R{sub p} (= R{sub f} - R{sub b}) << R{sub b}. For precipitation rates high enough that R{sub p} >> R{sub b}, both isotopic and trace element partitioning are controlled by the kinetics of ion attachment to the mineral surface, which tend to favor more rapid incorporation of the light isotopes of Ca and discriminate weakly between trace metals and Ca. With varying precipitation rate, a transition region between equilibrium and kinetic control occurs near R{sub p} {approx} R{sub b} for Ca isotopic fractionation. According to this model, Ca isotopic data can be used to estimate R{sub f} for calcite precipitation. Mechanistic models for calcite precipitation indicate that the molecular exchange rate is not constant at constant T and pH, but rather is dependent also on solution saturation state and hence R{sub p

  15. Finite element surface registration incorporating curvature, volume preservation, and statistical model information.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Thomas; Dedner, Andreas; Lüthi, Marcel; Vetter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for nonrigid registration of 3D surfaces and images. The method can be used to register surfaces by means of their distance images, or to register medical images directly. It is formulated as a minimization problem of a sum of several terms representing the desired properties of a registration result: smoothness, volume preservation, matching of the surface, its curvature, and possible other feature images, as well as consistency with previous registration results of similar objects, represented by a statistical deformation model. While most of these concepts are already known, we present a coherent continuous formulation of these constraints, including the statistical deformation model. This continuous formulation renders the registration method independent of its discretization. The finite element discretization we present is, while independent of the registration functional, the second main contribution of this paper. The local discontinuous Galerkin method has not previously been used in image registration, and it provides an efficient and general framework to discretize each of the terms of our functional. Computational efficiency and modest memory consumption are achieved thanks to parallelization and locally adaptive mesh refinement. This allows for the first time the use of otherwise prohibitively large 3D statistical deformation models.

  16. Finite Element Surface Registration Incorporating Curvature, Volume Preservation, and Statistical Model Information

    PubMed Central

    Lüthi, Marcel; Vetter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for nonrigid registration of 3D surfaces and images. The method can be used to register surfaces by means of their distance images, or to register medical images directly. It is formulated as a minimization problem of a sum of several terms representing the desired properties of a registration result: smoothness, volume preservation, matching of the surface, its curvature, and possible other feature images, as well as consistency with previous registration results of similar objects, represented by a statistical deformation model. While most of these concepts are already known, we present a coherent continuous formulation of these constraints, including the statistical deformation model. This continuous formulation renders the registration method independent of its discretization. The finite element discretization we present is, while independent of the registration functional, the second main contribution of this paper. The local discontinuous Galerkin method has not previously been used in image registration, and it provides an efficient and general framework to discretize each of the terms of our functional. Computational efficiency and modest memory consumption are achieved thanks to parallelization and locally adaptive mesh refinement. This allows for the first time the use of otherwise prohibitively large 3D statistical deformation models. PMID:24187581

  17. Finite element analysis on influence of implant surface treatments, connection and bone types.

    PubMed

    Santiago Junior, Joel Ferreira; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Almeida, Daniel Augusto de Faria; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effect of different dental implant designs, bone type, loading, and surface treatment on the stress distribution around the implant by using the 3D finite-element method. Twelve 3D models were developed with Invesalius 3.0, Rhinoceros 4.0, and Solidworks 2010 software. The analysis was processed using the FEMAP 10.2 and NeiNastran 10.0 software. The applied oblique forces were 200 N and 100 N. The results were analyzed using maps of maximum principal stress and bone microstrain. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The results showed that the Morse taper design was most efficient in terms of its distribution of stresses (p<0.05); the external hexagon with platform switching did not show a significant difference from an external hexagon with a standard platform (p>0.05). The different bone types did not show a significant difference in the stress/strain distribution (p>0.05). The surface treatment increased areas of stress concentration under axial loading (p<0.05) and increased areas of microstrain under axial and oblique loading (p<0.05) on the cortical bone. The Morse taper design behaved better biomechanically in relation to the bone tissue. The treated surface increased areas of stress and strain on the cortical bone tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Adsorption of nonmetallic elements on defect-free MgO(001) surface - DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pašti, Igor A.; Baljozović, Miloš; Skorodumova, Natalia V.

    2015-02-01

    Adsorption of 11 non-metals (H, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl and Br) on defect-free MgO(001) surface was investigate using DFT approach. Adsorption energies were found to be between - 0.56 eV (hydrogen adsorption) and - 2.63 eV (carbon adsorption). Charge transfer from substrate to adsorbate was observed to follow the periodicity in the Periodic Table of Elements, as increases from left to right and decreases from top to bottom. All investigated adsorbates prefer oxygen sites on MgO surface. The analysis of adsorbate-MgO(001) electronic structure suggested that the electronic structure of the O adsorption center and adsorbate atom is molecule-like and there is no strong interaction with MgO electronic bands. Based on the obtained dataset for adsorption energies of selected non-metallic adsorbates (X) the reactivity of MgO towards the bond cleavage in the cases of X-X, H-X and HO-X bonds was discussed. Obtained results point to weak reactivity of MgO(001) towards atomic adsorption and low activity for bond cleavage. However, these results can be used as a starting point for the functionalization of MgO, particularly in the cases where bond cleavage activity and surface-mediated stabilization of dissociation products are desired.

  19. Fast element mapping of titanium wear around implants of different surface structures.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Ulrich; Bühner, Martin; Büchter, Andre; Kruse-Lösler, Birgit; Stamm, Thomas; Wiesmann, Hans Peter

    2006-04-01

    The effect of unintended titanium release around oral implants remains a biological concern. The current study was undertaken to evaluate a new detection system of element mapping in biological probes. A new scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy detection method was used to map the features of titanium contamination in peri-implant bone around implants with different surface structures. The amount of titanium wear was highest adjacent to titanium-plasma-sprayed surfaces, followed by sandblastered large grid acid-etched and smooth surfaces. A high sensitivity of titanium detection over large areas of bone tissue was observed. A high spatial resolution of titanium wear particles (20 nm) could be reached and correlated to the ultrastructural morphological features of peri-implant tissue. Cells adjacent to titanium wear revealed no signs of morphological alterations on a nanoscale level at early periods of implant/bone interaction. The new technique may serve as a fast and effective tool to evaluate titanium release effects in biological probes.

  20. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) emissions from snow surfaces in northern New York.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, J Alexander; Holsen, Thomas M; Mondal, Sumona

    2013-01-01

    Snow surface-to-air exchange of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) was measured using a modified Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) dynamic flux chamber (DFC) in a remote, open site in Potsdam, New York. Sampling was conducted during the winter months of 2011. The inlet and outlet of the DFC were coupled with a Tekran Model 2537A mercury (Hg) vapor analyzer using a Tekran Model 1110 two port synchronized sampler. The surface GEM flux ranged from -4.47 ng m(-2) hr(-1) to 9.89 ng m(-2) hr(-1). For most sample periods, daytime GEM flux was strongly correlated with solar radiation. The average nighttime GEM flux was slightly negative and was not well correlated with any of the measured meteorological variables. Preliminary, empirical models were developed to estimate GEM emissions from snow surfaces in northern New York. These models suggest that most, if not all, of the Hg deposited with and to snow is reemitted to the atmosphere.

  1. Extended volume and surface scatterometer for optical characterization of 3D-printed elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannenberg, Florian; Uebeler, Denise; Weiß, Jürgen; Pescoller, Lukas; Weyer, Cornelia; Hahlweg, Cornelius

    2015-09-01

    The use of 3d printing technology seems to be a promising way for low cost prototyping, not only of mechanical, but also of optical components or systems. It is especially useful in applications where customized equipment repeatedly is subject to immediate destruction, as in experimental detonics and the like. Due to the nature of the 3D-printing process, there is a certain inner texture and therefore inhomogeneous optical behaviour to be taken into account, which also indicates mechanical anisotropy. Recent investigations are dedicated to quantification of optical properties of such printed bodies and derivation of corresponding optimization strategies for the printing process. Beside mounting, alignment and illumination means, also refractive and reflective elements are subject to investigation. The proposed measurement methods are based on an imaging nearfield scatterometer for combined volume and surface scatter measurements as proposed in previous papers. In continuation of last year's paper on the use of near field imaging, which basically is a reflective shadowgraph method, for characterization of glossy surfaces like printed matter or laminated material, further developments are discussed. The device has been extended for observation of photoelasticity effects and therefore homogeneity of polarization behaviour. A refined experimental set-up is introduced. Variation of plane of focus and incident angle are used for separation of various the images of the layers of the surface under test, cross and parallel polarization techniques are applied. Practical examples from current research studies are included.

  2. Two dimensional finite element thermal model of laser surface glazing for H13 tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, I. R.; Yin, D.; Naher, S.

    2016-10-01

    A two dimensional (2D) transient thermal model with line-heat-source was developed by Finite Element Method (FEM) for laser surface glazing of H13 tool steel using commercial software-ANSYS 15. The geometry of the model was taken as a transverse circular cross-section of cylindrical specimen. Two different power levels (300W, 200W) were used with 0.2mm width of laser beam and 0.15ms exposure time. Temperature distribution, heating and cooling rates, and the dimensions of modified surface were analysed. The maximum temperatures achieved were 2532K (2259°C) and 1592K (1319°C) for laser power 300W and 200W respectively. The maximum cooling rates were 4.2×107 K/s for 300W and 2×107 K/s for 200W. Depths of modified zone increased with increasing laser power. From this analysis, it can be predicted that for 0.2mm beam width and 0.15ms time exposer melting temperature of H13 tool steel is achieved within 200-300W power range of laser beam in laser surface glazing.

  3. Finite element method analysis of surface acoustic wave devices with microcavities for detection of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senveli, Sukru U.; Tigli, Onur

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces the use of finite element method analysis tools to investigate the use of a Rayleigh type surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor to interrogate minute amounts of liquids trapped in microcavities placed on the delay line. Launched surface waves in the ST-X quartz substrate couple to the liquid and emit compressional waves. These waves form a resonant cavity condition and interfere with the surface waves in the substrate. Simulations show that the platform operates in a different mechanism than the conventional mass loading of SAW devices. Based on the proposed detection mechanism, it is able to distinguish between variations of 40% and 90% glycerin based on phase relations while using liquid volumes smaller than 10 pl. Results from shallow microcavities show high correlation with sound velocity parameter of the liquid whereas deeper microcavities display high sensitivities with respect to glycerin concentration. Simulated devices yield a maximum sensitivity of -0.77°/(% glycerin) for 16 μm wavelength operation with 8 μm deep, 24 μm wide, and 24 μm long microcavities.

  4. Surface myomechanical responses recorded on a scanner galvanometer.

    PubMed

    Rafolt, D; Gallasch, E

    2002-09-01

    A moving magnet galvanometer equipped with lever and indentor was evaluated for mechanomyography (MMG). First, the precision of the galvanometer was tested on a piezo-electric disc actuator. Using a 50 mm lever, synthesised micromotions with an amplitude of 1 microm could be detected (noise level < 0.2 microm) at static indentation forces ranging from 0.1 to 2 N. Then the galvanometer was mounted on an isometric ankle dynamometer to sense calf-muscle responses (N = 6). In the first protocol, twitch contractions were elicited by electrical stimulation while the indentation force was increased. Twitch amplitudes, twitch contraction times and twitch half-relaxation times were analysed from the surface and contraction responses. With indentation force (0.1-0.5 N), the amplitude of the surface responses increased (+61%), contraction and half-relaxation times, however, were not influenced. The mean twitch contraction time from the surface responses (60 +/- 11 ms) was shorter than that from the contraction responses (115 +/- 7 ms), indicating more fast-contracting fibres under the indented area. In the second protocol, voluntary target contractions were produced, and the surface responses were simultaneously recorded on an accelerometer. After double differentiation of the galvanometer signal, both acceleration MMGs showed a high coincidence in the time and frequency domains. With an indentation force of 2 N applied on the accelerometer, the signal amplitude (-10%) and the mean frequency (-19%) decreased. A specific application of this galvanometer-dynamometer test system is the assessment of regeneration processes in paraplegics with long-term denervated muscles.

  5. Mercury (II) sensor based on monitoring dissociation rate of the trans-acting factor MerR from cis-element by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masaki; Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Ueda, Shunsaku; Maeda, Isamu

    2015-05-15

    Transcriptional switches regulate gene expression in response to environmental changes surrounding cell. Many studies have focused on two fundamentally different models of transcriptional control by bacterial metalloregulatory protein. Distortion of the DNA fragment including cis-element, to which the trans-acting factor MerR binds, is accepted as the mechanism of gene expression regulation by Hg (II) while, in cases of the other trans-acting factors ArsR and CadC, events of association to and dissociation from cis-element are known to control transcription in response to As (III) and Cd (II), respectively. In this study, interactions between green-fluorescent-protein-tagged trans-acting factor and immobilized cis-element were analyzed on solid surface. Fluorescent measurements and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) responses revealed that although the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) was much lower in MerR than in ArsR and CadC, the dissociation rate of MerR from DNA increased in response to Hg (II) at concentrations of 5-10(4) µg l(-1). These results firstly demonstrate an increase of KD between MerR and its recognition site in DNA by Hg (II), and possibility of rapid Hg (II) quantification with the low detection limit (5 µg l(-1)) and the high dynamic range (10(1)-10(4) µg l(-1)). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Surface reactivity in the pathogenic response to particulates.

    PubMed Central

    Fubini, B

    1997-01-01

    The peculiar characteristics of dust toxicity are discussed in relation to the processes taking place at the particle-biological medium interface. Because of surface reactivity, toxicity of solids is not merely predictable from chemical composition and molecular structure, as with water soluble compounds. With particles having the same bulk composition, micromorphology (the thermal and mechanical history of dust and adsorption from the environment) determines the kind and abundance of active surface sites, thus modulating reactivity toward cells and tissues. The quantitative evaluation of doses is discussed in comparisons of dose-response relationships obtained with different materials. Responses related to the surface of the particle are better compared on a per-unit surface than per-unit weight basis. The role of micromorphology, hydrophilicity, and reactive surface cations in determining the pathogenicity of inhaled particles is described with reference to silica and asbestos toxicity. Heating crystalline silica decreases hydrophilicity, with consequent modifications in membranolytic potential, retention, and transport. Transition metal ions exposed at the surface generate free radicals in aqueous suspensions. Continuous redox cycling of iron, with consequent activation-reactivation of the surface sites releasing free radicals, could account for the long-term pathogenicity caused by the inhalation of iron-containing fibers. In various pathogenicities caused by mixed dusts, the contact between components modifies toxicity. Hard metal lung disease is caused by exposure to mixtures of metals and carbides, typically cobalt (Co) and tungsten carbide (WC), but not to single components. Toxicity stems from reactive oxygen species generation in a mechanism involving both Co metal and WC in mutual contact. A relationship between the extent of water adsorption and biopersistence is proposed for vitreous fibers. Modifications of the surface taking place in vivo are

  7. The glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit gene promoter contains both positive and negative glucocorticoid response elements.

    PubMed

    Vander Kooi, Beth T; Onuma, Hiroshi; Oeser, James K; Svitek, Christina A; Allen, Shelley R; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Chazin, Walter J; O'Brien, Richard M

    2005-12-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase catalyzes the final step in the gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic pathways. Glucocorticoids stimulate glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit (G6Pase) gene transcription and studies performed in H4IIE hepatoma cells demonstrate the presence of a glucocorticoid response unit (GRU) in the proximal G6Pase promoter. In vitro deoxyribonuclease I footprinting analyses show that the glucocorticoid receptor binds to three glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) in the -231 to -129 promoter region and transfection results indicate all three contribute to glucocorticoid induction of G6Pase gene transcription. Furthermore, binding sites for hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 and -4, CRE binding factors, and FKHR (FOXO1a) are required for the full glucocorticoid response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that dexamethasone treatment stimulates glucocorticoid receptor and FKHR binding to the endogenous G6Pase promoter. Surprisingly, although glucocorticoids stimulate G6Pase gene transcription, deoxyribonuclease I footprinting and transfection analyses demonstrate the presence of a negative GRE and an associated negative accessory factor element in the -271 to -225 promoter region, which inhibit the glucocorticoid response. This appears to be the first report of a promoter that contains both positive and negative GREs, which function within the same cellular environment. We hypothesize that targeted signaling to the negative accessory element within the GRU may provide tight regulation of the glucocorticoid stimulation.

  8. Response Mechanism for Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors Based on Surface-Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiansheng; Lu, Yanyan

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical model is established to describe the response mechanism of surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors based on physical adsorption on the detector surface. Wohljent's method is utilized to describe the relationship of sensor output (frequency shift of SAW oscillator) and the mass loaded on the detector surface. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) formula and its improved form are introduced to depict the adsorption behavior of gas on the detector surface. By combining the two methods, we obtain a theoretical model for the response mechanism of SAW gas sensors. By using a commercial SAW gas chromatography (GC) analyzer, an experiment is performed to measure the frequency shifts caused by different concentration of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). The parameters in the model are given by fitting the experimental results and the theoretical curve agrees well with the experimental data. PMID:24743157

  9. Exploration on Kerf-angle and Surface Roughness in Abrasive Waterjet Machining using Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Munuswamy Naresh; Muthukrishnan, Nambi

    2017-05-01

    Abrasive waterjet machining is a mechanical based unconventional cutting process which uses a mixture of abrasives and pressurized water as an intermediate to cut the material. The present paper focuses in analyzing the effect process parameters like feed rate, water pressure, standoff distance and abrasive flow rate on the surface roughness and kerf-angle of AISI 1018 mild steel experimentally. The experiments were performed under Taguchi's L27 orthogonal array. Moreover, the optimal parameter that significantly reduces the surface roughness and kerf-angle were calculated through response surface method. The most dominating process parameter that affects the responses was calculated by the Analysis of variance. In addition, machined surfaces are further subjected to scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) for detailed study on the texture developed.

  10. Creating diversified response profiles from a single quenchometric sensor element by using phase-resolved luminescence.

    PubMed

    Tehan, Elizabeth C; Bukowski, Rachel M; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Titus, Albert H; Cartwright, Alexander N; Bright, Frank V

    2015-01-05

    We report a new strategy for generating a continuum of response profiles from a single luminescence-based sensor element by using phase-resolved detection. This strategy yields reliable responses that depend in a predictable manner on changes in the luminescent reporter lifetime in the presence of the target analyte, the excitation modulation frequency, and the detector (lock-in amplifier) phase angle. In the traditional steady-state mode, the sensor that we evaluate exhibits a linear, positive going response to changes in the target analyte concentration. Under phase-resolved conditions the analyte-dependent response profiles: (i) can become highly non-linear; (ii) yield negative going responses; (iii) can be biphasic; and (iv) can exhibit super sensitivity (e.g., sensitivities up to 300 fold greater in comparison to steady-state conditions).

  11. Dynamic Response of a Planetary Gear System Using a Finite Element/Contact Mechanics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Robert G.; Agashe, Vinayak; Vijayakar, Sandeep M.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic response of a helicopter planetary gear system is examined over a wide range of operating speeds and torques. The analysis tool is a unique, semianalytical finite element formulation that admits precise representation of the tooth geometry and contact forces that are crucial in gear dynamics. Importantly, no a priori specification of static transmission error excitation or mesh frequency variation is required; the dynamic contact forces are evaluated internally at each time step. The calculated response shows classical resonances when a harmonic of mesh frequency coincides with a natural frequency. However, peculiar behavior occurs where resonances expected to be excited at a given speed are absent. This absence of particular modes is explained by analytical relationships that depend on the planetary configuration and mesh frequency harmonic. The torque sensitivity of the dynamic response is examined and compared to static analyses. Rotation mode response is shown to be more sensitive to input torque than translational mode response.

  12. Dynamic Response of a Planetary Gear System Using a Finite Element/Contact Mechanics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Robert G.; Agashe, Vinayak; Vijayakar, Sandeep M.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic response of a helicopter planetary gear system is examined over a wide range of operating speeds and torques. The analysis tool is a unique, semianalytical finite element formulation that admits precise representation of the tooth geometry and contact forces that are crucial in gear dynamics. Importantly, no a priori specification of static transmission error excitation or mesh frequency variation is required; the dynamic contact forces are evaluated internally at each time step. The calculated response shows classical resonances when a harmonic of mesh frequency coincides with a natural frequency. However, peculiar behavior occurs where resonances expected to be excited at a given speed are absent. This absence of particular modes is explained by analytical relationships that depend on the planetary configuration and mesh frequency harmonic. The torque sensitivity of the dynamic response is examined and compared to static analyses. Rotation mode response is shown to be more sensitive to input torque than translational mode response.

  13. Creating Diversified Response Profiles from a Single Quenchometric Sensor Element by Using Phase-Resolved Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Tehan, Elizabeth C.; Bukowski, Rachel M.; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.; Titus, Albert H.; Cartwright, Alexander N.; Bright, Frank V.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new strategy for generating a continuum of response profiles from a single luminescence-based sensor element by using phase-resolved detection. This strategy yields reliable responses that depend in a predictable manner on changes in the luminescent reporter lifetime in the presence of the target analyte, the excitation modulation frequency, and the detector (lock-in amplifier) phase angle. In the traditional steady-state mode, the sensor that we evaluate exhibits a linear, positive going response to changes in the target analyte concentration. Under phase-resolved conditions the analyte-dependent response profiles: (i) can become highly non-linear; (ii) yield negative going responses; (iii) can be biphasic; and (iv) can exhibit super sensitivity (e.g., sensitivities up to 300 fold greater in comparison to steady-state conditions). PMID:25569752

  14. Global observations and modeling of atmosphere-surface exchange of elemental mercury: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Lin, Che-Jen; Wang, Xun; Sommar, Jonas; Fu, Xuewu; Feng, Xinbin

    2016-04-01

    Reliable quantification of air-surface fluxes of elemental Hg vapor (Hg0) is crucial for understanding mercury (Hg) global biogeochemical cycles. There have been extensive measurements and modeling efforts devoted to estimating the exchange fluxes between the atmosphere and various surfaces (e.g., soil, canopies, water, snow, etc.) in the past three decades. However, large uncertainties remain due to the complexity of Hg0 bidirectional exchange, limitations of flux quantification techniques and challenges in model parameterization. In this study, we provide a critical review on the state of science in the atmosphere-surface exchange of Hg0. Specifically, the advancement of flux quantification techniques, mechanisms in driving the air-surface Hg exchange and modeling efforts are presented. Due to the semi-volatile nature of Hg0 and redox transformation of Hg in environmental media, Hg deposition and evasion are influenced by multiple environmental variables including seasonality, vegetative coverage and its life cycle, temperature, light, moisture, atmospheric turbulence and the presence of reactants (e.g., O3, radicals, etc.). However, the effects of these processes on flux have not been fundamentally and quantitatively determined, which limits the accuracy of flux modeling. We compile an up-to-date global observational flux database and discuss the implication of flux data on the global Hg budget. Mean Hg0 fluxes obtained by micrometeorological measurements do not appear to be significantly greater than the fluxes measured by dynamic flux chamber methods over unpolluted surfaces (p = 0.16, one-tailed, Mann-Whitney U test). The spatiotemporal coverage of existing Hg0 flux measurements is highly heterogeneous with large data gaps existing in multiple continents (Africa, South Asia, Middle East, South America and Australia). The magnitude of the evasion flux is strongly enhanced by human activities, particularly at contaminated sites. Hg0 flux observations in East

  15. Atomic properties of element 113 and its adsorption on inert surfaces from ab initio Dirac-Coulomb calculations.

    PubMed

    Pershina, V; Borschevsky, A; Eliav, E; Kaldor, U

    2008-12-25

    Fully relativistic ab initio Dirac-Coulomb Fock-space coupled cluster calculations were performed on Tl and element 113. The calculated polarizabilty of element 113, 29.85 au, is the smallest in group 13, except for B. The estimated atomic and van der Waals radii of element 113 are also the smallest among these elements. Using the calculated atomic properties and an adsorption model, adsorption enthalpies of elements Al through 113 on inert surfaces, such as Teflon and polyethylene, are predicted. The trends in the atomic properties and DeltaH(ads) in group 13 were found to reverse from In to element 113, reflecting the strong relativistic contraction and stabilization of the outer np(1/2) orbital, which are largest for element 113. The small values of DeltaH(ads) for element 113 on Teflon (14 kJ/mol) and polyethylene (16 kJ/mol) guarantee its transport from the target chamber to the chemistry set up, and the 6 kJ/mol difference relative to Tl values makes possible the separation and identification of the superheavy element on the inert surfaces.

  16. Role of TATA-element in transcription from glucocorticoid receptor-responsive model promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, S; Schatt, M D; Rusconi, S

    1990-01-01

    Transcription activation properties of the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) on minimal, TATA-box containing or depleted promoters have been tested. We show that a cluster of Glucocorticoid Responsive Elements (GRE), upon activation by the GR, is sufficient to mediate abundant RNA-polymerase II transcription. We find that in absence of a bona fide TATA-element transcription initiates at a distance of 45-55bp from the activated GRE cluster with a marked preference for sequences homologous to the initiator element (Inr). Analyzing defined, bi-directional transcription units we demonstrate that the apparent reduction of specific transcription in strong, TATA-depleted promoters, is mainly due to loss of short-range promoter polarization. The implications for long-range promoter/enhancer communication mechanisms are also discussed. Images PMID:2402438

  17. Response of hot element wall shear stress gages in laminar oscillating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Murphy, J. D.; Giddings, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time-dependent response of hot element wall shear stress gages in unsteady periodic air flows is reported. The study has focused on wall shear stress in laminar oscillating flows produced on a flat plate by a free stream velocity composed of a mean component and a superposed sinusoidal variation. Two types of hot element gages, platinum film and flush wire, were tested for values of reduced frequency ranging from 0.14 to 2.36. Values of the phase angle of the wall shear stress variation relative to the free stream velocity, as indicated by the hot element gages, are compared with numerical prediction. The comparisons show that the gages indicate a wall shear stress variation that lags the true variation, and that the gages will also not indicate the correct wall shear stress variation in periodic turbulent flows.

  18. Response of hot element wall shear stress gages in laminar oscillating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Murphy, J. D.; Giddings, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time-dependent response of hot element wall shear stress gages in unsteady periodic air flows is reported. The study has focused on wall shear stress in laminar oscillating flows produced on a flat plate by a free stream velocity composed of a mean component and a superposed sinusoidal variation. Two types of hot element gages, platinum film and flush wire, were tested for values of reduced frequency ranging from 0.14 to 2.36. Values of the phase angle of the wall shear stress variation relative to the free stream velocity, as indicated by the hot element gages, are compared with numerical prediction. The comparisons show that the gages indicate a wall shear stress variation that lags the true variation, and that the gages will also not indicate the correct wall shear stress variation in periodic turbulent flows.

  19. Protein-surface interactions on stimuli-responsive polymeric biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Cross, Michael C; Toomey, Ryan G; Gallant, Nathan D

    2016-03-04

    Responsive surfaces: a review of the dependence of protein adsorption on the reversible volume phase transition in stimuli-responsive polymers. Specifically addressed are a widely studied subset: thermoresponsive polymers. Findings are also generalizable to other materials which undergo a similarly reversible volume phase transition. As of 2015, over 100,000 articles have been published on stimuli-responsive polymers and many more on protein-biomaterial interactions. Significantly, fewer than 100 of these have focused specifically on protein interactions with stimuli-responsive polymers. These report a clear trend of increased protein adsorption in the collapsed state compared to the swollen state. This control over protein interactions makes stimuli-responsive polymers highly useful in biomedical applications such as wound repair scaffolds, on-demand drug delivery, and antifouling surfaces. Outstanding questions are whether the protein adsorption is reversible with the volume phase transition and whether there is a time-dependence. A clear understanding of protein interactions with stimuli-responsive polymers will advance theoretical models, experimental results, and biomedical applications.

  20. Using Response Surface Methods to Correlate the Modal Test of an Inflatable Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Anju

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a practical application of response surface methods (RSM) to correlate a finite element model of a structural modal test. The test article is a quasi-cylindrical inflatable structure which primarily consists of a fabric weave, with an internal bladder and metallic bulkheads on either end. To mitigate model size, the fabric weave was simplified by representing it with shell elements. The task at hand is to represent the material behavior of the weave. The success of the model correlation is measured by comparing the four major modal frequencies of the analysis model to the four major modal frequencies of the test article. Given that only individual strap material properties were provided and material properties of the overall weave were not available, defining the material properties of the finite element model became very complex. First it was necessary to determine which material properties (modulus of elasticity in the hoop and longitudinal directions, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, etc.) affected the modal frequencies. Then a Latin Hypercube of the parameter space was created to form an efficiently distributed finite case set. Each case was then analyzed with the results input into RSM. In the resulting response surface it was possible to see how each material parameter affected the modal frequencies of the analysis model. If the modal frequencies of the analysis model and its corresponding parameters match the test with acceptable accuracy, it can be said that the model correlation is successful.

  1. Biologic response to titanium implants with laser-treated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Allegrini, Sergio; Yoshimoto, Marcelo; Salles, Marcos Barbosa; de Almeida Bressiani, Ana Helena

    2014-01-01

    To examine the biologic response to titanium implant surfaces treated with a neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. Sixty mini-implants made of grade 2 titanium were placed in the femora of 30 Wistar rats. Thirty implants had a machined surface and the other 30 had surfaces that were roughened by laser treatment. The animals were subdivided into three groups according to bone repair periods of 15, 30, and 60 days. The samples were observed under light and electron scanning microscopes and analyzed with the Student t test. Formation of new bone trabeculae toward the surface was apparent for the laser-treated implants at 15 days. Thin layers of bone matrix in intimate contact with the surface in the area of the central screw threads were observed, indicating high biocompatibility. Similar results were seen with machined implants after 30 days. A significant difference in bone formation was observed between the implant types at 15 days. Bone-to-implant contact was better on the surfaces subjected to laser treatment than on the machined titanium implants. The development of new laser treatments, which promote alterations in the surface energy as well as in the macro- and microstructures of titanium, may lead to improved bone-to-implant contact and thus better outcomes.

  2. A finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. II. Nonadiabaticity on coupled potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Warehime, Mick; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.

    2015-01-21

    This is the second in a series of papers detailing a MATLAB based implementation of the finite element method applied to collinear triatomic reactions. Here, we extend our previous work to reactions on coupled potential energy surfaces. The divergence of the probability current density field associated with the two electronically adiabatic states allows us to visualize in a novel way where and how nonadiabaticity occurs. A two-dimensional investigation gives additional insight into nonadiabaticity beyond standard one-dimensional models. We study the F({sup 2}P) + HCl and F({sup 2}P) + H{sub 2} reactions as model applications. Our publicly available code (http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM) is general and easy to use.

  3. Elements of the Chicxulub Impact Structure as Revealed in SRTM and Surface GPS Topographic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinsland, Gary L.; Sanchez, Gary; Kobrick, Michael; Cardador, Manuel Hurtado

    2003-01-01

    Pope et al. [1] utilized the elevations from the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) gravity data files to show that the main component of the surface expression of the Chicxulub Impact Structure is a roughly semi-circular, lowrelief depression about 90 km in diameter. They also identified other topographic features and the elements of the buried impact, which possibly led to the development of these features. These are summarized in Table 1. Kinsland et al. [2] presented a connection between these topographic anomalies, small gravity anomalies and buried structure of the impact. Very recently we have acquired digital topography data from NASA s Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Our subset covers 6 square degrees from 20deg N 91degW to 22deg N 88degW (corner to corner) with a pixel size of about 90m. This area includes all of the identified portion of the crater on land.

  4. Elements of the Chicxulub Impact Structure as Revealed in SRTM and Surface GPS Topographic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinsland, Gary L.; Sanchez, Gary; Kobrick, Michael; Cardador, Manuel Hurtado

    2003-01-01

    Pope et al. [1] utilized the elevations from the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) gravity data files to show that the main component of the surface expression of the Chicxulub Impact Structure is a roughly semi-circular, lowrelief depression about 90 km in diameter. They also identified other topographic features and the elements of the buried impact, which possibly led to the development of these features. These are summarized in Table 1. Kinsland et al. [2] presented a connection between these topographic anomalies, small gravity anomalies and buried structure of the impact. Very recently we have acquired digital topography data from NASA s Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Our subset covers 6 square degrees from 20deg N 91degW to 22deg N 88degW (corner to corner) with a pixel size of about 90m. This area includes all of the identified portion of the crater on land.

  5. Comparison of finite element and transfer matrix methods for numerical investigation of surface plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddouche, Issam; Cherbi, Lynda

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) in the visible regime at a metal/dielectric interface within two different waveguide structures, the first is a Photonic Crystal Fiber where the Full Vector Finite Element Method (FVFEM) is used and the second is a slab waveguide where the transfer matrix method (TMM) is used. Knowing the diversities between the two methods in terms of speed, simplicity, and scope of application, computation is implemented with respect to wavelength and metal layer thickness in order to analyze and compare the performances of the two methods. Simulation results show that the TMM can be a good approximation for the FVFEM and that SPPs behave more like modes propagating in a semi infinite metal/dielectric structure as metal thickness increases from about 150 nm.

  6. Element concentrations in surface soils of the Coconino Plateau, Grand Canyon region, Coconino County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2016-09-15

    This report provides the geochemical analyses of a large set of background soils collected from the surface of the Coconino Plateau in northern Arizona. More than 700 soil samples were collected at 46 widespread areas, sampled from sites that appear unaffected by mineralization and (or) anthropogenic contamination. The soils were analyzed for 47 elements, thereby providing data on metal concentrations in soils representative of the plateau. These background concentrations can be used, for instance, for comparison to metal concentrations found in soils potentially affected by natural and anthropogenic influences on the Coconino Plateau in the Grand Canyon region of Arizona.The soil sampling survey revealed low concentrations for the metals most commonly of environmental concern, such as arsenic, cobalt, chromium, copper, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, lead, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. For example, the median concentrations of the metals in soils of the Coconino Plateau were found to be comparable to the mean values previously reported for soils of the western United States.

  7. Experimental Validation of Two-dimensional Finite Element Method for Simulating Constitutive Response of Polycrystals During High Temperature Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sumit; Briant, Clyde L.; Krajewski, Paul E.; Bower, Allan F.; Taleff, Eric M.

    2007-04-01

    A finite element method was recently designed to model the mechanisms that cause superplastic deformation (A.F. Bower and E. Wininger, A Two-Dimensional Finite Element Method for Simulating the Constitutive Response and Microstructure of Polycrystals during High-Temperature Plastic Deformation, J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 2004, 52, p 1289-1317). The computations idealize the solid as a collection of two-dimensional grains, separated by sharp grain boundaries. The grains may deform plastically by thermally activated dislocation motion, which is modeled using a conventional crystal plasticity law. The solid may also deform by sliding on the grain boundaries, or by stress-driven diffusion of atoms along grain boundaries. The governing equations are solved using a finite element method, which includes a front-tracking procedure to monitor the evolution of the grain boundaries and surfaces in the solid. The goal of this article is to validate these computations by systematically comparing numerical predictions to experimental measurements of the elevated-temperature response of aluminum alloy AA5083 (M.-A. Kulas, W.P. Green, E.M. Taleff, P.E. Krajewski, and T.R. McNelley, Deformation Mechanisms in Superplastic AA5083 materials. Metall. Mater. Trans. A, 2005, 36(5), p 1249-1261). The experimental work revealed that a transition occurs from grain-boundary sliding to dislocation (solute-drag) creep at approximately 0.001/s for temperatures between 425 and 500 °C. In addition, increasing the grain size from 7 to 10 μm decreased the transition to significantly lower strain rates. Predictions from the finite element method accurately predict the effect of grain size on the transition in deformation mechanisms.

  8. Surface energy budget responses to radiative forcing at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nathaniel B.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Cox, Christopher J.; Noone, David; Persson, P. Ola G.; Steffen, Konrad

    2017-02-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet surface temperatures are controlled by an exchange of energy at the surface, which includes radiative, turbulent, and ground heat fluxes. Data collected by multiple projects are leveraged to calculate all surface energy budget (SEB) terms at Summit, Greenland, for the full annual cycle from July 2013 to June 2014 and extend to longer periods for the radiative and turbulent SEB terms. Radiative fluxes are measured directly by a suite of broadband radiometers. Turbulent sensible heat flux is estimated via the bulk aerodynamic and eddy correlation methods, and the turbulent latent heat flux is calculated via a two-level approach using measurements at 10 and 2 m. The subsurface heat flux is calculated using a string of thermistors buried in the snow pack. Extensive quality-control data processing produced a data set in which all terms of the SEB are present 75 % of the full annual cycle, despite the harsh conditions. By including a storage term for a near-surface layer, the SEB is balanced in this data set to within the aggregated uncertainties for the individual terms. November and August case studies illustrate that surface radiative forcing is driven by synoptically forced cloud characteristics, especially by low-level, liquid-bearing clouds. The annual cycle and seasonal diurnal cycles of all SEB components indicate that the non-radiative terms are anticorrelated to changes in the total radiative flux and are hence responding to cloud radiative forcing. Generally, the non-radiative SEB terms and the upwelling longwave radiation component compensate for changes in downwelling radiation, although exact partitioning of energy in the response terms varies with season and near-surface characteristics such as stability and moisture availability. Substantial surface warming from low-level clouds typically leads to a change from a very stable to a weakly stable near-surface regime with no solar radiation or from a weakly stable to neutral

  9. A multiple flux boundary element method applied to the description of surface water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hague, C. H.; Swan, C.

    2009-08-01

    This paper concerns a two dimensional numerical model based on a high-order boundary element method with fully nonlinear free surface boundary conditions. Multiple fluxes are applied as a method of removing the so-called “corner problem”, whereby the direction of the outward normal at geometric discontinuities is ill-defined. In the present method, both fluxes associated with differing directions of the outward normal at a corner are considered, allowing a single node to be placed at that position. This prevents any loss of information at what can be an important part of the boundary, especially if considering simulations of wave reflection and wave run-up. The method is compared to both the double node approach and the use of discontinuous elements and is shown to be a more accurate technique. The success of the method is further demonstrated by its ability to accurately simulate various problems involving wave transmission and wave-structure interactions at domain corners; the results being achieved without the need for filtering, smoothing or re-gridding of any kind.

  10. Investigation of turbulent wedges generated by different single surface roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traphan, Dominik; Meinlschmidt, Peter; Lutz, Otto; Peinke, Joachim; Gülker, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    It is known that small faults on rotor blades of wind turbines can cause significant power loss. In order to better understand the governing physical effects, in this experimental study, the formation of a turbulent wedge over a flat plate induced by single surface roughness elements is under investigation. The experiments are performed at different ambient pressure gradients, thus allowing conclusions about the formation of a turbulent wedge over an airfoil. With respect to typical initial faults on operating airfoils, the roughness elements are modified in both size and shape (raised or recessed). None intrusive experimental methods, such as stereoscopic PIV and LDA, enable investigations based on temporally and spatially highly resolved velocity measurements. In this way, a spectral analysis of the turbulent boundary layer is performed and differences in coherent structures within the wedge are identified. These findings are correlated with global measurements of the wedge carried out by infrared thermography. This correlation aims to enable distinguishing the cause and main properties of a turbulent wedge by the easy applicable method of infrared thermography, which is of practical relevance in the field of condition monitoring of wind turbines.

  11. Finite element modelling of surface acoustic wave device based corrugated microdiaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, Don W.; Al-Sarawi, Said; Lu, Tien-Fu; Abbott, Derek

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents modelling and analysis of microdiaphragms that are designed for implantable micropump applications. Microdiaphragms are considered to be a major component of micropumps. A securely operated, electrostatically actuated, fully passive micropump is designed using a novel method, which is based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices and wireless transcutaneous radio frequency (RF) communication. The device is capable of extracting the required power from the RF signal itself, like RFID (ID: identification device) tags; hence the need of a battery and active electronics is negated. Moreover, a SAW correlator is used for secure interrogation of the device. As a result, the device responds only to a unique RF signal, which has the same code as was implanted in the SAW correlator. Finite element analysis (FEA) based on code from ANSYS Inc. is carried out to model the microdiaphragm, and a Rayleigh-Ritz method based analytical model is developed to investigate the validity of the FEA results. During the FEA, a three-dimensional model of the diaphragm is developed and various kinds of corrugation profiles are considered for enhancing the device performance. A coupled-field analysis is carried out to model the electrostatics-solid interaction between the corrugated microdiaphragm and the SAW device. In modelling microdiaphragms, selection of appropriate material properties and element types, application of accurate constraints, and selection of suitable mesh parameters are carefully considered.

  12. Dipole excitation of surface plasmon on a conducting sheet: Finite element approximation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Matthias; Margetis, Dionisios; Luskin, Mitchell

    2017-06-01

    We formulate and validate a finite element approach to the propagation of a slowly decaying electromagnetic wave, called surface plasmon-polariton, excited along a conducting sheet, e.g., a single-layer graphene sheet, by an electric Hertzian dipole. By using a suitably rescaled form of time-harmonic Maxwell's equations, we derive a variational formulation that enables a direct numerical treatment of the associated class of boundary value problems by appropriate curl-conforming finite elements. The conducting sheet is modeled as an idealized hypersurface with an effective electric conductivity. The requisite weak discontinuity for the tangential magnetic field across the hypersurface can be incorporated naturally into the variational formulation. We carry out numerical simulations for an infinite sheet with constant isotropic conductivity embedded in two spatial dimensions; and validate our numerics against the closed-form exact solution obtained by the Fourier transform in the tangential coordinate. Numerical aspects of our treatment such as an absorbing perfectly matched layer, as well as local refinement and a posteriori error control are discussed.

  13. Bone Response to Surface-Modified Titanium Implants: Studies on the Early Tissue Response to Implants with Different Surface Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Larsson Wexell, C.; Thomsen, P.; Aronsson, B.-O.; Tengvall, P.; Rodahl, M.; Lausmaa, J.; Kasemo, B.; Ericson, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of experimental studies, the bone formation around systematically modified titanium implants is analyzed. In the present study, three different surface modifications were prepared and evaluated. Glow-discharge cleaning and oxidizing resulted in a highly stoichiometric TiO2 surface, while a glow-discharge treatment in nitrogen gas resulted in implants with essentially a surface of titanium nitride, covered with a very thin titanium oxide. Finally, hydrogen peroxide treatment of implants resulted in an almost stoichiometric TiO2, rich in hydroxyl groups on the surface. Machined commercially pure titanium implants served as controls. Scanning Auger Electron Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy revealed no significant differences in oxide thickness or surface roughness parameters, but differences in the surface chemical composition and apparent topography were observed. After surface preparation, the implants were inserted in cortical bone of rabbits and evaluated after 1, 3, and 6 weeks. Light microscopic evaluation of the tissue response showed that all implants were in contact with bone and had a large proportion of newly formed bone within the threads after 6 weeks. There were no morphological differences between the four groups. Our study shows that a high degree of bone contact and bone formation can be achieved with titanium implants of different surface composition and topography. PMID:24174936

  14. Elemental analyses of hypervelocity microparticle impact sites on Interplanetary Dust Experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. A.; Wortman, Jim J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1993-04-01

    The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity microparticles (approximately 0.2 to approximately 100 micron diameter) that struck the active sensors with enough energy to break down the 0.4 or 1.0 micron thick SIO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allowed detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of microparticle impact sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts were corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results were used to classify the particles' origins as 'manmade,' 'natural,' or 'indeterminate.' The last classification resulted from the presence of too little impactor residue, analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon and aluminum residues, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters of these features. Thus far a total of 79 randomly selected microparticle impact sites from the six primary sides of the LDEF have been analyzed: 36 from tray C-9 (Leading (ram), or East, side), 18 from tray C-3

  15. Elemental Analyses of Hypervelocity Microparticle Impact Sites on Interplanetary Dust Experiment Sensor Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, C. G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. A.; Wortman, J. J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity microparticles (approximately 0.2 to approximately 100 micron diameter) that struck the active sensors with enough energy to breakdown the 0.4 or 1.0 micron thick SiO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allowed detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of microparticle sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts were corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results classification resulted from the particles' origins as 'manmade', 'natural', or 'indeterminate'. The last classification resulted from the presence of too little impactor residue, analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon and aluminum residues, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters, of these features. Thus far, a total of 79 randomly selected microparticle impact sites from the six primary sides of the LDEF were analyzed: 36 from tray C-9 (Leading (ram), or east, side), 18 from tray C-3 (Trailing

  16. Elemental analyses of hypervelocity microparticle impact sites on Interplanetary Dust Experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. A.; Wortman, Jim J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity microparticles (approximately 0.2 to approximately 100 micron diameter) that struck the active sensors with enough energy to break down the 0.4 or 1.0 micron thick SIO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allowed detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of microparticle impact sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts were corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results were used to classify the particles' origins as 'manmade,' 'natural,' or 'indeterminate.' The last classification resulted from the presence of too little impactor residue, analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon and aluminum residues, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters of these features. Thus far a total of 79 randomly selected microparticle impact sites from the six primary sides of the LDEF have been analyzed: 36 from tray C-9 (Leading (ram), or East, side), 18 from tray C-3

  17. Elemental Analyses of Hypervelocity Microparticle Impact Sites on Interplanetary Dust Experiment Sensor Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, C. G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. A.; Wortman, J. J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity microparticles (approximately 0.2 to approximately 100 micron diameter) that struck the active sensors with enough energy to breakdown the 0.4 or 1.0 micron thick SiO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allowed detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of microparticle sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts were corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results classification resulted from the particles' origins as 'manmade', 'natural', or 'indeterminate'. The last classification resulted from the presence of too little impactor residue, analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon and aluminum residues, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters, of these features. Thus far, a total of 79 randomly selected microparticle impact sites from the six primary sides of the LDEF were analyzed: 36 from tray C-9 (Leading (ram), or east, side), 18 from tray C-3 (Trailing

  18. X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Direct Element Specific Surface Magnetometry of Nanomagnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, James G.

    1997-03-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of xray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the "sum rules."[1] Unfortunately, sum rule analyses are hampered by several limitations [2], including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic Xray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al [3] demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data of linear and circular dichroisms. Now we [4] have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus [5], it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together [6], this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source. [7,8] This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. 1. B.T. Thole et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 68,1943 (1992); P. Carra et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 694 (1993). 2. J.G. Tobin et al Phys. Rev. B 52, 6530 (1995). 3. E. Tamura et al, Phys. Rev. Lett 73, 1533 (1994) 4. J.G. Tobin, K.W. Goodman, F.O. Schumann, R.F. Willis, J

  19. Determination of thorium, uranium and potassium elemental concentrations in surface soils in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Tzortzis, Michalis; Tsertos, Haralabos

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive study was conducted to determine thorium, uranium and potassium elemental concentrations in surface soils throughout the accessible area of Cyprus using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. A total of 115 soil samples was collected from all over the bedrock surface of the island based on the different lithological units of the study area. The soil samples were air-dried, sieved through a fine mesh, sealed in 1000-ml plastic Marinelli beakers, and measured in the laboratory in terms of their gamma radioactivity for a counting time of 18 h each. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, elemental concentrations were determined for thorium (range from 2.5 x 10(-3) to 9.8 microg g(-1)), uranium (from 8.1 x 10(-4) to 3.2 microg g(-1)) and potassium (from 1.3 x 10(-4) to 1.9%). The arithmetic mean values (A.M. +/- S.D.) calculated from all samples are: (1.2+/-1.7 microg g(-1)), (0.6+/-0.7) microg g(-1), and (0.4+/-0.3%), for thorium, uranium and potassium, respectively, which are by a factor of three-six lower than the world average values of 7.4 microg g(-1) (Th), 2.8 microg g(-1) (U) and 1.3% (K) derived from all data available worldwide. The best-fitting relation between the concentrations of Th and K versus U and also of K versus Th, is essentially of linear type with a correlation coefficient of 0.93, 0.84 and 0.90, respectively. The Th/U, K/U and K/Th ratios (slopes) extracted are equal to 2.0, 2.8 x 10(3) and 1.4 x 10(3), respectively.

  20. Stem cell responses to plasma surface modified electrospun polyurethane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zandén, Carl; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Padel, Thomas; Wittgenstein, Julia; Liu, Johan; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-07-01

    The topographical effects from functional materials on stem cell behavior are currently of interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here we investigate the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses. The plasma gases were found to induce three combinations of fiber surface functionalities and roughness textures. On randomly oriented fibers, plasma treatments lead to substantially increased hESC attachment and proliferation as compared to native fibers. Argon plasma was found to induce the most optimal combination of surface functionality and roughness for cell expansion. Contact guided migration of cells and alignment of cell processes were observed on aligned fibers. Neuronal differentiation around 5% was found for all samples and was not significantly affected by the induced variations of surface functional group distribution or individual fiber topography. In this study the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses is studied with the goal of clarifying the potential effects of functional materials on stem cell behavior, a topic of substantial interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Partial-slip frictional response of rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Paggi, Marco; Pohrt, Roman; Popov, Valentin L

    2014-06-05

    If two elastic bodies with rough surfaces are first pressed against each other and then loaded tangentially, sliding will occur at the boundary of the contact area while the inner parts may still stick. With increasing tangential force, the sliding parts will expand while the sticking parts shrink and finally vanish. In this paper, we study the fractions of the contact area, tangential force and tangential stiffness, associated with the sticking portion of the contact area, as a function of the total applied tangential force up to the onset of full sliding. For the numerical analysis randomly rough, fractal surfaces are used, with the Hurst exponent H ranging from 0.1 to 0.9. Numerical simulations by boundary element method are compared with an analytical analysis in the framework of the Greenwood and Williamson (GW) model. In both cases, a universal linear dependency between the real contact area fraction in stick condition and the applied tangential force is found, regardless of the Hurst exponent of the rough surfaces. Regarding the dependence of the differential tangential stiffness on the tangential force, a linear relation is found in the GW case. For randomly rough surfaces, a nonlinear relation depending on H is derived.

  2. Mineral elements of subtropical tree seedlings in response to elevated carbon dioxide and nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenjuan; Zhou, Guoyi; Liu, Juxiu; Zhang, Deqiang; Liu, Shizhong; Chu, Guowei; Fang, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Mineral elements in plants have been strongly affected by increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and nitrogen (N) deposition due to human activities. However, such understanding is largely limited to N and phosphorus in grassland. Using open-top chambers, we examined the concentrations of potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), aluminum (Al), copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn) in the leaves and roots of the seedlings of five subtropical tree species in response to elevated CO2 (ca. 700 μmol CO2 mol(-1)) and N addition (100 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) from 2005 to 2009. These mineral elements in the roots responded more strongly to elevated CO2 and N addition than those in the leaves. Elevated CO2 did not consistently decrease the concentrations of plant mineral elements, with increases in K, Al, Cu and Mn in some tree species. N addition decreased K and had no influence on Cu in the five tree species. Given the shifts in plant mineral elements, Schima superba and Castanopsis hystrix were less responsive to elevated CO2 and N addition alone, respectively. Our results indicate that plant stoichiometry would be altered by increasing CO2 and N deposition, and K would likely become a limiting nutrient under increasing N deposition in subtropics.

  3. Finite-element simulation of transient heat response in ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Ei'ichi; Kagawa, Yukio

    1992-05-01

    The application of the finite-element method to a transient heat response problem in electrostrictive ultrasonic transducers during their pulsed operation is described. The temperature and thermal stress distribution are of practical importance for the design of the ultrasonic transducers when they are operated at intense levels. Mechanical vibratory loss is responsible for heat in the elastic parts while dielectric loss in the ferroelectric parts. A finite-element computer model is proposed for the temperature change evaluation in the transducers with time. Natural and forced cooling convection and heat radiation from the transducers' boundaries are included. Simulation is made for Langevin-type transducer models, for which comparison is made with experimental data.

  4. Designing Pulse Laser Surface Modification of H13 Steel Using Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqida, S. N.; Brabazon, D.; Naher, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a design of experiment (DOE) for laser surface modification process of AISI H13 tool steel in achieving the maximum hardness and minimum surface roughness at a range of modified layer depth. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 slab laser was used to process AISI H13 tool steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, overlap percentage and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The response surface method with Box-Behnken design approach in Design Expert 7 software was used to design the H13 laser surface modification process. Metallographic study and image analysis were done to measure the modified layer depth. The modified surface roughness was measured using two-dimensional surface profilometer. The correlation of the three laser processing parameters and the modified surface properties was specified by plotting three-dimensional graph. The hardness properties were tested at 981 mN force. From metallographic study, the laser modified surface depth was between 37 μm and 150 μm. The average surface roughness recorded from the 2D profilometry was at a minimum value of 1.8 μm. The maximum hardness achieved was between 728 and 905 HV0.1. These findings are significant to modern development of hard coatings for wear resistant applications.

  5. Designing Pulse Laser Surface Modification of H13 Steel Using Response Surface Method

    SciTech Connect

    Aqida, S. N.; Brabazon, D.; Naher, S.

    2011-01-17

    This paper presents a design of experiment (DOE) for laser surface modification process of AISI H13 tool steel in achieving the maximum hardness and minimum surface roughness at a range of modified layer depth. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO{sub 2} slab laser was used to process AISI H13 tool steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, overlap percentage and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The response surface method with Box-Behnken design approach in Design Expert 7 software was used to design the H13 laser surface modification process. Metallographic study and image analysis were done to measure the modified layer depth. The modified surface roughness was measured using two-dimensional surface profilometer. The correlation of the three laser processing parameters and the modified surface properties was specified by plotting three-dimensional graph. The hardness properties were tested at 981 mN force. From metallographic study, the laser modified surface depth was between 37 {mu}m and 150 {mu}m. The average surface roughness recorded from the 2D profilometry was at a minimum value of 1.8 {mu}m. The maximum hardness achieved was between 728 and 905 HV{sub 0.1}. These findings are significant to modern development of hard coatings for wear resistant applications.

  6. Highly sensitive and reversible silicon nanowire biosensor to study nuclear hormone receptor protein and response element DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Jun; Huang, Min Joon; Luo, Zhan Hong Henry; Tay, Guang Kai Ignatius; Lim, Eu-Jin Andy; Liu, Edison T; Thomsen, Jane S

    2010-10-15

    To thoroughly understand the role that estrogen receptors partake in regulation of gene expression, characterization of estrogen receptors (ERs) and estrogen-response elements (EREs) interactions is essential. In the work, we present a highly sensitive and reusable silicon nanowire (SiNW) biosensor to study the interactions between human ER proteins (ER, α and β subtypes) and EREs (dsDNA). The proteins were covalently immobilized on the SiNW surface. Various EREs including wild-type, mutant and scrambled DNA sequences were then applied to the protein-functionalized SiNW surface. Due to negatively charged dsDNA, binding of the EREs to the ERs on the n-type SiNW biosensor leads to the accumulation of negative charges on the surface, thereby inducing increase in resistance. The results show that the specificity of the ERE-ERα binding is higher than that of the ERE-ERβ binding, what is more, the mutant ERE reduces the binding affinity for both ERα and ERβ. By applying various concentrations of wild-type ERE to the bound ERα, a very low concentration of 10 fM wild-type ERE was found to be able to bind to the ERα. The reversible association and dissociation between ERα and wt-ERE was achieved, pointing to a reusable biosensor for protein-DNA binding. Through the study, we have established the SiNW biosensor as a promising method in providing comprehensive study for hormone receptor-response element interactions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Spatial And Temporal Variation In The Dissolved Trace Element Chemistry Of Chesapeake Bay Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, E.; Hannigan, R.; Jones, C.

    2001-12-01

    Surface waters were collected from sea grass beds around the Chesapeake Bay of Virginia as well as from the mouths of the York, James, Potomac and Rappahannock rivers and Tangier and Smith islands. These sea grass beds represent the nursery habitats for a variety of sport fish including Spotted Sea Trout and Weakfish. Trace element ratios of fish otoliths record the unique chemistries of bodies of water in which the fish live. The data presented here represent the initial results of a "ground-truthing" investigation of the relationships between the water and otolith chemistry. Waters were collected bi-monthly (July through September) from 30 sites around the western and eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay including major tributaries and Tangier and Smith islands. Water was collected using trace metal clean procedures including filtration through a 0.45 uM filter and acidification in the field to pH < 2 with ultra-pure nitric acid. Dissolved trace element composition was measured by sector field ICP-MS. The trace element chemistry of samples show both spatial and temporal variation. Using discriminant analysis it is not possible to statistically classify samples to the respective zones (western shore, eastern shore or islands) but it is possible to separate samples from the Tangier and Smith island sites from the eastern and western shore sites. Elements that allow this classification include Ce and Th, which are found in higher concentration in the samples from the island sites than in the eastern and western shore samples. These relationships follow the trends observed in pH and dissolved oxygen likely related to a restricted flow regime between the islands and the eastern shore. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios are unique for the sea grass beds along the western shore and allow the distinction of beds located between the York and Rappahannock rivers from those between the Rappahannock and Potomac rivers. Sr and Ba concentrations are variable between sites along the eastern

  8. Trace Elements in the Sea Surface Microlayer: Results from a Two Year Study in the Florida Keys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebling, A. M.; Westrich, J. R.; Lipp, E. K.; Mellett, T.; Buck, K. N.; Landing, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    Natural and anthropogenic aerosols are a significant source of trace elements to oligotrophic ocean surface waters, where they provide episodic pulses of limiting micronutrients for the microbial community. Opportunistic bacteria have been shown to experience rapid growth during deposition events. However, little is known about the fate of trace elements at the air-sea interface, i.e. the sea surface microlayer. It has been hypothesized that dust particles would be retained in the sea surface microlayer long enough to undergo chemical and physical changes that would affect the bioavailability of trace elements. In this study, aerosols, sea surface microlayer, and underlying water column samples were collected in the Florida Keys in July 2014 and May 2015 at various locations and analyzed for a suite of dissolved and particulate trace elements. Sea surface microlayer samples ( 50 μm) were collected using a cylinder of ultra-pure quartz glass; a novel adaptation of the glass plate technique. Sampling sites ranged from a more pristine environment approximately ten kilometers offshore to a more anthropogenic environment within a shallow bay a few hundred meters offshore. While it was clear from the results that dust deposition events played a large role in the chemical composition of the sea surface microlayer (elevated concentrations in dissolved and particulate trace elements associated with dust deposition), the location where the samples were collected also had a large impact on the sea surface microlayer as well as the underlying water column. The results were compared with other parameters analyzed such as Vibrio cultures as well as iron speciation, providing an important step towards our goal of understanding of the fate of trace elements in the sea surface microlayer as well as the specific effects of aeolian dust deposition on heterotrophic microbes in the upper ocean.

  9. Improvements to a Response Surface Thermal Model for Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Stephen W.; Walker, William Q.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to determine if a Design of Experiments (DOE)/Response Surface Methodology could be applied to on-orbit thermal analysis and produce a set of Response Surface Equations (RSE) that predict Orion vehicle temperatures within 10 F. The study used the Orion Outer Mold Line model. Five separate factors were identified for study: yaw, pitch, roll, beta angle, and the environmental parameters. Twenty-three external Orion components were selected and their minimum and maximum temperatures captured over a period of two orbits. Thus, there are 46 responses. A DOE case matrix of 145 runs was developed. The data from these cases were analyzed to produce a fifth order RSE for each of the temperature responses. For the 145 cases in the DOE matrix, the agreement between the engineering data and the RSE predictions was encouraging with 40 of the 46 RSEs predicting temperatures within the goal band. However, the verification cases showed most responses did not meet the 10 F goal. After reframing the focus of the study to better align the RSE development with the purposes of the model, a set of RSEs for both the minimum and maximum radiator temperatures was produced which predicted the engineering model output within +/-4 F. Therefore, with the correct application of the DOE/RSE methodology, RSEs can be developed that provide analysts a fast and easy way to screen large numbers of environments and assess proposed changes to the RSE factors.

  10. [Construction of a general AAV vector regulated by minimal and artificial hypoxic-responsive element].

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiao-wei; Sun, Li-jun; Hao, Yue-wen; Yang, Guang-xiao; Wang, Quan-ying

    2011-03-01

    To synthesize the minimal and artificial HRE, and to insert it into the anterior extremity of CMV promoter of a AAV plasmid, and then to construct the AAV regulated by hypoxic-responsive element which was introduced into 293 cell by method of Ca3(PO4)2 using three plasmids. Thus obtaining the adenoassociated virus vector regulated by hypoxic-responsive element was possibly used for gene therapy in ischemia angiocardiopathy and cerebrovascular disease. Artificially synthesize the 36 bp nucleotide sequences of four connection in series HIF-binding sites A/GCGTG(4×HBS)and a 35 bp nucleotide sequences spacing inserted into anterior extremity of CMV promoter TATA Box, then amplified by PCR. The cDNA fragment was confirmed to be right by DNA sequencing. Molecular biology routine method was used to construct a AAV vector regulated by minimal hypoxic-responsive element after the normal CMV promoter in AAV vector was replaced by the CMV promoter included minimal hypoxic-responsive element. Then, NT4-6His-PR39 fusogenic peptide was inserted into MCS of the plasmid, the recombinant AAV vector was obtained by three plasmid co-transfection in 293 cells, in which we can also investigate the expression of 6×His using immunochemistry in hypoxia environment. Artificial HRE was inserted into anterior extremity of CMV promoter and there was a correct spacing between the HRE and the TATA-box. The DNA sequencing and restriction enzyme digestion results indicated that the AAV regulated by hypoxic-responsive element was successfully constructed. Compared to the control group, the expressions of 6×His was significantly increased in the experimental groups in hypoxia environment, which confirmed that the AAV effectually regulated by the minimal HRE was inserted into anterior extremity of CMV promoter. The HRE is inserted into anterior extremity of CMV promoter to lack incision enzyme recognition site by PCR. And eukaryotic expression vector regulated by hypoxic-responsive is constructed

  11. The sensitivity of biological finite element models to the resolution of surface geometry: a case study of crocodilian crania

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Alistair R.; McHenry, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    The reliability of finite element analysis (FEA) in biomechanical investigations depends upon understanding the influence of model assumptions. In producing finite element models, surface mesh resolution is influenced by the resolution of input geometry, and influences the resolution of the ensuing solid mesh used for numerical analysis. Despite a large number of studies incorporating sensitivity studies of the effects of solid mesh resolution there has not yet been any investigation into the effect of surface mesh resolution upon results in a comparative context. Here we use a dataset of crocodile crania to examine the effects of surface resolution on FEA results in a comparative context. Seven high-resolution surface meshes were each down-sampled to varying degrees while keeping the resulting number of solid elements constant. These models were then subjected to bite and shake load cases using finite element analysis. The results show that incremental decreases in surface resolution can result in fluctuations in strain magnitudes, but that it is possible to obtain stable results using lower resolution surface in a comparative FEA study. As surface mesh resolution links input geometry with the resulting solid mesh, the implication of these results is that low resolution input geometry and solid meshes may provide valid results in a comparative context. PMID:26056620

  12. The sensitivity of biological finite element models to the resolution of surface geometry: a case study of crocodilian crania.

    PubMed

    McCurry, Matthew R; Evans, Alistair R; McHenry, Colin R

    2015-01-01

    The reliability of finite element analysis (FEA) in biomechanical investigations depends upon understanding the influence of model assumptions. In producing finite element models, surface mesh resolution is influenced by the resolution of input geometry, and influences the resolution of the ensuing solid mesh used for numerical analysis. Despite a large number of studies incorporating sensitivity studies of the effects of solid mesh resolution there has not yet been any investigation into the effect of surface mesh resolution upon results in a comparative context. Here we use a dataset of crocodile crania to examine the effects of surface resolution on FEA results in a comparative context. Seven high-resolution surface meshes were each down-sampled to varying degrees while keeping the resulting number of solid elements constant. These models were then subjected to bite and shake load cases using finite element analysis. The results show that incremental decreases in surface resolution can result in fluctuations in strain magnitudes, but that it is possible to obtain stable results using lower resolution surface in a comparative FEA study. As surface mesh resolution links input geometry with the resulting solid mesh, the implication of these results is that low resolution input geometry and solid meshes may provide valid results in a comparative context.

  13. Simulation of the ultrasonic array response from real branched cracks using an efficient finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim J.; Dunhill, Tony K.

    2014-02-01

    A hybrid model to simulate the ultrasonic array response from stress corrosion cracks is presented. These cracks are branched and difficult to detect so the model is required to enable optimization of an array design. An efficient frequency-domain finite element method is described and selected to simulate the ultrasonic scattering. Experimental validation results are presented, followed by an example of the simulated ultrasonic array response from a real stress corrosion crack whose geometry is obtained from an X-ray Computed Tomography image. A simulation-assisted array design methodology, which includes the model and use of real crack geometries, is proposed.

  14. Simulation of the ultrasonic array response from real branched cracks using an efficient finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim J.; Dunhill, Tony K.

    2014-02-18

    A hybrid model to simulate the ultrasonic array response from stress corrosion cracks is presented. These cracks are branched and difficult to detect so the model is required to enable optimization of an array design. An efficient frequency-domain finite element method is described and selected to simulate the ultrasonic scattering. Experimental validation results are presented, followed by an example of the simulated ultrasonic array response from a real stress corrosion crack whose geometry is obtained from an X-ray Computed Tomography image. A simulation-assisted array design methodology, which includes the model and use of real crack geometries, is proposed.

  15. A GC-rich element confers epidermal growth factor responsiveness to transcription from the gastrin promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, J L; Demediuk, B; Brand, S J

    1991-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha are important determinants of mucosal integrity in the gastrointestinal tract, and they act both directly and indirectly to prevent ulceration in the stomach. Consistent with this physiological role, EGF stimulates transcription of gastrin, a peptide hormone which regulates gastric acid secretion and mucosal growth. EGF stimulation of gastrin transcription is mediated by a GC-rich gastrin EGF response element (gERE) (GGGGCGGGGTGGGGGG) which lies between -54 and -68 in the human gastrin promoter. The gERE sequence also confers weaker responsiveness to phorbol ester stimulation. The gERE sequence differs from previously described EGF response elements. The gERE DNA sequence specifically interacts with a GH4 DNA-binding protein distinct from previously described transcription factors (Egr-1 and AP2) which bind GC-rich sequences and mediate transcriptional activation by growth factors. Furthermore, the gERE element does not bind the Sp1 transcription factor even though the gERE sequence contains a high-affinity Sp1-binding site (GGCGGG). Images PMID:2017173

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of Flow Over Surface-Mounted Cube Using a Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandala, Sriharsha; Rempfer, Dietmar

    2010-11-01

    Unsteady three dimensional flow over a surface-mounted cube, with its rich set of features like flow turbulence, upstream boundary layer separation, curved mixing layer, unsteady three dimensional wake, etc., provides an excellent test case for evaluating the performance of CFD codes. We are developing a parallel spectral element code, SpecSolve, with the objective of modeling incompressible flows in complex geometries. The code is based on the fractional step method and uses the operator-integrating factor splitting scheme for temporal integration. In this talk, we provide a brief overview of the algorithm and implementation details. We present results from large-eddy simulations of flow over a surface-mounted cube using SpecSolve. The Reynolds number, based on bulk flow velocity and height of the cube, is 40,000. The dynamic Smagorinsky model is used for modeling turbulence. These results are compared with experimental data of Martinuzzi and Tropea, LES results of Shah and Ferziger and our FLUENT LES simulations.

  17. Rare earth elements tracing the soil erosion processes on slope surface under natural rainfall.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingyong; Tan, Shuduan; Dang, Haishan; Zhang, Quanfa

    2011-12-01

    A field experiment using rare earth elements (REEs) as tracers was conducted to investigate soil erosion processes on slope surfaces during rainfall events. A plot of 10m×2m×0.16m with a gradient of 20° (36.4%) was established and the plot was divided into two layers and four segments. Various REE tracers were applied to the different layers and segments to determine sediment dynamics under natural rainfall. Results indicated that sheet erosion accounted for more than 90% of total erosion when the rainfall amount and density was not large enough to generate concentrated flows. Sediment source changed in different sections on the slope surface, and the primary sediment source area tended to move upslope as erosion progressed. In rill erosion, sediment discharge mainly originated from the toe-slope and moved upwards as erosion intensified. The results obtained from this study suggest that multi-REE tracer technique is valuable in understanding the erosion processes and determining sediment sources.

  18. A Semiparametric Response Surface Model for Assessing Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Maiying; Lee, J. Jack

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY When multiple drugs are administered simultaneously, investigators are often interested in assessing whether the drug combinations are synergistic, additive, or antagonistic. Existing response surface models are not adequate to capture the complex patterns of drug interactions. We propose a two-component semiparametric response surface model with a parametric function to describe the additive effect of a combination dose and a nonparametric function to capture the departure from the additive effect. The nonparametric function is estimated using the technique developed in thin plate splines, and the pointwise bootstrap confidence interval for this function is constructed. The proposed semiparametric model offers an effective way of formulating the additive effect while allowing the flexibility of modeling a departure from additivity. Example and simulations are given to illustrate that the proposed model provides an excellent estimation for different patterns of interactions between two drugs. PMID:17900314

  19. Confidence sets for optimal factor levels of a response surface.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fang; Liu, Wei; Bretz, Frank; Han, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Construction of confidence sets for the optimal factor levels is an important topic in response surfaces methodology. In Wan et al. (2015), an exact (1-α) confidence set has been provided for a maximum or minimum point (i.e., an optimal factor level) of a univariate polynomial function in a given interval. In this article, the method has been extended to construct an exact (1-α) confidence set for the optimal factor levels of response surfaces. The construction method is readily applied to many parametric and semiparametric regression models involving a quadratic function. A conservative confidence set has been provided as an intermediate step in the construction of the exact confidence set. Two examples are given to illustrate the application of the confidence sets. The comparison between confidence sets indicates that our exact confidence set is better than the only other confidence set available in the statistical literature that guarantees the (1-α) confidence level.

  20. The frictional response of patterned soft polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, Charles J.

    2008-10-01

    Friction plays an intricate role in our everyday lives, it is therefore critical to understand the underlying features of friction to better help control and manipulate the response anywhere two surfaces in contact move past each other by a sliding motion. Here we present results targeting a thorough understanding of soft material friction and how it can be manipulated with patterns. We found that the naturally occurring length scale or periodicity (lambda) of frictionally induced patterns, Schallamach waves, could be described using two materials properties (critical energy release rate Gc and complex modulus (E*), i.e. lambdainfinity Gc /E*). Following this, we evaluated the effect of a single defect at a sliding interface. Sliding over a defect can be used to model the sliding from one feature to another in a patterned surface. Defects decreased the sliding frictional force by as much as 80% sliding and this decrease was attributed to changes in tangential stiffness of the sliding interface. The frictional response of surface wrinkles, where multiple edges or defects are acting in concert, was also evaluated. Wrinkles were shown to decrease friction (F) and changes in contact area (A) could not describe this decrease. A tangential stiffness correction factor (fx) and changes in the critical energy release rate were used to describe this deviation (F infinity Gc *A*fx/ℓ, where ℓ is a materials defined length scale of dissipation). This scaling can be used to describe the friction of any topographically patterned surface including the Gecko's foot, where the feature size is smaller than ℓ and thus replaces ℓ, increasing the friction compared to a flat surface. Also, mechanically-induced surface defects were used to align osmotically driven surface wrinkles by creating stress discontinuities that convert the global biaxial stress state to local uniaxial stresses. Defect spacing was used to control the alignment process at the surface of the wrinkled rigid

  1. Effect of randomness on multi-frequency aeroelastic responses resolved by Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Witteveen, Jeroen A.S. Bijl, Hester

    2009-10-01

    The Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements (UASFE) method resolves the effect of randomness in numerical simulations of single-mode aeroelastic responses with a constant accuracy in time for a constant number of samples. In this paper, the UASFE framework is extended to multi-frequency responses and continuous structures by employing a wavelet decomposition pre-processing step to decompose the sampled multi-frequency signals into single-frequency components. The effect of the randomness on the multi-frequency response is then obtained by summing the results of the UASFE interpolation at constant phase for the different frequency components. Results for multi-frequency responses and continuous structures show a three orders of magnitude reduction of computational costs compared to crude Monte Carlo simulations in a harmonically forced oscillator, a flutter panel problem, and the three-dimensional transonic AGARD 445.6 wing aeroelastic benchmark subject to random fields and random parameters with various probability distributions.

  2. Global Surface Temperature Response Explained by Multibox Energy Balance Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksen, H. B.; Rypdal, M.

    2016-12-01

    We formulate a multibox energy balance model, from which global temperature evolution can be described by convolving a linear response function and a forcing record. We estimate parameters in the response function from instrumental data and historic forcing, such that our model can produce a response to both deterministic forcing and stochastic weather forcing consistent with observations. Furthermore, if we make separate boxes for upper ocean layer and atmosphere over land, we can also make separate response functions for global land and sea surface temperature. By describing internal variability as a linear response to white noise, we demonstrate that the power-law form of the observed temperature spectra can be described by linear dynamics, contrary to a common belief that these power-law spectra must arise from nonlinear processes. In our multibox model, the power-law form can arise due to the multiple response times. While one of our main points is that the climate system responds over a wide range of time scales, we cannot find one set of time scales that can be preferred compared to other choices. Hence we think the temperature response can best be characterized as something that is scale-free, but still possible to approximate by a set of well separated time scales.

  3. Modeling of rare earth element sorption to the Gram positive Bacillus subtilis bacteria surface.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Raul E; Pourret, Olivier; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    In this study, rare earth element (REE) binding constants and site concentration on the Gram+ bacteria surfaces were quantified using a multi-site Langmuir isotherm model, along with a linear programming regression method (LPM), applied to fit experimental REE sorption data. This approach found one discrete REE binding site on the Gram+ Bacillus subtilis surface for the pH range of 2.5-4.5. Average log10 REE binding constants for a site j on these bacteria ranged from 1.08±0.04 to 1.40±0.04 for the light REE (LREE: La to Eu), and from 1.36±0.03 to 2.18±0.14 for the heavy REE (HREE: Gd to Lu) at the highest biomass concentration of 1.3 g/L of B. subtilis bacteria. Similar values were obtained for bacteria concentrations of 0.39 and 0.67 g/L indicating the independence of REE sorption constants on biomass concentration. Within the experimental pH range in this study, B. subtilis was shown to have a lower affinity for LREE (e.g. La, Ce, Pr, Nd) and a higher affinity for HREE (e.g. Tm, Yb, Lu) suggesting an enrichment of HREE on the surface of Gram+ bacteria. Total surface binding site concentrations of 6.73±0.06 to 5.67±0.06 and 5.53±0.07 to 4.54±0.03 mol/g of bacteria were observed for LREE and HREE respectively, with the exception of Y, which showed a total site concentration of 9.53±0.03, and a log K(REE,j) of 1.46±0.02 for a biomass content of 1.3 g/L. The difference in these values (e.g. a lower affinity and increased binding site concentration for LREE, and the contrary for the HREE) suggests a distinction between the LREE and HREE binding modes to the Gram+ bacteria reactive surface at low pH. This further implies that HREE may bind more than one monoprotic reactive group on the cell surface. A multisite Langmuir isotherm approach along with the LPM regression method, not requiring prior knowledge of the number or concentration of cell surface REE complexation sites, were able to distinguish between the sorption constant and binding site concentration

  4. Sortase-Mediated Surface Functionalization of Stimuli-Responsive Microgels.

    PubMed

    Gau, Elisabeth; Mate, Diana M; Zou, Zhi; Oppermann, Alex; Töpel, Alexander; Jakob, Felix; Wöll, Dominik; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Pich, Andrij

    2017-09-11

    In this work we explored an enzyme-mediated method for selective and efficient decoration of aqueous microgels with biomolecules. Poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (VCL) microgels with varied amounts of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) as comonomer incorporated in the microgel shell were synthesized and characterized in regard to their size, swelling degree, and temperature-responsiveness in aqueous solutions. The surface of the PVCL/GMA microgel containing 5 mol % glycidyl methyacrylate was modified by grafting of a specific recognition peptide sequence (LPETG) for Sortase A from Staphylococcus aureus (Sa-SrtAΔ59). Sortase-mediated conjugation of the enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) carrying a N-terminal triglycine tag to LPETG-modified microgels was successfully performed. Conjugation of eGFP to the microgel surface was qualitatively proven by confocal microscopy and by fluorescence intensity measurements. The developed protocol enables a precise control of the amount of eGFP grafted to the microgel surface as evidenced by the linear increase of fluorescence intensity of modified microgel samples. The kinetic of the sortase-mediated coupling reaction was determined by time-dependent fluorescence intensity measurements. In summary, sortase-mediated coupling reactions are a simple and powerful technique for targeted surface functionalization of stimuli-responsive microgels with biomolecules.

  5. Plant surface wax affects parasitoid's response to host footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostás, Michael; Ruf, Daniel; Zabka, Vanessa; Hildebrandt, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    The plant surface is the substrate upon which herbivorous insects and natural enemies meet and thus represents the stage for interactions between the three trophic levels. Plant surfaces are covered by an epicuticular wax layer which is highly variable depending on species, cultivar or plant part. Differences in wax chemistry may modulate ecological interactions. We explored whether caterpillars of Spodoptera frugiperda, when walking over a plant surface, leave a chemical trail (kairomones) that can be detected by the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris. Chemistry and micromorphology of cuticular waxes of two barley eceriferum wax mutants ( cer-za.126, cer-yp.949) and wild-type cv. Bonus (wt) were assessed. The plants were then used to investigate potential surface effects on the detectability of caterpillar kairomones. Here we provide evidence that C. marginiventris responds to chemical footprints of its host. Parasitoids were able to detect the kairomone on wild-type plants and on both cer mutants but the response to cer-yp.949 (reduced wax, high aldehyde fraction) was less pronounced. Experiments with caterpillar-treated wt and mutant leaves offered simultaneously, confirmed this observation: no difference in wasp response was found when wt was tested against cer-za.126 (reduced wax, wt-like chemical composition) but wt was significantly more attractive than cer-yp.949. This demonstrates for the first time that the wax layer can modulate the detectability of host kairomones.

  6. Trace element concentrations and bioindicator responses in tree swallows from northwestern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, Christine M.; Custer, T.W.; Warburton, D.; Hoffman, D.J.; Bickham, J.W.; Matson, C.W.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Extremely high concentrations of cadmium (3.5 ug/g dry wgt.) and elevated concentrations of chromium (>10 ug/g dry wgt.) and mercury (1.6 ug/g dry wgt.) were reported in waterbird tissues at Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge in northwestern Minnesota in 1994. Tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) were studied during 1998-2001 at three drainages into the Refuge, two pools on the Refuge, and at a nearby reference location to document whether high levels of contaminants were still present, and if so to quantify the source and severity of the contamination. Trace elements were measured in tree swallow eggs, livers, and diet. Reproductive success and bioindicator responses were monitored. In 2000, water was drawn down on Agassiz Pool, one of the main pools on the Refuge. This presented an opportunity to evaluate the response of trace element concentrations in the diet and tissues of tree swallows after reflooding. High concentrations of trace elements were not detected in swallow tissues, nor were there differences among locations. Less than 20% of swallow samples had detectable concentrations of cadmium or chromium. Mercury concentrations were low and averaged <0.25 ug/g dry wgt. in swallow tissues. Trace elements, including mercury, did not increase in tree swallows following the 2000 drawdown at Agassiz Pool. Hatching success and survival of nestlings to 12 days-of-age for tree swallows on the Refuge were similar to the national average and consistent with background trace element concentrations. Bioindicator measurements were within the normal ranges as well.

  7. Factors Predicting the Ocular Surface Response to Desiccating Environmental Stress

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Anastasia; Edwards, Austin; Hays, J. Daniel; Kerkstra, Michelle; Shih, Amanda; de Paiva, Cintia S.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To identify factors predicting the ocular surface response to experimental desiccating stress. Methods. The ocular surfaces of both eyes of 15 normal and 10 dry eye subjects wearing goggles were exposed to a controlled desiccating environment (15%–25% relative humidity and 2–5 L/min airflow) for 90 minutes. Eye irritation symptoms, blink rate, tear meniscus dimensions, noninvasive (RBUT) and invasive tear break-up time, and corneal fluorescein and conjunctival lissamine green-dye staining were recorded before and after desiccating stress. Pre- and postexposure measurements were compared, and Pearson correlations between clinical parameters before and after desiccating stress were calculated. Results. Corneal and conjunctival dye staining significantly increased in all subjects following 90-minute exposure to desiccating environment, and the magnitude of change was similar in normal and dry eye subjects; except superior cornea staining was greater in dry eye. Irritation severity in the desiccating environment was associated with baseline dye staining, baseline tear meniscus height, and blink rate after 45 minutes. Desiccation-induced change in corneal fluorescein staining was inversely correlated to baseline tear meniscus width, whereas change in total ocular surface dye staining was inversely correlated to baseline dye staining, RBUT, and tear meniscus height and width. Blink rate from 30 to 90 minutes in desiccating environment was higher in the dry eye than normal group. Blink rate significantly correlated to baseline corneal fluorescein staining and environmental-induced change in corneal fluorescein staining. Conclusions. Ocular surface dye staining increases in response to desiccating stress. Baseline ocular surface dye staining, tear meniscus height, and blink rate predict severity of ocular surface dye staining following exposure to a desiccating environment. PMID:23572103

  8. A Novel Peroxisome Proliferator Response Element Modulates Hepatic Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Transcription in Response to PPARδ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Vikram R.; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    The hepatic expression of LDLR gene is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level by a sterol-regulatory element (SRE) in its proximal promoter region which is the site of action of SRE-binding protein 2 (SREBP2). However whether additional cis-regulatory elements contribute to LDLR transcription has not been fully explored. We investigated the function of a putative PPAR-response element (PPRE) sequence motif located at −768 to −752 bases upstream of the transcription start site of human LDLR gene in response to PPARδ activation. Promoter luciferase reporter analyses showed that treating HepG2 cells with PPARδ agonist L165041 markedly increased the activity of a full-length LDLR promoter construct (pLDLR-1192) without any effects on the shorter promoter reporter pLDLR-234 that contains only the core regulatory elements SRE-1 and SP1 sites. Importantly, mutation of the PPRE sequence greatly attenuated the induction of the full-length LDLR promoter activity by L165041 without affecting rosuvastatin mediated transactivation. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further confirmed the binding of PPARδ to the LDLR-PPRE site. Treating HepG2 cells with L165041 elevated the mRNA and protein expressions of LDLR without affecting the LDLR mRNA decay rate. The induction of LDLR expression by PPARδ agonist was further observed in liver tissue of mice and hamsters treated with L165041. Altogether, our studies identify a novel PPRE-mediated regulatory mechanism for LDLR transcription and suggest that combined treatment of statin with PPARδ agonists may have advantageous effects on LDLR expression. PMID:26443862

  9. A novel peroxisome proliferator response element modulates hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor gene transcription in response to PPARδ activation.

    PubMed

    Shende, Vikram R; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-12-15

    The hepatic expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) gene is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level by a sterol-regulatory element (SRE) in its proximal promoter region which is the site of action of SRE-binding protein 2 (SREBP2). However whether additional cis-regulatory elements contribute to LDLR transcription has not been fully explored. We investigated the function of a putative peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-response element (PPRE) sequence motif located at -768 to -752 bases upstream of the transcription start site of human LDLR gene in response to PPARδ activation. Promoter luciferase reporter analyses showed that treating HepG2 cells with PPARδ agonist L165041 markedly increased the activity of a full-length LDLR promoter construct (pLDLR-1192) without any effects on the shorter promoter reporter pLDLR-234 that contains only the core regulatory elements SRE-1 and SP1 sites. Importantly, mutation of the PPRE sequence greatly attenuated the induction of the full-length LDLR promoter activity by L165041 without affecting rosuvastatin (RSV)-mediated transactivation. EMSA and ChIP assay further confirmed the binding of PPARδ to the LDLR-PPRE site. Treating HepG2 cells with L165041 elevated the mRNA and protein expressions of LDLR without affecting the LDLR mRNA decay rate. The induction of LDLR expression by PPARδ agonist was further observed in liver tissue of mice and hamsters treated with L165041. Altogether, our studies identify a novel PPRE-mediated regulatory mechanism for LDLR transcription and suggest that combined treatment of statin with PPARδ agonists may have advantageous effects on LDLR expression.

  10. EMG responses to maintain stance during multidirectional surface translations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, S. M.; Fung, J.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To characterize muscle synergy organization underlying multidirectional control of stance posture, electromyographic activity was recorded from 11 lower limb and trunk muscles of 7 healthy subjects while they were subjected to horizontal surface translations in 12 different, randomly presented directions. The latency and amplitude of muscle responses were quantified for each perturbation direction. Tuning curves for each muscle were examined to relate the amplitude of the muscle response to the direction of surface translation. The latencies of responses for the shank and thigh muscles were constant, regardless of perturbation direction. In contrast, the latencies for another thigh [tensor fascia latae (TFL)] and two trunk muscles [rectus abdominis (RAB) and erector spinae (ESP)] were either early or late, depending on the perturbation direction. These three muscles with direction-specific latencies may play different roles in postural control as prime movers or as stabilizers for different translation directions, depending on the timing of recruitment. Most muscle tuning curves were within one quadrant, having one direction of maximal activity, generally in response to diagonal surface translations. Two trunk muscles (RAB and ESP) and two lower limb muscles (semimembranosus and peroneus longus) had bipolar tuning curves, with two different directions of maximal activity, suggesting that these muscle can play different roles as part of different synergies, depending on translation direction. Muscle tuning curves tended to group into one of three regions in response to 12 different directions of perturbations. Two muscles [rectus femoris (RFM) and TFL] were maximally active in response to lateral surface translations. The remaining muscles clustered into one of two diagonal regions. The diagonal regions corresponded to the two primary directions of active horizontal force vector responses. Two muscles (RFM and adductor longus) were maximally active orthogonal to

  11. EMG responses to maintain stance during multidirectional surface translations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, S. M.; Fung, J.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To characterize muscle synergy organization underlying multidirectional control of stance posture, electromyographic activity was recorded from 11 lower limb and trunk muscles of 7 healthy subjects while they were subjected to horizontal surface translations in 12 different, randomly presented directions. The latency and amplitude of muscle responses were quantified for each perturbation direction. Tuning curves for each muscle were examined to relate the amplitude of the muscle response to the direction of surface translation. The latencies of responses for the shank and thigh muscles were constant, regardless of perturbation direction. In contrast, the latencies for another thigh [tensor fascia latae (TFL)] and two trunk muscles [rectus abdominis (RAB) and erector spinae (ESP)] were either early or late, depending on the perturbation direction. These three muscles with direction-specific latencies may play different roles in postural control as prime movers or as stabilizers for different translation directions, depending on the timing of recruitment. Most muscle tuning curves were within one quadrant, having one direction of maximal activity, generally in response to diagonal surface translations. Two trunk muscles (RAB and ESP) and two lower limb muscles (semimembranosus and peroneus longus) had bipolar tuning curves, with two different directions of maximal activity, suggesting that these muscle can play different roles as part of different synergies, depending on translation direction. Muscle tuning curves tended to group into one of three regions in response to 12 different directions of perturbations. Two muscles [rectus femoris (RFM) and TFL] were maximally active in response to lateral surface translations. The remaining muscles clustered into one of two diagonal regions. The diagonal regions corresponded to the two primary directions of active horizontal force vector responses. Two muscles (RFM and adductor longus) were maximally active orthogonal to

  12. The Use of Microscale Geometry to Tailor Stimulus-Responsive Surface Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lin; Yin, Jie; Wang, Lifeng; Chia, Khek-Khiang; Cohen, Robert; Rubner, Michael; Boyce, Mary; Ortiz, Christine

    2012-02-01

    The capability to tailor stimulus-responsive surface friction, including sensitivity profile, range, temporal response and deformation mechanisms, holds great potential for an array of engineering and biomedical applications. In this study, the pH-dependent friction of layer-by-layer assemblies of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAH/PAA) were quantified for structures of a continuous planar film and anisotropic microtube forests via lateral force microscopy. By comparing experiments to microstructure-specific finite element modeling, a mechanistic change from surface adhesion-dominated friction (μ=0.11) to viscoelasticity-governed shear (=0.017) was predicted upon ionic crosslink density reduction of PAH/PAA from pH 5.5 to 2.0 for the film (6.5x decrease). The responsiveness of μ was further tuned by the tube forest geometry to be 3.5x. At pH 5.5, μ (=0.094) was lower than the film due to discrete tube bending/buckling and smaller tip-sample interface stress. At pH 2.0, μ (=0.027) was higher because of inter-tube contact and weaker substrate effect. This study provides an excellent platform to quantitatively access and design dynamic substrates with tailorable stimulus-responsive surface friction.

  13. Response surfaces for climate change impact assessments in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Semadeni-Davies, A

    2003-01-01

    Assessment of the impacts of climate change in real-world water systems, such as urban drainage networks, is a research priority for IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change). The usual approach is to force a hydrological transformation model with a changed climate scenario. To tackle uncertainty, the model should be run with at least high, middle and low change scenarios. This paper shows the value of response surfaces for displaying multiple simulated responses to incremental changes in air temperature and precipitation. The example given is inflow, related to sewer infiltration, at the Lycksele waste water treatment plant. The range of plausible changes in inflow is displayed for a series of runs for eight GCMs (Global Circulation Model; ACACIA; Carter, 2002, pers. comm.). These runs are summarised by climate envelopes, one for each prediction time-slice (2020, 2050, 2080). Together, the climate envelopes and response surfaces allow uncertainty to be easily seen. Winter inflows are currently sensitive to temperature, but if average temperature rises to above zero, inflow will be most sensitive to precipitation. Spring inflows are sensitive to changes in winter snow accumulation and melt. Inflow responses are highly dependent on the greenhouse gas emission scenario and GCM chosen.

  14. GPU-based interactive cut-surface extraction from high-order finite element fields.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Blake; Haimes, Robert; Kirby, Robert M

    2011-12-01

    We present a GPU-based ray-tracing system for the accurate and interactive visualization of cut-surfaces through 3D simulations of physical processes created from spectral/hp high-order finite element methods. When used by the numerical analyst to debug the solver, the ability for the imagery to precisely reflect the data is critical. In practice, the investigator interactively selects from a palette of visualization tools to construct a scene that can answer a query of the data. This is effective as long as the implicit contract of image quality between the individual and the visualization system is upheld. OpenGL rendering of scientific visualizations has worked remarkably well for exploratory visualization for most solver results. This is due to the consistency between the use of first-order representations in the simulation and the linear assumptions inherent in OpenGL (planar fragments and color-space interpolation). Unfortunately, the contract is broken when the solver discretization is of higher-order. There have been attempts to mitigate this through the use of spatial adaptation and/or texture mapping. These methods do a better job of approximating what the imagery should be but are not exact and tend to be view-dependent. This paper introduces new rendering mechanisms that specifically deal with the kinds of native data generated by high-order finite element solvers. The exploratory visualization tools are reassessed and cast in this system with the focus on image accuracy. This is accomplished in a GPU setting to ensure interactivity.

  15. Intronic hormone response elements mediate regulation of FKBP5 by progestins and glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Hubler, Tina R; Scammell, Jonathan G

    2004-01-01

    Expression of FKBP51, a large molecular weight immunophilin, is strongly enhanced by glucocorticoids, progestins, and androgens. However, the activity of a 3.4-kb fragment of the FKBP51 gene (FKBP5) promoter was only weakly increased by progestin and we show here that it is unresponsive to glucocorticoids and androgens. The entire FKBP5 was scanned for consensus hormone response elements (HREs) using MatInspector. We found that 2 regions of intron E, which are conserved in rat and mouse FKBP5, contain HRE-like sequences with high match scores. Deoxyribonucleic acid fragments (approximately 1 kb in length) containing these regions were amplified and tested in reporter gene assays for steroid responsiveness. One region of intron E of FKBP5 (pIE2) conferred both glucocorticoid and progestin responsiveness to 2 heterologous reporter genes, whereas the other, less-conserved region of intron E (pIE1) was responsive only to progestins. The inclusion of pIE1 upstream of pIE2 (pIE1IE2) enhanced progestin but not glucocorticoid responsiveness. None of the constructs containing intronic sequences was responsive to androgens. Mutation of the putative HREs within pIE1 and pIE2 eliminated hormone responsiveness. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that progesterone receptors (PR) bound to the HRE in pIE1, whereas both PR and glucocorticoid receptors interacted with the HRE in pIE2. These data suggest that distal intronic elements significantly contribute to transcriptional regulation of FKBP5 by glucocorticoids and progestins.

  16. Transient Response of Rotor on Rolling-Element Bearings with Clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.; Murphy, Brian T.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Poplawski, J. V.

    2006-01-01

    Internal clearance in rolling element bearings is usually present to allow for radial and axial growth of the rotor-bearing system and to accommodate bearing fit-up. The presence of this clearance also introduces a "dead band" into the load-deflection behavior of the bearing. Previous studies demonstrated that the presence of dead band clearance might have a significant effect on synchronous rotor response. In this work, the authors investigate transient response of a rotor supported on rolling element bearings with internal clearance. In addition, the stiffness of the bearings varies nonlinearly with bearing deflection and with speed. Bearing properties were accurately calculated with a state of the art rolling bearing analysis code. The subsequent rotordynamics analysis shows that for rapid acceleration rates the maximum response amplitude may be less than predicted by steady-state analysis. The presence of clearance may shift the critical speed location to lower speed values. The rotor vibration response exhibits subharmonic components which are more prominent with bearing clearance.

  17. Validation of an interferon stimulatory response element reporter gene assay for quantifying type I interferons.

    PubMed

    McCoski, S R; Xie, M; Hall, E B; Mercadante, P M; Spencer, T E; Lonergan, P; Ealy, A D

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a virus-free, cell-based interferon (IFN) bioassay and determine the utility of this assay on biological samples that contained IFN-τ, the trophoblast-secreted maternal recognition of pregnancy factor in ruminants. Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells were transduced with lentiviral particles that contained a firefly luciferase reporter construct driven by an IFN stimulatory response element (ISRE). Stably transduced cells were selected with the use of puromycin resistance. A linear, dose-responsive response was detected with human IFN-α and ovine IFN-τ. Interferon activity was detected in conditioned media from bovine trophoblast cells and uterine flushes collected from sheep and cattle. Activity also was detected in media collected after individual or small group culture of in vitro-produced bovine blastocysts at day 8 to 10 after fertilization. In summary, this IFN stimulatory response element-reporter assay may be used as an alternative to virus-dependent, cytopathic assays. It contains a similar sensitivity to IFNs and can be completed in a shorter time than cytopathic assays and does not require heightened biosafety conditions after cell transduction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Elemental analysis of powders with surface-assisted thin film laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Cheung, Hoi Ching; Zheng, Ronger; Ma, Qianli; Chen, Yanping; Delepine-Gilon, Nicole; Yu, Jin

    2016-10-01

    We have developed in this work a method of elemental analysis of powdered materials with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). This method requires simple sample preparation. Powders are first mixed into a 75 cSt base oil to obtain a paste which is then smeared onto the polished surface of a solid state substrate, aluminum plate for instance, in the form of a uniform thin film. The prepared sample is ablated by a high energy infrared (IR at 1064 nm) nanosecond laser pulse. The laser beam transmits through the coating layer of the material to be analyzed and induces a strong plasma from the substrate. The initial plasma interacts in turn with the coating layer, leading to the vaporization and excitation of the incorporated powder particles. The subsequent emission from the plasma includes emission lines of the elements contained in the powder, which is preferentially captured by a suitable detection system. The analysis of the recorded spectrum allows the concentration determination of the targeted elements in the powder. We first applied the method on a cellulose powder of 20 μm typical particle size. The powder was spiked with titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles for Ti concentrations ranging from 25 ppm to 5000 ppm by weight. Calibration graphs were thus built to deduce figures-of-merit parameters such as the coefficient of determination (R2) and the limits of detection and quantification (LoD and LoQ). We optimized especially the choice of reference line for spectrum normalization, which resulted in better analytical performances. In the second step, two sets of powders, the aforementioned cellulose powder and an alumina powder with average particle size of ≤ 10 μm, were spiked with TiO2 nanoparticles. We then assessed the matrix effect between these two different powders for the determination of Ti by comparing their calibration curves. Our results show universal calibration curve in Ti determination in the two tested matrices. The results are

  19. Sea-surface temperature reconstruction from trace elements variations of tropical coralline red algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrenougue, Nicolas; De Deckker, Patrick; Eggins, Stephen; Payri, Claude

    2014-06-01

    We used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) to obtain high-resolution variations of the Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Li/Ca composition of free-living forms (i.e. rhodoliths) of the coralline red algal species Sporolithon durum in order to test their potential to archive seawater temperature information. A monitoring experiment was conducted based on alizarin red S (ARS) staining of rhodoliths specimens collected in various locations across a ˜1 km2 rhodolith bed in the vicinity of Nouméa, New Caledonia, where in situ temperature (IST) variations were recorded for 22 months between November 2009 and August 2011. A >45-year comparison of Mg and trace elements with sea-surface temperature (SST) was established from the analysis of 5 different branches belonging to three of the largest (7.4-8.5 cm in diameter) rhodolith specimens observed at the site. Consistent mean Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Li/Ca concentrations and seasonal patterns are found for the rhodoliths' last living years (2009-2011) across 43 branches and for the full 1963-2008 period across the 5 branches. Average elemental concentrations (Mg/Ca: 0.31 ± 0.04 mol/mol; Sr/Ca: 3.5 ± 0.4 mmol/mol and Li/Ca: 0.08 ± 0.02 mmol/mol) fall within range of those found in the literature. Individual element variations show good reproducibility between records and Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Li/Ca co-vary systematically. Combined records of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Li/Ca are highly correlated with the IST monthly pattern for the 2009-2011 period (0.82 < r < 0.91; p < 0.001) and with local variations of monthly SST for the 1963-2008 period (0.65 < r < 0.85; p < 0.001), with Mg/Ca systematically being the best fit to monthly seawater temperature variations. Inter-annual Mg/Ca anomalies show significant correlation with the Oceanic Nino Index (ONI), indicating that S. durum rhodoliths also have the capacity to record the regional climate pattern in the tropical Pacific. Finally, consistent variations between the combined Mg

  20. Analysis of Resonance Response Performance of C-Band Antenna Using Parasitic Element

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. T.; Misran, N.; Mandeep, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the resonance response improvement of a planar C-band (4–8 GHz) antenna is proposed using parasitic element method. This parasitic element based method is validated for change in the active and parasitic antenna elements. A novel dual-band antenna for C-band application covering 5.7 GHz and 7.6 GHz is designed and fabricated. The antenna is composed of circular parasitic element with unequal microstrip lines at both sides and a rectangular partial ground plane. A fractional bandwidth of 13.5% has been achieved from 5.5 GHz to 6.3 GHz (WLAN band) for the lower band. The upper band covers from 7.1 GHz to 8 GHz with a fractional bandwidth of 12%. A gain of 6.4 dBi is achieved at the lower frequency and 4 dBi is achieved at the upper frequency. The VSWR of the antenna is less than 2 at the resonance frequency. PMID:24895643

  1. A phorbol ester response element within the human T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, H M; Wotton, D; Gegonne, A; Ghysdael, J; Wang, S; Speck, N A; Owen, M J

    1992-01-01

    The activity of the T-cell receptor beta-chain gene enhancer is increased by activators of the protein kinase C pathway during T-cell activation. Analysis of mutant enhancer constructs identified two elements, beta E2 and beta E3, conferring phorbol ester inducibility. Multimerized beta E2 acted in isolation as a phorbol ester-responsive element. Both beta E2 and beta E3, which contain a consensus Ets-binding site, were shown to bind directly to the product of the c-ets-1 protooncogene. Both regions also bound a second factor, core-binding factor. Mutation of the beta E2 Ets site abolished the inducibility of the beta E2 multimer. beta E2 and beta E3 Ets site mutations also profoundly affected activity and inducibility of the enhancer. In contrast, enhancer activity but not its inducibility was affected by mutation of the beta E2 core-binding factor site. Cotransfection studies showed that Ets-1 specifically repressed activity of the multimerized beta E2 element and the complete T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer. These data show that the T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer responds to protein kinase C-mediated activation signals via a functional domain, composed of two elements, which contains binding sites for Ets transcription factors and which is negatively regulated by Ets-1. Images PMID:1409722

  2. Assessment of Pulse Echo Response of Flat Bottom Holes Through Curved Interfaces Using the Patch Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, G.; Reddy, Sudhan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2009-03-01

    The World Federations of Non-Destructive Evaluations Centers (WFNDEC) has proposed two studies for 2008 Benchmark problem. The first study deals with surface curvature effects across fluid-solid media to evaluate immersion transducer's P-wave response from Flat Bottom Holes (FBH) situated in the solid medium. The second study pertains to pulse echo response from Side Drilled Holes (SDH). We report the results for P-wave response from a FBH due to a transducer placed above a curved interface using the frequency domain Patch Element Model (PEM), developed at CNDE at IITM. The assessment employs an optimized algorithm to determine the points of reflection/refraction on any planar or curved interface between two media and incorporates the Divergence Factor (DF) to account for curvature effects on the field assessment. We also report results on the 2007 benchmark problem dealing with the response from FBH which has two parts: One is model based study and the other is comparison of model with experiments. The PEM results for 2007 and 2008 are compared with the available results from experiments and other models.

  3. Paired hormone response elements predict caveolin-1 as a glucocorticoid target gene.

    PubMed

    van Batenburg, Marinus F; Li, Hualing; Polman, J Annelies; Lachize, Servane; Datson, Nicole A; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Meijer, Onno C

    2010-01-21

    Glucocorticoids act in part via glucocorticoid receptor binding to hormone response elements (HREs), but their direct target genes in vivo are still largely unknown. We developed the criterion that genomic occurrence of paired HREs at an inter-HRE distance less than 200 bp predicts hormone responsiveness, based on synergy of multiple HREs, and HRE information from known target genes. This criterion predicts a substantial number of novel responsive genes, when applied to genomic regions 10 kb upstream of genes. Multiple-tissue in situ hybridization showed that mRNA expression of 6 out of 10 selected genes was induced in a tissue-specific manner in mice treated with a single dose of corticosterone, with the spleen being the most responsive organ. Caveolin-1 was strongly responsive in several organs, and the HRE pair in its upstream region showed increased occupancy by glucocorticoid receptor in response to corticosterone. Our approach allowed for discovery of novel tissue specific glucocorticoid target genes, which may exemplify responses underlying the permissive actions of glucocorticoids.

  4. Two approaches to form antibacterial surface: Doping with bactericidal element and drug loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhorukova, I. V.; Sheveyko, A. N.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Ph. V.; Anisimova, N. Y.; Gloushankova, N. A.; Zhitnyak, I. Y.; Benesova, J.; Amler, E.; Shtansky, D. V.

    2015-03-01

    Two approaches (surface doping with bactericidal element and loading of antibiotic into specially formed surface microcontainers) to the fabrication of antibacterial yet biocompatible and bioactive surfaces are described. A network structure with square-shaped blind pores of 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10-3 mm3 for drug loading was obtained by selective laser sintering (SLS). The SLS-fabricated samples were loaded with 0.03, 0.3, 2.4, and 4 mg/cm2 of co-amoxiclav (amoxicillin and clavulanic acid). Ag-doped TiCaPCON films with 0.4, 1.2, and 4.0 at.% of Ag were obtained by co-sputtering of composite TiC0.5-Ca3(PO4)2 and metallic Ag targets. The surface structure of SLS-prepared samples and cross-sectional morphology of TiCaPCON-Ag films were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The through-thickness of Ag distribution in the TiCaPCON-Ag films was obtained by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The kinetics of Ag ion release in normal saline solution was studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Bacterial activity of the samples was evaluated against S. epidermidis, S. aureus, and K. pneum. ozaenae using the agar diffusion test and photometric method by controlling the variation of optical density of the bacterial suspension over time. Cytocompatibility of the Ag-doped TiCaPCON films was observed in vitro using chondrocytic and MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. The viability and proliferation of chondrocytic cells were determined using the MTS assay and PicoGreen assay tests, respectively. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of the SLS-fabricated samples loaded with co-amoxiclav was also studied. The obtained results showed that the moderate bacteriostatic effect of the Ag-doped TiCaPCON films is mainly manifested in the change of bacterial colony morphology and optical densities of bacteria suspensions. In contrast, the SLS-prepared samples showed a very rapid initial drug release resulting in strong bactericidal effect just from the start of the

  5. Regulation of the rat UGT1A6 by glucocorticoids involves a cryptic glucocorticoid response element.

    PubMed

    Falkner, K C; Ritter, J K; Prough, R A

    2008-02-01

    Glucocorticoids precociously induce fetal rat UGT1A6 and potentiate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-dependent induction of this enzyme in vivo and in isolated rat hepatocytes. To establish whether induction was due to glucocorticoid receptor (GR), luciferase reporter vectors were tested in transfection assays with HepG2 cells. Using a reporter construct containing approximately 2.26 kilobases of the 5'-flanking region of the UGT1A6-noncoding leader exon (A1*), dexamethasone increased basal activity 3- to 7-fold in cells cotransfected with an expression plasmid for GR. PAH increased gene expression 23-fold, but the presence of dexamethasone only induced PAH-dependent expression by 1.5-fold, suggesting interaction between GR and the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor. Furthermore, the GR antagonist RU 38486 [17beta-hydroxy-11beta-(4-dimethylamino-phenyl)-17alpha-(prop-1-ynyl)-estra-4,9-dien-3-one] was a partial agonist that increased, rather than inhibited, basal activity 3-fold. 5'-deletion analysis defined the 5'-boundary for a functional glucocorticoid-responsive unit between base pairs -141 and -118 relative to the transcription start site. This region contains the Ah receptor response element (AhRE), and both PAH and glucocorticoid-dependent gene activation were lost when this area was deleted. Mutation of a single base pair located in the AhRE region simultaneously reduced induction by PAH and increased glucocorticoid induction. Thus, the sequences of both the AhRE and glucocorticoid response elements seem to overlap, suggesting that Ah receptor binding may decrease glucocorticoid-dependent induction due to interactions of these two cis-acting elements. Mutation of a putative GRE located between base pair -81 and -95 reduced, but did not completely eliminate, glucocorticoid-dependent induction of the reporter, suggesting that a nonclassic mechanism of induction is involved in this response.

  6. Microgravity decreases c-fos induction and serum response element activity.

    PubMed

    de Groot, R P; Rijken, P J; den Hertog, J; Boonstra, J; Verkleij, A J; de Laat, S W; Kruijer, W

    1990-09-01

    Several studies have shown that altered gravity conditions influence mammalian cell growth and differentiation. The molecular mechanisms underlying these effects, however, remain relatively obscure. In this paper we show that microgravity reached in a sounding rocket strongly decreases epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced expression of the proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun, which are both implicated in the regulation of proliferation and differentiation. Decreased activity of the serum response element (SRE), present in the c-fos promoter-enhancer region, is probably responsible for the decrease in EGF-induced c-fos expression. In addition, we show that gravity alterations differentially modulate distinctive signal transduction pathways, indicating that gravity-dependent modulations of mammalian cell proliferation are unlikely to be caused by a nonspecific stress response of the cell.

  7. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Ablative Thermal Response and Thermostructural Design of Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    A finite element ablation and thermal response program is presented for simulation of three-dimensional transient thermostructural analysis. The three-dimensional governing differential equations and finite element formulation are summarized. A novel probabilistic design methodology for thermal protection systems is presented. The design methodology is an eight step process beginning with a parameter sensitivity study and is followed by a deterministic analysis whereby an optimum design can determined. The design process concludes with a Monte Carlo simulation where the probabilities of exceeding design specifications are estimated. The design methodology is demonstrated by applying the methodology to the carbon phenolic compression pads of the Crew Exploration Vehicle. The maximum allowed values of bondline temperature and tensile stress are used as the design specifications in this study.

  8. Identification of peroxisome-proliferator responsive element in the mouse HSL gene

    SciTech Connect

    Yajima, Hiroaki . E-mail: hyajima@kirin.co.jp; Kobayashi, Yumie; Kanaya, Tomoka; Horino, Yoko

    2007-01-12

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of lipolysis in adipose tissue. Several studies suggest that protein phosphorylation regulates the HSL enzymatic activity. On the other hand, the precise mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of the HSL gene remains to be elucidated. Here, we identified a functional peroxisome-proliferator responsive element (PPRE) in the mouse HSL promoter by reporter assay in CV-1 cells using serial deletion and point mutants of the 5'-flanking region. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed that both peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR{gamma}) and retinoid X receptor (RXR{alpha}) interacted with the region. Binding of the PPAR{gamma}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer to the PPRE sequence was also confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. These results indicate that the HSL gene is transcriptionally regulated by PPAR{gamma}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer, and suggest that a cis-acting element regulates the HSL gene expression.

  9. Effects of rare earth elements and REE-binding proteins on physiological responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongwu; Wang, Xue; Chen, Zhiwei

    2012-02-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs), which include 17 elements in the periodic table, share chemical properties related to a similar external electronic configuration. REEs enriched fertilizers have been used in China since the 1980s. REEs could enter the cell and cell organelles, influence plant growth, and mainly be bound with the biological macromolecules. REE-binding proteins have been found in some plants. In addition, the chlorophyll activities and photosynthetic rate can be regulated by REEs. REEs could promote the protective function of cell membrane and enhance the plant resistance capability to stress produced by environmental factors, and affect the plant physiological mechanism by regulating the Ca²⁺ level in the plant cells. The focus of present review is to describe how REEs and REE-binding proteins participate in the physiological responses in plants.

  10. Finite element simulation of rate-dependent magneto-active polymer response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, K.; Kiefer, B.; Menzel, A.

    2016-10-01

    This contribution is concerned with the embedding of constitutive relations for magneto-active polymers (MAP) into finite element simulations. To this end, a recently suggested, calibrated, and validated material model for magneto-mechanically coupled and rate-dependent MAP response is briefly summarized in its continuous and algorithmic settings. Moreover, the strongly coupled field equations of finite deformation magneto-mechanics are reviewed. For the purpose of numerical simulation, a finite element model is then established based on the usual steps of weak form representation, discretization and consistent linearization. Two verifying inhomogeneous numerical examples are presented in which a classical ‘plate with a hole’ geometry is equipped with MAP properties and subjected to different types of time-varying mechanical and magnetic loading.

  11. Surface Chemistry of Nanocellulose Fibers Directs Monocyte/Macrophage Response.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kai; Ålander, Eva; Lindström, Tom; Mihranyan, Albert; Strømme, Maria; Ferraz, Natalia

    2015-09-14

    The effect of surface functionalization of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) on monocyte/macrophage (MM) behavior is investigated to understand how the physicochemical properties of nanocelluloses influence the interactions of such materials with biological systems. Films of anionic (a-), cationic (c-), and unmodified (u-) NFC were synthesized and characterized in terms of surface charge. THP-1 monocytes were cultured on the surface of the films for 24 h in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide, and the cell response was evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, morphology, and secretion of TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-1ra. The results show that MMs cultured on carboxymethylated-NFC films (a-NFC) are activated toward a proinflammatory phenotype, whereas u-NFC promotes a mild activation of the studied cells. The presence of hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium groups on c-NFC, however, does not promote the activation of MMs, indicating that c-NFC closely behaves as an inert material in terms of MM activation. None of the materials is able to directly activate the MMs toward an anti-inflammatory response. These results may provide a foundation for the design of future NFC-based materials with the ability to control MM activation and may expand the use of NFC in biomedical applications.

  12. Cross-surface interface element for coupling built-up structural subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, C. G.; Ransom, J. B.; Aminpour, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    A new finite element for coupling built-up shell substructures is presented. The present work extends the hybrid variational formulation of the interface element developed by Aminpour and Ransom to permit coupling between two intersecting substructures. Designed for the assembly of independently built-up finite element models, this technique provides a level of modeling flexibility previously unavailable.

  13. Discrete element modeling of Martian pit crater formation in response to extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Kevin J.; Wyrick, Danielle Y.; Ferrill, David A.

    2011-04-01

    Pit craters, circular to elliptical depressions that lack a raised rim or ejecta deposits, are common on the surface of Mars. Similar structures are also found on Earth, Venus, the Moon, and smaller planetary bodies, including some asteroids. While it is generally accepted that these pits form in response to material drainage into a subsurface void space, the primary mechanism(s) responsible for creating the void is a subject of debate. Previously proposed mechanisms include collapse into lave tubes, dike injection, extensional fracturing, and dilational normal faulting. In this study, we employ two-dimensional discrete element models to assess both extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting as mechanisms for forming pit craters. We also examine the effect of mechanical stratigraphy (alternating strong and weak layers) and variation in regolith thickness on pit morphology. Our simulations indicate that both extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting are viable mechanisms. Both mechanisms lead to generally convex (steepening downward) slope profiles; extensional fracturing results in generally symmetric pits, whereas dilational normal faulting produces strongly asymmetric geometries. Pit width is established early, whereas pit depth increases later in the deformation history. Inclusion of mechanical stratigraphy results in wider and deeper pits, particularly for the dilational normal faulting, and the presence of strong near-surface layers leads to pits with distinct edges as observed on Mars. The modeling results suggest that a thicker regolith leads to wider but shallower pits that are less distinct and may be more difficult to detect in areas of thick regolith.

  14. Surface functionalities of gold nanoparticles impact embryonic gene expression responses

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Lisa; Tilton, Susan C.; Zaikova, Tatiana; Richman, Erik; Waters, Katrina M.; Hutchison, James E.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) into consumer products is increasing; however, there is a gap in available toxicological data to determine the safety of AuNPs. In this study, we utilised the embryonic zebrafish to investigate how surface functionalisation and charge influence molecular responses. Precisely engineered AuNPs with 1.5 nm cores were synthesised and functionalized with three ligands: 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (MES), N,N,N-trimethylammoniumethanethiol (TMAT), or 2-(2-(2-mercaptoethoxy)ethoxy)ethanol. Developmental assessments revealed differential biological responses when embryos were exposed to the functionalised AuNPs at the same concentration. Using inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry, AuNP uptake was confirmed in exposed embryos. Following exposure to MES- and TMAT-AuNPs from 6 to 24 or 6 to 48 h post fertilisation, pathways involved in inflammation and immune response were perturbed. Additionally, transport mechanisms were misregulated after exposure to TMAT and MES-AuNPs, demonstrating that surface functionalisation influences many molecular pathways. PMID:22263968

  15. Surface response methodology for the study of supported membrane formation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Claire; Briand, Elisabeth; Parot, Pierre; Odorico, Michael; Chopineau, Joël

    2007-07-05

    We report on the investigations of the formation of the tethered lipid bilayer by vesicle deposition on amine-functionalized surfaces. The tethered bilayer was created by the deposition of egg-PC vesicles containing 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-poly-(ethyleneglycol)-N-hydroxysuccinimide as anchoring molecules on an amine-coated surface. This approach is an easy route for the formation of a biomimetic-supported membrane. A Doelhert experimental design was applied to determine the conditions leading to the formation of a continuous and defect-free tethered bilayer on different surfaces (gold and glass). Doehlert designs allow modeling of the experimental responses by second-order polynomial equations as a function of experimental factors. Four factors expected to influence bilayer formation were studied: the lipid concentration in the vesicle suspension, the mass percentage of anchoring molecules in the vesicles, the contact time between the vesicles and the surface, and the resting time of the membrane after buffer rinse. The optimization of the membrane preparation parameters was achieved by monitoring lipid assembly formation using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy on gold and by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching on glass. Three characteristic responses were systematically measured: the bilayer thickness, the lipid diffusion coefficient, and the lipid mobile fraction. The simultaneous inspection of the three characteristics revealed that a restricted experimental domain leads to properties that are in accordance with a bilayer presence. The factors of this domain are a lipid concentration from 0.1 to 1 mg/mL, 4-8% of anchoring molecules in the vesicles, 1-4 h of contact time between vesicles and surface, and 21-24 h of resting time after buffer rinse. Under these conditions, a membrane having a lipid mass per surface between 545 +/- 5 and 590 +/- 10 ng/cm2, a diffusion coefficient of between 2.5 +/- 0.3 x 10(-8) and 3.60 +/- 0.5 x

  16. Bioadsorption of rare earth elements through cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Dan M.; Reed, David W.; Yung, Mimi C.; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-02-02

    In this study, with the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb3+ could be effectively recovered using citrate, consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb3+ by citrate. No reduction in Tb3+ adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.

  17. Bioadsorption of rare earth elements through cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Dan M.; Reed, David W.; Yung, Mimi C.; ...

    2016-02-02

    In this study, with the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb3+ could be effectively recovered using citrate,more » consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb3+ by citrate. No reduction in Tb3+ adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.« less

  18. Manipulation of the closing transients of bileaflet mechanical heart valves using passive, surface-mounted elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Helene

    2005-11-01

    The time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is accompanied by a strong flow transient that is associated with the formation of a counter-rotating vortex pair near the b-datum line of leaflet edges. The strong transitory shear that is generated by these vortices may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation. In the present work, these flow transients are mitigated using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. The closing transients in the absence and presence of the passive vortex generators are characterized using PIV measurements that are phase locked to the leaflet motion. The study utilizes a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in the aortic position of the Georgia Tech left heart simulator. The valve is subjected to physiological flow conditions: a heart rate of 70 bpm; a cardiac output of 5 l/min; and a mean aortic pressure of 90 mmHg. Measurements of the velocity field in the center plane of the leaflets demonstrate that the dynamics of the transient vortices that precede the formation of the leakage jets can be significantly altered and controlled by relatively simple passive modifications of existing valve designs.

  19. Bone char surface modification by nano-gold coating for elemental mercury vapor removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assari, Mohamad javad; Rezaee, Abbas; Rangkooy, Hossinali

    2015-07-01

    The present work was done to develop a novel nanocomposite using bone char coated with nano-gold for capture of elemental mercury (Hg0) from air. The morphologies, structures, and chemical constitute of the prepared nanocomposite were evaluated by UV-VIS-NIR, dynamic light-scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The capture performance of nanocomposite was evaluated in a needle trap for mercury vapor. An on-line setup based on cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS) was designed for Hg0 determination. Dynamic capacity of nanocomposite for Hg0 was shown high efficient operating capacity of 586.7 μg/g. As temperature increases, the dynamic adsorption capacity of the nanocomposite was decreased, which are characteristics of physicosorption processes. It was found that the surface modification of bone char with nano-gold has various advantages such as high operating dynamic adsorption capacity and low cost preparation. It was also demonstrated that the developed nanocomposite is suitable for on-line monitoring of Hg0. It could be applied for the laboratory and field studies.

  20. Bioadsorption of Rare Earth Elements through Cell Surface Display of Lanthanide Binding Tags.

    PubMed

    Park, Dan M; Reed, David W; Yung, Mimi C; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb(3+) could be effectively recovered using citrate, consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb(3+) by citrate. No reduction in Tb(3+) adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.

  1. Measurements of deuterium retention and surface elemental composition with double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaviva, Salvatore; Caneve, Luisa; Colao, Francesco; Maddaluno, Giorgio; Krawczyk, Natalia; Czarnecka, Agata; Gasior, Pawel; Kubkowska, Monica; Lepek, Michal

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the tritium amount retained in the plasma facing components and their surface layer composition is of crucial importance for ITER. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical technique suitable for in situ measurements of both these quantities. For improving its sensitivity, the double pulse (DP) variant can be used, instead of the standard single pulse (SP). In this work Mo samples coated with 1.5-1.8 μm thick W-Al (as a proxy for Be) mixed layer, with co-deposited deuterium were analyzed under vacuum (˜5 × 10-5 mbar) by SP and DP LIBS, showing enhancement of the spectral intensity for the latter. Calibration free method was applied to the LIBS data for getting the elemental concentration of W and Al. Results are in satisfactory agreement with those obtained from preliminary, ion beam analysis measurements. Deuterium concentration was tentatively estimated by accounting for the intensity ratio between Dα and nearby WI lines.

  2. Structural and surface analysis of AlInN thin films synthesized by elemental stacks annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Naveed; Devarajan, Mutharasu; Subramani, Shanmugan; Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the synthesis of AlInN thin films on Si (100) substrates using elemental stacks annealing (ESA) process. Single stack InN films were grown on Si (100) substrates by reactive radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering using pure indium target in Ar-N2 environment and then an Al stack layer was deposited on the InN films by direct current (dc) sputtering of pure aluminum target in Ar atmosphere at room temperature. Annealing of the deposited films was carried out at 400 °C for 2, 4 and 6 h in a tube furnace under N2 atmosphere. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results reveal that annealing for 2 h does not produce a well-defined AlInN film, however, with the increase of annealing time to 4 h and to 6 h, (002) and (103) oriented highly crystalline AlInN films are formed with wurtzite structures. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) results indicate a uniform film structure with grains growth by increasing the annealing time. Energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis shows higher Al (atomic %) in the film as compared to In and N. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results show a decrease in the surface roughness with increase of the annealing time.

  3. A comparison of the effects of prosthetic and commercially pure metals on retrieved human fibroblasts: the role of surface elemental composition.

    PubMed

    Mostardi, R A; Kovacik, M W; Ramsier, R D; Bender, E T; Finefrock, J M; Bear, T F; Askew, M J

    2010-02-01

    The most common clinical cause of long-term failure in total joint replacement surgery is inflammatory aseptic osteolysis; a condition in which bone surrounding the prosthetic implant, and to which the implant is attached, is resorbed, rendering the artificial device loose and painful. Historically, the severity of this bone resorptive process has been thought to be predominately attributed to the size and shape of wear-debris particles, particularly the metallic particulates that interact biologically/immunologically with cells in the joint. Because the cytotoxic reactions are the result of interactions between the cells and the surfaces of the particulates, it is not clear in the realm of orthopedics to what extent different surface stoichiometric ratios contribute to instigating bioreactive or cytotoxic cellular responses that can lead to aseptic osteolysis. Using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), this study presents data and analyses concerning the respective bulk and surface stoichiometric ratios of two commercially pure metal micro-particulates (tantalum and titanium), two prosthetic F75 cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy micro-particulates, and prosthetic F136 titanium-aluminum-vanadium alloy micro-particulates, each containing elements common to total joint replacement surgery. Cell culture viability data from four volunteer donors are also presented, which suggest that micro-particulates containing large percentages of surface titanium and aluminum can cause moderate cellular toxicity, and micro-particulates containing large percentages of surface cobalt can result in extremely severe cellular toxicity. This work further suggests that surface analysis techniques, such as XPS, are essential to determine surface elemental characterization of metallic materials prior to interpreting cellular response results.

  4. Metal oxide surfaces for enhanced colorimetric response in bioassays.

    PubMed

    Bonyi, Enock; Kukoyi, Zeenat; Daodu, Oluseyi; Boone-Kukoyi, Zainab; Coskun, Sahin; Unalan, Husnu Emrah; Aslan, Kadir

    2017-06-01

    Physical stability of metal nanoparticle films on planar surfaces can be increased by employing surface modification techniques and/or type of metal nanoparticles. Subsequently, the enzymatic response of colorimetric bioassays can be increased for improved dynamic range for the detection of biomolecules. Using a model bioassay b-BSA, three planar platforms (1) poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) with silver thin films (STFs), (2) silver nanowires (Ag NWs) on paper and (3) indium tin oxide (ITO) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were evaluated to investigate the extent of increase in the colorimetric signal. Bioassays for b-BSA and Ki-67 antigen (a real-life bioassay) in buffer were performed using microwave heating (total assay time is 25-30min) and at room temperature (a control experiment, total assay time is 3h). Model bioassays showed that STFs were removed from the surface during washing steps and the extent of ITO remained unchanged. The lowest level of detection (LLOD) for b-BSA bioassays were: 10(-10)M for 10nm STFs on PMMA and Ag NWs on paper and 10(-11)M for ITO. Bioassays for Ki-67 antigen yielded a LLOD of <10(-9)M on ITO platforms, while STFs platforms were deemed unusable due to significant loss of STFs from the surfaces. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Surface temperature changes in response to handling in domestic chickens.

    PubMed

    Edgar, J L; Nicol, C J; Pugh, C A; Paul, E S

    2013-07-02

    Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) occurs in numerous species and is characterised by an increase in core body temperature, and a decrease in surface temperature, of between 0.5 and 1.5°C within 10 to 15 min of the onset of "emotional stress". The aim of the current study was to ascertain whether the husbandry-relevant procedure of handling resulted in measurable changes in surface body temperature in chickens, as measured using infrared thermography. Baseline temperatures for 19 domestic hens were compared to temperatures immediately, and up to 20 min following handling (catching and brief restraint by a human). Surface head, eye and comb temperatures were plotted to investigate the pattern of temperature change. In response to handling, comb temperature decreased significantly, showing a rapid 2°C drop. Eye temperature showed an initial decrease then rose to levels significantly higher than handling. Head temperature increased over the 20 min post-handling period, to reach levels significantly higher than baseline. It can be concluded that surface temperature changes assessed using infrared thermography, in particular of the hen's comb, are sensitive to husbandry procedures such as handling and represent a potentially useful method for assessing stress-induced hyperthermia in chickens. © 2013.

  6. New resource for the computation of cartilage biphasic material properties with the interpolant response surface method

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Kathryn E.; Kourtis, Lampros C.; Besier, Thor F.; Lindsey, Derek P.; Gold, Garry E.; Delp, Scott L.; Beaupre, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage material properties are important for understanding joint function and diseases, but can be challenging to obtain. Three biphasic material properties (aggregate modulus, Poisson's ratio and permeability) can be determined using an analytical or finite element model combined with optimisation to find the material properties values that best reproduce an experimental creep curve. The purpose of this study was to develop an easy-to-use resource to determine biphasic cartilage material properties. A Cartilage Interpolant Response Surface was generated from interpolation of finite element simulations of creep indentation tests. Creep indentation tests were performed on five sites across a tibial plateau. A least-squares residual search of the Cartilage Interpolant Response Surface resulted in a best-fit curve for each experimental condition with corresponding material properties. These sites provided a representative range of aggregate moduli (0.48–1.58 MPa), Poisson's ratio (0.00–0.05) and permeability (1.7 × 10−15−5.4 × 10−15 m4/N s) values found in human cartilage. PMID:19675978

  7. New resource for the computation of cartilage biphasic material properties with the interpolant response surface method.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Kathryn E; Kourtis, Lampros C; Besier, Thor F; Lindsey, Derek P; Gold, Garry E; Delp, Scott L; Beaupre, Gary S

    2009-08-01

    Cartilage material properties are important for understanding joint function and diseases, but can be challenging to obtain. Three biphasic material properties (aggregate modulus, Poisson's ratio and permeability) can be determined using an analytical or finite element model combined with optimisation to find the material properties values that best reproduce an experimental creep curve. The purpose of this study was to develop an easy-to-use resource to determine biphasic cartilage material properties. A Cartilage Interpolant Response Surface was generated from interpolation of finite element simulations of creep indentation tests. Creep indentation tests were performed on five sites across a tibial plateau. A least-squares residual search of the Cartilage Interpolant Response Surface resulted in a best-fit curve for each experimental condition with corresponding material properties. These sites provided a representative range of aggregate moduli (0.48-1.58 MPa), Poisson's ratio (0.00-0.05) and permeability (1.7 x 10(- 15)-5.4 x 10(- 15) m(4)/N s) values found in human cartilage. The resource is freely available from https://simtk.org/home/va-squish.

  8. Differential interactions of promoter elements in stress responses of the Arabidopsis Adh gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dolferus, R; Jacobs, M; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S

    1994-01-01

    The Adh (alcohol dehydrogenase, EC 1.1.1.1.) gene from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. can be induced by dehydration and cold, as well as by hypoxia. A 1-kb promoter fragment (CADH: -964 to +53) is sufficient to confer the stress induction and tissue-specific developmental expression characteristics of the Adh gene to a beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Deletion mapping of the 5' end and site-specific mutagenesis identified four regions of the promoter essential for expression under the three stress conditions. Some sequence elements are important for response to all three stress treatments, whereas others are stress specific. The most critical region essential for expression of the Arabidopsis Adh promoter under all three environmental stresses (region IV: -172 to -141) contains sequences homologous to the GT motif (-160 to -152) and the GC motif (-147 to -144) of the maize Adh1 anaerobic responsive element. Region III (-235 to -172) contains two regions shown by R.J. Ferl and B.H. Laughner ([1989] Plant Mol Biol 12: 357-366) to bind regulatory proteins; mutation of the G-box-1 region (5'-CCACGTGG-3', -216 to -209) does not affect expression under uninduced or hypoxic conditions, but significantly reduces induction by cold stress and, to a lesser extent, by dehydration stress. Mutation of the other G-box-like sequence (G-box-2: 5'-CCAAGTGG-3', -193 to -182) does not change hypoxic response and affects cold and dehydration stress only slightly. G-box-2 mutations also promote high levels of expression under uninduced conditions. Deletion of region I (-964 to -510) results in increased expression under uninduced and all stress conditions, suggesting that this region contains a repressor binding site. Region II (-510 to -384) contains a positive regulatory element and is necessary for high expression levels under all treatments. PMID:7972489

  9. Characterization of a hypoxia-response element in the Epo locus of the pufferfish, Takifugu rubripes.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Rashmi P; Tohari, Sumanty; Ho, Adrian; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2010-06-01

    Animals respond to hypoxia by increasing synthesis of the glycoprotein hormone erythropoietin (Epo) which in turn stimulates the production of red blood cells. The gene encoding Epo has been recently cloned in teleost fishes such as the pufferfish Takifugu rubripes (fugu) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). It has been shown that the transcription levels of Epo in teleost fishes increase in response to anemia or hypoxia in a manner similar to its human ortholog. However, the cis-regulatory element(s) mediating the hypoxia response of Epo gene in fishes has not been identified. In the present study, using the human hepatoma cell line (Hep3B), we have identified and characterized a hypoxia response element (HRE) in the fugu Epo locus. The sequence of the fugu HRE (ACGTGCTG) is identical to that of the HRE in the human EPO locus. However, unlike the HRE in the mammalian Epo locus, which is located in the 3' region of the gene, the fugu HRE is located in the 5' flanking region and on the opposite strand of DNA. This HRE is conserved in other teleosts such as Tetraodon and zebrafish in a similar location. A 365-bp fragment containing the fugu HRE was able to drive GFP expression in the liver of transgenic zebrafish. However, we could not ascertain if the expression of transgene is induced by hypoxia in vivo due to the low and variable levels of GFP expression in transgenic zebrafish. Our investigations also revealed that the Epo locus has experienced extensive rearrangements during vertebrate evolution.

  10. Altered Response Hierarchy and Increased T-Cell Breadth upon HIV-1 Conserved Element DNA Vaccination in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Viraj; Valentin, Antonio; Rosati, Margherita; Alicea, Candido; Singh, Ashish K.; Jalah, Rashmi; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Mothe, Beatriz; Brander, Christian; Rolland, Morgane; Mullins, James I.; Pavlakis, George N.; Felber, Barbara K.

    2014-01-01

    HIV sequence diversity and potential decoy epitopes are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. A DNA vaccine candidate comprising of highly conserved p24gag elements (CE) induced robust immunity in all 10 vaccinated macaques, whereas full-length gag DNA vaccination elicited responses to these conserved elements in only 5 of 11 animals, targeting fewer CE per animal. Importantly, boosting CE-primed macaques with DNA expressing full-length p55gag increased both magnitude of CE responses and breadth of Gag immunity, demonstrating alteration of the hierarchy of epitope recognition in the presence of pre-existing CE-specific responses. Inclusion of a conserved element immunogen provides a novel and effective strategy to broaden responses against highly diverse pathogens by avoiding decoy epitopes, while focusing responses to critical viral elements for which few escape pathways exist. PMID:24465991

  11. Evolutionary conservation of an atypical glucocorticoid-responsive element in the human tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Sheela Rani, C S; Soto-Pina, Alexandra; Iacovitti, Lorraine; Strong, Randy

    2013-07-01

    The human tyrosine hydroxylase (hTH) gene has a 42 bp evolutionarily conserved region designated (CR) II at -7.24 kb, which bears 93% homology to the region we earlier identified as containing the glucocorticoid response element, a 7 bp activator protein-1 (AP-1)-like motif in the rat TH gene. We cloned this hTH-CRII region upstream of minimal basal hTH promoter in luciferase (Luc) reporter vector, and tested glucocorticoid responsiveness in human cell lines. Dexamethasone (Dex) stimulated Luc activity of hTH-CRII in HeLa cells, while mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, prevented Dex stimulation. Deletion of the 7 bp 5'-TGACTAA at -7243 bp completely abolished the Dex-stimulated Luc activity of hTH-CRII construct. The AP-1 agonist, tetradeconoyl-12,13-phorbol acetate (TPA), also stimulated hTH promoter activity, and Dex and TPA together further accentuated this response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed the presence of both GR and AP-1 proteins, especially Jun family members, at this hTH promoter site. Dex did not stimulate hTH promoter activity in a catecholaminergic cell line, which had low endogenous GR levels, but did activate the response when GR was expressed exogenously. Thus, our studies have clearly identified a glucocorticoid-responsive element in a 7 bp AP-1-like motif in the promoter region at -7.24 kb of the human TH gene.

  12. Hormone withdrawal triggers a premature and sustained gene activation from delayed secondary glucocorticoid response elements.

    PubMed

    Hess, P; Payvar, F

    1992-02-15

    Glucocorticoid regulatory elements, denoted GREs and delayed secondary GREs (sGREs), bind the purified glucocorticoid receptors via distinctive sequence motifs and confer a primary and delayed secondary hormone inducibility, respectively, upon a linked reporter construct in stably transfected mammalian cells. The delayed secondary responses, but not the primary responses, are preceded by a time lag of several hours and blocked by protein synthesis inhibitors. In this report, we further characterized and distinguished these hormonal inductions. A 206-base pair DNA fragment from the hepatic rat alpha 2u-globulin (RUG) gene, containing at least two delayed sGREs, was specifically activated by glucocorticoids in a dose-dependent manner via a process which is sensitive to receptor antagonist RU486. Delayed sGRE-stimulated production of correctly initiated transcripts was preceded by a time lag of 2 h, a time when the GRE-mediated induction had reached maximal levels. A pulse of glucocorticoids sustained maximal activation of the delayed secondary response but not the primary response. In fact, hormone withdrawal triggered a premature induction of this delayed secondary response, suggesting that delayed sGREs are under both negative and positive control of the hormone receptor. Two separable elements of the 206-base pair fragment, including the 29-base pair sequence of a single receptor binding site, activated the reporter expression as effectively with transient, pulsatile exposure to hormone as with continuous exposure. Our results suggest that the information content of a hormonal pulse is retained, or "memorized," more persistently by a receptor binding site of delayed sGREs than those of the prototypical GREs.

  13. Effect of design selection on response surface performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, William C.

    1993-01-01

    Artificial neural nets and polynomial approximations were used to develop response surfaces for several test problems. Based on the number of functional evaluations required to build the approximations and the number of undetermined parameters associated with the approximations, the performance of the two types of approximations was found to be comparable. A rule of thumb is developed for determining the number of nodes to be used on a hidden layer of an artificial neural net and the number of designs needed to train an approximation is discussed.

  14. Postural responses to yaw rotation of support surface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiung-Ling; Lou, Shu-Zon; Wu, Hong-Wen; Wu, Shyi-Kuen; Yeung, Kwok-Tak; Su, Fong-Chin

    2013-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate EMG and kinematic responses to yaw rotation of a support surface. Twenty people participated in four conditions, i.e., two velocities (240°/s, 120°/s) and two amplitudes (30°, 15°). Longer latency and smaller muscle responses were induced for yaw rotation, and distal ankle and knee muscles were activated earlier than trunk and neck muscles. Joint kinematics demonstrated larger angular displacements in axial rotation. Velocity and amplitude did not affect onset latency or magnitude of muscle activation but had significant effects on joint movements and COM displacements. Preliminary information about normative data of healthy subjects was obtained, and questions were generated about optimal velocity and amplitude test protocols that require further investigation.

  15. Broadband multiple responses of surface modes in quasicrystalline plasmonic structure

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Haiming; Jiang, Xiangqian; Huang, Feng; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the multiple excitation of surface modes in 2D photonic quasicrystal/metal/substrate structure. An improved rigorous coupled wave analysis method that can handle the quasicrystalline structure is presented. The quasicrystalline lattice, which refers to Penrose tiling in this paper, is generated by the cut-and-project method. The normal incidence spectrum presents a broadband multiple responses property. We find that the phase matching condition determines the excitation frequency for a given incident angle, while the depth of the reflection valley depends on the incident polarization. The modes will split into several sub-modes at oblique incidence, which give rise to the appearance of more responses on the spectrum. PMID:27492782

  16. Response Surface Analysis of Crowd Dynamics during Tawaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarita, Zainuddin; Lim Eng, Aik

    2012-07-01

    A refined cellular automata model is applied to simulate the crowd movement of Muslim pilgrims performing the Tawaf ritual within the Al-Haram Mosque in Mecca. The results from the simulation are obtained and the influence of the predictor variables of the evacuation process (pedestrian flow and Tawaf duration) on the responses (pedestrian density, average walking speed, and cumulative evacuee) is investigated using response surface methodology (RSM). The average results from the experiments with an rms error less than 0.5 are obtained from the RSM. Its performance indicates that the RSM possesses excellent predictive ability for the model evacuation study, because both the experimental and the predicted values agree well with the results obtained in this study.

  17. Surface Plasmon Resonance Study of Cooperative Interactions of Estrogen Receptor α and Specificity Protein 1 with Composite DNA Elements.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaodi; Song, Hong Yan

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) and Specificity protein 1 (Sp1) are transcription factors (TF) that are involved in regulating progesterone receptor (PR) gene expression through cooperative interactions with DNA. The natural composite DNA +571 ERE/Sp1 site in promoter A of the progesterone receptor contains a half-site of estrogen response elements (½ERE) upstream of two Sp1 binding sites (the proximal Sp1 (Sp1/P) and distal Sp1 (Sp1/D)) with a 4 bp spacer. Here, we have developed a protocol for studying the cooperative interaction of Sp1 and ERα with the composite DNA of +571 ERE/Sp1 site using Biacore T200, a high sensitivity surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. With this protocol, we have concluded that Sp1 binding enhances the overall ERα binding to the composite DNA. We have also determined the optimal spacer distance between the ½ERE and Sp1/D for the best cooperative protein binding. This study is pivotal in guiding the bioinformatics simulation to yield an exact model of the spacer dependency of the transcription factor/cofactor-DNA interactions, which is important for understanding the nuclear receptor regulating activity through other coactivators.

  18. Platinum-group elements: quantification in collected exhaust fumes and studies of catalyst surfaces.

    PubMed

    Palacios, M A; Gómez, M M; Moldovan, M; Morrison, G; Rauch, S; Mcleod, C; Ma, R; Laserna, J; Lucena, P; Caroli, S; Alimonti, A; Petrucci, F; Bocca, B; Schramel, P; Lustig, S; Zischka, M; Wass, U; Stenbom, B; Luna, M; Saenz, J C; Santamaría, J; Torrens, J M

    2000-07-20

    Automotive catalytic converters, in which Pt, Pd and Rh (platinum-group elements; PGEs) are the active components for eliminating several noxious components from exhaust fumes, have become the main source of environmental urban pollution by PGEs. This work reports on the catalyst morphology through changes in catalyst surface by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) and laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) from fresh to aged catalytic converters. The distribution of these elements in the fresh catalysts analysed (Pt-Pd-Rh gasoline catalyst) is not uniform and occurs mainly in a longitudinal direction. This heterogeneity seems to be greater for Pt and Pd. PGEs released by the catalysts, fresh and aged 30,000 km, were studied in parallel. Whole raw exhaust fumes from four catalysts of three different types were also examined. Two of these were gasoline catalysts (Pt-Pd Rh and Pd-Rh) and the other two were diesel catalysts (Pt). Samples were collected following the 91,441 EUDC driving cycle for light-duty vehicle testing. The results show that at 0 km the samples collected first have the highest content of particulate PGEs and although the general tendency is for the release to decrease with increasing number of samples taken, exceptions are frequent. At 30,000 km the released PGEs in gasoline and diesel catalysts decreased significantly. For fresh gasoline catalysts the mean of the total amount released was approximately 100, 250 and 50 ng km(-1) for Pt, Pd and Rh, respectively. In diesel catalysts the Pt release varied in the range 400-800 ng km-1. After ageing the catalysts up to 30,000 km, the gasoline catalysts released amounts of Pt between 6 and 8 ng km(-1), Pd between 12 and 16 ng km(-1) and Rh between 3 and 12 ng km(-1). In diesel catalysts the Pt release varied in the range 108-150 ng km(-1). The soluble portion of PGEs in the HNO3 collector solution represented less than 5% of the total amount for fresh catalysts

  19. Transposable Elements Contribute to Activation of Maize Genes in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Makarevitch, Irina; Waters, Amanda J.; West, Patrick T.; Stitzer, Michelle; Hirsch, Candice N.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Springer, Nathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for a large portion of the genome in many eukaryotic species. Despite their reputation as “junk” DNA or genomic parasites deleterious for the host, TEs have complex interactions with host genes and the potential to contribute to regulatory variation in gene expression. It has been hypothesized that TEs and genes they insert near may be transcriptionally activated in response to stress conditions. The maize genome, with many different types of TEs interspersed with genes, provides an ideal system to study the genome-wide influence of TEs on gene regulation. To analyze the magnitude of the TE effect on gene expression response to environmental changes, we profiled gene and TE transcript levels in maize seedlings exposed to a number of abiotic stresses. Many genes exhibit up- or down-regulation in response to these stress conditions. The analysis of TE families inserted within upstream regions of up-regulated genes revealed that between four and nine different TE families are associated with up-regulated gene expression in each of these stress conditions, affecting up to 20% of the genes up-regulated in response to abiotic stress, and as many as 33% of genes that are only expressed in response to stress. Expression of many of these same TE families also responds to the same stress conditions. The analysis of the stress-induced transcripts and proximity of the transposon to the gene suggests that these TEs may provide local enhancer activities that stimulate stress-responsive gene expression. Our data on allelic variation for insertions of several of these TEs show strong correlation between the presence of TE insertions and stress-responsive up-regulation of gene expression. Our findings suggest that TEs provide an important source of allelic regulatory variation in gene response to abiotic stress in maize. PMID:25569788

  20. Functional evolution of the p53 regulatory network through its target response elements

    PubMed Central

    Jegga, Anil G.; Inga, Alberto; Menendez, Daniel; Aronow, Bruce J.; Resnick, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional network evolution is central to the development of complex biological systems. Networks can evolve through variation of master regulators and/or by changes in regulation of genes within networks. To gain insight into meaningful evolutionary differences in large networks, it is essential to address the functional consequences of sequence differences in response elements (REs) targeted by transcription factors. Using a combination of custom bioinformatics and multispecies alignment of promoter regions, we investigated the functional evolution of REs in terms of responsiveness to the sequence-specific transcription factor p53, a tumor suppressor and master regulator of stress responses. We identified REs orthologous to known p53 targets in human and rodent cells or alternatively REs related to the established p53 consensus. The orthologous REs were assigned p53 transactivation capabilities based on rules determined from model systems, and a functional heat map was developed to visually summarize conservation of sequence and relative level of responsiveness to p53 for 47 REs in 14 species. Individual REs exhibited marked differences in transactivation potentials and widespread evolutionary turnover. Functional differences were often not predicted from consensus sequence evaluations. Of the established human p53 REs analyzed, 91% had sequence conservation in at least one nonprimate species compared with 67.5% for functional conservation. Surprisingly, there was almost no conservation of functional REs for genes involved in DNA metabolism or repair between humans and rodents, suggesting important differences in p53 stress responses and cancer development. PMID:18187580

  1. Biodynamic response and spinal load estimation of seated body in vibration using finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenping; Bazrgari, Babak; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Rakheja, Subhash; Boileau, Paul-Émile

    2010-01-01

    Trunk biomechanical models play an indispensable role in predicting muscle forces and spinal loads under whole-body vibration (WBV) exposures. Earlier measurements on the force-motion biodynamic response (impedance, apparent mass) at the body-seat interface and vibration transmissibility (seat to head) have led to the development of different mechanical models. Such models could simulate the overall passive response and serve as an important tool for vehicle seat design. They cannot, however, evaluate physiological parameters of interest under the WBV. On the contrary, anatomical models simulating human's physiological characteristics can predict activities in muscles and their dynamic effects on the spine. In this study, a kinematics-driven nonlinear finite element model of the spine, in which the kinematics data are prescribed, is used to analyse the trunk response in seated WBV. Predictions of the active model (i.e., with varying muscle forces) as compared with the passive model (i.e., with no muscle forces) compared satisfactorily with measurements on vertical apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility biodynamic responses. Results demonstrated the crucial role of muscle forces in the dynamic response of the trunk. Muscle forces, while maintaining trunk equilibrium, substantially increased the compression and shear forces on the spine and, hence, the risk of tissue injury.

  2. ROLE OF SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS IN THE CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AND MERCURIC CHLORIDE BY ACTIVATED CARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses using a laboratory-scale, fixed bed apparatus to study the role of surface functional groups (SFGs) in the capture of mercuric chloride (HgC12) and elemental mercury (Hgo) in nitrogen (N2) prior to flue gas atmosphere studies. The study focused on two activat...

  3. CHEMICAL MAPPING OF ELEMENTAL SULFUR ON PYRITE AND ARSENOPYRITE SURFACES USING NEAR-INFRARED RAMAN IMAGING MICROSCOPY. (R826189)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Near-infrared Raman imaging microscopy (NIRIM) was used to produce chemical images of the distribution of elemental sulfur on oxidized pyrite and arsenopyrite surfaces. Analysis using Savitsky¯Golay filtering permits an unambiguous identificati...

  4. ROLE OF SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS IN THE CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AND MERCURIC CHLORIDE BY ACTIVATED CARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses using a laboratory-scale, fixed bed apparatus to study the role of surface functional groups (SFGs) in the capture of mercuric chloride (HgC12) and elemental mercury (Hgo) in nitrogen (N2) prior to flue gas atmosphere studies. The study focused on two activat...

  5. Evaluation of finite-element models and stress-intensity factors for surface cracks emanating from stress concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, P. W.; Raju, I. S.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A re-evaluation of the 3-D finite-element models and methods used to analyze surface crack at stress concentrations is presented. Previous finite-element models used by Raju and Newman for surface and corner cracks at holes were shown to have ill-shaped elements at the intersection of the hole and crack boundaries. Improved models, without these ill-shaped elements, were developed for a surface crack at a circular hole and at a semi-circular edge notch. Stress-intensity factors were calculated by both the nodal-force and virtual-crack-closure methods. Comparisons made between the previously developed stress-intensity factor equations and the results from the improved models agreed well except for configurations with large notch-radii-to-plate-thickness ratios. Stress-intensity factors for a semi-elliptical surface crack located at the center of a semi-circular edge notch in a plate subjected to remote tensile loadings were calculated using the improved models.

  6. CHEMICAL MAPPING OF ELEMENTAL SULFUR ON PYRITE AND ARSENOPYRITE SURFACES USING NEAR-INFRARED RAMAN IMAGING MICROSCOPY. (R826189)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Near-infrared Raman imaging microscopy (NIRIM) was used to produce chemical images of the distribution of elemental sulfur on oxidized pyrite and arsenopyrite surfaces. Analysis using Savitsky¯Golay filtering permits an unambiguous identificati...

  7. Stretch-dependent changes in surface profiles of the human crystalline lens during accommodation: A finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Pour, Hooman Mohammad; Kanapathipillai, Sangarapillai; Zarrabi, Khosrow; Manns, Fabrice; Ho, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Background A nonlinear isotropic finite element (FE) model of a 29 year old human crystalline lens was constructed to study the effects of various geometrical parameters on lens accommodation. Methods The model simulates dis-accommodation by stretching of the lens and predicts the change in the lens capsule, cortex and nucleus surface profiles at select states of stretching/accommodation. Multiple regression analysis (MRA) is used to develop a stretch-dependent mathematical model relating the lens sagittal height to the radial position of the lens surface as a function of dis-accommodative stretch. A load analysis is performed to compare the FE results to empirical results from lens stretcher studies. Using the predicted geometrical changes, the optical response of the whole eye during accommodation was analysed by ray-tracing. Results Aspects of lens shape change relative to stretch were evaluated including change in diameter (d), central thickness (T) and accommodation (A). Maximum accommodation achieved was 10.29 D. From the MRA, the stretch-dependent mathematical model of the lens shape related lens curvatures as a function of lens ciliary stretch well (maximum mean-square residual error 2.5×10−3 µm, p<0.001). The results are compared with those from in vitro studies. Conclusions The FE and ray-tracing predictions are consistent with EVAS studies in terms of load and power change versus change in thickness. The mathematical stretch-dependent model of accommodation presented may have utility in investigating lens behaviour at states other than the relaxed or fully-accommodated states. PMID:25727940

  8. Blast response of curved carbon/epoxy composite panels: Experimental study and finite-element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, V. A.; Kumar, P.; Shukla, A.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Experimental and numerical studies were conducted to understand the effect of plate curvature on blast response of carbon/epoxy composite panels. A shock-tube system was utilized to impart controlled shock loading to quasi-isotropic composite panels with differing range of radii of curvatures. A 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique coupled with high-speed photography was used to obtain out-of-plane deflection and velocity, as well as in-plane strain on the back face of the panels. Macroscopic post-mortem analysis was performed to compare yielding and deformation in these panels. A dynamic computational simulation that integrates fluid-structure interaction was conducted to evaluate the panel response in general purpose finite-element software ABAQUS/Explicit. The obtained numerical results were compared to the experimental data and showed a good correlation.

  9. PEGylated graphene oxide elicits strong immunological responses despite surface passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nana; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Wang, Shuang; Luan, Binquan; Yue, Hua; Xi, Xiaobo; Du, Jing; Yang, Zaixing; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Ruhong; Ma, Guanghui

    2017-02-01

    Engineered nanomaterials promise to transform medicine at the bio-nano interface. However, it is important to elucidate how synthetic nanomaterials interact with critical biological systems before such products can be safely utilized in humans. Past evidence suggests that polyethylene glycol-functionalized (PEGylated) nanomaterials are largely biocompatible and elicit less dramatic immune responses than their pristine counterparts. We here report results that contradict these findings. We find that PEGylated graphene oxide nanosheets (nGO-PEGs) stimulate potent cytokine responses in peritoneal macrophages, despite not being internalized. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations support a mechanism by which nGO-PEGs preferentially adsorb onto and/or partially insert into cell membranes, thereby amplifying interactions with stimulatory surface receptors. Further experiments demonstrate that nGO-PEG indeed provokes cytokine secretion by enhancing integrin β8-related signalling pathways. The present results inform that surface passivation does not always prevent immunological reactions to 2D nanomaterials but also suggest applications for PEGylated nanomaterials wherein immune stimulation is desired.

  10. PEGylated graphene oxide elicits strong immunological responses despite surface passivation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Nana; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Wang, Shuang; Luan, Binquan; Yue, Hua; Xi, Xiaobo; Du, Jing; Yang, Zaixing; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Ruhong; Ma, Guanghui

    2017-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials promise to transform medicine at the bio–nano interface. However, it is important to elucidate how synthetic nanomaterials interact with critical biological systems before such products can be safely utilized in humans. Past evidence suggests that polyethylene glycol-functionalized (PEGylated) nanomaterials are largely biocompatible and elicit less dramatic immune responses than their pristine counterparts. We here report results that contradict these findings. We find that PEGylated graphene oxide nanosheets (nGO-PEGs) stimulate potent cytokine responses in peritoneal macrophages, despite not being internalized. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations support a mechanism by which nGO-PEGs preferentially adsorb onto and/or partially insert into cell membranes, thereby amplifying interactions with stimulatory surface receptors. Further experiments demonstrate that nGO-PEG indeed provokes cytokine secretion by enhancing integrin β8-related signalling pathways. The present results inform that surface passivation does not always prevent immunological reactions to 2D nanomaterials but also suggest applications for PEGylated nanomaterials wherein immune stimulation is desired. PMID:28233871

  11. Process optimization of mechano-electrospinning by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Bu, Ningbin; Huang, YongAn; Duan, Yongqing; Yin, Zhouping

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, mechano-electrospinning (MES) is presented to write the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) solution into fibers directly, and the effects of the process parameters on the fiber are investigated experimentally based on response surface methodology. The different width of the fiber is obtained by adjusting the individual process parameters (velocity of the substrate, applied voltage and nozzle-to-substrate distance). Considering the continuous jet and stable Taylor-cone, the operation field is selected for investigating the complicated relationship between the process parameters on the width of the fiber by using the response surface methodology. The experiment results show that the predicted width of the fiber is in good agreement with the actual width of the fiber. Based on the analysis of the importance of the terms in the equation, a simple model can be used to predict the width of the fiber. Depending on this model, a large number of calibration experiments can be subducted. Additionally, the principle of the selection of the process parameters is presented by optimizing parameters, which can give a guideline for obtaining the desired fiber in the experiment.

  12. Reliable Support Design for Excavations in Brittle Rock Using a Global Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, J. Connor; Diederichs, Mark S.

    2015-03-01

    Spalling damage can pose significant risks during the construction of underground excavations in brittle rock. While deterministic analyses have traditionally been used in the design of these structures, reliability-based design (RBD) methods provide a more rational approach to quantify spalling risk by directly incorporating input uncertainty into the design process and quantifying variable ground response. This paper presents a new RBD approach to evaluate the excavation response and support performance for a tunnel in brittle ground. Guidance for the selection of appropriate parameters for variable brittle materials is provided using a combination of the damage initiation and spalling limit method and theories of microcrack initiation. System performance is then evaluated using a proposed global response surface method (GRSM) coupled with the first-order reliability method, random sampling and finite element analysis. The proposed GRSM provides a computationally efficient way to evaluate the probability of failure for various limit states, allowing for the selection of appropriate design parameters such as minimum bolt length and required bolt capacity during early stages of design. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, a preliminary design option for a proposed deep geologic repository located in Canada was assessed. Numerical analyses were completed using finite element modeling to determine the depth of spalling around the excavation and support loads over the range of possible rock mass and in situ stress conditions. The results of these analyses were then used to assess support performance and make support recommendations.

  13. Molecular cloning and expression of chicken carbohydrate response element binding protein and Max-like protein X gene homologues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) are transcription factors that are known to be key regulators of glucose metabolism and lipid synthesis in mammals. Since ChREBP and its co-activator Max-like protein X (Mlx) have not ...

  14. Trace elements in surface sediments of the Hooghly (Ganges) estuary: distribution and contamination risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Mondal, Priyanka; Biswas, Jayanta Kumar; Kwon, Eilhann E; Ok, Yong Sik; Rinklebe, Jörg

    2017-04-11

    Our objective was to evaluate distribution and accumulation of trace elements (TEs) in surface sediments along the Hooghly (Ganges) River Estuary, India, and to assess the potential risk with view to human health. The TE concentrations (mg kg(-1) dry weight) exhibited a wide range in the following order: Al (31.801 ± 15.943) > Fe (23.337 ± 7584) > Mn (461 ± 147) > S (381 ± 235) > Zn (54 ± 18) > V (43 ± 14) > Cr (39 ± 15) > As (34 ± 15) > Cu (27 ± 11) > Ni (24 ± 9) > Se (17 ± 8) > Co (11 ± 3) > Mo (10 ± 2) > Hg (0.02 ± 0.01). Clay, silt, iron, manganese and sulphur were important for the accumulation of TE in the sediments as confirmed by factor analysis and Pearson correlation. The accumulation and dispersal of TEs were most likely to be governed by both tide-induced processes and anthropogenic inputs from point and non-point sources. Enrichment factor analysis and geoaccumulation index revealed serious contamination of the sediments with Se and As, while comparing the consensus-based sediment quality guidelines (SQGs), adverse biological effects to benthic fauna might be caused by As, Cu, Ni and Cr. This investigation may serve as a model study and recommends continuous monitoring of As, Se, Cu, Ni and Cr to ascertain that SQGs with respect to acceptable levels of TEs to safeguard geochemical health and ecology in the vicinity of this estuary.

  15. Application of the response surface method to hydrological impact studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, M.; Alcamo, J.

    2009-04-01

    The new trend towards ensemble climate modelling systems and multi-model simulations for generating future climate projections leaves the impact modeller having to deal with a large number of future climate realizations. If analysed in the conventional way, this could lead to a great number of impact model simulations. Therefore, a systematic approach is required that enables a fast, consistent and objective assessment of potential future impacts. One approach is the response surface method. In this study, it is analysed in respect to its applicability to hydrological modelling. Explicitly, this study aims at assessing the impacts of climate change on water availability in several European catchments. The global hydrology model WaterGAP (Alcamo et al., 2003) is applied to generate response surfaces of average long-term standardized water availability to simultaneous changes in the key climate parameters temperature and precipitation. Temperature and precipitation cycles are hereby adjusted to follow a future average annual cycle as projected by 5 different RCMs for 2050. The risk of reaching an unacceptable state in 2050 under the IPCC A1B scenario is examined with different indicators relating to discharge, e.g. high flow, low flow and water quality indicators. Superimposing multi-model climate projections enables a water stress classification of the analysed basins. The results of this analysis provide a good overview of the sensitivity of European river basins towards climate change and allow assigning the basins to categories of different response surfaces. Overall, the degree of response differs between basins in the cold climates of Northern Europe and basins located in the rest of Europe. The degree of future water stress is highly influenced by the intensity of anthropogenic interference with the hydrological system as well as with the amplitude of projected climate changes. References: Alcamo, J., Döll, P., Henrichs, T., Kaspar, F., Lehner, B., Rösch, T

  16. Identification of a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response Element Regulated by XBP1*

    PubMed Central

    Misiewicz, Michael; Déry, Marc-André; Foveau, Bénédicte; Jodoin, Julie; Ruths, Derek; LeBlanc, Andréa C.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory mechanisms mediating PRNP gene expression is highly relevant to elucidating normal cellular prion protein (PrP) function(s) and the transmissibility of prion protein neurodegenerative diseases. Here, luciferase reporter assays showed that an endoplasmic reticulum stress element (ERSE)-like element, CCAAT-N26-CCACG in the human PRNP promoter, is regulated by ER stress and X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1) but not by activating transcription factor 6 α (ATF6α). Bioinformatics identified the ERSE-26 motif in 37 other human genes in the absence of canonical ERSE sites except for three genes. Several of these genes are associated with a synaptic function or are involved in oxidative stress. Brefeldin A, tunicamycin, and thapsigargin ER stressors induced gene expression of PRNP and four randomly chosen ERSE-26-containing genes, ERLEC1, GADD45B, SESN2, and SLC38A5, in primary human neuron cultures or in the breast carcinoma MCF-7 cell line, although the level of the response depends on the gene analyzed, the genetic background of the cells, the cell type, and the ER stressor. Overexpression of XBP1 increased, whereas siRNA knockdown of XBP1 considerably reduced, PRNP and ERLEC1 mRNA levels in MCF-7 cells. Taken together, these results identify a novel ER stress regulator, which implicates the ER stress response in previously unrecognized cellular functions. PMID:23737521

  17. Eye as a key element of conspecific image eliciting lateralized response in fish.

    PubMed

    Karenina, Karina A; Giljov, Andrey N; Malashichev, Yegor B

    2013-03-01

    Visual lateralization in different aspects of social behaviour has been found for numerous species of vertebrates ranging from fish to mammals. For inspection of a shoal mate, many fishes show a left eye-right hemisphere preference. Here, we tested the hypothesis that in fish, there is a key cue in the conspecific appearance, which elicits lateralized response to the whole image of the conspecific. In a series of eight experiments, we explored eye preferences in cryptic-coloured Amur sleeper, Perccottus glenii, fry. Fish displayed left-eye preferences at the population level for inspection of a group of conspecifics, their own mirror image, and a motionless flat model of a conspecific. In contrast, no population bias was found for scrutinizing an empty environment or a moving cylinder. When fry were showed a model of a conspecific in a lateral view with the eye displaced from the head to the tail, they again showed a significant preference for left-eye use. On the other hand, 'eyeless' conspecific model elicited no lateralized viewing in fry. Finally, the left-eye preference was revealed for scrutiny of the image of a conspecific eye alone. We argue that in Amur sleeper fry, eye is the element of the conspecific image, which can serve as a 'key' for the initiation of lateralized social response. This key element may serve as a trigger for the rapid recognition of conspecifics in the left eye-right hemisphere system. Possible causes and advantages of lateralized perception of social stimuli and their key elements are discussed in the context of current theories of brain lateralization.

  18. Finite Element Method Simulations of the Near-Field Enhancement at the Vicinity of Fractal Rough Metallic Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Micic, Miodrag; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Lu, H PETER.

    2004-03-04

    Near-field optical enhancement at metal surfaces and methods such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), fluorescent quenching and enhancement, and various near-field scanning microscopies (NSOM) all depend on a metals surface properties, mainly on its morphology and SPR resonant frequency. We report on simulations of the influence of different surface morphologies on electromagnetic field enhancements at the rough surfaces of noble metals and also evaluate the optimal conditions for the generation of a surface-enhanced Raman signal of absorbed species on a metallic substrate. All simulations were performed with a classical electrodynamics approach using the full set of Maxwells equations, which were solved with the three-dimensional finite element method (FEM). Two different classes of surfaces where modeled using fractals, representing diffusion limited aggregation growth dendritic structures, such as one on the surface of electrodes, and second one representing the sponge-like structure used to model surfaces of particles with high porosity, such as metal coated catalyst supports. The simulations depict the high inhomogeneity of an enhanced electromagnetic field as both a field enhancement and field attenuation near the surface. While the diffusion limited aggregation dendritical fractals enhanced the near-field electromagnetic field, the sponge fractals significantly reduced the local electromagnetic field intensity. Moreover, the fractal orders of the fractal objects did not significantly alter the total enhancement, and the distribution of a near-field enhancement was essentially invariant to the changes in the angle of an incoming laser beam.

  19. A role for neuronal cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in brain responses to calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Salvatore; Ripoli, Cristian; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Ranieri, Sofia Chiatamone; Leone, Lucia; Toietta, Gabriele; McBurney, Michael W; Schütz, Günther; Riccio, Antonella; Grassi, Claudio; Galeotti, Tommaso; Pani, Giovambattista

    2012-01-10

    Calorie restriction delays brain senescence and prevents neurodegeneration, but critical regulators of these beneficial responses other than the NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1) are unknown. We report that effects of calorie restriction on neuronal plasticity, memory and social behavior are abolished in mice lacking cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in the forebrain. Moreover, CREB deficiency drastically reduces the expression of Sirt-1 and the induction of genes relevant to neuronal metabolism and survival in the cortex and hippocampus of dietary-restricted animals. Biochemical studies reveal a complex interplay between CREB and Sirt-1: CREB directly regulates the transcription of the sirtuin in neuronal cells by binding to Sirt-1 chromatin; Sirt-1, in turn, is recruited by CREB to DNA and promotes CREB-dependent expression of target gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and neuronal NO Synthase. Accordingly, expression of these CREB targets is markedly reduced in the brain of Sirt KO mice that are, like CREB-deficient mice, poorly responsive to calorie restriction. Thus, the above circuitry, modulated by nutrient availability, links energy metabolism with neurotrophin signaling, participates in brain adaptation to nutrient restriction, and is potentially relevant to accelerated brain aging by overnutrition and diabetes.

  20. Solar Ion Processing of Major Element Surface Compositions of Mature Mare Soils: Insights from Combined XPS and Analytical TEM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind ions are capable of altering the sur-face chemistry of the lunar regolith by a number of mechanisms including preferential sputtering, radiation-enhanced diffusion and sputter erosion of space weathered surfaces containing pre-existing compositional profiles. We have previously reported in-situ ion irradiation experiments supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytical TEM that show how solar ions potentially drive Fe and Ti reduction at the monolayer scale as well as the 10-100 nm depth scale in lunar soils [1]. Here we report experimental data on the effect of ion irradiation on the major element surface composition in a mature mare soil.

  1. An iterative immersed finite element method for an electric potential interface problem based on given surface electric quantity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yong; Chu, Yuchuan; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Interface problems involving the non-homogeneous flux jump condition are critical for engineering designs in the magnetostatic/electrostatic field. In applications, such as plasma simulation, we often only know the total electric quantity on the surface of the object, not the charge density distribution on the surface which appears as the non-homogeneous flux jump condition in the usual interface problems considered in the literature for the magnetostatic/electrostatic field. Based on structured meshes independent of the interface, this article proposes an iterative method that employs both the immersed finite element (IFE) method with non-homogeneous flux jump conditions and the regular finite element method with ghost nodes introduced in the object to solve the 2D interface problem for the potential field according to the given total electric quantity on the surface of the object. Numerical experiments are provided to illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

  2. Effects of Frequency and Acceleration Amplitude on Osteoblast Mechanical Vibration Responses: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hung-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Bone cells are deformed according to mechanical stimulation they receive and their mechanical characteristics. However, how osteoblasts are affected by mechanical vibration frequency and acceleration amplitude remains unclear. By developing 3D osteoblast finite element (FE) models, this study investigated the effect of cell shapes on vibration characteristics and effect of acceleration (vibration intensity) on vibrational responses of cultured osteoblasts. Firstly, the developed FE models predicted natural frequencies of osteoblasts within 6.85–48.69 Hz. Then, three different levels of acceleration of base excitation were selected (0.5, 1, and 2 g) to simulate vibrational responses, and acceleration of base excitation was found to have no influence on natural frequencies of osteoblasts. However, vibration response values of displacement, stress, and strain increased with the increase of acceleration. Finally, stress and stress distributions of osteoblast models under 0.5 g acceleration in Z-direction were investigated further. It was revealed that resonance frequencies can be a monotonic function of cell height or bottom area when cell volumes and material properties were assumed as constants. These findings will be useful in understanding how forces are transferred and influence osteoblast mechanical responses during vibrations and in providing guidance for cell culture and external vibration loading in experimental and clinical osteogenesis studies. PMID:28074178

  3. Deciphering dynamic dose responses of natural promoters and single cis elements upon osmotic and oxidative stress in yeast.

    PubMed

    Dolz-Edo, Laura; Rienzo, Alessandro; Poveda-Huertes, Daniel; Pascual-Ahuir, Amparo; Proft, Markus

    2013-06-01

    Fine-tuned activation of gene expression in response to stress is the result of dynamic interactions of transcription factors with specific promoter binding sites. In the study described here we used a time-resolved luciferase reporter assay in living Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells to gain insights into how osmotic and oxidative stress signals modulate gene expression in a dose-sensitive manner. Specifically, the dose-response behavior of four different natural promoters (GRE2, CTT1, SOD2, and CCP1) reveals differences in their sensitivity and dynamics in response to different salt and oxidative stimuli. Characteristic dose-response profiles were also obtained for artificial promoters driven by only one type of stress-regulated consensus element, such as the cyclic AMP-responsive element, stress response element, or AP-1 site. Oxidative and osmotic stress signals activate these elements separately and with different sensitivities through different signaling molecules. Combination of stress-activated cis elements does not, in general, enhance the absolute expression levels; however, specific combinations can increase the inducibility of the promoter in response to different stress doses. Finally, we show that the stress tolerance of the cell critically modulates the dynamics of its transcriptional response in the case of oxidative stress.

  4. Fabrication and evaluation of temperature responsive molecularly imprinted sorbents based on surface of yeast via surface-initiated AGET ATRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jianming; Hang, Hui; Li, Xiuxiu; Zhu, Wenjing; Meng, Minjia; Dai, Xiaohui; Dai, Jiangdong; Yan, Yongsheng

    2013-12-01

    Temperature responsive molecularly imprinted polymers (T-MIPs) were prepared based on the surface of yeast by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP). The as-prepared T-MIPs were charcterized by FT-IR, SEM, TGA and elemental analysis, which indicated that T-MIPs exhibited thermal stability and composed of temperature responsive imprinted layer. Then T-MIPs were evaluated as sorbents to selectively recognise and release cefalexin (CFX) molecules. The results suggested binding properties of T-MIPs were related to the testing temperature. The maximum adsorption capacity of T-MIPs at 303 K was 59.4 mg g-1, and the maximum release proportion for T-MIPs at 293 K in water for 24 h was 71.08%. The selective recognition experiments demonstrated high affinity and selectivity of T-MIPs towards CFX over competitive compounds, and the specific recognition of binding sites may be based on the distinct size, structure and functional group to the template molecules.

  5. Trace element concentrations in surface estuarine and marine sediments along the Mississippi Gulf Coast following Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Warren, Crystal; Duzgoren-Aydin, Nurdan S; Weston, James; Willett, Kristine L

    2012-01-01

    Hurricanes are relatively frequent ecological disturbances that may cause potentially long-term impacts to the coastal environment. Hurricane Katrina hit the Mississippi Gulf Coast in August 2005, and caused a storm surge with the potential to change the trace element content of coastal surface sediments. In this study, surface estuarine and marine sediments were collected monthly following the storm from ten sites along the Mississippi Gulf Coast (Mobile Bay, Grand Bay Bayous Heron and Cumbest, Pascagoula, Ocean Springs, Biloxi Gulf, Back Biloxi Bay, Gulfport Gulf, Gulfport Courthouse Rd, and Gulfport Marina). Concentrations of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to evaluate their temporal and spatial variations in the year following Hurricane Katrina. Sediments were characterized by pH, particle size distribution and total carbon and nitrogen content. Trace element contents of the sediments were determined in both <2 mm and <63 μm grain size fractions. Results revealed no significant temporal and spatial variability in trace element concentrations, in either size fraction. Potential ecological risk of the sediments was assessed by using NOAA SQuiRTs' guideline values; most concentrations remained below probable adverse effects guidelines to marine organisms suggesting that trace elements redistributed by Hurricane Katrina would not cause an adverse impact on resident organisms. Instead, the concentrations of trace elements were site-dependent, with specific contaminants relating to the use of the area prior to Hurricane Katrina.

  6. Capicua DNA-binding sites are general response elements for RTK signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ajuria, Leiore; Nieva, Claudia; Winkler, Clint; Kuo, Dennis; Samper, Núria; Andreu, María José; Helman, Aharon; González-Crespo, Sergio; Paroush, Ze'ev; Courey, Albert J; Jiménez, Gerardo

    2011-03-01

    RTK/Ras/MAPK signaling pathways play key functions in metazoan development, but how they control expression of downstream genes is not well understood. In Drosophila, it is generally assumed that most transcriptional responses to RTK signal activation depend on binding of Ets-family proteins to specific cis-acting sites in target enhancers. Here, we show that several Drosophila RTK pathways control expression of downstream genes through common octameric elements that are binding sites for the HMG-box factor Capicua, a transcriptional repressor that is downregulated by RTK signaling in different contexts. We show that Torso RTK-dependent regulation of terminal gap gene expression in the early embryo critically depends on Capicua octameric sites, and that binding of Capicua to these sites is essential for recruitment of the Groucho co-repressor to the huckebein enhancer in vivo. We then show that subsequent activation of the EGFR RTK pathway in the neuroectodermal region of the embryo controls dorsal-ventral gene expression by downregulating the Capicua protein, and that this control also depends on Capicua octameric motifs. Thus, a similar mechanism of RTK regulation operates during subdivision of the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral embryonic axes. We also find that identical DNA octamers mediate Capicua-dependent regulation of another EGFR target in the developing wing. Remarkably, a simple combination of activator-binding sites and Capicua motifs is sufficient to establish complex patterns of gene expression in response to both Torso and EGFR activation in different tissues. We conclude that Capicua octamers are general response elements for RTK signaling in Drosophila.

  7. Contributions of individual domains to function of the HIV-1 Rev response element.

    PubMed

    O'Carroll, Ina P; Thappeta, Yashna; Fan, Lixin; Ramirez-Valdez, Edric A; Smith, Sean; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan

    2017-08-16

    The HIV-1 Rev response element (RRE) is a 351-base element in unspliced and partially spliced viral RNA; binding of the RRE by the viral Rev protein induces nuclear export of RRE-containing RNAs, as required for virus replication. It contains one long, imperfect double helix (domain I), one branched domain (domain II) containing a high-affinity Rev-binding site, and two or three additional domains. We previously reported that the RRE assumes an "A" shape in solution and suggested that the location of the Rev binding sites in domains I and II, opposite each other on the two legs of the A, is optimal for Rev binding and explains Rev's specificity for RRE-containing RNAs. Using SAXS and a quantitative functional assay, we have now analyzed a panel of RRE mutants. All the results support the essential role of the A shape for RRE function. Moreover, they suggest that the distal portion of domain I and the three crowning domains all contribute to the maintenance of the A shape. Domains I and II are necessary and sufficient for substantial RRE function, provided they are joined by a flexible linker that allows the two domains to face each other.IMPORTANCE Retroviral replication requires that some of the viral RNAs transcribed in the cell nucleus be exported to the cytoplasm without being spliced. To achieve this, HIV-1 encodes a protein, Rev, which binds to a complex, highly structured element within viral RNA, the Rev Response Element (RRE), and escorts RRE-containing RNAs from the nucleus. We previously reported that the RRE is "A"-shaped and suggested that this architecture, with the 2 legs opposite one another, can explain the specificity of Rev for the RRE. We have analyzed the functional contributions of individual RRE domains, and now report that several domains contribute, with some redundancy, to maintenance of the overall RRE shape. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the opposed placement of the 2 legs is essential for RRE function. Copyright © 2017

  8. Transcriptional induction of IFN-gamma-responsive genes is modulated by DNA surrounding the interferon stimulation response element.

    PubMed Central

    Strehlow, I; Decker, T

    1992-01-01

    The 9/27 and GBP mRNAs are both inducible by Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). The promoters of both genes contain an Interferon Stimulation Response Element (ISRE), but while the GBP gene is strongly induced transcriptionally by IFN-gamma the response of the 9/27 promoter is very weak. We investigated the molecular basis for this difference. The different IFN-gamma-responsiveness was found to have more than one reason. First, 9/27 promoter DNA was unable to bind the Gamma Interferon Activation Factor (GAF) with a single high affinity site. It efficiently competed for the association of the GAF with the GBP promoter but this competition was due to the presence of two low affinity sites, the ISRE and an ISRE-like sequence, suggesting that the GAS and ISRE, though both having clear preferences for specific proteins, may nevertheless share a certain degree of structural homology. Second, the 9/27 and GBP ISREs differed markedly in their affinities for regulatory proteins (ISGFs 1,2,3) and the GBP ISRE was more potent in mediating IFN-gamma-induced promoter activity in transient transfection. Third and most importantly, however, the strong difference between the IFN-gamma response of the two promoters was mainly due to the sequences surrounding the ISRE: the positive-acting GAS on one side and sequences with silencing properties 5' and 3' of the 9/27 ISRE on the other side. The data thus show mechanisms to both up- and down-regulate the activity of the ISRE. Images PMID:1508672

  9. Springback Reduction in Stamping of Front Side Member with a Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jung-Han; Huh, Hoon; Kim, Se-Ho; Park, Sung-Ho

    2005-08-01

    Springback is a common phenomenon in sheet metal forming since the elastic recovery of the internal stresses is induced after removal of the tooling. The numerical analysis of springback is a complicated time-consuming job and its result is greatly effected by a type of the yield function, finite elements used and the constraint condition for eliminating a rigid body motion. In this paper, optimization of the draw-bead force is carried out utilizing the response surface method in order to reduce springback and improve shape accuracy of a deep drawn product. In the optimization process, the tendency of springback is evaluated qualitatively without springback simulation usually done with the implicit solving scheme. Instead of springback simulation, the amount of stress deviation along the thickness direction in the deep drawn product is used as an indicator of springback. The stamping process is analyzed for a front side member formed with advanced high strength steel (AHSS) sheets such as DP60. The analysis procedure fully covers the binder-wrap, stamping, trimming and springback processes with the commercial elasto-plastic finite element code LS-DYNA 3D. The effect of the restraining force of draw-beads is confirmed with the decreased stress deviation. The analysis result shown in the final springback simulation demonstrates that the present analysis provides a guideline for controlling the evolution of springback based on the finite element simulation of complicated auto-body members.

  10. Springback Reduction in Stamping of Front Side Member with a Response Surface Method

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jung-Han; Huh, Hoon; Kim, Se-Ho; Park, Sung-Ho

    2005-08-05

    Springback is a common phenomenon in sheet metal forming since the elastic recovery of the internal stresses is induced after removal of the tooling. The numerical analysis of springback is a complicated time-consuming job and its result is greatly effected by a type of the yield function, finite elements used and the constraint condition for eliminating a rigid body motion. In this paper, optimization of the draw-bead force is carried out utilizing the response surface method in order to reduce springback and improve shape accuracy of a deep drawn product. In the optimization process, the tendency of springback is evaluated qualitatively without springback simulation usually done with the implicit solving scheme. Instead of springback simulation, the amount of stress deviation along the thickness direction in the deep drawn product is used as an indicator of springback. The stamping process is analyzed for a front side member formed with advanced high strength steel (AHSS) sheets such as DP60. The analysis procedure fully covers the binder-wrap, stamping, trimming and springback processes with the commercial elasto-plastic finite element code LS-DYNA 3D. The effect of the restraining force of draw-beads is confirmed with the decreased stress deviation. The analysis result shown in the final springback simulation demonstrates that the present analysis provides a guideline for controlling the evolution of springback based on the finite element simulation of complicated auto-body members.

  11. SEM-EDS-Based Elemental Identification on the Enamel Surface after the Completion of Orthodontic Treatment: In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Seeliger, Julia; Lipski, Mariusz; Wójcicka, Anna; Gedrange, Tomasz; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Braces as foreign bodies in the mouth carry a risk of side effects and toxicity to the human body. This article presents the results indicating the possible toxic effects of tools used for cleaning the enamel after the completion of orthodontic treatment. The studies were carried out in vitro. The procedure of enamel etching, bonding orthodontic metal brackets, and enamel cleaning after their removal was performed under laboratory conditions. The enamel microstructure and elements present on its surface were evaluated using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Silicon and aluminium were found in addition to the tooth building elements. PMID:27766265

  12. Reliablity analysis of gravity dams by response surface method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humar, Nina; Kryžanowski, Andrej; Brilly, Mitja; Schnabl, Simon

    2013-04-01

    A dam failure is one of the most important problems in dam industry. Since the mechanical behavior of dams is usually a complex phenomenon existing classical mathematical models are generally insufficient to adequately predict the dam failure and thus the safety of dams. Therefore, numerical reliability methods are often used to model such a complex mechanical phenomena. Thus, the main purpose of the present paper is to present the response surface method as a powerful mathematical tool used to study and foresee the dam safety considering a set of collected monitoring data. The derived mathematical model is applied to a case study, the Moste dam, which is the highest concrete gravity dam in Slovenia. Based on the derived model, the ambient/state variables are correlated with the dam deformation in order to gain a forecasting tool able to define the critical thresholds for dam management.

  13. A useful approximation for the flat surface impulse response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gary S.

    1989-01-01

    The flat surface impulse response (FSIR) is a very useful quantity in computing the mean return power for near-nadir-oriented short-pulse radar altimeters. However, for very small antenna beamwidths and relatively large pointing angles, previous analytical descriptions become very difficult to compute accurately. An asymptotic approximation is developed to overcome these computational problems. Since accuracy is of key importance, a condition is developed under which this solution is within 2 percent of the exact answer. The asymptotic solution is shown to be in functional agreement with a conventional clutter power result and gives a 1.25-dB correction to this formula to account properly for the antenna-pattern variation over the illuminated area.

  14. Maximization of fructose esters synthesis by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Neta, Nair Sampaio; Peres, António M; Teixeira, José A; Rodrigues, Ligia R

    2011-07-01

    Enzymatic synthesis of fructose fatty acid ester was performed in organic solvent media, using a purified lipase from Candida antartica B immobilized in acrylic resin. Response surface methodology with a central composite rotatable design based on five levels was implemented to optimize three experimental operating conditions (temperature, agitation and reaction time). A statistical significant cubic model was established. Temperature and reaction time were found to be the most significant parameters. The optimum operational conditions for maximizing the synthesis of fructose esters were 57.1°C, 100 rpm and 37.8 h. The model was validated in the identified optimal conditions to check its adequacy and accuracy, and an experimental esterification percentage of 88.4% (±0.3%) was obtained. These results showed that an improvement of the enzymatic synthesis of fructose esters was obtained under the optimized conditions.

  15. Aerodynamic configuration design using response surface methodology analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelund, Walter C.; Stanley, Douglas O.; Lepsch, Roger A.; McMillin, Mark M.; Unal, Resit

    1993-08-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine a set of optimal design parameters for a single-stage-to-orbit reentry vehicle. Several configuration geometry parameters which had a large impact on the entry vehicle flying characteristics were selected as design variables: the fuselage fineness ratio, the nose to body length ratio, the nose camber value, the wing planform area scale factor, and the wing location. The optimal geometry parameter values were chosen using a response surface methodology (RSM) technique which allowed for a minimum dry weight configuration design that met a set of aerodynamic performance constraints on the landing speed, and on the subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic trim and stability levels. The RSM technique utilized, specifically the central composite design method, is presented, along with the general vehicle conceptual design process. Results are presented for an optimized configuration along with several design trade cases.

  16. Aerodynamic configuration design using response surface methodology analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelund, Walter C.; Stanley, Douglas O.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Mcmillin, Mark M.; Unal, Resit

    1993-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine a set of optimal design parameters for a single-stage-to-orbit reentry vehicle. Several configuration geometry parameters which had a large impact on the entry vehicle flying characteristics were selected as design variables: the fuselage fineness ratio, the nose to body length ratio, the nose camber value, the wing planform area scale factor, and the wing location. The optimal geometry parameter values were chosen using a respons