Science.gov

Sample records for elemental boron powder

  1. Neutron detectors comprising boron powder

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher; Bacon, Jeffrey Darnell; Makela, Mark F; Spaulding, Randy Jay

    2013-05-21

    High-efficiency neutron detector substrate assemblies comprising a first conductive substrate, wherein a first side of the substrate is in direct contact with a first layer of a powder material comprising .sup.10boron, .sup.10boron carbide or combinations thereof, and wherein a conductive material is in proximity to the first layer of powder material; and processes of making said neutron detector substrate assemblies.

  2. Characterization of electrodeposited elemental boron

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ashish; Anthonysamy, S. Ananthasivan, K.; Ranganathan, R.; Mittal, Vinit; Narasimhan, S.V.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2008-07-15

    Elemental boron was produced through electrowinning from potassium fluoroborate dissolved in a mixture of molten potassium fluoride and potassium chloride. The characteristics of the electrodeposited boron (raw boron) as well as the water and acid-leached product (processed boron) were studied. The chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size of the boron powders were investigated. The morphology of the deposits was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical state of the matrix, as well as the impurity phases present in them, was established using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to interpret and understand the results obtained, a thermodynamic analysis was carried out. The gas-phase corrosion in the head space as well as the chemistry behind the leaching process were interpreted using this analysis. The ease of oxidation of these powders in air was investigated using differential thermal analysis (DTA) coupled with thermogravimetry (TG). From the results obtained in this study it was established that elemental boron powder with a purity of 95-99% could be produced using a high temperature molten salt electrowinning process. The major impurities were found to be oxygen, carbon, iron and nickel.

  3. Powdered Hexagonal Boron Nitride Reducing Nanoscale Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkhartishvili, L.; Matcharashvili, T.; Esiava, R.; Tsagareishvili, O.; Gabunia, D.; Margiev, B.; Gachechiladze, A.

    2013-05-01

    A morphology model is suggested for nano-powdered hexagonal boron nitride that can serve as an effective solid additive to liquid lubricants. It allows to estimate the specific surface, that is a hard-to-measure parameter, based on average size of powder particles. The model can be used also to control nanoscale wear processes.

  4. X-ray diffraction investigation of ultrafine boron nitride powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gurov, S.V.; Chukalin, V.I.; Rezchikova, T.V.; Torbov, V.J.; Troitskii, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an x-ray diffraction analysis of ultrafine boron nitride powders of different mean particle sizes. Diffraction spectra of the ultrafine boron nitride powders were obtained using a DRON-1 apparatus. The experimental facts are indicative of a turbostratic character of deformation of the hexagonal lattice of ultrafinely divided boron nitride.

  5. Determination of phase stability of elemental boron.

    PubMed

    White, Mary Anne; Cerqueira, Anthony B; Whitman, Catherine A; Johnson, Michel B; Ogitsu, Tadashi

    2015-03-16

    Boron is an important element, used in applications from superhard materials to superconductors. Boron exists in several forms (allotropes) and, surprisingly, it was not known which form (α or β) is stable at ambient conditions. Through experiment, we quantify the relative stability of α-boron and β-boron as a function of temperature. The ground-state energies of α-boron and β-boron are nearly identical. For all temperatures up to 2000 K, the complicated β-boron structure is more stable than the simpler α-boron structure at ambient pressure. Below 1000 K, β-boron is entropically stabilized with respect to α-boron owing to its partially occupied sites, whereas at higher temperatures β-boron is enthalpically stabilized with respect to α-boron. We show that α-boron only becomes stable on application of pressure.

  6. Boronizing of Machine and Tool Parts in Powdered Mixtures,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A technological scheme is presented for boronizing in saturating powder mixtures. Some data are given on the use of this method of boration for increasing the service life of machine parts and instruments . (Author)

  7. Neutron detectors comprising ultra-thin layers of boron powder

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehul; Morris, Christopher

    2013-07-23

    High-efficiency neutron detector substrate assemblies comprising a first conductive substrate, wherein a first side of the substrate is in direct contact with a first layer of a powder material having a thickness of from about 50 nm to about 250 nm and comprising .sup.10boron, .sup.10boron carbide or combinations thereof, and wherein a conductive material is in proximity to the first layer of powder material; and processes of making said neutron detector substrate assemblies.

  8. New Ground-State Crystal Structure of Elemental Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qi; Reddy, K. Madhav; Xie, Kelvin Y.; Hemker, Kevin J.; Goddard, William A.

    2016-08-01

    Elemental boron exhibits many polymorphs in nature based mostly on an icosahedral shell motif, involving stabilization of 13 strong multicenter intraicosahedral bonds. It is commonly accepted that the most thermodynamic stable structure of elemental boron at atmospheric pressure is the β rhombohedral boron (β -B ). Surprisingly, using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we found that pure boron powder contains grains of two different types, the previously identified β -B containing a number of randomly spaced twins and what appears to be a fully transformed twinlike structure. This fully transformed structure, denoted here as τ -B , is based on the C m c m orthorhombic space group. Quantum mechanics predicts that the newly identified τ -B structure is 13.8 meV /B more stable than β -B . The τ -B structure allows 6% more charge transfer from B57 units to nearby B12 units, making the net charge 6% closer to the ideal expected from Wade's rules. Thus, we predict the τ -B structure to be the ground state structure for elemental boron at atmospheric pressure.

  9. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ashish; Anthonysamy, S.; Ghosh, C.; Ravindran, T.R.; Divakar, R.; Mohandas, E.

    2013-10-15

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron ({sup 10}B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of {sup 10}B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron.

  10. Production and Coating of Pure Boron Powders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-30

    usually supersonic ; and causing that stream to impinge upon a surface, producing a shock wave, such that the aerosol particles strike the surface...McGraw-Hill, New York, 1960). 20. Donaldson, C.D., Snedeker, R.S., and Margolis, D.P., "A Study of Free Jet Impingement . Part 2. Free Jet Turbulent...products expanded through a supersonic nozzle, in which titanium tetrachloride is added to produce titanium. The titanium coats the boron particle. The

  11. Characterisation of graphite using boron as a marker element

    SciTech Connect

    Kamble, Granthali S.; Pandey, Shailaja; Thakur, Neha; Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Venkatesh, K.; Kumar, Sangita D.; Kameswaran, R.; Reddy, A. V. R.

    2013-06-12

    Graphite has many industrial applications. Two of the most important applications are as electrodes in industries and as moderator in nuclear industry. Determination of the Boron Equivalent of the impurity elements in graphite is the most important parameter for certifying the grade of graphite electrode [1]. The use of a suitable method with low limits of determination of boron is therefore necessary. A method has been standardised in Analytical Chemistry Division, BARC for determining trace amounts of boron in graphite electrodes. It involves controlled dissolution of graphite sample powder and measurement of boron by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) using matrix matched standards. The method detection limit is 1 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The method Relative Standard Deviation was 5%. The method was verified by spike recovery experiments. Recoveries were found to be within 100{+-}2% in the concentration range of 1 to 100 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The developed method has been adopted for the compositional characterization of several graphite electrode samples.

  12. Characterisation of graphite using boron as a marker element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Granthali S.; Pandey, Shailaja; Thakur, Neha; Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Venkatesh, K.; Kumar, Sangita D.; Kameswaran, R.; Reddy, A. V. R.

    2013-06-01

    Graphite has many industrial applications. Two of the most important applications are as electrodes in industries and as moderator in nuclear industry. Determination of the Boron Equivalent of the impurity elements in graphite is the most important parameter for certifying the grade of graphite electrode [1]. The use of a suitable method with low limits of determination of boron is therefore necessary. A method has been standardised in Analytical Chemistry Division, BARC for determining trace amounts of boron in graphite electrodes. It involves controlled dissolution of graphite sample powder and measurement of boron by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) using matrix matched standards. The method detection limit is 1 μg g-1. The method Relative Standard Deviation was 5%. The method was verified by spike recovery experiments. Recoveries were found to be within 100±2% in the concentration range of 1 to 100 μg g-1. The developed method has been adopted for the compositional characterization of several graphite electrode samples.

  13. Influence of nanocrystalline boron precursor powder on superconductivity in MgB2 bulk.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Lu, Cheng; Zhou, Sihai; Joo, Jinho

    2009-12-01

    In this report, high-purity nanocrystalline boron powders processed by ball-milling were used as the precursor powders to fabricate MgB2 superconductor. The transport properties and the critical current density in the samples made from ball-milled boron powders and as-supplied boron powders were investigated. It was found that the ball-milled boron powders led to a significant enhancement of the critical current density in MgB2 sintered at 650 degrees C. The reason can be attributed to the small MgB2 grain size caused by the ball-milled boron precursor powders. The resistivity of the samples made from the ball-milled boron powder was lower than that of the sample from as-supplied boron powder. As the sintering temperature increased, both resistivity and upper critical field decreased in the samples using the ball-milled boron powders as a precursor. Poor connectivity and large strain are responsible for the high resistivity.

  14. Ionic High-Pressure Form of Elemental Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Oganov, A.; Chen, J; Gatti, C; Ma, Y; Ma, Y; Glass, C; Liu, Z; Yu, T; Kurakevych, O; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    This Letter presents the results of high-pressure experiments and ab initio evolutionary crystal structure predictions, and found a new boron phase that we named gamma-B28. This phase is comprised of icosahedral B12 clusters and B2 pairs in a NaCl-type arrangement, stable between 19 and 89 GPa, and exhibits evidence for charge transfer (for which our best estimate is delta approximately 0.48) between the constituent clusters to give (B2)delta+(B12)delta-. We have recently found that the same high-pressure boron phase may have given rise to the Bragg reflections reported by Wentorf in 1965 (ref. 1), although the chemical composition was not analysed and the data (subsequently deleted from the Powder Diffraction File database) seems to not have been used to propose a structure model. We also note that although we used the terms 'partially ionic' and 'ionic' to emphasize the polar nature of the high-pressure boron phase and the influence this polarity has on several physical properties of the elemental phase, the chemical bonding in gamma-B28 is predominantly covalent.

  15. Boron

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Boron is an essential micronutrient element required for plant growth. Boron deficiency is wide-spread in crop plants throughout the world especially in coarse-textured soils in humid areas. Boron toxicity can also occur, especially in arid regions under irrigation. Plants respond directly to the...

  16. Double helix boron-10 powder thermal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher L.; Bacon, Jeffrey D.

    2015-06-02

    A double-helix Boron-10 powder detector having intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency comparable to 36'' long, 2-in diameter, 2-bar Helium-3 detectors, and which can be used to replace such detectors for use in portal monitoring, is described. An embodiment of the detector includes a metallic plate coated with Boron-10 powder for generating alpha and Lithium-7 particles responsive to neutrons impinging thereon supported by insulators affixed to at least two opposing edges; a grounded first wire wound in a helical manner around two opposing insulators; and a second wire having a smaller diameter than that of the first wire, wound in a helical manner around the same insulators and spaced apart from the first wire, the second wire being positively biased. A gas, disposed within a gas-tight container enclosing the plate, insulators and wires, and capable of stopping alpha and Lithium-7 particles and generating electrons produces a signal on the second wire which is detected and subsequently related to the number of neutrons impinging on the plate.

  17. Reductive Insertion of Elemental Chalcogens into Boron-Boron Multiple Bonds.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Holger; Dellermann, Theresa; Ewing, William C; Kramer, Thomas; Schneider, Christoph; Ullrich, Stefan

    2015-08-24

    The syntheses of sulfur- and selenium-bridged cyclic compounds containing boron stabilized by N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) have been achieved by the reductive insertion of elemental chalcogens into boron-boron multiple bonds. The three pairs of bonding electrons between the boron atoms in the triply bonded diboryne enabled six-electron reduction reactions, resulting in the formation of [2.2.1]-bicyclic systems wherein bridgehead boron atoms are spanned by three chalcogen bridges. A similar reaction using a diborene (boron-boron double bond) resulted in the reductive transfer of both pairs of bonding electrons to three sulfur atoms, yielding a NHC-stabilized trisulfidodiborolane. The demonstration of these six- and four-electron reductions lends support to the presence of three and two pairs of bonding electrons between the boron atoms of the diboryne and diborene, respectively, a fact that may be useful in future discussions on bond order.

  18. Geometrical frustration in an element solid: (beta)-rhombohedral boron

    SciTech Connect

    Ogitsu, T; Gygi, F; Reed, J; Udagawa, M; Motome, Y; Schwegler, E; Galli, G

    2009-05-19

    Although a comprehensive understanding of the basic properties of most elemental solids has been achieved, there are still fundamental, open questions regarding simple substances, e.g. boron. Based on an Ising model that describes the intrinsic defect states in elemental boron, we show that this system is the only known element to exhibit geometrical frustration in its solid form. Interestingly, we find that the peculiar transport properties of boron that have been reported over the past forty years originate from the presence of geometrical frustration.

  19. Ionic high-pressure form of elemental boron.

    PubMed

    Oganov, Artem R; Chen, Jiuhua; Gatti, Carlo; Ma, Yanzhang; Ma, Yanming; Glass, Colin W; Liu, Zhenxian; Yu, Tony; Kurakevych, Oleksandr O; Solozhenko, Vladimir L

    2009-02-12

    Boron is an element of fascinating chemical complexity. Controversies have shrouded this element since its discovery was announced in 1808: the new 'element' turned out to be a compound containing less than 60-70% of boron, and it was not until 1909 that 99% pure boron was obtained. And although we now know of at least 16 polymorphs, the stable phase of boron is not yet experimentally established even at ambient conditions. Boron's complexities arise from frustration: situated between metals and insulators in the periodic table, boron has only three valence electrons, which would favour metallicity, but they are sufficiently localized that insulating states emerge. However, this subtle balance between metallic and insulating states is easily shifted by pressure, temperature and impurities. Here we report the results of high-pressure experiments and ab initio evolutionary crystal structure predictions that explore the structural stability of boron under pressure and, strikingly, reveal a partially ionic high-pressure boron phase. This new phase is stable between 19 and 89 GPa, can be quenched to ambient conditions, and has a hitherto unknown structure (space group Pnnm, 28 atoms in the unit cell) consisting of icosahedral B(12) clusters and B(2) pairs in a NaCl-type arrangement. We find that the ionicity of the phase affects its electronic bandgap, infrared adsorption and dielectric constants, and that it arises from the different electronic properties of the B(2) pairs and B(12) clusters and the resultant charge transfer between them.

  20. Properties of MgB2 wires made by internal magnesium diffusion into different boron powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, P.; Hušek, I.; Rosova, A.; Kulich, M.; Melišek, T.; Kopera, L.; Brunner, B.

    2015-09-01

    Different boron powders were used for MgB2 wires manufactured by internal magnesium diffusion. The structure of the MgB2 core, critical temperature and critical currents of Cu/Ti sheathed wires differing only in boron powder were analyzed and compared. It was found that the particle size and purity of boron powders influence the creation of the MgB2 phase and, consequently, also considerably influence its superconducting properties. The highest critical current density in the low external field was measured for wire with a boron purity of 98.5% produced by Pavezyum. It was used also for stabilized multi-core MgB2 wire with high engineering current densities in low magnetic fields at 20 K, which may be attractive for some low field applications, e.g. high-power wind generators.

  1. Elemental Boron for Efficient Carbon Dioxide Reduction under Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guigao; Meng, Xianguang; Zhang, Huabin; Zhao, Guixia; Pang, Hong; Wang, Tao; Li, Peng; Kako, Tetsuya; Ye, Jinhua

    2017-03-24

    The photoreduction of CO2 is attractive for the production of renewable fuels and the mitigation of global warming. Herein, we report an efficient method for CO2 reduction over elemental boron catalysts in the presence of only water and light irradiation through a photothermocatalytic process. Owing to its high solar-light absorption and effective photothermal conversion, the illuminated boron catalyst experiences remarkable self-heating. This process favors CO2 activation and also induces localized boron hydrolysis to in situ produce H2 as an active proton source and electron donor for CO2 reduction as well as boron oxides as promoters of CO2 adsorption. These synergistic effects, in combination with the unique catalytic properties of boron, are proposed to account for the efficiency of the CO2 reduction. This study highlights the promise of photothermocatalytic strategies for CO2 conversion and also opens new avenues towards the development of related solar-energy utilization schemes.

  2. Chemical and structural characterization of boron carbide powders and ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwelkar, Kanak Anant

    Boron carbide is the material of choice for lightweight armor applications due to its extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and low specific weight. The homogeneity range in boron carbide extends from 9 to 20 at% carbon with the solubility limits not uniquely defined in literature. Over the homogeneity range, the exact lattice positions of boron and carbon atoms have not been unambiguously established, and this topic has been the consideration of significant debate over the last 60 years. The atomic configuration and positions of the boron and carbon atoms play a key role in the crystal structure of the boron carbide phases. Depending on the atomic structure, boron carbide exhibits different mechanical properties which may alter its ballistic performance under extreme dynamic conditions. This work focusses on refinement and development of analytical and chemical methods for an accurate determination of the boron carbide stoichiometry. These methods were then utilized to link structural changes of boron carbide across the solubility range to variations in mechanical properties. After an extensive assessment of the currently employed characterization techniques, it was discerned that the largest source of uncertainty in the determination of the boron carbide stoichiometry was found to arise from the method utilized to evaluate the free carbon concentration. To this end, a modified spiking technique was introduced for free carbon determination where curve fitting techniques were employed to model the asymmetry of the 002 free carbon diffraction peak based on the amorphous, disordered and graphitic nature of carbon. A relationship was then established between the relative intensities of the carbon and boron carbide peaks to the percentage of added carbon and the free-carbon content was obtained by extrapolation. Samples with varying chemistry and high purity were synthesized across the solubility range by hot pressing mixtures of amorphous boron and boron carbide

  3. A technique to measure heats of reaction of titanium-boron, aluminim-titanium-boron, and aluminum-titanium-boron-carbon powder blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Andrew H.

    In this research, a modification to initiation aid ignition in bomb calorimetry that involves systemically blending levels of boron and potassium nitrate initiation aids with a bulk structural energetic elemental power blend is developed. A regression is used to estimate the nominal heat of reaction for the primary reaction. The technique is first applied to the synthesis of TiB 2 as a validation study to see if close proximity to literature values can be achieved. The technique is then applied to two systems of interest, Al-Ti-B, and Al-Ti-B4C. In all three investigations, x-ray diffraction is used to characterize the product phases of the reactions to determine the extent and identity of the product phases and any by-products that may have formed as a result of adding the initiation aid. The experimental data indicates the technique approximates the heat of reaction value for the synthesis of TiB2 from Ti-B powder blends and the formation of TiB2 is supported by volume fraction analysis by x-ray diffraction. Application to the Al-Ti-B and Al-Ti-B4C blends show some correlation with variation of the initiation aid, with x-ray diffraction showing the formation of equilibrium products. However, these blends require further investigation to resolve more complex interactions and rule out extraneous variables.

  4. Boron-Doped Strontium-Stabilized Bismuth Cobalt Oxide Thermoelectric Nanocrystalline Ceramic Powders Synthesized via Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koçyiğit, Serhat; Aytimur, Arda; Çınar, Emre; Uslu, İbrahim; Akdemir, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Boron-doped strontium-stabilized bismuth cobalt oxide thermoelectric nanocrystalline ceramic powders were produced by using a polymeric precursor technique. The powders were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and physical properties measurement system (PPMS) techniques. The XRD results showed that these patterns have a two-phase mixture. The phases are face-centered cubic (fcc) and body-centered cubic (bcc). Values of the crystallite size, dislocation density, and microstrain were calculated by using the Scherrer equation. The lattice parameters were calculated for fcc and bcc phases. The SEM results showed that needle-like grains are formed in boron-undoped composite materials, but the needle-like grains changed to the plate-like grains with the addition of boron. The distribution of the nanofiber diameters was calculated and the average diameter of the boron-doped sample is smaller than the boron-undoped one. PPMS values showed that the electrical resistivity values decreased, but the thermal conductivity values, the Seebeck coefficients, and figure of merit ( ZT) increased with increasing temperature for the two samples.

  5. Characterization of the distribution of the sintering activator boron in powder metallurgical steels with SIMS.

    PubMed

    Krecar, Dragan; Vassileva, Vassilka; Danninger, Herbert; Hutter, Herbert

    2004-06-01

    Powder metallurgy is a well-established method for manufacturing ferrous precision parts. A very important step is sintering, which can be strongly enhanced by the formation of a liquid phase during the sintering process. Boron activates this process by forming such a liquid phase at about 1200 degrees C. In this work, the sintering of Fe-B was performed under the protective atmospheres of hydrogen, argon or nitrogen. Using different grain sizes of the added ferroboron leads to different formations of pores and to the formation of secondary pores. The effect of boron was investigated by means of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) supported by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Light Microscopy (LM). To verify the influence of the process parameters on the mechanical properties, the microstructure (pore shape) was examined and impact energy measurements were performed. The concentrations of B in different samples were varied from 0.03-0.6 weight percent (wt%). Higher boron concentrations are detectable by EPMA, whereas the distributions of boron in the samples with interesting overall concentration in the low wt% range are only detectable by means of SIMS. This work shows that the distribution of boron strongly depends on its concentration and the sintering atmosphere used. At low concentration (up to 0.1 wt%) there are boride precipitations; at higher concentration there is a eutectic iron-boron grain boundary network. There is a decrease of the impact energy observed that correlates with the amount of eutectic phase.

  6. Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product

    DOEpatents

    Rabin, Barry H.; Wright, Richard N.

    1993-01-01

    A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe.sub.3 Al and FeAl.

  7. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  8. Liquid Phase Sintering of Boron-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel with Chromium and Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei; Fan, Yu-Chi; Huang, Her-Yueh; Cai, Wen-Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Liquid phase sintering is an effective method to improve the densification of powder metallurgy materials. Boron is an excellent alloying element for liquid phase sintering of Fe-based materials. However, the roles of chromium and carbon, and particularly that of the former, on liquid phase sintering are still undetermined. This study demonstrated the effects of chromium and carbon on the microstructure, elemental distribution, boride structure, liquid formation, and densification of Fe-B-Cr and Fe-B-Cr-C steels during liquid phase sintering. The results showed that steels with 0.5 wt pct C densify faster than those without 0.5 wt pct C. Moreover, although only one liquid phase forms in Fe-B-Cr steel, adding 0.5 wt pct C reduces the formation temperature of the liquid phase by about 50 K (°C) and facilitates the formation of an additional liquid, resulting in better densification at 1473 K (1200 °C). In both Fe-B-Cr and Fe-B-Cr-C steels, increasing the chromium content from 1.5 to 3 wt pct raises the temperature of liquid formation by about 10 K (°C). Thermodynamic simulations and experimental results demonstrated that carbon atoms dissolved in austenite facilitate the eutectic reaction and reduce the formation temperature of the liquid phase. In contrast, both chromium and molybdenum atoms dissolved in austenite delay the eutectic reaction. Furthermore, the 3Cr-0.5Mo additive in the Fe-0.4B steel does not change the typical boride structure of M2B. With the addition of 0.5 wt pct C, the crystal structure is completely transformed from M2B boride to M3(B,C) boro-carbide.

  9. Electromagnetic properties and microstructures of in situ MgB2 wires made from three types of boron powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Motomune; Kotaki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Iwane, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Kazuhide; Tanaka, Hideki; Okishiro, Kenji; Okamoto, Kazutaka; Nishijima, Gen; Matsumoto, Akiyoshi; Kumakura, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Akiyasu; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi; Kishio, Kohji

    2016-10-01

    In powder-in-tube processed MgB2 wires, the choice of boron powder as a starting material crucially affects their performance. In this paper, we prepared in situ MgB2 wires from three types of boron powders in various heat-treatment conditions and investigated their electromagnetic properties and microstructures. Their critical current density, J c, varied over a wide range from sample to sample. The difference in J c is understood to be caused by the effect of changes in the electrical connectivity, K, and intrinsic residual resistivity, ρ 0. Here, K represents the effective cross-sectional area for current, and ρ 0 reflects the degree of the charge carrier scattering caused by lattice defects. It was found that the use of boron powder with a large specific surface area leads to a large degree of lattice defects in MgB2 grains and enhances ρ 0, resulting in improving J c. The boron powder produced by thermal decomposition of B2H6 has a large specific surface area. Hence, this boron powder is the most suitable as a starting material for MgB2. Meanwhile, dry pulverization of low-cost boron powder, which is largely produced by active-metal reduction of B2O3, is also effective to increase its specific surface area without introducing impurities, resulting in the enhancement of J c in the entire magnetic field region. This finding broadens the choice of boron powder and contributes to realizing superconducting applications with excellent balance between performance and cost.

  10. Phase identification in boron-containing powder metallurgy steel using EBSD in combination with EPMA

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ming-Wei Cai, Wen-Zhang

    2016-03-15

    Boron (B) is extensively used to induce liquid phase sintering (LPS) in powder metallurgy (PM) steels and thereby increase the densification. The alloying elements in B-containing PM steels affect the boride phase, stability of the boride, the temperature of liquid formation, and the progress of LPS. However, the boride phase has not been systematically identified yet. The main objective of this study was to clarify the influences of alloying elements, including C, Cr, and Ni, on the boride phases using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in combination with electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Network structures consisting of ferrite, Fe{sub 2}B boride, and Fe{sub 3}C carbide were extensively observed in the Fe–0.4B–0.5C steel. The portions of Fe{sub 2}B were sufficiently larger than those of Fe{sub 3}C, and Fe{sub 3}C was mostly distributed at the interfaces between ferrite and Fe{sub 2}B. Adding 1.5 wt.% Cr or 1.8 wt.% Ni to Fe–0.4B–0.5C steel completely changes the Fe{sub 2}B and Fe{sub 3}C phases to a M{sub 3}(B,C) phase, where M represents the metallic elements, including Fe, Cr, Mo, and Ni. Furthermore, Cr, Mo, B, and C atoms tend to concentrate on the M{sub 3}(B,C) phase, but Ni atoms do not. - Highlights: • Network structures consisting of ferrite, Fe{sub 2}B boride, and Fe{sub 3}C carbide were extensively observed in the Fe–0.4B–0.5C steel. • Adding 1.5 wt.% Cr or 1.8 wt.% Ni to Fe–0.4B–0.5C steel completely transforms the Fe{sub 2}B and Fe{sub 3}C phases to a M{sub 3}(B,C) phase. • Cr, Mo, B, and C atoms tend to concentrate on the M{sub 3}(B,C) phase, but Ni atoms do not.

  11. Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product

    DOEpatents

    Rabin, B.H.; Wright, R.N.

    1993-12-14

    A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders is described. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe[sub 3] Al and FeAl. 25 figures.

  12. Synthesis of nano-sized amorphous boron powders through active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jilin; Gu, Yunle; Li, Zili; Wang, Weimin; Fu, Zhengyi

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method. The effects of endothermic reaction rate, the possible chemical reaction mechanism and active dilution model for synthesis of the product were also discussed. Highlights: ► Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis method. ► The morphology, particle size and purity of the samples could be effectively controlled via changing the endothermic rate. ► The diluter KBH{sub 4} played an important role in active dilution synthesis of amorphous nano-sized boron powders. ► The active dilution method could be further popularized and become a common approach to prepare various inorganic materials. - Abstract: Nano-sized amorphous boron powders were synthesized by active dilution self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method at temperatures ranging from 700 °C to 850 °C in a SHS furnace using Mg, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and KBH{sub 4} as raw materials. Samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Laser particle size analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission TEM (HRTEM). The boron powders demonstrated an average particle size of 50 nm with a purity of 95.64 wt.%. The diluter KBH{sub 4} played an important role in the active dilution synthesis of amorphous nano-sized boron powders. The effects of endothermic reaction rate, the possible chemical reaction mechanism and active dilution model for synthesis of the product were also discussed.

  13. Microstructure and superconducting properties of nanocarbon-doped internal Mg diffusion-processed MgB2 wires fabricated using different boron powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Da; Wang, Dongliang; Li, Chen; Yuan, Pusheng; Zhang, Xianping; Yao, Chao; Dong, Chiheng; Huang, He; Ma, Yanwei; Oguro, Hidetoshi; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    MgB2/Nb/Monel monofilament wires were fabricated using four different boron powders by an internal Mg diffusion (IMD) process. The microstructure, morphology and the critical current density (J c) of the used boron powders and the formative MgB2 layers were analyzed and compared. It was found that the purity and particle size of the boron powder influence the superconducting properties of MgB2 wires; further that the optimized heat-treatment condition also depends on the quality of the boron powder. The highest J c was obtained in the MgB2 layer made using amorphous boron (AB) powder, although a certain amount of voids existed in the superconducting layer. The IMD-processed MgB2 layer fabricated using high-purity boron (HB) powder had also a high J c compared with the powder-in-tube (PIT) process and a few unreacted boron particles remained in it. MgB2 wire fabricated using low-purity boron (LB) powder had a high cost-performance ratio compared with the others, which is expected to allow the fabrication of large-scale and low-cost superconducting wires for practical application. However, the enhancement of the J c was not found in the MgB2 layer manufactured using the ball-milled LB (MLB) powder as expected due to the increased percentage of impurity.

  14. β-Rhombohedral Boron: At the Crossroads of the Chemistry of Boron and the Physics of Frustration [Boron: a frustrated element

    SciTech Connect

    Ogitsu, Tadashi; Schwegler, Eric; Galli, Giulia

    2013-05-08

    In the periodic table boron occupies a peculiar, crossover position: on the first row, it is surrounded by metal forming elements on the left and by non-metals on the right. In addition, it is the only non-metal of the third column. Therefore it is perhaps not surprising that the crystallographic structure and topology of its stable allotrope at room temperature (β-boron) are not shared by any other element, and are extremely complex. The formidable intricacy of β- boron, with interconnecting icosahedra, partially occupied sites, and an unusually large number of atoms per unit cell (more than 300) has been known for more than 40 years. Nevertheless boron remains the only element purified in significant quantities whose ground state geometry has not been completely determined by experiments. However theoretical progress reported in the last decade has shed light on numerous properties of elemental boron, leading to a thorough characterization of its structure at ambient conditions, as well as of its electronic and thermodynamic properties. This review discusses in detail the properties of β-boron, as inferred from experiments and the ab-initio theories developed in the last decade.

  15. Elements and the Origin of Life. Boron and Molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, S. R.; Ricardo, A.; Illangkoon, H.; Kim, M. J.; Carrigan, M.; Frye, F.; Benner, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    The central paradox surrounding the origin of life is not presented by a scarcity of organic compounds (which are abundant in the cosmos), but rather the ease with which organic compounds become tar when they are exposed to energy. One emerging solution to this problem is the interaction of minerals with organic compounds in ways that no only guides their reactivity, but also stabilizes end products having biological value. One breakthrough in this area is the discovery that ribose, the "R" in "RNA", is formed in a guided process in the presence of boron-containing minerals, and is stabilized by boron once it is formed. This process may have been coupled with molybdenum-guided pathways on early Earth. These observations, confirmed in detail in the laboratory, are guiding those who model planetary formation to consider how these two elements, neither particularly abundant in the Earth's crust, might have been made available to organic molecules evolving early in Earth's history to give chemical systems capable of Darwinian evolution.

  16. Protective matching polymer powder coating of piezoelectric element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilova, V. A.; Fazlyyyakhmatov, M. G.; Kashapov, N. F.

    2013-12-01

    Objects of research are coatings and technology of their applying to the piezoelectric elements for ultrasound. Acoustic impedance and thicknesses of matching layers for medical ultrasound transducers have been defined. In this paper performance characteristics of coating systems with predetermined properties have been selected. The conditions for selection of polymer powder paint for quarter wave matching layer have been determined. Conditions of forming polymer powder coatings have been proposed.

  17. Spark Plasma Sintering of Aluminum-Magnesium-Matrix Composites with Boron Carbide and Tungsten Nano-powder Inclusions: Modeling and Experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvilis, E. S.; Khasanov, O. L.; Gulbin, V. N.; Petyukevich, M. S.; Khasanov, A. O.; Olevsky, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    Spark-plasma sintering (SPS) is used to fabricate fully-dense metal-matrix (Al/Mg) composites containing hard ceramic (boron carbide) and refractory metal (tungsten) inclusions. The study objectives include the modeling (and its experimental verification) of the process of the consolidation of the composites consisted of aluminum-magnesium alloy AMg6 (65 wt.%), B4C powder (15 wt.%), and W nano-powder (20 wt.%), as well as the optimization of the composite content and of the SPS conditions to achieve higher density. Discrete element modeling of the composite particles packing based on the particle size distribution functions of real powders is utilized for the determination of the powder compositions rendering maximum mixture packing densities. Two models: a power-law creep model of the high temperature deformation of powder materials, and an empirical logarithmic pressure-temperature-relative density relationship are successfully applied for the description of the densification of the aluminum-magnesium metal matrix powder composite subjected to spark-plasma sintering. The elastoplastic properties of the sintered composite samples are assessed by nanoindentation.

  18. Boron

    MedlinePlus

    ... body handles other minerals such as magnesium and phosphorus. It also seems to increase estrogen levels in ... happens in men.PhosphorusSupplemental boron might reduce blood phosphorus levels in some people.

  19. Preparation of superhard cubic boron nitride sintered from commercially available submicron powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Teng; Kou, Zili; Lu, Jingrui; Yan, Xiaozhi; Liu, Fangming; Li, Xin; Ding, Wei; Liu, Jin; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Dejiang; Lei, Li; He, Duanwei

    2017-03-01

    Using submicron cubic boron nitride (cBN) powder as a starting material, polycrystalline cBN (PcBN) samples without additives were sintered from 8.0-14.0 GPa at 1750 °C, and their sintering behaviour and mechanical properties were investigated. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that high-density nanotwins could be generated from common submicron cBN grains during high pressure and high temperature treatment. The dislocation glide and (111) mechanical micro-twinning are the main mechanisms that underlie plastic deformation in the sintering process, and this contributes to the grain refinement. A refinement in the grain size (˜120 nm), micro-defect (nanotwin and stacking faults), and strong covalent bonding between the grains are crucial for improving the sample mechanical properties. The PcBN sintered at 11.0 GPa/1750 °C possessed outstanding mechanical properties, including a high Vickers hardness (˜72 GPa), fracture toughness (˜12.4 MPam1/2), and thermal stability (˜1273 °C in air).

  20. Boron reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.

    1980-07-01

    A process to recover high purity /sup 10/B enriched crystalline boron powder from a polymeric matrix was developed on a laboratory basis and ultimately scaled up to production capacity. The process is based on controlled pyrolysis of boron-filled scrap followed by an acid leach and dry sieving operation to return the powder to the required purity and particle size specifications. Typically, the recovery rate of the crystalline powder is in excess of 98.5 percent, and some of the remaining boron is recovered in the form of boric acid. The minimum purity requirement of the recovered product is 98.6 percent total boron.

  1. High-purity, fine-particle boron nitride powder synthesis at -75 to 750C. Report of investigations/1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyoncu, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Nonoxide ceramics with improved high-temperature properties could substitute for high-temperature alloys and reduce the Nation's dependence on imports of Cr, Co, Ni, and Mn. To meet the objective, the Bureau of Mines conducted research to synthesize ultrafine reactive boron nitride (BN) powders. BN powders were prepared at temperatures ranging from -75 degrees to 750 degrees C. Low-temperature reactions (-75 to 200/sup 0/C) between boron halides and N compounds led to formation of elemento-organic compounds that were thermally decomposed to ultrafine (approximately 100- to 150-A particle size) reactive BN powders. BN powders were also prepared through the reaction of a low-melting inorganic B compound (boric acid, borax) with an organic N compound (carbimide and thiocarbimide) in N/sub 2/ and/or ammonia (NH/sub 3/) atmospheres at temperatures between 500 and 750/sup 0/C. The report is based upon work done under an agreement between the University of Alabama and the Bureau of Mines.

  2. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Morrow, Marvin S.

    1993-01-01

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy.

  3. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1993-10-12

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy.

  4. The Influences of Carbon and Molybdenum on the Progress of Liquid Phase Sintering and the Microstructure of Boron-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Boron is an optimal alloying element for liquid phase sintering (LPS) of powder metallurgy (PM) Fe-based materials. However, the influences of various alloying elements on the progress of LPS are still undetermined. The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of carbon and molybdenum on the LPS and microstructure of boron-containing PM steel. The results showed that adding 0.5 wt pct C and 1.5 wt pct Mo, and particularly the former, promotes the LPS and increases the sintered density. With the addition of 0.5 wt pct C, liquid can be generated in two distinct regions, and the secondary liquid improves the densification. After 1523 K (1250 °C) sintering, the increases in sintered densities of Fe-0.4B, Fe-0.4B-1.5Mo, Fe-0.4B-0.5C, and Fe-0.4B-1.5Mo-0.5C steels were 0.33, 0.47, 0.56, and 0.64 g/cm3, respectively. Thermodynamic simulation also demonstrated that the increases in sintered densities were correlated with the liquid volumes formed at 1523 K (1250 °C). In conclusion, adding 0.5 wt pct C to B-containing PM steels facilitates the formation of a secondary liquid phase and higher liquid volume, resulting in better densification.

  5. Production and Characterization of Bulk MgB2 Material made by the Combination of Crystalline and Carbon Coated Amorphous Boron Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroki, K.; Muralidhar, M.; Koblischka, M. R.; Murakami, M.

    2017-07-01

    The object of this investigation is to reduce the cost of bulk production and in the same time to increase the critical current performance of bulk MgB2 material. High-purity commercial powders of Mg metal (99.9% purity) and two types of crystalline (99% purity) and 16.5 wt% carbon-coated, nanometer-sized amorphous boron powders (98.5% purity) were mixed in a nominal composition of MgB2 to reduce the boron cost and to see the effect on the superconducting and magnetic properties. Several samples were produced mixing the crystalline boron and carbon-coated, nanometer-sized amorphous boron powders in varying ratios (50:50, 60:40, 70:30, 80:20, 90:10) and synthesized using a single-step process using the solid state reaction around 800 °C for 3 h in pure argon atmosphere. The magnetization measurements exhibited a sharp superconducting transition temperature with T c, onset around 38.6 K to 37.2 K for the bulk samples prepared utilizing the mixture of crystalline boron and 16.5% carbon-coated amorphous boron. The critical current density at higher magnetic field was improved with addition of carbon-coated boron to crystalline boron in a ratio of 80:20. The highest self-field Jc around 215,000 A/cm2 and 37,000 A/cm2 were recorded at 20 K, self-field and 2 T for the sample with a ratio of 80:10. The present results clearly demonstrate that the bulk MgB2 performance can be improved by adding carbon-coated nano boron to crystalline boron, which will be attractive to reduce the cost of bulk MgB2 material for several industrial applications.

  6. Is Boron a Prebiotic Element? A Mini-review of the Essentiality of Boron for the Appearance of Life on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorei, Romulus

    2012-02-01

    Boron is probably a prebiotic element with special importance in the so-called "sugars world". Boron is not present on Earth in its elemental form. It is found only in compounds, e.g., borax, boric acid, kernite, ulexite, colemanite and other borates. Volcanic spring waters sometimes contain boron-based acids (e.g., boric, metaboric, tetraboric and pyroboric acid). Borates influence the formation of ribofuranose from formaldehyde that feeds the "prebiotic metabolic cycle". The importance of boron in the living world is strongly related to its implications in the prebiotic origins of genetic material; consequently, we believe that throughout the evolution of life, the primary role of boron has been to provide thermal and chemical stability in hostile environments. The complexation of boric acid and borates with organic cis-diols remains the most probable chemical mechanism for the role of this element in the evolution of the living world. Because borates can stabilize ribose and form borate ester nucleotides, boron may have provided an essential contribution to the "pre-RNA world".

  7. Is boron a prebiotic element? A mini-review of the essentiality of boron for the appearance of life on earth.

    PubMed

    Scorei, Romulus

    2012-02-01

    Boron is probably a prebiotic element with special importance in the so-called "sugars world". Boron is not present on Earth in its elemental form. It is found only in compounds, e.g., borax, boric acid, kernite, ulexite, colemanite and other borates. Volcanic spring waters sometimes contain boron-based acids (e.g., boric, metaboric, tetraboric and pyroboric acid). Borates influence the formation of ribofuranose from formaldehyde that feeds the "prebiotic metabolic cycle". The importance of boron in the living world is strongly related to its implications in the prebiotic origins of genetic material; consequently, we believe that throughout the evolution of life, the primary role of boron has been to provide thermal and chemical stability in hostile environments. The complexation of boric acid and borates with organic cis-diols remains the most probable chemical mechanism for the role of this element in the evolution of the living world. Because borates can stabilize ribose and form borate ester nucleotides, boron may have provided an essential contribution to the "pre-RNA world".

  8. Novel nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating for boron powders by direct pyrolysis of coronene without solvent.

    PubMed

    Ye, ShuJun; Song, MingHui; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-30

    A 3 nm coronene coating and a 4 nm amorphous carbon coating with a uniform shell-core encapsulation structure for nanosized boron (B) powders are formed by a simple process in which coronene is directly mixed with boron particles without a solvent and heated at 520 °C for 1 h or at 630 °C for 3 h in a vacuum-sealed silica tube. Coronene has a melting point lower than its decomposition temperature, which enables liquid coronene to cover B particles by liquid diffusion and penetration without the need for a solvent. The diffusion and penetration of coronene can extend to the boundaries of particles and to inside the agglomerated nanoparticles to form a complete shell-core encapsulated structure. As the temperature is increased, thermal decomposition of coronene on the B particles results in the formation of a uniform amorphous carbon coating layer. This novel and simple nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating method can possibly be applied to many other powders; thus, it has potential applications in many fields at low cost.

  9. Novel nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating for boron powders by direct pyrolysis of coronene without solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, ShuJun; Song, MingHui; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    A 3 nm coronene coating and a 4 nm amorphous carbon coating with a uniform shell-core encapsulation structure for nanosized boron (B) powders are formed by a simple process in which coronene is directly mixed with boron particles without a solvent and heated at 520 °C for 1 h or at 630 °C for 3 h in a vacuum-sealed silica tube. Coronene has a melting point lower than its decomposition temperature, which enables liquid coronene to cover B particles by liquid diffusion and penetration without the need for a solvent. The diffusion and penetration of coronene can extend to the boundaries of particles and to inside the agglomerated nanoparticles to form a complete shell-core encapsulated structure. As the temperature is increased, thermal decomposition of coronene on the B particles results in the formation of a uniform amorphous carbon coating layer. This novel and simple nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating method can possibly be applied to many other powders; thus, it has potential applications in many fields at low cost.

  10. Influence of crystalline boron powders on superconducting properties of C-doped internal Mg diffusion processed MgB2 wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongliang; Zhang, Xianping; Tang, Shaopu; Xu, Da; Yao, Chao; Dong, Chiheng; Xu, Zhongtang; Ma, Yanwei; Oguro, Hidetoshi; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    Monofilament MgB2/Fe wires or tapes were fabricated with two different purity crystalline boron powders, using internal magnesium diffusion (IMD) and in situ powder-in-tube (PIT) processes. To evaluate which method was more insensitive to the purity of the boron powders, a sensitivity factor was used. It was found that the IMD process was less sensitive to the purity of the boron powders, compared to the PIT method. Furthermore, J c values of the IMD-processed wires were higher than those of the PIT-processed samples. The reduced porosity and hence the increased density in the IMD-processed samples was thought to be the main reason. Although a number of B-rich particles remained in the MgB2 region, a layer J c as high as 4.8 × 104 A cm-2 at 4.2 K and 10 T was still obtained in the IMD-processed wire, which was comparable to that of IMD-processed wires fabricated using amorphous boron powders.

  11. The effect of boron powder on the microstructure of MgB2 filaments prepared by the modified internal magnesium diffusion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosová, A.; Kulich, M.; Kováč, P.; Brunner, B.; Scheiter, J.; Häßler, W.

    2017-05-01

    We have analyzed the microstructure of MgB2 prepared by the modified internal magnesium diffusion technique resulting in filaments without a central hole. Three different amorphous boron powders with a nominal purity of 98.5%-99.0% and a different particle size were used. It was shown that the real purity of the powders was different from the nominal purity, and the microstructure as well as the critical current densities of the MgB2 were affected by using boron. Larger B particles with a size of 400-500 nm led to the presence of large B-rich grains inside the MgB2 matrix. For one wire series, boron powder containing residual chlorine from the boron preparation process was used. It was found that just a small quantity of chlorine in the B powder caused significant MgB2 filament inhomogeneity, an apparent decrease in the critical current density and high reactivity with air. We estimated the ideal packing density for achieving a large volume of dense MgB2.

  12. Piezoelectric effects in boron nitride nanotubes predicted by the atomistic finite element method and molecular mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolladay, Mat; Ivanov, Dmitry; Allan, Neil L.; Scarpa, Fabrizio

    2017-09-01

    We calculate the tensile and shear moduli of a series of boron nitride nanotubes and their piezoelectric response to applied loads. We compare in detail results from a simple molecular mechanics (MM) potential, the universal force field, with those from the atomistic finite element method (AFEM) using both Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam formulations. The MM energy minimisations are much more successful than those using the AFEM, and we analyse the failure of the latter approach both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  13. Piezoelectric effects in boron nitride nanotubes predicted by the atomistic finite element method and molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Tolladay, Mat; Ivanov, Dmitry; Allan, Neil L; Scarpa, Fabrizio

    2017-09-01

    We calculate the tensile and shear moduli of a series of boron nitride nanotubes and their piezoelectric response to applied loads. We compare in detail results from a simple molecular mechanics (MM) potential, the universal force field, with those from the atomistic finite element method (AFEM) using both Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam formulations. The MM energy minimisations are much more successful than those using the AFEM, and we analyse the failure of the latter approach both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  14. Source of boron in the Palokas gold deposit, northern Finland: evidence from boron isotopes and major element composition of tourmaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranta, Jukka-Pekka; Hanski, Eero; Cook, Nick; Lahaye, Yann

    2017-06-01

    The recently discovered Palokas gold deposit is part of the larger Rompas-Rajapalot gold-mineralized system located in the Paleoproterozoic Peräpohja Belt, northern Finland. Tourmaline is an important gangue mineral in the Palokas gold mineralization. It occurs as tourmalinite veins and as tourmaline crystals in sulfide-rich metasomatized gold-bearing rocks. In order to understand the origin of tourmaline in the gold-mineralized rocks, we have investigated the major element chemistry and boron isotope composition of tourmaline from three areas: (1) the Palokas gold mineralization, (2) a pegmatitic tourmaline granite, and (3) the evaporitic Petäjäskoski Formation. Based on textural evidence, tourmaline in gold mineralization is divided into two different types. Type 1 is located within the host rock and is cut by rock-forming anthophyllite crystals. Type 2 occurs in late veins and/or breccia zones consisting of approximately 80% tourmaline and 20% sulfides, commonly adjacent to quartz veins. All the studied tourmaline samples belong to the alkali-group tourmaline and can be classified as dravite and schorl. The δ11B values of the three localities lie in the same range, from 0 to -4‰. Tourmaline from the Au mineralization and from the Petäjäskoski Formation has similar compositional trends. Mg is the major substituent for Al; inferred low Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios and Na values (<0.8 atoms per formula unit (apfu)) of all tourmaline samples suggest that they precipitated from reduced, low-salinity fluids. Based on the similar chemical and boron isotope composition and the Re-Os age of molybdenite related to the tourmaline-sulfide-quartz veins, we propose that the tourmaline-forming process is a result of a single magmatic-hydrothermal event related to the extensive granite magmatism at around 1.79-1.77 Ga. Tourmaline was crystallized throughout the hydrothermal process, which resulted in the paragenetic variation between type 1 and type 2. The close association of

  15. Source of boron in the Palokas gold deposit, northern Finland: evidence from boron isotopes and major element composition of tourmaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranta, Jukka-Pekka; Hanski, Eero; Cook, Nick; Lahaye, Yann

    2016-11-01

    The recently discovered Palokas gold deposit is part of the larger Rompas-Rajapalot gold-mineralized system located in the Paleoproterozoic Peräpohja Belt, northern Finland. Tourmaline is an important gangue mineral in the Palokas gold mineralization. It occurs as tourmalinite veins and as tourmaline crystals in sulfide-rich metasomatized gold-bearing rocks. In order to understand the origin of tourmaline in the gold-mineralized rocks, we have investigated the major element chemistry and boron isotope composition of tourmaline from three areas: (1) the Palokas gold mineralization, (2) a pegmatitic tourmaline granite, and (3) the evaporitic Petäjäskoski Formation. Based on textural evidence, tourmaline in gold mineralization is divided into two different types. Type 1 is located within the host rock and is cut by rock-forming anthophyllite crystals. Type 2 occurs in late veins and/or breccia zones consisting of approximately 80% tourmaline and 20% sulfides, commonly adjacent to quartz veins. All the studied tourmaline samples belong to the alkali-group tourmaline and can be classified as dravite and schorl. The δ11B values of the three localities lie in the same range, from 0 to -4‰. Tourmaline from the Au mineralization and from the Petäjäskoski Formation has similar compositional trends. Mg is the major substituent for Al; inferred low Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios and Na values (<0.8 atoms per formula unit (apfu)) of all tourmaline samples suggest that they precipitated from reduced, low-salinity fluids. Based on the similar chemical and boron isotope composition and the Re-Os age of molybdenite related to the tourmaline-sulfide-quartz veins, we propose that the tourmaline-forming process is a result of a single magmatic-hydrothermal event related to the extensive granite magmatism at around 1.79-1.77 Ga. Tourmaline was crystallized throughout the hydrothermal process, which resulted in the paragenetic variation between type 1 and type 2. The close association of

  16. Polyhedral boranes and elemental boron: direct structural relations and diverse electronic requirements.

    PubMed

    Jemmis, E D; Balakrishnarajan, M M

    2001-05-09

    Details of the electronic and structural connections between macropolyhedral boranes and elemental boron are reported. The nature of electron deficiency in the beta-rhombohedral polymorph of boron is analyzed by using a molecular fragments approach with boranes as model systems. The B57H36 molecule constructed from such an approach has three more electrons than mandated by the electron-counting rules (Balakrishnarajan, M. M.; Jemmis, E. D. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2000, 122, 456. Jemmis, E. D.; Balakrishnarajan, M. M.; Pancharatna, P. D. J. Am Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 4313-4323.) devised for macropolyhedral boranes. This is also confirmed by electronic structure calculations at the extended Hückel and B3LYP/6-31G levels. The aromaticity of this B57H36(3+) molecule is on par with the most stable B12H12(2-) itself, as revealed by nuclear independent chemical shift calculations. The B57 skeleton can be made electron precise by adopting a nido arrangement by eliminating an atom from the closo skeleton, so that three valence electrons will be removed. The exact site of elimination, governed by thermodynamic factors, necessitates the removal of a boron atom from any of the six symmetrically equivalent B[13] sites in the unit cell. This leads to partial occupancies, which causes disorder in packing, as revealed by X-ray structure studies. The rest of the boron atoms are distributed in icosahedral B12 fragments, whose two-electron deficiency is satisfied by the capping of extra atoms, distributed statistically in the interstitial sites. These results show that the three-dimensional network of the idealized beta-rhombohedral unit cell is not stable, unlike the electron-precise carbon polymorphs such as diamond and graphite. Thus, disorder in the form of partial occupancies, interstitial atoms, alien atoms, etc., is necessary for electron sufficiency and hence for the stability of this polymorphic form. Through these ingenious steps, all components of the unit cell attain electron

  17. Preparation of titanium diboride powder

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, Jorulf; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1985-01-01

    Finely-divided titanium diboride or zirconium diboride powders are formed by reacting gaseous boron trichloride with a material selected from the group consisting of titanium powder, zirconium powder, titanium dichloride powder, titanium trichloride powder, and gaseous titanium trichloride.

  18. Preparation of metal diboride powders

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

    Finely-divided titanium diboride or zirconium diboride powders are formed by reacting gaseous boron trichloride with a material selected from the group of consisting of titanium powder, zirconium powder, titanium dichloride powder, titanium trichloride powder, and gaseous titanium trichloride.

  19. Synthesis and Explosive Consolidation of Titanium, Aluminium, Boron and Carbon Containing Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikhradze, Mikheil; Oniashvili, George; Chikhradze, Nikoloz; D. S Marquis, Fernand

    2016-10-01

    The development of modern technologies in the field of materials science has increased the interest towards the bulk materials with improved physical, chemical and mechanical properties. Composites, fabricated in Ti-Al-B-C systems are characterized by unique physical and mechanical properties. They are attractive for aerospace, power engineering, machine and chemical applications. The technologies to fabricate ultrafine grained powder and bulk materials in Ti-Al-B-C system are described in the paper. It includes results of theoretical and experimental investigation for selection of powders composition and determination of thermodynamic conditions for bland preparation, as well as optimal technological parameters for mechanical alloying and adiabatic compaction. The crystalline coarse Ti, Al, C powders and amorphous B were used as precursors and blends with different compositions of Ti-Al, Ti-Al-C, Ti-B-C and Ti-Al-B were prepared. Preliminary determination/selection of blend compositions was made on the basis of phase diagrams. The powders were mixed according to the selected ratios of components to produce the blend. Blends were processed in “Fritsch” Planetary premium line ball mill for mechanical alloying, syntheses of new phases, amorphization and ultrafine powder production. The blends processing time was variable: 1 to 20 hours. The optimal technological regimes of nano blend preparation were determined experimentally. Ball milled nano blends were placed in metallic tube and loaded by shock waves for realization of consolidation in adiabatic regime. The structure and properties of the obtained ultrafine grained materials depending on the processing parameters are investigated and discussed. For consolidation of the mixture, explosive compaction technology is applied at room temperatures. The prepared mixtures were located in low carbon steel tube and blast energies were used for explosive consolidation compositions. The relationship of ball milling

  20. Preparation of nanocrystalline TiN coated cubic boron nitride powders by a sol-gel process.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee S; Umer, M Adeel; Ryu, Ho J; Hong, Soon H

    2011-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles coated with 20 wt% nanocrystalline TiN were prepared by coating the surface of cBN particles with TiO2, followed by nitridation with NH3 gas at 900 degrees C. Coating of TiO2 on cBN powders was accomplished by a sol-gel process from a solution of titanium (IV) isopropoxide and anhydrous ethanol. An amorphous TiO(x) layer of 50 nm thickness was homogenously formed on the surface of the cBN particles by the sol-gel process. The amorphous layer was then crystallized to an anatase TiO2 phase through calcination in air at 400 degrees C. The crystallized TiO2 layer was 50 nm in thickness, and the size of TiO2 particles comprising the layer was nearly 10 nm. The TiO2 on cBN surfaces was completely converted into nanocrystalline TiN of uniform particles 20 nm in size on cBN particles by nitridation under flowing NH3 gas.

  1. Fabrication of boron articles

    DOEpatents

    Benton, Samuel T.

    1976-01-01

    This invention is directed to the fabrication of boron articles by a powder metallurgical method wherein the articles are of a density close to the theoretical density of boron and are essentially crackfree. The method comprises the steps of admixing 1 to 10 weight percent carbon powder with amorphous boron powder, cold pressing the mixture and then hot pressing the cold pressed compact into the desired article. The addition of the carbon to the mixture provides a pressing aid for inhibiting the cracking of the hot pressed article and is of a concentration less than that which would cause the articles to possess significant concentrations of boron carbide.

  2. Microwave sintering of boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Blake, R.D.; Katz, J.D.; Petrovic, J.J.; Sheinberg, H.

    1988-06-10

    A method for forming boron carbide into a particular shape and densifying the green boron carbide shape. Boron carbide in powder form is pressed into a green shape and then sintered, using a microwave oven, to obtain a dense boron carbide body. Densities of greater than 95% of theoretical density have been obtained. 1 tab.

  3. Elemental analysis of powders with surface-assisted thin film laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Cheung, Hoi Ching; Zheng, Ronger; Ma, Qianli; Chen, Yanping; Delepine-Gilon, Nicole; Yu, Jin

    2016-10-01

    We have developed in this work a method of elemental analysis of powdered materials with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). This method requires simple sample preparation. Powders are first mixed into a 75 cSt base oil to obtain a paste which is then smeared onto the polished surface of a solid state substrate, aluminum plate for instance, in the form of a uniform thin film. The prepared sample is ablated by a high energy infrared (IR at 1064 nm) nanosecond laser pulse. The laser beam transmits through the coating layer of the material to be analyzed and induces a strong plasma from the substrate. The initial plasma interacts in turn with the coating layer, leading to the vaporization and excitation of the incorporated powder particles. The subsequent emission from the plasma includes emission lines of the elements contained in the powder, which is preferentially captured by a suitable detection system. The analysis of the recorded spectrum allows the concentration determination of the targeted elements in the powder. We first applied the method on a cellulose powder of 20 μm typical particle size. The powder was spiked with titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles for Ti concentrations ranging from 25 ppm to 5000 ppm by weight. Calibration graphs were thus built to deduce figures-of-merit parameters such as the coefficient of determination (R2) and the limits of detection and quantification (LoD and LoQ). We optimized especially the choice of reference line for spectrum normalization, which resulted in better analytical performances. In the second step, two sets of powders, the aforementioned cellulose powder and an alumina powder with average particle size of ≤ 10 μm, were spiked with TiO2 nanoparticles. We then assessed the matrix effect between these two different powders for the determination of Ti by comparing their calibration curves. Our results show universal calibration curve in Ti determination in the two tested matrices. The results are

  4. Boron cosmochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, D. B.; Gladney, E. S.

    1985-01-01

    The abundances of boron, silicon, sulfur, and sodium were determined in 50 pieces of 28 chondritic meteorites. Boron abundances are found to define compositionally distinct domains within type C2M carbonaceous chondrites and petrologic type 5 and 6 ordinary chondrites. These domains may manifest the redistribution of boron within meteorites in response to low-temperature hydrous processes in C2M chondrites and high-temperature metamorphic processes in high petrologic type ordinary chondrites. Assuming that the redistribution was limited to regions comparable in size to the mass of the available meteorites, the boron abundance in unaltered material is determined. The depletion factors for boron in chondritic subgroups correlate with those for sulfur in the same subgroups. This correlation indicates that boron, like sulfur, is a moderately volatile element with a condensation temperature between 400 and 900 K.

  5. The use of amorphous boron powder enhances mechanical alloying in soft magnetic FeNbB alloy: A magnetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Ipus, J. J.; Blazquez, J. S.; Franco, V.; Conde, A.

    2013-05-07

    Saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy have been studied during mechanical alloying of Fe{sub 75}Nb{sub 10}B{sub 15} alloys prepared using crystalline and commercial amorphous boron. The evolution of saturation magnetization indicates a more efficient dissolution of boron into the matrix using amorphous boron, particularly for short milling times. The magnetization of the crystalline phase increases as boron is incorporated into this phase. Two milling time regimes can be used to describe the evolution of magnetic anisotropy: a first regime governed by microstrains and a second one mainly governed by crystal size and amorphous fraction.

  6. Identification of quantitative trait loci for mineral elements in grains and grass powder of barley.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y W; Du, J; Yang, X M; Pu, X Y; Wang, L X; Yang, J Z; Du, L J; Yang, T; Yang, S M; Sun, Z H

    2016-12-02

    Mineral elements in barley (Hordeum vulgare) play an important physiological role in global human health. In this study, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for concentration of nine mineral elements in barley grain and grass powder were detected in a population of 193 recombinant inbred lines of the barley cross Ziguangmangluoerling x Schooner and the parents. We observed large genetic variation contributing to element concentrations in both grains and grass powder. The mean K, Ca, and Fe concentrations in grass powder were 6.67, 12.00, and 4.58 times that of regenerating barley grains. In grains, 17 QTLs that accounted for 6.36-64.08% of the phenotypic variation in Zn, Mg, Ca, K, Na, Mn, Fe, and P concentrations were identified. In grass powder, seven QTLs were identified; these accounted for 6.03-21.86% of the variation in Ca, Zn, Mg, K, Fe, and Cu concentrations. These QTLs affecting elements in grain and grass powder are so far unreported in barley. To our knowledge, QTLs with pleiotropic effects for three elements were also identified for the first time in barley. The qK1/qMg1/qCa1 region between markers Bmag0211 and GBMS0014 on chromosome 1H was shown to have large additive effects for Mg, Ca, and K concentrations in grains. These additive effects indicated that the high element (Mg, Ca, Zn, Mn, and K) alleles were contributed by Ziguangmangluoerling. These results will further our understanding of the genetic basis of mineral elements and help us develop markers linked with mineral elements for marker-assisted selection breeding in barley.

  7. Crystal structure and magnetic properties of Nd2Fe14B powder prepared by using high energy milling from elements metal Nd,Fe,B powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlan; Muljadi; Sardjono, P.; Gulo, F.; Setiabudidaya, D.

    2016-11-01

    The Nd2Fe14B powder has been made by using High Energy Milling (HEM) from mixed metal powders Iron (Fe), Neodymium (Nd) and Boron (B). The Nd, Fe and B powders were mixed according stoichiometric composition (atomic ratio Nd:Fe:B = 2: 14: 1) and milled and milling time was varied in 10, 20, and 40 hours by using HEM. Toluene liquid was used as milling media to protect of metal powders from oxygen. The measurement result of x- ray diffraction show that the optimum Nd2Fe14B phase already formed about 69,46% after milling 40 hours with crystallite size about 25.64 nm. The magnetic properties of milled powders were measured by using VSM at room temperature. The highest value of magnetic properties are obtained at powder milled in 40 hours, at this condition, it is obtained Ms = 122 emu/g, Mr = 81 emu/g, Hc = 5.54 kOe and BHmax = 11.01 MGOe.

  8. Bifunctional air electrodes containing elemental iron powder charging additive

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chia-tsun; Demczyk, Brian G.; Gongaware, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A bifunctional air electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer essentially comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon; (ii) elemental iron particles having a particle size of between about 25 microns and about 700 microns diameter; (iii) an oxygen evolution material; (iv) a nonwetting agent; and (v) a catalyst, where at least one current collector is formed into said composite.

  9. Reaction synthesis of MoSi sub 2 from high purity elemental powders

    SciTech Connect

    Hardwick, D.A.; Martin, P.L.; Moores, R.J. )

    1992-08-15

    This paper reports that Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) is an intermetallic compound that combines a high melting point (2293K) with excellent resistance to high temperature oxidation. With respect to mechanical properties the behavior of polycrystalline MoSi{sub 2} falls into one of three regimes, based on the sue temperature: t {lt} 925{degrees} C: strong + brittle; 925 {lt} T {lt} 1250{degrees} C:strong + ductile and T {gt} 1250{degrees} C:weak + ductile. The majority of recent investigations have focused on the properties of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials processed from commercially available powder. Commercial MoSi{sub 2} powder contains significant amounts of oxygen; for example, a chemical analysis of powder obtained from Cerac Inc. revealed an oxygen content of 0.6 wt%. Consolidation of such powder resulted in a substantial volume fraction of amorphous silica in the final product. MoSi{sub 2} powder produced by the crushing and grinding of arc-melted elemental Mo and Si also exhibited amorphous Si-rich particles after vacuum hot-pressing at 1973K and 30MPa. Grinding of the cast material to powder was done in ethanol but one this was driven off, the powder was air-handled. The high energy mechanical alloying in an argon atmosphere of elemental Mo and Si powder to produce MoSi{sub 2} has also been investigated. Following hot pressing, the MoSi{sub 2} made in this fashion still contained a substantial volume fraction of SiO{sub 2}.

  10. Discrete element simulation of powder compaction in cold uniaxial pressing with low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojek, Jerzy; Nosewicz, Szymon; Jurczak, Kamila; Chmielewski, Marcin; Bochenek, Kamil; Pietrzak, Katarzyna

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents numerical studies of powder compaction in cold uniaxial pressing. The powder compaction in this work is considered as an initial stage of a hot pressing process so it is realized with relatively low pressure (up to 50 MPa). Hence the attention has been focused on the densification mechanisms at this range of pressure and models suitable for these conditions. The discrete element method employing spherical particles has been used in the numerical studies. Numerical simulations have been performed for two different contact models—the elastic Hertz-Mindlin-Deresiewicz model and the plastic Storåkers model. Numerical results have been compared with the results of laboratory tests of the die compaction of the NiAl powder. Comparisons have shown that the discrete element method is capable to represent properly the densification mechanisms by the particle rearrangement and particle deformation.

  11. Boron and other elements in sporophores of ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi.

    PubMed

    Lavola, Anu; Aphalo, Pedro J; Lehto, Tarja

    2011-04-01

    Fungi are usually thought not to have a boron (B) requirement. It is not known if mycorrhizas take up B from low concentrations that are common in forest soils, as fungi might also immobilise B. Here, we studied the B concentrations in sporophores of 49 ectomycorrhizal and 10 saprotrophic fungi to assess whether B is translocated in mycelium or not. Additionally, P and metal concentrations were measured for comparison. Variability both within species and between species was very large, as the lowest measured B concentration was 0.01 mg kg(-1) in Amanita muscaria, and the highest was 280 mg kg(-1) in Paxillus involutus. There was no clear difference between saprotrophic and mycorrhizal fungi. The majority of species did not accumulate B at more than 0.01-3 mg kg(-1), but there were some species that consistently had median concentration values higher than 5-6 mg kg(-1) and much higher maximum values, particularly Paxillus involutus, Lactarius necator and several Russula species. Most species increased their B concentration in B fertilised plots, but there were exceptions, particularly Rozites caperatus and Lactarius camphoratus. Boron concentrations did not correlate with those of other elements. In conclusion, B is translocated in the mycelia of most of the studied species. The differences between species may be due to differences in their water use, or carbohydrates used in translocation. It remains to be studied, if B concentrations in mycorrhizas or mycelia in soil are in the same order of magnitude as the larger ones found here, and if this has any effects on the host plants.

  12. Glacial-interglacial Changes in Ocean Carbon Chemistry constrained by Boron Isotopes, Trace Elements, and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, J. W. B.; Adkins, J. F.; Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C.

    2014-12-01

    Deep ocean carbon storage and release is commonly invoked to explain glacial-interglacial CO2 cycles, but records of the carbonate chemistry of the glacial ocean have, until recently, been scarce. Here we present new boron isotope (δ11B) and trace metal data from benthic foraminifera from a suite of 15 cores from the South Atlantic from depths ranging from 1500 to 4000 m. These records show distinct changes in the water column depth structure of these tracers between the last glacial maximum (LGM) and late Holocene. Comparison of these paired trace element and isotope ratios reveals new insights to the shared and individual controls on tracers including Li/Ca, Sr/Ca, U/Ca, Mg/Li and δ11B. We further examine these data using a recently developed tracer fields modelling approach (Lund et al. 2011). This has previously been applied to δ18O data to investigate changes in circulation at the LGM. Here we extend this method to non-conservative isotopic and trace elemental tracers, allowing us to constrain the roles of circulation, the biological pump of organic carbon and CaCO3, and carbonate compensation, in setting deep ocean carbon storage at the LGM. Lund, D. C., J. F. Adkins, and R. Ferrari (2011), Abyssal Atlantic circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum: Constraining the ratio between transport and vertical mixing, Paleoceanography, 26, PA1213, doi:10.1029/2010PA001938.

  13. Elastic and Piezoelectric Properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube Composites. Part II; Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. Alicia; Hardie, Robert; Yamakov, Vesselin; Park, Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-part series where the first part presents a molecular dynamics model of a single Boron Nitride Nanotube (BNNT) and this paper scales up to multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix. This paper presents finite element (FE) models to investigate the effective elastic and piezoelectric properties of (BNNT) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites studied in this paper are thin films of polymer matrix with aligned co-planar BNNTs. The FE modelling approach provides a computationally efficient way to gain an understanding of the material properties. We examine several FE models to identify the most suitable models and investigate the effective properties with respect to the BNNT volume fraction and the number of nanotube walls. The FE models are constructed to represent aligned and randomly distributed BNNTs in a matrix of resin using 2D and 3D hollow and 3D filled cylinders. The homogenisation approach is employed to determine the overall elastic and piezoelectric constants for a range of volume fractions. These models are compared with an analytical model based on Mori-Tanaka formulation suitable for finite length cylindrical inclusions. The model applies to primarily single-wall BNNTs but is also extended to multi-wall BNNTs, for which preliminary results will be presented. Results from the Part 1 of this series can help to establish a constitutive relationship for input into the finite element model to enable the modeling of multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix.

  14. Dative Bonding between Group 13 Elements Using a Boron-Centered Lewis Base.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Holger; Dewhurst, Rian D; Pentecost, Leanne; Radacki, Krzysztof; Vargas, Alfredo; Ye, Qing

    2016-01-04

    An electron-rich monovalent boron compound is used as a Lewis base to prepare adducts with Group 13 Lewis acids using both its boron and nitrogen sites. The hard Lewis acid AlCl3 binds through a nitrogen atom of the Lewis base, while softer Lewis acids GaX3 (Cl, Br, I) bind at the boron atom. The latter are the first noncluster Lewis adducts between a boron-centered Lewis base and a main-group Lewis acid. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Synthesis of in-situ TiAl-based composites from elemental powders

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Hawk, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    Alloys and composites based on the intermetallic compound TiAl are emerging as an important class of light-weight, high-temperature structural materials. Recently, it has been recognized that these alloys have applications in industries, such as the automotive industry, where cost is frequently a major concern in materials selection. However, for these alloys to be used in this type of application, new low cost methods for high volume component fabrication are required. One potential fabrication approach is reactive synthesis (also termed combustion synthesis). This technique involves initiating an self-propagating, high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction within an intimate mixture of elemental powders. This process has been used to fabricate intermetallics, ceramics and in-situ composites in the form of powders and dense monoliths. SHS reactions tend to initiate at low homologous temperatures of the forming compound (for aluminides near or at the melting point of Al, 660°C), and tend to go to completion in a short period of time (i.e., a few seconds). For some compounds, particularly aluminides, the reaction is ac companied by the formation of transient liquid phases. These factors can reduce the required processing parameters (time, temperature and pressure) needed to produce dense products by reactive synthesis techniques compared to conventional powder metallurgical approaches. This paper characterizes the reactions that occur and resultant microstructures of TiAl based composites fabricated from ternary mixtures of elemental Ti, Al and B or Si powders. Mixtures of the elemental powders were prepared corresponding to TiAl reinforced with 0, 10 25, 60 and 100 vol. pct. Ti5Si3 or TiB2. The powders were consolidated by reactive hot-pressing (at 1000°C and 20 MPa for 1 hr). It was found that the composites produced from Ti, Al and Si powders were dense, and the elemental powders transformed to the target phases of TiAl and Ti5Si3. Whereas, composites produced

  16. Element discrimination in a hexagonal boron nitride nanosheet by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mitome, Masanori; Sawada, Hidetaka; Kondo, Yukihito; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2012-11-01

    Boron nitride nanosheets prepared by an exfoliation technique were observed by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy at 300 kV acceleration voltage. Single boron and nitrogen atoms in a monolayer region were imaged with different image contrast; a boron atom gave 16% less intensity reduction than a nitrogen atom. The number of atoms at each hexagonal ring site was determined by the image intensity that changed discretely with a 0.25-0.30 intensity difference. A double BN sheet was found to have a boron vacancy layer, and a triple BN layer has also a boron deficient layer on the incident surface resulting from the electron beam thinning process. The high sensitivity for atomic species was achieved by the high resolution and a small information limit due to the use of a cold field emission electron source.

  17. Elemental boron-doped p(+)-SiGe layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy for infrared detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. L.; George, T.; Jones, E. W.; Ksendzov, A.; Huberman, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) detectors have been fabricated utilizing molecular beam epitaxy of p(+)-SiGe layers on p(-)-Si substrates. Elemental boron from a high-temperature effusion cell was used as the dopant source during MBE growth, and high doping concentrations have been achieved. Strong infrared absorption, mainly by free-carrier absorption, was observed for the degenerately doped SiGe layers. The use of elemental boron as the dopant source allows a low MBE growth temperature, resulting in improved crystalline quality and smooth surface morphology of the Si(0.7)Ge(0.3) layers. Nearly ideal thermionic emission dark current characteristics have been obtained. Photoresponse of the HIP detectors in the long-wavelength infrared regime has been demonstrated.

  18. Elemental boron-doped p(+)-SiGe layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy for infrared detector applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; George, T.; Jones, E. W.; Ksendzov, A.; Huberman, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) detectors have been fabricated utilizing molecular beam epitaxy of p(+)-SiGe layers on p(-)-Si substrates. Elemental boron from a high-temperature effusion cell was used as the dopant source during MBE growth, and high doping concentrations have been achieved. Strong infrared absorption, mainly by free-carrier absorption, was observed for the degenerately doped SiGe layers. The use of elemental boron as the dopant source allows a low MBE growth temperature, resulting in improved crystalline quality and smooth surface morphology of the Si(0.7)Ge(0.3) layers. Nearly ideal thermionic emission dark current characteristics have been obtained. Photoresponse of the HIP detectors in the long-wavelength infrared regime has been demonstrated.

  19. Finite Element Modeling and Analysis of Powder Stream in Low Pressure Cold Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Tarun; Walia, Ravinderjit Singh; Sharma, Prince; Sidhu, Tejinder Singh

    2016-07-01

    Low pressure cold gas dynamic spray (LPCGDS) is a coating process that utilize low pressure gas (5-10 bars instead of 25-30 bars) and the radial injection of powder instead of axial injection with the particle range (1-50 μm). In the LPCGDS process, pressurized compressed gas is accelerated to the critical velocity, which depends on length of the divergent section of nozzle, the propellant gas and particle characteristics, and the diameters ratio of the inlet and outer diameters. This paper presents finite element modeling (FEM) of powder stream in supersonic nozzle wherein adiabatic gas flow and expansion of gas occurs in uniform manner and the same is used to evaluate the resultant temperature and velocity contours during coating process. FEM analyses were performed using commercial finite volume package, ANSYS CFD FLUENT. The results are helpful to predict the characteristics of powder stream at the exit of the supersonic nozzle.

  20. Homoepitaxial Boron Doped Diamond Anvils as Heating Elements in a Diamond Anvil Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeffrey; Samudrala, Gopi; Smith, Spencer; Tsoi, Georgiy; Vohra, Yogesh; Weir, Samuel

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in designer-diamond technology have allowed for the use of electrically and thermally conducting homoepitaxially-grown layers of boron-doped diamond (grown at 1200 °C with a 2% mixture of CH4 in H, resulting in extremely high doping levels ~ 1020/cm3) to be used as heating elements in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). These diamonds allow for precise control of the temperature inside of the diamond anvil itself, particularly when coupled with a cryostat. Furthermore, the unmatched thermally conducting nature of diamond ensures that no significant lateral gradient in temperature occurs across the culet area. Since a thermocouple can easily be attached anywhere on the diamond surface, we can also measure diamond temperatures directly. With two such heaters, one can raise sample temperatures uniformly, or with any desired gradient along the pressure axis while preserving optical access. In our continuing set of benchmark experiments, we use two newly created matching heater anvils with 500 μm culets to analyze the various fluorescence emission lines of ruby microspheres, which show more complicated behavior than traditional ruby chips. We also report on the temperature dependence of the high-pressure Raman modes of paracetamol (C8H9NO2) up to 20 GPa.

  1. Homoepitaxial Boron Doped Diamond Anvil as Heating Element in a Diamond Anvil Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeffrey; Samudrala, Gopi; Vohra, Yogesh

    2012-02-01

    Recent advances in designer-diamond technology have allowed for the use of electrically and thermally conducting homoepitaxially-grown layers of boron-doped diamond (grown at 1200 C with a 2% mixture of CH4 in H, resulting in extremely high doping levels ˜ 10^20/cm^3) to be used as heating elements in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). These diamonds allow for precise control of the temperature inside of the diamond anvil itself, particularly when coupled with a cryostat. Furthermore, the unmatched thermally conducting nature of diamond ensures that no significant spatial gradient in temperature occurs across the culet area. Since a thermocouple can easily be attached anywhere on the diamond surface, we can also measure diamond temperatures directly. With two such heaters, one can raise sample temperatures uniformly, or with any desired gradient along the pressure axis while preserving optical access. In our initial experiments with these diamond anvils we report on the measurement of the thermal conductivity of copper-beryllium using a single diamond heater and two thermocouples. We augment these measurements with measurements of sample pressure via ruby fluorescence and electrical resistance of the sample and diamond heater.

  2. Comparative study of mono- and multi-filament MgB2 wires with different boron powders and malic acid addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Heo, Yoon-Uk; Matsumoto, A.; Kumakura, H.; Rindfleisch, M.; Tomsic, M.; Dou, S. X.

    2010-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of different boron (B) powders and of malic acid (C4H6O5) addition on the critical current density (Jc) of mono- and multi-filament MgB2 wires. We found that Jc of the wires made from the amorphous B showed the best performance. Low sintering processing keeps the grain size small, which leads to strong flux pinning. From transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, we confirmed that the crystalline B powders supplied by SMI and Tangshan had a β-rhombohedral structure as a main phase. These two powders also had numerous defects, such as twin and stacking faults inside the powder particles. However, these defects are not enough to promote the full reaction between magnesium (Mg) and B crystalline powder when sintered at low temperatures, and brings about low Jc values. Even though the morphologies of the two crystalline B powders appeared somewhat different, Jc for the two wires had similar quantitative values. For the malic acid doped wires, Jc of the wire made from the amorphous B was estimated to be above 100 000 A cm - 2 at 6 T and 4.2 K. This value is comparable to the low temperature superconductor Nb-Ti. In addition, the Jc was 25 000 A cm - 2 at 10 T and 4.2 K. This performance is the best Jc reported so far in in situ processed MgB2 wires. Interestingly, the low-field Jc performance of malic acid doped wire fabricated with crystalline B is higher than that of the pure wire fabricated with amorphous B. At 20 K, enhanced performance of Jc by malic acid doping is much higher than that of the pure MgB2 wire. The Jc at 5 T and 20 K was estimated to be 13 000 A cm - 2.

  3. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    DOEpatents

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; Sikka, Vinod K.; Hajaligol, Mohammed R.

    2000-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1 % rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  4. Simulation of Powder Layer Deposition in Additive Manufacturing Processes Using the Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, E. B.; Walton, O.; Homel, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    This document serves as a final report to a small effort where several improvements were added to a LLNL code GEODYN-­L to develop Discrete Element Method (DEM) algorithms coupled to Lagrangian Finite Element (FE) solvers to investigate powder-­bed formation problems for additive manufacturing. The results from these simulations will be assessed for inclusion as the initial conditions for Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) simulations performed with ALE3D. The algorithms were written and performed on parallel computing platforms at LLNL. The total funding level was 3-­4 weeks of an FTE split amongst two staff scientists and one post-­doc. The DEM simulations emulated, as much as was feasible, the physical process of depositing a new layer of powder over a bed of existing powder. The DEM simulations utilized truncated size distributions spanning realistic size ranges with a size distribution profile consistent with realistic sample set. A minimum simulation sample size on the order of 40-­particles square by 10-­particles deep was utilized in these scoping studies in order to evaluate the potential effects of size segregation variation with distance displaced in front of a screed blade. A reasonable method for evaluating the problem was developed and validated. Several simulations were performed to show the viability of the approach. Future investigations will focus on running various simulations investigating powder particle sizing and screen geometries.

  5. Content of trace elements and chromium speciation in Neem powder and tea infusions.

    PubMed

    Novotnik, Breda; Zuliani, Tea; Ščančar, Janez; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-01-01

    Total concentrations of selected trace elements in Neem powder and in Neem tea were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The data revealed that despite high total concentrations of the potentially toxic elements Al and Ni in Neem powder, their amounts dissolved in Neem tea were low. Total concentrations of the other toxic elements Pb, As and Cd were also very low and do not represent a health hazard. In contrast, total concentrations of the essential elements Fe, Cu, Zn, Se Mo and Cr in Neem powder were high and also considerable in Neem tea. Consuming one cup of Neem tea (2g per 200 mL of water) covers the recommended daily intakes for Cr and Se and represents an important source of Mo and Cu. Speciation analysis of Cr by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to ICP-MS with the use of enriched Cr isotopic tracers to follow species interconversions during the analytical procedure demonstrated that toxic Cr(VI) was not present either in Neem powder or in Neem tea. Its concentrations were below the limits of detection of the HPLC-ICP-MS procedure applied. The speciation analysis data confirmed that even Cr(VI) was added, it was rapidly reduced by the presence of antioxidants in Neem leaves. By the use of enriched Cr isotopic spike solutions it was also demonstrated that for obtaining reliable analytical data it is essential to apply the extraction procedures which prevent Cr species interconversions, or to correct for species transformation.

  6. Processing of a porous titanium alloy from elemental powders using a solid state isothermal foaming technique.

    PubMed

    Nugroho, Aris W; Leadbeater, Garry; Davies, Ian J

    2010-12-01

    The authors have conducted a preliminary investigation with regard to the potential to manufacture porous titanium alloys for biomedical applications using toxic-free elemental powders, i.e., Ti, Nb, Ta, Zr, in combination with the pressurised gas bubble entrapment method and in contrast to standard processing routes that generally utilise prealloyed powder containing potentially toxic elements. Elemental powder compacts were either hot isostatic pressed (HIP-ed) at 1000°C and then foamed at 1150°C or else HIP-ed at 1100°C and foamed at 1350°C. Porous α + β alloys containing up to 45 vol% of porosity in the size range 20-200 μm were successfully produced, thus highlighting the potential of this manufacturing route. It was expected that further optimisation of the processing route would allow full development of the preferred β-Ti phase (from the point of view of elastic modulus compatibility between implant and bone) with this being the subject of future work by the authors.

  7. Plasma-Arc Deposited Elemental Boron Film for use as a Durable Nonstick Coating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    COOKWARE BORON PLASMA ARCS MAGNETIC PROPERTIES FILTERED VACUUM CATHODIC ARC 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a... magnetic ducting system, which would filter out macroparticles (particle debris from the cathode) and expand the boron plasma to produce a uniform, debris...current. In addition to the high rate of material production, vacuum arc deposition also benefits from the fact that the output vapor is in a fully

  8. Progress on Determining the alpha-beta Phase Boundary of Elemental Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogitsu, Tadashi; Schwegler, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Recently, it was reported that the phase boundary between alpha-boron and beta-boron has been directly determined using high-pressure and temperature experiments down to P˜4GPa and T˜1400K [Scientific Reports 1, 96 (2011)]. Based on linear extrapolation of their results to lower pressure and temperature, these authors proposed that at P=0GPa alpha-boron is the stable form below about T˜933(20)K, in conflict with the recent theoretical works based on DFT total energy calculations [JACS 129, 2458 (2007); PRB 77, 064113 (2008); JACS 131, 1903 (2009) ], where it was concluded that beta-boron is the most stable at all temperature below melting temperature and down to zero Kelvin. At the talk, we show that the theoretical alpha-beta boundary obtained with a few approximations agrees well with the aforementioned experimental results within the error bars except for the lowest P, T point, and in this case, the ground state is still beta-boron [submitted]. We will also discuss on the recent experimental efforts in measuring the specific heat of boron allotropes that lead to a tentative conclusion supporting the aforementioned DFT results.

  9. Effects of element doping on electronic structures and optical properties in cubic boron nitride from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yin; Wang, Hongjie; Lu, Xuefeng; Fan, Xingyu; Wei, Heng

    2017-06-01

    Attractive potential applications of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) derive from the properties of semiconductors, widely used in optoelectronic and microelectronic devices. In this paper, the effects of element doping on the electronic structures and optical properties in cubic boron nitride are investigated. The Al- and Ga-doped systems have the lower bonding energies of -11.544 eV and -5.302 eV, respectively, indicating better stability. Difference charge density maps demonstrate that the electron loss increases after P doping and decreases after Al, Ga and As dopings, indicating that the covalent character of polar covalent bonds decreases by doping in the range of P, Al, Ga and As, which is in accordance with the calculated atom population values. The Al- and Ga-doped systems show lower dielectric loss, absorption and reflectivity in the lower energy region, displaying the “transparent-type” characteristic and their potential applications in electron devices.

  10. On the vibrational characteristics of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes/polymer nanocomposites: A finite element simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhi, S.; Ansari, R.; Nikkar, A.

    2017-08-01

    The finite element method is used here to investigate the vibrational behavior of single-walled boron nitride nanotube/polymer nanocomposites. The polymer matrix is modeled as a continuous media. Besides, nanotubes are modeled as a space-frame structure. It is shown that increasing the length of nanotubes at a constant volume fraction leads to decreasing of the nanocomposite frequency. By investigating the effect of volume percentage on the frequencies of the boron nitride nanotube-reinforced polymer nanocomposites, it is observed that for short nanotubes, the nanocomposites with larger nanotube volume fractions have larger frequencies. Also, through studying the first 10 frequencies of nanocomposites reinforced by armchair and zigzag nanotubes, it is shown that the effect of chirality on the vibrational behavior of nanocomposite is insignificant.

  11. Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1990-02-06

    This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

  12. Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1990-01-01

    This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

  13. Cosmic abundance of boron.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.; Colgate, S. A.; Grossman, L.

    1973-01-01

    All abundances are expressed relative to a million atoms of Si. An average abundance of boron in ordinary chondrites is 6.2. The boron abundance in meteorites is highly variable. It has been found that the abundances in carbonaceous chondrites are very much higher than those in ordinary chondrites. The condensation of boron and beryllium from a cooling, low-pressure gas of solar composition is discussed together with the occurrence of boron in the interstellar medium, questions of element abundances in the sun, problems of boron production by cosmic rays, and boron production from supernovae.

  14. Elemental mercury oxidation and adsorption on magnesite powder modified by Mn at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yalin; Zhong, Qin; Liu, Xinya

    2015-01-01

    Mn modified the commercial magnesite powder prepared by wet impregnation method has been shown to be effective for gas-phase elemental mercury (Hg(0)) removal at low temperatures. The prepared samples are characterized in detail across multiform techniques: XRF, BET, SEM-EDX, XRD, H2-TPR, and XPS, and all the results show that the amorphous MnO2 impregnated on magnesite powder improves the removal efficiency of Hg(0). Through further analysis by TG and in situ FTIR, the reasonable removal mechanism is also speculated. The results indicate that chemisorbed oxygen is an important reactant in the heterogeneous reaction, and gas-phase Hg(0) is adsorbed and then oxidized to solid MnHgO3 on the surface of the adsorbent.

  15. Effect of Elemental Powder Size on Foaming Behavior of NiTi Alloy Made by Combustion Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Yuya; Kobashi, Makoto; Kanetake, Naoyuki

    2012-01-01

    Nickel titanium (NiTi) foams were made by combustion synthesis of powders with the help of ZrH2 as foaming agent and TiB2 as endothermic agent. In this paper, we investigated the effect of elemental powder size on the foaming. The powder size of Ni and Ti affected the ignition temperature of the combustion reaction, cell morphology and microstructure of the foams. The cell morphology of the foams was also modified by the powder size of TiB2.

  16. Finite element investigation of the vibrational behavior of concentric multi-walled boron nitride and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Rouhi, S.; Nikkar, A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper concerns the vibrational behavior of concentric double-walled and triple-walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes using the finite element method. Armchair and zigzag nanotubes with different lengths and diameters are considered. Moreover, different boundary conditions are applied on the nanotubes. It is observed that in double-walled nanotubes, when the inner and outer layers are respectively from boron nitride and carbon, the frequencies are larger than those in the reverse arrangement. Investigating the effect of diameter on the first 10 natural frequencies of double-walled and triple-walled nanotubes showed that nanotubes with larger diameters possess smaller frequencies. The effect of diameter is more significant for higher modes. Finally, comparisons are made between the vibrational behavior of concentric carbon and boron nitride double-walled and triple-walled nanotubes. Considering the effect of vacancy defect on the vibrational characteristics of the nanotubes revealed that when all of the walls of the nanotubes are defective, the largest diminish occurs for the fundamental natural frequencies.

  17. Rapid Synthesis of a Near-β Titanium Alloy by Blended Elemental Powder Metallurgy (BEPM) with Induction Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Mingtu; Gabbitas, Brian

    2015-10-01

    A near-β Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al alloy was produced by blended elemental powder metallurgy combining warm compaction and induction sintering. Two Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al powder compacts with different oxygen content were manufactured by mixing PREP and HDH Ti powders with Cr and AlV master alloy powders, respectively. The effect of isothermal holding time, at a sintering temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C), on pore characteristics and compositional homogeneity was investigated in this study. Pore coarsening by Ostwald ripening occurred with an increase in the isothermal holding time and Kirkendall voids were produced by a reaction between Ti and Cr. After an isothermal holding time of 10 minutes, the two sintered powder compacts had a homogeneous composition. Ti/AlV and Ti/Cr diffusion couples were used to predict the distribution of alloying elements, and the binary Ti-V, Ti-Al, and Ti-Cr interdiffusion coefficients were consistent with the distribution of alloying elements after isothermal holding. The mechanical properties of sintered powder compacts, prepared using PREP Ti powder as the raw powder, were optimized by sintered density and pore size.

  18. Novel Processing of Boron Carbide (B4C): Plasma Synthesized Nano Powders and Pressureless Sintering Forming of Complex Shapes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    2.5 glcm ’, compared to 3.2 glcm ’ for silicon carbide (SiC) and 3.9 gI em’ for aluminum oxide (AI,O,). Traditionally, boron carbide (B,C) annor is...ADM002187. Proceedings of the Army Science Conference (26th) Held in Orlando, Florida on 1-4 December 2008, The original document contains color images

  19. The availability of bone powder as inorganic element source on growth and development in wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Genisel, Mucip; Erdal, Serkan; Turk, Hulya; Dumlupinar, Rahmi

    2012-06-01

    Bone powder (BP), a by-product of cattle slaughtering plants, consists of fat, protein, amino acids, inorganic elements and vitamins. It is used as bone meal in biomedical and feed industry because of its rich content. In addition, bone contains a large amount of inorganic elements especially calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P), which the plants need to maintain their physiological and biochemical processes. BP has been used as Ca and P source in agriculture for many years; however, its effects on plant growth and development have not yet been studied in detail. The present study aimed to determine the effects of BP on dry weight and contents of total chlorophyll, soluble protein and sugar as indicators of physiological response in the leaves. For this purpose, bone powder solutions (BPS) were prepared at different concentrations (0.5%, 1%, 1.5% and 2%) and applied to growing media of the 10-day wheat seedlings. Afterward, the 14-day seedlings were harvested, and the effects of BPS on plant response were determined. The results showed that BPS treatments significantly stimulated dry weight and contents of total chlorophyll, protein and sugar compared to control seedlings. The best stimulatory effect of BPS was determined at 1% concentration. According to these results, it is possible to say that BP may be used to meet the inorganic element requirements of plants in poor soils and hydroponic systems.

  20. Average bond energies between boron and elements of the fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh groups of the periodic table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altshuller, Aubrey P

    1955-01-01

    The average bond energies D(gm)(B-Z) for boron-containing molecules have been calculated by the Pauling geometric-mean equation. These calculated bond energies are compared with the average bond energies D(exp)(B-Z) obtained from experimental data. The higher values of D(exp)(B-Z) in comparison with D(gm)(B-Z) when Z is an element in the fifth, sixth, or seventh periodic group may be attributed to resonance stabilization or double-bond character.

  1. Influence of phosphorus element on direct laser sintering of multicomponent Cu-based metal powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, D. D.; Shen, Y. F.

    2006-12-01

    This article presents a detailed investigation on the influence of the phosphorus element upon the laser sintering of a multicomponent Cu-based metal powder system consisting of Cu, Cu-10Sn, and Cu-8.4P. Powder systems containing 0, 10, 15, and 20 wt pct CuP were sintered in atmosphere at room temperature using the following optimal processing parameters: laser power of 350 W, scan speed of 0.04 m/s, scan line spacing of 0.15 mm, and layer thickness of 0.25 mm. It was found that the relative density of the sintered sample with 15 wt pct CuP increased by 24,4 pct as compared with the sample without phosphorus addition. A further increase in the CuP content (≥20 wt pct), however, resulted in a poor densification with a serious delamination. The exact metallurgical roles of the phosphorus element in the laser sintering process were addressed as follows. First, the phosphorus could prevent the sintering system from oxidation by forming CuPO3, thereby improving the wetting characteristics and the sintering kinetics. Second, the phosphorus could decrease the surface tension of molten materials, leading to a successive transition from highly discontinuous sintered tracks to fairly coherent ones with increasing the phosphorus content. Third, the phosphorus could lower the melt viscosity, thereby improving the microstructural homogeneity of the laser-sintered samples.

  2. Effect of boron particle size on microstructure and superconducting properties of in-situ Cu addition MgB2 multifilamentary wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishinuma, Y.; Kikuchi, A.; Shimada, Y.; Hata, S.; Takeuchi, T.; Yamada, S.; Sagara, A.

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, the secondary (impurity and non-reactive) phase and voids were observed in MgB2 matrix after the heat treatment, and then these are the lowering factors of critical current density (Jc) property. In order to improve Jc property by microstructure control of MgB2 matrix, the fine elemental boron powder as the raw material was carried out using the high-speed vibrated milling with tungsten carbide (WC) jar. The average particle size of metal boron powder was decreased from 1.14 μm to 0.20 μm by the high-speed vibrated milling. The various fine particle boron powders as the function of milling time were also prepared, and in-situ Cu addition MgB2 multifilamentary wires using these fine boron powders were fabricated. Critical transition temperature (Tc) value of Cu addition MgB2 wire using fine boron powder obtained to about 37 K. No change of the Tc property by the different particle sized boron powders was confirmed. In this paper, the comparisons of microstructure and superconducting properties between the different boron particle sizes were investigated.

  3. Synthesis of Ti-Ta alloys with dual structure by incomplete diffusion between elemental powders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Li, Kaiyang; Wu, Hong; Song, Min; Wang, Wen; Li, Nianfeng; Tang, Huiping

    2015-11-01

    In this work, powder metallurgical (PM) Ti-Ta alloys were sintered using blended elemental powders. A dual structure, consisting of Ti-rich and Ta-rich zones, was formed due to the insufficient diffusion between Ti and Ta powders. The microstructure, mechanical properties and in vitro biological properties of the alloys were studied. Results indicated that the alloys have inhomogenous microstructures and compositions, but the grain structures were continuous from the Ti-rich zone to the Ta-rich zone. The Ta-rich zone exhibited a much finer grain size than the Ti-rich zone. The alloys had a high relative density in the range of 95-98%, with the porosity increasing with the content of Ta due to the increased difficulty in sintering and the formation of Kirkendall pores. The alloys had a good combination of low elastic modulus and high tensile strength. The strength of alloys was almost doubled compared to that of the ingot metallurgy alloys with the same compositions. The low elastic modulus was due to the residual pores and the alloying effect of Ta, while the high tensile strength resulted from the strengthening effects of solid solution, fine grain size and α phase. The alloys had a high biocompatibility due to the addition of Ta, and were suitable for the attachment of cells due to the surface porosity. It was also indicated that PM Ti-(20-30)Ta alloys are promising for biomedical applications after the evaluations of both the mechanical and the biological properties.

  4. Application of powder metallurgy techniques to produce improved bearing elements for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moracz, D. J.; Shipley, R. J.; Moxson, V. S.; Killman, R. J.; Munson, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective was to apply powder metallurgy techniques for the production of improved bearing elements, specifically balls and races, for advanced cryogenic turbopump bearings. The materials and fabrication techniques evaluated were judged on the basis of their ability to improve fatigue life, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) propellant bearings over the currently used 440C. An extensive list of candidate bearing alloys in five different categories was considered: tool/die steels, through hardened stainless steels, cobalt-base alloys, and gear steels. Testing of alloys for final consideration included hardness, rolling contact fatigue, cross cylinder wear, elevated temperature wear, room and cryogenic fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking, and five-ball (rolling-sliding element) testing. Results of the program indicated two alloys that showed promise for improved bearing elements. These alloys were MRC-2001 and X-405. 57mm bearings were fabricated from the MRC-2001 alloy for further actual hardware rig testing by NASA-MSFC.

  5. A Novel Powder Metallurgy Processing Approach to Prepare Fine-Grained Cu-Al-Ni Shape-Memory Alloy Strips from Elemental Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajpai, S. K.; Dube, R. K.; Chatterjee, P.; Sangal, S.

    2012-07-01

    The current work describes the experimental results related to the successful preparation of fine-grained, Cu-Al-Ni, high-temperature shape-memory alloy (SMA) strips from elemental Cu, Al, and Ni powders via a novel powder metallurgy (P/M) processing approach. This route consists of short time period ball milling of elemental powder mixture, preform preparation from milled powder, sintering of preforms, hot-densification rolling of unsheathed sintered powder preforms under protective atmosphere, and postconsolidation homogenization treatment of the hot-rolled strips. It has been shown that it is possible to prepare chemically homogeneous Cu-Al-Ni SMA strips consisting of equiaxed grains of average size approximately 6 μm via the current processing approach. It also has been shown that fine-grained microstructure in the finished Cu-Al-Ni SMA strips resulted from the pinning effect of nanosized alumina particles present on the grain boundaries. The finished SMA strips were almost fully martensitic in nature, consisting of a mixture of β1^' } - and γ1^' } -type martensites. The Cu-Al-Ni SMA strips had 677 MPa average fracture strength, coupled with 13 pct average fracture strain. The fractured surfaces of the specimens exhibited primarily dimpled ductile type of fracture, together with some transgranular mode of fracture. The Cu-Al-Ni strips exhibited an almost 100 pct one-way shape recovery after bending followed by unconstrained heating at 1, 2, and 4 pct applied deformation prestrain. The two-way shape-memory strain was found approximately 0.35 pct after 15 training cycles at 4 pct applied training prestrain.

  6. Microstructure and the elemental and phase compositions of the diffusion joint of grade 45 steel through a powder layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeer, G. M.; Zelenkova, E. G.; Belousov, O. V.; Koroleva, Yu. P.; Fedorova, E. N.; Mikheev, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The microstructures of the transition zone and the powder layer, the concentration distribution of chemical elements across a diffusion joint, and the microhardness of the grade 45 steel-Ni powder layer-grade 45 steel layered composite materials fabricated by diffusion welding at various temperatures are studied. It is shown that the deposition of a nickel sublayer on steel and the application of a submicron nickel powder as an activating layer make it possible to form a high-quality diffusion joint at a temperature of 850°C, which is ~0.6 of the melting temperature of nickel (which has the lowest melting temperature in the given composite material). The sintering of a nickel powder and the formation of a transition zone between the nickel layer and steel occur simultaneously in a solid phase during diffusion joining. The transition zone consists of an α-Fe solid solution and the FeNi3 compound.

  7. Structures, stability, mechanical and electronic properties of α-boron and α∗-boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chaoyu; Zhong, J. X.

    2013-04-01

    The structures, stability, mechanical and electronic properties of α-boron and a promising metastable boron phase (α*-boron) have been studied by first-principles calculations. α-boron and α*-boron consist of equivalent icosahedra B12 clusters in different connecting configurations of "3S-6D-3S" and "2S-6D-4S", respectively. The total energy calculations show that α*-boron is less stable than α-boron but more favorable than the well-known β-boron and γ-boron at zero pressure. Both α-boron and α*-boron are confirmed dynamically and mechanically stable. The mechanical and electronic properties of α-boron and α*-boron indicate that they are potential superhard semiconducting phases of element boron.

  8. Microstructure Analysis of Boron Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    figure 1 2 3 High resolution TEM showing very small elongated BNT filaments 3 4 SAED from an area in figure 3 showing exactly the same kind of...scattered large numbers of BNT 4 7 EDAX analyses of boron nitride nano powder showing boron and oxygen 5 8 Low magnification SEM picture of folded 600...Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. INTRODUCTION Boron nanotubes ( BNT ) have never been produced in a reliable manner, yet they remain a promising

  9. Rapid Quantitative Analyses of Elements on Herb Medicine and Food Powder Using TEA CO2 Laser-Induced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khumaeni, Ali; Ramli, Muliadi; Idris, Nasrullah; Lee, Yong Inn; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie; Deguchi, Yoji; Niki, Hideaki; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2009-03-01

    A novel technique for rapid quantitative analyses of elements on herb medicine and food powder has successfully been developed. In this technique, the powder samples were plugged in a small hole (2 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth) and covered by a metal mesh. The Transversely Excited Atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser (1500 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the powder sample surfaces passing through the metal mesh at atmospheric pressure of nitrogen surrounding gas. It is hypothesized that the small hole functions to confine the powder particles and suppresses the blowing-off, while the metal mesh works as the source of electrons to initiate the strong gas breakdown plasma. The confined powder particles are subsequently ablated by the laser irradiation and the ablated particles move into the strong gas breakdown plasma region to be atomized and excited. Using this method, a quantitative analysis of the milk powder sample containing different concentrations of Ca was successfully demonstrated, resulting in a good linear calibration curve with high precision.

  10. Boron-Based Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Ban, Hyun Seung; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    The use of the element boron, which is not generally observed in a living body, possesses a high potential for the discovery of new biological activity in pharmaceutical drug design. In this account, we describe our recent developments in boron-based drug design, including boronic acid containing protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, and tubulin polymerization inhibitors, and ortho-carborane-containing proteasome activators, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 inhibitors, and topoisomerase inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied a closo-dodecaborate as a water-soluble moiety as well as a boron-10 source for the design of boron carriers in boron neutron capture therapy, such as boronated porphyrins and boron lipids for a liposomal boron delivery system.

  11. Finite element modelling of process-integrated powder coating by radial axial rolling of rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischkorn, J.; Kebriaei, R.; Reese, S.; Moll, H.; Theisen, W.; Husmann, T.; Meier, H.

    2011-05-01

    The process-integrated powder coating by radial axial rolling of rings represents a new hybrid production technique applied in the manufacturing of large ring-shaped work pieces with functional layers. It is thought to break some limitations that come along with the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) which is used nowadays to apply the powdery layer material onto the rolled substrate ring. Within the new process the compaction of the layer material is integrated into the ring rolling and HIP becomes dispensable. Following this approach the rolling of such compound rings brings up some new challenges. The volume of a solid ring stays nearly constant during the rolling. This behaviour can be exploited to determine the infeed of the rollers needed to reach the desired ring shape. Since volume consistency cannot be guaranteed for the rolling of a compound ring the choice of appropriate infeed of the rollers is still an open question. This paper deals with the finite element (FE) simulation of this new process. First, the material model that is used to describe the compaction of the layer material is shortly reviewed. The main focus of the paper is then put on a parameterized FE ring rolling model that incorporates a control system in order to stabilize the process. Also the differences in the behaviour during the rolling stage between a compound and a solid ring will be discussed by means of simulation results.

  12. Finite element modelling of process-integrated powder coating by radial axial rolling of rings

    SciTech Connect

    Frischkorn, J.; Kebriaei, R.; Reese, S.; Moll, H.; Theisen, W.; Husmann, T.; Meier, H.

    2011-05-04

    The process-integrated powder coating by radial axial rolling of rings represents a new hybrid production technique applied in the manufacturing of large ring-shaped work pieces with functional layers. It is thought to break some limitations that come along with the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) which is used nowadays to apply the powdery layer material onto the rolled substrate ring. Within the new process the compaction of the layer material is integrated into the ring rolling and HIP becomes dispensable. Following this approach the rolling of such compound rings brings up some new challenges. The volume of a solid ring stays nearly constant during the rolling. This behaviour can be exploited to determine the infeed of the rollers needed to reach the desired ring shape. Since volume consistency cannot be guaranteed for the rolling of a compound ring the choice of appropriate infeed of the rollers is still an open question. This paper deals with the finite element (FE) simulation of this new process. First, the material model that is used to describe the compaction of the layer material is shortly reviewed. The main focus of the paper is then put on a parameterized FE ring rolling model that incorporates a control system in order to stabilize the process. Also the differences in the behaviour during the rolling stage between a compound and a solid ring will be discussed by means of simulation results.

  13. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1995-02-28

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil. 7 figs.

  14. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil.

  15. Fabrication of zero power reactor fuel elements containing /sup 233/U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ powder

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, R G; Parrott, J R; Krichinsky, A M; Box, W D; Martin, C W; Whitson, W R

    1982-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory, under contract with Argonne National Laboratory, completed the fabrication of 1743 fuel elements for use in their Zero Power Reactor. The contract also included recovery of 20 kg of /sup 233/U from rejected elements. This report describes the steps associated with conversion of purified uranyl nitrate (as solution) to U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ powder (suitable for fuel) and subsequent charging, sealing, decontamination, and testing of the fuel elements (packets) preparatory to shipment. The nuclear safety, radiation exposures, and quality assurance aspects of the program are discussed.

  16. Boron-lithium relationships in rhyolites and associated thermal waters of young silicic calderas, with comments on incompatible element behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, D.M. ); Sturchio, N.C. )

    1992-10-01

    This study had three goals: (1) to study B distribution in a rhyolitic volcanic sequence already extensively investigated for other elements; (2) to interpret the joint behavior of B and Li during the interaction of such rocks with subsurface waters; and (3) to assess the manner in which water affects the behavior of incompatible elements such as B and Gd. New B, Gd, and Sm analyses have been made on a suite of Yellowstone rhyolites, including fresh and partially devitrified glassy obsidian from surface exposures of several flows, a drill-core of increasing degrees of alteration in the Biscuit Basin Flow, and two drill-cores from other flows. Within the Biscuit Basin Flow, the Sm and Gd concentrations remain rather constant and behave conservatively, independent of alteration. Boron decreases from about 10 to 3 ppm with progressive alteration, and Li increases from about 40 ppm by a factor of 2-3 in the most altered rocks. Obsidians from the Valles and Long Valley calderas show greater Li loss during alteration. All the rhyolitic rocks lose B during aqueous alteration; the waters acquire both B and Li, but proportionately much more B. Natural waters of all kinds, including those from the three calderas, show six orders of magnitude range in aqueous B and Li, with a high degree of linear correlation and an average ratio B/Li essentially constant at 4.0. The linearity mainly expresses processes of dilution and concentration: reactions specific to B or Li engender waters with deviating B/Li.

  17. Elemental characterization of the National Bureau of Standards Milk Powder Standard Reference Material by instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenburg, R.R.

    1986-10-01

    The Milk Powder Standard Reference Material, SRM 1549, recently prepared by the National Bureau of Standards has been analyzed by instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The extremely low levels of many of the elements of interest, combined with the high levels of many of the matrix elements, necessitated improvements in many of the existing analytical procedures. Special attention has been given to reducing and evaluating the analytical uncertainties. Bovine Liver, SRM 1577, was analyzed as a control and the results obtained were compared with the literature and the NBS certified values.

  18. Experimental evidence of orbital order in α-B12 and γ-B28 polymorphs of elemental boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Swastik; van Smaalen, Sander; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; Prathapa, Siriyara Jagannatha; Noohinejad, Leila; Bykova, Elena; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2013-07-01

    The electron density of the α form of boron has been obtained by multipole refinement against high-resolution, single-crystal x-ray diffraction data measured on a high-quality single crystal at a temperature of 100 K. Topological properties of this density have been used to show that all chemical bonds between B12 clusters in α-B12 are formed due to one orbital on each boron atom that is oriented perpendicular to the surface of the cluster. It is shown that the same orbital order on B12 clusters persists in both α-B12 and γ-B28 polymorphs and in several dodecaboranes, despite the fact that in every case the B12 clusters participate in entirely different kinds of exocluster bonds. It is likely that the same orbital order of B12 clusters can explain bonding in other boron polymorphs and boron-rich solids.

  19. Shock synthesis of NiTi intermetallic compounds from a mixture of titanium and nickel elemental powders

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.L.; Li, T.C.; Liu, J.T.; Han, X.D.; Yang, D.Z. . Dept. of Materials Engineering)

    1994-03-15

    Recently, explosive consolidation of metal powders has had a renewed interest because of its short processing time, and the high pressures that are obtained easily etc. Although there are some new techniques such as combustion synthesis or self-propagating high temperature synthesis which have been developed. In previous papers, NiTi alloy with a good SME was obtained by explosive consolidation and a subsequent heat treatment with pure nickel and titanium powders. Metallic powders have also been successfully made by this method. Thus NiTi alloys made by explosive consolidation are feasible. But it seems impossible that NiTi intermetallic compounds are directly shock synthesized from pure Ti and Ni elemental powders. By comparison with the processing and properties, few papers were published about microstructures of explosively consolidated NiTi alloys which greatly influence the phase transformation behavior and properties. In this paper, the authors report detailed results of microfeatures for the specimen without any future heat treatments by the transmission electron microscope.

  20. Finite element modeling of the powder-in- tube process for manufacture of BSCCO-2212 superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, R.; Tangrila, S.; Rachakonda, S.; Thirukkonda, M.

    1995-12-01

    High-temperature superconductors have recently attracted a great deal of attention owing to their potential use in a variety of applications including power generators, superconducting magnets for mine sweepers or ship propulsion motors, and magnetic levitation transportation systems. The powder-in-tube (PIT) process has emerged as one of the most promising and economically feasible techniques to produce long lengths high-Tc oxide based superconducting wires. The PIT method involves multi-pass wire drawing followed by rolling and heat treatment. This work focuses on the development of finite element models to simulate the PIT drawing process for fabrication of silver sheathed Bi-2212 superconducting wires. The numerical models were used to predict the density of the oxide powder, the wire drawing forces, and the silver-oxide ratio during drawing. A cap-type pressure dependent constitutive equation was implemented in the model to simulate the powder behavior. The model incorporated experimentally obtained material data for the silver and powder. Data from wire drawing experiments were used to verify model predictions.

  1. First-Principles Study of the Stability and Electronic Properties of Sheets and Nanotubes of Elemental Boron

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    suggested that boron nanotubes ( BNTs ) could be constructed by the appropriate wrapping of an idealized triangular boron sheet, referred to as the {1212...of carbon nano- tubes (CNTs), the wrapping in BNTs was described by a chiral vector R = na + mb, denoted as (n,m), where n and m are integers, and...the BNTs were suggested to form zig- zag, armchair and chiral structures depending upon the values of n and m [9]. A tubular structure consisting

  2. Studies on distribution of element contents in transient layer at interface between boron-doped diamond film electrode and tantalum substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiachang; Gao, Chengyao; Zhang, Liping; Jiang, Lihui; Yang, Zhengquan; Wang, Zhiping; Ji, Chaohui; Le, Xiaoyun; Rong, Cuihua; Zhang, Jian

    2011-05-01

    The boron-doped diamond film (BDD) grown on tantalum (Ta) substrate as an electrode (BDD/Ta) was prepared by hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. The experimental results demonstrated that our BDD/Ta had high current efficiency, strong ability to degrade wastewater, good corrosion stability and long lifetime. These excellent characteristics of BDD/Ta have been explained in terms of Rutherford backscattering (RBS) experiments. RBS investigation revealed that the continuous transient layer at the interface between boron-doped diamond film and Ta-substrate was formed and the microstructure of the continuous transient layer given by the continuous distribution of all element contents at the interface was obtained. The thicknesses of boron-doped diamond film and the continuous transient layer were about equal to 8000 × 10 15 atoms/cm 2 and 5800 × 10 15 atoms/cm 2, respectively. The formation of the continuous transient layer at the interface can eliminate the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients (TEC) at the interface and only lead to the slow change of TEC because of the continuous distribution of element contents of the film and substrate in the transient layer at the interface. Thus, there is no residual stress to concentrate on the interface and the stress-corrosion delamination of the film disappears. Therefore, the corrosion stability and lifetime of BDD/Ta increase and last well, that have been verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments.

  3. Mechanical behaviour of pressed and sintered titanium alloys obtained from prealloyed and blended elemental powders.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, L; Esteban, P G; Ruiz-Navas, E M; Gordo, E

    2012-10-01

    The applicability of irregular prealloyed Ti-6Al-4V powder for the fabrication of titanium products by pressing and sintering and its employment as a master alloy to obtain the Ti-3Al-2.5V alloy was studied. To this end, the starting powders were characterised by dilatometry, differential thermal analysis and XRD. Green samples were obtained by cold uniaxial pressing, and the evolution of the microstructure over the sintering temperature range 900-1400°C was studied. The variation of the final density and mechanical properties with the sintering temperature was considered. Based on the study carried out, it can be stated that more reliable powders are needed to open the titanium market to new applications. A relative density of 95% and diverse microstructural features and mechanical properties equivalent to those of biomedical devices can be obtained by the pressing and sintering route. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetron sputtered boron films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1998-06-16

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence. 8 figs.

  5. Magnetron sputtered boron films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1998-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  6. Boron Clusters Come of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Russell N.

    2004-01-01

    Boron is the only element other than carbon that can build molecules of unlimited size by covalently boding to itself, a property known as catenation. In contrast to the chains and rings favored by carbon, boron arguably adopts a cluster motif that is reflected in the various forms of the pure element and in the huge area of polyhedral borane…

  7. Boron Clusters Come of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Russell N.

    2004-01-01

    Boron is the only element other than carbon that can build molecules of unlimited size by covalently boding to itself, a property known as catenation. In contrast to the chains and rings favored by carbon, boron arguably adopts a cluster motif that is reflected in the various forms of the pure element and in the huge area of polyhedral borane…

  8. METHOD OF PREPARING POLONIUM-BORON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.

    1959-08-01

    An improved technique is described for preparation of a polonium-boron neutron source. A selected amount of Po-210 is vaporized into a thin walled nickel container, then the desired amcunt of boron powder is added. After sealing the container, it is heated quickly by induction heating to vaporize the Po-210 and deposit it in the still cool boron powder. The unit is then quickly cooled to prevent revaporization of the Po-210 from the boron. The build-up of neutron emission may be followed by means of a neutron counter in order to terminate the heating at the optimum level of neutron yield.

  9. Major to ultra trace element bulk rock analysis of nanoparticulate pressed powder pellets by LA-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Daniel; Pettke, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    An efficient, clean procedure for bulk rock major to trace element analysis by 193 nm Excimer LA-ICP-MS analysis of nanoparticulate pressed powder pellets (PPPs) employing a binder is presented. Sample powders are milled in water suspension in a planetary ball mill, reducing average grain size by about one order of magnitude compared to common dry milling protocols. Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) is employed as a binder, improving the mechanical strength of the PPP and the ablation behaviour, because MCC absorbs 193 nm laser light well. Use of MCC binder allows for producing cohesive pellets of materials that cannot be pelletized in their pure forms, such as quartz powder. Rigorous blank quantification was performed on synthetic quartz treated like rock samples, demonstrating that procedural blanks are irrelevant except for a few elements at the 10 ng g-1 concentration level. The LA-ICP-MS PPP analytical procedure was optimised and evaluated using six different SRM powders (JP-1, UB-N, BCR-2, GSP-2, OKUM, and MUH-1). Calibration based on external standardization using SRM 610, SRM 612, BCR-2G, and GSD-1G glasses allows for evaluation of possible matrix effects during LA-ICP-MS analysis. The data accuracy of the PPP LA-ICP-MS analytical procedure compares well to that achieved for liquid ICP-MS and LA-ICP-MS glass analysis, except for element concentrations below ˜30 ng g-1, where liquid ICP-MS offers more precise data and in part lower limits of detection. Uncertainties on the external reproducibility of LA-ICP-MS PPP element concentrations are of the order of 0.5 to 2 % (1σ standard deviation) for concentrations exceeding ˜1 μg g-1. For lower element concentrations these uncertainties increase to 5-10% or higher when analyte-depending limits of detection (LOD) are approached, and LODs do not significantly differ from glass analysis. Sample homogeneity is demonstrated by the high analytical precision, except for very few elements where grain size effects can

  10. Laser-ablation ICP-MS as a tool for whole rock trace element analyses on fused powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, G.; Rooney, T. O.

    2013-12-01

    Here we present an accurate and precise technique for routine trace element analysis of geologic materials by laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). We focus on rock powders previously prepared for X-ray fluorescence by fusion in a Li2B4O7 flux, and subsequently quenched in a Pt mold to form a glass disk. Our method allows for the analysis up to 30 trace elements by LA-ICP-MS using a Photon-Machines Analyte G2 193 nm excimer laser coupled to a Thermo-Fisher Scientific ICAP Q quadrupole ICP-MS. Analyses are run as scans on the surface of the disks. Laser ablation conditions for which trace element fractionation effects are minimal have been empirically determined to be ~ 4 J m-2 fluence, at 10 Hz , and 10 μm s-1 scan speed, using a 110 μm laser beam size. Ablated material is carried into the ICP-MS by a He carrier at a rate of 0.75 L min-1. Following pre-ablation to remove surface particles, samples are ablated for 200 s, of which 140 s are used for data acquisition. At the end of each scan, a gas blank is collected for 30 s. Dwell times for each element vary between 15 and 60 μs, depending on abundance and instrument sensitivity, allowing 120 readings of each element during the data acquisition time window. To correct for variations in the total volume of material extracted by the laser, three internal standards are used, Ca, Fe and Zr. These elements are routinely analyzed by X-ray fluorescence by the Geoanalytical laboratory at Michigan State University with precision and accuracy of <5%. The availability of several internal standards allows for better correction of possible persisting laser ablation fractionation effects; for a particular trace element, we correct using the internal standard that best reproduces its ablation behavior. Our calibration is based on a combination of fused powders of US Geological Survey and Geological Survey of Japan rock standards, NIST SRM 612 glass, and US Geological Survey natural and

  11. Process of Making Boron-Fiber Reinforced Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composition from powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and then are processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with the boron fibers become a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite tape. A driving mechanism pulls the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with boron fibers through the processing line of the apparatus and a take-up spool collects the formed hybrid boron-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite tape.

  12. Process of Making Boron-Fiber Reinforced Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composition from powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and then are processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with the boron fibers become a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite tape. A driving mechanism pulls the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with boron fibers through the processing line of the apparatus and a take-up spool collects the formed hybrid boron-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite tape.

  13. Analysis of the laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process through experimental measurement and finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Alexander Jay

    The objective in this work is to provide rigourous experimental measurements to aid in the development of laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) additive manufacturing (AM). A specialized enclosed instrumented measurement system is designed to provide in situ experimental measurements of temperature and distortion. Experiments include comparisons of process parameters, materials and LPBF machines. In situ measurements of distortion and temperature made throughout the build process highlight inter-layer distortion effects previously undocumented for laser powder bed fusion. Results from these experiments are also be implemented in the development and validation of finite element models of the powder bed build process. Experimental analysis is extended from small-scale to larger part-scale builds where experimental post-build measurements are used in analysis of distortion profiles. Experimental results provided from this study are utilized in the validation of a finite element model capable of simulating production scale parts. The validated finite element model is then implemented in the analysis of the part to provide information regarding the distortion evolution process. A combination of experimental measurements and simulation results are used to identify the mechanism that results in the measured distortion profile for this geometry. Optimization of support structure primarily focuses on the minimization of material use and scan time, but no information regarding failure criteria for support structure is available. Tensile test samples of LPBF built support structure are designed, built, and tested to provide measurements of mechanical properties of the support structure. Experimental tests show that LPBF built support structure has only 30-40% of the ultimate tensile strength of solid material built in the same machine. Experimental measurement of LPBF built support structure provides clear failure criteria to be utilized in the future design and implementation of

  14. X-ray diffraction study of W-B elemental powder mixtures after high-energy ball-milling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubičar, Mirko; Tonejc, Antun; Stubičar, Nada

    Very high temperatures are needed to prepare W-B compounds. However, the results obtained in this study demonstrate a possibility of inducing the formation of W2B, WB or WB4 tungsten borides, in air and at room temperature, using the high-energy ball-mill treatment on appropriate compositions of the W-B elemental powder mixtures. The present results throw a new light on the synthesis of tungsten borides, and on the accuracy of the equilibrium W-B phase diagram.

  15. [Ultra-Fine Pressed Powder Pellet Sample Preparation XRF Determination of Multi-Elements and Carbon Dioxide in Carbonate].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-li; An, Shu-qing; Xu, Tie-min; Liu, Yi-bo; Zhang, Li-juan; Zeng, Jiang-ping; Wang, Na

    2015-06-01

    The main analysis error of pressed powder pellet of carbonate comes from particle-size effect and mineral effect. So in the article in order to eliminate the particle-size effect, the ultrafine pressed powder pellet sample preparation is used to the determination of multi-elements and carbon-dioxide in carbonate. To prepare the ultrafine powder the FRITSCH planetary Micro Mill machine and tungsten carbide media is utilized. To conquer the conglomeration during the process of grinding, the wet grinding is preferred. The surface morphology of the pellet is more smooth and neat, the Compton scatter effect is reduced with the decrease in particle size. The intensity of the spectral line is varied with the change of the particle size, generally the intensity of the spectral line is increased with the decrease in the particle size. But when the particle size of more than one component of the material is decreased, the intensity of the spectral line may increase for S, Si, Mg, or decrease for Ca, Al, Ti, K, which depend on the respective mass absorption coefficient . The change of the composition of the phase with milling is also researched. The incident depth of respective element is given from theoretical calculation. When the sample is grounded to the particle size of less than the penetration depth of all the analyte, the effect of the particle size on the intensity of the spectral line is much reduced. In the experiment, when grounded the sample to less than 8 μm(d95), the particle-size effect is much eliminated, with the correction method of theoretical α coefficient and the empirical coefficient, 14 major, minor and trace element in the carbonate can be determined accurately. And the precision of the method is much improved with RSD < 2%, except Na2O. Carbon is ultra-light element, the fluorescence yield is low and the interference is serious. With the manual multi-layer crystal PX4, coarse collimator, empirical correction, X-ray spectrometer can be used to

  16. Boron and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Madeleine V; Culver, B Dwight; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2005-10-01

    Boron, the fifth element in the periodic table, is ubiquitous in nature. It is present in food and in surface and ocean waters, and is frequently used in industrial, cosmetic, and medical settings. Exposure to boron and related compounds has been recently implicated as a potential cause of chronic kidney disease in Southeast Asia. This observation prompted the present review of the published data on the effects of acute and chronic exposure to boron on renal function and structure in human beings and in experimental animals.

  17. Boron doping a semiconductor particle

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Gary Don; Reynolds, Jeffrey Scott; Brown, Louanne Kay

    1998-06-09

    A method (10,30) of boron doping a semiconductor particle using boric acid to obtain a p-type doped particle. Either silicon spheres or silicon powder is mixed with a diluted solution of boric acid having a predetermined concentration. The spheres are dried (16), with the boron film then being driven (18) into the sphere. A melt procedure mixes the driven boron uniformly throughout the sphere. In the case of silicon powder, the powder is metered out (38) into piles and melted/fused (40) with an optical furnace. Both processes obtain a p-type doped silicon sphere with desired resistivity. Boric acid is not a restricted chemical, is inexpensive, and does not pose any special shipping, handling, or disposal requirements.

  18. Boron doping a semiconductor particle

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, G.D.; Reynolds, J.S.; Brown, L.K.

    1998-06-09

    A method of boron doping a semiconductor particle using boric acid to obtain a p-type doped particle. Either silicon spheres or silicon powder is mixed with a diluted solution of boric acid having a predetermined concentration. The spheres are dried, with the boron film then being driven into the sphere. A melt procedure mixes the driven boron uniformly throughout the sphere. In the case of silicon powder, the powder is metered out into piles and melted/fused with an optical furnace. Both processes obtain a p-type doped silicon sphere with desired resistivity. Boric acid is not a restricted chemical, is inexpensive, and does not pose any special shipping, handling, or disposal requirements. 2 figs.

  19. A study of galactic cosmic ray propagation models based on the isotopic composition of the elements lithium, beryllium and boron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, G. F.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Greiner, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    A good test for a cosmic ray propagation model is its ability to predict the abundances of the light secondary nuclei lithium, beryllium, and boron. By using measured isotopic abundances of lithium, beryllium, and boron, Garcia-Munoz et al. (1979) were able to place limits on three important parameters of a leaky box propagation model. The considered parameters include the source spectral parameter, the leakage mean free path, and the characteristic adiabatic energy loss due to solar modulation. The present investigation is concerned with a critical evaluation of the information which can be deduced about these parameters from isotopic composition alone, taking into account the effects of uncertainties in the spallation cross section data.

  20. A study of galactic cosmic ray propagation models based on the isotopic composition of the elements lithium, beryllium and boron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, G. F.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Greiner, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    A good test for a cosmic ray propagation model is its ability to predict the abundances of the light secondary nuclei lithium, beryllium, and boron. By using measured isotopic abundances of lithium, beryllium, and boron, Garcia-Munoz et al. (1979) were able to place limits on three important parameters of a leaky box propagation model. The considered parameters include the source spectral parameter, the leakage mean free path, and the characteristic adiabatic energy loss due to solar modulation. The present investigation is concerned with a critical evaluation of the information which can be deduced about these parameters from isotopic composition alone, taking into account the effects of uncertainties in the spallation cross section data.

  1. Effect of hypoeutectic boron additions on the grain size and mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V manufactured with powder bed electron beam additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Mahbooba, Zaynab; West, Harvey; Harrysson, Ola; ...

    2016-12-02

    In additive manufacturing, microstructural control is feasible via processing parameter alteration. However, the window for parameter variation for certain materials, such as Ti-6Al-4V, is limited, and alternative methods must be employed to customize microstructures. Grain refinement and homogenization in cast titanium alloys has been demonstrated through the addition of hypoeutectic concentrations of boron. This work explores the influence of 0.00 wt.%, 0.25 wt.%, 0.50 wt.%, and 1.0 wt.% boron additions on the microstructure and bulk mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V samples fabricated in an Arcam A2 electron beam melting (EBM) system with commercial processing parameters for Ti-6Al-4V. Analyses of EBM fabricatedmore » Ti-6Al-4V + B indicate that the addition of 0.25–1.0 wt.% boron progressively refines the grain structure, and it improves hardness and elastic modulus. Furthermore, despite a reduction in size, the β grain structure remained columnar as a result of directional heat transfer during EBM fabrication.« less

  2. Effect of hypoeutectic boron additions on the grain size and mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V manufactured with powder bed electron beam additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Mahbooba, Zaynab; West, Harvey; Harrysson, Ola; Wojcieszynski, Andrzej; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Nandwana, Peeyush; Horn, Timothy

    2016-12-02

    In additive manufacturing, microstructural control is feasible via processing parameter alteration. However, the window for parameter variation for certain materials, such as Ti-6Al-4V, is limited, and alternative methods must be employed to customize microstructures. Grain refinement and homogenization in cast titanium alloys has been demonstrated through the addition of hypoeutectic concentrations of boron. This work explores the influence of 0.00 wt.%, 0.25 wt.%, 0.50 wt.%, and 1.0 wt.% boron additions on the microstructure and bulk mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V samples fabricated in an Arcam A2 electron beam melting (EBM) system with commercial processing parameters for Ti-6Al-4V. Analyses of EBM fabricated Ti-6Al-4V + B indicate that the addition of 0.25–1.0 wt.% boron progressively refines the grain structure, and it improves hardness and elastic modulus. Furthermore, despite a reduction in size, the β grain structure remained columnar as a result of directional heat transfer during EBM fabrication.

  3. Effect of Hypoeutectic Boron Additions on the Grain Size and Mechanical Properties of Ti-6Al-4V Manufactured with Powder Bed Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahbooba, Zaynab; West, Harvey; Harrysson, Ola; Wojcieszynski, Andrzej; Dehoff, Ryan; Nandwana, Peeyush; Horn, Timothy

    2017-03-01

    In additive manufacturing, microstructural control is feasible via processing parameter alteration. However, the window for parameter variation for certain materials, such as Ti-6Al-4V, is limited, and alternative methods must be employed to customize microstructures. Grain refinement and homogenization in cast titanium alloys has been demonstrated through the addition of hypoeutectic concentrations of boron. This work explores the influence of 0.00 wt.%, 0.25 wt.%, 0.50 wt.%, and 1.0 wt.% boron additions on the microstructure and bulk mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V samples fabricated in an Arcam A2 electron beam melting (EBM) system with commercial processing parameters for Ti-6Al-4V. Analyses of EBM fabricated Ti-6Al-4V + B indicate that the addition of 0.25-1.0 wt.% boron progressively refines the grain structure, and it improves hardness and elastic modulus. Despite a reduction in size, the β grain structure remained columnar as a result of directional heat transfer during EBM fabrication.

  4. Determination of trace elements in high purity alumina powder by helium enhanced direct current glow discharge mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sehoon; Kim, Sunhye; Hinrichs, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Trace impurities in high purity alumina powder were determined by fast flow direct current glow discharge mass spectrometry (GD-MS). The non-conductive samples were prepared with high purity graphite powder and used as a sample binder and as a secondary cathode. To improve the sensitivity of the GD-MS analysis, helium was introduced as an additional glow discharge gas to argon plasma. The quantification results of the GD-MS measurement were calculated by external calibration with matrix matched certified reference materials. The GD-MS results for the determination of Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn and Ga in the alumina samples agreed well with the certified values of a reference material and the results of chemical analysis using wet sample digestion with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The GD-MS analysis is a rapid analysis technique to determine trace elements in non-conductive alumina to below mg·kg- 1 levels.

  5. Application of powder metallurgy technique to produce improved bearing elements for cryogenic aerospace engine turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moxson, V. S.; Moracz, D. J.; Bhat, B. N.; Dolan, F. J.; Thom, R.

    1987-01-01

    Traditionally, vacuum melted 440C stainless steel is used for high performance bearings for aerospace cryogenic systems where corrosion due to condensation is a major concern. For the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), however, 440C performance in the high-pressure turbopumps has been marginal. A basic assumption of this study was that powder metallurgy, rather than cast/wrought, processing would provide the finest, most homogeneous bearing alloy structure. Preliminary testing of P/M alloys (hardness, corrosion resistance, wear resistance, fatigue resistance, and fracture toughness) was used to 'de-select' alloys which did perform as well as baseline 440C. Five out of eleven candidate materials (14-4/6V, X-405, MRC-2001, T-440V, and D-5) based on preliminary screening were selected for the actual rolling-sliding five-ball testing. The results of this test were compared with high-performance vacuum-melted M50 bearing steel. The results of the testing indicated outstanding performance of two P/M alloys, X-405 and MRC-2001, which eventually will be further evaluated by full-scale bearing testing.

  6. Polyethylene/Boron Composites for Radiation Shielding Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Courtney; Grulke, Eric; Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan

    2008-01-21

    Multifunctional composites made with boron are absorbers of low energy nuetrons, and could be used for structural shielding materials. Polyethylene/boron carbide composites were fabricated using conventional polymer processing techniques, and were evaluated for mechanical and radiation shielding properties. Addition of neat boron carbide (powder and nanoparticles) to an injection molding grade HPDE showed superior mechanical properties compared to neat HDPE. Radiation shielding measurements of a 2 wt% boron carbide composite were improved over those of the neat polyethylene.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.; Leitten, C.F. Jr.

    1962-04-17

    A boron-10 containing reactor control element wherein the boron-10 is dispersed in a matrix material is describeri. The concentration of boron-10 in the matrix varies transversely across the element from a minimum at the surface to a maximum at the center of the element, prior to exposure to neutrons. (AEC)

  8. Boron supercapacitors

    DOE PAGES

    Zhan, Cheng; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng; ...

    2016-11-16

    Supercapacitors based on the electric double-layer mechanism use porous carbons or graphene as electrodes. To move beyond this paradigm, we propose boron supercapacitors to leverage two-dimensional (2D) boron sheets’ metallicity and low weight. Six 2D boron sheets from both previous theoretical design and experimental growth are chosen as test electrodes. By applying joint density functional theory (JDFT) to the electrode–electrolyte system, we examine how the 2D boron sheets charge up against applied potential. JDFT predicts that these 2D boron sheets exhibit specific capacitance on the order of 400 F/g, about four times that of graphene. As a result, our workmore » suggests that 2D boron sheets are promising electrodes for supercapacitor applications.« less

  9. Boron supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Cheng; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De -en

    2016-11-16

    Supercapacitors based on the electric double-layer mechanism use porous carbons or graphene as electrodes. To move beyond this paradigm, we propose boron supercapacitors to leverage two-dimensional (2D) boron sheets’ metallicity and low weight. Six 2D boron sheets from both previous theoretical design and experimental growth are chosen as test electrodes. By applying joint density functional theory (JDFT) to the electrode–electrolyte system, we examine how the 2D boron sheets charge up against applied potential. JDFT predicts that these 2D boron sheets exhibit specific capacitance on the order of 400 F/g, about four times that of graphene. As a result, our work suggests that 2D boron sheets are promising electrodes for supercapacitor applications.

  10. Deformation Behavior of Powder Metallurgy Connecting Rod Preform During Hot Forging Based on Hot Compression and Finite Element Method Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengxian; Yi, Jianhong; Eckert, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    Powder-forged connecting rod with a complex geometry shape always has a problem with nonuniform density distribution. Moreover, the physical property of preform plays a critical role for optimizing the connecting rod quality. The flow behavior of a Fe-3Cu-0.5C (wt pct) alloy with a relative density of 0.8 manufactured by powder metallurgy (P/M, Fe-Cu-C) was studied using isothermal compression tests. The material constitutive equation, power dissipation ( η) maps, and hot processing maps of the P/M Fe-Cu-C alloy were established. Then, the hot forging process of the connecting rod preforms was simulated using the material constitutive model based on finite element method simulation. The calculated results agree well with the experimental ones. The results show that the flow stress increases with decreasing temperature and increasing strain rate. The activation energy of the P/M Fe-Cu-C alloy with a relative density of 0.8 is 188.42 kJ/mol. The optimum temperature at the strain of 0.4 for good hot workability of sintered Fe-Cu-C alloy ranges from 1333 K to 1380 K (1060 °C to 1107 °C). The relative density of the hot-forged connecting rod at the central part changed significantly compared with that at the big end and that at the small end. These present theoretical and experimental investigations can provide a methodology for accurately predicting the densification behavior of the P/M connecting rod preform during hot forging, and they help to optimize the processing parameters.

  11. Leaching of rare earth elements from fluorescent powder using the tea fungus Kombucha.

    PubMed

    Hopfe, Stefanie; Flemming, Katrin; Lehmann, Falk; Möckel, Robert; Kutschke, Sabine; Pollmann, Katrin

    2017-04-01

    In most modern technologies such as flat screens, highly effective magnets and lasers, as well as luminescence phosphors, Rare Earth Elements (REE) are used. Unfortunately no environmentally friendly recycling process exists so far. In comparison to other elements the interaction of microorganisms with REE has been studied to a less extent. However, as REE are ubiquitously present in nature it can be assumed that microorganisms play an important role in the biogeochemistry of REE. This study investigates the potential of organic acid-producing microbes for extracting REE from industrial waste. In Germany, 175 tons of fluorescent phosphor (FP) are collected per year as a distinct fraction from the recycling of compact fluorescent lamps. Because the FP contains about 10% of REE-oxides bound in the so-called triband dyes it is a readily accessible secondary resource of REE. Using the symbiotic mixed culture Kombucha, consisting of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria, REE were leached at a significant rate. The highest leaching-rates were observed in shake cultures using the entire Kombucha-consortium or its supernatant as leaching agent compared to experiments using the isolates Zygosaccharomyces lentus and Komagataeibacter hansenii as leaching organisms. During the cultivation, the pH decreased as a result of organic acid production (mainly acetic and gluconic acid). Thus, the underlying mechanism of the triband dye solubilisation is probably linked to the carboxyl-functionality or a proton excess. In accordance with the higher solubility of REE-oxides compared to REE-phosphates and -aluminates, the red dye Y2O3:Eu(2+) containing relatively expensive REE was shown to be preferentially solubilized. These results show that it is possible to dissolve the REE-compounds of FP with the help of microbial processes. Moreover, they provide the basis for the development of an eco-friendly alternative to the currently applied methods that use strong inorganic acids or toxic

  12. Hydrocarbon analogues of boron clusters - planarity, aromaticity and antiaromaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Hua-Jin; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Li, Jun; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2003-12-01

    An interesting feature of elemental boron and boron compounds is the occurrence of highly symmetric icosahedral clusters. The rich chemistry of boron is also dominated by three-dimensional cage structures. Despite its proximity to carbon in the periodic table, elemental boron clusters have been scarcely studied experimentally and their structures and chemical bonding have not been fully elucidated. Here we report experimental and theoretical evidence that small boron clusters prefer planar structures and exhibit aromaticity and antiaromaticity according to the Hückel rules, akin to planar hydrocarbons. Aromatic boron clusters possess more circular shapes whereas antiaromatic boron clusters are elongated, analogous to structural distortions of antiaromatic hydrocarbons. The planar boron clusters are thus the only series of molecules other than the hydrocarbons to exhibit size-dependent aromatic and antiaromatic behaviour and represent a new dimension of boron chemistry. The stable aromatic boron clusters may exhibit similar chemistries to that of benzene, such as forming sandwich-type metal compounds.

  13. Behavior of Boron Doped Graphites and Boron Carbide under Ion Beam and Plasma Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinsky, O. I.; Zakharovi, A.

    The paper shortly describes the methods of boron carbide coating deposition and presents the experimental results characterizing the properties of boron carbide coatings and of boron doped graphites important to their application as the plasma facing materials of fusion devices and other plasma apparatus dealing with dense and high temperature plasma. Conclusion is made that thick renewable boron carbide coating can successfully be used as the protecting coating of plasma facing elements of ITER.

  14. TEM studies of the effects of Zr additions on some HDDR-processed, high boron, NdFeB-type powders and hot-pressed magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, G.; Chapman, J. N.; Brown, D. N.; Harris, I. R.

    2000-10-01

    The transmission electron microscope has been used to study the physical and magnetic microstructures of two HDDR-processed NdFeB-type alloys, one without Zr and the other containing 1.1 at% Zr. Studies were made of the as-produced powders and the solids produced following hot-pressing at 900°C. In the HDDR powders, the principal effects of adding Zr were to reduce the average grain size by ≈ {1}/{3} and made the grain size distribution more uniform. In the hot-pressed samples, the effect of Zr was more dramatic in that grain growth was very significantly reduced. Zr-containing phases were identified and a simple model, due to Zener, used to provide a plausible explanation of how the small amount of Zr present could stabilise the grain size to ≈0.5 μm. The microstructural results correlated well with measured magnetic properties.

  15. Detection of rare earth elements in Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal ash using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Phuoc

    2015-10-01

    We reported our preliminary results on the use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to analyze the rare earth elements contained in ash samples from Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal (PRB-coal). We have identified many elements in the lanthanide series (cerium, europium, holmium, lanthanum, lutetium, praseodymium, promethium, samarium, terbium, ytterbium) and some elements in the actinide series (actinium, thorium, uranium, plutonium, berkelium, californium) in the ash samples. In addition, various metals were also seen to present in the ash samples

  16. A comparison of physical properties, screening procedures and a human efficacy trial for predicting the bioavailability of commercial elemental iron powders used for food fortification.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Sean R; Bothwell, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    Elemental iron powders are widely used to fortify staple foods. Experimental evidence indicates that there is considerable variation in the bioavailability of different products. For some powders, it may be too low to permit a significant impact on iron status. This study was designed to evaluate possible approaches to screening commercial iron powders for predicted bioavailability, to identify products that have the potential to improve iron status, and to ascertain whether bioavailability is related to the method of manufacture. Nine commercial iron powders were allocated to one of five types based on the production process; carbonyl, electrolytic, hydrogen-reduced (H-reduced), carbon monoxide-reduced (CO-reduced), and other reduced. Structure by scanning electron microscopy and physical properties (pycnometric and apparent density, particle size distribution, Fisher subsieve size, and surface area) were determined on all samples. Selected samples (one or more of each type depending on the cost of the assay) were then subjected to five screening procedures that have previously been advocated for predicting bioavailability in humans--issolution rate in 0.1 mol/L HCl, dialyzability and Caco-2 cell iron uptake, both after simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, relative bioavailability (RBV) with respect to ferrous sulfate by the AOAC rat hemoglobin repletion method, and plasma iron tolerance tests in human volunteers. The results for particle size distribution, surface area, Fisher subsieve size, dissolution rate in 0.1 mol/L HCl, and RBV in rats were significantly correlated and consistent for powders of the same type. However, values for different powder types were significantly different. There was no correlation between either dialyzability or Caco-2 cell uptake and the predicted bioavailability estimates based on the physical properties, dissolution rates, RBV in rats, or human efficacy data. Although human plasma iron tolerance tests were in general

  17. Development of a certified reference material (NMIJ CRM 7512-a) for the determination of trace elements in milk powder.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanbei; Narukawa, Tomohiro; Miyashita, Shin-ichi; Kuroiwa, Takayoshi; Inagaki, Kazumi; Chiba, Koichi; Hioki, Akiharu

    2013-01-01

    A certified reference material (CRM), NMIJ CRM 7512-a, was developed for the determination of trace elements in milk powder. At least three independent analytical methods were applied to characterize the certified value of each element; all of these analytical methods were based on microwave acid digestions and carried out using different analytical instruments. The certified value was given on a dry-mass basis, where the dry-mass correction factor was obtained by drying the sample at 65°C for 15 to 25 h. The certified values in the units of mass fractions for 13 elements were as follows: Ca, 8.65 (0.38) g kg(-1); Fe, 0.104 (0.007) g kg(-1); K, 8.41 (0.33) g kg(-1); Mg, 0.819 (0.024) g kg(-1); Na, 1.87 (0.09) g kg(-1); P, 5.62 (0.23) g kg(-1); Ba, 0.449 (0.013) mg kg(-1); Cu, 4.66 (0.23) mg kg(-1); Mn, 0.931 (0.032) mg kg(-1); Mo, 0.223 (0.012) mg kg(-1); Rb, 8.93 (0.31) mg kg(-1); Sr, 5.88 (0.20) mg kg(-1); and Zn, 41.3 (1.4) mg kg(-1), where the numbers in the parentheses are the expanded uncertainties with a coverage factor of 2. The expanded uncertainties were estimated considering the contribution of the analytical methods, the method-to-method variance, the sample homogeneity, the dry-mass correction factor, and the concentrations of the standard solutions for calibration. The concentrations of As (2.1 μg kg(-1)), Cd (0.2 μg kg(-1)), Cr (1.3 μg kg(-1)), Pb (0.3 μg kg(-1)), and Y (64 μg kg(-1)) were given as information values for the present CRM.

  18. Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J. Birch; Kingman, deceased, Donald D.; Bianchini, Gregory M.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

  19. Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J.B.; Kingman, D.D.; Bianchini, G.M.

    1992-04-28

    Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

  20. Boron deposition from fused salts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.L.

    1980-08-01

    A partial evaluation of the feasibility of a process to electrodeposit pure coherent coatings of elemental boron from molten fluorides has been performed. The deposit produced was powdery and acicular, unless the fluoride melt was purified to have very low oxygen concentration. When the oxygen activity was reduced in the melt by addition of crystalline elemental boron, dense, amorphous boron deposit was produced. The boron deposits produced had cracks but were otherwise pure and dense and ranged up to 0.35 mm thick. Information derived during this project suggests that similar deposits might be obtained crack-free up to 1.00 mm thick by process modifications and improvements.

  1. Toxic effects of boron on mallard reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.J.; Anders, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    Boron, a naturally occurring trace element generally considered environmentally innocuous, was documented to severely impair mallard reproduction. Boron is leached from irrigated agricultural soils and transported in drainage water that contaminates wetlands. Until now, only the selenium accumulated in aquatic food chains has been documented to pose a toxic hazard to wildlife in drainage water wetlands. Management of drainage water-contaminated environments must now also consider the adverse effects of boron, as well as the possible interactions of drainage water contaminants.

  2. Method and device to synthesize boron nitride nanotubes and related nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-07-19

    Methods and apparatus for producing chemical nanostructures having multiple elements, such as boron and nitride, e.g. boron nitride nanotubes, are disclosed. The method comprises creating a plasma jet, or plume, such as by an arc discharge. The plasma plume is elongated and has a temperature gradient along its length. It extends along its length into a port connector area having ports for introduction of feed materials. The feed materials include the multiple elements, which are introduced separately as fluids or powders at multiple ports along the length of the plasma plume, said ports entering the plasma plume at different temperatures. The method further comprises modifying a temperature at a distal portion of or immediately downstream of said plasma plume; and collecting said chemical nanostructures after said modifying.

  3. Initial boronization of PBX-M using ablation of solid boronized probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Hirooka, Y.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Khandagle, M.; Timberlake, J.; Bell, R.; England, A.; Isler, R.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Takahashi, H.; Tighe, W.; von Goeler, S.; Post-Zwicker, A.P.; Jones, S.

    1993-05-01

    The initial boronization of PBX-M was performed using the sequential ablation of two types of solid target probes. Probe-1 in a mushroom shape consisted of a 10.7% boronized 2-D C-C composite containing 3.6 g of boron in a B{sub 4}C binder. Probe-2 in a rectangular shape consisted of an 86% boronized graphite felt composite containing 19.5 g of 40 {mu} boron particles. After boronization with Probe-1, the loop voltage during 1 MW neutral beam heated plasmas decreased 27% and volt-sec consumption decreased 20%. Strong peripheral spectral lines from low-Z elements decreased by factors of about 5. The central oxygen density decreased 15--20%. The total radiated power during neutral beam injection decreased by 43%. Probe-2 boronization exhibited improved operating conditions similar to Probe-1, but for some parameters, a smaller percentage change occurred due to the residual boron from the previous boronization using Probe-1. The ablation rates of both probes were consistent with front face temperatures at or slightly above the boron melting point. These results confirm the effectiveness of the solid target boronization (STB) technique as a real-time impurity control method for replenishing boron depositions without the use of hazardous borane compounds.

  4. Initial boronization of PBX-M using ablation of solid boronized probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Hirooka, Y.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Khandagle, M. . Inst. of Plasma and Fusion Research); Timberlake, J.; Bell, R.; England, A.; Isler, R.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Takahashi, H.; Tighe, W.; von Goeler, S.; Post-Zwicker, A.P. ); Jones, S. )

    1993-05-01

    The initial boronization of PBX-M was performed using the sequential ablation of two types of solid target probes. Probe-1 in a mushroom shape consisted of a 10.7% boronized 2-D C-C composite containing 3.6 g of boron in a B[sub 4]C binder. Probe-2 in a rectangular shape consisted of an 86% boronized graphite felt composite containing 19.5 g of 40 [mu] boron particles. After boronization with Probe-1, the loop voltage during 1 MW neutral beam heated plasmas decreased 27% and volt-sec consumption decreased 20%. Strong peripheral spectral lines from low-Z elements decreased by factors of about 5. The central oxygen density decreased 15--20%. The total radiated power during neutral beam injection decreased by 43%. Probe-2 boronization exhibited improved operating conditions similar to Probe-1, but for some parameters, a smaller percentage change occurred due to the residual boron from the previous boronization using Probe-1. The ablation rates of both probes were consistent with front face temperatures at or slightly above the boron melting point. These results confirm the effectiveness of the solid target boronization (STB) technique as a real-time impurity control method for replenishing boron depositions without the use of hazardous borane compounds.

  5. Boron nutrition and mobility, and its relation to the elemental composition of greenhouse grown root crops I. rutabaga

    SciTech Connect

    Shelp, B.J.; Shattuck, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    The nutrition and mobility of B, and its relation to the elemental composition of two cultivars of rutabaga (Brassica napus ssp. rapifera cv. Laurentian and Wilhelmsberger) plants were investigated in greenhouse experiments. Laurentian exhibited a greater response than Wilhelmsberger to continuing B deficiency as indicated by the severity in the roots of brown heart, of external roughness and elongation and of the decrease in B concentration. Signs of B deficiency were not found when the B contents of the root and young leaves were 27 and 56 ..mu..g and g/sup -1/ DM respectively. Root B levels of 14 and 17-20 ..mu..g f/sup -1/ gave moderate and slight internal signs of brown discoloration. Foliar applications of B partially restored the B concentrations of the roots; however, the mechanisms of movement was unclear. The Mg, Mn and Zn contents of roots were the only elements that consistently increased and accumulated under B deficiency. The relative element composition of the root compared to the mature leaves is consistent with the root being supplied predominantly with nutrients by the phloem.

  6. Effect of boron addition on injection molded 316L stainless steel: mechanical, corrosion properties and in vitro bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Bayraktaroglu, Esra; Gulsoy, H Ozkan; Gulsoy, Nagihan; Er, Ozay; Kilic, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    The research was investigated the effect of boron additions on sintering characteristics, mechanical, corrosion properties and biocompatibility of injection molded austenitic grade 316L stainless steel. Addition of boron is promoted to get high density of sintered 316L stainless steels. The amount of boron plays a role in determining the sintered microstructure and all properties. In this study, 316L stainless steel powders have been used with the elemental NiB powders. A feedstock containing 62.5 wt% powders loading was molded at different injection molded temperature. The binders were completely removed from molded components by solvent and thermal debinding at different temperature. The debinded samples were sintered at different temperature for 60 min. Mechanical property, microstructural characterization and electrochemical property of the sintered samples were performed using tensile testing, hardness, optical, scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical corrosion experiments. Sintered samples were immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) with elemental concentrations that were comparable to those of human blood plasma for a total period of 15 days. Both materials were implanted in fibroblast culture for biocompatibility evaluations were carried out. Results of study showed that sintered 316L and 316L with NiB addition samples exhibited high mechanical and corrosion properties in a physiological environment. Especially, 316L with NiB addition can be used in some bioapplications.

  7. Boron Investigation Survey, March Air Force Base, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    for boron recommend 0.75 mg/l for long-term irrigation on sensitive crops(5). A common source of boron is soap containing sodium borate or perborate ...Sodium perborate (Eodium metaborate peroxyhvdrate--NaB0 2 3H20) is a bleaching powder found in many soaps. It is frequently listed as a perborate bleach

  8. Fragment approach to the electronic structure of τ -boron allotrope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmodak, Naiwrit; Jemmis, Eluvathingal D.

    2017-04-01

    The presence of nonconventional bonding features is an intriguing part of elemental boron. The recent addition of τ boron to the family of three-dimensional boron allotropes is no exception. We provide an understanding of the electronic structure of τ boron using a fragment molecular approach, where the effect of symmetry reduction on skeletal bands of B12 and the B57 fragments are examined qualitatively by analyzing the projected density of states of these fragments. In spite of the structural resemblance to β boron, the reduction of symmetry from a rhombohedral space group to the orthorhombic one destabilizes the bands and reduces the electronic requirements. This suggests the presence of the partially occupied boron sites, as seen for a β boron unit cell, and draws the possibility for the existence of different energetically similar polymorphs. τ boron has a lower binding energy than β boron.

  9. Comparative measurements of mineral elements in milk powders with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lei, W Q; El Haddad, J; Motto-Ros, V; Gilon-Delepine, N; Stankova, A; Ma, Q L; Bai, X S; Zheng, L J; Zeng, H P; Yu, J

    2011-07-01

    Mineral elements contained in commercially available milk powders, including seven infant formulae and one adult milk, were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The purpose of this work was, through a direct comparison of the analytical results, to provide an assessment of the performance of LIBS, and especially of the procedure of calibration-free LIBS (CF-LIBS), to deal with organic compounds such as milk powders. In our experiments, the matrix effect was clearly observed affecting the analytical results each time laser ablation was employed for sampling. Such effect was in addition directly observed by determining the physical parameters of the plasmas induced on the different samples. The CF-LIBS procedure was implemented to deduce the concentrations of Mg and K with Ca as the internal reference element. Quantitative analytical results with CF-LIBS were validated with ICP-AES measurements and nominal concentrations specified for commercial milks. The obtained good results with the CF-LIBS procedure demonstrate its capacity to take into account the difference in physical parameters of the plasma in the calculation of the concentrations of mineral elements, which allows a significant reduction of the matrix effect related to laser ablation. We finally discuss the way to optimize the implementation of the CF-LIBS procedure for the analysis of mineral elements in organic materials.

  10. Dietary boron: possible roles in human and animal physiology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Boron is a bioactive element of low molecular weight. Since discovery of the first boron biomolecule, boromycin, in 1967, several other similar biomolecules are now well-characterized. Most recently described was a bacterial cell-to-cell communication signal that requires boron, autoinducer-II. Boro...

  11. Mineral resource of the month: boron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crangle, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on the mineral, boron. Boron compounds, particularly borates, have more commercial applications than its elemental relative which is a metalloid. Making up the 90% of the borates that are used worldwide are colemanite, kernite, tincal, and ulexite. The main borate deposits are located in the Mojave Desert of the U.S., the Tethyan belt in southern Asia, and the Andean belt of South America. Underground and surface mining are being used in gathering boron compounds. INSETS: Fun facts;Boron production and consumption.

  12. Producing carbon stripper foils containing boron

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, J. O. Jr.

    2012-12-19

    Parameters being actively tested by the accelerator community for the purpose of extending carbon stripper foil lifetimes in fast ion beams include methods of deposition, parting agents, mounting techniques, support (fork) materials, and inclusion of alloying elements, particularly boron. Specialized production apparatus is required for either sequential deposition or co-deposition of boron in carbon foils. A dual-use vacuum evaporator for arc evaporation of carbon and electron-beam evaporation of boron and other materials has been built for such development. Production of both carbon and boron foils has begun and improvements are in progress.

  13. Direct current sputtering of boron from boron/boron mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, J.R.; Manos, D.; Nartowitz, E.

    1994-12-13

    A method for coating a substrate with boron by sputtering includes lowering the electrical resistance of a boron-containing rod to allow electrical conduction in the rod; placing the boron-containing rod inside a vacuum chamber containing substrate material to be coated; applying an electrical potential between the boron target material and the vacuum chamber; countering a current avalanche that commences when the conduction heating rate exceeds the cooling rate, and until a steady equilibrium heating current is reached; and, coating the substrate material with boron by sputtering from the boron-containing rod. 2 figures.

  14. Quantitative analysis of major and trace elements in NH4HF2-modified silicate rock powders by laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Hu, Zhaochu; Liu, Yongsheng; Yang, Wenwu; Chen, Haihong; Hu, Shenghong; Xiao, Hongyan

    2017-08-29

    In this paper, we described a NH4HF2 digestion method as sample preparation for the rapid determination of major and trace elements in silicate rocks using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Sample powders digested by NH4HF2 at 230 °C for 3 h form ultrafine powders with a typical grain size d80 < 8.5 μm, and various silicate rocks have a consistent grain morphology and size, allowing us to produce pressed powder pellets that have excellent cohesion and homogeneity suitable for laser ablation micro-analysis without the addition of binder. The influences of the digestion parameters were investigated and optimized, including the evaporation stage of removing residual NH4HF2, sample homogenization, selection of the digestion vessel and calibration strategy of quantitative analysis. The optimized NH4HF2 digestion method was applied to dissolve six silicate rock reference materials (BCR-2, BHVO-2, AGV-2, RGM-2, GSP-2, GSR-1) covering a wide range of rock types. Ten major elements and thirty-five trace elements were simultaneously analyzed by LA-ICP-MS. The analytical results of the six reference materials generally agreed with the recommended values, with discrepancies of less than 10% for most elements. The analytical precision is within 5% for most major elements and within 10% for most trace elements. Compared with previous methods of LA-ICP-MS bulk analysis, our method enables the complete dissolution of refractory minerals, such as zircon, in intermediate-acidic intrusive rocks and limits contamination as well as the loss of volatile elements. Moreover, there are many advantages for the new technique, including reducing matrix effects between reference materials and samples, spiking the internal standard simply and feasibly and sample batch processing. The applicability filed of the new technique in this study was focused on the whole-rock analysis of igneous rock samples, which are from basic rocks to acid rocks (45%

  15. Solution-processed highly efficient Cu2ZnSnSe4 thin film solar cells by dissolution of elemental Cu, Zn, Sn, and Se powders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanchun; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Wangen; Tian, Qingwen; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2015-01-14

    Solution deposition approaches play an important role in reducing the manufacturing cost of Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) thin film solar cells. Here, we present a novel precursor-based solution approach to fabricate highly efficient CZTSe solar cells. In this approach, low-cost elemental Cu, Zn, Sn, and Se powders were simultaneously dissolved in the solution of thioglycolic acid and ethanolamine, forming a homogeneous CZTSe precursor solution to deposit CZTSe nanocrystal thin films. Based on high-quality CZTSe absorber layer, pure selenide CZTSe solar cell with a photoelectric conversion efficiency of 8.02% has been achieved without antireflection coating.

  16. Synthesis of aluminium nitride/boron nitride composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, T.D. . Polymer Science Program and Dept. of Chemistry); Gonsalves, K.E. . Polymer Science Program and Dept. of Chemistry Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT . Dept. of Chemistry); Strutt, P.R. . Dept. of Metallurgy)

    1993-04-01

    Aluminum nitride/boron nitride composite was synthesized by using boric acid, urea, and aluminum chloride (or aluminum lactate) as the starting compounds. The starting materials were dissolved in water and mixed homogeneously. Ammonolysis of this aqueous solution resulted in the formation of a precomposite gel, which converted into the aluminum nitride/boron nitride composite on further heat treatment. Characterization of both the precomposite and the composite powders included powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of the composite revealed that the aluminum nitride phase had a hexagonal structure, and the boron nitride phase a turbostratic structure.

  17. Infiltration processing of boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal cermets

    DOEpatents

    Halverson, Danny C.; Landingham, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    A chemical pretreatment method is used to produce boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal composites by an infiltration process. The boron carbide or other starting constituents, in powder form, are immersed in various alcohols, or other chemical agents, to change the surface chemistry of the starting constituents. The chemically treated starting constituents are consolidated into a porous ceramic precursor which is then infiltrated by molten aluminum or other metal by heating to wetting conditions. Chemical treatment of the starting constituents allows infiltration to full density. The infiltrated precursor is further heat treated to produce a tailorable microstructure. The process at low cost produces composites with improved characteristics, including increased toughness, strength.

  18. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  19. Monolayer boron-aluminum compacted sheet material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The manufacturing techniques, basic materials used, and equipment required to produce monolayer boron-aluminum composites are described. Tentative materials and process specifications are included. Improvements in bonding and filament spacing obtained through use of brazing powder in the fugitive binder are discussed.

  20. Boron removal in radioactive liquid waste by forward osmosis membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Doo Seong Hwang; Hei Min Choi; Kune Woo Lee; Jei Kwon Moon

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the treatment of boric acid contained in liquid radioactive waste using a forward osmosis membrane. The boron permeation through the membrane depends on the type of membrane, membrane orientation, pH of the feed solution, salt and boron concentration in the feed solution, and osmotic pressure of the draw solution. The boron flux begins to decline from pH 7 and increases with an increase of the osmotic driving force. The boron flux decreases slightly with the salt concentration, but is not heavily influenced by a low salt concentration. The boron flux increases linearly with the concentration of boron. No element except for boron was permeated through the FO membrane in the multi-component system. The maximum boron flux is obtained in an active layer facing a draw solution orientation of the CTA-ES membrane under conditions of less than pH 7 and high osmotic pressure. (authors)

  1. Boron-copper neutron absorbing material and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Wiencek, Thomas C.; Domagala, Robert F.; Thresh, Henry

    1991-01-01

    A composite, copper clad neutron absorbing material is comprised of copper powder and boron powder enriched with boron 10. The boron 10 content can reach over 30 percent by volume, permitting a very high level of neutron absorption. The copper clad product is also capable of being reduced to a thickness of 0.05 to 0.06 inches and curved to a radius of 2 to 3 inches, and can resist temperatures of 900.degree. C. A method of preparing the material includes the steps of compacting a boron-copper powder mixture and placing it in a copper cladding, restraining the clad assembly in a steel frame while it is hot rolled at 900.degree. C. with cross rolling, and removing the steel frame and further rolling the clad assembly at 650.degree. C. An additional sheet of copper can be soldered onto the clad assembly so that the finished sheet can be cold formed into curved shapes.

  2. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry for quantitative elemental analysis of powdered samples by radiofrequency pulsed glow discharge time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Toral, Aitor; Fernandez, Beatriz; Malherbe, Julien; Claverie, Fanny; Molloy, John L; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2013-10-15

    In recent years particular effort is being devoted to the development of pulsed glow discharges (PGDs) for mass spectrometry because this powering operation mode could offer important ionization analytical advantages. However, the capabilities of radiofrequency (RF) PGD coupled to a time of flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS) for accurate isotope ratio measurements have not been demonstrated yet. This work is focused on investigating different time positions along the pulse profile for the accurate measurement of isotope ratios. As a result, a method has been developed for the direct and simultaneous multielement determination of trace elements in powdered geological samples by RF-PGD-ToFMS in combination with isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) as an absolute measurement method directly traceable to the International System of Units. Optimized operating conditions were 70 W of applied radiofrequency power, 250 Pa of pressure, 2 ms of pulse width and 4 ms of pulse period, being argon the plasma gas used. To homogeneously distribute the added isotopically-enriched standards, lithium borate fusion of powdered solid samples was used as sample preparation approach. In this way, Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb were successfully determined by RF-PGD-ToF(IDMS) in two NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRM 2586 and SRM 2780) representing two different matrices of geological interest (soil and rock samples). Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb concentrations determined by RF-PGD-ToF(IDMS) were well in agreement with the certified values at 95% confidence interval and precisions below 12% relative standard deviation were observed for three independent analyses. Elemental concentrations investigated were in the range of 81-5770 mg/kg, demonstrating the potential of RF-PGD-ToF(IDMS) for a sensitive, accurate and robust analysis of powdered samples.

  3. Atmospheric contribution to boron enrichment in aboveground wheat tissues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Ji, Junfeng; Chen, Mindong; Zhong, Cong; Yang, Zhongfang; Browne, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    Boron is an essential trace element for all organisms and has both beneficial and harmful biological functions. A particular amount of boron is discharged into the environment every year because of industrial activities; however, the effects of environmental boron emissions on boron accumulation in cereals has not yet been estimated. The present study characterized the accumulation of boron in wheat under different ecological conditions in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) area. This study aimed to estimate the effects of atmospheric boron that is associated with industrial activities on boron accumulation in wheat. The results showed that the concentrations of boron in aboveground wheat tissues from the highly industrialized region were significantly higher than those from the agriculture-dominated region, even though there was no significant difference in boron content in soils. Using the model based on the translocation coefficients of boron in the soil-wheat system, we estimated that the contribution of atmosphere to boron accumulation in wheat straw in the highly industrialized region exceeded that in the agriculture-dominated region by 36%. In addition, from the environmental implication of the model, it was estimated that the development of boron-utilizing industries had elevated the concentration of boron in aboveground wheat tissues by 28-53%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dietary boron, brain function, and cognitive performance.

    PubMed Central

    Penland, J G

    1994-01-01

    Although the trace element boron has yet to be recognized as an essential nutrient for humans, recent data from animal and human studies suggest that boron may be important for mineral metabolism and membrane function. To investigate further the functional role of boron, brain electrophysiology and cognitive performance were assessed in response to dietary manipulation of boron (approximately 0.25 versus approximately 3.25 mg boron/2000 kcal/day) in three studies with healthy older men and women. Within-subject designs were used to assess functional responses in all studies. Spectral analysis of electroencephalographic data showed effects of dietary boron in two of the three studies. When the low boron intake was compared to the high intake, there was a significant (p < 0.05) increase in the proportion of low-frequency activity, and a decrease in the proportion of higher-frequency activity, an effect often observed in response to general malnutrition and heavy metal toxicity. Performance (e.g., response time) on various cognitive and psychomotor tasks also showed an effect of dietary boron. When contrasted with the high boron intake, low dietary boron resulted in significantly poorer performance (p < 0.05) on tasks emphasizing manual dexterity (studies II and III); eye-hand coordination (study II); attention (all studies); perception (study III); encoding and short-term memory (all studies); and long-term memory (study I). Collectively, the data from these three studies indicate that boron may play a role in human brain function and cognitive performance, and provide additional evidence that boron is an essential nutrient for humans. PMID:7889884

  5. Verification of enhanced sintering concepts using iron compacts alloyed with boron

    SciTech Connect

    Madan, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The theories of enhanced sintering identify three criteria for a sintering enhancer, namely, high solubility of base in the second phase, segregation of the additive at the interparticle boundaries, and easy diffusion of the base material through the segregated phase. This study proposes a figure of merit relating to thermodynamic quantities that is capable of reliably identifying a sintering enhancer. The new figure of merit was defined as a weighted sum of solubility, segregation, and diffusion terms. It is a dimensionless quantity and can be easily calculated from phase diagram features. The proposed figure of merit was used to successfully identify effective sintering enhancers for iron and the results compared to sintered density values obtained from a controlled experiment and from past literature. Based on these evaluations and past literature, boron was identified as a potential sintering enhancer for iron. A carefully planned experimental procedure was adopted to understand the sintering of the iron-boron system. Elemental boron and Fe{sub 2}B were added to water atomized and carbonyl iron powders. A total of 37 compositions containing 0 to 0.8 wt% boron were investigated. All samples were compacted to the same green density and sintered for one hour at 1200 C in dry hydrogen. Densification studies, dilatometry, thermal analysis, mechanical testing, and microstructural analysis were conducted. The addition of boron increased the sintered density, hardness, and strength of the iron compacts. The sintering of this system is dominated by the formation of the Fe-Fe{sub 2}B eutectic liquid phase at about 1175 C. Densification occurred by particle rearrangement and the process of solution-reprecipitation. Higher boron contents resulted in a greater amount of liquid phase, lower porosity, and a smaller pore size.

  6. Combustion synthesis of novel boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harini, R. Saai; Manikandan, E.; Anthonysamy, S.; Chandramouli, V.; Eswaramoorthy, D.

    2013-02-01

    The solid-state boron carbide is one of the hardest materials known, ranking third behind diamond and cubic boron nitride. Boron carbide (BxCx) enriched in the 10B isotope is used as a control rod material in the nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption cross section and other favorable physico-chemical properties. Conventional methods of preparation of boron carbide are energy intensive processes accompanied by huge loss of boron. Attempts were made at IGCAR Kalpakkam to develop energy efficient and cost effective methods to prepare boron carbide. The products of the gel combustion and microwave synthesis experiments were characterized for phase purity by XRD. The carbide formation was ascertained using finger-print spectroscopy of FTIR. Samples of pyrolized/microwave heated powder were characterized for surface morphology using SEM. The present work shows the recent advances in understanding of structural and chemical variations in boron carbide and their influence on morphology, optical and vibrational property results discussed in details.

  7. Magnetron sputtered boron films and TI/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  8. Magnetron sputtered boron films and TI/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1993-04-20

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  9. Magnetron sputtered boron films and Ti/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  10. Magnetron sputtered boron films and Ti/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1995-02-14

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence. 6 figs.

  11. Dietary boron: progress in establishing essential roles in human physiology.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Curtiss D

    2012-06-01

    This review summarizes the progress made in establishing essential roles for boron in human physiology and assesses that progress in view of criteria for essentiality of elements. The evidence to date suggests that humans and at least some higher animals may use boron to support normal biological functions. These include roles in calcium metabolism, bone growth and maintenance, insulin metabolism, and completion of the life cycle. The biochemical mechanisms responsible for these effects are poorly understood but the nature of boron biochemistry suggests further characterization of the cell signaling molecules capable of complexing with boron. Such characterization may provide insights into the biochemical function(s) of boron in humans.

  12. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    DOE PAGES

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-18

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nmmore » to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Furthermore, experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.« less

  13. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    SciTech Connect

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-18

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nm to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Furthermore, experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.

  14. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nm to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.

  15. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  16. Fluid sources and metallogenesis in the Blackbird Co-Cu-Au-Bi-Y-REE district, Idaho, U.S.A.: Insights from major-element and boron isotopic compositions of tourmaline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trumbull, Robert B.; Slack, John F.; Krienitz, M.-S.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Wiedenbeck, M.

    2011-01-01

    Tourmaline is a widespread mineral in the Mesoproterozoic Blackbird Co–Cu–Au–Bi–Y–REE district, Idaho, where it occurs in both mineralized zones and wallrocks. We report here major-element and B-isotope compositions of tourmaline from stratabound sulfide deposits and their metasedimentary wallrocks, from mineralized and barren pipes of tourmaline breccia, from late barren quartz veins, and from Mesoproterozoic granite. The tourmalines are aluminous, intermediate in the schorl–dravite series, with Fe/(Fe + Mg) values of 0.30 to 0.85, and 10 to 50% X-site vacancies. Compositional zoning is prominent only in tourmaline from breccias and quartz veins; crystal rims are enriched in Mg, Ca and Ti, and depleted in Fe and Al relative to cores. The chemical composition of tourmaline does not correlate with the presence or absence of mineralization. The δ11B values fall into two groups. Isotopically light tourmaline (−21.7 to −7.6‰) occurs in unmineralized samples from wallrocks, late quartz veins and Mesoproterozoic granite, whereas heavy tourmaline (−6.9 to +3.2‰) is spatially associated with mineralization (stratabound and breccia-hosted), and is also found in barren breccia. At an inferred temperature of 300°C, boron in the hydrothermal fluid associated with mineralization had δ11B values of −3 to +7‰. The high end of this range indicates a marine source of the boron. A likely scenario involves leaching of boron principally from marine carbonate beds or B-bearing evaporites in Mesoproterozoic strata of the region. The δ11B values of the isotopically light tourmaline in the sulfide deposits are attributed to recrystallization during Cretaceous metamorphism, superimposed on a light boron component derived from footwall siliciclastic sediments (e.g., marine clays) during Mesoproterozoic mineralization, and possibly a minor component of light boron from a magmatic–hydrothermal fluid. The metal association of Bi–Be–Y–REE in the Blackbird

  17. Coupling in-situ X-ray micro- and nano-tomography and discrete element method for investigating high temperature sintering of metal and ceramic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zilin; Martin, Christophe L.; Bouvard, Didier; Jauffrès, David; Lhuissier, Pierre; Salvo, Luc; Olmos, Luis; Villanova, Julie; Guillon, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    The behaviour of various powder systems during high temperature sintering has been investigated by coupling X-ray microtomography and discrete element method (DEM). Both methods are particularly relevant to analyse particle interactions and porosity changes occurring during sintering. Two examples are presented. The first one deals with a copper powder including artificially created pores which sintering has been observed in situ at the European synchrotron and simulated by DEM. 3D images with a resolution of 1.5 μm have been taken at various times of the sintering cycle. The comparison of the real displacement of particle centers with the displacement derived from the mean field assumption demonstrates significant particle rearrangement in some regions of the sample. Although DEM simulation showed less rearrangement, it has been able to accurately predict the densification kinetics. The second example concerns multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) composed of hundreds of alternated metal electrode and ceramic dielectric layers. The observation of Ni-based MLCCs by synchrotron nanotomography at Argon National Laboratory with a spatial resolution between 10 and 50 nm allowed understanding the origin of heterogeneities formed in Ni layers during sintering. DEM simulations confirmed this analysis and provided clues for reducing these defects.

  18. In situ elaboration of a binary Ti-26Nb alloy by selective laser melting of elemental titanium and niobium mixed powders.

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Joguet, D; Robin, G; Peltier, L; Laheurte, P

    2016-05-01

    Ti-Nb alloys are excellent candidates for biomedical applications such as implantology and joint replacement because of their very low elastic modulus, their excellent biocompatibility and their high strength. A low elastic modulus, close to that of the cortical bone minimizes the stress shielding effect that appears subsequent to the insertion of an implant. The objective of this study is to investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties of a Ti-Nb alloy elaborated by selective laser melting on powder bed of a mixture of Ti and Nb elemental powders (26 at.%). The influence of operating parameters on porosity of manufactured samples and on efficacy of dissolving Nb particles in Ti was studied. The results obtained by optical microscopy, SEM analysis and X-ray microtomography show that the laser energy has a significant effect on the compactness and homogeneity of the manufactured parts. Homogeneous and compact samples were obtained for high energy levels. Microstructure of these samples has been further characterized. Their mechanical properties were assessed by ultrasonic measures and the Young's modulus found is close to that of classically elaborated Ti-26 Nbingot.

  19. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  20. Boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W [Newport News, VA; Jordan, Kevin [Newport News, VA; Park, Cheol [Yorktown, VA

    2012-06-06

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  1. Boron nitride composites

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2017-02-21

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and one or more borate binders; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and amorphous boron nitride; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material.

  2. Boron chemicals in diagnosis and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bhaskar C; Thapa, Pritam; Karki, Radha; Schinke, Caroline; Das, Sasmita; Kambhampati, Suman; Banerjee, Sushanta K; Van Veldhuizen, Peter; Verma, Amit; Weiss, Louis M; Evans, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the field of boron chemistry have expanded the application of boron from material use to medicine. Boron-based drugs represent a new class of molecules that possess several biomedical applications including use as imaging agents for both optical and nuclear imaging as well as therapeutic agents with anticancer, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal and other disease-specific activities. For example, bortezomib (Velcade®), the only drug in clinical use with boron as an active element, was approved in 2003 as a proteasome inhibitor for the treatment of multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Several other boron-based compounds are in various phases of clinical trials, which illustrates the promise of this approach for medicinal chemists working in the area of boron chemistry. It is expected that in the near future, several boron-containing drugs should become available in the market with better efficacy and potency than existing drugs. This article discusses the current status of the development of boron-based compounds as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in humans. PMID:23617429

  3. Boron chemicals in diagnosis and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhaskar C; Thapa, Pritam; Karki, Radha; Schinke, Caroline; Das, Sasmita; Kambhampati, Suman; Banerjee, Sushanta K; Van Veldhuizen, Peter; Verma, Amit; Weiss, Louis M; Evans, Todd

    2013-04-01

    Advances in the field of boron chemistry have expanded the application of boron from material use to medicine. Boron-based drugs represent a new class of molecules that possess several biomedical applications including use as imaging agents for both optical and nuclear imaging as well as therapeutic agents with anticancer, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal and other disease-specific activities. For example, bortezomib (Velcade(®)), the only drug in clinical use with boron as an active element, was approved in 2003 as a proteasome inhibitor for the treatment of multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Several other boron-based compounds are in various phases of clinical trials, which illustrates the promise of this approach for medicinal chemists working in the area of boron chemistry. It is expected that in the near future, several boron-containing drugs should become available in the market with better efficacy and potency than existing drugs. This article discusses the current status of the development of boron-based compounds as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in humans.

  4. Identification of a Novel System for Boron Transport: Atr1 Is a Main Boron Exporter in Yeast▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Alaattin; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Boron is a micronutrient in plants and animals, but its specific roles in cellular processes are not known. To understand boron transport and functions, we screened a yeast genomic DNA library for genes that confer resistance to the element in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thirty boron-resistant transformants were isolated, and they all contained the ATR1 (YML116w) gene. Atr1 is a multidrug resistance transport protein belonging to the major facilitator superfamily. C-terminal green fluorescent protein-tagged Atr1 localized to the cell membrane and vacuole, and ATR1 gene expression was upregulated by boron and several stress conditions. We found that atr1Δ mutants were highly sensitive to boron treatment, whereas cells overexpressing ATR1 were boron resistant. In addition, atr1Δ cells accumulated boron, whereas ATR1-overexpressing cells had low intracellular levels of the element. Furthermore, atr1Δ cells showed stronger boron-dependent phenotypes than mutants deficient in genes previously reported to be implicated in boron metabolism. ATR1 is widely distributed in bacteria, archaea, and lower eukaryotes. Our data suggest that Atr1 functions as a boron efflux pump and is required for boron tolerance. PMID:19414602

  5. Microstructure and high-temperature tensile deformation of TiAl(Si) alloys made from elemental powders

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.X.; Dogan, B.; Dahms, M.; Hsu, F.Y.; Klaar, H.J.

    1995-03-01

    Two ternary TiAl-based alloys with chemical compositions of Ti-46.4 at. pct Al-1.4 at. pct Si (Si poor) and Ti-45 at. pct Al-2.7 at. pct Si (Si rich), which were prepared by reaction powder processing, have been investigated. Both alloys consist of the intermetallic compounds {gamma}-TiAl, {alpha}{sub 2}-Ti{sub 3}Al, and {zeta}-Ti{sub 5}(Si, Al){sub 3}. The microstructure can be described as a duplex structure (i.e., lamellar {gamma}/{alpha}{sub 2} regions distributed in {gamma} matrix) containing {zeta} precipitates. The higher Si content leads to a larger amount of {zeta} precipitates and a finer {gamma} grain size in the Si-rich alloy. The tensile properties of both alloys depend on test temperature. At room temperature and 700 C, the tensile properties of the Si-poor alloy are better than those of the Si-rich alloy. At 900 C, the opposite is true. Examinations of tensile deformed specimens reveal {zeta}-Ti{sub 5}(Si, Al){sub 3} particle debonding and particle cracking at lower test temperatures. At 900 C, nucleation of voids and microcracks along lamellar grain boundaries and evidence for recovery and dynamic recrystallization were observed. Due to these processes, the alloys can tolerate {zeta}-Ti{sub 5}(Si, Al){sub 3} particles at high temperature, where the positive effect of grain refinement on both strength and ductility can be utilized.

  6. Methods of forming boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  7. Boron nitride insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Jr., Chester S.; Cavin, O. Burl; McCulloch, Reginald W.; Clark, David L.

    1978-01-01

    High temperature BN-insulated heaters for use as fuel pin simulators in reactor thermal hydraulic test facility studies comprise a cylindrical housing and a concentric heating element disposed within the housing and spaced apart from the housing to define an annular region therebetween. The annular region contains BN for providing electrical resistance and thermal conductivity between the housing and the heating element. The fabrication method of this invention comprises the steps of cold pressing BN powder at a pressure of 20 to 80,000 psig and a dwell time of at least 0.1-3 seconds to provide hollow cylindrical preforms of suitable dimensions for insertion into the annular region, the BN powder having a tap density of about 0.6-1.1 g/cm.sup.3 and an orientation ratio of at least about 100/3.5. The preforms are inserted into the annular region and crushed in place.

  8. Processing of boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Namtae

    The processing of boron carbide powder including sintering optimization, green body optimization and sintering behavior of nano-sized boron carbide was investigated for the development of complex shaped body armor. Pressureless sintered B4C relative densities as high as 96.7% were obtained by optimizing the soak temperature, and holding at that temperature for the minimum time required to reach terminal density. Although the relative densities of pressureless sintered specimens were lower than that of commercially produced hot-pressed B4C, their (Vickers) hardness values were comparable. For 4.45 cm dia. 1.35 cm height disk-shaped specimens, pressureless sintered to at least 93.0% relative density, post-hot isostatic pressing resulted in vast increases in relative densities (e.g. 100.0%) and hardness values significantly greater than that of commercially produced hot-pressed B 4C. The densification behavior of 20-40nm graphite-coated B4C nano-particles was studied using dilatometry, x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The higher than expected sintering onset from a nano-scale powder (˜1500°C) was caused by remnant B2O3 not removed by methanol washing, keeping particles separated until volatilization, and the carbon coatings, which imposed particle to particle contact of a substance more refractory than B4C. Solid state sintering (1500-1850°C) was followed by an arrest in contraction attributed to formation of eutectic liquid droplets of size more than 10X the original nano-particles. These droplets, induced to form well below known B4C-graphite eutectic temperatures by the high surface energy of nanoparticles, are interpreted to have quickly solidified to form a vast number of voids in particle packing, which in turn, impeded continued solid state sintering. Starting at 2200°C, a permanent liquid phase formed which facilitated a rapid measured contraction by liquid phase sintering and/or compact slumping.

  9. Quantitative analysis of trace elements in environmental powders with laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry using non-sample-corresponding reference materials for signal evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Gerald; Limbeck, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is an attractive alternative to traditional procedures for the analysis of environmental samples (i.e., conventional liquid measurement after sample digestion). However, for accurate quantification, certified reference materials (CRM) are necessary which match the composition of the sample and include all elements of interest at the required concentration levels. The limited availability of appropriate CRMs hampers therefore substantial application. In this work, an LA-ICP-MS procedure allowing for accurate determination of trace element contents in powdered environmental samples is presented. For LA-ICP-MS analysis, the samples are mixed with an internal standard (silver oxide) and a binder (sodium tetra borate) and subsequently pressed to pellets. Quantification is accomplished using a calibration function determined using CRMs with varying matrix composition and analyte content, pre-treated and measured in the same way as the samples. With this approach, matrix-induced ablation differences resulting from varying physical/chemical properties of the individual CRMs could be compensated. Furthermore, ICP-related matrix-effects could be minimized using collision/reaction cell technology. Applicability of the procedure has been demonstrated by assessment of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn in four different environmental CRMs (NIST SRM1648a (urban particulate matter), NIST SRM2709 (San Joaquin Soil), BCR144 (sewage sludge), and BCR723 (road dust)). Signal evaluation was performed by alternative use of three CRMs for calculation of the calibration function whereas the remaining fourth CRM acted as unknown sample, resulting in a good agreement between measured and certified values for all elements and reference materials.

  10. Synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes, bamboos and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Luhua; Li, Chi Pui; Chen, Ying

    2008-05-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes and nanowires in high purity and large quantity have been produced using an improved ball-milling and annealing method. Boron powder was first ball milled to produce nanosized boron particles with a metastable structure. The ball-milled sample was ultrasonicated in ethanol to break up large aggregates formed during high-energy ball milling. Isothermal annealing under controlled conditions produced nanotubes in two different structures (multi-walled cylindrical and bamboo nanotubes), as well as nanowires. The formation mechanisms of various nanostructures are discussed.

  11. Where Boron? Mars Rover Detects It

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    This map shows the route driven by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover (blue line) and locations where the rover's Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument detected the element boron (dots, colored by abundance of boron according to the key at right). The main map shows the traverse from landing day (Sol 0) in August 2012 to the rover's location in September 2016, with boron detections through September 2015. The inset at upper left shows a magnified version of the most recent portion of that traverse, with boron detections during that portion. Overlapping dots represent cases when boron was detected in multiple ChemCam observation points in the same target and non-overlapping dots represent cases where two different targets in the same location have boron. Most of the mission's detections of boron have been made in the most recent seven months (about 200 sols) of the rover's uphill traverse. The base image for the map is from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. North is up. The scale bar at lower right represents one kilometer (0.62 mile). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21150

  12. Properties of vacuum-evaporated boron films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feakes, F.

    1973-01-01

    The work on the properties of thin boron films made by vacuum evaporation of elemental boron using an electron beam as the energy source is reported. The program aimed at characterizing the properties of vacuum evaporated films. The work was directed toward those variables considered to be important in affecting the tensile strength of the boron films. In general, the thickness of the films was less than 0.002 in. The temperature of the substrate on which the boron was condensed was found to be most important. Three distinctly different forms of boron deposit were produced. Although the transition temperature was not sharply defined, at substrate temperatures of less than approximately 600 deg C the boron deposits were amorphous to X-ray. If the substrate were highly polished, the deposits were black and mirror-like. For substrates with coefficients of thermal expansion close to that of boron, the deposits were then continuous and uncracked. The studies suggest that the potential continues to exist for film-type composites to have both high strength and high modulus.

  13. Combustion synthesis of amorphous boron in a very-short-term magnesiothermic reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semnan, Masih; Jalaly, Maisam

    2016-11-01

    Nanosized amorphous boron powder was produced using mechanochemistry via a magnesiothermic reduction in a Mg/B2O3 system. High-energy ball milling was used to induce a mechanically induced self-sustaining reaction. Under severe milling conditions it was found that the ignition time for boron formation was only about 27 min of milling. In this study, the formation of boron and its amorphous nature is demonstrated by various characterizations.

  14. Coal Quality and Major, Minor, and Trace Elements in the Powder River, Green River, and Williston Basins, Wyoming and North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stricker, Gary D.; Flores, Romeo M.; Trippi, Michael H.; Ellis, Margaret S.; Olson, Carol M.; Sullivan, Jonah E.; Takahashi, Kenneth I.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Wyoming Reservoir Management Group (RMG) of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and nineteen independent coalbed methane (CBM) gas operators in the Powder River and Green River Basins in Wyoming and the Williston Basin in North Dakota, collected 963 coal samples from 37 core holes (fig. 1; table 1) between 1999 and 2005. The drilling and coring program was in response to the rapid development of CBM, particularly in the Powder River Basin (PRB), and the needs of the RMG BLM for new and more reliable data for CBM resource estimates and reservoir characterization. The USGS and BLM entered into agreements with the gas operators to drill and core Fort Union coal beds, thus supplying core samples for the USGS to analyze and provide the RMG with rapid, real-time results of total gas desorbed, coal quality, and high pressure methane adsorption isotherm data (Stricker and others, 2006). The USGS determined the ultimate composition of all coal core samples; for selected samples analyses also included proximate analysis, calorific value, equilibrium moisture, apparent specific gravity, and forms of sulfur. Analytical procedures followed those of the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM; 1998). In addition, samples from three wells (129 samples) were analyzed for major, minor, and trace element contents. Ultimate and proximate compositions, calorific value, and forms of sulfur are fundamental parameters in evaluating the economic value of a coal. Determining trace element concentrations, along with total sulfur and ash yield, is also essential to assess the environmental effects of coal use, as is the suitability of the coal for cleaning, gasification, liquefaction, and other treatments. Determination of coal quality in the deeper part (depths greater than 1,000 to 1,200 ft) of the PRB (Rohrbacher and others, 2006; Luppens and others, 2006) is especially important, because these coals are targeted for future

  15. Dietary boron in the typical diet: possible essential roles in human and animal physiology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Boron is a bioactive element of low molecular weight. Since discovery of the first boron biomolecule, boromycin, in 1967, several other similar biomolecules are now well-characterized. Most recently described was a bacterial cell-to-cell communication signal that requires boron, autoinducer-II. Boro...

  16. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  17. Growing evidence for human health benefits of boron

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Growing evidence from numerous laboratories using a variety of experimental models shows that boron is a bioactive beneficial, perhaps essential, element for humans. Reported beneficial actions of boron include arthritis alleviation or risk reduction; bone growth and maintenance; central nervous sys...

  18. Solid-state hot pressing of elemental aluminum and titanium powders to form TiAl ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) intermetallic microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.B.; Teoh, K.W.; Hwang, W.S.

    1996-10-01

    The elemental powder metallurgy (EPM) process is used to prepare TiAl-base intermetallics. An EPM process conducted by two-stage solid-state hot pressing was employed to prepare TiAl-base intermetallics and to investigate the resulting microstructural changes. The results showed that the TiAl{sub 3} phase forms in the first stage. During the temperature increase to the second sintering stage, lamellar phases start to precipitate in the TiAl{sub 3} matrix. Further, the TiAl{sub 3} phase transforms to TiAl, and Ti{sub 3}Al layers develop in the remaining titanium particles. Meanwhile, the lamellar phases grow into ring-type structures between the TiAl matrix and the Ti{sub 3}Al layers. After the second stage, the remaining titanium particles are fully reacted, and a microstructure of Ti{sub 3}Al phases enclosed by fine-grained lamellar rings in the TiAl matrix is developed.

  19. Properties of boron/boron-nitride multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Wall, M.A.; Hayes, J.P.; Alexander, K.B.

    1996-06-01

    Boron-Nitride films are of interest for their high hardness and wear resistance. Large intrinsic stresses and poor adhesion which often accompany high hardness materials can be moderated through the use of a layered structure. Alternate layers of boron (B) and boron-nitride (BN) are formed by modulating the composition of the sputter gas during deposition from a pure B target. The thin films are characterized with TEM to evaluate the microstructure and with nanoindentation to determine hardness. Layer pair spacing and continuity effects on hardness are evaluated for the B/BN films.

  20. Comparison of performance of partial prestressed beam-column subassemblages made of reactive powder concrete and normal concrete materials using finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurjannah, S. A.; Budiono, B.; Imran, I.; Sugiri, S.

    2016-04-01

    Research on concrete material continues in several countries and had produced a concrete type of Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC) which has a better compressive strength, tensile strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, and durability than normal concrete (NC) namely Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC). Researches on structures using RPC material showed that the RPC structures had a better performance than the NC structures in resisting gravity and lateral cyclic loads. In this study, an experiment was conducted to apply combination of constant axial and lateral cyclic loads to a prototype of RPC interior partial prestressed beam-column subassemblage (prototype of BCS-RPC) with a value of Partial Prestressed Ratio (PPR) of 31.72% on the beam. The test results were compared with finite element model of beam-column subassemblage made of RPC by PPR of 31.72% (BCS-RPC-31.72). Furthermore, there was BCS-RPC modeling with PPR of 21.39% (BCS-RPC-21.39) and beam-column subassemblages made of NC materials modeling with a value of PPR at 21.09% (BCS-NC-21.09) and 32.02% (BCS-NC-32.02). The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of the BCS-RPC models compared to the performance of the BCS-NC models with PPR values below and above 25%, which is the maximum limit of permitted PPR. The results showed that all models of BCS-RPC had a better performance than all models of BCS-NC and the BCS-RPC model with PPR above 25% still behaved ductile and was able to dissipate energy well.

  1. Optical investigations of noncrystalline semiconductors. [considering silicon and boron films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, N. A.; Feldman, C.; Moorjani, K.

    1973-01-01

    Three areas of investigation into the properties of amorphous silicon and boron are reported: (1) optical properties of elemental amorphous semiconductors; (2) Mossbauer studies of disordered systems; and (3) theoretical aspects of disordered semiconductors.

  2. Boron sorption from aqueous solution by hydrotalcite and its preliminary application in geothermal water deboronation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qinghai; Zhang, Yin; Cao, Yaowu; Wang, Yanxin; Yan, Weide

    2013-11-01

    Hydrotalcite and its calcination product were used to treat pure water spiked with various concentrations of boron and geothermal water containing boron as a major undesirable element. The kinetics process of boron sorption by uncalcined hydrotalcite is controlled by the diffusion of boron from bulk solution to sorbent-solution boundary film and its exchange with interlayer chloride of hydrotalcite, whereas the removal rate of boron by calcined hydrotalcite rests with the restoration process of its layered structure. The results of isotherm sorption experiments reveal that calcined hydrotalcite generally has much stronger ability to lower solution boron concentration than uncalcined hydrotalcite. The combination of adsorption of boron on the residue of MgO-Al2O3 solid solution and intercalation of boron into the reconstructed hydrotalcite structure due to "structural memory effect" is the basic mechanism based on which the greater boron removal by calcined hydrotalcite was achieved. As 15 geothermal water samples were used to test the deboronation ability of calcined hydrotalcite at 65 °C, much lower boron removal efficiencies were observed. The competitive sorption of the other anions in geothermal water, such as HCO3-, SO4(2-), and F-, is the reason why calcined hydrotalcite could not remove boron from geothermal water as effectively as from pure boron solution. However, boron removal percents ranging from 89.3 to 99.0% could be obtained if 50 times of sorbent were added to the geothermal water samples. Calcined hydrotalcite is a good candidate for deboronation of geothermal water.

  3. Boron diffusion across the dialysis membrane during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Usuda, K; Kono, K; Nishiura, K; Miyata, K; Nishiura, H; Saito, M; Goto, E; Nakaya, H

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the movement of boron across the dialysis membrane, serum and dialysate boron levels of long-term hemodialysis (HD) patients (n = 17) were determined using inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry in both the inlet and the outlet side of the dialyzer. Results revealed that 77.8% of the serum boron in the inlet side of the dialyzer was filterable and 94.4% of filterable boron was actually filtered during HD. Boron dialysance was found to be 138.6 +/- 16.1 ml/min, and this value was higher than the clearance value of blood urea nitrogen (not significant), phosphorus and creatinine (p < 0.001). It is concluded that HD is effective in eliminating serum boron even at low concentrations, and boron can be classified as an element that is easily diffusible across the dialysis membrane. There seems to be relatively little relation of boron to serum constituents of macromolecules that are reported to have a major impact on the diffusion of trace elements across the HD membrane.

  4. NEW ADVANCES IN BORON SOIL CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Boron is an essential plant micronutrient for which the range between deficiency and toxicity is narrower than for any other nutrient element. Plants respond directly to the amount of B in soil solution and only indirectly to the amount of B adsorbed on soil particle surfaces. ...

  5. NEW ADVANCES IN BORON SOIL CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Boron is an essential plant micronutrient for which the range between deficiency and toxicity is narrower than for any other nutrient element. Plants respond directly to the amount of B in soil solution and only indirectly to the amount of B adsorbed on soil particle surfaces. ...

  6. NEW ADVANCES IN BORON SOIL CHEMISTRY - Paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    Boron is an essential plant micronutrient for which the range between deficiency and toxicity is narrower than for any other nutrient element. Plants respond directly to the amount of B in soil solution and only indirectly to the amount of B adsorbed on soil particle surfaces. ...

  7. NEW ADVANCES IN BORON SOIL CHEMISTRY - Paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    Boron is an essential plant micronutrient for which the range between deficiency and toxicity is narrower than for any other nutrient element. Plants respond directly to the amount of B in soil solution and only indirectly to the amount of B adsorbed on soil particle surfaces. ...

  8. Microwave-assisted wet digestion with H2O2 at high temperature and pressure using single reaction chamber for elemental determination in milk powder by ICP-OES and ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Muller, Edson I; Souza, Juliana P; Muller, Cristiano C; Muller, Aline L H; Mello, Paola A; Bizzi, Cezar A

    2016-08-15

    In this work a green digestion method which only used H2O2 as an oxidant and high temperature and pressure in the single reaction chamber system (SRC-UltraWave™) was applied for subsequent elemental determination by inductively coupled plasma-based techniques. Milk powder was chosen to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of the proposed method. Samples masses up to 500mg were efficiently digested, and the determination of Ca, Fe, K, Mg and Na was performed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), while trace elements (B, Ba, Cd, Cu, Mn, Mo, Pb, Sr and Zn) were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Residual carbon (RC) lower than 918mgL(-1) of C was obtained for digests which contributed to minimizing interferences in determination by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Accuracy was evaluated using certified reference materials NIST 1549 (non-fat milk powder certified reference material) and NIST 8435 (whole milk powder reference material). The results obtained by the proposed method were in agreement with the certified reference values (t-test, 95% confidence level). In addition, no significant difference was observed between results obtained by the proposed method and conventional wet digestion using concentrated HNO3. As digestion was performed without using any kind of acid, the characteristics of final digests were in agreement with green chemistry principles when compared to digests obtained using conventional wet digestion method with concentrated HNO3. Additionally, H2O2 digests were more suitable for subsequent analysis by ICP-based techniques due to of water being the main product of organic matrix oxidation. The proposed method was suitable for quality control of major components and trace elements present in milk powder in consonance with green sample preparation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamic response of laser ablative shock waves from coated and uncoated amorphous boron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelikani, Leela; Pinnoju, Venkateshwarlu; Verma, Pankaj; Singh, Raja V.; Kiran, P. Prem

    2017-01-01

    Laser ablative shock waves from compacted nano-sized powders was studied using time resolved shadowgraphy technique. Shock wave properties such as propagation of shock front, contact front, velocity and pressure behind the shock front were studied from nano-sized powders of Amorphous Boron (B) and Lithium Fluoride coated Boron (LiF-B) with the material density of 2.34 g/cc. The experiments were performed to understand the challenging aspects of laser-powder interactions to explore their application potential for laser ablation Propulsion (LAP).

  10. Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Graff, Robert T.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Reinhardt, Catherine; Voss, Lars F.; Cheung, Chin Li; Heineck, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    Three-dimensional boron particle loaded thermal neutron detectors utilize neutron sensitive conversion materials in the form of nano-powders and micro-sized particles, as opposed to thin films, suspensions, paraffin, etc. More specifically, methods to infiltrate, intersperse and embed the neutron nano-powders to form two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional charge sensitive platforms are specified. The use of nano-powders enables conformal contact with the entire charge-collecting structure regardless of its shape or configuration.

  11. The structure of boron in boron fibres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, J.; Krawitz, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of noncrystalline, chemically vapour-deposited boron fibres was investigated by computer modelling the experimentally obtained X-ray diffraction patterns. The diffraction patterns from the models were computed using the Debye scattering equation. The modelling was done utilizing the minimum nearest-neighbour distance, the density of the model, and the broadening and relative intensity of the various peaks as boundary conditions. The results suggest that the fibres consist of a continuous network of randomly oriented regions of local atomic order, about 2 nm in diameter, containing boron atoms arranged in icosahedra. Approximately half of these regions have a tetragonal structure and the remaining half a distorted rhombohedral structure. The model also indicates the presence of many partial icosahedra and loose atoms not associated with any icosahedra. The partial icosahedra and loose atoms indicated in the present model are in agreement with the relaxing sub-units which have been suggested to explain the anelastic behavior of fibre boron and the loosely bound boron atoms which have been postulated to explain the strengthening mechanism in boron fibres during thermal treatment.

  12. Biological Evaluation of Boronated Unnatural Amino Acids as New Boron Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Kabalka, G.W.; Yao, M.-L.; Marepally, S.R.; Chandra, S.

    2010-01-01

    There is a pressing need for new and more efficient boron delivery agents to tumor cells for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A class of boronated unnatural cyclic amino acids has demonstrated a remarkable selectivity toward tumors in animal and cell culture models, far superior to currently used agents in clinical BNCT. One of these amino acids, 1-amino-3-boronocyclopentanecarboxylic acid (ABCPC), has shown a tumor to blood ratio of 8 and a tumor to normal brain ratio of nearly 21 in a melanoma bearing mouse model. This work represents further biological characterization of this compound for tumor targeting in an EMT6 murine mammary carcinoma mouse model and a T98G human glioblastoma cell line. Female BALB/c mice bearing EMT6 tumors were injected with the fructose complex form of racemic mixtures of cis- and trans isomers of ABCPC in identical concentrations. Boron concentrations were measured in the tumor, blood, brain, skin, and liver tissues at 1, 3, and 5 hr post injection. These observations revealed a remarkable difference in racemic mixtures of cis and trans isomers in tumor targeting by boron. This implies that further separation of the L and D forms of this compound may enhance tumor targeting to an even higher degree than that provided by the racemic mixtures. Since the uptake measurements were made in homogenized tumor and normal tissues, little is known about the subcellular location of the boron arising from the various isomeric forms of the amino acid. To study subcellular delivery of boron from ABCPC in T98G human glioblastoma cells, we employed secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of ion microscopy, which is capable of quantitatively imaging isotopic (elemental) gradients in cells and tissues at 500 nm spatial resolution. The T98G cells were exposed to the nutrient medium containing 100 ppm boron equivalent of a mixture of both L and D isomers of ABCPC in the form of a fructose complex for 1 hr. Following this

  13. Boron: elementary challenge for experimenters and theoreticians.

    PubMed

    Albert, Barbara; Hillebrecht, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Many of the fundamental questions regarding the solid-state chemistry of boron are still unsolved, more than 200 years after its discovery. Recently, theoretical work on the existence and stability of known and new modifications of the element combined with high-pressure and high-temperature experiments have revealed new aspects. A lot has also happened over the last few years in the field of reactions between boron and main group elements. Binary compounds such as B(6)O, MgB(2), LiB(1-x), Na(3)B(20), and CaB(6) have caused much excitement, but the electron-precise, colorless boride carbides Li(2)B(12)C(2), LiB(13)C(2), and MgB(12)C(2) as well as the graphite analogue BeB(2)C(2) also deserve special attention. Physical properties such as hardness, superconductivity, neutron scattering length, and thermoelectricity have also made boron-rich compounds attractive to materials research and for applications. The greatest challenges to boron chemistry, however, are still the synthesis of monophasic products in macroscopic quantities and in the form of single crystals, the unequivocal identification and determination of crystal structures, and a thorough understanding of their electronic situation. Linked polyhedra are the dominating structural elements of the boron-rich compounds of the main group elements. In many cases, their structures can be derived from those that have been assigned to modifications of the element. Again, even these require a critical revision and discussion.

  14. Method for fabricating boron carbide articles

    DOEpatents

    Ardary, Zane L.; Reynolds, Carl D.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the fabrication of boron carbide articles having length-to-diameter or width ratios greater than 2 to 1. The process of the present invention is practiced by the steps comprising hot pressing boron carbide powder into article segments or portions in which the segments have a length-to-diameter or width ratio less than 1.5, aligning a plurality of the initially hot-pressed segments in a hot-pressing die with the end surfaces of the segments placed in intimate contact with one another, and then hot pressing the aligned segments into an article of the desired configuration. The resulting article exhibits essentially uniform density throughout the structure with the bonds between the segments being equivalent in hardness, strength, and density to the remainder of the article.

  15. Thermodynamic stability and properties of boron subnitrides from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ektarawong, A.; Simak, S. I.; Alling, B.

    2017-02-01

    We use the first-principles approach to clarify the thermodynamic stability as a function of pressure and temperature of three different α -rhombohedral-boron-like boron subnitrides, with the compositions of B6N , B13N2 , and B38N6 , proposed in the literature. We find that, out of these subnitrides with the structural units of B12(N-N), B12(NBN), and [B12(N-N) ] 0.33[B12(NBN)] 0.67 , respectively, only B38N6 , represented by [B12(N-N) ] 0.33[B12(NBN)] 0.67 , is thermodynamically stable. Beyond a pressure of about 7.5 GPa depending on the temperature, also B38N6 becomes unstable, and decomposes into cubic boron nitride and α -tetragonal-boron-like boron subnitride B50N2 . The thermodynamic stability of boron subnitrides and relevant competing phases is determined by the Gibbs free energy, in which the contributions from the lattice vibrations and the configurational disorder are obtained within the quasiharmonic and the mean-field approximations, respectively. We calculate lattice parameters, elastic constants, phonon and electronic density of states, and demonstrate that [B12(N-N) ] 0.33[B12(NBN)] 0.67 is both mechanically and dynamically stable, and is an electrical semiconductor. The simulated x-ray powder-diffraction pattern as well as the calculated lattice parameters of [B12(N-N) ] 0.33[B12(NBN)] 0.67 are found to be in good agreement with those of the experimentally synthesized boron subnitrides reported in the literature, verifying that B38N6 is the stable composition of α -rhombohedral-boron-like boron subnitride.

  16. Chemical disposition of boron in animals and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Moseman, R F

    1994-01-01

    Elemental boron was isolated in 1808. It typically occurs in nature as borates hydrated with varying amounts of water. Important compounds are boric acid and borax. Boron compounds are also used in the production of metals, enamels, and glasses. In trace amounts, boron is essential for the growth of many plants, and is found in animal and human tissues at low concentrations. Poisoning in humans has been reported as the result of accidental ingestion or use of large amounts in the treatment of burns. Boron as boric acid is fairly rapidly absorbed and excreted from the body via urine. The half-life of boric acid in humans is on the order of 1 day. Boron does not appear to accumulate in soft tissues of animals, but does accumulate in bone. Normal levels of boron in soft tissues, urine, and blood generally range from less than 0.05 ppm to no more than 10 ppm. In poisoning incidents, the amount of boric acid in brain and liver tissue has been reported to be as high as 2000 ppm. Recent studies at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences have indicated that boron may contribute to reduced fertility in male rodents fed 9000 ppm of boric acid in feed. Within a few days, boron levels in blood and most soft tissues quickly reached a plateau of about 15 ppm. Boron in bone did not appear to plateau, reaching 47 ppm after 7 days on the diet. Cessation of exposure to dietary boron resulted in a rapid drop in bone boron.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889870

  17. Controlling the Morphology and Oxidation Resistance of Boron Carbide Synthesized Via Carbothermic Reduction Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Yasser M. Z.; El-Sheikh, Said M.; Ewais, Emad M. M.; Abd-Allah, Asmaa A.; Sayed, Said A.

    2017-02-01

    Boron carbide powder was synthesized from boric acid and lactose mixtures via easy procedure. Boric acid and lactose solution mixtures were roasted in stainless steel pot at 280 °C for 24 h. Boron carbide was obtained by heating the roasted samples under flowing of industrial argon gas at 1500 °C for 3 h. The amount of borate ester compound in the roasted samples was highly influenced by the boron/carbon ratio in the starting mixtures and plays a versatile role in the produced boron carbide. The high-purity boron carbide powder was produced with a sample composed of lowest boron/carbon ratio of 1:1 without calcination step. Particle morphology was changed from nano-needles like structure of 8-10 nm size with highest carbon ratio mixture to spherical shape of >150 nm size with lowest one. The oxidation resistance performance of boron carbide is highly dependent on the morphology and grain size of the synthesized powder.

  18. Controlling the Morphology and Oxidation Resistance of Boron Carbide Synthesized Via Carbothermic Reduction Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Yasser M. Z.; El-Sheikh, Said M.; Ewais, Emad M. M.; Abd-Allah, Asmaa A.; Sayed, Said A.

    2017-03-01

    Boron carbide powder was synthesized from boric acid and lactose mixtures via easy procedure. Boric acid and lactose solution mixtures were roasted in stainless steel pot at 280 °C for 24 h. Boron carbide was obtained by heating the roasted samples under flowing of industrial argon gas at 1500 °C for 3 h. The amount of borate ester compound in the roasted samples was highly influenced by the boron/carbon ratio in the starting mixtures and plays a versatile role in the produced boron carbide. The high-purity boron carbide powder was produced with a sample composed of lowest boron/carbon ratio of 1:1 without calcination step. Particle morphology was changed from nano-needles like structure of 8-10 nm size with highest carbon ratio mixture to spherical shape of >150 nm size with lowest one. The oxidation resistance performance of boron carbide is highly dependent on the morphology and grain size of the synthesized powder.

  19. Update on human health effects of boron.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Forrest H

    2014-10-01

    In vitro, animal, and human experiments have shown that boron is a bioactive element in nutritional amounts that beneficially affects bone growth and central nervous system function, alleviates arthritic symptoms, facilitates hormone action and is associated with a reduced risk for some types of cancer. The diverse effects of boron suggest that it influences the formation and/or activity of substances that are involved in numerous biochemical processes. Several findings suggest that this influence is through the formation of boroesters in biomolecules containing cis-hydroxyl groups. These biomolecules include those that contain ribose (e.g., S-adenosylmethionine, diadenosine phosphates, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). In addition, boron may form boroester complexes with phosphoinositides, glycoproteins, and glycolipids that affect cell membrane integrity and function. Both animal and human data indicate that an intake of less than 1.0mg/day inhibits the health benefits of boron. Dietary surveys indicate such an intake is not rare. Thus, increasing boron intake by consuming a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, nuts and pulses should be recognized as a reasonable dietary recommendation to enhance health and well-being. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  20. Root-growth mechanism for single-walled boron nitride nanotubes in laser vaporization technique.

    PubMed

    Arenal, Raul; Stephan, Odile; Cochon, Jean-Lou; Loiseau, Annick

    2007-12-26

    We present a detailed study of the growth mechanism of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes synthesized by laser vaporization, which is the unique route known to the synthesis of this kind of tube in high quantities. We have performed a nanometric chemical and structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy (high-resolution mode (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy) of the synthesis products. Different boron-based compounds and other impurities were identified in the raw synthesis products. The results obtained by the TEM analysis and from the synthesis parameters (temperature, boron, and nitrogen sources) combined with phase diagram analysis to provide identification of the fundamental factors determining the nanotube growth mechanism. Our experiments strongly support a root-growth model that involves the presence of a droplet of boron. This phenomenological model considers the solubility, solidification, and segregation phenomena of the elements present in this boron droplet. In this model, we distinguish three different steps as a function of the temperature: (1) formation of the liquid boron droplet from the decomposition of different boron compounds existing in the hexagonal boron nitride target, (2) reaction of these boron droplets with nitrogen gas present in the vaporization chamber and recombination of these elements to form boron nitride, and (3) incorporation of the nitrogen atoms at the root of the boron particle at active reacting sites that achieves the growth of the tube.

  1. Abundance and distribution of boron in the Hauzenberg (Bavaria) granite complex

    SciTech Connect

    Sauerer, A.; Troll, G. )

    1990-01-01

    Hercynian S-type granites from the Hauzenberg igneous complex show a range of boron concentration from 1 to 12 ppm. The whole-rock boron data are not significantly correlated with concentrations of other trace elements (Zr, Rb, Ba, Sr, Ni, V, Co, Cu, Zn, F); neither is boron correlated with the major elements (except with sodium) or with the differentiation index (DI). The boron budget in the rock-forming minerals (plagioclase, alkali feldspar, quartz, biotite, muscovite) of the tourmaline-free granites reveals that the highest concentrations of boron occur in muscovite, whereas the greatest amount of boron is incorporated in plagioclase (57-69%) due to its high modal amount. Boron in plagioclase increases with the extent of of sericitization (obtained by X-ray diffractometry). Muscovite in a pegmatite contains more than 50% of the total boron. The areal distribution of boron within the complex is neither uniform nor random; an increase of boron concentrations from granodioritic to granitic rocks is indicated, whereas the late differentiates are depleted in boron.

  2. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of gadolinium studied using a boron-doped heater anvil

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, J. M.; Samudrala, G. K.; Velisavljevic, N.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2016-04-07

    A boron-doped designer heater anvil is used in conjunction with powder x-ray diffraction to collect structural information on a sample of quasi-hydrostatically loaded gadolinium metal up to pressures above 8 GPa and 600 K. The heater anvil consists of a natural diamond anvil that has been surface modified with a homoepitaxially-grown chemical-vapor-deposited layer of conducting boron-doped diamond, and is used as a DC heating element. Internally insulating both diamond anvils with sapphire support seats allows for heating and cooling of the high pressure area on the order of a few tens of seconds. This device is then used to scan the phase diagram of the sample by oscillating the temperature while continuously increasing the externally applied pressure and collecting in situ time-resolved powder diffraction images. In the pressure-temperature range covered in the experiment the gadolinium sample is observed in its hcp, αSm, and dhcp phases. Under this temperature cycling, the hcp→αSm transition proceeds in discontinuous steps at points along the expected phase boundary. Additionally, the unit cell volumes of each phase deviate from the expected thermal expansion behavior just before each transition is observed from the diffraction data. From these measurements (representing only one hour of synchrotron x-ray collection time), a single-experiment equation of state and phase diagram of each phase of gadolinium is presented for the range of 0 - 10 GPa and 300 - 650 K.

  3. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of gadolinium studied using a boron-doped heater anvil

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, J. M.; Samudrala, G. K.; Vohra, Y. K.; Velisavljevic, N.

    2016-04-07

    A boron-doped designer heater anvil is used in conjunction with powder x-ray diffraction to collect structural information on a sample of quasi-hydrostatically loaded gadolinium metal up to pressures above 8 GPa and 600 K. The heater anvil consists of a natural diamond anvil that has been surface modified with a homoepitaxially grown chemical-vapor-deposited layer of conducting boron-doped diamond, and is used as a DC heating element. Internally insulating both diamond anvils with sapphire support seats allows for heating and cooling of the high-pressure area on the order of a few tens of seconds. This device is then used to scan the phase diagram of the sample by oscillating the temperature while continuously increasing the externally applied pressure and collecting in situ time-resolved powder diffraction images. In the pressure-temperature range covered in this experiment, the gadolinium sample is observed in its hcp, αSm, and dhcp phases. Under this temperature cycling, the hcp → αSm transition proceeds in discontinuous steps at points along the expected phase boundary. From these measurements (representing only one hour of synchrotron x-ray collection time), a single-experiment equation of state and phase diagram of each phase of gadolinium is presented for the range of 0–10 GPa and 300–650 K.

  4. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of gadolinium studied using a boron-doped heater anvil

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, J. M.; Samudrala, G. K.; Velisavljevic, N.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2016-04-07

    A boron-doped designer heater anvil is used in conjunction with powder x-ray diffraction to collect structural information on a sample of quasi-hydrostatically loaded gadolinium metal up to pressures above 8GPa and 600K. The heater anvil consists of a natural diamond anvil that has been surface modified with a homoepitaxially grown chemical-vapor-deposited layer of conducting boron-doped diamond, and is used as a DC heating element. Internally insulating both diamond anvils with sapphire support seats allows for heating and cooling of the high-pressure area on the order of a few tens of seconds. This device is then used to scan the phase diagram of the sample by oscillating the temperature while continuously increasing the externally applied pressure and collecting in situ time-resolved powder diffraction images. In the pressure-temperature range covered in this experiment, the gadolinium sample is observed in its hcp, αSm, and dhcp phases. Under this temperature cycling, the hcp → αSm transition proceeds in discontinuous steps at points along the expected phase boundary. From these measurements (representing only one hour of synchrotron x-ray collection time), a single-experiment equation of state and phase diagram of each phase of gadolinium is presented for the range of 0–10GPa and 300–650K

  5. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of gadolinium studied using a boron-doped heater anvil

    DOE PAGES

    Montgomery, J. M.; Samudrala, G. K.; Velisavljevic, N.; ...

    2016-04-07

    A boron-doped designer heater anvil is used in conjunction with powder x-ray diffraction to collect structural information on a sample of quasi-hydrostatically loaded gadolinium metal up to pressures above 8GPa and 600K. The heater anvil consists of a natural diamond anvil that has been surface modified with a homoepitaxially grown chemical-vapor-deposited layer of conducting boron-doped diamond, and is used as a DC heating element. Internally insulating both diamond anvils with sapphire support seats allows for heating and cooling of the high-pressure area on the order of a few tens of seconds. This device is then used to scan the phasemore » diagram of the sample by oscillating the temperature while continuously increasing the externally applied pressure and collecting in situ time-resolved powder diffraction images. In the pressure-temperature range covered in this experiment, the gadolinium sample is observed in its hcp, αSm, and dhcp phases. Under this temperature cycling, the hcp → αSm transition proceeds in discontinuous steps at points along the expected phase boundary. From these measurements (representing only one hour of synchrotron x-ray collection time), a single-experiment equation of state and phase diagram of each phase of gadolinium is presented for the range of 0–10GPa and 300–650K« less

  6. Boron and strontium isotope ratios and major/trace elements concentrations in tea leaves at four major tea growing gardens in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Ta; You, Chen-Feng; Aggarwal, Suresh Kumar; Chung, Chuan-Hsiung; Chao, Hung-Chun; Liu, Hou-Chun

    2016-06-01

    Isotopic compositions of B and Sr in rocks and sediments can be used as tracers for plant provincial sources. This study aims to test whether tea leaf origin can be discriminated using (10)B/(11)B and Sr isotopic composition data, along with concentrations of major/trace elements, in tea specimens collected from major plantation gardens in Taiwan. The tea leaves were digested by microwave and analyzed by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The data showed significant variations in (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios (from 0.70482 to 0.71462), which reflect changes in soil, groundwater or irrigation conditions. The most radiogenic tea leaves were found at the Taitung garden and the least radiogenic ones were from the Hualien garden. The δ (11)B was found to change appreciably (δ (11)B = 0.38-23.73 ‰) which could be due to fertilizers. The maximum δ (11)B was also observed in tea samples from the Hualien garden. Principal component analysis combining (87)Sr/(86)Sr, δ (11)B and major/trace elements results successfully discriminated different sources of major tea gardens in Taiwan, except the Hualien gardens, and this may be due to rather complicated local geological settings.

  7. Innovative method for boron extraction from iron ore containing boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang; Wang, Jing-song; Yu, Xin-yun; Shen, Ying-feng; Zuo, Hai-bin; Xue, Qing-guo

    2016-03-01

    A novel process for boron enrichment and extraction from ludwigite based on iron nugget technology was proposed. The key steps of this novel process, which include boron and iron separation, crystallization of boron-rich slag, and elucidation of the boron extraction behavior of boron-rich slag by acid leaching, were performed at the laboratory. The results indicated that 95.7% of the total boron could be enriched into the slag phase, thereby forming a boron-rich slag during the iron and slag melting separation process. Suanite and kotoite were observed to be the boron-containing crystalline phases, and the boron extraction properties of the boron-rich slag depended on the amounts and grain sizes of these minerals. When the boron-rich slag was slowly cooled to 1100°C, the slag crystallized well and the efficiency of extraction of boron (EEB) of the slag was the highest observed in the present study. The boron extraction property of the slow-cooled boron-rich slag obtained in this study was much better than that of szaibelyite ore under the conditions of 80% of theoretical sulfuric acid amount, leaching time of 30 min, leaching temperature of 40°C, and liquid-to-solid ratio of 8 mL/g.

  8. Fe nanowire encapsulated in boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koi, Naruhiro; Oku, Takeo; Nishijima, Masahiko

    2005-11-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes, nanohorns, nanocoils were synthesized by annealing Fe 4N and B powders at 1000 °C for 1 h in nitrogen gas atmosphere. Especially, Fe-filled BN nanotubes were produced, and investigated by high-resolution electron microscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which indicates that the [110] of Fe is parallel to the BN nanotube axis. Formation mechanism of Fe-filled BN nanotube was speculated based on these results.

  9. Method for exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A new method is disclosed for the exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride into mono- and few-layered nanosheets (or nanoplatelets, nanomesh, nanoribbons). The method does not necessarily require high temperature or vacuum, but uses commercially available h-BN powders (or those derived from these materials, bulk crystals) and only requires wet chemical processing. The method is facile, cost efficient, and scalable. The resultant exfoliated h-BN is dispersible in an organic solvent or water thus amenable for solution processing for unique microelectronic or composite applications.

  10. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  11. Direct current sputtering of boron from boron/coron mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, John R.; Manos, Dennis; Nartowitz, Ed

    1994-01-01

    A method for coating a substrate with boron by sputtering includes lowering the electrical resistance of a boron-containing rod to allow electrical conduction in the rod; placing the boron-containing rod inside a vacuum chamber containing substrate material to be coated; applying an electrical potential between the boron target material and the vacuum chamber; countering a current avalanche that commences when the conduction heating rate exceeds the cooling rate, and until a steady equilibrium heating current is reached; and, coating the substrate material with boron by sputtering from the boron-containing rod.

  12. A comparative study of the mechanical properties and the behavior of carbon and boron in stainless steel cladding tubes fabricated by PM HIP and traditional technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    The ring tensile test method was optimized and successfully used to obtain precise data for specimens of the cladding tubes of AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steels and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. The positive modifications in the tensile properties of the stainless steel cladding tubes fabricated by powder metallurgy and hot isostatic pressing of melt atomized powders (PM HIP) when compared with the cladding tubes produced by traditional technology were found. Presently, PM HIP is also used in the fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels. The high degree of homogeneity of the distribution of carbon and boron as well the high dispersivity of the phase-structure elements in the specimens manufactured via PM HIP were determined by direct autoradiography methods. These results correlate well with the increase of the tensile properties of the specimens produced by PM HIP technology.

  13. Structure, Mechanics and Synthesis of Nanoscale Carbon and Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, Steven G.

    formation of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In Chapter 6, we look at various methods of producing BNNTs from boron droplets, and introduce a new method involving injection of boron powder into an induction furnace. In Chapter 7 we consider another useful process, where ammonia is reacted with boron vapor generated in situ, either through the reaction of boron with metal oxides or through the decomposition of metal borides.

  14. Method for removing oxide contamination from titanium diboride powder

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

    A method for removing oxide contamination from titanium diboride powder involves the direct chemical treatment of TiB/sub 2/ powders with a gaseous boron halide, such as BCl/sub 3/, at temperatures in the range of 500 to 800/sup 0/C. The BCl/sub 3/ reacts with the oxides to form volatile species which are removed by the BCl/sub 3/ exit stream.

  15. Method for removing oxide contamination from titanium diboride powder

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, Jorulf; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1984-01-01

    A method for removing oxide contamination from titanium diboride powder involves the direct chemical treatment of TiB.sub.2 powders with a gaseous boron halide, such as BCl.sub.3, at temperatures in the range of 500.degree.-800.degree. C. The BCl.sub.3 reacts with the oxides to form volatile species which are removed by the BCl.sub.3 exit stream.

  16. Boron nitride composites

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  17. Zeolitic Boron Imidazolate Frameworks**

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Wu, Tao; Zhou, Cong; Chen, Shumei; Feng, Pingyun; Bu, Xianhui

    2009-01-01

    From porous AlPO4 to porous BIFs Reported here are a family of crystalline materials based on boron imidazolate frameworks (BIFs). It is demonstrated that the synthetic method, which is based on the crosslinking of various pre-synthesized boron imidazolates by monovalent cations (Li+ and Cu+), is capable of generating a large variety of open frameworks ranging from the 4-connected zeolitic sodalite type to the 3-connected chiral (10,3)-a type. PMID:19241428

  18. Nondestructive determination of boron doses in semiconductor materials using neutron depth profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Uenlue, K.; Saglam, M.; Wehring, B.W.

    1996-12-31

    The physical and electrical properties of semiconductor materials are greatly effected by implantation of boron and other elements. The dose and depth distribution of boron in the near surface region and across interfacial boundaries determine the quality of semiconductor devices. Therefore, a number of analytical techniques has been developed in the last two decades to measure boron doses and depth profiles in semiconductor materials. Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) is one of the techniques which is capable of determining the boron dose as well as the concentration distribution in the near surface region of semiconductor materials. NDP is a nuclear technique which is based on the absorption reaction of thermal/cold neutrons by certain isotopes of low mass elements e.g., boron-10. In this study, boron doses in semiconductor materials were measured using NDP. The results will be used to complement the measurements done with other techniques and provide a basis for accurate dose calibration of commercial ion implant systems.

  19. Boron and strontium isotopic characterization of coal combustion residuals: validation of new environmental tracers.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Laura S; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Hower, James C; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-12-16

    In the U.S., coal fired power plants produce over 136 million tons of coal combustion residuals (CCRs) annually. CCRs are enriched in toxic elements, and their leachates can have significant impacts on water quality. Here we report the boron and strontium isotopic ratios of leaching experiments on CCRs from a variety of coal sources (Appalachian, Illinois, and Powder River Basins). CCR leachates had a mostly negative δ(11)B, ranging from -17.6 to +6.3‰, and (87)Sr/(86)Sr ranging from 0.70975 to 0.71251. Additionally, we utilized these isotopic ratios for tracing CCR contaminants in different environments: (1) the 2008 Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) coal ash spill affected waters; (2) CCR effluents from power plants in Tennessee and North Carolina; (3) lakes and rivers affected by CCR effluents in North Carolina; and (4) porewater extracted from sediments in lakes affected by CCRs. The boron isotopes measured in these environments had a distinctive negative δ(11)B signature relative to background waters. In contrast (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios in CCRs were not always exclusively different from background, limiting their use as a CCR tracer. This investigation demonstrates the validity of the combined geochemical and isotopic approach as a unique and practical identification method for delineating and evaluating the environmental impact of CCRs.

  20. Risk assessment of boron in glass wool insulation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Allan Astrup

    2009-01-01

    Glass wools are man-made vitreous fibres, which consist principally of sodium, calcium and magnesium silicates, but may contain smaller amounts of other elements, including boron. The boron contents originate from the use of borates in the glass melting process as a glass former and a flux agent. During the production and application of glass wool insulation products, workers may legally be exposed to glass fibre up to the occupational limit value, commonly of 1 fibre/cm3. However, in practice, the fibre exposure will be at least ten times lower. Boron is a non-metallic element widely distributed in nature, where it occurs as boric acid, borates and borosilicates. Humans are mainly exposed to boron via vegetarian food and drinking water, mineral supplements and various consumer products. Boron is an essential element for plant growth, but the essentiality for humans is not proven, although intakes of trace amounts of the element seem to be useful for bone health and proper brain function; higher concentrations of boron, however, may be toxic. In relation to the European Union legislation on dangerous substances, an EU Expert Group has recommended classifying boric acid and borates with risk phrases for reproductive toxicity. The aim of this paper is to assess whether the new EU hazard classification of boron compounds should imply that glass wool products used for building insulation in the future should be labelled, "may impair fertility and cause harm to the unborn child", because of the low boron content. Boron intakes are estimated in a worst-case occupational situation with human exposure to glass wool fibres at the occupational limit of 1 fibre/cm3 by calculation of the mass of the amount of fibres inhaled during an 8-h work day. Fibres are supposed to be cylinders of glass with a length of 30 microm, an average diameter of 1.5-2 microm and containing either 1.5% or 3.5% boron. As a worst-case scenario, the density of the fibres is set to 2,700 kg/m3. The

  1. Accumulation and loss of arsenic and boron, alone and in combination, in mallard ducks

    SciTech Connect

    Pendleton, G.W.; Whitworth, M.R.; Olsen, G.H.

    1995-08-01

    Arsenic and boron are common in the environment, and wildlife can be exposed to toxic concentrations through both natural and human-influenced processes. The authors exposed adult male mallard ducks to dietary concentrations of 300 ppm arsenic as sodium arsenate, 1,600 ppm boron as boric acid, or both and estimated the tissue accumulation and loss rates when the ducks were returned to uncontaminated food. Both elements were accumulated rapidly; equilibrium levels were reached for arsenic in 10 to 30 d and for boron in 2 to 15 d. Accumulation of each element was slowed by the presence of the other in the diet. Boron was eliminated by mallards very rapidly, with few detectable residues {ge}1 d after removal of boron from the diet; arsenic was also rapidly lost with half-lives of 1 to 3 d (half-lives were not constant throughout the loss period). Arsenic loss rate was not affected by the presence of boron. Arsenic accumulated to the highest level in liver tissue, with blood and brain levels lower; concentrations in the liver and blood were proportional but affected by the presence of boron. Boron concentrations were highest in the blood, followed by the brain and liver; concentrations in the liver and blood were proportional but affected by the presence of boron. Boron concentrations were highest in the blood, followed by the brain and liver; concentrations in the blood and liver were proportional.

  2. Explosively driven low-density foams and powders

    DOEpatents

    Viecelli, James A [Orinda, CA; Wood, Lowell L [Simi Valley, CA; Ishikawa, Muriel Y [Livermore, CA; Nuckolls, John H [Danville, CA; Pagoria, Phillip F [Livermore, CA

    2010-05-04

    Hollow RX-08HD cylindrical charges were loaded with boron and PTFE, in the form of low-bulk density powders or powders dispersed in a rigid foam matrix. Each charge was initiated by a Comp B booster at one end, producing a detonation wave propagating down the length of the cylinder, crushing the foam or bulk powder and collapsing the void spaces. The PdV work done in crushing the material heated it to high temperatures, expelling it in a high velocity fluid jet. In the case of boron particles supported in foam, framing camera photos, temperature measurements, and aluminum witness plates suggest that the boron was completely vaporized by the crush wave and that the boron vapor turbulently mixed with and burned in the surrounding air. In the case of PTFE powder, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of residues recovered from fragments of a granite target slab suggest that heating was sufficient to dissociate the PTFE to carbon vapor and molecular fluorine which reacted with the quartz and aluminum silicates in the granite to form aluminum oxide and mineral fluoride compounds.

  3. Computational study of boron nitride nanotube synthesis: How catalyst morphology stabilizes the boron nitride bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riikonen, S.; Foster, A. S.; Krasheninnikov, A. V.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2009-10-01

    In an attempt to understand why catalytic methods for the growth of boron nitride nanotubes work much worse than for their carbon counterparts, we use first-principles calculations to study the energetics of elemental reactions forming N2 , B2 , and BN molecules on an iron catalyst. We observe that the local morphology of a step edge present in our nanoparticle model stabilizes the boron nitride molecule with respect to B2 due to the ability of the step edge to offer sites with different coordination simultaneously for nitrogen and boron. Our results emphasize the importance of atomic steps for a high yield chemical vapor deposition growth of BN nanotubes and may outline new directions for improving the efficiency of the method.

  4. Boron-carbide-aluminum and boron-carbide-reactive metal cermets

    DOEpatents

    Halverson, Danny C.; Pyzik, Aleksander J.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    1986-01-01

    Hard, tough, lightweight boron-carbide-reactive metal composites, particularly boron-carbide-aluminum composites, are produced. These composites have compositions with a plurality of phases. A method is provided, including the steps of wetting and reacting the starting materials, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected. Starting compositions, reaction temperatures, reaction times, and reaction atmospheres are parameters for controlling the process and resulting compositions. The ceramic phases are homogeneously distributed in the metal phases and adhesive forces at ceramic-metal interfaces are maximized. An initial consolidation step is used to achieve fully dense composites. Microstructures of boron-carbide-aluminum cermets have been produced with modulus of rupture exceeding 110 ksi and fracture toughness exceeding 12 ksi.sqroot.in. These composites and methods can be used to form a variety of structural elements.

  5. Metal powder reactions in ball milling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, A.

    1976-01-01

    On milling chromium powder in three metal chlorides and either chromium or nickel powders in ten organic liquids representative of nine different functional groups, the powders always reacted with the liquids and became contaminated with elements from them. The milled powders had specific surface areas ranging from 0.14 to 37 sq m/g, and the total contamination with elements from the milling liquid ranged from 0.01 to 56 wt%. In most milling runs, compounds resulting from substitution, addition, or elimination reactions formed in or from the milling liquid, and in most runs with organic liquids H2, CH4, and CO2 were generated.

  6. Boronated liposome development and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, M.F.

    1995-11-01

    The boronated liposome development and evaluation effort consists of two separate tasks. The first is the development of new boron compounds and the synthesis of known boron species with BNCT potential. These compounds are then encapsulated within liposomes for the second task, biodistribution testing in tumor-bearing mice, which examines the potential for the liposomes and their contents to concentrate boron in cancerous tissues.

  7. A reduction nitridation route to boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Wang, X.; Liu, J.; Wang, Z.; Qian, Y.

    2005-10-01

    Multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes were synthesized through a simple reduction nitridation route, in which boron trifluoride etherate ((C2H5)2OBF3) and sodium azide (NaN3) were used as reactants in the presence of Fe-Ni powder at 600 °C for 12 h. The obtained BN nanotubes have an average outer diameter of 60 nm, an average inner diameter of 30 nm, and an average length up to 300 nm. Some nanobamboo structured BN were found coexisting with the BN nanotubes. The experimental results show that the reaction temperature and Fe-Ni powder play important roles in the formation of BN nanotubes. Finally, a possible formation mechanism is also discussed.

  8. Enhancement of thermal neutron shielding of cement mortar by using borosilicate glass powder.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bo-Kil; Lee, Jun-Cheol; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2017-05-01

    Concrete has been used as a traditional biological shielding material. High hydrogen content in concrete also effectively attenuates high-energy fast neutrons. However, concrete does not have strong protection against thermal neutrons because of the lack of boron compound. In this research, boron was added in the form of borosilicate glass powder to increase the neutron shielding property of cement mortar. Borosilicate glass powder was chosen in order to have beneficial pozzolanic activity and to avoid deleterious expansion caused by an alkali-silica reaction. According to the experimental results, borosilicate glass powder with an average particle size of 13µm showed pozzolanic activity. The replacement of borosilicate glass powder with cement caused a slight increase in the 28-day compressive strength. However, the incorporation of borosilicate glass powder resulted in higher thermal neutron shielding capability. Thus, borosilicate glass powder can be used as a good mineral additive for various radiation shielding purposes.

  9. Method for separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1978-01-01

    A method of separating boron isotopes .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl.sub.3 molecules containing a particular boron isotope. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl.sub.3, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

  10. Status of Boron Combustion Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 5 Vaporization of boron oxide drops In wet and dry .-. environments. From Turns et al . ([1...19 10 SEN photographs of boron slurry agglomerates: a. Oxide layer present: b. Oxide layer absent.From Turns et al . [7...21 -- f- 11 Ignition of boron agglomerates as a function of particle and agglomerate diameters. From Shevahuk et al . [26

  11. Mineral of the month: boron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyday, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    What does boron have to do with baseball, apple pie, motherhood and Chevrolet? Boron minerals and chemicals are used in the tanning of leather baseballs and gloves; in micro-fertilizer to grow apples and in the glass and enamels of bakewares to cook apple pie; in boron detergents for soaking baby clothes and diapers; and in fiberglass parts for the Chevrolet Corvette.

  12. High density crystalline boron prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1993-08-31

    Boron powder is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid boron monolith with a bulk density at least 2.22 g/cc and up to or greater than 2.34 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1,800 C and 30 PSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.34 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  13. High density crystalline boron prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, Clarence L.

    1993-01-01

    Boron powder is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid boron monolith with a bulk density at least 2.22 g/cc and up to or greater than 2.34 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.34 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  14. Boron uptake, localization, and speciation in marine brown algae.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric P; Wu, Youxian; Carrano, Carl J

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to the generally boron-poor terrestrial environment, the concentration of boron in the marine environment is relatively high (0.4 mM) and while there has been extensive interest in its use as a surrogate of pH in paleoclimate studies in the context of climate change-related questions, the relatively depth independent, and the generally non-nutrient-like concentration profile of this element have led to boron being neglected as a potentially biologically relevant element in the ocean. Among the marine plant-like organisms the brown algae (Phaeophyta) are one of only five lineages of photosynthetic eukaryotes to have evolved complex multicellularity. Many of unusual and often unique features of brown algae are attributable to this singular evolutionary history. These adaptations are a reflection of the marine coastal environment which brown algae dominate in terms of biomass. Consequently, brown algae are of fundamental importance to oceanic ecology, geochemistry, and coastal industry. Our results indicate that boron is taken up by a facilitated diffusion mechanism against a considerable concentration gradient. Furthermore, in both Ectocarpus and Macrocystis some boron is most likely bound to cell wall constituent alginate and the photoassimilate mannitol located in sieve cells. Herein, we describe boron uptake, speciation, localization and possible biological function in two species of brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera and Ectocarpus siliculosus.

  15. Boron Carbide Aluminum Cermets for External Pressure Housing Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    TABLES 1. Phase chemistry of B4C/A1 composites as a function of baking temperature (by stereology) .................. ...... 10 2. Summary of the...diffractometer using CuKo radiation and a scan rate of 2° per minute. The chemistry of all phases was determined from electron microprobe analysis of... a change in the chemistry of the boron carbide. The depth of the ESCA beam into the surface is only about 50A. Further analysis of the BC powders

  16. A boron-boron coupling reaction between two ethyl cation analogues.

    PubMed

    Litters, Sebastian; Kaifer, Elisabeth; Enders, Markus; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2013-12-01

    The design of larger architectures from smaller molecular building blocks by element-element coupling reactions is one of the key concerns of synthetic chemistry, so a number of strategies were developed for this bottom-up approach. A general scheme is the coupling of two elements with opposing polarity or that of two radicals. Here, we show that a B-B coupling reaction is possible between two boron analogues of the ethyl cation, resulting in the formation of an unprecedented dicationic tetraborane. The bonding properties in the rhomboid B₄ core of the product can be described as two B-B units connected by three-centre, two-electron bonds, sharing the short diagonal. Our discovery might lead the way to the long sought-after boron chain polymers with a structure similar to the silicon chains in β-SiB₃. Moreover, the reaction is a prime textbook example of the influence of multiple-centre bonding on reactivity.

  17. In Vivo Boron Uptake Determination for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Binello, Emanuela; Shortkroff, Sonya; Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    1999-06-06

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) has been proposed as a new application of the boron neutron capture reaction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In BNCS, a boron compound is injected into the joint space, where it is taken up by the synovium. The joint is then irradiated with neutrons of a desired energy range, inducing the boron neutron capture reaction in boron-loaded cells. Boron uptake by the synovium is an important parameter in the assessment of the potential of BNCS and in the determination of whether to proceed to animal irradiations for the testing of therapeutic efficacy. We present results from an investigation of boron uptake in vivo by the synovium.

  18. Boron isotope exchange in a heterogeneous boron-boron fluoride system

    SciTech Connect

    Begak, O.Yu.; Fedorov, V.V.

    1988-11-01

    Studies have been made on exchange between /sup 10/B and /sup 11/B in heterogeneous systems containing finely divided amorphous boron and BF/sub 3/ gas. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters have been examined. The self-diffusion coefficient for boron in amorphous boron has been determined at 973-1273 K.

  19. Energetic powder

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Danen, Wayne C.

    2003-12-23

    Fluoroalkylsilane-coated metal particles. The particles have a central metal core, a buffer layer surrounding the core, and a fluoroalkylsilane layer attached to the buffer layer. The particles may be prepared by combining a chemically reactive fluoroalkylsilane compound with an oxide coated metal particle having a hydroxylated surface. The resulting fluoroalkylsilane layer that coats the particles provides them with excellent resistance to aging. The particles can be blended with oxidant particles to form energetic powder that releases chemical energy when the buffer layer is physically disrupted so that the reductant metal core can react with the oxidant.

  20. Ceramic Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In developing its product line of specialty ceramic powders and related products for government and industrial customers, including companies in the oil, automotive, electronics and nuclear industries, Advanced Refractory Technologies sought technical assistance from NERAC, Inc. in specific areas of ceramic materials and silicon technology, and for assistance in identifying possible applications of these materials in government programs and in the automotive and electronics industry. NERAC conducted a computerized search of several data bases and provided extensive information in the subject areas requested. NERAC's assistance resulted in transfer of technologies that helped ART staff develop a unique method for manufacture of ceramic materials to precise customer specifications.

  1. Enhanced-wetting, boron-based liquid-metal ion source and method

    DOEpatents

    Bozack, M.J.; Swanson, L.W.; Bell, A.E.; Clark, W.M. Jr.; Utlaut, M.W.; Storms, E.K.

    1999-02-16

    A binary, boron-based alloy as a source for field-emission-type, ion-beam generating devices, wherein boron predominates in the alloy, preferably with a presence of about 60 atomic percent is disclosed. The other constituent in the alloy is selected from the group of elements consisting of nickel, palladium and platinum. Predominance of boron in these alloys, during operation, promotes combining of boron with trace impurities of carbon in the alloys to form B{sub 4}C and thus to promote wetting of an associated carbon support substrate. 1 fig.

  2. Enhanced-wetting, boron-based liquid-metal ion source and method

    DOEpatents

    Bozack, Michael J.; Swanson, Lynwood W.; Bell, Anthony E.; Clark Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Storms, Edmund K.

    1999-01-01

    A binary, boron-based alloy as a source for field-emission-type, ion-beam generating devices, wherein boron predominates in the alloy, preferably with a presence of about 60 atomic percent. The other constituent in the alloy is selected from the group of elements consisting of nickel, palladium and platinum. Predominance of boron in these alloys, during operation, promotes combining of boron with trace impurities of carbon in the alloys to form B.sub.4 C and thus to promote wetting of an associated carbon support substrate.

  3. Numerical study on determining formation porosity using a boron capture gamma ray technique and MCNP.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juntao; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Xinguang; Han, Fei; Yuan, Zhelong

    2014-12-01

    Formation porosity can be determined using the boron capture gamma ray counting ratio with a near to far detector in a pulsed neutron-gamma element logging tool. The thermal neutron distribution, boron capture gamma spectroscopy and porosity response for formations with different water salinity and wellbore diameter characteristics were simulated using the Monte Carlo method. We found that a boron lining improves the signal-to-noise ratio and that the boron capture gamma ray counting ratio has a higher sensitivity for determining porosity than total capture gamma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Minerals Yearbook 1989: Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Lyday, P.A.

    1990-08-01

    U.S. production and sales of boron minerals and chemicals decreased during the year. Domestically, glass fiber insulation was the largest use for borates, followed by sales to distributors, textile-grade glass fibers, and borosilicate glasses. California was the only domestic source of boron minerals. The United States continued to provide essentially all of its own supply while maintaining a strong position as a source of sodium borate products and boric acid exported to foreign markets. Supplementary U.S. imports of Turkish calcium borate and calcium-sodium borate ores, borax, and boric acid, primarily for various glass uses, continued.

  5. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Bystroff, Roman I.; Miller, Dale E.

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  6. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  7. The loss of boron in ultra-shallow boron implanted Si under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelicon, P.; El Bouanani, M.; Prasad, G. V. R.; Razpet, A.; Simcic, J.; Guo, B. N.; Birt, D.; Duggan, J. L.; McDaniel, F. D.

    2006-08-01

    Heavy ion impact has been known to cause a loss of light elements from the near-surface region of the irradiated sample. One of the possible approaches to a better understanding of the processes responsible for the release of specific elements is to irradiate shallow-implanted samples, which exhibit a well-known depth distribution of the implanted species. In this work, the samples studied were produced by implantation of Si wafers with 11 B at implantation energies of 250 and 500 eV and fluence of 1.0x10(15) atoms/cm 2 . Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis was applied to monitor the remnant boron fluence in the sample. Irradiation of the samples by a 14.2 (MeVF4+)-F-19 beam resulted in a slow decrease of boron remnant fluence with initial loss rates of the order of 0.05 B atom per impact ion. Under irradiation with 12 (MeVS3+)-S-32 ions, the remnant boron fluence in Si decreased exponentially with a much faster loss rate of boron and became constant after a certain heavy ion irradiation dose. A simple model, which assumes a finite desorption range and corresponding depletion of the near-surface region, was used to describe the observations. The depletion depths under the given irradiation conditions were calculated from the measured data.

  8. Flame synthesis of high purity, nanosized crystalline silicon carbide powder

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, D.G.; Calcote, H.F.; Gill, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Self-propagating flames in pure silane-acetylene mixtures produce silicon carbide (SiC) powder and hydrogen as main products. Through precise control of the stoichiometry of the reactant gas mixture, it has been possible to produce white SiC at high yields. Characterization of such powders by TEM has shown that the nascent powder consists of polycrystalline hexagonal plates with a narrow size distribution (40 {+-} 7 nm diameter). Infrared spectroscopy of powders indicate microcrystalline SiC and little bound hydrogen. Chemical analysis by the ANSI method showed the powder to be >96 wt% SiC with an impurity of silica (3.9 weight%) due to air exposure of the powder. Traces (0.1 to 0.2 weight%) of both free carbon and free silicon were found. Metal impurities detected by SIMS were typically low: less than 10 ppba for aluminum, sodium, titanium and vanadium. Boron was observed at 10 ppma. Like the oxygen, the boron impurities are probably associated with exposure of the powders to the atmosphere.

  9. Reaction-bonding preparation of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/MoSi{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/WSi{sub 2} composites from elemental powders

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.R.; Marino, F.

    1997-01-01

    Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/MoSi{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/WSi{sub 2} composites were prepared by reaction-bonding processes using as starting materials powder mixtures of Si-Mo and Si-W, respectively. A presintering step in an Ar-base atmosphere was used before nitriding for the formation of MoSi{sub 2} and WSi{sub 2}; the nitridation in a N{sub 2}-base atmosphere was followed after presintering with the total stepwise cycle of 1,350 C {times} 20 h + 1,400 C {times} 20 h + 1,450 C {times} 2 h. The final phases obtained in the two different composites were Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and MoSi{sub 2} or WSi{sub 2}; no free elemental Si and Mo or W were detected by X-ray diffraction.

  10. Finite element analysis of the temperature field in laser cladding of Ni-based powders on teeth surfaces of the helical gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Liu, S.; Tao, R.; Liu, D.; Lou, D.; Bennett, P.

    2016-09-01

    The temperature field formed in the process of laser cladding of worn teeth surfaces of the gear shaft is simulated by the finite element analysis software. Isothermal lines inside the tooth are obtained. Simulated results are compared with experimental data. Recommendations are given on improvement of the cladding technology to provide a durable continuous coating.

  11. Nanostructure and Phases Formation under Mechanical Alloying of Bynary Powder Mixtures of Fe and sp-Element (M); M = C,B,Al,Si,Ge,Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelsukov, E. P.; Dorofeev, G. A.

    2005-07-01

    The processes of mechanical alloying of iron and sp-elements (C, B, Al, Si, Ge, Sn) under identical conditions of mechanical treatment have been studied. General regularities and differences in the mechanisms and kinetics of solid state reactions have been ascertained. A microscopic model of mechanical alloying in these systems is suggested.

  12. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  13. Boron and Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA 635 / 04 / 052 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF BORON AND COMPOUNDS ( CAS No . 7440 - 42 - 8 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) June 2004 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed

  14. Understanding boron through size-selected clusters: structure, chemical bonding, and fluxionality.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Alina P; Popov, Ivan A; Piazza, Zachary A; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Boldyrev, Alexander I

    2014-04-15

    Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center-two-electron (2c-2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter-two-electron (nc-2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron's electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13(+) and B19(-). A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B(-), formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B(-)/C analogy. It is

  15. Boron site preference in ternary Ta and Nb boron silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Atta U.; Nunes, Carlos A.; Coelho, Gilberto C.; Suzuki, Paulo A.; Grytsiv, Andriy; Bourree, Francoise; Rogl, Peter F.

    2012-06-15

    X-ray single crystal (XSC) and neutron powder diffraction data (NPD) were used to elucidate boron site preference for five ternary phases. Ta{sub 3}Si{sub 1-x}B{sub x} (x=0.112(4)) crystallizes with the Ti{sub 3}P-type (space group P4{sub 2}/n) with B-atoms sharing the 8g site with Si atoms. Ta{sub 5}Si{sub 3-x} (x=0.03(1); Cr{sub 5}B{sub 3}- type) crystallizes with space group I4/mcm, exhibiting a small amount of vacancies on the 4a site. Both, Ta{sub 5}(Si{sub 1-x}B{sub x}){sub 3}, x=0.568(3), and Nb{sub 5}(Si{sub 1-x}B{sub x}){sub 3}, x=0.59(2), are part of solid solutions of M{sub 5}Si{sub 3} with Cr{sub 5}B{sub 3}-type into the ternary M-Si-B systems (M=Nb or Ta) with B replacing Si on the 8h site. The D8{sub 8}-phase in the Nb-Si-B system crystallizes with the Ti{sub 5}Ga{sub 4}-type revealing the formula Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub 1-x} (x=0.292(3)) with B partially filling the voids in the 2b site of the Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3} parent type. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structures of a series of compounds have been solved from X-ray single crystal diffractometry revealing details on the boron incorporation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of a series of compounds have been solved by X-ray single crystal diffractometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ta{sub 3}(Si{sub 1-x}B{sub x}) (x=0.112) crystallizes with the Ti{sub 3}P-type, B and Si atoms randomly share the 8g site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub 1-x} (x=0.292; Ti{sub 5}Ga{sub 4}-type) was solved from NPD.

  16. Nothing Boring About Boron.

    PubMed

    Pizzorno, Lara

    2015-08-01

    The trace mineral boron is a micronutrient with diverse and vitally important roles in metabolism that render it necessary for plant, animal, and human health, and as recent research suggests, possibly for the evolution of life on Earth. As the current article shows, boron has been proven to be an important trace mineral because it (1) is essential for the growth and maintenance of bone; (2) greatly improves wound healing; (3) beneficially impacts the body's use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D; (4) boosts magnesium absorption; (5) reduces levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α); (6) raises levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase; (7) protects against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity; (8) improves the brains electrical activity, cognitive performance, and short-term memory for elders; (9) influences the formation and activity of key biomolecules, such as S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)); (10) has demonstrated preventive and therapeutic effects in a number of cancers, such as prostate, cervical, and lung cancers, and multiple and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and (11) may help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents. In none of the numerous studies conducted to date, however, do boron's beneficial effects appear at intakes > 3 mg/d. No estimated average requirements (EARs) or dietary reference intakes (DRIs) have been set for boron-only an upper intake level (UL) of 20 mg/d for individuals aged ≥ 18 y. The absence of studies showing harm in conjunction with the substantial number of articles showing benefits support the consideration of boron supplementation of 3 mg/d for any individual who is consuming a diet lacking in fruits and vegetables or who is at risk for or has osteopenia; osteoporosis; osteoarthritis (OA

  17. Asymmetric twins in rhombohedral boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Takeshi Guan, Pengfei; Madhav Reddy, K.; Hirata, Akihiko; Guo, Junjie; Chen, Mingwei

    2014-01-13

    Superhard materials consisting of light elements have recently received considerable attention because of their ultrahigh specific strength for a wide range of applications as structural and functional materials. However, the failure mechanisms of these materials subjected to high stresses and dynamic loading remain to be poorly known. We report asymmetric twins in a complex compound, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), characterized by spherical-aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. The atomic structure of boron-rich icosahedra at rhombohedral vertices and cross-linked carbon-rich atomic chains can be clearly visualized, which reveals unusual asymmetric twins with detectable strains along the twin interfaces. This study offers atomic insights into the structure of twins in a complex material and has important implications in understanding the planar defect-related failure of superhard materials under high stresses and shock loading.

  18. Experimental realization of two-dimensional boron sheets.

    PubMed

    Feng, Baojie; Zhang, Jin; Zhong, Qing; Li, Wenbin; Li, Shuai; Li, Hui; Cheng, Peng; Meng, Sheng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2016-06-01

    A variety of two-dimensional materials have been reported in recent years, yet single-element systems such as graphene and black phosphorus have remained rare. Boron analogues have been predicted, as boron atoms possess a short covalent radius and the flexibility to adopt sp(2) hybridization, features that favour the formation of two-dimensional allotropes, and one example of such a borophene material has been reported recently. Here, we present a parallel experimental work showing that two-dimensional boron sheets can be grown epitaxially on a Ag(111) substrate. Two types of boron sheet, a β12 sheet and a χ3 sheet, both exhibiting a triangular lattice but with different arrangements of periodic holes, are observed by scanning tunnelling microscopy. Density functional theory simulations agree well with experiments, and indicate that both sheets are planar without obvious vertical undulations. The boron sheets are quite inert to oxidization and interact only weakly with their substrate. We envisage that such boron sheets may find applications in electronic devices in the future.

  19. Experimental realization of two-dimensional boron sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Baojie; Zhang, Jin; Zhong, Qing; Li, Wenbin; Li, Shuai; Li, Hui; Cheng, Peng; Meng, Sheng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2016-06-01

    A variety of two-dimensional materials have been reported in recent years, yet single-element systems such as graphene and black phosphorus have remained rare. Boron analogues have been predicted, as boron atoms possess a short covalent radius and the flexibility to adopt sp2 hybridization, features that favour the formation of two-dimensional allotropes, and one example of such a borophene material has been reported recently. Here, we present a parallel experimental work showing that two-dimensional boron sheets can be grown epitaxially on a Ag(111) substrate. Two types of boron sheet, a β12 sheet and a χ3 sheet, both exhibiting a triangular lattice but with different arrangements of periodic holes, are observed by scanning tunnelling microscopy. Density functional theory simulations agree well with experiments, and indicate that both sheets are planar without obvious vertical undulations. The boron sheets are quite inert to oxidization and interact only weakly with their substrate. We envisage that such boron sheets may find applications in electronic devices in the future.

  20. Ferrocenyl-substituted Schiff base complexes of boron: Synthesis, structural, physico-chemical and biochemical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Sunita; Singh, R. V.

    2011-01-01

    Biological important complexes of boron(III) derived from 1-acetylferrocenehydrazinecarboxamide (L 1H), 1-acetylferrocenehydrazinecarbothioamide (L 2H) and 1-acetylferrocene carbodithioic acid (L 3H) have been prepared and investigated using a combination of microanalytical analysis, melting point, electronic, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral studies, cyclic voltammetry and X-ray powder diffraction studies. Boron isopropoxide interacts with the ligands in 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 molar ratios (boron:ligand) resulting in the formation of coloured products. On the basis of conductance and spectral evidences, tetrahedral structures for boron(III) complexes have been assigned. The ligands are coordinated to the boron(III) via the azomethine nitrogen atom and the thiolic sulfur atom/enolic oxygen atom. On the basis of X-ray powder diffraction study one of the representative boron complex was found to have orthorhombic lattice, having lattice parameters: a = 9.9700, b = 15.0000 and c = 7.0000. Both the ligands and their complexes have been screened for their biological activity on several pathogenic fungi and bacteria and were found to possess appreciable fungicidal and bactericidal properties. Plant growth regulating activity of one of the ligand and its complexes has also been recorded on gram plant, and results have been discussed.

  1. Understanding Boron through Size-Selected Clusters: Structure, Chemical Bonding, and Fluxionality

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeeva, Alina P.; Popov, Ivan A.; Piazza, Zachary A.; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2014-04-15

    Conspectus Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center–two-electron (2c–2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter–two-electron (nc–2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron’s electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13+ and B19–. A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B–, formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B

  2. Powder treatment process

    DOEpatents

    Weyand, John D.

    1988-01-01

    (1) A process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the slurry containing a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, while reducing the tendency for oxidation of the constituent by including as a liquid constituent of the slurry an organic liquid; (2) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the powder having been pretreated to reduce content of a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, the pretreating comprising heating the powder to react the constituent; and (3) a process comprising reacting ceramic powder, grinding the reacted powder, slurrying the ground powder, spray drying the slurried powder, and blending the dried powder with metal powder.

  3. Powder treatment process

    DOEpatents

    Weyand, J.D.

    1988-02-09

    Disclosed are: (1) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the slurry containing a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, while reducing the tendency for oxidation of the constituent by including as a liquid constituent of the slurry an organic liquid; (2) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the powder having been pretreated to reduce content of a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, the pretreating comprising heating the powder to react the constituent; and (3) a process comprising reacting ceramic powder, grinding the reacted powder, slurrying the ground powder, spray drying the slurried powder, and blending the dried powder with metal powder. 2 figs.

  4. Density functional theory (DFT) studies of hydrogen rich solids and boron carbide under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamp, Andrew James

    Since the first prediction that compressed hydrogen would metallize in 1935 and the further prediction that the metallic allotrope would be a superconductor at high temperatures, metallic hydrogen has been termed the "holy grail" of high-pressure science. A tremendous amount of theoretical and experimental research has been carried out, with the ultimate goal of metallizing hydrogen via the application of external pressure. It has been previously proposed that doping hydrogen with another element can lower the pressure at which metallization occurs. A number of experimental and theoretical studies have investigated doping hydrogen by either a group XIII or XIV element. Experiments in diamond anvil cells have illustrated that it is indeed possible to synthesize hydrogen-rich phases under conditions of extreme pressures, and SiH4 (H2)2, GeH4(H2) n, and Xe(H2)n have been shown to behave as true compounds. The focus herein is on the theoretical exploration of hydrogen-rich phases with novel stoichiometries, which contain a dopant element up to pressures of 350 GPa. In particular, the alkali-metal and alkaline Earth metal polyhydrides (MHn where n > 1) have been considered. Within this thesis the XtalOpt evolutionary algorithm was employed in order to complete this work, and predict the most stable structures of cesium and beryllium polyhydrides under pressure. In addition, we explore the possibility of mixing excess hydrogen with an electronegative element, iodine and phosphorus. The phases found are examined via detailed first principles calculations. In addition, because of its outstanding hardness, thermodynamic stability, low density, electronic properties, thermal stability, and high melting point boron carbide has many uses: i.e. as a refractory material, in abrasive powders and ballistics, as a neutron radiation absorbent, and in electronic applications. However, little is known about the behavior of boron carbide when under the external stress of pressure. The

  5. Large-scale fabrication of boron nitride nanotubes with high purity via solid-state reaction method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An effective solid-state reaction method is reported for synthesizing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in large scale and with high purity by annealing amorphous boron powder and ferric chloride (FeCl3) catalyst in ammonia atmosphere at elevated temperatures. FeCl3 that has rarely been utilized before is introduced not only as a catalyst but also as an efficient transforming agent which converts boron powder into boron chloride (BCl3) vapor in situ. The nanotubes are bamboo in shape and have an average diameter of about 90 nm. The effect of synthetic temperatures on nanotube morphology and yield is investigated. The photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows emission bands of the nanotubes at 354, 423, 467, and 666 nm. A combined growth mechanism of vapor–liquid-solid (VLS) and solid–liquid-solid (SLS) model is proposed for the formation of the BNNTs. PMID:25313303

  6. Impact of boron dilution accidents on low boron PWR safety

    SciTech Connect

    Papukchiev, A.; Liu, Y.; Schaefer, A.

    2006-07-01

    In conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, soluble boron is used for reactivity control over core fuel cycle. As an inadvertent reduction of the boron concentration during a boron dilution accident could introduce positive reactivity and have a negative impact on PWR safety, design changes to reduce boron concentration in the reactor coolant are of general interest. In the framework of an investigation into the feasibility of low boron design, a PWR core configuration based on fuel with higher gadolinium (Gd) load has been developed which permits to reduce the natural boron concentration at begin of cycle (BOC) to 518 ppm. For the assessment of the potential safety advantages, a boron dilution accident due to small break loss-of-coolant-accident (SBLOCA) has been simulated with the system code ATHLET for two PWR core designs: a low boron design and a standard core design. The results from the comparative analyses showed that the impact of the boron dilution accident on the new PWR design safety is significantly lower in comparison with the standard design. The new reactor design provided at least 4, 4% higher reactivity margin to recriticality during the whole accident which is equivalent to the negative reactivity worth of additional 63% of all control rods fully inserted in to the core. (authors)

  7. Optical properties of boron carbide near the boron K edge evaluated by soft-x-ray reflectometry from a Ru/B4C multilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Ksenzov, Dmitriy; Panzner, Tobias; Schlemper, Christoph; Morawe, Christian; Pietsch, Ullrich

    2009-12-10

    Soft-x-ray Bragg reflection from two Ru/B4C multilayers with 10 and 63 periods was used for independent determination of both real and imaginary parts of the refractive index n = 1 -{delta} + i{beta} close to the boron K edge ({approx}188 eV). Prior to soft x-ray measurements, the structural parameters of the multilayers were determined by x-ray reflectometry using hard x rays. For the 63-period sample, the optical properties based on the predictions made for elemental boron major deviations were found close to the K edge of boron for the 10-period sample explained by chemical bonding of boron to B4C and various boron oxides.

  8. Boronizing protects metals against wear

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, K.

    1997-03-01

    Boronizing is a thermochemical surface treatment that involves diffusion of boron into a base metal at a high temperature. The resulting metallic boride provides high hardness and resistance to acid corrosion, and lengthens service life by a factor of three to ten. Boronizing fills a gap between conventional surface treatments and the more exotic chemical and physical vapor deposition. In a number of applications, boronizing has replaced such processes as carburizing, nitriding, and nitrocarburizing. It has even replaced hard chrome plating in some cases, while achieving similar service life improvements. Boron can be uniformly applied to irregular surfaces, and can be applied to specific areas of a surface. It is also suitable for high-volume production applications, as first demonstrated in the European automotive industry. This article describes the boronizing process, provides material selection/preparation criteria, and lists industrial applications.

  9. Effect of mechanical activation on jell boronizing treatment of the AISI 4140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, S. O.; Karataş, S.

    2013-06-01

    The article presents the effect of mechanical activation on the growth kinetics of boride layer of boronized AISI 4140 steel. The samples were boronized by ferroboron + (SiO2-Na2O) powders for 873-1173 K temperature and 2, 4, 6 and 8 h times, respectively. The morphology and types of borides formed on the surface of AISI 4140 steel substrate were analyzed. Layer growth kinetics were analyzed by measuring the extent of penetration of FeB and Fe2B sublayers as function of treatment time and temperature in the range of 873-1173 K. High diffusivity was obtained by creating a large number of defects through mechanical activation in the form of nanometer sized crystalline particles through the repeated fracturing and cold-welding of the powder particles, and a depth of 100 μm was found in the specimen borided by the 2 h MA powders, for 4 h and 1073 K, where 2000-2350 HV were measured. Consequently, the application conditions of boronizing were improved by usage of mechanical activation. The preferred Fe2B boride without FeB could be formed in the boride layer under 973 K boronizing temperature by mechanically activated by ferroboron + sodium silicate powder mixture due to the decrease of the activation energy.

  10. Spectrochemical Analysis of Boron Carbide by Powder Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    SI. A. Bu ffer A 1. 2.45 grams of 200 mesh graphite 2. 2.00 grams of lithium carbonate 3. 0.05 gram of cobalt oxide B. MIx 30 mg of B,,C sample and...Buffer B 1. 3.51 grams of 200 mesh graphite 2. 0.90 gram of lithium fluoride a’ 3. 0,09 gram of cobalt oxide B. Mix 100 mg of B, C. cample and 100 mg of...Aberdeen 1 ATT1I: SARkAI-QA , Mr . J. M i ller Proving Ground , Maryland 21005 1 SARWV -QA , Quality Assurance Office 2 ACTS: ORST E-TA - 4 Commander

  11. Concertation-Inhomogeneous Hard Magnetic Alloys of the Fe - Cr - Co System with Elevated Content of Cobalt and Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatsov, A. A.; Ryaposov, I. V.; Kozvonin, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    The structure and magnetic properties of a powder alloy based on the Fe - Cr - Co system with elevated content of cobalt and boron are studied. The dependences of the magnetic induction and of the coercivity on the aging temperature are determined experimentally. It is shown that the introduction of boron into the alloy hinders precipitation of σ-phase and makes it possible to raise the cobalt content by 4% as compared to standard alloy 30Kh23K.

  12. The effects of hydrogenation and high pressure on α-tetragonal boron: a first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Naoki; Shirai, Koun

    It is well known that boron rich crystals are superhard materials. α-tetragonal (α-tet) boron is one of the metastable phase in elemental boron crystals under high temperature and high pressure. This phase has a possibility of including some hydrogen atoms due to the experimental process, but it has not yet been shown crystal structures and electronic properties of hydrogenated α-tet boron. Using first-principles calculations, we theoretically predicted stable structures and investigated the influences from hydrogenation of α-tet boron and high pressures. According to our calculations, non-bonding states of pure α-tet boron, which were mostly occupied by Pz like orbitals coming from interstitial boron atoms in α-tet boron, were completely vanished by doping some hydrogen atoms and the higher the pressure was, the lager energy gaps between the valence band maximum and the conduction band minimum on α-tet boron were. These results provide that the deformation potential depended on the pressure is positive, which is basically negative on semiconductors except for diamonds and is an index of the hardness under pressure on semiconductors.

  13. Chemical and photoluminescence analyses of new carbon-based boron oxynitride phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei-Ning; Kaihatsu, Yutaka; Iskandar, Ferry; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2009-11-15

    Analyses of newly developed carbon-based boron oxynitride phosphors using an electron energy-loss spectrometer and a spectroflurophotometer were carried out. The results showed that the prepared phosphor powder has covalently bonded boron, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms with a soft carbon framework. Photoluminescence characterization revealed that the resultant phosphor has a direct bandgap transition with defect broadened band edges, resulting in a high quantum efficiency, because the atomic distances of the phosphor are smaller than those of conventional carbon-based boron nitride compounds, which have an indirect bandgap transition and a low quantum efficiency. The atomic distances of the phosphor are smaller owing to the presence of oxygen atoms, which have a higher electron affinity and a smaller covalent bond radius compared with boron, carbon and nitrogen.

  14. Preliminary study of neutron absorption by concrete with boron carbide addition

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Yusof Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Yazid, Hafizal; Ariffin, Fatin Nabilah Tajul; Ahmad, Sahrim; Hamid, Roszilah; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz

    2014-02-12

    Concrete has become a conventional material in construction of nuclear reactor due to its properties like safety and low cost. Boron carbide was added as additives in the concrete construction as it has a good neutron absorption property. The sample preparation for concrete was produced with different weight percent of boron carbide powder content. The neutron absorption rate of these samples was determined by using a fast neutron source of Americium-241/Be (Am-Be 241) and detection with a portable backscattering neutron detector. Concrete with 20 wt % of boron carbide shows the lowest count of neutron transmitted and this indicates the most neutrons have been absorbed by the concrete. Higher boron carbide content may affect the concrete strength and other properties.

  15. Boronization of nickel and nickel clad materials for potential use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Xia, Gordon; Coleman, J. E.; Yang, Z Gary

    2006-12-20

    A new low-cost, nickel clad bipolar plate concept is currently being developed for use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Reported in this paper are the details of a powder-pack boronization process that would be used to establish a passivation layer on the electrolyte exposed surfaces of the bipolar plate in the final stage of manufacture. Results from energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy indicate that under moderate boronization conditions a homogeneous Ni3B layer grows on the exposed surfaces of the nickel clad material, the thickness of which depends on the time and temperature of boronization according to a Wagner-type scale growth relationship. At higher temperatures and longer reaction times, a Ni2B overlayer forms on top of the Ni3B during boronization.

  16. Preliminary study of neutron absorption by concrete with boron carbide addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Yusof; Ariffin, Fatin Nabilah Tajul; Hamid, Roszilah; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Yazid, Hafizal; Ahmad, Sahrim; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz

    2014-02-01

    Concrete has become a conventional material in construction of nuclear reactor due to its properties like safety and low cost. Boron carbide was added as additives in the concrete construction as it has a good neutron absorption property. The sample preparation for concrete was produced with different weight percent of boron carbide powder content. The neutron absorption rate of these samples was determined by using a fast neutron source of Americium-241/Be (Am-Be 241) and detection with a portable backscattering neutron detector. Concrete with 20 wt % of boron carbide shows the lowest count of neutron transmitted and this indicates the most neutrons have been absorbed by the concrete. Higher boron carbide content may affect the concrete strength and other properties.

  17. Boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chopra, N G; Luyken, R J; Cherrey, K; Crespi, V H; Cohen, M L; Louie, S G; Zettl, A

    1995-08-18

    The successful synthesis of pure boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is reported here. Multi-walled tubes with inner diameters on the order of 1 to 3 nanometers and with lengths up to 200 nanometers were produced in a carbon-free plasma discharge between a BN-packed tungsten rod and a cooled copper electrode. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy on individual tubes yielded B:N ratios of approximately 1, which is consistent with theoretical predictions of stable BN tube structures.

  18. Study on urine boron reference values of Japanese men: use of confidence intervals as an indicator of exposure to boron compounds.

    PubMed

    Usuda, K; Kono, K; Dote, T; Miyata, K; Nishiura, H; Shimahara, M; Sugimoto, K

    1998-09-04

    A simple and rapid method for the determination of urine boron by inductively-coupled plasma argon emission spectrometry (ICPAES) has been developed to establish boron exposure guidelines. After 11-fold dilution in 18.25 M omega cm ultra-pure water and vigorous shaking, urine may be directly injected into the spectrometer, providing accurate and reproducible results. We report the results obtained with urine samples obtained from a group of male Japanese electronic workers (n = 102) who had not been exposed to boron; boron concentrations were corrected with use of a specific gravity of 1.024 g/ml. The frequency distribution resulted in a log-normal distribution diagram for anatomical spread. The geometric mean values for urine boron in the non-exposed workers was 798.0 micrograms/l, while the confidence interval (C.I.) was between 398.1 and 1599.6 micrograms/l. Taking into consideration the short biological half-life of boron and its major excretion route via urine, urine was considered to be a suitable means for monitoring of exposure to this element. We conclude that the guidelines established by determining boron reference values are useful for the protection of individuals exposed to boron in their working environments.

  19. The role of substitutional boron in carbon oxidation: Inhibitor and catalyst!

    SciTech Connect

    Radovic, L.R.; Karra, M.; Thrower, P.A.

    1996-10-01

    Boron is considered to be one of the very few promising candidates for chemical protection of carbon/carbon composite materials against oxidation. The conventional wisdom is that boron inhibits carbon oxidation. Its inhibiting effect can be manifested in three different ways: (1) Substitutional boron enhances the graphitization of carbon. (2) As the surface carbon atoms are consumed, substitutional boron forms an oxide surface film, which acts as an O{sub 2} diffusion harrier and an active site blocker. (3) Substitutional boron redistributes the {pi} electrons in the basal plane (graphene layer), lowers the Fermi level of carbon, and hence presumably inhibits the desorption of CO and CO{sub 2}. This last mode of inhibition is of great fundamental interest; it had not been verified in the past. Upon closer examination of some early studies, its closer scrutiny is wan-anted. We provide such a scrutiny in the present communication. Three widely differing carbon materials were used: a heat-treated ({open_quote}graphitized{close_quote}) carbon black (Graphon), Saran char and a glassy carbon. Boron was introduced substitutionally into the quasi-graphitic lattice by heating these carbons, physically mixed with boron powder. Isothermal carbon oxidation experiments were performed. In selected cases, the reactive surface area of the carbons was determined.

  20. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1999-01-01

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition.

  1. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1999-04-27

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition. 3 figs.

  2. The role of boron in ductilizing Ni3Al

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedula, K.; Shabel, B. S.; Khadkikar, P. S.

    1987-01-01

    Ductilization of Ni3Al at room temperature by microalloying with boron has been primarily attributed to the increased grain boundary cohesion in the presence of boron. However, another aspect of the role played by boron in ductilizing Ni3Al is revealed when the Hall-Petch relationships for Ni3Al and B-doped Ni3Al are compared. A shallower slope for the B-doped Ni3Al compared to that for Ni3Al indicates a reduced resistance to slip propagation across grain boundaries, and therefore reduced stress concentration at boundaries, in the presence of boron. This comparison of Hall-Petch relationships was carried out by generating data for powder processed B-doped Ni3Al at various grain sizes and by compiling data for Ni3Al from the literature. In addition, the room temperature fracture of B-doped Ni3Al has been shown to initiate along certain grain boundaries. The fracture eventually occurs by transgranular ductile tearing.

  3. PROCESS OF FORMING POWDERED MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Glatter, J.; Schaner, B.E.

    1961-07-14

    A process of forming high-density compacts of a powdered ceramic material is described by agglomerating the powdered ceramic material with a heat- decompossble binder, adding a heat-decompossble lubricant to the agglomerated material, placing a quantity of the material into a die cavity, pressing the material to form a compact, pretreating the compacts in a nonoxidizing atmosphere to remove the binder and lubricant, and sintering the compacts. When this process is used for making nuclear reactor fuel elements, the ceramic material is an oxide powder of a fissionsble material and after forming, the compacts are placed in a cladding tube which is closed at its ends by vapor tight end caps, so that the sintered compacts are held in close contact with each other and with the interior wall of the cladding tube.

  4. Resin-Powder Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standfield, Clarence E.

    1994-01-01

    Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

  5. Particle-based simulations of powder coating in additive manufacturing suggest increase in powder bed roughness with coating speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parteli, Eric J. R.; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2017-06-01

    We have developed the first particle-based numerical tool to simulate the coating of powder particles in additive manufacturing devices. Our Discrete Element Method considers realistic particle shapes and incorporates attractive interaction (van-der-Waals) forces between the particles. From simulations of powder coating using a roller as coating device, we find that the surface roughness of the powder bed scales with the square of coating speed. Moreover, we find that using fine, highly polydisperse powders may lead to larger powder bed roughness, compared to process simulations using coarser powders, due to the formation of agglomerates resulting from cohesive forces.

  6. Plasma Synthesized Doped Boron Nanopowder for MgB2 Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    James V. Marzik

    2012-03-26

    Under this program, a process to synthesize nano-sized doped boron powder by a plasma synthesis process was developed and scaled up from 20 gram batches at program start to over 200 grams by program end. Over 75 batches of boron nanopowder were made by RF plasma synthesis. Particle sizes were typically in the 20-200 nm range. The powder was synthesized by the reductive pyrolysis of BCl{sub 3} in hydrogen in an RF plasma. A wide range of process parameters were investigated including plasma power, torch geometry, gas flow rates, and process pressure. The powder-in-tube technique was used to make monofilament and multifilament superconducting wires. MgB{sub 2} wire made with Specialty Materials plasma synthesized boron nanopowder exhibited superconducting properties that significantly exceeded the program goals. Superconducting critical currents, J{sub c}, in excess of 10{sup 5} A cm{sup -2} at magnetic fields of 8 tesla were reproducibly achieved. The upper critical magnetic field in wires fabricated with program boron powder were H{sub c2}(0) = 37 tesla, demonstrating the potential of these materials for high field magnet applications. T{sub c} in carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} powder showed a systematic decrease with increasing carbon precursor gas flows, indicating the plasma synthesis process can give precise control over dopant concentrations. Synthesis rates increased by a factor of 400% over the course of the program, demonstrating the scalability of the powder synthesis process. The plasma synthesis equipment at Specialty Materials has successfully and reproducibly made high quality boron nanopowder for MgB{sub 2} superconductors. Research and development from this program enabled Specialty Materials to successfully scale up the powder synthesis process by a factor of ten and to double the size of its powder pilot plant. Thus far the program has been a technical success. It is anticipated that continued systematic development of plasma processing parameters, dopant

  7. Ignition kinetics of boron in primary combustion products of propellant based on its unique characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Wen; Wang, Yang; Wu, Shixi

    2017-07-01

    Study on the boron-based primary combustion products can bridge the gap between primary combustion and secondary combustion in solid rocket ramjets. To clarify the initial state and ignition characteristics of boron particles in the after-burning chamber of solid rocket ramjets, the elemental, composition and morphology of the primary combustion products collected under gas generator chamber pressure of 0.2 MPa and 6 MPa were investigated by energy dispersive (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive (SEM-EDS) individually. The ignition times of boron particles among the primary combustion products were determined using a high temperature tube furnace system. The BD model was adopted for numerical verification. The numerical solution procedure of boron ignition model in a real afterburner chamber was modified. The results show that the sum of B, C, O elements in the primary combustion products reaches approximately 90%. The primary combustion products are mainly consisted of B, C, and B2O3. Images of the primary combustion products present highly agglomeration, indicating an oxidation of boron surface. Numerous spherical carbon particles with a diameter around 100 nm are observed in the products. Three features of the boron in the primary combustion products are obtained, compared to virgin boron. First most of the boron lumps are covered by carbon particles on the surface. Second the mean particle size is five times larger than that of virgin boron. Third the overall initial oxide layer covered on boron surface increases its thickness by above 0.1 μm. The ignition time of boron in the primary combustion products reaches 20-30 ms under 1673-1873 K, which is quite different from virgin boron of 4 ms. Numerical calculation results show the key reason leading to such a long ignition time is the variation of the initial oxide layer thickness. In conclusion, the physicochemical properties of boron particles

  8. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of gadolinium studied using a boron-doped heater anvil

    DOE PAGES

    Montgomery, J. M.; Samudrala, G. K.; Velisavljevic, N.; ...

    2016-04-07

    A boron-doped designer heater anvil is used in conjunction with powder x-ray diffraction to collect structural information on a sample of quasi-hydrostatically loaded gadolinium metal up to pressures above 8 GPa and 600 K. The heater anvil consists of a natural diamond anvil that has been surface modified with a homoepitaxially-grown chemical-vapor-deposited layer of conducting boron-doped diamond, and is used as a DC heating element. Internally insulating both diamond anvils with sapphire support seats allows for heating and cooling of the high pressure area on the order of a few tens of seconds. This device is then used to scanmore » the phase diagram of the sample by oscillating the temperature while continuously increasing the externally applied pressure and collecting in situ time-resolved powder diffraction images. In the pressure-temperature range covered in the experiment the gadolinium sample is observed in its hcp, αSm, and dhcp phases. Under this temperature cycling, the hcp→αSm transition proceeds in discontinuous steps at points along the expected phase boundary. Additionally, the unit cell volumes of each phase deviate from the expected thermal expansion behavior just before each transition is observed from the diffraction data. From these measurements (representing only one hour of synchrotron x-ray collection time), a single-experiment equation of state and phase diagram of each phase of gadolinium is presented for the range of 0 - 10 GPa and 300 - 650 K.« less

  9. Micronutrients in parenteral nutrition: boron, silicon, and fluoride.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Forrest H

    2009-11-01

    Boron may be beneficial for bone growth and maintenance, central nervous system function, and the inflammatory response, and silicon may be beneficial for bone maintenance and wound healing. Fluoride is not an essential element but amounts provided by contamination may be beneficial for bone strength. Fluoride toxicity may be a concern in parenteral nutrition. Further studies are warranted to determine whether there are optimal amounts of boron and silicon that should be delivered to typical and special population patients receiving parenteral nutrition. In addition, further studies are needed to determine whether providing the dietary guideline of adequate intake amounts of fluoride parenterally would prevent or treat parenteral nutrition osteopenia.

  10. Boron isotopic compositions of some boron minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Oi, Takao; Musashi, Masaaki; Ossaka, Tomoko; Kakihana, Hidetake ); Nomura, Masao; Okamoto, Makoto )

    1989-12-01

    Boron minerals that have different structural formulae but are supposed to have the same geologic origin have been collected and analyzed for the {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B isotopic ratio. It has been reconfirmed that minerals of marine origin have higher {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B ratios than those of nonmarine origin. It has been found that the sequence of decreasing {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B values among the minerals with the same geologic origin is; borax, tincal, kernite (Na borates) > ulexite (Na/Ca borate) > colemanite, iyoite, meyerhofferite (Ca borates). This sequence is explainable on the basis of the difference in crystal structure among the minerals. That is, minerals with high BO{sub 3}/BO{sub 4} ratios, (the ratio of the number of the BO{sub 3} triangle units to the number of the BO{sub 4} tetrahedron units in the structural formula of a mineral) have higher {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B ratios.

  11. Boron containing multilayer coatings and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1997-01-01

    Hard coatings are fabricated from multilayer boron/boron carbide, boron carbide/cubic boron nitride, and boron/boron nitride/boron carbide, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron and boron carbide used in forming the multilayers are formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/boron carbide, and boron carbide/cubic boron nitride is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron, cubic boron nitride or boron carbide, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be of a discrete or a blended or graded composition.

  12. High density hexagonal boron nitride prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, Clarence L.

    1992-01-01

    Boron nitride powder with less than or equal to the oxygen content of starting powder (down to 0.5% or less) is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce hexagonal boron nitride with a bulk density greater than 2.0 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.21 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  13. High density hexagonal boron nitride prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1990-12-31

    Boron nitride powder with less than or equal to the oxygen content of starting powder (down to 0.5% or less) is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce hexagonal boron nitride with a bulk density greater than 2.0 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a cansister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800{degrees}C and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.21 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  14. Boron Abundances in A and B-type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, David L.

    1997-01-01

    Boron abundances in A- and B-type stars may be a successful way to track evolutionary effects in these hot stars. The light elements - Li, Be, and B - are tracers of exposure to temperatures more moderate than those in which the H-burning CN-cycle operates. Thus, any exposure of surface stellar layers to deeper layers will affect these light element abundances. Li and Be are used in this role in investigations of evolutionary processes in cool stars, but are not observable in hotter stars. An investigation of boron, however, is possible through the B II 1362 A resonance line. We have gathered high resolution spectra from the IUE database of A- and B-type stars near 10 solar mass for which nitrogen abundances have been determined. The B II 1362 A line is blended throughout; the temperature range of this program, requiring spectrum syntheses to recover the boron abundances. For no star could we synthesize the 1362 A region using the meteoritic/solar boron abundance of log e (B) = 2.88; a lower boron abundance was necessary which may reflect evolutionary effects (e.g., mass loss or mixing near the main-sequence), the natal composition of the star forming regions, or a systematic error in the analyses (e.g., non-LTE effects). Regardless of the initial boron abundance, and despite the possibility of non-LTE effects, it seems clear that boron is severely depleted in some stars. It may be that the nitrogen and boron abundances are anticorrelated, as would be expected from mixing between the H-burning and outer stellar layers. If, as we suspect, a residue of boron is present in the A-type supergiants, we may exclude a scenario in which mixing occurs continuously between the surface and the deep layers operating the CN-cycle. Further exploitation of the B II 1362 A line as an indicator of the evolutionary status of A- and B-type stars will require a larger stellar sample to be observed with higher signal-to-noise as attainable with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  15. Facile synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and improved electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjun; Luo, Lijie; Zhou, Longchang; Mo, Libin; Tong, Zhangfa

    2010-02-01

    A layer of catalyst film on substrate is usually required during the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials. In this work, however, a novel approach for synthesizing high-purity bamboo-like boron nitride (BN) nanotubes directly on commercial stainless steel foils was demonstrated. Synthesis was realized by heating boron and zinc oxide (ZnO) powders at 1200 degrees C under a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. The stainless steel foils played an additional role of catalyst besides the substrate during the VLS growth of the nanotubes. In addition, the electrical conductivity of the BN nanotubes was efficiently improved in a simple way by coating with Au and Pd nanoparticles. The decorated BN nanotubes may find potential applications in catalysts, sensors and nanoelectronics.

  16. Residual Stress Analysis of Boronized AISI 1018 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Payne,J.; Petrova, R.; White, H.; Chauhan, A.; Bai, J.

    2008-01-01

    AISI 1018 steel substrates were powder-pack, diffusion boronized at 850 C for 4 h, followed by air quenching. Optical microscopy in conjunction with color etching was used to obtain the average penetration depth of the iron monoboride layer (9 {mu}m) and the iron diboride layer (57 {mu}m). X-ray diffraction by synchrotron radiation, conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Brookhaven National Laboratory, confirmed the presence of iron monoboride and iron diboride in the boronized plain steel substrates. The sin2 {psi} technique was employed to calculate the residual stress found in the iron monoboride layer (-237 MPa) and in the substrate layer (-150 MPa) that is intertwined with the needle-like, iron diboride penetration.

  17. Magnetron sputtered boron films for increasing hardness of a metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    2003-05-27

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  18. Calculation of residual principal stresses in CVD boron on carbon filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of boron on a carbon substrate (B/C) is developed. The model includes an expansion of the boron after deposition due to atomic rearrangement and includes creep of the boron and carbon. Curves are presented to show how the principal residual stresses and the filament elongation vary as the parameters defining deposition strain and creep are varied. The calculated results are compared with experimental axial residual stress and elongation measurements made on B/C filaments. This comparison requires that for good agreement between calculated and experimental results, the deposited boron must continue to expand after deposition, and that the build-up of residual stresses is limited by significant boron and carbon creep rates.

  19. Calculation of residual principal stresses in CVD boron on carbon filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model of the chemical vapor deposition of boron on a carbon substrate (B/C) is developed. The model includes an expansion of the boron after deposition due to atomic rearrangement and includes creep of the boron and carbon. Curves are presented showing the variation of the principal residual stresses and the filament elongation with the parameters defining deposition strain and creep. The calculated results are compared with experimental axial residual stress and elongation measurements made on B/C filaments. For good agreement between calculated and experimental results, the deposited boron must continue to expand after deposition, and the build up of residual stresses must be limited by significant boron and carbon creep rates.

  20. Effect of Current Pathways During Spark Plasma Sintering of an Aluminum Alloy Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, Frank; McWilliams, Brandon; Cho, Kyu

    2016-12-01

    Spark plasma sintering has been a well-studied processing technique primarily for its very high cooling and heating rates. However, the underlying phenomenon driving the sintering behavior of powders under an electric field is still poorly understood. In this study, we look at the effect of changing current pathways through the powder bed by changing die materials, from conductive graphite to insulating boron nitride for sintering aluminum alloy 5083 powder. We found that the aluminum powder itself was insulating and that by changing the current paths, we had to find alternate processing methods to initiate sintering. Altering the current pathways led to faster temperature raises and faster melting (and potentially densification) of the aluminum powder. A flash sintering effect in metallic powders is observed in which the powder compact undergoes a rapid transition from electrically insulating to conducting at a temperature of 583 K (310 °C).

  1. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  2. Development of a boron-copper neutron absorber composite

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.; Thresh, H.R.; Summers, J.R.

    1991-05-01

    This report describes the fabrication of a new boron-copper neutron absorbing material that was developed to meet the upgrading needs of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory. To increase the intensity of the neutron beams from the IPNS, the target uranium was changed from depleted uranium to uranium enriched to 77.5% {sup 235}U. To keep the multiplication factor, k{sub eff} (number of fissions in one generation/number of fissions in preceding generation) at a safe level, a new neutron absorber material was needed. The previous materials, boral and cadmium, could not meet the new requirements and a search of the literature showed that no currently available material was acceptable. With previous powder metallurgy used as a base, the composite was fabricated with 43 vol. % {sup 10}B (81% enriched {sup 10}B) and the balance copper and voids. The powder metallurgy techniques was followed by hot-rolling the composite to a sheet. The material composed of boron particles dispersed in a pure copper matrix and clad with pure copper on both sides, exhibits the following properties: Loadings up to 43 vol. % boron, with the balance copper and voids. A loading of 0.5 {times} 10{sup 22}{sup 10}B atoms/cm{sup 2} in sections as thin as 0.067 in. (1.7 mm), with copper cladding as thin as 0.010 in. (0.25 mm). Formability to radii as small as 2.1 in. (53.3 mm). No observed reaction between boron and the copper matrix and cladding at temperatures up to 900{degrees}C for times as long as 7 h. Retains structural integrity at 900{degrees}C.

  3. Initial boronization of the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.; Hodapp, T.; Holtrop, K.; Jackson, G.; Winter, J.

    1991-10-01

    A system has been installed to deposit a thin film of elemental boron to the walls of the D3-D tokamak, in order to reduce the influx of impurities during plasma discharges. Subsequently new regimes of substantially tokamak energy confinement were obtained. The deposition of the boron layer is achieved during a glow-discharge session using a helium-diborane age mixture and a film of {approx}100 nm is deposited. The boronization system includes special storage and handling precautions for the diborane, a delivery and metering system for the glow-discharge, modifications to the tokamak's residual gas analyzer system, and a dedicated system for handling and neutralizing the exhaust gas from the tokamak. Tokamak discharges with similar parameters before and after boronization are used to characterize the effects of the boron film. Nickel has been reduced by a factor of 30, while impurities such as oxygen and carbon are reduced fivefold. A system of pulsing the flow discharge has been developed in order to improve the uniformity of the film applied.

  4. Atomically controlled substitutional boron-doping of graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Shigeki; Saito, Shohei; Osumi, Shinichiro; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro; Foster, Adam S.; Spijker, Peter; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-08-01

    Boron is a unique element in terms of electron deficiency and Lewis acidity. Incorporation of boron atoms into an aromatic carbon framework offers a wide variety of functionality. However, the intrinsic instability of organoboron compounds against moisture and oxygen has delayed the development. Here, we present boron-doped graphene nanoribbons (B-GNRs) of widths of N=7, 14 and 21 by on-surface chemical reactions with an employed organoboron precursor. The location of the boron dopant is well defined in the centre of the B-GNR, corresponding to 4.8 atom%, as programmed. The chemical reactivity of B-GNRs is probed by the adsorption of nitric oxide (NO), which is most effectively trapped by the boron sites, demonstrating the Lewis acid character. Structural properties and the chemical nature of the NO-reacted B-GNR are determined by a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy, high-resolution atomic force microscopy with a CO tip, and density functional and classical computations.

  5. Boron-carbide-aluminum and boron-carbide-reactive metal cermets. [B/sub 4/C-Al

    DOEpatents

    Halverson, D.C.; Pyzik, A.J.; Aksay, I.A.

    1985-05-06

    Hard, tough, lighweight boron-carbide-reactive metal composites, particularly boron-carbide-aluminum composites, are produced. These composites have compositions with a plurality of phases. A method is provided, including the steps of wetting and reacting the starting materials, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected. Starting compositions, reaction temperatures, reaction times, and reaction atmospheres are parameters for controlling the process and resulting compositions. The ceramic phases are homogeneously distributed in the metal phases and adhesive forces at ceramic-metal interfaces are maximized. An initial consolidated step is used to achieve fully dense composites. Microstructures of boron-carbide-aluminum cermets have been produced with modules of rupture exceeding 110 ksi and fracture toughness exceeding 12 ksi..sqrt..in. These composites and methods can be used to form a variety of structural elements.

  6. Covalent and Noncovalent Interactions Between Boron and Argon: AN Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopic Study of Argon-Boron Oxide Cation Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jiaye; Li, Wei; Wang, Guanjun; Zhou, Mingfei

    2017-06-01

    Although a wide range of compounds of the heavy rare-gas elements are experimentally known, very few chemically bound molecules have been experimentally observed for the lighter noble gases. Here we report a combined infrared photodissociation spectroscopic and theoretical study on a series of argon-boron oxide cation complexes prepared via a laser vaporization supersonic ion source in the gas phase. Infrared spectroscopic combined with state-of-the-art quantum chemical calculations indicate that the [ArB_3O_{4,5}]^+, [ArB_4O_{5-7}]^+ and [ArB_5O_7]^+ cation complexes have planar structures each involving an aromatic boroxol ring and an argon-boron covalent bond formed between the in-plane 2p atomic orbitals of Ar and boron. In contrast, the [ArB_3O_4]^+ cation complex is characterized to be a weakly bound complex with a BO chain structure.

  7. METHOD OF COATING SURFACES WITH BORON

    DOEpatents

    Martin, G.R.

    1949-10-11

    A method of forming a thin coating of boron on metallic, glass, or other surfaces is described. The method comprises heating the article to be coated to a temperature of about 550 d C in an evacuated chamber and passing trimethyl boron, triethyl boron, or tripropyl boron in the vapor phase and under reduced pressure into contact with the heated surface causing boron to be deposited in a thin film.

  8. Outside the pH box: Boron isotopes in synthetic calcite precipitated under varying solution chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, J. R.; Uchikawa, J.; Penman, D. E.; Hoenisch, B.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Boron isotopic measurements (δ11B) in marine carbonates are a powerful tool for reconstructing past ocean carbon chemistry and the carbon cycle. Boron systematics in marine carbonates are rooted in the equilibrium dissociation of dissolved boron in seawater, but existing evidence from biogenic carbonates (corals, planktic and benthic foraminifers) suggests somewhat variable controls on boron concentration and δ11B. Synthetic precipitation experiments provide an opportunity to study boron systematics without biological interference, and recent studies (e.g., Uchikawa et al., 2015, GCA v150, 171-191) suggest that boron incorporation (measured as B/Ca ratios) into synthetic carbonates varies both with the elemental composition of experimental seawater and precipitation rate. Here we extend the geochemical characterization of synthetic calcite by investigating the influences of changing solution chemistry (pH, [Ca2+], [DIC] and [B]) and precipitation rate on their boron isotopic composition. Our results will be evaluated in the context of carbonate precipitation rates, modes of boron incorporation, and changing seawater chemistry through geologic time.

  9. Boron implanted strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. J. M.

    Single crystals of strontium titanate implanted with boron were found to have highly conductive surface layers. The effects of varying dose from 10 to the 16th power to 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm, implantation voltage from 50 to 175 keV and annealing conditions on the room temperature surface resistance and Hall mobility are presented. Variation of the implantation voltage did not have a major effect on the sheet resistances obtained by boron implantation of strontium titanate, while dose and annealing conditions have major effects. Doses of 5 x 10 to the 16th power ions/sq cm required annealing on the order of one hour at 500 K for maximum reduction of the room temperature resistance in the implanted layer. Samples implanted with a dose of 1 x 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm required slightly higher temperatures (approximately 575 K) to obtain a minimum resistance at room temperature. Long term (several weeks) room temperature annealing was found to occur in high dose samples. After one to two months at room temperature followed by an anneal to 575 K, the surface resistances were found to be lower than those produced by the annealing of a freshly implanted sample to 575 K.

  10. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, C.H.; Branagan, D.J.; Hyde, T.A.

    2000-02-08

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: (a) forming a melt comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; (b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and (c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}.

  11. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    DOEpatents

    Sellers, Charles H.; Branagan, Daniel J.; Hyde, Timothy A.

    2000-01-01

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: a) forming a melt comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1.

  12. Structural and mechanical characterization of boron doped biphasic calcium phosphate produced by wet chemical method and subsequent thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Albayrak, Onder

    2016-03-15

    In the current study, boron doped biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramics consisting of a mixture of boron doped hydroxyapatite (BHA) and beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) of varying BHA/β-TCP ratios were obtained after sintering stage. The effects of varying boron contents and different sintering temperatures on the BHA/β-TCP ratios and on the sinterability of the final products were investigated. Particle sizes and morphologies of the obtained precipitates were determined using SEM. XRD and FTIR investigation were conducted to detect the boron formation in the structure of HA and quantitative analysis was performed to determine the BHA/β-TCP ratio before and after sintering stage. In order to determine the sinterability of the obtained powders, pellets were prepared and sintered; the rates of densification were calculated and obtained results were correlated by SEM images. Also Vickers microhardness values of the sintered samples were determined. The experimental results verified that boron doped hydroxyapatite powders were obtained after sintering stage and the structure consists of a mixture of BHA and β-TCP. As the boron content used in the precipitation stage increases, β-TCP content of the BHA/β-TCP ratio increases but sinterability, density and microhardness deteriorate. As the sintering temperature increases, β-TCP content, density and microhardness of the samples increase and sinterability improves. - Highlights: • This is the first paper about boron doped biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramics. • Boron doping affects the structural and mechanical properties. • BHA/β-TCP ratio can be adjustable with boron content and sintering temperature.

  13. Environmental boron exposure and activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) in a newborn population.

    PubMed

    Huel, Guy; Yazbeck, Chadi; Burnel, Daniel; Missy, Pascale; Kloppmann, Wolfram

    2004-08-01

    Following boron intake, multiple effects have been observed in animal experiments. However, human data is lacking, and no data is available on the ability of boron to accumulate in fetal tissues. Positive responses in animal species suggest that developmental toxicity may be an area of concern in humans, following exposure to boron. Two hypotheses have seemed to account for the multiple effects described in scientific findings. One hypothesis is that boron is a negative regulator that influences a number of metabolic pathways by competitively inhibiting some key enzyme reactions. The other hypothesis is that boron has a role in ionic membrane transport regulations. To better understand boron potential toxicity, the present study examined the relationship between boron exposure and some key enzymes, well-known for their affinity for mineral elements, such as delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D), and two fundamental enzymes having a role in ionic membrane transport regulations (Ca-pump and Na(+)K(+)-ATPase). We investigated the potential effects of an environmental boron exposure on the activity of these enzymes in an urban population of 197 "normal" newborns. Environmental boron exposure was assessed in placental tissue. Because of the well-known inhibiting effect of lead on these enzymes, cord blood and placental lead were also analyzed. After adjustment for potential confounders, including lead, placental boron levels were negatively significantly correlated to ALA-D activity while Ca-pump and Na(+)K(+)-ATPase activities did not seem to be affected by the level of boron exposure. Given boron's ability, as a Lewis acid, to complex with hydroxyl groups, we suggest that such a mechanism would explain the inhibiting effect of boron on ALA-D.

  14. Concentrations of arsenic, antimony, and boron in steam and steam condensate at The Geysers, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, C.L.; Ficklin, W.H.; Thompson, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Studies at The Geysers Geothermal Field, California indicate that under some circumstances elements that are transported in the vapor phase can become enriched in the liquid phase. Waters from two condensate traps (steam traps) on steam lines at The Geysers are enriched with arsenic, antimony, and boron compared to the concentrations of these elements in coexisting steam. Concentrations of boron in condensate-trap waters were as high as 160 mg/L, arsenic as high as 35 mg/L, and antimony as high as 200 ??g/L. Enrichment of arsenic, antimony, and boron is at least partially controlled by the partitioning of these elements into the liquid phase, according to their vapor-liquid distribution coefficients, after they are transported in steam. Several of the elements that are most soluble in steam, including arsenic and antimony, are part of the trace-element suite that characterizes precious-metal epithermal ore deposits. ?? 1987.

  15. Entropy of gaseous boron monobromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Feng; Peng, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Wang, Chao-Wen; Jia, Chun-Sheng

    2017-10-01

    We present an explicit representation of molar entropy for gaseous boron monobromide in terms of experimental values of only three molecular constants. Fortunately, through comparison of theoretically calculated results and experimental data, we find that the molar entropy of gaseous boron monobromide can be well predicted by employing the improved Manning-Rosen oscillator to describe the internal vibration of boron monobromide molecule. The present approach provides also opportunities for theoretical predictions of molar entropy for other gases with no use of large amounts of experimental spectroscopy data.

  16. Boron modified molybdenum silicide and products

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Mitchell K.; Akinc, Mufit

    1999-02-02

    A boron-modified molybdenum silicide material having the composition comprising about 80 to about 90 weight % Mo, about 10 to about 20 weight % Si, and about 0.1 to about 2 weight % B and a multiphase microstructure including Mo.sub.5 Si.sub.3 phase as at least one microstructural component effective to impart good high temperature creep resistance. The boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is fabricated into such products as electrical components, such as resistors and interconnects, that exhibit oxidation resistance to withstand high temperatures in service in air as a result of electrical power dissipation, electrical resistance heating elements that can withstand high temperatures in service in air and other oxygen-bearing atmospheres and can span greater distances than MoSi.sub.2 heating elements due to improved creep resistance, and high temperature structural members and other fabricated components that can withstand high temperatures in service in air or other oxygen-bearing atmospheres while retaining creep resistance associated with Mo.sub.5 Si.sub.3 for structural integrity.

  17. Boron modified molybdenum silicide and products

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, M.K.; Akinc, M.

    1999-02-02

    A boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is disclosed having the composition comprising about 80 to about 90 weight % Mo, about 10 to about 20 weight % Si, and about 0.1 to about 2 weight % B and a multiphase microstructure including Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} phase as at least one microstructural component effective to impart good high temperature creep resistance. The boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is fabricated into such products as electrical components, such as resistors and interconnects, that exhibit oxidation resistance to withstand high temperatures in service in air as a result of electrical power dissipation, electrical resistance heating elements that can withstand high temperatures in service in air and other oxygen-bearing atmospheres and can span greater distances than MoSi{sub 2} heating elements due to improved creep resistance, and high temperature structural members and other fabricated components that can withstand high temperatures in service in air or other oxygen-bearing atmospheres while retaining creep resistance associated with Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} for structural integrity. 7 figs.

  18. A new and effective approach to boron removal by using novel boron-specific fungi isolated from boron mining wastewater.

    PubMed

    Taştan, Burcu Ertit; Çakir, Dilara Nur; Dönmez, Gönül

    2016-01-01

    Boron-resistant fungi were isolated from the wastewater of a boron mine in Turkey. Boron removal efficiencies of Penicillium crustosum and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were detected in different media compositions. Minimal Salt Medium (MSM) and two different waste media containing molasses (WM-1) or whey + molasses (WM-2) were tested to make this process cost effective when scaled up. Both isolates achieved high boron removal yields at the highest boron concentrations tested in MSM and WM-1. The maximum boron removal yield by P. crustosum was 45.68% at 33.95 mg l(-1) initial boron concentration in MSM, and was 38.97% at 42.76 mg l(-1) boron for R. mucilaginosa, which seemed to offer an economically feasible method of removing boron from the effluents.

  19. Regulation of iron transport related genes by boron in the marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ariel; Trimble, Lyndsay; Hobusch, Ashtian R; Schroeder, Kristine J; Amin, Shady A; Hartnett, Andrej D; Barker, Ryan A; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Carrano, Carl J

    2013-08-01

    While there has been extensive interest in the use of boron isotope ratios as a surrogate of pH in paleoclimate studies in the context of climate change-related questions, the high (0.4 mM) concentration and the depth-independent (conservative or non-nutrient-like) concentration profile of this element have led to boron being neglected as a potentially biologically relevant element in the modern ocean. Here we report that boron affects the expression of a number of protein and genes in the "algal-associated" Gram-negative marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893. Most intriguingly, a number of these proteins and genes are related to iron uptake. In a recent separate publication we have shown that boron regulates one such iron transport related protein, i.e. the periplasmic iron binding protein FbpA via a direct interaction of the metalloid with this protein. Here we show that a number of other iron uptake related genes are also affected by boron but in the opposite way i.e. they are up-regulated. We propose that the differential effect of boron on FbpA expression relative to other iron transport related genes is a result of an interaction between boron and the global iron regulatory protein Fur.

  20. Boron and Boron-Rich Solids at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polian, Alain; Ovsyannikov, Sergey V.; Gauthier, Michel; Munsch, Pascal; Chervin, Jean-Claude; Lemarchand, Gilles

    Boron seems to be the indispensable ingredient to obtain materials with high hardness. It exists under many different structures. The simplest member of the family, α-boron is based on an arrangement of slightly distorted B12 icosahedra in a rhombohedral unit cell. B12X2 compounds, with X = O, P, As, are based on the α-boron structure, with the X atoms in the inter-icosahedra space. The stability of α-boron has been studied by x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering up to 100 GPa, showing no sign of phase transformation, and by Raman scattering for B12P2 and B12As2 with the observation of phase transformation in the 80 GPa range.

  1. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-02-02

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air.

  2. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-01-01

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air. PMID:26831205

  3. Effect of boron on tensile properties of B2 BeAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crimp, M.; Vedula, K.

    1986-01-01

    Small additions of boron were shown to improve the room temperature ductility of the intermetallic compound Ni3Al. Boron is believed to segregate to the gain boundaries and strengthen them, allowing the inheret ductility of the grains to be achieved. The present study was undertaken to see if boron has a similar effect on the low temperature tensile properties of the equiatomic intermetallic compound FeAl. A binary alloy without boron is compared with an alloy containing 0.78 at % B (0.2 wt %) B, by tensile testing over the temperature range of 300 K to 640 K. Both alloys were processed by powder metallurgy. Results showed that 0.78 at % B addition to FeAl does indeed change the room temperature fracture mode from intergranular to transgranular, suggesting a strengthening of grain boundaries. The alloy containing boron is, however, still brittle at room temperature. A slight decrease in the ductile to brittle transition temperature is, nevertheless, observed. In addition a significant increase in strength of the alloy is observed with boron addition.

  4. T Strip Properties Fabricated by Powder Rolling Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jae-Keun; Lee, Chae-Hun; Kim, Jeoung-Han; Yeom, Jong-Taek; Park, Nho-Kwang

    In the present study, the characteristics of the Ti powders fabricated by Hydride-Dehydride (HDH) were analyzed in terms of particle shape, size and size distribution. Ti powders were subjected to roll compaction and their microstructure and green densities were evaluated in terms of particle size, powder morphology, roll gap and rolling speed. Effects of blending elements having different powder sizes on densification properties were analyzed. The strip thickness was proportional to the roll gap up to 0.9 mm and the density of titanium strip was decreased with the increase in roll gap. As the roll speed increased, the strip density and thickness were decreased by using -200 mesh Ti powder. However, the effect of rolling speed for -400 mesh Ti powder was not greater than that of -200 mesh powder. The highest density by 93% was achieved by using -400 mesh Ti powder at 0.1 mm roll gap, however edge cracks and alligator cracks were occurred.

  5. Precision powder feeder

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M. Eric; Schmale, David T.; Oliver, Michael S.

    2001-07-10

    A new class of precision powder feeders is disclosed. These feeders provide a precision flow of a wide range of powdered materials, while remaining robust against jamming or damage. These feeders can be precisely controlled by feedback mechanisms.

  6. Composite powder particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Donald S. (Inventor); MacDowell, Louis G. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A liquid coating composition including a coating vehicle and composite powder particles disposed within the coating vehicle. Each composite powder particle may include a magnesium component, a zinc component, and an indium component.

  7. The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0075 The Oxidation Products of Aluminum Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters KIT BOWEN JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV BALTIMORE MD...Hydride and Boron Aluminum Hydride Clusters 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1-0324 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) KIT...of both Aluminum Hydride Cluster Anions and Boron Aluminum Hydride Cluster Anions with Oxygen: Anionic Products The anionic products of reactions

  8. Double-walled boron nitride nanotubes grown by floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung Jong; Chatterjee, Shahana; Kim, Seung Min; Stach, Eric A; Bradley, Mark G; Pender, Mark J; Sneddon, Larry G; Maruyama, Benji

    2008-10-01

    One-dimensional nanostructures exhibit quantum confinement which leads to unique electronic properties, making them attractive as the active elements for nanoscale electronic devices. Boron nitride nanotubes are of particular interest since, unlike carbon nanotubes, all chiralities are semiconducting. Here, we report a synthesis based on the use of low pressures of the molecular precursor borazine in conjunction with a floating nickelocene catalyst that resulted in the formation of double-walled boron nitride nanotubes. As has been shown for carbon nanotube production, the floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition method has the potential for creating high quality boron nitride nanostructures with high production volumes.

  9. Neutron depth profiling measurements for implanted boron-10 characterization in semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Uenlue, K.; Saglam, M.; Wehring, B.W.

    1997-12-01

    The implantation of boron and other elements affects the physical and electrical properties of semiconductor materials. The quality of semiconductor devices is determined mainly by the dose and depth distribution of boron in the near-surface region and across interfacial boundaries. The capability to measure these quantities accurately is becoming more important with the production of {open_quotes}shallow junction{close_quotes} devices. A number of techniques are available to measure the boron doses and depth distribution in semiconductor materials, some of which have been developed in the past two decades. Traditionally, the semiconductor industry uses second ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) for this purpose.

  10. Modeling of boron control during power transients in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, P.; Distexhe, E.

    1986-02-01

    Accurate control instructions in a reactor control aid computer are included in order to realize the boron makeup throughput, which is required to obtain the boron concentration in the primary coolant loop, predicted by a neutronic code. A modeling of the transfer function between the makeup and the primary loop is proposed. The chemical and volumetric control system, the pressurizer, and the primary loop are modeled as instantaneous diffusion cells. The pipes are modeled as time lag lines. The model provides the unstationary boron distributions in the different elements of the setup. A numerical code is developed to calculate the time evolutions of the makeup throughput during power transients.

  11. Boron nitride nanowires synthesis via a simple chemical vapor deposition at 1200 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Pervaiz; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Khan, Ziaul Raza

    2015-04-24

    A very simple chemical vapor deposition technique is used to synthesize high quality boron nitride nanowires at 1200 °C within a short growth duration of 30 min. FESEM micrograph shows that the as-synthesized boron nitride nanowires have a clear wire like morphology with diameter in the range of ∼20 to 150 nm. HR-TEM confirmed the wire-like structure of boron nitride nanowires, whereas XPS and Raman spectroscopy are used to find out the elemental composition and phase of the synthesized material. The synthesized boron nitride nanowires have potential applications as a sensing element in solid state neutron detector, neutron capture therapy and microelectronic devices with uniform electronic properties.

  12. Copper passivation of boron in silicon and boron reactivation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboelfotoh, M. O.; Svensson, B. G.

    1991-12-01

    Copper passivation of substitutional boron in single-crystal silicon and the reactivation kinetics of the passivated boron have been investigated with the use of Schottky-barrier structures formed by the deposition of copper on boron-doped silicon at room temperature. It is found that passivation of the boron acceptors occurs after copper deposition. The results suggest that the fast-diffusing interstitial Cu+ passivates the boron acceptors by forming neutral B-Cu complexes, rather than by direct compensation. No compensating donor levels associated with Cu are observed. These results are consistent with recent theoretical predictions. The reactivation kinetics are first order with an activation energy of 0.89 eV, and the annealing process is found to be controlled by long-range diffusion, rather than by pure dissociation. The thermal dissociation of the B-Cu complexes is driven by the formation of the copper silicide η'-Cu3Si, indicating the importance of silicide formation in the reactivation of the boron acceptors.

  13. Nothing Boring About Boron

    PubMed Central

    Pizzorno, Lara

    2015-01-01

    The trace mineral boron is a micronutrient with diverse and vitally important roles in metabolism that render it necessary for plant, animal, and human health, and as recent research suggests, possibly for the evolution of life on Earth. As the current article shows, boron has been proven to be an important trace mineral because it (1) is essential for the growth and maintenance of bone; (2) greatly improves wound healing; (3) beneficially impacts the body’s use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D; (4) boosts magnesium absorption; (5) reduces levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α); (6) raises levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase; (7) protects against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity; (8) improves the brains electrical activity, cognitive performance, and short-term memory for elders; (9) influences the formation and activity of key biomolecules, such as S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+); (10) has demonstrated preventive and therapeutic effects in a number of cancers, such as prostate, cervical, and lung cancers, and multiple and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma; and (11) may help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents. In none of the numerous studies conducted to date, however, do boron’s beneficial effects appear at intakes > 3 mg/d. No estimated average requirements (EARs) or dietary reference intakes (DRIs) have been set for boron—only an upper intake level (UL) of 20 mg/d for individuals aged ≥ 18 y. The absence of studies showing harm in conjunction with the substantial number of articles showing benefits support the consideration of boron supplementation of 3 mg/d for any individual who is consuming a diet lacking in fruits and vegetables or who is at risk for or has osteopenia; osteoporosis

  14. The shocking development of lithium (and boron) in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearborn, David S. P.; Schramm, David N.; Steigman, Gary; Truran, James

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that significant amounts of Li-7 and B-11 are produced in Type 2 supernovae. The synthesis of these rare elements occurs as the supernova shock traverses the base of the hydrogen envelope burning He-3 to masses 7 and 11 via alpha capture. The yields in this process are sufficient to account for the difference in lithium abundance observed between Pop 2 and Pop 1 stars. Since lithium (and boron) would, in this manner, be created in the same stars that produce the bulk of the heavy elements, the lithium abundance even in old Pop 1 stars would be high (as observed). The B-11 production may remedy the long-standing problem of the traditional spallation scenario to account for the observed isotopic ratio of boron. Observational consequences of this mechanism are discussed, including the evolution of lithium and boron isotope ratios in the Galaxy and the possible use of the boron yields to constrain the number of blue progenitor Type 2 supernovae.

  15. The shocking development of lithium (and boron) in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearborn, David S. P.; Schramm, David N.; Steigman, Gary; Truran, James

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that significant amounts of Li-7 and B-11 are produced in Type 2 supernovae. The synthesis of these rare elements occurs as the supernova shock traverses the base of the hydrogen envelope burning He-3 to masses 7 and 11 via alpha capture. The yields in this process are sufficient to account for the difference in lithium abundance observed between Pop 2 and Pop 1 stars. Since lithium (and boron) would, in this manner, be created in the same stars that produce the bulk of the heavy elements, the lithium abundance even in old Pop 1 stars would be high (as observed). The B-11 production may remedy the long-standing problem of the traditional spallation scenario to account for the observed isotopic ratio of boron. Observational consequences of this mechanism are discussed, including the evolution of lithium and boron isotope ratios in the Galaxy and the possible use of the boron yields to constrain the number of blue progenitor Type 2 supernovae.

  16. Incorporation of Integral Fuel Burnable Absorbers Boron and Gadolinium into Zirconium-Alloy Fuel Clad Material

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, K.; Renk, T.J.; Lahoda, E.J.; Corradini, M.L

    2004-12-14

    Long-lived fuels require the use of higher enrichments of 235U or other fissile materials. Such high levels of fissile material lead to excessive fuel activity at the beginning of life. To counteract this excessive activity, integral fuel burnable absorbers (IFBA) are added to some rods in the fuel assembly. The two commonly used IFBA elements are gadolinium, which is added as gadolinium-oxide to the UO2 powder, and boron, which is applied as a zirconium-diboride coating on the UO2 pellets using plasma spraying or chemical vapor deposition techniques. The incorporation of IFBA into the fuel has to be performed in a nuclear-regulated facility that is physically separated from the main plant. These operations tend to be very costly because of their small volume and can add from 20 to 30% to the manufacturing cost of the fuel. Other manufacturing issues that impact cost and performance are maintaining the correct levels of dosing, the reduction in fuel melting point due to gadolinium-oxide additions, and parasitic neutron absorption at fuel's end-of-life. The goal of the proposed research is to develop an alternative approach that involves incorporation of boron or gadolinium into the outer surface of the fuel cladding material rather than as an additive to the fuel pellets. This paradigm shift will allow for the introduction of the IFBA in a non-nuclear regulated environment and will obviate the necessity of additional handling and processing of the fuel pellets. This could represent significant cost savings and potentially lead to greater reproducibility and control of the burnable fuel in the early stages of the reactor operation. The surface alloying is being performed using the IBEST (Ion Beam Surface Treatment) process developed at Sandia National Laboratories. IBEST involves the delivery of energetic ion beam pulses onto the surface of a material, near-surface melting, and rapid solidification. The non-equilibrium nature of such processing allows for surface

  17. Reducing Boron Toxicity by Microbial Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.; Phelps, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    While electricity is a clean source of energy, methods of electricity-production, such as the use of coal-fired power plants, often result in significant environmental damage. Coal-fired electrical power plants produce air pollution, while contaminating ground water and soils by build-up of boron, which enters surrounding areas through leachate. Increasingly high levels of boron in soils eventually overcome boron tolerance levels in plants and trees, resulting in toxicity. Formation of insoluble boron precipitates, mediated by mineral-precipitating bacteria, may sequester boron into more stable forms that are less available and toxic to vegetation. Results have provided evidence of microbially-facilitated sequestration of boron into insoluble mineral precipitates. Analyses of water samples taken from ponds with high boron concentrations showed that algae present contained 3-5 times more boron than contained in the water in the samples. Boron sequestration may also be facilitated by the incorporation of boron within algal cells. Experiments examining boron sequestration by algae are in progress. In bacterial experiments with added ferric citrate, the reduction of iron by the bacteria resulted in an ironcarbonate precipitate containing boron. An apparent color change showing the reduction of amorphous iron, as well as the precipitation of boron with iron, was more favorable at higher pH. Analysis of precipitates by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy revealed mineralogical composition and biologicallymediated accumulation of boron precipitates in test-tube experiments.

  18. The influence of metal Mg on micro-morphology and crystallinity of spherical hexagonal boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ning Liu, Huan; Kan, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyang; Long, Haibo; Zhou, Yonghui

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The action mechanism of Mg to the synthesis of spherical BN was explored. • The influence of Mg content on the crystallinity of h-BN powders was studied. • Even if not added any template, the spherical h-BN could be prepared. - Abstract: This search used the boric acid and borax as a source of boron, urea as a nitrogen source, Mg as metal catalyst, and thus prepared different micro-morphology and crystallinity hexagonal boron nitride powders under a flowing ammonia atmosphere at a nitriding temperature of 750 °C. The effect of Mg content on the crystallinity and micro-morphology of hexagonal boron nitride powders was studied, and the Mg action mechanism was explored. Without the added surfactant, the graphitization index (GI) was 6.87, and the diameter of the spherical h-BN was bigger. When the added Mg were 0.1 g, 0.3 g, 0.5 g and 0.7 g, the (GI) decreased to 6.04, 5.67, 4.62 and 4.84, respectively. When the Mg content was higher (0.9 g), GI value increased rapidly, and the crystallinity became bad. When the Mg content was 0.5 g, the dispersion of h-BN powders was at its optimum and refinement apparently, and the crystallinity at its highest.

  19. Nano boron nitride flatland.

    PubMed

    Pakdel, Amir; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2014-02-07

    Recent years have witnessed many breakthroughs in research on two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, among which is hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), a layered material with a regular network of BN hexagons. This review provides an insight into the marvellous nano BN flatland, beginning with a concise introduction to BN and its low-dimensional nanostructures, followed by an overview of the past and current state of research on 2D BN nanostructures. A comprehensive review of the structural characteristics and synthetic routes of BN monolayers, multilayers, nanomeshes, nanowaves, nanoflakes, nanosheets and nanoribbons is presented. In addition, electronic, optical, thermal, mechanical, magnetic, piezoelectric, catalytic, ecological, biological and wetting properties, applications and research perspectives for these novel 2D nanomaterials are discussed.

  20. Boron diffusion in silicon devices

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Kim, Dong Seop; Nakayashiki, Kenta; Rounsaville, Brian

    2010-09-07

    Disclosed are various embodiments that include a process, an arrangement, and an apparatus for boron diffusion in a wafer. In one representative embodiment, a process is provided in which a boric oxide solution is applied to a surface of the wafer. Thereafter, the wafer is subjected to a fast heat ramp-up associated with a first heating cycle that results in a release of an amount of boron for diffusion into the wafer.

  1. Boron exposure assessment using drinking water and urine in the North of Chile.

    PubMed

    Cortes, S; Reynaga-Delgado, E; Sancha, A M; Ferreccio, C

    2011-12-01

    Boron is an essential trace element for plants and humans however it is still an open question what levels of boron are actually safe for humans. This study, conducted between 2006 and 2010, measured exposure levels of boron in drinking water and urine of volunteers in Arica, an area in the North of Chile with high levels of naturally occurring boron. Samples were taken of tap and bottled water (173 and 22, respectively), as well as urine from 22 volunteers, and subsequently analyzed by inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Boron varied in public tap water from 0.22 to 11.3mgL(-1), with a median value of 2.9mgL(-1), while concentrations of boron in bottled water varied from 0.01 to 12.2mgL(-1). Neither tap nor bottled water samples had concentrations of boron within WHO recommended limits. The concentration of boron in urine varied between 0.45 and 17.4mgL(-1), with a median of 4.28mgL(-1) and was found to be correlated with tap water sampled from the homes of the volunteers (r=0.64). Authors highly recommend that in northern Chile - where levels of boron are naturally high - that the tap and bottled water supplies be monitored in order to protect public health and that regulatory standards also be established for boron in drinking water in order to limit exposure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Coprecipitation and isotopic fractionation of boron in modern biogenic carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Vengosh, A. Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem ); Chivas, A.R.; McCulloch, M.T. ); Kolodny, Y.; Starinsky, A. )

    1991-10-01

    The abundances and isotopic composition of boron in modern, biogenic calcareous skeletons from the Gulf of Elat, Israel, the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and in deep-sea sediments have been examined by negative thermal-ionization mass spectrometry. The selected species (Foraminifera, Pteropoda, corals, Gastropoda, and Pelecypoda) yield large variations in boron concentration that range from 1 ppm in gastropod shells to 80 ppm in corals. The variations of {delta}{sup 11}B may be controlled by isotopic exchange of boron species in which {sup 10}B is preferentially partitioned into the tetrahedral species, and coprecipitation of different proportions of trigonal and tetrahedral species in the calcium carbonates. The B content and {delta}{sup 11}B values of deep-sea sediments, Foraminifera tests, and corals are used to estimate the global oceanic sink of elemental boron by calcium carbonate deposition. As a result of enrichment of B in corals, a substantially higher biogenic sink of 6.4 {plus minus} 0.9 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr is calculated for carbonates. This is only slightly lower than the sink for desorbable B in marine sediments (10 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr) and approximately half that of altered oceanic crust (14 {times} 10{sup 10} g/yr). Thus, carbonates are an important sink for B in the oceans being {approximately}20% of the total sinks. The preferential incorporation of {sup 10}B into calcium carbonate results in oceanic {sup 11}B-enrichment, estimated as 1.2 {plus minus} 0.3 {times} 10{sup 12} per mil {center dot} g/yr. The boron-isotope composition of authigenic, well-preserved carbonate skeletons may provide a useful tool to record secular boron-isotope variations in seawater at various times in the geological record.

  3. Two Possible Ways Boron Got into Veins on Mount Sharp

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    This graphic portrays two hypotheses about how the element boron ended up in calcium sulfate veins found within mudstone layers of the Murray formation on Mars' lower Mount Sharp. Hypothesis A is presented left-to-right in the upper four panels; hypothesis B in the lower four. Note that the two final panels are identical, depicting conditions found by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover. Calcium sulfate is the veins' main ingredient. The mudstone matrix around the veins resulted from deposition of sediments in a lake environment in Mars' Gale Crater billions of years ago. In hypothesis A: (1) Boron dissolved in the lake and was incorporated into the lake bottom clays that became the Murray formation. (2) The lake then dried and the bedrock fractured. (3) Later groundwater interacted with the clays under conditions that released the boron into the groundwater. (4) Then, the boron was deposited along with the calcium sulfate that makes up the bulk of these veins. In hypothesis B: (1) Boron was not incorporated into the clays as the lake was active. (2) Instead, when the lake dried out, it left a layer of boron-containing salts, and likely other types of salts, such as sodium chloride (table salt) and calcium sulfates, in an overlying layer that Curiosity has not yet visited. The bedrock fractured. (3) Groundwater later dissolved this layer of evaporite salts and moved the salts down into the older layers the rover has investigated. (4) The groundwater deposited the evaporite salts with the calcium sulfate that makes up the bulk of these veins. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21253

  4. Nature of boron and nitrogen superficial segregation on the Fe-Ni 36 alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Saindrenan, G.; Roptin, D.; Mostefa, L.B. )

    1989-05-01

    In a recent paper, the authors reported the parameters of sulfur bulk diffusion in a Fe-Ni 36 alloy. They were determined by the exploitation of the superficial segregation kinetics obtained by AES studies. The authors have also reported that neither boron nor nitrogen are observed on the free surface of the as received alloys during the various heat treatments up to 1000{degrees}C, but they are observed in the 600--900{degrees}C range, if the material is prior annealed at 1000{degrees}C. The boron and nitrogen elements are shown to cosegregate on the free surface and the observed energy shift (7 eV) of the auger boron peak suggests a strong binding of this element. When the annealing temperature approaches 900{degrees}C these elements disappear from the surface leaving only sulfur strongly segregated at all temperatures studied. Otherwise, working on the Ni{sub 3}Al, another research effort interpreted the boron behavior as indicating that it tends to segregate only to the defective free surface (after ion bombardment) and attribute the absence of boron on the well annealed surfaces to the highly ordered nature and good crystallinity of the near surface regions. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the nature of the superficial cosegregation of boron and nitrogen and the surface layer on the Fe-Ni alloy using AES results and according to Fowler's thermodynamic model.

  5. Edge-Hydroxylated Boron Nitride Nanosheets as an Effective Additive to Improve the Thermal Response of Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feng; Naficy, Sina; Casillas, Gilberto; Khan, Majharul H; Katkus, Tomas; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Huakun; Li, Huijun; Huang, Zhenguo

    2015-11-25

    Upon flowing hot steam over hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) bulk powder, efficient exfoliation and hydroxylation of BN occur simultaneously. Through effective hydrogen bonding with water and N-isopropylacrylamide, edge-hydroxylated BN nanosheets dramatically improve the dimensional change and dye release of this temperature-sensitive hydrogel and thereby enhance its efficacy in bionic, soft robotic, and drug-delivery applications.

  6. Low-temperature collapsing boron nitride nanospheres into nanoflakes and their photoluminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Luo, Han; Lin, Jing; Xue, Yanming; Liu, Zhenya; Jin, Peng; Xu, Xuewen; Huang, Yang; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Jun; Tang, Chengchun

    2014-09-01

    Flake-like boron nitride (BN) nanocrystals with a uniform diameter of ˜200 nm and thickness of ˜20 nm were fabricated by directly transforming from BN nanospheres with the assistance of NaCl salt at 1300 °C. The transformation from nanospheres to nano-pies and further to nanoflakes was achieved in a simple procedure of Na or Cl ions intercalation/deintercalation procedure at such low temperature. The morphologies of the spherical precursor and resulting nanoflakes were almost identical. X-ray powder diffractions revealed that the BN nanoflakes (BNfs) were well crystallized in the hexagonal structure via graphitizing index calculation. Elemental content analysis, FTIR spectra and TEM images were also used to characterize the products. Strong ultraviolet (UV) emissions were detected by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic analysis, in which the emission regions could be facilely tuned by controlling the reaction temperature. Detailed studies indicated that the collapsing temperature of unstable BN nanospheres into nanoflakes was strongly dependent on the introduction of NaCl molten salts or not. We believe the use of the NaCl molten salt medium may enhance the kinetics of the crystallization and also purification. The green fabrication characteristics, such as using NaCl salt as the additive, energy saving (300 °C lower than the commercial process), non-toxicity of byproduct and easy scale-up, make the present novel synthetic route likely to be of interest to commercial-scale production of BN nanoflakes.

  7. Application of sodium carbonate-zinc oxide decomposition mixture on ICP-AES determination of boron in tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Lihareva, N; Kosturkova, P; Vakarelska, T

    2000-05-01

    Boron in tourmaline, a high refractory mineral with a high boron content (approximately 3%), can be determined after aqueous leaching of a sodium carbonate-zinc oxide melt. Boron is separated effectively from the major elements of matrix, such as silicon, calcium and magnesium and especially from iron, the main spectral interfering element. Measurements were performed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. A determination limit of 4 microg/g could be achieved when 200 mg of sample are analyzed with a precision of 5.2% RSD. This method could be applied to the determination of fluorine in the same solution.

  8. Consolidation of cubic and hexagonal boron nitride composites

    SciTech Connect

    Du Frane, W. L.; Cervantes, O.; Ellsworth, G. F.; Kuntz, J. D.

    2015-12-08

    When we Consolidate cubic boron nitride (cBN) it typically requires either a matrix of metal bearing materials that are undesirable for certain applications, or very high pressures within the cBN phase stability field that are prohibitive to manufacturing size and cost. We present new methodology for consolidating high stiffness cBN composites within a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) matrix (15–25 vol%) with the aid of a binder phase (0–6 vol%) at moderate pressures (0.5–1.0 GPa) and temperatures (900–1300 °C). The composites are demonstrated to be highly tailorable with a range of compositions and resulting physical/mechanical properties. Ultrasonic measurements indicate that in some cases these composites have elastic mechanical properties that exceed those of the highest strength steel alloys. Moreover, two methods were identified to prevent phase transformation of the metastable cBN phase into hBN during consolidation: 1. removal of hydrocarbons, and 2. increased cBN particle size. Lithium tetraborate worked better as a binder than boron oxide, aiding consolidation without enhancing cBN to hBN phase transformation kinetics. These powder mixtures consolidated within error of their full theoretical mass densities at 1 GPa, and had only slightly lower densities at 0.5 GPa. This shows potential for consolidation of these composites into larger parts, in a variety of shapes, at even lower pressures using more conventional manufacturing methods, such as hot-pressing.

  9. Developments in Titanium Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froes, F. H.; Eylon, D.; Eichelman, G. E.; Burte, H. M.

    1980-02-01

    The high buy-to-fly ratio associated with many titanium components, combined with forging and machining difficulties, and recent availability problems, has led to a strong drive for near-net titanium shape fabrication. A very promising method of attaining this goal is powder metallurgy. Two major approaches are considered in this article: the "elemental" and "pre-alloyed" powder methods. Shape-making capability and mechanical properties of both technologies are presented. Consideration is given to the cost-effectiveness of the processes and mechanical performance compared to conventional fabrication methods. Design philosophies, modified to include the presence of foreign particles in the compacted article, are discussed. Emerging advances in the technology are presented and future developments forecast.

  10. Polymer quenched prealloyed metal powder

    DOEpatents

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Fleischhauer, Grier; German, Randall M.

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3 % Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  11. Determination of trace impurities in boron nitride by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using solid sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, P.; Hassler, J.; Kudrik, I.; Krivan, V.

    2007-09-01

    Two digestion-free methods for trace analysis of boron nitride based on graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma spectrometry optical emission (ETV-ICP-OES) using direct solid sampling have been developed and applied to the determination of Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Si, Ti and Zr in four boron nitride materials in concentration intervals of 1-23, 54-735, 0.05-21, 0.005-1.3, 1.6-112, 4.5-20, 0.03-1.8, 6-46, 38-170 and 0.4-2.3 μg g - 1 , respectively. At optimized experimental conditions, with both methods, effective in-situ analyte/matrix separation was achieved and calibration could be performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions. In solid sampling GFAAS, before sampling, the platform was covered with graphite powder and, for determination of Si, also the Pd/Mg(NO 3) 2 modifier was used. In the determination of all analyte elements by solid sampling ETV-ICP-OES, Freon R12 was added to argon carrier gas. For solid sampling GFAAS and ETV-ICP-OES, the achievable limits of detection were within 5 (Cu)-130 (Si) ng g - 1 and 8 (Cu)-200 (Si) ng g - 1 , respectively. The results obtained by these two methods for four boron nitride materials of different purity grades are compared each with the other and with those obtained in analysis of digests by ICP-OES. The performance of the two solid sampling methods is compared and discussed.

  12. Boron in Pariette Wetland Sediments, Aquatic Vegetation & Benthic Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudeva, P.; Jones, C. P.; Powelson, D.; Jacobson, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Pariette Wetlands are comprised of 20 ponds located in Utah's Uintah Basin. Boron concentration in the Pariette Wetlands have been observed to exceed the total maximum daily limit of 750 µg L-1. Considering water flow in and out of the wetlands, boron is accumulating within the wetlands where it is sorbed to sediments and bioconcentrated by wetland plant and macro invertebrates. Since boron is an avian teratogen, an estimate of boron ingestion exposure is warranted. Samples from 3 of the 23 Pariette Wetland ponds with one pond near the inlet, one near the outlet, and one in the middle were collected. Five sampling points were designated along a 100 m transect of each pond. At each sampling point duplicate (or triplicate) samples of water, sediments, benthic organisms and wetland vegetation were collected. The sediments were collected with a KB-corer and divided at depths of 0-2 cm, 2-7 cm, and 7+ cm from the sediment surface. Sample splits were sent to the USU Bug lab for identification of invertebrate species. Whenever this transect was not intercepting vegetation, 2-3 additional sample sites were identified at the pond within stands of representative vegetation where bird nests are located. The plant parts used for boron analyses will include seeds, shoot and roots of vascular plants, as well as algae or duckweeds skimmed from the surface. Samples were processed within 2 days of collection. Water samples filtered through a 0.45 μ membrane filter were analyzed for DOC, pH and ECe. The dried and washed vegetation samples were ground and stored. The benthic organisms and macro invertebrates were netted at the water surface. The dried samples were weighed, ground and stored. Samples were weighed, oven dried and reweighed. For plant and macro-invertebrate samples, a nitric and hydrogen peroxide digestion procedure is used to dissolve environmentally available elements. The Hot Water extraction and DTPA-Sorbitol extraction were compared to estimate wetland plant

  13. Method for preparing metal powder, device for preparing metal powder, method for processing spent nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee [Clarendon Hills, IL

    2011-11-29

    A method for producing metal powder is provided the comprising supplying a molten bath containing a reducing agent, contacting a metal oxide with the molten bath for a time and at a temperature sufficient to reduce the metal in the metal oxide to elemental metal and produce free oxygen; and isolating the elemental metal from the molten bath.

  14. Polynitroethyl- and fluorodinitroethyl substituted boron esters.

    PubMed

    Klapötke, Thomas M; Krumm, Burkhard; Moll, Richard

    2013-09-02

    The reaction of boron oxide with various nitro-substituted ethanols (2-nitroethanol, 2-fluoro-2,2-dinitroethanol, 2,2,2-trinitroethanol) furnished the corresponding nitroethyl borates B(OCH2CH2NO2)3 (1), B(OCH2CF(NO2)2)3 (2), and B(OCH2C(NO2)3)3 (3). Fluorination of the anion [(NO2)2CCH2OH](-) (4) resulted in 2-fluoro-2,2-dinitroethanol (5), a precursor for 2, and was thoroughly characterized. An interesting condensation was observed with the anion 4 to form the unusual dianion [(NO2)2CCH2C(NO2)2](2-) (6). All compounds were fully characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy (IR, Raman), mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. The chemical, physical and energetic properties of 1-3 and 5 are reported, as well as quantum chemical calculations at the CBS-4M level of theory to predict the enthalpies and energies of formation. X-ray diffraction studies were performed, and the crystal structures for compounds 1-6 were determined and discussed thoroughly. The boron esters 1-3 are of interest as possible candidates for smoke-free, green colorants in pyrotechnic applications, and in case of 2 and 3 also as promising high energy oxidizers. Copyright © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Boron-10 ABUNCL Prototype Initial Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results of initial testing of an Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) design built by General Electric Reuter-Stokes. Several configurations of the ABUNCL models, which use 10B-lined proportional counters in place of 3He proportional counters for the neutron detection elements, were previously reported. The ABUNCL tested is of a different design than previously modeled. Initial experimental testing of the as-delivered passive ABUNCL was performed, and modeling will be conducted. Testing of the system reconfigured for active testing will be performed in the near future, followed by testing with nuclear fuel.

  16. Boronated porhyrins and methods for their use

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Shelnutt, John A.; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention covers boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies such as boron neutron capture therapy and photodynamic therapy.

  17. Boronated porhyrins and methods for their use

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention covers boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies such as boron neutron capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. 3 figs.

  18. Synthesis and Utility of Dihydropyridine Boronic Esters**

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Santanu; Coffin, Aaron; Nguyen, Q. Nhu; Tantillo, Dean; Ready, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    When activated by an acylating agent, pyridine boronic esters react with organometallic reagents to form a dihydropyridine boronic ester. This intermediate allows access to a number of valuable substituted pyridine, dihydropyridine and piperidine products. PMID:26694785

  19. Synthesis and Utility of Dihydropyridine Boronic Esters.

    PubMed

    Panda, Santanu; Coffin, Aaron; Nguyen, Q Nhu; Tantillo, Dean J; Ready, Joseph M

    2016-02-05

    When activated by an acylating agent, pyridine boronic esters react with organometallic reagents to form a dihydropyridine boronic ester. This intermediate allows access to a number of valuable substituted pyridine, dihydropyridine, and piperidine products.

  20. Preparation of a boronate-functionalized affinity hybrid monolith for specific capture of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Mao, J; He, X W; Chen, L X; Zhang, Y K

    2013-06-01

    A novel strategy for preparation of a boronate affinity hybrid monolith was developed using a Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction of an alkyne-boronate ligand with an azide-functionalized monolithic intermediate. An azide-functionalized hybrid monolith was first synthesized via a single-step procedure to provide reactive sites for click chemistry; then the alkyne-boronate ligands were covalently immobilized on the azide-functionalized hybrid monolith via an in-column CuAAC reaction to form a boronate affinity hybrid monolith under mild conditions. The boronate affinity monolith was characterized and evaluated by means of elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The boronate affinity hybrid monolith exhibited excellent specificity toward nucleosides and glycoproteins, which were chosen as test cis-diol-containing compounds under neutral conditions. The binding capacity of the monolith for the glycoprotein ovalbumin was 2.36 mg · g(-1) at pH 7.0. The practicability of the boronate affinity hybrid monolithic material was demonstrated by specific capture of the glycoproteins ovalbumin and ovotransferrin from an egg sample.

  1. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis for determination of boron in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baechler, S.; Kudejova, P.; Jolie, J.; Schenker, J.-L.; Stritt, N.

    2002-08-01

    Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) is a nuclear analytical technique for the determination of trace and other elements in solid, liquid or gaseous samples. The method consists in observing gamma rays emitted by a sample during neutron irradiation. Of particular importance for PGAA is the measurement of boron. Indeed, this technique gives the opportunity to detect boron concentration down to the ppm or ppb level depending on the sample matrix. Furthermore, boron cannot be easily measured by other methods without risks of contamination. Trace analysis of boron in liquids has been performed and characterized at the PGA facility of the neutron spallation source SINQ (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). First, a calibration curve was determined with standard boron solutions. Then, the PGAA was applied for the determination of boron in geological water samples. The results were compared with ICP-MS measurements. Finally, the method yielded promising results to measure the concentration of boron taken up by cells in a new treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Phosphors containing boron and metals of Group IIIA and IIIB

    DOEpatents

    Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2006-10-31

    A phosphor comprises: (a) at least a first metal selected from the group consisting of yttrium and elements of lanthanide series other than europium; (b) at least a second metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and scandium; (c) boron; and (d) europium. The phosphor is used in light source that comprises a UV radiation source to convert UV radiation to visible light.

  3. Stopping characteristics of boron and indium ions in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Veselov, D. S. Voronov, Yu. A.

    2016-12-15

    The mean range and its standard deviation are calculated for boron ions implanted into silicon with energies below 10 keV. Similar characteristics are calculated for indium ions with energies below 200 keV. The obtained results are presented in tabular and graphical forms. These results may help in the assessment of conditions of production of integrated circuits with nanometer-sized elements.

  4. Beryllium and Boron abundances in population II stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The scientific focus of this program was to undertake UV spectroscopic abundance analyses of extremely metal poor stars with attention to determining abundances of light elements such as beryllium and boron. The abundances are likely to reflect primordial abundances within the early galaxy and help to constrain models for early galactic nucleosynthesis. The general metal abundances of these stars are also important for understanding stellar evolution.

  5. Methods for boron delivery to mammalian tissue

    DOEpatents

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Feaks, Debra A.; Shelly, Kenneth J.

    2003-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy can be used to destroy tumors. This treatment modality is enhanced by delivering compounds to the tumor site where the compounds have high concentrations of boron, the boron compounds being encapsulated in the bilayer of a liposome or in the bilayer as well as the internal space of the liposomes. Preferred compounds, include carborane units with multiple boron atoms within the carborane cage structure. Liposomes with increased tumor specificity may also be used.

  6. Methods and compositions for boronizing metallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, D. K.

    1985-11-26

    The present disclosure is directed to methods and compositions for boronizing metal and in particular ferrous surfaces. It has been discovered that if hydrocarbons are processed in metallic equipment which have been previously boronized, that coke formation and deposition which is commonly experienced at high temperatures can be minimized if not totally eliminated. The compositions utilized for this purpose are comprised of boron or boron compounds contained in an organic solvent or carrier together with specific activating materials.

  7. High temperature heat treatment on boron precursor and PIT process optimization to improve the Jc performance of MgB2-based conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignolo, M.; Bovone, G.; Bernini, C.; Palenzona, A.; Kawale, S.; Romano, G.; Siri, A. S.

    2013-10-01

    The promising results reported in our previous works led us to think that the production process of boron plays a crucial role in MgB2 synthesis. A new method for boron preparation has been developed in our laboratory. This particular process is based on magnesiothermic reaction (Moissan’s process) with the addition of an initial step that gives boron powder with nano-metric grain size. In this paper we report our efforts regarding optimization of the powder-in-tube (PIT) method for these nano-metric powders, and the resolution of problems previously highlighted such as the difficulty in powder packaging and the high friction phenomena occurring during cold working. This increases cracking during the tape and wire manufacture, leading to failure. Packaging problems are related to the amorphous nature of boron synthesized in our laboratory, so a crystallization treatment was applied to improve the crystallinity of the boron. To prevent excessive friction phenomena we synthesized non-stoichiometric MgB2 and used magnesium as lubricant. Our goal is the Jc improvement, but a global physical-chemical characterization was also made to analyse the improvement given by our treatments: this characterization includes x-ray diffraction, ρ(T) measurement, and SEM imaging, besides magnetic and transport Jc measurements.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of boron-based one-dimensional nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, Carolyn Jones

    New synthetic methods for the preparation of boron-based one-dimensional nanostructures are developed that employ catalytic chemical vapor deposition. The structures, morphologies, and elemental compositions of the nanostructures are characterized using electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Electrical-transport measurements performed on individual boron nanowires assess their potential as nanoscale interconnects. Multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes are generated from a molten salt mixture containing (NH4)2SO4, NaBH4, and Co3O4 at 300--400°C. Volatile BN-containing species generated in the molten salt are transported via a carrier gas to a nickel boride catalyst at 1100°C, whereupon precursor decomposition upon the catalyst material results in the formation of crystalline boron nitride nanotubes. The BN nanotubes have concentric-tube structures, are free of internal closures, have crystalline walls, and exhibit lengths of up to ca. 5 mum. The nanotubes often possess bulbous, flag-like, or club-like tip closures. A root-growth mechanism is proposed for the catalyzed process. This work provides the first CVD synthesis of BN nanotubes not requiring the use of carbon nanotube templates. A theoretical prediction for the existence of conductive boron nanotubes inspired our next project in the search for ideal nanostructured electrical interconnects for nanoelectronics. Promising candidates should be highly refractory, covalently bonded, and conductive irrespective of their crystallographic orientation. We report the growth of crystalline boron nanowires from a nickel boride catalyst using diborane at temperatures of 1100°C. However, our one-dimensional boron nanostructures are dense nanowhiskers rather than hollow nanotubes. Electrical-conductivity measurements indicate the boron nanowires to be semiconductors, with properties consistent with bulk elemental boron. To our knowledge, these are the first measurements reported on crystalline boron nanowires. To probe the

  9. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kawabata, Shinji; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Ono, Koji

    2016-07-15

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting.

  10. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    MIYATAKE, Shin-Ichi; KAWABATA, Shinji; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; KUROIWA, Toshihiko; SUZUKI, Minoru; KONDO, Natsuko; ONO, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  11. The significance of dietary boron, with particular reference to athletes.

    PubMed

    Naghii, M R

    1999-01-01

    Ergogenic substances and synthetic steroids have a wide spread use, particularly among non-professional athletes. To avoid the side-effect of drug abuse, it is suggested that the key to success is a proper athletic nutrition. It is a balanced intake of nutritional wholesome foods that contain a proper blend of essential nutrients. Knowledge of human physiology and nutrition has increased greatly, and so has application of dietary alterations and supplementation with specific nutrients. Modulation of dietary composition and/or supplementation with specific nutrients with the intent of improving human physical performance is a working definition of nutritional ergogenic aids. Boron is a trace element nutrient, and recently its supplements have been shown to increase the concentration of plasma steroid hormones. In a single blind cross-over trial, it resulted in a significant increase in plasma 17-B estradiol (E2) concentration (P < 0.004) and there was a trend for plasma testosterone (T) levels to be increased. The ratio of E2/T increased significantly. However, there was no perturbation in plasma lipids. Furthermore, the effect of boron on steroidogenesis and its mechanism was also investigated in two more studies conducted on adult male rats. The elevation of endogenous steroid hormones as a result of boron supplementation suggest that boron may be used as an ergogenic safe substance for athletes which should be further investigated.

  12. Design and fabrication of a boron reinforced intertank skirt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henshaw, J.; Roy, P. A.; Pylypetz, P.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to evaluate the structural efficiency of a boron reinforced shell, where the medium of reinforcement consists of hollow aluminum extrusions infiltrated with boron epoxy. Studies were completed for the design of a one-half scale minimum weight shell using boron reinforced stringers and boron reinforced rings. Parametric and iterative studies were completed for the design of minimum weight stringers, rings, shells without rings and shells with rings. Computer studies were completed for the final evaluation of a minimum weight shell using highly buckled minimum gage skin. The detail design is described of a practical minimum weight test shell which demonstrates a weight savings of 30% as compared to an all aluminum longitudinal stiffened shell. Sub-element tests were conducted on representative segments of the compression surface at maximum stress and also on segments of the load transfer joint. A 10 foot long, 77 inch diameter shell was fabricated from the design and delivered for further testing.

  13. Diffusion of boron in alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Zhang, S; He, X.

    1995-04-01

    By means of particle tracking autoradiography (PTA), the diffusion coefficients of boron between 900 and 1,200 C were measured in 04MnNbB steel, 25MnTiB steel, Ni-B, Fe-30%Ni-B and Fe-3%Si-B alloys, and the frequency factor D{sub 0} and activation energy Q were obtained respectively. The experiment results indicated that there was an obvious difference between the present result and the result obtained by Busby (in 1953). It was found that the boron diffusivity in {gamma}-Fe increased as Ni was added. The diffusivity of boron in Fe-3%Si-B alloy with b.c.c. structure was much slower than one obtained by Busby in {alpha}-Fe (1954), which, however, was much faster than the results obtained in {gamma}-Fe (with f.c.c. structure). Based on the present data of boron diffusion coefficients, the mechanism of segregation of boron to grain boundaries is discussed.

  14. Wettability of boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Torvund, T.; Akselsen, O.M.; Ulvensoeen, J.H.; Grong, O.

    1994-12-31

    The wettability of boron carbide has been examined by means of the sessile drop method, using the following candidate alloys: (96wt%AG-4wt%Ti), (Ag-26.5wt%Cu-3wt%Ti), (Sn-10wt%Ag-4wt%Ti), Sn(99.95wt%) and Al(99.99wt%). The results show that B{sub 4}C is completely wetted by the Ag-based alloys. Sn-10wt%Ag-4wt%Ti alloy and pure Al partly wet the B{sub 4}C surface, while pure Sn does not wet B{sub 4}C at all. For all the alloys used, except pure Sn, a reaction layer was observed at the interface between the ceramic part and the metal drop. Although the spreading kinetics of the Al-drop was much slower compared with the Ti-containing alloys, the reaction rate was considerably higher in the former case. This suggests that aluminium is an attractive candidate material for brazing of B{sub 4}C. Formation of the low melting B{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the B{sub 4}C surface may cause oxidation of the filler metal during joining, which, in turn, leads to a low bond strength.

  15. Multiple feed powder splitter

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    2001-01-01

    A device for providing uniform powder flow to the nozzles when creating solid structures using a solid fabrication system such as the directed light fabrication (DLF) process. In the DLF process, gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power laser light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention is a device providing uniform flow of gas entrained powders to the nozzles of the DLF system. The device comprises a series of modular splitters which are slidably interconnected and contain an integral flow control mechanism. The device can take the gas entrained powder from between one to four hoppers and split the flow into eight tubular lines which feed the powder delivery nozzles of the DLF system.

  16. Multiple feed powder splitter

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    A device for providing uniform powder flow to the nozzles when creating solid structures using a solid fabrication system such as the directed light fabrication (DLF) process. In the DLF process, gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power laser light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention is a device providing uniform flow of gas entrained powders to the nozzles of the DLF system. The device comprises a series of modular splitters which are slidably interconnected and contain an integral flow control mechanism. The device can take the gas entrained powder from between one to four hoppers and split the flow into eight tubular lines which feed the powder delivery nozzles of the DLF system.

  17. Granulation of fine powder

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ching-Fong

    2016-08-09

    A mixture of fine powder including thorium oxide was converted to granulated powder by forming a first-green-body and heat treating the first-green-body at a high temperature to strengthen the first-green-body followed by granulation by crushing or milling the heat-treated first-green-body. The granulated powder was achieved by screening through a combination of sieves to achieve the desired granule size distribution. The granulated powder relies on the thermal bonding to maintain its shape and structure. The granulated powder contains no organic binder and can be stored in a radioactive or other extreme environment. The granulated powder was pressed and sintered to form a dense compact with a higher density and more uniform pore size distribution.

  18. Boron intake and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Alejandro; Peters, Ulrike; Lampe, Johanna W; White, Emily

    2007-12-01

    Experimental studies suggest that boron may prevent prostate cancer. Only one small epidemiological study has been conducted of boron, which found that those in the highest quartile of boron intake had less than half the risk of prostate cancer versus those in the lowest quartile. We evaluated the association between boron intake and prostate cancer within the VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) cohort. A total of 35,244 men completed the baseline supplement and food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) in 2000-2002. A boron database was constructed from published sources to estimate boron intake from the FFQ and from multivitamins. A total of 832 men developed prostate cancer from baseline to 31 December 2004. Dietary boron intake and total boron intake from diet plus multivitamins were not associated with prostate cancer risk. The hazard ratio of prostate cancer for those in the highest versus lowest quartile of total boron intake was 1.17 (95% CI 0.85, 1.61). This risk did not vary by prostate cancer stage or Gleason score. Furthermore, none of the foods high in boron content was associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer. This cohort study provides no evidence for a preventive role of boron intake on prostate cancer. Since few studies exist on this topic, future research is needed to better elucidate any role that boron may play in the prevention of prostate cancer.

  19. Mineral resource of the month: boron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyday, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    What does boron have to do with baseball, apple pie, motherhood and Chevrolet? Boron minerals and chemicals are used in the tanning of leather baseballs and gloves; in micro-fertilizer to grow apples and in the glass and enamels of bakewares to cook apple pie; in boron detergents for soaking baby clothes and diapers; and in fiberglass parts for the Chevrolet Corvette.

  20. Boron-doped diamond synthesized at high-pressure and high-temperature with metal catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhov, Fedor M.; Abyzov, Andrey M.; Kidalov, Sergey V.; Krasilin, Andrei A.; Lähderanta, Erkki; Lebedev, Vasiliy T.; Shamshur, Dmitriy V.; Takai, Kazuyuki

    2017-04-01

    The boron-doped diamond (BDD) powder consisting of 40-100 μm particles was synthesized at 5 GPa and 1500-1600 °C from a mixture of 50 wt% graphite and 50 wt% Ni-Mn catalyst with an addition of 1 wt% or 5 wt% boron powder. The size of crystal domains of doped and non-doped diamond was evaluated as a coherent scattering region by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), being ≥180 nm (XRD) and 100 nm (SANS). Magnetic impurities of NiMnx originating from the catalyst in the synthesis, which prevent superconductivity, were detected by magnetization measurements at 2-300 K. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the temperature dependence of the resistivity, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy reveal that the concentration of electrically active boron is as high as (2±1)×1020 cm-3 (0.1 at%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest boron content for BDD synthesized in high-pressure high-temperature process with metal catalysts.

  1. Cow dung powder poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sherfudeen, Khaja Mohideen; Kaliannan, Senthil Kumar; Dammalapati, Pavan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Cow dung, which has germicidal property, was used in ancient days to clean living premises in South India. Nowadays, people are using commercially available synthetic cow dung powder. It is locally known as "saani powder" in Tamil Nadu. It is freely available in homes and is sometimes accidentally consumed by children. It is available in two colors - yellow and green. Cow dung powder poisoning is common in districts of Tamil Nadu such as Coimbatore, Tirupur, and Erode. We report two cases of yellow cow dung powder poisoning from our hospital.

  2. Highly Fluorescent Non-Conventional Boron-Difluoride-Based π Organogel with Gelation-Assisted Piezochromism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sa; Lan, Haichuang; Xiao, Shuzhang; Tan, Ronghua; Lu, Yunxiang

    2017-01-17

    Triphenylamine-functionalized boron 2-(2'-pyridyl)imidazole complex bearing no alkyl chains or H-bond unit was found to be able to gelate a series of solvents, and the balanced intermolecular π-π interactions play an important role in its supramolecular self-assembly. The gelator molecule is piezochromic, and the dried gel responded to pressure more sensitively than regular crystalline powder.

  3. Present knowledge of electronic properties and charge transport of icosahedral boron-rich solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werheit, Helmut

    2009-06-01

    B12 icosahedra or related structure elements determine the different modifications of elementary boron and numerous boron-rich compounds from α-rhombohedral boron with 12 to YB66 type with about 1584 atoms per unit cell. Typical are well-defined high density intrinsic defects: Jahn-Teller distorted icosahedra, vacancies, incomplete occupancies, statistical occupancies and antisite defects. The correlation between intrinsic point defects and electron deficiencies solves the discrepancy between theoretically predicted metal and experimentally proved semiconducting character. The electron deficiencies generate split-off valence states, which are decisive for the electronic transport, a superposition of band-type and hopping-type conduction. Their share depends on actual conditions like temperature or pre-excitation. The theoretical model of bipolaron hopping is incompatible with numerous experiments. Technical application of the typically p-type icosahedral boron-rich solids requires suitable n-type counterparts; doping and other possibilities are discussed.

  4. Two-dimensional boron: Lightest catalyst for hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mir, Showkat H.; Chakraborty, Sudip E-mail: prakash.jha@cug.ac.in; Wärnå, John; Jha, Prakash C. E-mail: prakash.jha@cug.ac.in; Soni, Himadri; Jha, Prafulla K.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-08-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) have been envisaged on a two-dimensional (2D) boron sheet through electronic structure calculations based on a density functional theory framework. To date, boron sheets are the lightest 2D material and, therefore, exploring the catalytic activity of such a monolayer system would be quite intuitive both from fundamental and application perspectives. We have functionalized the boron sheet (BS) with different elemental dopants like carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, sulphur, and lithium and determined the adsorption energy for each case while hydrogen and oxygen are on top of the doping site of the boron sheet. The free energy calculated from the individual adsorption energy for each functionalized BS subsequently guides us to predict which case of functionalization serves better for the HER or the OER.

  5. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-05

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of ternary mixtures consisting of: Ni powder, Cu powder, and Al powder, Ni powder, Cr powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, W powder and Al powder; Ni powder, V powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, Mo powder, and Al powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  6. Graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankowitz, Matthew; Xue, Jiamin; LeRoy, B. J.

    2014-07-01

    The field of graphene research has developed rapidly since its first isolation by mechanical exfoliation in 2004. Due to the relativistic Dirac nature of its charge carriers, graphene is both a promising material for next-generation electronic devices and a convenient low-energy testbed for intrinsically high-energy physical phenomena. Both of these research branches require the facile fabrication of clean graphene devices so as not to obscure its intrinsic physical properties. Hexagonal boron nitride has emerged as a promising substrate for graphene devices as it is insulating, atomically flat and provides a clean charge environment for the graphene. Additionally, the interaction between graphene and boron nitride provides a path for the study of new physical phenomena not present in bare graphene devices. This review focuses on recent advancements in the study of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride devices from the perspective of scanning tunneling microscopy with highlights of some important results from electrical transport measurements.

  7. Effects of sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron applications on sunflower yield and plant nutrient concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, B.R.; Zubriski, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron application did not affect the seed yield or oil percentage of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) on both dryland and irrigated soils in North Dakota in 1981. Field averages indicated significant Zn, Mn, and B uptake by sunflower at the 12-leaf stage as a result of fertilization with these elements. Increased Zn uptake was also observed in the uppermost mature leaf at anthesis from zinc fertilization. Although sunflower yield from boron fertilization was not significantly different from the check, a trend was observed in which boron fertilization seemed to decrease sunflower yield. Sunflower yields from the boron treatment were the lowest out of seven treatments in three out of four fields. Also, sunflower yield from the boron treatment was significantly lower than both iron and sulfur treatments when all fields were combined.

  8. Drinking water health advisory for boron

    SciTech Connect

    Cantilli, R.

    1991-04-01

    The Health Advisory Program, sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Water, has issued its report on the element boron: included are the compounds boric acid and borax(sodium tetraborate). It provides information on the health effects, analytical methodology, and treatment technology that would be useful in dealing with the contamination of drinking water. Health Advisories (HAs) describe nonregulatory concentrations of drinking water contaminants at which adverse health effects would not be anticipated to occur over specific exposure durations. HAs serve as informal technical guidance to assist Federal, State, and local officials responsible for protecting public health when emergency spills or contamination situations occur. They are not legally enforceable Federal Standards and are subject to change as new information becomes available.

  9. BP: synthesis and properties of boron phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Katherine; Lee, Kathleen; Kovnir, Kirill

    2016-07-01

    Cubic boron phosphide, BP, is notorious for its difficult synthesis, thus preventing it from being a widely used material in spite of having numerous favorable technological properties. In the current work, three different methods of synthesis are developed and compared: from the high temperature reaction of elements, Sn flux assisted synthesis, and a solid state metathesis reaction. Structural and optical properties of the products synthesized from the three methods were thoroughly characterized. Solid state metathesis is shown to be the cleanest and most efficient method in terms of reaction temperature and time. Synthesis by Sn flux resulted in a novel Sn-doped BP compound. Undoped BP samples exhibit an optical bandgap of ∼2.2 eV while Sn-doped BP exhibits a significantly smaller bandgap of 1.74 eV. All synthesized samples show high stability in concentrated hydrochloric acid, saturated sodium hydroxide solutions, and fresh aqua regia.

  10. Arsenic and boron in the Tongonan environment

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, d'E.C.

    1980-09-01

    Arsenic and boron occur in higher concentrations in Tongonan hydrothermal fluids than in those of most other geothermal projects, and are the elements most likely to cause problems in the local environment. Mercury levels are low, and H/sub 2/S is unlikely to have adverse effects in view of local geography and rainfall. Streams in the steam field join rivers flowing through a rice irrigation scheme and out to sea in an area which is intensively fished, hence the clear necessity to minimize environmental damage. Studies during project development led to the proposal of site-specific concentration limits for As and B, with subsequent monitoring to assess their validity. Well testing is programmed to take account of these limits in conjunction with expected flow-rates and chemical characteristics of the separated fluids. Injection wells are or will be provided to accept all effluents except those from isolated exploration wells in distant parts of the field.

  11. Micro-feeding and dosing of powders via a small-scale powder pump.

    PubMed

    Besenhard, M O; Fathollahi, S; Siegmann, E; Slama, E; Faulhammer, E; Khinast, J G

    2017-03-15

    Robust and accurate powder micro-feeding (<100mg/s) and micro-dosing (<5 mg) are major challenges, especially with regard to regulatory limitations applicable to pharmaceutical development and production. Since known micro-feeders that yield feed rates below 5mg/s use gravimetric feeding principles, feed rates depend primarily on powder properties. In contrast, volumetric powder feeders do not require regular calibration because their feed rates are primarily determined by the feeder's characteristic volume replacement. In this paper, we present a volumetric micro-feeder based on a cylinder piston system (i.e., a powder pump), which allows accurate micro-feeding and feed rates of a few grams per hours even for very fine powders. Our experimental studies addressed the influence of cylinder geometries, the initial conditions of bulk powder, and the piston speeds. Additional computational studies via Discrete Element Method simulations offered a better understanding of the feeding process, its possible limitations and ways to overcome them. The powder pump is a simple yet valuable tool for accurate powder feeding at feed rates of several orders of magnitude.

  12. Boronization and Carburization of Superplastic Stainless Steel and Titanium-Based Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Masafumi

    2011-01-01

    Bronization and carburization of fine-grain superplastic stainless steel is reviewed, and new experimental results for fine grain Ti88.5Al4.5V3Fe2Mo2 are reported. In superplastic duplex stainless steel, the diffusion of carbon and boron is faster than in non-superplastic duplex stainless steel. Further, diffusion is activated by uniaxial compressive stress. Moreover, non-superplastic duplex stainless steel shows typical grain boundary diffusion; however, inner grain diffusion is confirmed in superplastic stainless steel. The presence of Fe and Cr carbides or borides is confirmed by X-ray diffraction, which indicates that the diffused carbon and boron react with the Fe and Cr in superplastic stainless steel. The Vickers hardness of the carburized and boronized layers is similar to that achieved with other surface treatments such as electro-deposition. Diffusion of boron into the superplastic Ti88.5Al4.5V3Fe2Mo2 alloy was investigated. The hardness of the surface exposed to boron powder can be increased by annealing above the superplastic temperature. However, the Vickers hardness is lower than that of Ti boride. PMID:28824144

  13. Boron oxygen complexes in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanati, M.; Estreicher, S. K.

    2006-04-01

    The carrier lifetime in boron-doped Czochralski Si is strongly reduced by irradiation (space-based solar cells) or illumination (terrestrial cells). The culprits are believed to be boron-oxygen complexes. We use first-principles theory to predict the structure, electrical activity, and stability of complexes involving substitutional or interstitial B and interstitial O or oxygen dimers. Four complexes with comparable binding energies and thermodynamic gap levels are identified and their local vibrational modes predicted. Replacing B with Ga yields complexes with much smaller binding energies.

  14. Boron Derivatives of 3-Methylpyrazole.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    AD-A14$ 988 BORON DERIVRTIYES OF 3 -IETHYLPYRRZOLECU) KENTUCKY UNIV i/i LEXINGTON DEPT OF CHEMISTRY K NIEDENZU ET AL. DEC 84 UK/DC/TR- 5 N8@814-83-K...REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFORE CO.!?OVE~r;G FORM UK/DC/TR- 5 I - -_ E. ’and Subtitle) OF 21-P R & PZRIOD COVER=~ BORON DERIVATIVES OF 3 -METHYLPYRAZOLE...pathways for the latter process. In addition, the compounds 4 ,4 ,8,8-tetrabromo- and 4 ,4 ,8 ,8-tetrakis( 3 -methylpyrazole-l-yl)-l, 5 (7)-dimethyl

  15. Analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from boron silicate glass film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurachi, Ikuo; Yoshioka, Kentaro

    2015-09-01

    An analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from a boron silicate glass (BSG) film has been proposed in terms of enhanced diffusion due to boron-silicon interstitial pair formation. The silicon interstitial generation is considered to be a result of the silicon kick-out mechanism by the diffused boron at the surface. The additional silicon interstitial generation in the bulk silicon is considered to be the dissociation of the diffused pairs. The former one causes the surface boron concentration dependent diffusion. The latter one causes the local boron concentration dependent diffusion. The calculated boron profiles based on the diffusivity model are confirmed to agree with the actual diffusion profiles measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) for a wide range of the BSG boron concentration. This analytical diffusivity model is a helpful tool for p+ boron diffusion process optimization of n-type solar cell manufacturing.

  16. Boron Nitride Nanoribbons from Exfoliation of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Two types of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were exfoliated into boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNR), which were identified using transmission electron microscopy: (1) commercial BNNTs with thin tube walls and small diameters. Tube unzipping was indicated by a large decrease of the sample's surface area and volume for pores less than 2 nm in diameter. (2) BNNTs with large diameters and thick walls synthesized at NASA Glenn Research Center. Here, tube unraveling was indicated by a large increase in external surface area and pore volume. For both, the exfoliation process was similar to the previous reported method to exfoliate commercial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN): Mixtures of BNNT, FeCl3, and NaF (or KF) were sequentially treated in 250 to 350 C nitrogen for intercalation, 500 to 750 C air for exfoliation, and finally HCl for purification. Property changes of the nanosized boron nitride throughout this process were also similar to the previously observed changes of commercial hBN during the exfoliation process: Both crystal structure (x-ray diffraction data) and chemical properties (Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy data) of the original reactant changed after intercalation and exfoliation, but most (not all) of these changes revert back to those of the reactant once the final, purified products are obtained.

  17. Computational Studies of Nanostructures of Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandy, P.; Yu, M.; Leahy, C.; Tian, W. Q.; Wu, S. Y.; Jayanthi, C. S.

    2009-03-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a reliable semi-empirical Hamiltonian for boron that may be used to predict nanostructures of boron. It is well known that bonding in boron is complicated as it may form three-center, two-electron bonds. The semi-empirical Hamiltonian used here was recently developed by Leahy et al. in the framework of linear combination of atomic orbitals[1]. The salient feature of this Hamiltonian is that it treats environment dependency and charge redistributions on equal footing. It will be shown that such a parameterized Hamiltonian can predict the B80 cage structure with C1 symmetry as found in a recent first-principles study [2]. Having validated our semi-empirical Hamiltonian for boron with small boron clusters and the B80 cage, we have performed a systematic study of other boron nanostructures: (i) larger cage structures (e.g., B215), (ii) boron clusters cut from the bulk alpha boron, and (iii) boron sheets (triangular sheets with and without holes). We will discuss the ground state structures of these boron nanostructures as well as the energetics and HOMO-LUMO gaps of different families of boron clusters as a function their diameters. 1. C. Leahy et al. Phys. Rev. B74, 155408 (2006). 2. N. G. Szwacki et al. PRL 100, 159901 (2008).

  18. Thermionic properties of the molybdenum boron system

    SciTech Connect

    Storms, E.K.

    1980-01-01

    The thermionic work function has been measured as a function of composition within the various two phase regions between Mo and MoB/sub 2/. Values at the low boron and high boron phase boundaries for the various compounds were obtained by extrapolation. The following effective work functions were obtained: Mo/sub 2/B (low boron) = 3.08 eV; Mo/sub 2/B (high boron) = 3.63 eV; ..cap alpha..-MoB (low boron) = 3.38 eV; ..cap alpha..-MoB (high boron) = 4.30 eV; ..beta..-MoB (low boron) = 2.83 eV; ..beta..-MoB (high boron) = 3.92; Mo/sub 2/B/sub 3/ (low boron) = 4.65 eV; Mo/sub 2/B/sub 3/ (high boron) = 3.85 eV; and MoB/sub 2/ (low boron) = 3.52 eV. Because the composition range of these compounds is very narrow, the work function is very sensitive to the composition within the single phase regions.

  19. Boron analysis and boron imaging in biological materials for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT).

    PubMed

    Wittig, Andrea; Michel, Jean; Moss, Raymond L; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bendel, Peter; Mauri, Pier Luigi; Altieri, Saverio; Hilger, Ralf; Salvadori, Piero A; Menichetti, Luca; Zamenhof, Robert; Sauerwein, Wolfgang A G

    2008-10-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on the ability of the stable isotope 10B to capture neutrons, which leads to a nuclear reaction producing an alpha- and a 7Li-particle, both having a high biological effectiveness and a very short range in tissue, being limited to approximately one cell diameter. This opens the possibility for a highly selective cancer therapy. BNCT strongly depends on the selective uptake of 10B in tumor cells and on its distribution inside the cells. The chemical properties of boron and the need to discriminate different isotopes make the investigation of the concentration and distribution of 10B a challenging task. The most advanced techniques to measure and image boron are described, both invasive and non-invasive. The most promising approach for further investigation will be the complementary use of the different techniques to obtain the information that is mandatory for the future of this innovative treatment modality.

  20. Boron-enhanced diffusion of boron from ultralow-energy boron implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.; Eaglesham, D.J.; Gossmann, H.J.; Pelaz, L.; Herner, S.B.; Jacobson, D.C.; Haynes, T.E.; Erokhin, Y.E.

    1998-05-03

    The authors have investigated the diffusion enhancement mechanism of BED (boron enhanced diffusion), wherein the boron diffusivity is enhanced three to four times over the equilibrium diffusivity at 1,050 C in the proximity of a silicon layer containing a high boron concentration. It is shown that BED is associated with the formation of a fine-grain polycrystalline silicon boride phase within an initially amorphous Si layer having a high B concentration. For 0.5 keV B{sup +}, the threshold implantation dose which leads to BED lies between 3 {times} 10{sup 14} and of 1 {times} 10{sup 15}/cm{sup {minus}2}. Formation of the shallowest possible junctions by 0.5 keV B{sup +} requires that the implant dose be kept lower than this threshold.

  1. High fluence boron implantation into polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacík, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Červená, J.; Peřina, V.; Popok, V.; Odzhaev, V.; Fink, D.

    1999-01-01

    100 keV B + ions are implanted at high fluences into polyimide and the boron depth distributions are measured by the neutron depth profiling technique. Subsequently the implanted samples are annealed isochronally to determine the diffusional, trapping and detrapping behaviour of the boron atoms. The boron depth profiles of as-implanted samples differ significantly from those predicted by TRIM code. Pronounced inward and outward profile tails point at increased mobility and redistribution of boron atoms after implantation. Thermal annealing to the temperatures below 150°C does not change the total boron content in 1 μm thick surface layer and the boron depth profiles as well. For higher annealing temperatures a continuous desorption and significant redistribution of boron atoms is observed.

  2. Atom probe tomography and nano secondary ion mass spectroscopy investigation of the segregation of boron at austenite grain boundaries in 0.5 wt.% carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, J. B.; Lim, N. S.; Lee, B. H.; Renaud, L.; Park, C. G.

    2011-06-01

    The grain boundary segregation of boron atoms in high strength low alloy steels containing 50 ppm boron was accomplished using atom probe tomography (APT) and nano-beam secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The formation of boro-carbides under an excessive addition of boron to the steels was identified through the SIMS and TEM. The APT was performed in order to evaluate the composition of the alloying elements, such as, boron and carbon, segregated at prior austenite grain boundaries. The boron contents at the prior austenite grain boundaries were approximately 1.7 ± 0.2 at.%, which was approximately 70 times more than the amount of boron added to the steels.

  3. An Exploration of Neutron Detection in Semiconducting Boron Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Nina

    The 3He supply problem in the U.S. has necessitated the search for alternatives for neutron detection. The neutron detection efficiency is a function of density, atomic composition, neutron absorption cross section, and thickness of the neutron capture material. The isotope 10B is one of only a handful of isotopes with a high neutron absorption cross section---3840 barns for thermal neutrons. So a boron carbide semiconductor represents a viable alternative to 3He. This dissertation provides an evaluation of the performance of semiconducting boron carbide neutron detectors grown by plasma enhance chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) in order to determine the advantages and drawbacks of these devices for neutron detection. Improved handling of the PECVD system has resulted in an extremely stable plasma, enabling deposition of thick films of semiconducting boron carbide. A variety of material and semiconducting characterization tools have been used to investigate the structure and electronic properties of boron carbide thin films, including X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, infrared/Raman spectroscopy, current-voltage measurements and capacitance-voltage measurements. Elemental concentrations in the boron carbide films have been obtained from Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection analysis. Solid state neutron detection devices have been fabricated in the form of heterostructured p-n diodes, p-type boron carbide/n-type Si. Operating conditions, including applied bias voltage, and time constants, have been optimized for maximum detection efficiency and correlated to the semiconducting properties investigated in separate electronic measurements. Accurate measurements of the neutron detection efficiency and the response of the detector to a wide range of neutron wavelengths have been performed at a well calibrated, tightly collimated, "white" cold neutron beam source using time-of-flight neutron detection technique

  4. Silicon and boron differ in their localization and loading in bone.

    PubMed

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Pedro, Liliana D; Watson, Abigail; Powell, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    Silicon and boron share many similarities, both chemically and biochemically, including having similar effects on bone, although their mechanisms of action are not known. Here we compared the loading of silicon and boron into bone, their localization and how they are influenced by age (growth & development), to obtain further clues as to the biological effects of these elements and, especially, to see if they behave the same or not. Bone samples were obtained from two different studies where female Sprague Dawley rats had been maintained on a normal maintenance diet for up to 43 weeks. Total bone elemental levels were determined by ICP-OES following microwave assisted acid digestion. Silicon and boron levels in the decalcified bones (i.e. the collagen fraction) were also investigated. Silicon and boron showed marked differences in loading and in their localization in bone. Highest silicon and lowest boron concentrations were found in the under-mineralized bone of younger rats and lowest silicon and highest boron concentrations were found in the fully mineralized bone of the adult rat. Overall, however total bone silicon content increased with age, as did boron content, the latter mirroring the increase in calcium (mineral) content of bone. However, whereas silicon showed equal distribution in the collagen and mineral fractions of bone, boron was exclusively localized in the mineral fraction. These findings confirm the reported association between silicon and collagen, especially at the early stages of bone mineralization, and show that boron is associated with the bone mineral but not connective tissues. These data suggest that silicon and boron have different biological roles and that one is unlikely, therefore, to substitute for the other, or at least boron would not substitute for Si in the connective tissues. Finally, we noted that silicon levels in the mineral fraction varied greatly between the two studies, suggesting that one or more nutritional factor

  5. Silicon and boron differ in their localization and loading in bone☆

    PubMed Central

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Pedro, Liliana D.; Watson, Abigail; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon and boron share many similarities, both chemically and biochemically, including having similar effects on bone, although their mechanisms of action are not known. Here we compared the loading of silicon and boron into bone, their localization and how they are influenced by age (growth & development), to obtain further clues as to the biological effects of these elements and, especially, to see if they behave the same or not. Bone samples were obtained from two different studies where female Sprague Dawley rats had been maintained on a normal maintenance diet for up to 43 weeks. Total bone elemental levels were determined by ICP-OES following microwave assisted acid digestion. Silicon and boron levels in the decalcified bones (i.e. the collagen fraction) were also investigated. Silicon and boron showed marked differences in loading and in their localization in bone. Highest silicon and lowest boron concentrations were found in the under-mineralized bone of younger rats and lowest silicon and highest boron concentrations were found in the fully mineralized bone of the adult rat. Overall, however total bone silicon content increased with age, as did boron content, the latter mirroring the increase in calcium (mineral) content of bone. However, whereas silicon showed equal distribution in the collagen and mineral fractions of bone, boron was exclusively localized in the mineral fraction. These findings confirm the reported association between silicon and collagen, especially at the early stages of bone mineralization, and show that boron is associated with the bone mineral but not connective tissues. These data suggest that silicon and boron have different biological roles and that one is unlikely, therefore, to substitute for the other, or at least boron would not substitute for Si in the connective tissues. Finally, we noted that silicon levels in the mineral fraction varied greatly between the two studies, suggesting that one or more nutritional factor

  6. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buranova, Yu. S.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-01

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  7. Boron trifluoride coatings for plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubacki, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Tough, durable coatings of boron triflouride can be deposited on plastic optical components to protect them from destructive effects of abrasion, scratching, and environment. Coating material can be applied simultaneously with organic polymers, using plasma glow-discharge methods, or it can be used as base material for other coatings to increase adhesion.

  8. Method of separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Thorne, J.M.; Cluff, C.L.

    1981-01-23

    A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)-dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily by achieved with CO/sub 2/ laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl/sub 3/.

  9. Method of separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Reed J.; Thorne, James M.; Cluff, Coran L.; Hayes, John K.

    1984-01-01

    A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily be achieved with CO.sub.2 laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl.sub.3.

  10. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Buranova, Yu. S. Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-15

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  11. Method of separating boron isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.J.; Cluff, C.L.; Hayes, J.K.; Thorne, J.M.

    1984-05-08

    A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily be achieved with CO/sub 2/ laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl/sub 3/.

  12. Fuel powder production from ductile uranium alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C. R.

    1998-10-23

    Metallic uranium alloys are candidate materials for use as the fuel phase in very-high-density LEU dispersion fuels. These ductile alloys cannot be converted to powder form by the processes routinely used for oxides or intermetallics. Three methods of powder production from uranium alloys have been investigated within the US-RERTR program. These processes are grinding, cryogenic milling, and hydride-dehydride. In addition, a gas atomization process was investigated using gold as a surrogate for uranium. Grinding was found to be inefficient and introduced impurities into the fuel. Cryogenic milling of machine chips in a steel vial was found to have similar shortcomings. The hydride-dehydride process has historically been used to produce very fine powder that may not be suitable for fuel fabrication. Uranium is made to form its hydride by heating in a hydrogen atmosphere. Subsequent heating under vacuum drives off hydrogen gas and returns the hydride to a metallic state. The volume change on hydride formation results in a fine powder upon dehydriding. The effects of alloying elements, partial hydriding, and subsequent milling treatments on particle size distribution are being explored. Inert gas atomization is used on an industrial scale to produce metal powder. Current designs are not suitable for use with uranium. A system was specifically designed for uranium atomization. A prototype was built and tested using gold as a surrogate for uranium. The system operates efficiently and can produce powder in a variety of size ranges by changing the atomization nozzle.

  13. Efficient FEM simulation of static and free vibration behavior of single walled boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannopoulos, Georgios I.; Kontoni, Denise-Penelope N.; Georgantzinos, Stylianos K.

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the static and free vibration behavior of single walled boron nitride nanotubes using a structural mechanics based finite element method. First, depending on the type of nanotube under investigation, its three dimensional nanostructure is developed according to the well-known corresponding positions of boron and nitride atoms as well as boron nitride bonds. Then, appropriate point masses are assigned to the atomic positions of the developed space frame. Next, these point masses are suitably interconnected with two-noded, linear, spring-like, finite elements. In order to simulate effectively the interactions observed between boron and nitride atoms within the nanotube, appropriate potential energy functions are introduced for these finite elements. In this manner, various atomistic models for both armchair and zigzag nanotubes with different aspect ratios are numerically analyzed and their effective elastic modulus as well as their natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are obtained. Regarding the free vibration analysis, the computed results reveal bending, breathing and axial modes of vibration depending on the nanotube size and chirality as well as the applied boundary support conditions. The longitudinal stiffness of the boron nitride nanotubes is found also sensitive to their geometric characteristics.

  14. Determination of structural changes and phase transformations in boron carbide by static and dynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Varun

    Recent transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the failure of B4C is commensurate with the segregation of boron icosahedra embedded in amorphous carbon in 2--3 nm wide amorphous bands along the (113) lattice direction, in good agreement with our recent theoretical results. Boron carbide is generally composed of multiple polytypes of B4C which have the same primitive lattice parameters but differ from each other by the location of the boron and carbon atoms in the unit cells. The unit cells are formed by a 12-atom B12-nCn icosahedron and a 3-atom (C3-nBn) chain. Our theoretical results indicate that one polytype, B12(C3), whose formation is responsible for the failure of the entire material. This anomalous and poorly understood glass-like behavior in boron carbide has been the subject of research since its discovery over 70 years ago. The characterization of disorder in hot pressed and powder boron carbide samples is therefore of primary interest. The research work has focused on characterization techniques which can be used at a micrometric sampling size so that individual powder grains of the material can be utilized. Specifically, micro-Raman and electrical conductivity measurements can be used with micrometric gap cells to understand the disorder in B4C. The results also demonstrate that it is possible to induce transformations in boron carbide using electric fields that are comparable with those obtained under shock and nanoindentation. Our calculations present a hypothesis which can provide a solution to prevent the premature failure of B4C. A route to achieve suppression of the B12(CCC) polytype without significantly affecting the elastic constants is via low concentration Silicon (Si) doping of B4C. Suppression of B12(CCC) by Si doping has implications towards development of boron carbide armor with improved properties for protection against high velocity threats. In order to achieve this, nanostructures (nanowires, nanorods, etc.) of Si

  15. Superhard Semiconducting Optically Transparent High Pressure Phase of Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Zarechnaya, E.Yu.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Filinchuk, Y.; Chernyshov, D.; Dmitriev, V.; Miyajima, N.; Goresy, A. El; Braun, H.F.; Van Smaalen, S.; Kantor, I.; Kantor, A.; Prakapenka, V.; Hanfland, M.; Mikhaylushkin, A.S.; Abrikosov, I.A.; Simak, S.I.

    2009-05-21

    An orthorhombic (space group Pnnm) boron phase was synthesized at pressures above 9 GPa and high temperature, and it was demonstrated to be stable at least up to 30 GPa. The structure, determined by single-crystal x-ray diffraction, consists of B{sub 12} icosahedra and B{sub 2} dumbbells. The charge density distribution obtained from experimental data and ab initio calculations suggests covalent chemical bonding in this phase. Strong covalent interatomic interactions explain the low compressibility value (bulk modulus is K{sub 300} = 227 GPa) and high hardness of high-pressure boron (Vickers hardness H{sub v} = 58 GPa), after diamond the second hardest elemental material.

  16. Sintering titanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Alman, David E.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in low-cost titanium. Near-net-shape powder metallurgy offers the potential of manufacturing titanium articles without costly and difficult forming and machining operations; hence, processing methods such as conventional press-and-sinter, powder forging and powder injection molding are of interest. The sintering behavior of a variety of commercial and experimental titanium powders was studied. Commercial powders were acquired that were produced different routes: (i) sponge fines from the primary titanium processing; (ii) via the hydride-dehydride process; and (iii) gas atomization. The influence of vacuum sintering time (0.5 to 32 hrs) and temperature (1200, 1275 or 1350°C) on the microstructure (porosity present) of cold pressed powders was studied. The results are discussed in terms of the difference in powder characteristics, with the aim of identify the characteristics required for full density via press-and-sinter processing. Near-net-shape tensile bars were consolidated via cold pressed and sintered. After sintering, a sub-set of the tensile bars was hot-isostatic pressed (HIPed). The microstructure and properties of the bars were compared in the sintered and HIPed conditions.

  17. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen,J; Jablonski, Paul, J

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines<150 {micro}m,<75 {micro}m, and<45 {micro}m; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH]<75 {micro}m and<45 {micro}m; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  18. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  19. Chronic boron exposure and human semen parameters.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Wendie A; Xun, Lin; Jia, Juan; Kennedy, Nola; Elashoff, David A; Ping, Liu

    2010-04-01

    Boron found as borates in soil, food, and water has important industrial and medical applications. A panel reviewing NTP reproductive toxicants identified boric acid as high priority for occupational studies to determine safe versus adverse reproductive effects. To address this, we collected boron exposure/dose measures in workplace inhalable dust, dietary food/fluids, blood, semen, and urine from boron workers and two comparison worker groups (n=192) over three months and determined correlations between boron and semen parameters (total sperm count, sperm concentration, motility, morphology, DNA breakage, apoptosis and aneuploidy). Blood boron averaged 499.2 ppb for boron workers, 96.1 and 47.9 ppb for workers from high and low environmental boron areas (p<0.0001). Boron concentrated in seminal fluid. No significant correlations were found between blood or urine boron and adverse semen parameters. Exposures did not reach those causing adverse effects published in animal toxicology work but exceeded those previously published for boron occupational groups.

  20. Boron neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, R.E.; Soloway, A.H. ); Fairchild, R.G. State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook )

    1990-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) bring together two components that when kept separate have only minor effects on normal cells. The first component is a stable isotope of boron (boron 10) that can be concentrated in tumor cells. The second is a beam of low-energy neutrons that produces short-range radiation when absorbed, or captured, by the boron. The combination of these two conditions at the site of a tumor releases intense radiation that can destroy malignant tissues. BNCT is based on the nuclear reaction that occurs when boron 10 is irradiated with an absorbs neutrons. The neutrons that it takes up are called thermal, or slow, neutrons. They are of such low energy that they cause little tissue damage as compared with other forms of radiation such as protons, gamma rays and fast neutrons. When an atom of boron 10 captures a neutron, an unstable isotope, boron 11, forms. The boron 11 instantly fissions, yielding lithium 7 nuclei and energetic alpha particles. These heavy particles, which carry 2.79 million electron volts of energy, are a highly lethal form of radiation. If the treatment proceeds as intended, the destructive effects of the capture reaction would occur primarily in those cancer cells that have accumulated boron 10. Normal cells with low concentrations of boron would be spared.

  1. Plasma synthesized doped B powders for MgB 2 superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzik, J. V.; Suplinskas, R. J.; Wilke, R. H. T.; Canfield, P. C.; Finnemore, D. K.; Rindfleisch, M.; Margolies, J.; Hannahs, S. T.

    2005-07-01

    Gas phase plasma synthesis methods have been used to prepare nano-scale particles of C doped boron powder that are well suited for powder-in-tube (PIT) fabrication of superconducting wire. Mixtures of H2, BCl3, and CH4 gas are injected into an induction plasma where doped boron powder is formed and collected on a stainless steel screen. The particles typically are ∼20 nm in size and collect into lacy agglomerates in the 1-50 μm size range. Pressed pellets of these powders heated in a Mg atmosphere are transformed to the MgB2 phase at temperatures ranging from 600 °C to 1200 °C. Critical current densities, Jc, at 5 K run from about 106 A/cm2 at self-field to 4 × 104 A/cm2 at 7 T. At 20 K, Jc ranges from 5 × 105 A/cm2 at self-field to about 104 A/cm2 at 3 T. Samples of pure B powder and B with 7.4%C powder were prepared as PIT wires having a combination Fe inner jacket and a cupro-nickel outer jacket. These PIT Jc values are lower than, but comparable to the pressed pellet values. The PIT samples can be reacted in times on the order of 10 min and still exhibit greater than 105 A/cm2 at 5 K and 2 T.

  2. Ferromagnetism and semiconducting of boron nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    More recently, motivated by extensively technical applications of carbon nanostructures, there is a growing interest in exploring novel non-carbon nanostructures. As the nearest neighbor of carbon in the periodic table, boron has exceptional properties of low volatility and high melting point and is stronger than steel, harder than corundum, and lighter than aluminum. Boron nanostructures thus are expected to have broad applications in various circumstances. In this contribution, we have performed a systematical study of the stability and electronic and magnetic properties of boron nanowires using the spin-polarized density functional calculations. Our calculations have revealed that there are six stable configurations of boron nanowires obtained by growing along different base vectors from the unit cell of the bulk α-rhombohedral boron (α-B) and β-rhombohedral boron (β-B). Well known, the boron bulk is usually metallic without magnetism. However, theoretical results about the magnetic and electronic properties showed that, whether for the α-B-based or the β-B-based nanowires, their magnetism is dependent on the growing direction. When the boron nanowires grow along the base vector [001], they exhibit ferromagnetism and have the magnetic moments of 1.98 and 2.62 μB, respectively, for the α-c [001] and β-c [001] directions. Electronically, when the boron nanowire grows along the α-c [001] direction, it shows semiconducting and has the direct bandgap of 0.19 eV. These results showed that boron nanowires possess the unique direction dependence of the magnetic and semiconducting behaviors, which are distinctly different from that of the bulk boron. Therefore, these theoretical findings would bring boron nanowires to have many promising applications that are novel for the boron bulk. PMID:23244063

  3. Functionally graded boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; McClellan, K.J.; Kise, C.D.; Hoover, R.C.; Scarborough, W.K.

    1998-12-31

    Lightweight body armor is important for the protection of US soldiers in the field. Here, fabrication techniques were developed for producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C, and for producing aluminum-B{sub 4}C and epoxy-B{sub 4}C functionally graded materials. The key fabrication aspect was obtaining the graded porosity B{sub 4}C. The feasibility of producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C using a grading of carbon densification aid produced from a gradient of furfuryl alcohol carbon precursor was demonstrated. This approach is quite promising, but it was not optimized in the present investigation. Graded porosity B{sub 4}C materials were produced by a layering approach using different size distributions of B{sub 4}C powders in the green state, and then densifying the layered assembly by hot pressing at 1,900 C. The hardness of uninfiltrated graded B{sub 4}C, aluminum infiltrated B{sub 4}C, and epoxy infiltrated B{sub 4}C was observed to be similar.

  4. A DEM contact model for history-dependent powder flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashibon, Adham; Schubert, Raphael; Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2016-11-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder handling process chain that greatly influences the characteristic structure and properties of the final part. Predictive modelling and simulation of the die-filling process can greatly contribute to the optimization of the part and the whole production procedure, e.g. by predicting the resulting powder compaction structure as a function of filling process parameters. The rheology of powders can be very difficult to model especially if heterogeneous agglomeration or time-dependent consolidation effects occur. We present a new discrete element contact force model that enables modelling complex powder flow characteristics including direct time-dependent consolidation effects and load history-dependent cohesion to describe the filling process of complex, difficult to handle powders. The model is demonstrated for simple flow and an industrial powder flow.

  5. Alkylamine-functionalized hexagonal boron nitride nanoplatelets as a novel material for the reduction of friction and wear.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sangita; Sharma, Om P; Khatri, Om P

    2016-08-17

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanoplatelets (h-BNNPs), which are structurally analogous to graphene, were prepared via the ultrasound-assisted exfoliation of h-BN powder using N-methyl pyrrolidone as the solvent. The alkylamines with variable alkyl chains and electron-rich nitrogen atoms were grafted onto the boron sites of the h-BNNPs based on Lewis acid-base chemistry. The grafting of the alkylamines onto the h-BNNPs was confirmed using FTIR, XPS, TGA and (13)C SSNMR analyses. The crystalline and structural features of the alkylamine-functionalized h-BNNPs were studied using XRD and HRTEM analyses. The TGA and FTIR results revealed a higher grafting of octadecylamine (ODA) on the h-BNNPs compared to trioctylamine (TOA). The cohesive interaction between the alkyl chains grafted onto the h-BNNPs and the hydrocarbon chains of mineral lube base oil facilitates the dispersion of the alkylamine-functionalized h-BNNPs. The TOA-grafted h-BNNPs (h-BNNPs-TOA) exhibited long-term dispersion stability compared to the ODA-grafted h-BNNPs and this was attributed to a higher degree of van der Waals interactions between the octyl chains of the TOA molecules grafted onto the h-BNNPs and the hydrocarbon chains of the mineral lube base oil. The tribo-performance of the h-BNNPs-TOA as an additive to mineral lube base oil was evaluated in terms of the coefficient of friction and wear using ball-on-disc contact geometry. A minute dosing (0.02 mg mL(-1)) of h-BNNPs-TOA significantly improved the lubrication characteristics of the mineral lube base oil and showed a 35 and 25% reduction of friction and wear, respectively. The presence of boron and nitrogen on the worn scar of an aluminium disc, as deduced from elemental mapping, confirmed the formation of a tribo-chemical thin film of h-BN lamellae on the contact interfaces, which not only reduced the friction but also protected the contact interfaces against undesirable wear events.

  6. Two-dimensional boron based nanomaterials: electronic, vibrational, Raman, and STM signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massote, Daniel V. P.; Liang, Liangbo; Kharche, Neerav; Meunier, Vincent

    Because boron has only three electrons on its outer shell, planar mono-elemental boron nanostructures are expected to be much more challenging to assemble than their carbon counterparts. Several studies proposed schemes in which boron is stabilized to form flat semiconducting sheets consisting of a hexagonal lattice of boron atoms with partial hexagon filling (PRL 99 115501, ACSNano 6 7443-7453) . Other structures were proposed based on results from an evolutionary algorithm (PRL 112 085502). These structures are metallic and one even features a distorted Dirac cone near the Fermi level. Experimental evidence for 2D boron is still lacking but the recently proposed molecular synthesis of a flat all-boron molecule is a promising route to achieve this goal (Nat.Comms. 5 3113). Our research aims at providing a first-principles based description of these materials' properties to help in their identification. DFT is used to calculate phonon dispersion and associated Raman scattering spectra. We report some marked discrepancy between our findings and results from the recent literature and address the deviation using two methods for phonon dispersion. We also simulated STM images at various bias potentials to reveal the electronic symmetry of each material.

  7. Enhanced Sintering of Boron Carbide-Silicon Composites by Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaojun; Liu, Weiliang

    2016-11-01

    Boron carbide (B4C)-silicon (Si) composites have been prepared by aqueous tape casting, laminating, and spark plasma sintering (SPS). The influences of silicon (Si) content on the phases, microstructure, sintering properties, and mechanical properties of the obtained B4C-Si composites are studied. The results indicate that the addition of Si powder can act as a sintering aid and contribute to the sintering densification. The addition of Si powder can also act as a second phase and contribute to the toughening for composites. The relative density of B4C-Si composites samples with adding 10 wt.% Si powder prepared by SPS at 1600 °C and 50 MPa for 8 min is up to 98.3%. The bending strength, fracture toughness, and Vickers hardness of the sintered samples are 518.5 MPa, 5.87 MPa m1/2, and 38.9 GPa, respectively. The testing temperature-dependent high-temperature bending strength and fracture toughness can reach a maximum value at 1350 °C. The B4C-Si composites prepared at 1600, 1650, and 1700 °C have good high-temperature mechanical properties. This paper provides a facile low-temperature sintering route for B4C ceramics with improved properties.

  8. ScRu2B3 and Sc2RuB6: Borides Featuring a 2D Infinite Boron Clustering.

    PubMed

    Salamakha, Leonid P; Sologub, Oksana; Stöger, Berthold; Rogl, Peter Franz; Waas, Monika; Kapustianyk, Volodymyr B; Bauer, Ernst

    2017-09-05

    Two borides, ScRu2B3 and Sc2RuB6, were obtained by argon-arc melting of the elements followed by annealing at 800 °C. ScRu2B3 exhibits a new structure type with the space group Cmcm (a = 3.0195(2) Å, b = 15.4056(8) Å, c = 5.4492(3) Å; single crystal X-ray data; RF(2) = 0.0105). Sc2RuB6 adopts the Y2ReB6-type structure (space group Pbam; a = 8.8545(2) Å, b = 11.1620(3) Å, c = 3.4760(1) Å; single crystal X-ray data; RF(2) = 0.0185). ScRu2B3 displays an unusual intergrowth of CeCo3B2- and AlB2-related slabs; a striking feature is a boat configuration of puckered boron hexagons within infinite graphite like boron layers (6(3) nets). Sc2RuB6 presents two-dimensional planar nets of condensed boron pentagons, hexagons, and heptagons sandwiched between metal layers. In Sc/Y substituted Y2ReB6-type, Y atoms are distributed exclusively inside the boron heptagons. Exploration of the Sc-Ru-B system at 800 °C including binary boundaries employing EPMA and powder X-ray diffraction technique furthermore rules out the existence of previously reported "ScRuB4" but confirms the formation and crystal structure of Sc2Ru5B4. ScRu4B4 forms in cast alloys (LuRu4B4-type structure; space group I41/acd (No. 142), a = 7.3543(2) Å, c = 14.92137(8) Å). Cell parameters and atomic coordinates have been refined for ScRu2B3, Sc2RuB6, and ScRu4B4 in the scope of the generalized gradient approximation. Ab initio electronic structure calculations indicate a moderate electronic density of states at the Fermi level situated near the upper edge of essentially filled d-bands. Electrical resistivity measurements characterize ScRu2B3 and Sc2RuB6 as metals in concord with electronic band structure calculations.

  9. Boron content in daily meals for preschool children and school youth.

    PubMed

    Pieczyńska, J; Borkowska-Burnecka, J; Biernat, J; Grajeta, H; Zyrnicki, W; Zechałko-Czajkowska, A

    2003-01-01

    Boron content in daily meals for preschool children and school youth was studied in this research. The boron content was measured in the meals taken from Wroclaw preschool and boarding school in December, March, June, and September. The whole meal was homogenized. Four grams of sample were mineralized and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Statistical assessment of the results was made with the Statistica v.5.1 program. The recovery was determined by the use of the standard additions method to evaluate the accuracy of the procedure. The mean boron content in 1 kg dry weight of a preschool meal was 2.31 mg B/kg dry wt, and in boarding-school meals, it was 2.15 mg B/kg dry wt. Based on these results, the estimated daily boron intake was calculated. The daily boron intake from food by preschool children was found to be 1.01 mg B/d for children and 1.2 mg B/d for youth. The actual intake of boron from food was determined after having related the quantity of the element to 1 kg of body weight. In the case of children, the mean intake of boron was 0.05 mg B/kg body wt/d, whereas in teenagers, it was 0.016 mg B/kg body wt/d. The results of this research show no significant differences between daily boron intake for preschool children and boarding-school youth.

  10. Boron and Coumaphos Residues in Hive Materials Following Treatments for the Control of Aethina tumida Murray

    PubMed Central

    Valdovinos-Flores, Cesar; Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Heras–Ramírez, María Elena; Dorantes-Ugalde, José Antonio; Saldaña-Loza, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    In the search of alternatives for controlling Aethina tumida Murray, we recently proposed the BAA trap which uses boric acid and an attractant which mimics the process of fermentation caused by Kodamaea ohmeri in the hive. This yeast is excreted in the feces of A. tumida causing the fermentation of pollen and honey of infested hives and releasing compounds that function as aggregation pheromones to A. tumida. Since the boron is the toxic element in boric acid, the aim of this article is to assess the amount of boron residues in honey and beeswax from hives treated with the BAA trap. For this aim, the amount of bioaccumulated boron in products of untreated hives was first determined and then compared with the amount of boron of products from hives treated with the BAA trap in two distinct climatic and soil conditions. The study was conducted in the cities of Padilla, Tamaulipas, and Valladolid, Yucatan (Mexico) from August 2014 to March 2015. The quantity of boron in honey was significantly less in Yucatan than in Tamaulipas; this agrees with the boron deficiency among Luvisol and Leptosol soils found in Yucatan compared to the Vertisol soil found in Tamaulipas. In fact, the honey from Yucatan has lower boron levels than those reported in the literature. The BAA treatment was applied for four months, results show that the BAA trap does not have any residual effect in either honey or wax; i.e., there is no significant difference in boron content before and after treatment. On the other hand, the organophosphate pesticide coumaphos was found in 100% of wax samples and in 64% of honey samples collected from Yucatan. The concentration of coumaphos in honey ranges from 0.005 to 0.040 mg/kg, which are below Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) allowed in the European Union (0.1 mg/kg) but 7.14% of samples exceeded the MRL allowed in Canada (0.02 mg/kg). PMID:27092938

  11. Boron and Coumaphos Residues in Hive Materials Following Treatments for the Control of Aethina tumida Murray.

    PubMed

    Valdovinos-Flores, Cesar; Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Heras-Ramírez, María Elena; Lara-Álvarez, Carlos; Dorantes-Ugalde, José Antonio; Saldaña-Loza, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    In the search of alternatives for controlling Aethina tumida Murray, we recently proposed the BAA trap which uses boric acid and an attractant which mimics the process of fermentation caused by Kodamaea ohmeri in the hive. This yeast is excreted in the feces of A. tumida causing the fermentation of pollen and honey of infested hives and releasing compounds that function as aggregation pheromones to A. tumida. Since the boron is the toxic element in boric acid, the aim of this article is to assess the amount of boron residues in honey and beeswax from hives treated with the BAA trap. For this aim, the amount of bioaccumulated boron in products of untreated hives was first determined and then compared with the amount of boron of products from hives treated with the BAA trap in two distinct climatic and soil conditions. The study was conducted in the cities of Padilla, Tamaulipas, and Valladolid, Yucatan (Mexico) from August 2014 to March 2015. The quantity of boron in honey was significantly less in Yucatan than in Tamaulipas; this agrees with the boron deficiency among Luvisol and Leptosol soils found in Yucatan compared to the Vertisol soil found in Tamaulipas. In fact, the honey from Yucatan has lower boron levels than those reported in the literature. The BAA treatment was applied for four months, results show that the BAA trap does not have any residual effect in either honey or wax; i.e., there is no significant difference in boron content before and after treatment. On the other hand, the organophosphate pesticide coumaphos was found in 100% of wax samples and in 64% of honey samples collected from Yucatan. The concentration of coumaphos in honey ranges from 0.005 to 0.040 mg/kg, which are below Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) allowed in the European Union (0.1 mg/kg) but 7.14% of samples exceeded the MRL allowed in Canada (0.02 mg/kg).

  12. Jaguar Procedures for Detonation Behavior of Explosives Containing Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, L. I.; Baker, E. L.; Capellos, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Jaguar product library was expanded to include boron and boron containing products by analysis of Available Hugoniot and static volumetric data to obtain constants of the Murnaghan relationships for the components. Experimental melting points were also utilized to obtain the constants of the volumetric relationships for liquid boron and boron oxide. Detonation velocities for HMX—boron mixtures calculated with these relationships using Jaguar are in closer agreement with literature values at high initial densities for inert (unreacted) boron than with the completely reacted metal. These results indicate that the boron does not react near the detonation front or that boron mixtures exhibit eigenvalue detonation behavior (as shown by some aluminized explosives), with higher detonation velocities at the initial points. Analyses of calorimetric measurements for RDX—boron mixtures indicate that at high boron contents the formation of side products, including boron nitride and boron carbide, inhibits the detonation properties of the formulation.

  13. Synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes by boron ink annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lu Hua; Chen, Ying; Glushenkov, Alexey M.

    2010-03-01

    Ball-milling and annealing is one effective method for the mass production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). We report that the method has been modified to a boron (B) ink annealing method. In this new process, the nanosize ball-milled B particles are mixed with metal nitrate in ethanol to form an ink-like solution, and then the ink is annealed in nitrogen-containing gas to form nanotubes. The new method greatly enhances the yield of BNNTs, giving a higher density of nanotubes. These improvements are caused by the addition of metal nitrate and ethanol, both of which can strongly boost the nitriding reaction, as revealed by thermogravimetric analysis. The size and structure of BNNTs can be controlled by varying the annealing conditions. This high-yield production of BNNTs in large quantities enables the large-scale application of BNNTs.

  14. Synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes by boron ink annealing.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu Hua; Chen, Ying; Glushenkov, Alexey M

    2010-03-12

    Ball-milling and annealing is one effective method for the mass production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). We report that the method has been modified to a boron (B) ink annealing method. In this new process, the nanosize ball-milled B particles are mixed with metal nitrate in ethanol to form an ink-like solution, and then the ink is annealed in nitrogen-containing gas to form nanotubes. The new method greatly enhances the yield of BNNTs, giving a higher density of nanotubes. These improvements are caused by the addition of metal nitrate and ethanol, both of which can strongly boost the nitriding reaction, as revealed by thermogravimetric analysis. The size and structure of BNNTs can be controlled by varying the annealing conditions. This high-yield production of BNNTs in large quantities enables the large-scale application of BNNTs.

  15. POWDER COAT APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses an investigation of critical factors that affect the use of powder coatings on the environment, cost, quality, and production. The investigation involved a small business representative working with the National Defense Center for Environmental Excellence (ND...

  16. Talcum powder poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... powder As a filler in street drugs, like heroin Other products may also contain talc. ... have developed serious lung damage and cancer. Injecting heroin that contains talc into a vein may lead ...

  17. OIL SOLUTIONS POWDER

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technical product bulletin: aka OIL SOLUTIONS POWDER, SPILL GREEN LS, this miscellaneous oil spill control agent used in cleanups initially behaves like a synthetic sorbent, then as a solidifier as the molecular microencapsulating process occurs.

  18. POWDER COAT APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses an investigation of critical factors that affect the use of powder coatings on the environment, cost, quality, and production. The investigation involved a small business representative working with the National Defense Center for Environmental Excellence (ND...

  19. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarik, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (-20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties.

  20. Longitudinal Splitting of Boron Nitride Nanotubes for the Facile Synthesis of High Quality Boron Nitride Nanoribbons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-24

    Boron Nitride Nanotubes for the Facile Synthesis of High Quality Boron Nitride Nanoribbons Kris J. Erickson,†,‡,§ Ashley...We report the synthesis of BNNRs through the potassium-intercalation-induced longitudinal splitting of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). This facile...COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Longitudinal Splitting of Boron Nitride Nanotubes for the Facile Synthesis of High

  1. Mapping Boron Dioxide (BO2) Light Emission During Ballistic Initiation of Boron

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-03

    ARL-TN-0738 ● FEB 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Mapping Boron Dioxide (BO2) Light Emission During Ballistic Initiation of...ARL-TN-0738 ● FEB 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Mapping Boron Dioxide (BO2) Light Emission During Ballistic Initiation of Boron...Technical Note 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) February 2013–February 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mapping Boron Dioxide (BO2) Light Emission During

  2. Aluminum powder applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gurganus, T.B.

    1995-08-01

    Aluminum powders have physical and metallurgical characteristics related to their method of manufacture that make them extremely important in a variety of applications. They can propel rockets, improve personal hygiene, increase computer reliability, refine exotic alloys, and reduce weight in the family sedan or the newest Air Force fighter. Powders formed into parts for structural and non-structural applications hold the key to some of the most exciting new developments in the aluminum future.

  3. Effects of ball milling and sintering on alumina and alumina-boron compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Thomas

    Alumina has a wide variety of applications, but the processing of alumina based materials can be costly. Mechanically milling alumina has been shown to enhance the sintering properties while decreasing the sintering temperature. Additions of boron have also proven to increase sintering properties of alumina. These two processes, mechanical milling and boron additions, will be combined to test the sintering properties and determine if they are improved upon even further compared to the individual processes. Multiple samples of pure alumina, 0.2 weight percent boron, and 1.0 weight percent boron are batched and processed in a ball mill for different time intervals. These samples are then characterized to observe the structure and properties of the samples after milling but before sintering. Pellets are dry pressed from the milled powders, sintered at 1200°C for one to 10 hours, and characterized to determine the impact of processing. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) was used on each sample to determine crystallite size and lattice parameters at different stages throughout the experiment. XRD was also used to identify any samples with an aluminum borate phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the powder and pellet morphology and to measure bulk chemical composition. Samples were sputter coated with an Au-Pd coating observed in the SEM to characterize the topography as a function of variables such as milling time, boron composition, and sintering time. Additionally, porosity and change in diameter were measured to track the sintering process. Milling sample for longer periods of time would be unnecessary due to the crystallite size leveling off between 10 and 12 hours of milling time. Samples of alumina with 0.2 weight percent boron prove to have very little effect on the sintering properties. At 1.0 weight percent boron, there are changes in diffraction patterns and topography after being sintered for one hour. The porosities of all of the sintered

  4. Prediction of boron carbon nitrogen phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Sanxi; Zhang, Hantao; Widom, Michael

    We studied the phase diagram of boron, carbon and nitrogen, including the boron-carbon and boron-nitrogen binaries and the boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary. Based on the idea of electron counting and using a technique of mixing similar primitive cells, we constructed many ''electron precise'' structures. First principles calculation is performed on these structures, with either zero or high pressures. For the BN binary, our calculation confirms that a rhmobohedral phase can be stablized at high pressure, consistent with some experimental results. For the BCN ternary, a new ground state structure is discovered and an Ising-like phase transition is suggested. Moreover, we modeled BCN ternary phase diagram and show continuous solubility from boron carbide to the boron subnitride phase.

  5. Method for preparing boron-carbide articles

    DOEpatents

    Benton, S.T.; Masters, D.R.

    1975-10-21

    The invention is directed to the preparation of boron carbide articles of various configurations. A stoichiometric mixture of particulate boron and carbon is confined in a suitable mold, heated to a temperature in the range of about 1250 to 1500$sup 0$C for effecting a solid state diffusion reaction between the boron and carbon for forming the boron carbide (B$sub 4$C), and thereafter the resulting boron-carbide particles are hot-pressed at a temperature in the range of about 1800 to 2200$sup 0$C and a pressure in the range of about 1000 to 4000 psi for densifying and sintering the boron carbide into the desired article.

  6. A new class of boron nanotube.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Ying; Li, You-Cheng

    2009-12-07

    The configurations, stability and electronic structures of a new class of boron sheet and related boron nanotubes are predicted within the framework of density functional theory. This boron sheet is sparser than those of recent proposals. Our theoretic results show that the stable boron sheet remains flat and is metallic. There are bands similar to the pi-bands in graphite near the Fermi level. Stable nanotubes with various diameters and chiral vectors can be rolled from the sheet. Within our study, only the thin (8, 0) nanotube with a band gap of 0.44 eV is semiconducting, while all the other thicker boron nanotubes are metallic, independent of their chirality. It indicates the possibility, in the design of nanodevices, to control the electronic transport properties of the boron nanotube through the diameter.

  7. Serum and urinary boron levels in rats after single administration of sodium tetraborate.

    PubMed

    Usuda, K; Kono, K; Orita, Y; Dote, T; Iguchi, K; Nishiura, H; Tominaga, M; Tagawa, T; Goto, E; Shirai, Y

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of boron was studied in rats by administering a 1 ml oral dose of sodium tetraborate solution to several groups of rats (n=20) at eleven different dose levels ranging from 0 to 0.4 mg/100 g body weight as boron. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were collected after boron administration. After 24 h the average urinary recovery rate for this element was 99.6+/-7.9. The relationship between boron dose and excretion was linear (r=0.999) with a regression coefficient of 0.954. This result suggests that the oral bioavailability (F) of boron was complete. Another group of rats (n=10) was given a single oral injection of 2 ml of sodium tetraborate solution containing 0.4 mg of boron/100 g body wt. The serum decay of boron was followed and found to be monophasic. The data were interpreted according to a one-compartment open model. The appropriate pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated as follows: absorption half-life, t1/2a=0.608+/-0.432 h; elimination half-life, t1/2=4.64+/-1.19 h; volume of distribution, Vd = 142.0+/-30.2 ml/100 g body wt.; total clearance, Ctot=0.359+/-0.0285 ml/min per 100 g body wt. The maximum boron concentration in serum after administration (Cmax) was 2.13+/-0.270 mg/l, and the time needed to reach this maximum concentration (Tmax) was 1.76+/-0.887 h. Our results suggest that orally administered boric acid is rapidly and completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract into the blood stream. Boric acid in the intravascular space does not have a strong affinity to serum proteins, and rapidly diffuses to the extravascular space in proportion to blood flow without massive accumulation or binding in tissues. The main route of boron excretion from the body is via glomerular filtration. It may be inferred that there is partial tubular resorption at low plasma levels. The animal model is proposed as a useful tool to approach the problem of environmental or industrial exposure to boron or in cases of accidental acute boron

  8. Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Of Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes synthesis, properties, and applications of boron nitride. Especially in thin-film form. Boron nitride films useful as masks in x-ray lithography; as layers for passivation of high-speed microelectronic circuits; insulating films; hard, wear-resistant, protective films for optical components; lubricants; and radiation detectors. Present status of single-crystal growth of boron nitride indicates promising candidate for use in high-temperature semiconductor electronics.

  9. Stereodivergent Olefination of Enantioenriched Boronic Esters

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Roly J.; García‐Ruiz, Cristina; Myers, Eddie L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A stereodivergent coupling reaction between vinyl halides and boronic esters is described. This coupling process proceeds without a transition‐metal catalyst, instead proceeding by electrophilic selenation or iodination of a vinyl boronate complex followed by stereospecific syn or anti elimination. Chiral, nonracemic boronic esters could be coupled with complete enantiospecificity. The process enables the highly stereoselective synthesis of either the E or Z alkene from a single isomer of a vinyl coupling partner. PMID:27958668

  10. Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Of Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes synthesis, properties, and applications of boron nitride. Especially in thin-film form. Boron nitride films useful as masks in x-ray lithography; as layers for passivation of high-speed microelectronic circuits; insulating films; hard, wear-resistant, protective films for optical components; lubricants; and radiation detectors. Present status of single-crystal growth of boron nitride indicates promising candidate for use in high-temperature semiconductor electronics.

  11. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  12. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-28

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  13. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goval, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-06-07

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  14. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  15. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-07-29

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  16. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-05-10

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-14

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  18. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-01-25

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  19. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  20. Boron containing multilayer coatings and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1997-09-23

    Hard coatings are fabricated from multilayer boron/boron carbide, boron carbide/cubic boron nitride, and boron/boron nitride/boron carbide, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron and boron carbide used in forming the multilayers are formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/boron carbide, and boron carbide/cubic boron nitride is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron, cubic boron nitride or boron carbide, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be of a discrete or a blended or graded composition. 6 figs.