Science.gov

Sample records for elemental energy spectra

  1. CREAM: High Energy Frontier of Cosmic Ray Elemental Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Suk

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment was flown for 161 days in six flights over Antarctica. High energy cosmic-ray data were collected over a wide energy range from 10 (10) to 10 (15) eV at an average altitude of 38.5 km with 3.9 g/cm (2) atmospheric overburden. Cosmic-ray elements from protons (Z = 1) to iron nuclei (Z = 26) are separated with excellent charge resolution. Building on success of the balloon flights, the payload is being reconfigured for exposure on the International Space Station (ISS). This ISS-CREAM instrument is configured with the CREAM calorimeter for energy measurements, and four finely segmented Silicon Charge Detector layers for precise charge measurements. In addition, the Top and Bottom Counting Detectors (TCD and BCD) and Boronated Scintillator Detector (BSD) have been newly developed. The TCD and BCD are scintillator based segmented detectors to separate electrons from nuclei using the shower profile differences, while BSD distinguishes electrons from nuclei by detecting thermal neutrons that are dominant in nuclei induced showers. An order of magnitude increase in data collecting power is possible by utilizing the ISS to reach the highest energies practical with direct measurements. The project status including results from on-going analysis of existing data and future plans will be discussed.

  2. An Instrument to Measure Elemental Energy Spectra of Cosmic Ray Nuclei Up to 10(exp 16) eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Chilingarian, A.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov,S.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Podorozhnyi, D.; Procqureur, J.

    2000-01-01

    A longstanding goal of cosmic ray research is to measure the elemental energy spectra of cosmic rays up to and through the "knee" (approx. equal to 3 x 10 (exp 15) eV. It is not currently feasible to achieve this goal with an ionization calorimeter because the mass required to be deployed in Earth orbit is very large (at least 50 tonnes). An alternative method will be presented. This is based on measuring the primary particle energy by determining the angular distribution of secondaries produced in a target layer using silicon microstrip detector technology. The proposed technique can be used over a wide range of energies (10 (exp 11)- 10 (exp 16) eV) and gives an energy resolution of 60% or better. Based on this technique, a design for a new lightweight instrument with a large aperture (KLEM) will be described.

  3. Energy spectra of elements with 18 or = Z or = 28 between 10 and 300 GeV/amu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. D.; Klarmann, J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Garrard, T. L.; Israel, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The HEAO-3 Heavy Nuclei Experiment is composed of ionization chambers above and below a plastic Cerenkov counter. The energy dependence of the abundances of elements with atomic number, Z, between 18 and 28 at very high energies where they are rare and thus need the large area x time are measured. The measurements of the Danish-French HEAO-3 experiment (Englemann,, et al., 1983) are extended to higher energies, using the relativistic rise of ionization signal as a measure of energy. Source abundances for Ar and Ca were determined.

  4. Speciation of Energy Critical Elements in Marine Ferromanganese Crusts and Nodules by Principal Component Analysis and Least-squares fits to XAFS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, A. L.; Klofas, J. M.; Hein, J. R.; Koschinsky, A.; Bargar, J.; Dunham, R. E.; Conrad, T. A.

    2011-12-01

    Marine ferromanganese crusts and nodules ("Fe-Mn crusts") are considered a potential mineral resource due to their accumulation of several economically-important elements at concentrations above mean crustal abundances. They are typically composed of intergrown Fe oxyhydroxide and Mn oxide; thicker (older) crusts can also contain carbonate fluorapatite. We used X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, a molecular-scale structure probe, to determine the speciation of several elements (Te, Bi, Mo, Zr, Pt) in Fe-Mn crusts. As a first step in analysis of this dataset, we have conducted principal component analysis (PCA) of Te K-edge and Mo K-edge, k3-weighted XAFS spectra. The sample set consisted of 12 homogenized, ground Fe-Mn crust samples from 8 locations in the global ocean. One sample was subjected to a chemical leach to selectively remove Mn oxides and the elements associated with it. The samples in the study set contain 50-205 mg/kg Te (average = 88) and 97-802 mg/kg Mo (average = 567). PCAs of background-subtracted, normalized Te K-edge and Mo K-edge XAFS spectra were performed on a data matrix of 12 rows x 122 columns (rows = samples; columns = Te or Mo fluorescence value at each energy step) and results were visualized without rotation. The number of significant components was assessed by the Malinowski indicator function and ability of the components to reconstruct the features (minus noise) of all sample spectra. Two components were significant by these criteria for both Te and Mo PCAs and described a total of 74 and 75% of the total variance, respectively. Reconstruction of potential model compounds by the principal components derived from PCAs on the sample set ("target transformation") provides a means of ranking models in terms of their utility for subsequent linear-combination, least-squares (LCLS) fits (the next step of data analysis). Synthetic end-member models of Te4+, Te6+, and Mo adsorbed to Fe(III) oxyhydroxide and Mn oxide were

  5. Accelerator measurement of the energy spectra of neutrons emitted in the interaction of 3-GeV protons with several elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalesnik, W. J.; Devlin, T. J.; Merker, M.; Shen, B. S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The application of time of flight techniques for determining the shapes of the energy spectra of neutrons between 20 and 400 MeV is discussed. The neutrons are emitted at 20, 34, and 90 degrees in the bombardment of targets by 3 GeV protons. The targets used are carbon, aluminum, cobalt, and platinum with cylindrical cross section. Targets being bombarded are located in the internal circulating beam of a particle accelerator.

  6. Galactic cosmic ray composition and energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Galactic cosmic ray nuclei represent a significant risk to long-duration spaceflight outside the magnetosphere. We review briefly existing measurements of the composition and energy spectra of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, pointing out which species and energy ranges are most critical to assessing cosmic ray risks for spaceflight. Key data sets are identified and a table of cosmic ray abundances is presented for elements from H to Ni (Z = 1 to 28). Because of the 22-year nature of the solar modulation cycle, data from the approaching 1998 solar minimum is especially important to reducing uncertainties in the cosmic ray radiation hazard. It is recommended that efforts to model this hazard take advantage of approaches that have been developed to model the astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays.

  7. High-Energy Anomaly in the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectra of Nd2-xCexCuO4: Evidence for a Matrix Element Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rienks, E. D. L.; ńrrälä, M.; Lindroos, M.; Roth, F.; Tabis, W.; Yu, G.; Greven, M.; Fink, J.

    2014-09-01

    We use polarization-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the high-energy anomaly (HEA) in the dispersion of Nd2-xCexCuO4, x =0.123. We find that at particular photon energies the anomalous, waterfall-like dispersion gives way to a broad, continuous band. This suggests that the HEA is a matrix element effect: it arises due to a suppression of the intensity of the broadened quasiparticle band in a narrow momentum range. We confirm this interpretation experimentally, by showing that the HEA appears when the matrix element is suppressed deliberately by changing the light polarization. Calculations of the matrix element using atomic wave functions and simulation of the ARPES intensity with one-step model calculations provide further evidence for this scenario. The possibility to detect the full quasiparticle dispersion further allows us to extract the high-energy self-energy function near the center and at the edge of the Brillouin zone.

  8. DISCREPANT HARDENING OBSERVED IN COSMIC-RAY ELEMENTAL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Lutz, L.; Malinin, A.; Allison, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Childers, J. T.; DuVernois, M. A.; Conklin, N. B.; Coutu, S.; Mognet, S. I.; Jeon, J. A.; Minnick, S.

    2010-05-01

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass experiment launched five times from Antarctica has achieved a cumulative flight duration of about 156 days above 99.5% of the atmosphere. The instrument is configured with complementary and redundant particle detectors designed to extend direct measurements of cosmic-ray composition to the highest energies practical with balloon flights. All elements from protons to iron nuclei are separated with excellent charge resolution. Here, we report results from the first two flights of {approx}70 days, which indicate hardening of the elemental spectra above {approx}200 GeV/nucleon and a spectral difference between the two most abundant species, protons and helium nuclei. These results challenge the view that cosmic-ray spectra are simple power laws below the so-called knee at {approx}10{sup 15} eV. This discrepant hardening may result from a relatively nearby source, or it could represent spectral concavity caused by interactions of cosmic rays with the accelerating shock. Other possible explanations should also be investigated.

  9. Comprehensive Analyses of the Spectra of Iron-group Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J; Pickering, Juliet C; Liggins, Florence

    2014-06-01

    For many decades, the Atomic Spectroscopy Group at NIST has measured atomic data of vital use to astronomy and other fields using high resolution spectrometers that are found in few other places in the world. These now include the 2-m Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer covering the region 285 nm to 5500 nm, the FT700 vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) FT spectrometer covering the region 143 nm to 900 nm, and a 10.7-m normal incidence spectrograph (NIVS) covering 30 nm to 500 nm. Recent work focused on the measurement and analysis of wavelengths and energy levels of iron-group elements to provide extensive data for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. Our comprehensive linelist for Fe II from 90 nm to 5500 nm contains over 13 600 lines with order of magnitude improvements in the wavelengths compared to previous work [Nave & Johansson, ApJSS 204, 1(2013)]. The spectra were observed in high-current continuous and pulsed hollow cathode (HCL) discharges using FT spectrometers and our NIVS spectrograph. A similar analysis of Cr II contains over 5300 lines and extends the knowledge of this spectrum to the previously unobserved region between 731 nm at 5500 nm [Sansonetti, Nave, Reader & Kerber, ApJSS 202, 15 (2012); Sansonetti & Nave, ApJSS (in prep.)]. Our analysis of the Co III spectrum contains 750 lines observed in Penning discharge lamps and an additional 900 lines compiled from previous work, including Ritz wavelengths, optimized energy levels, and calculated log(gf) values [Smillie, Pickering, Nave & Smith, ApJSS (in prep.)]. NIST and ICL are currently collaborating to complete the measurement and analysis of wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters for all singly-ionized iron-group elements of astrophysical interest, covering the wavelength range 80 nm to 5500 nm. This project uses archival data from FT spectrometers at NIST, ICL and Kitt Peak National Observatory, with additional spectra of HCL and Penning discharge sources taken using our FT and

  10. Energy spectra in elasto-inertial turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, P. C.; da Silva, C. B.; Pinho, F. T.

    2016-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations of statistically steady homogeneous isotropic turbulence in viscoelastic fluids described by the FENE-P model are presented. Emphasis is given to large polymer relaxation times compared to the eddy turnover time, which is a regime recently termed elasto-inertial turbulence. In this regime the polymers are ineffective in dissipating kinetic energy but they play a lead role in transferring kinetic energy to the small solvent scales which turns out to be concomitant with the depletion of the usual non-linear energy cascade. However, we show that the non-linear interactions are still highly active, but they lead to no net downscale energy transfer because the forward and reversed energy cascades are nearly balanced. Finally, we show that the tendency for a steeper elasto-inertial power-law spectra is reversed for large polymer relaxation times and the spectra tend towards the usual k-5/3 functional form.

  11. Energy spectra of high energy atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, K.; Minorikawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on high energy neutrinos ( or = 1 TeV), a new calculation of atmospheric neutrino intensities was carried out taking into account EMC effects observed in P-A collisions by accelerator, recent measurement of primary cosmic ray spectrum and results of cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio. Other features of the present calculation are (1) taking into account kinematics of three body decays of kaons and charm particles in diffusion equations and (2) taking into account energy dependence of kaon production.

  12. Determination of the Light Element Fraction in MSL APXS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrett, G. M.; Pradler, I.; Campbell, J. L.; Gellert, R.; Leshin, L. A.; Schmidt, M. E.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Additional light invisible components (ALICs), measured using the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS), represent all light elements (e.g. CO3, OH, H2O) present in a sample below Na, excluding bound oxygen. The method for quantifying ALICs was originally developed for the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) APXS (Mallet et al, 2006; Campbell et al, 2008). This method has been applied to data collected by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) APXS up to sol 269 using a new terrestrial calibration. ALICs are investigated using the intensity ratio of Pu L-alpha Compton and Rayleigh scatter peaks (C/R). Peak areas of the scattered X-rays are determined by the GUAPX fitting program. This experimental C/R is compared to a Monte Carlo simulated C/R. The ratio of simulated and experimental C/R values is called the K-value. ALIC concentrations are calculated by comparing the K-value to the fraction of all invisibles present; the invisible fraction is produced from the spectrum fit by GUAPX. This method is applied to MSL spectra with long integration duration (greater than 3 hours) and with energy resolution less than 180 eV at 5.9 keV. These overnight spectra encompass a variety of geologic materials examined by the Curiosity Rover, including volcanic and sedimentary lithologies. Transfer of the K-value calibration produced in the lab to the flight APXS has been completed and temperature, geometry and spectrum duration effects have been thoroughly examined. A typical limit of detection of ALICs is around 5 wt% with uncertainties of approximately 5 wt%. Accurate elemental concentrations are required as input to the Monte Carlo program (Mallet et al, 2006; Lee, 2010). Elemental concentrations are obtained from the GUAPX code using the same long duration, good resolution spectra used for determining the experimental C/R ratios (Campbell et al. 2012). Special attention was given to the assessment of Rb, Sr, and Y as these element peaks overlap the scatter peaks. Mineral effects

  13. Specific heat of multifractal energy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, L. R.; Vallejos, R. O.; Tsallis, C.; Mendes, R. S.; Roux, S.

    2001-07-01

    Motivated by the self-similar character of energy spectra demonstrated for quasicrystals, we investigate the case of multifractal energy spectra, and compute the specific heat associated with simple archetypal forms of multifractal sets as generated by iterated maps. We considered the logistic map and the circle map at their threshold to chaos. Both examples show nontrivial structures associated with the scaling properties of their respective chaotic attractors. The specific heat displays generically log-periodic oscillations around a value that characterizes a single exponent, the ``fractal dimension,'' of the distribution of energy levels close to the minimum value set to 0. It is shown that when the fractal dimension and the frequency of log oscillations of the density of states are large, the amplitude of the resulting log oscillation in the specific heat becomes much smaller than the log-periodic oscillation measured on the density of states.

  14. Deconvolution of Energy Spectra in the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batkov, K. E.; Panov, A. D.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazley, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasigha, R. M.; Guzik, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic- ray elemental spectra measurements from below 100 GeV up to tens TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. The instrument is composed of a silicon matrix detector followed by a carbon target, interleaved with scintillator tracking layers, and a segmented BGO calorimeter composed of 320 individual crystals totalling 18 radiation lengths, used to determine the particle energy. The technique for deconvolution of the energy spectra measured in the thin calorimeter is based on detailed simulations of the response of the ATIC instrument to different cosmic ray nuclei over a wide energy range. The method of deconvolution is described and energy spectrum of carbon obtained by this technique is presented.

  15. High energy cosmic ray charge and energy spectra measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, J. H.; Webber, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    In 1976, 1977, and 1978, a series of three balloon flights was conducted to measure the energy spectra of cosmic ray nuclei. A gas Cerenkov detector with different gas thresholds of 8.97, 13.12, and 17.94 GeV/n was employed to extend these measurements to high energies. The total collection factor for these flights is more than 20 sq m ster-hr. Individual charge resolution was achieved over the charge range Z equals 4-26, and overlapping differential spectra were obtained from the three flights up to approximately 100.0 GeV/n.

  16. Enhancement of energy spectra through constant fraction timing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermis, Elif Ebru; Celiktas, Cuneyt

    2017-02-01

    The energy spectra of 137Cs, 60Co and 14C were achieved by using the spectrometers composed of different types of detectors. In this work, constant fraction timing method was used to enhance their energy spectra. Energy resolution values of 137Cs and 60Co gamma energy spectra were improved through this timing method. In addition, electronic noise appeared in the energy spectrum of 14C was discriminated through the timing method, leading to clear beta energy spectrum.

  17. On Measuring Cosmic Ray Energy Spectra with the Rapidity Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J.; Chilingarian, A.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov, S.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Podorozhnyi, D.; Procqureur, J.

    2000-01-01

    An important goal of cosmic ray research is to measure the elemental energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays up to 10(exp 16) eV. This goal cannot be achieved with an ionization calorimeter because the required instrument is too massive for space flight. An alternate method will be presented. This method is based on measuring the primary particle energy by determining the angular distribution of secondaries produced in a target layer. The proposed technique can be used over a wide range of energies (10 (exp 11) -10 (exp 16) eV) and gives an energy resolution of 60% or better. Based on this technique, a conceptual design for a new instrument (KLEM) will be presented. Due to its light weight, this instrument can have a large aperture enabling the direct measurement of cosmic rays to 1016 eV.

  18. Bremsstrahlung spectra from atoms and ions at low relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdonina, N. B.; Pratt, R. H.

    1999-09-01

    Analytic expressions for bremsstrahlung spectra from neutral atoms and ions, including the polarizational bremsstrahlung contribution in a stripped atom approximation, are developed for electron scattering at energies of 10-2000 keV. A modified Elwert factor and a simple higher Born correction are used for the Coulomb spectrum, with ordinary bremsstrahlung screening effects in ions and atoms adequately characterized in the non-relativistic Born approximation. In parallel with the development of this analytic description, new numerical results are obtained for ordinary bremsstrahlung from ions and from bare nuclei, appreciably extending the available data set which can be used to study dependences on element, ionicity, energy and the fraction of incident energy radiated. The accuracy of predictions with the analytic expressions is then determined by comparison with the full numerical relativistic partial-wave results for ordinary bremsstrahlung and with non-relativistic numerical results in the Born approximation or in partial waves for the polarizational amplitude.

  19. Surface energies of elemental crystals.

    PubMed

    Tran, Richard; Xu, Zihan; Radhakrishnan, Balachandran; Winston, Donald; Sun, Wenhao; Persson, Kristin A; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-09-13

    The surface energy is a fundamental property of the different facets of a crystal that is crucial to the understanding of various phenomena like surface segregation, roughening, catalytic activity, and the crystal's equilibrium shape. Such surface phenomena are especially important at the nanoscale, where the large surface area to volume ratios lead to properties that are significantly different from the bulk. In this work, we present the largest database of calculated surface energies for elemental crystals to date. This database contains the surface energies of more than 100 polymorphs of about 70 elements, up to a maximum Miller index of two and three for non-cubic and cubic crystals, respectively. Well-known reconstruction schemes are also accounted for. The database is systematically improvable and has been rigorously validated against previous experimental and computational data where available. We will describe the methodology used in constructing the database, and how it can be accessed for further studies and design of materials.

  20. Surface energies of elemental crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Richard; Xu, Zihan; Radhakrishnan, Balachandran; Winston, Donald; Sun, Wenhao; Persson, Kristin A.; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-09-01

    The surface energy is a fundamental property of the different facets of a crystal that is crucial to the understanding of various phenomena like surface segregation, roughening, catalytic activity, and the crystal’s equilibrium shape. Such surface phenomena are especially important at the nanoscale, where the large surface area to volume ratios lead to properties that are significantly different from the bulk. In this work, we present the largest database of calculated surface energies for elemental crystals to date. This database contains the surface energies of more than 100 polymorphs of about 70 elements, up to a maximum Miller index of two and three for non-cubic and cubic crystals, respectively. Well-known reconstruction schemes are also accounted for. The database is systematically improvable and has been rigorously validated against previous experimental and computational data where available. We will describe the methodology used in constructing the database, and how it can be accessed for further studies and design of materials.

  1. Surface energies of elemental crystals

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Richard; Xu, Zihan; Radhakrishnan, Balachandran; Winston, Donald; Sun, Wenhao; Persson, Kristin A.; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-01-01

    The surface energy is a fundamental property of the different facets of a crystal that is crucial to the understanding of various phenomena like surface segregation, roughening, catalytic activity, and the crystal’s equilibrium shape. Such surface phenomena are especially important at the nanoscale, where the large surface area to volume ratios lead to properties that are significantly different from the bulk. In this work, we present the largest database of calculated surface energies for elemental crystals to date. This database contains the surface energies of more than 100 polymorphs of about 70 elements, up to a maximum Miller index of two and three for non-cubic and cubic crystals, respectively. Well-known reconstruction schemes are also accounted for. The database is systematically improvable and has been rigorously validated against previous experimental and computational data where available. We will describe the methodology used in constructing the database, and how it can be accessed for further studies and design of materials. PMID:27622853

  2. Study on Properties of Energy Spectra of the Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    The energy-spectra of nonlinear vibration of molecular crystals such as acetanilide have been calculated by using discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation appropriate to the systems, containing various interactions. The energy levels including higher excited states are basically consistent with experimental values obtained by infrared absorption and Raman scattering in acetanilide. We further give the features of distribution of the energy-spectra for the acetanilide. Using the energy spectra we also explained well experimental results obtained by Careri et al..

  3. Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, H.; Cartwright, D. C.; Trajmar, S.

    1979-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine, for energy losses from 0 to 17.0 eV, have been taken at incident electron energies of 30, 50, and 90 eV and scattering angles from 5 to 140 deg. Features in the spectra above 11.5 eV energy loss agree well with the assignments recently made from optical spectroscopy. Excitations of many of the eleven repulsive valence excited electronic states are observed and their location correlates reasonably well with recent theoretical results. Several of these excitations have been observed for the first time and four features, for which there are no identifications, appear in the spectra.

  4. Radial Distribution of Electron Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The average track model describes the response of physical and biological systems using radial dose distribution as the key physical descriptor. We report on an extension of this model to describe the average distribution of electron spectra as a function of radial distance from an ion. We present calculations of these spectra for ions of identical linear energy transfer (LET), but dissimilar charge and velocity to evaluate the differences in electron spectra from these ions. To illustrate the usefulness of the radial electron spectra for describing effects that are not described by electron dose, we consider the evaluation of the indirect events in microdosimetric distributions for ions. We show that folding our average electron spectra model with experimentally determined frequency distributions for photons or electrons provides a good representation of radial event spectra from high-energy ions in 0.5-2 micrometer sites.

  5. Automated system for identification of atomic elements and calculation of lines profiles in emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Wilder; Restrepo, Elisabeth; Devia, Alfonso

    2001-04-01

    A database was designed starting from the Kurucz cd-rom N0 23 of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. In this database the different atomic elements are ordered by wavelength with their ionization levels. Also, there are other data like statistic weight, Einstein's coefficient, information about energy levels, constant of damping, among others. The spectra of the discharge are processed using a digital filtrate technique, with the purpose of reducing the noise present in the data to locate the points where the maximum amplitudes are presented. Starting from these results, consultations dynamic SQL are made, these obtain the elements present in these regions from the database. Finally, by means of the use of statistical methods it is determined which are the elements that have the highest probability of conform with the plasma. .

  6. Variation of the energy spectra of cosmic rays and their propagation in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitmukhambetov, A. A.

    A homogeneous model is used to investigate the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Source particle spectra are determined and conclusions as to relative chemical composition are drawn on the basis of a comparison with particle spectra outside the modulation region, determined at energies above 100 MeV/nucleon. It is shown that, compared with the mean chemical composition of the universe, cosmic rays in sources are impoverished in hydrogen and helium, and are enriched in heavy elements. It is also found that source energy spectra are of power type according to the total energy per nucleon, and that their shape variation in the low-energy region observed in unmodulated spectra is explained wholly by nuclear interactions during the passage through 4.5 g/sq cm matter and by ionization losses of particles.

  7. Energy Spectra of Very Large Gradual Solar Particle Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Bastille Day event, the Fe spectrum here does not harden with increasing energy. Instead, it falls much Fig. 2. Sample heavy-ion spectra from the 1998 April... Bastille Day) event from two intervals covering 6–14 and 22–26 hours after the flare (Tylka et al. 2001). The spectra clearly evolve, with e-folding...flare component much larger than 5% is excluded by <QFe> 10 from SEPICA in the Bastille Day event. To model the Fe spectra, we first fit the spectra

  8. Definition of energy-calibrated spectra for national reachback

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Christopher L.; Hertz, Kristin L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the timeliness and accuracy of analysis results of spectra submitted to National Reachback, particularly for the detection of threat items. Many spectra submitted for analysis include either a calibration spectrum using 137Cs or no calibration spectrum at all. The single line provided by 137Cs is insufficient to adequately calibrate nonlinear spectra. A calibration source that provides several lines that are well-spaced, from the low energy cutoff to the full energy range of the detector, is needed for a satisfactory energy calibration. This paper defines the requirements of an energy calibration for the purposes of National Reachback, outlines a method to validate whether a given spectrum meets that definition, discusses general source considerations, and provides a specific operating procedure for calibrating the GR-135.

  9. Elements of the theory of molecular spectra. [multiatomic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gribov, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    The basic aspects of the theory concerning the spectra of multiatomic molecules are presented. The classification of the forms of motions in a molecule, the methods for determining the corresponding Schroudinger levels, the spectral types and the selection rules are discussed in order to identify their presence and state in outer space.

  10. Implications for High Energy Blazar Spectra from Intergalactic Absorption Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F

    2008-01-01

    Given a knowledge of the density spectra intergalactic low energy photons as a function of redshift, one can derive the intrinsic gamma-ray spectra and luminosities of blazars over a range of redshifts and look for possible trends in blazar evolution. Stecker, Baring & Summerlin have found some evidence hinting that TeV blazars with harder spectra have higher intrinsic TeV gamma-ray luminosities and indicating that there may be a correlation of spectral hardness and luminosity with redshift. Further work along these lines, treating recent observations of the blazers lES02291+200 and 3C279 in the TeV and sub-TeV energy ranges, has recently been explored by Stecker & Scully. GLAST will observe and investigate many blazars in the GeV energy range and will be sensitive to blazers at higher redshifts. I examine the implications high redshift gamma-ray absorption for both theoretical and observational blazer studies.

  11. Characterization of radiation belt electron energy spectra from CRRES observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, W. R.; Lindstrom, C. D.; Ginet, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    Energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt and the slot region exhibit a wide variety of energy spectral forms, more so than radiation belt protons. We characterize the spatial and temporal dependence of these forms using observations from the CRRES satellite Medium Electron Sensor A (MEA) and High-Energy Electron Fluxmeter (HEEF) instruments, together covering an energy range 0.15-8 MeV. Spectra were classified with two independent methods, data clustering and curve-fitting analyses, in each case defining categories represented by power law, exponential, and bump-on-tail (BOT) or other complex shapes. Both methods yielded similar results, with BOT, exponential, and power law spectra respectively dominating in the slot region, outer belt, and regions just beyond the outer belt. The transition from exponential to power law spectra occurs at higher L for lower magnetic latitude. The location of the transition from exponential to BOT spectra is highly correlated with the location of the plasmapause. In the slot region during the days following storm events, electron spectra were observed to evolve from exponential to BOT yielding differential flux minima at 350-650 keV and maxima at 1.5-2 MeV; such evolution has been attributed to energy-dependent losses from scattering by whistler hiss.

  12. Model for Cumulative Solar Heavy Ion Energy and LET Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Mike; Barth, Janet; Stauffer, Craig; Jordan, Tom; Mewaldt, Richard

    2007-01-01

    A probabilistic model of cumulative solar heavy ion energy and lineary energy transfer (LET) spectra is developed for spacecraft design applications. Spectra are given as a function of confidence level, mission time period during solar maximum and shielding thickness. It is shown that long-term solar heavy ion fluxes exceed galactic cosmic ray fluxes during solar maximum for shielding levels of interest. Cumulative solar heavy ion fluences should therefore be accounted for in single event effects rate calculations and in the planning of space missions.

  13. Calculating fusion neutron energy spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, J.; Conroy, S.; Andersson Sundén, E.; Hellesen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Directional Relativistic Spectrum Simulator (DRESS) code can perform Monte-Carlo calculations of reaction product spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions, using fully relativistic kinematics. The code is set up to calculate energy spectra from neutrons and alpha particles produced in the D(d, n)3He and T(d, n)4He fusion reactions, but any two-body reaction can be simulated by including the corresponding cross section. The code has been thoroughly tested. The kinematics calculations have been benchmarked against the kinematics module of the ROOT Data Analysis Framework. Calculated neutron energy spectra have been validated against tabulated fusion reactivities and against an exact analytical expression for the thermonuclear fusion neutron spectrum, with good agreement. The DRESS code will be used as the core of a detailed synthetic diagnostic framework for neutron measurements at the JET and MAST tokamaks.

  14. High-energy X-ray spectra of five sources.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Gerassimenko, M.; Lewin , W. H. G.

    1973-01-01

    On October 15-16, 1970, we carried out balloon X-ray observations from Australia at energies above 15 keV. We present the high-energy X-ray spectra of three sources discovered by us, GX 301-2, GX 304-1, and GX 1 + 4. The data suggest that these high-energy sources correspond to the sources 2U 1223-62, 2U 1258-61, and 2U 1728-24 respectively. We also present the spectra for two additional sources, GX 5-1 (2U 1757-25) and GX 3 + 1 (2U 1744-26). The average intensity of the highly variable source GX 301-2 was observed to be as great as Tau X-1 in the energy range 15-50 keV.

  15. Emission spectra of selected SSME elements and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.; Vandyke, David B.; Bircher, Felix E.; Gardner, Donald G.; Chenevert, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    Stennis Space Center (SSC) is pursuing the advancement of experimental techniques and theoretical developments in the field of plume spectroscopy for application to rocket development testing programs and engine health monitoring. Exhaust plume spectral data for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are routinely acquired. The usefulness of this data depends upon qualitative and quantitative interpretation of spectral features and their correlation with the engine performance. A knowledge of the emission spectral characteristics of effluent materials in the exhaust plume is essential. A study of SSME critical components and their materials identified 30 elements and 53 materials whose engine exhaust plume spectral might be required. The most important were evaluated using SSC's Diagnostic Testbed Facility Thruster (DTFT), a 1200-lbf, liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen rocket engine which very nearly replicates the temperature and pressure conditions of the SSME exhaust plume in the first Mach diamond. This report presents the spectral data for the 10 most important elements and 27 most important materials which are strongly to moderately emitting in the DTFT exhaust plume. The covered spectral range is 300 to 426 nm and the spectral resolution is 0.25 nm. Spectral line identification information is provided and line interference effects are considered.

  16. Terahertz absorption spectra and potential energy distribution of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zezhang; Jiang, Yurong; Jiang, Lulu; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of a set of nematic liquid crystals were studied using the density functional theories (DFT). An accurate assignment of the vibrational modes corresponding to absorption frequencies were performed using potential energy distribution (PED) in a frequency range of 0-3 THz. The impacts of different core structures on THz absorption spectra were discussed. The results indicate that scope of application must be considered in the LC-based THz device designing. This proposed work may give a useful suggestion on the design of novel liquid crystal material in THz wave.

  17. Terahertz absorption spectra and potential energy distribution of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zezhang; Jiang, Yurong; Jiang, Lulu; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of a set of nematic liquid crystals were studied using the density functional theories (DFT). An accurate assignment of the vibrational modes corresponding to absorption frequencies were performed using potential energy distribution (PED) in a frequency range of 0-3 THz. The impacts of different core structures on THz absorption spectra were discussed. The results indicate that scope of application must be considered in the LC-based THz device designing. This proposed work may give a useful suggestion on the design of novel liquid crystal material in THz wave.

  18. Possible explanation of the atmospheric kinetic and potential energy spectra.

    PubMed

    Vallgren, Andreas; Deusebio, Enrico; Lindborg, Erik

    2011-12-23

    We hypothesize that the observed wave number spectra of kinetic and potential energy in the atmosphere can be explained by assuming that there are two related cascade processes emanating from the same large-scale energy source, a downscale cascade of potential enstrophy, giving rise to the k(-3) spectrum at synoptic scales and a downscale energy cascade giving rise to the k(-5/3) spectrum at mesoscales. The amount of energy which is going into the downscale energy cascade is determined by the rate of system rotation, with negligible energy going downscale in the limit of very fast rotation. We present a set of simulations of a system with strong rotation and stratification, supporting these hypotheses and showing good agreement with observations.

  19. IR Spectra and Bond Energies Computed Using DFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles; Andrews, Lester; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The combination of density functional theory (DFT) frequencies and infrared (IR) intensities and experimental spectra is a very powerful tool in the identification of molecules and ions. The computed and measured isotopic ratios make the identification much more secure than frequencies and intensities alone. This will be illustrated using several examples, such as Mn(CO)n and Mn(CO)n-. The accuracy of DFT metal-ligand bond energies will also be discussed.

  20. On the use of Lineal Energy Measurements to Estimate Linear Energy Transfer Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, David A.; Howell, Leonard W., Jr.; Adam, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the error resulting from using a lineal energy spectrum to represent a linear energy transfer spectrum for applications in the space radiation environment. Lineal energy and linear energy transfer spectra are compared in three diverse but typical space radiation environments. Different detector geometries are also studied to determine how they affect the error. LET spectra are typically used to compute dose equivalent for radiation hazard estimation and single event effect rates to estimate radiation effects on electronics. The errors in the estimations of dose equivalent and single event rates that result from substituting lineal energy spectra for linear energy spectra are examined. It is found that this substitution has little effect on dose equivalent estimates in interplanetary quiet-time environment regardless of detector shape. The substitution has more of an effect when the environment is dominated by solar energetic particles or trapped radiation, but even then the errors are minor especially if a spherical detector is used. For single event estimation, the effect of the substitution can be large if the threshold for the single event effect is near where the linear energy spectrum drops suddenly. It is judged that single event rate estimates made from lineal energy spectra are unreliable and the use of lineal energy spectra for single event rate estimation should be avoided.

  1. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1-100 MeV region is reported. Most of the events studied are dominated by He and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. Spectra of H, He-3, O, and Fe have spectral indices that are consistent with a value of about 3.5 above about 2 MeV/amu. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. Alternative interpretations are that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the resulting ion spectrum or that low-energy particles encounter significant additional scattering during transport from the flare.

  2. Determination of Endpoint Energy and Bremsstrahlung Spectra for High-Energy Radiation-Therapy Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Danny Joe

    Few attempts have been made to experimentally determine thick-target bremsstrahlung spectra of megavoltage therapy beams. For spectral studies using the Compton scattering technique, sodium iodine (NaI) detectors with relatively poor energy resolution have been used. Other experimental techniques for determining spectra are generally not suited for a clinical environment with the inherent time and space constraints. To gather more spectral information than previously obtained in the region near the endpoint energy, the use of a high-resolution intrinsic-germanium (Ge) detector was proposed. A response function matrix was determined from experimentally obtained pulse height distributions on the multichannel analyzer. The distributions were for nine various monoenergetic sources between 280 adn 1525 keV. The response function was used to convert the measured pulse height distributions to photon flux spectra using an iterative approximation technique with a computer. Photon flux spectra from the Sagittaire Linear Accelerator were obtained at average-electron endpoint energies of 15, 20, and 25 MeV. Two spectra were measured at the 25 MeV setting; one spectrum was measured along the central axis and one spectrum at 4(DEGREES) off axis. Photon spectra were also obtained for a Van de Graaff generator at the nominal endpoint energies of 2.2, 2.35, and 2.5 MeV. The results for both the linac and the Van de Graaff generator were compared with theoretical spectra and previously measured spectra where available. Also, photon spectra from a Theratron-80 (('60)Co) unit were determined for three field sizes and for a 10 x 10 cm. field with a lucite tray or a 45(DEGREES) wedge in the beam. The resulting spectra were compared to previously measured ('60)Co spectra.

  3. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1 to 100 MeV region is reported with data from the combined observations of experiments on the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. Most of the events studied are dominated by He, and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. An alternative interpretation is that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the spectrum.

  4. Determination of neutron energy spectra inside a water phantom irradiated by 64 MeV neutrons.

    PubMed

    Herbert, M S; Brooks, F D; Allie, M S; Buffler, A; Nchodu, M R; Makupula, S A; Jones, D T L; Langen, K M

    2007-01-01

    A NE230 deuterated liquid scintillator detector (25 mm diameter x 25 mm) has been used to investigate neutron energy spectra as a function of position in a water phantom under irradiation by a quasi-monoenergetic 64 MeV neutron beam. Neutron energy spectra are obtained from measurements of pulse height spectra by the NE230 detector using the Bayesian unfolding code MAXED. The experimentally measured energy spectra are compared with spectra calculated by Monte Carlo simulation using the code MCNPX.

  5. Energy spectra of He + ions penetrating thick biological targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yueyuan; Tan, Chunyu; Mu, Yuguang; Wang, Ruijin; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Xiangdong; Liu, Jitian; Yu, Zhengliang

    1999-05-01

    Energy spectra of 500 keV-1MeV He + ion penetrating 50 μ m- 100 μ m thick seed coat of maize, fruit peel of grape and of tomato, are measured. The results indicate that these thick biological targets, as seen by the penetrating ions, are inhomogeneous, and there are open paths, along which the incident ions can penetrate the targets easily. While most of the incident ions are stopped in the targets, some of the penetrating ions only lose a small fraction of their initial incident energy. The penetration energy spectra show a pure electronic stopping feature. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs taken from these samples with thickness of 30 μ m indicate that 150 keV electron beam from the TEM can penetrate the thick samples to give very good images with clear contrast. The electronic structures of β-1,4 glucosan molecular chains, which is deemed as the most important constituent of the cell walls of seed coats and peels of fruits, are calculated to show the possible open-path directions which exist in biological samples.

  6. Interatomic scattering in energy dependent photoelectron spectra of Ar clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Patanen, M.; Benkoula, S.; Nicolas, C.; Goel, A.; Antonsson, E.; Neville, J. J.; Miron, C.

    2015-09-28

    Soft X-ray photoelectron spectra of Ar 2p levels of atomic argon and argon clusters are recorded over an extended range of photon energies. The Ar 2p intensity ratios between atomic argon and clusters’ surface and bulk components reveal oscillations similar to photoelectron extended X-ray absorption fine structure signal (PEXAFS). We demonstrate here that this technique allows us to analyze separately the PEXAFS signals from surface and bulk sites of free-standing, neutral clusters, revealing a bond contraction at the surface.

  7. Multiple scattering calculations of relativistic electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorissen, K.; Rehr, J. J.; Verbeeck, J.

    2010-04-01

    A generalization of the real-space Green’s-function approach is presented for ab initio calculations of relativistic electron energy loss spectra (EELS) which are particularly important in anisotropic materials. The approach incorporates relativistic effects in terms of the transition tensor within the dipole-selection rule. In particular, the method accounts for relativistic corrections to the magic angle in orientation resolved EELS experiments. The approach is validated by a study of the graphite CK edge, for which we present an accurate magic angle measurement consistent with the predicted value.

  8. High-energy spectra of active nuclei. 1: The catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malaguti, G.; Bassani, L.; Caroli, E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a catalog of high-energy spectra (E is greater than or equal to 0.01 keV) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The catalog contains 209 objects (140 Seyfert galaxies, 65 quasars, and 4 objects otherwise classified), for a total of 1030 spectra. Most of the data have been collected from the literature over a period spanning more than 20 yr starting from the early 1970s up to the end of 1992. For a numbner of objects (17), EXOSAT/ME data have been extracted and analyzed, and the 27 spectra obtained have been added to the database. For each object we report individual observation spectral fit parameters using a power-law model corrected for cold gas absorption along the line of sight (photon index, 1 keV intensity and hydrogen column density), plus other relevant data. It is hoped that this database can become a useful tool for the study of the AGN phenomenon in its various aspects.

  9. Mineralogical analyses of surface sediments in the Antarctic Dry Valleys: coordinated analyses of Raman spectra, reflectance spectra and elemental abundances.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Janice L; Englert, Peter A J; Patel, Shital; Tirsch, Daniela; Roy, Alex J; Koeberl, Christian; Böttger, Ute; Hanke, Franziska; Jaumann, Ralf

    2014-12-13

    Surface sediments at Lakes Fryxell, Vanda and Brownworth in the Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) were investigated as analogues for the cold, dry environment on Mars. Sediments were sampled from regions surrounding the lakes and from the ice cover on top of the lakes. The ADV sediments were studied using Raman spectra of individual grains and reflectance spectra of bulk particulate samples and compared with previous analyses of subsurface and lakebottom sediments. Elemental abundances were coordinated with the spectral data in order to assess trends in sediment alteration. The surface sediments in this study were compared with lakebottom sediments (Bishop JL et al. 2003 Int. J. Astrobiol. 2, 273-287 (doi:10.1017/S1473550403001654)) and samples from soil pits (Englert P et al. 2013 In European Planetary Science Congress, abstract no. 96; Englert P et al. 2014 In 45th Lunar and Planetary Science Conf., abstract no. 1707). Feldspar, quartz and pyroxene are common minerals found in all the sediments. Minor abundances of carbonate, chlorite, actinolite and allophane are also found in the surface sediments, and are similar to minerals found in greater abundance in the lakebottom sediments. Surface sediment formation is dominated by physical processes; a few centimetres below the surface chemical alteration sets in, whereas lakebottom sediments experience biomineralization. Characterizing the mineralogical variations in these samples provides insights into the alteration processes occurring in the ADV and supports understanding alteration in the cold and dry environment on Mars.

  10. Use of thin ionization calorimeters for measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V.; Ormes, J. S.; Schmidt, W. K. H.

    1976-01-01

    The reliability of performing measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra with a thin ionization calorimeter was investigated. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine whether energy response fluctuations would cause measured spectra to be different from the primary spectra. First, Gaussian distributions were assumed for the calorimeter energy resolutions. The second method employed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of cascades from an isotropic flux of protons. The results show that as long as the energy resolution does not change significantly with energy, the spectral indices can be reliably determined even for sigma sub e/e = 50%. However, if the energy resolution is strongly energy dependent, the measured spectra do not reproduce the true spectra. Energy resolutions greatly improving with energy result in measured spectra that are too steep, while resolutions getting much worse with energy cause the measured spectra to be too flat.

  11. Neutron dose and energy spectra measurements at Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Soldat, K.L.; Haggard, D.L.; Faust, L.G.; Tomeraasen, P.L.

    1987-08-01

    Because some workers have a high potential for significant neutron exposure, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to verify the accuracy of neutron dosimetry at the plant. Energy spectrum and neutron dose measurements were made at the SRP calibrations laboratory and at several other locations. The energy spectra measurements were made using multisphere or Bonner sphere spectrometers,/sup 3/He spectrometers, and NE-213 liquid scintillator spectrometers. Neutron dose equivalent determinations were made using these instruments and others specifically designed to determine dose equivalent, such as the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Survey instruments, such as the Eberline PNR-4, and the thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo and track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also used. The TEPC, subjectively judged to provide the most accurate estimation of true dose equivalent, was used as the reference for comparison with other devices. 29 refs., 43 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. Nuclear neutrino energy spectra in high temperature astrophysical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misch, G. Wendell; Fuller, George M.

    2016-11-01

    Astrophysical environments that reach temperatures greater than ˜100 keV can have significant neutrino energy loss via both plasma processes and nuclear weak interactions. We find that nuclear processes likely produce the highest-energy neutrinos. The important weak nuclear interactions include both charged current channels (electron capture and emission and positron capture and emission) and neutral current channels (deexcitation of nuclei via neutrino pair emission). We show that, in order to make a realistic prediction of the nuclear neutrino spectrum, one must take nuclear structure into account; in some cases, the most important transitions may involve excited states, possibly in both parent and daughter nuclei. We find that the standard technique of producing a neutrino energy spectrum by using a single transition with a Q value and matrix element chosen to fit published neutrino production rates and energy losses will not accurately capture important spectral features.

  13. High-Energy Neutron Spectra and Flux Measurements Below Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous and often poorly measured background. Below ground, these neutrons could potentially interfere with antineutrino based reactor monitoring experiments as well as other rare-event neutral particle detectors. We have designed and constructed a transportable fast neutron detection system for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The spectrometer uses a multiplicity technique in order to have a higher effective area than traditional transportable high-energy neutron spectrometers. Transportability ensures a common detector-related systematic bias for future measurements. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. A high-energy neutron may interact in the lead producing many secondary neutrons. The detector records the correlated secondary neutron multiplicity. Over many events, the response can be used to infer the incident neutron energy spectrum and flux. As a validation of the detector response, surface measurements have been performed; results confirm agreement with previous experiments. Below ground measurements have been performed at 3 depths (380, 600, and 1450 m.w.e.); results from these measurements will be presented.

  14. Turbulence power and kinetic energy spectra measured by a temporal-to-spatial record conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara

    2015-11-01

    A method of converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive streak line elements that allows computation of turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra is briefly introduced (more detail in a related paper at this conference, see ref). The method completely bypasses the problems with Taylor's hypothesis caused by fluctuating convection velocities. In the present contribution, we discuss the interpretation of the first order static moments (e.g. mean and rms velocity) and second order dynamic moments (e.g. spatial correlation function and energy spectrum) computed from the spatial record, which was derived from the measured temporal record. We compare several possible versions of the new energy spectra with the classical 1D and 3D energy spectra and the so-called total kinetic energy spectrum and discuss the range of validity of any equivalence between the new computations and the classical ones. Ref.: Clara M. Velte: A novel time-to-space conversion methods bypassing the problems with Taylor's hypothesis caused by fluctuating convection velocities

  15. Elemental quantification using multiple-energy x-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozul, N.; Davis, G. R.; Anderson, P.; Elliott, J. C.

    1999-03-01

    A novel implementation of multiple-energy x-ray absorptiometry (MEXA) for elemental quantification has been developed. Species are resolved on the basis of their differential attenuation spectra across a wide energy range, ideally including absorption edges. By measuring the incident and exiting x-ray spectra and using known values of mass attenuation coefficients over selected energy bands, the density line integral of the species along the x-ray path can be calculated from all the selected energy channels simultaneously by non-linear least squares methods. Effects of `escape' peak phenomena are modelled and corrections for them are included in the MEXA software. The applications of MEXA are illustrated by single measurements on aluminium and zirconium foils, quantitation of aqueous KI diffusing into a porous solid, simultaneous measurement of acidic diffusant 0957-0233/10/3/023/img1 and porous solid with which it reacts and which it dissolves and microtomographic reconstructions of liquid and solid specimens containing caesium and/or iodine.

  16. The low energy spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.; Lamb, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    The implications of observed gamma-ray burst spectra for the physical conditions and geometries of the sources are examined. It is noted that an explanation of the continua in terms of optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung requires a relatively large area but a fairly shallow depth. On the other hand, a spectrum similar to that observed could be produced by rapid flickering of sources with less extreme geometries if each flicker emits a Comptonized thermal spectrum. Either field inhomogeneities or plasma motions are required to interpret the low energy features as cyclotron extinction. An alternative explanation is photoelectric absorption by heavy atoms; this requires a field strength high enough to make one-photon electron positron annihilation possible. Observational tests of these possibilities are proposed

  17. Energy and flatness spectra in a forced turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Shigeo; Ohkitani, Koji; Yamada, Michio; Murakami, Youichi

    1990-12-01

    The statistical properties of forced Navier-Stokes turbulence are investigated numerically using the high-symmetry flow method. A spectral simulation with a resolution of 340 cubed realizes the K exp -5/3 power law with a Kolmogoroff constant of 1.8 in the one-dimensional longitudinal and lateral spectra over one decade of wavenumber. The normalized form of the energy spectrum is the same as for the freely decaying turbulence reported by Kida and Murakami (1987) in both the inertial and dissipation ranges. The flatness factor of an individual Fourier component of velocity increases montonically with wavenumber in the inertial range and saturates at approximately 3.7 in the dissipation range.

  18. Flux tube spectra from approximate integrability at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovsky, S.; Flauger, R.; Gorbenko, V.

    2015-03-01

    We provide a detailed introduction to a method we recently proposed for calculating the spectrum of excitations of effective strings such as QCD flux tubes. The method relies on the approximate integrability of the low-energy effective theory describing the flux tube excitations and is based on the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz. The approximate integrability is a consequence of the Lorentz symmetry of QCD. For excited states, the convergence of the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz technique is significantly better than that of the traditional perturbative approach. We apply the new technique to the lattice spectra for fundamental flux tubes in gluodynamics in D = 3 + 1 and D = 2 + 1, and to k-strings in gluodynamics in D = 2 + 1. We identify a massive pseudoscalar resonance on the worldsheet of the confining strings in SU(3) gluodynamics in D = 3 + 1, and massive scalar resonances on the worldsheet of k = 2.3 strings in SU(6) gluodynamics in D = 2 + 1.

  19. Matter power spectra in dynamical dark energy cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedeli, C.; Dolag, K.; Moscardini, L.

    2012-01-01

    We used a suite of numerical cosmological simulations in order to investigate the effect of gas cooling and star formation on the large-scale matter distribution. The simulations follow the formation of cosmic structures in five different dark energy models: the fiducial Λcold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology and four models where the dark energy density is allowed to have a non-trivial redshift evolution. Each simulation includes a variety of gas physics, ranging from radiative cooling to UV heating and supernova feedback [although the active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback is not incorporated]. Moreover, for each cosmology we have a control run with dark matter only, in order to allow a direct assessment of the effect of baryonic processes. We found that the power spectra of gas and stars, as well as the total matter power spectrum, are in qualitative agreement with the results of previous works not including the AGN effects in the framework of the fiducial model, although several quantitative differences exist. We used the physically motivated halo model in order to investigate the backreaction of gas and stars on the dark matter distribution, finding that it is very well reproduced by simply increasing the average dark matter halo concentration by 17 per cent, irrespective of the mass. This is in agreement with the cooling of gas dragging dark matter in the very centre of haloes, as well as adiabatic contraction steepening the relative potential wells. Moving to model universes dominated by dynamical dark energy, it turns out that they introduce a specific signature on the power spectra of the various matter components, which is qualitatively independent of the exact cosmology considered. This generic shape is well captured by the halo model if we blindly consider the cosmology dependences of the halo mass function, bias and concentration. However, the details of the dark matter power spectrum can be precisely captured only at the cost of a few slight

  20. The Energy Spectra of Heavy Nuclei Measured by the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panov, A. D.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazley, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon-borne experiment to measure the spectra and composition of primary cosmic rays in the region of total energy from 100 GeV to near 100 TeV for Z from 1 to 26. ATIC consists of a pixelated silicon matrix detector to measure charge plus a fully active BGO calorimeter, to measure energy, located below a carbon target interleaved with three layers of scintillator hodoscope. The ATIC instrument had a second (scientific) flight from McMurdo, Antarctica from 12/29/02 to 1/18/03, yielding 20 days of good data. The GEANT 3.21 Monte Carlo code with the QGSM event generator and the FLUKA code with the DPMJET-II event generator were used to convert energy deposition measurements to primary energy. We present the preliminary energy spectra for the abundant elements C, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe and compare them with the results of the first (test) flight of ATIC in 2000-01 and with results from the HEAO-3 and CRN experiments.

  1. Interpretation of the spectra of energy scattered by dispersed anchovies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diachok, Orest

    2001-12-01

    The spectra of backscattered energy by dispersed anchovies, which were reported by Holliday (1972), reveal several peaks at frequencies that correspond to theoretically calculated resonance frequencies of year classes of anchovies. Theoretical calculations are based on concurrent measurements of distributions of swim bladder dimensions and a modified form of Minnaert's (1933) equation. Differences between calculated and measured values of the mean lengths of the second-, third-, and fourth-year classes are within experimental uncertainties (+/-8%). The calculated mean lengths of juvenile anchovies are in good agreement with historical measurements of the bounds on this parameter (Butler, 1989). Matching of theoretical calculations and measurements of backscattered energy level versus frequency yields estimates of the total Q of the spectral line, QT, and the relative number density per year class. The resultant estimate of QT of adult anchovies is approximately 4.4. This value of QT is consistent with laboratory measurements of the Q of individual anchovies, Q0 (~7 at 15 m) and measurements of length distributions of year classes and depth distributions. Resultant estimates of relative number densities of year classes were consistent with historical measurements of the relative number densities of year classes of anchovies in the Southern California Bight.

  2. A satellite investigation of energy flux and inferred potential drop in auroral electron energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Burch, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between auroral electron energy flux and the inferred accelerating potential drop for accelerated Maxwellian distributions is investigated on the basis of Atmospheric Explorer D spectral measurements. An analytical approximation for the total downward energy flux carried by an isotropic Maxwellian electron population accelerated by a field-aligned electrostatic potential drop is derived which is valid for values of the electron energy/characteristic accelerated Maxwellian distribution energy which are less than the difference between the ratio of the magnetic field strengths at the altitude of observation and the altitude of potential drop, and unity. Data from the Low Energy Electron Experiment on board AE D obtained on both the dayside and the nightside during periods of significant inverted-V type electron precipitation shows that the 455 energy spectra considered, 160 of them, obtained between 60 and 85 deg invariant latitude, could be fit to accelerated Maxwellian distributions. The 160 Maxwellian spectra are then shown to be in agreement with the predictions of the accelerated Maxwellian model. Finally, analysis of individual spectra suggests that the altitude of the inferred potential drop is at a maximum near the center of the inverted-V structures.

  3. The energy spectra of solar energetic protons in the large energy range: their functional form and parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nymmik, Rikho; Pervaia, Taisia

    2016-07-01

    Experimental data on the fluxes of protons of solar energetic particles (SEP) are analyzed. It is known that above energies of 2-45 MeV (averaging 27-30 MeV), the proton spectra are a power-law function of the energy (at relativistic energies - from the momentum) of the particles. At lower energies, the spectra become harder, with the high-energy part of the spectra forming the "knee". This report is devoted to the determination of the parameters of the SEP spectra, having the form of a "double power-law shape", to ascertain the reliability of the parameters of the approximations of the experimental data.

  4. Hierarchical energy spectra in quasi-steady turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuti, Kiyosi; Fujisawa, Takeharu

    2007-11-01

    The Kolmogorov -5/3 law, E0(k)=CK&2/3circ;k^- 3/5, forms a base state for the energy spectrum in the inertial subrange, which is applied only to a steady state. An expansion for the spectrum about this base state using the perturbation method (Yoshizawa 1998, Woodroff & Rubinstein 2006) yields a nonequilibrium spectrum as E(k)= E0(k)+CNɛ;&-2/3circ;k-7/3+C3(ɛ;&-1circ;-2ɛ^2&-2circ;/3)k-9/3+, where ɛ and ɛ denote the dissipation rate and its time derivative, respectively. This formula indicates that the spectrum contains the hierarchical scaling exponents, and the -7/3 and -9/3 scalings can be induced by the fluctuation of ɛ. Long term-temporal average yields E(k) E0(k), but the -7/3 component can be extracted by conditionally sampling on ɛ . We carried out this extraction using the DNS data for quasi- steady forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence and homogeneous sheared turbulence. It is shown that the -7/3 spectrum is indeed identified in both flows. The relationship between the each decomposed spectra and those induced by the three modes of vorticity configurations in the stretched spiral vortex model (Lundgren 1982, Horiuti & Fujisawa 2007) will be discussed.

  5. BATSE Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra. Part 3; Low-Energy Behavior of Time-Averaged Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, R. D.; Briggs, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Matteson, J. L.; Band, D. L.; Skelton, R. T.; Meegan, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze time-averaged spectra from 86 bright gamma-ray bursts from the first 5 years of the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory to determine whether the lowest energy data are consistent with a standard spectra form fit to the data at all energies. The BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors have the capability to observe photons as low as 5 keV. Using the gamma-ray burst locations obtained with the BATSE Large Area Detectors, the Spectroscopy Detectors' low-energy response can be modeled accurately. This, together with a postlaunch calibration of the lowest energy Spectroscopy Detector discriminator channel, which can lie in the range 5-20 keV, allows spectral deconvolution over a broad energy range, approx. 5 keV to 2 MeV. The additional coverage allows us to search for evidence of excess emission, or for a deficit, below 20 keV. While no burst has a significant (greater than or equal to 3 sigma) deficit relative to a standard spectra model, we find that 12 bursts have excess low-energy emission, ranging between 1.2 and 5.8 times the model flux, that exceeds 5 sigma in significance. This is evidence for an additional low-energy spectral component in at least some bursts, or for deviations from the power-law spectral form typically used to model gamma-ray bursts at energies below 100 keV.

  6. Properties of Energy Spectra of Molecular Crystals Investigated by Nonlinear Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Huai-Wu

    We calculate the quantum energy spectra of molecular crystals, such as acetanilide, by using discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation, containing various interactions, appropriate to the systems. The energy spectra consist of many energy bands, in each energy band there are a lot of energy levels including some higher excited states. The result of energy spectrum is basically consistent with experimental values obtained by infrared absorption and Raman scattering in acetanilide and can also explain some experimental results obtained by Careri et al. Finally, we further discuss the influences of variously characteristic parameters on the energy spectra of the systems.

  7. Vibrational circular dichroism spectra for large molecules and molecules with heavy elements.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Kevin; Kühn, Michael; Weigend, Florian

    2017-02-07

    We present an implementation of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra in TURBOMOLE. We mainly followed the route proposed by Cheeseman [Chem. Phys. Lett. 252, 211 (1996)] and extended the modules for calculating the magnetic response and vibrational frequencies accordingly. The implementation allows for gauge origin invariant employment of effective core potentials, as demonstrated for Co(ppy)3, ppy = 2-Phenylpyridine. In this way, scalar relativistic effects are covered and heavy elements can be treated. Further, with the present implementation molecular symmetry may be efficiently exploited, which makes the calculation of large (symmetric) systems feasible. The calculation of the VCD spectrum of icosahedral C620(2+) is shown as an illustrative application.

  8. Vibrational circular dichroism spectra for large molecules and molecules with heavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Kevin; Kühn, Michael; Weigend, Florian

    2017-02-01

    We present an implementation of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra in TURBOMOLE. We mainly followed the route proposed by Cheeseman [Chem. Phys. Lett. 252, 211 (1996)] and extended the modules for calculating the magnetic response and vibrational frequencies accordingly. The implementation allows for gauge origin invariant employment of effective core potentials, as demonstrated for Co(ppy)3, ppy = 2-Phenylpyridine. In this way, scalar relativistic effects are covered and heavy elements can be treated. Further, with the present implementation molecular symmetry may be efficiently exploited, which makes the calculation of large (symmetric) systems feasible. The calculation of the VCD spectrum of icosahedral C6202+ is shown as an illustrative application.

  9. Galactic Cosmic-Ray Energy Spectra and Composition during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Wiedenbeck, Mark E.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Israel, M. H..; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; VonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2013-01-01

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 <= Z <= 28 in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV / nucleon. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than approx. 7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than approx. 4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2sigma, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  10. Alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra under different shieldings in the Los Alamos high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of space radiation with shielding materials result in alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra that depend on the specific elemental composition, density and thickness of the material. The shielding characteristics of materials have been studied using charged-particle beams and radiation transport models by examining the risk reduction using the conventional dose-equivalent approach. Secondary neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total radiation exposure in space. An experiment to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra by shielding materials was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. In the energy range of about 2 to 200 MeV, this neutron spectrum is similar in shape within a factor of about 2 to the spectrum expected in the International Space Station habitable modules. It is shown that with a shielding thickness of about 5 g cm(-2), the conventional radiation risk increases, in some cases by as much as a factor of 2, but decreases with thicknesses of about of 20 g cm(-2). This suggests that care must be taken in evaluating the shielding effectiveness of a given material by including both the charged-particle and neutron components of space radiation.

  11. Numerical Study of the Generation of Linear Energy Transfer Spectra for Space Radiation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Wilson, John W.; Hunter, Abigail

    2005-01-01

    In analyzing charged particle spectra in space due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE), the conversion of particle energy spectra into linear energy transfer (LET) distributions is a convenient guide in assessing biologically significant components of these spectra. The mapping of LET to energy is triple valued and can be defined only on open energy subintervals where the derivative of LET with respect to energy is not zero. Presented here is a well-defined numerical procedure which allows for the generation of LET spectra on the open energy subintervals that are integrable in spite of their singular nature. The efficiency and accuracy of the numerical procedures is demonstrated by providing examples of computed differential and integral LET spectra and their equilibrium components for historically large SPEs and 1977 solar minimum GCR environments. Due to the biological significance of tissue, all simulations are done with tissue as the target material.

  12. Trends in Ionization Energy of Transition-Metal Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2005-01-01

    A rationale for the difference in the periodic trends in the ionization energy of the transition-metal elements versus the main-group elements is presented. The difference is that in the transition-metal elements, the electrons enter an inner-shell electron orbital, while in the main-group elements, the electrons enter an outer-shell electron…

  13. Studies of the fast ion energy spectra in TJ-II

    SciTech Connect

    Bustos, A.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Arevalo, J.; Castejon, F.; Velasco, J. L.; Tereshchenko, M.

    2013-02-15

    The dynamics of the neutral beam injection fast ions in the TJ-II stellarator is studied in this paper from both the theoretical and experimental points of view. The code Integrator of Stochastic Differential Equations for Plasmas (ISDEP) is used to estimate the fast ion distribution function in 3D:1D in real space and 2D in velocity space, considering the 3D structure of TJ-II, the electrostatic potential, non turbulent collisional transport, and charge exchange losses. The results of ISDEP are compared with the experimental data from the compact neutral particle analyzer, which measures the outgoing neutral flux spectra in the energy range E Element-Of (1-45) keV.

  14. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-06-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure tested and developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed, one which is developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a~uniform distribution of low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the low EC calibration to low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produces predictions for low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), no

  15. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-10-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive and nondestructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FT-IR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed: one developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a uniform distribution of Low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the Low EC calibration to Low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produce predictions for Low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), no bias (0.00 μg m-3, a

  16. Comprehensive Wavelengths, Energy Levels, and Hyperfine Structure Parameters of Singly-Ionized Iron-Group Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian

    We propose to measure wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters of Ni II, Mn II, Sc II and other singly-ionized iron-group elements, covering the wavelength range 80 nm to 5500 nm. We shall use archival data from spectrometers at NIST and Kitt Peak National Observatory for spectra above 140 nm. Additional experimental observations will be taken if needed using Fourier transform spectrometers at NIST. Spectra will be taken using our normal incidence grating spectrograph to provide better sensitivity than the FT spectra and to extend the wavelength range down to 80 nm. We aim to produce a comprehensive description of the spectra of all singly-ionized iron- group elements. The wavelength uncertainty of the strong lines will be better than 1 part in 10^7. For most singly-ionized iron-group elements available laboratory data have uncertainties an order of magnitude larger than astronomical observations over wide spectra ranges. Some of these laboratory measurements date back to the 1960's. Since then, Fourier transform spectroscopy has made significant progress in improving the accuracy and quantity of data in the UV-vis-IR region, but high quality Fourier transform spectra are still needed for Mn II, Ni II and Sc II. Fourier transform spectroscopy has low sensitivity in the VUV region and is limited to wavelengths above 140 nm. Spectra measured with high-resolution grating spectrographs are needed in this region in order to obtain laboratory data of comparable quality to the STIS and COS spectrographs on the Hubble Space Telescope. Currently, such data exist only for Fe II and Cr II. Lines of Sc II, V II, and Mn II show hyperfine structure, but hyperfine structure parameters have been measured for relatively few lines of these elements. Significant errors can occur if hyperfine structure is neglected when abundances are determined from stellar spectra. Measurements of hyperfine structure parameters will be made using Fourier transform spectroscopy

  17. Track Structure Model for Radial Distributions of Electron Spectra and Event Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Katz, R.; Wilson, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    An analytic method is described for evaluating the average radial electron spectrum and the radial and total frequency-event spectrum for high-energy ions. For high-energy ions, indirect events make important contributions to frequency-event spectra. The method used for evaluating indirect events is to fold the radial electron spectrum with measured frequency-event spectrum for photons or electrons. The contribution from direct events is treated using a spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET). We find that high-energy heavy ions have a significantly reduced frequency-averaged final energy (yF) compared to LET, while relativistic protons have a significantly increased yF and dose-averaged lineal energy (yD) for typical site sizes used in tissue equivalent proportional counters. Such differences represent important factors in evaluating event spectra with laboratory beams, in space- flight, or in atmospheric radiation studies and in validation of radiation transport codes. The inadequacy of LET as descriptor because of deviations in values of physical quantities, such as track width, secondary electron spectrum, and yD for ions of identical LET is also discussed.

  18. Natural widths and Coster Kronig transitions of L X-ray spectra in elements between Pd and Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakura, Shusuke; Oohashi, Hirofumi; Ito, Yoshiaki; Tochio, Tatsunori; Vlaicu, Aurel M.; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Ikenaga, Eiji; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2006-11-01

    The Lα and Lβ X-ray emission spectra in the elements between Pd ( Z=46) and Sb ( Z=51) were measured using a high-resolution double-crystal vacuum spectrometer. The relative intensities of satellite structures, which originate in L1L3M4,5 Coster-Kronig transitions, were estimated to that of each diagram line, and compared with calculated values. According to the work of Chen et al. [1977a. Theoretical L-shell Coster-Kronig energies 11⩽ Z⩽103. At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 19, 97-151], Salgueiro et al. [1987. J. Phys. (Paris) 48 Colloq. C9, 609] and Vlaicu et al. [1998. Investigation of the 74W L emission spectra and satellites. Phys. Rev. A 58, 3544] L1L3M4 Coster-Kronig transition is forbidden for 50⩽ Z⩽77, and L1L3M5 Coster-Kronig transition is forbidden for 50⩽ Z⩽73. The results suggest that L1L3M4,5 Coster-Kronig transitions may be allowed even for Sn ( Z=50) and Sb ( Z=51).

  19. Energy flux and characteristic energy of an elemental auroral structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanchester, B. S.; Palmer, J. R.; Rees, M. H.; Lummerzheim, D.; Kaila, K.; Turunen, T.

    1994-01-01

    Electron density profiles acquired with the EISCAT radar at 0.2 s time resolution, together with TV images and photometric intensities, were used to study the characteristics of thin (less than 1 km) auroral arc structures that drifted through the field of view of the instruments. It is demonstrated that both high time and space resolution are essential for deriving the input parameters of the electron flux responsible for the elemental auroral structures. One such structure required a 400 mW/sq m (erg/sq cm s) downward energy flux carried by an 8 keV monochromatic electron flux equivalent to a current density of 50 micro Angstrom/sq m.

  20. Detailed Monte Carlo Simulation of electron transport and electron energy loss spectra.

    PubMed

    Attarian Shandiz, M; Salvat, F; Gauvin, R

    2016-11-01

    A computer program for detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of electrons with kinetic energies in the range between about 0.1 and about 500 keV in bulk materials and in thin solid films is presented. Elastic scattering is described from differential cross sections calculated by the relativistic (Dirac) partial-wave expansion method with different models of the scattering potential. Inelastic interactions are simulated from an optical-data model based on an empirical optical oscillator strength that combines optical functions of the solid with atomic photoelectric data. The generalized oscillator strength is built from the adopted optical oscillator strength by using an extension algorithm derived from Lindhard's dielectric function for a free-electron gas. It is shown that simulated backscattering fractions of electron beams from bulk (semi-infinite) specimens are in good agreement with experimental data for beam energies from 0.1 keV up to about 100 keV. Simulations also yield transmitted and backscattered fractions of electron beams on thin solid films that agree closely with measurements for different film thicknesses and incidence angles. Simulated most probable deflection angles and depth-dose distributions also agree satisfactorily with measurements. Finally, electron energy loss spectra of several elemental solids are simulated and the effects of the beam energy and the foil thickness on the signal to background and signal to noise ratios are investigated. SCANNING 38:475-491, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Spectra in the 60 )angstrom) to 345 )angstrom) wavelength region of elements injected into the PLT tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, A.; Schwob, J.L.; Suckewer, S.; Seely, J.F.; Feldman, U.; Dave, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    High resolution spectra of the elements Fe, Ni, Zn, Ge, Se, and Mo injected into the PLT tokamak were recorded by the 2-meter Schwob-Fraenkel soft X-ray multichannel spectrometer (SOXMOS). Spectra were recorded every 50 ms during the time before and after injection. The spectral lines of the injected element were very strong in the spectrum recorded immedately after injection, and the transition in the injected element were easily distinguished from the transitions in te intrinsic elements (C, O, Ti, Cr, Fe, and Ni). An accurate wavelength scale was established using well-known reference transitions in the intrinsic elements. The spectra recorded just prior to injection were substracted from the spectra recorded after injection, and the resulting spectrum was composed almost entirely of transitions from the injected element. A large number of ..delta..n + 0 transitions between the ground and the first excited configurations in the Li I through K I isoelectronic sequences of the injected elements were identified in the wavelength region 60 )angstrom) to 345 )angstrom). 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Spectra, energy levels, and energy transition of lanthanide complexes with cinnamic acid and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kaining; Feng, Zhongshan; Shen, Jun; Wu, Bing; Luo, Xiaobing; Jiang, Sha; Li, Li; Zhou, Xianju

    2016-04-01

    High resolution spectra and luminescent lifetimes of 6 europium(III)-cinnamic acid complex {[Eu2L6(DMF)(H2O)]·nDMF·H2O}m (L = cinnamic acid I, 4-methyl-cinnamic acid II, 4-chloro-cinnamic acid III, 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid IV, 4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid V, 4-nitro-cinnamic acid VI; DMF = N, N-dimethylformamide, C3H7NO) were recorded from 8 K to room temperature. The energy levels of Eu3 + in these 6 complexes are obtained from the spectra analysis. It is found that the energy levels of the central Eu3 + ions are influenced by the nephelauxetic effect, while the triplet state of ligand is lowered by the p-π conjugation effect of the para-substituted functional groups. The best energy matching between the ligand triplet state and the central ion excited state is found in complex I. While the other complexes show poorer matching because the gap of 5D0 and triplet state contracts.

  3. Spectra, energy levels, and energy transition of lanthanide complexes with cinnamic acid and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kaining; Feng, Zhongshan; Shen, Jun; Wu, Bing; Luo, Xiaobing; Jiang, Sha; Li, Li; Zhou, Xianju

    2016-04-05

    High resolution spectra and luminescent lifetimes of 6 europium(III)-cinnamic acid complex {[Eu2L6(DMF)(H2O)]·nDMF·H2O}m (L=cinnamic acid I, 4-methyl-cinnamic acid II, 4-chloro-cinnamic acid III, 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid IV, 4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid V, 4-nitro-cinnamic acid VI; DMF=N, N-dimethylformamide, C3H7NO) were recorded from 8 K to room temperature. The energy levels of Eu(3+) in these 6 complexes are obtained from the spectra analysis. It is found that the energy levels of the central Eu(3+) ions are influenced by the nephelauxetic effect, while the triplet state of ligand is lowered by the p-π conjugation effect of the para-substituted functional groups. The best energy matching between the ligand triplet state and the central ion excited state is found in complex I. While the other complexes show poorer matching because the gap of (5)D0 and triplet state contracts.

  4. Energy Diagnoses of Nine Infrared Luminous Galaxies Based on 3-4 Micron Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-20

    spectrometer (CGS4; Moun- tain et al. 1990) to obtain 3È4 km spectra of the IRLGs and NGC 253 with UKIRT on Mauna Kea , Hawaii. An observ- ing log is...DIAGNOSES OF NINE INFRARED LUMINOUS GALAXIES BASED ON 3È4 MICRON SPECTRA MASATOSHI IMANISHI1 National Astronomical Observatory , Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588...feature at 7.7 km, systematic studies of the energy sources of IRLGs have been reported based on the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) spectra at

  5. 20-element HgI[sub 2] energy dispersive x-ray array detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dorri, N.; Wang, M.; Szczebiot, R.W.; Dabrowski, A.J. ); Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Patt, B.E. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of HgI[sub 2] energy dispersive x-ray arrays and associated miniaturized processing electronics for synchrotron radiation research applications. The experimental results with a 20-element array detector were obtained under realistic synchrotron beam conditions at SSRL. An energy resolution of 250 eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV (Mn-K[sub alpha]) was achieved. Energy resolution and throughput measurements versus input count rate and energy of incoming radiation have been measured. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra were taken form diluted samples simulating proteins with nickel.

  6. 20 element HgI sub 2 energy dispersive x-ray array detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.A.; Dorri, N.; Wang, M.; Szczebiot, R.W.; Dabrowski, A.J. ); Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Patt, B.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of HgI{sub 2} energy dispersive x-ray detector arrays and associated miniaturized processing electronics for synchrotron radiation research applications. The experimental results with a 20 element array detector were obtained under realistic synchrotron beam conditions at SSRL. An energy resolution of 250 eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV (Mn-K{sub a}) was achieved. Energy resolution and throughput measurements versus input count rate and energy of incoming radiation have been measured. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra were taken from diluted samples simulating proteins with nickel.

  7. 20 element HgI{sub 2} energy dispersive x-ray array detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.A.; Dorri, N.; Wang, M.; Szczebiot, R.W.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Patt, B.E.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of HgI{sub 2} energy dispersive x-ray detector arrays and associated miniaturized processing electronics for synchrotron radiation research applications. The experimental results with a 20 element array detector were obtained under realistic synchrotron beam conditions at SSRL. An energy resolution of 250 eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV (Mn-K{sub a}) was achieved. Energy resolution and throughput measurements versus input count rate and energy of incoming radiation have been measured. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra were taken from diluted samples simulating proteins with nickel.

  8. Neutron energy spectra of d(49)-Be and p(41)-Be neutron radiotherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Graves, R G; Smathers, J B; Almond, P R; Grant, W H; Otte, V A

    1979-01-01

    Zero-degree neutron energy spectra for the p(41)-Be and d(49)-Be reactions were measured by time-of-flight for neutrons with energies above 1.9 and 1.4 MeV, respectively. Spectral changes resulting from the addition of copper, aluminum, and polyethylene filters to unfiltered beams were determined. Integral yields, average energies, filter material attenuation coefficients, and kerma fractions were computed for these spectra. Calculated spectra for neutron beams filtered by various thicknesses of polyethylene compared favorably with experimental results

  9. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, M.; Marmitt, G. G.; Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.

    2015-09-14

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and SiO{sub 2}) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5–40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO{sub 2}, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E − E{sub gap}){sup 1.5}. For CaCO{sub 3}, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  10. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, M.; Marmitt, G. G.; Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.

    2015-09-01

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO3, Li2CO3, and SiO2) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5-40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO2, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E - Egap)1.5. For CaCO3, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li2CO3 (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  11. The multiplicity and the spectra of secondaries correlated with the leading particle energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruglov, N. A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Sarycheva, L. I.; Smirnova, L. N.

    1985-01-01

    The spectra of leading particles of different nature in pp-collisions at E sub 0 = 33 GeV are obtained. The multiplicities and the spectra of secondaries, mesons, gamma-quanta, lambda and lambda-hyperons and protons for different leading particle energy ranges are determined.

  12. Transport analysis of measured neutron leakage spectra from spheres as tests of evaluated high energy cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, D. D.; Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.

    1973-01-01

    Integral tests of evaluated ENDF/B high-energy cross sections have been made by comparing measured and calculated neutron leakage flux spectra from spheres of various materials. An Am-Be (alpha,n) source was used to provide fast neutrons at the center of the test spheres of Be, CH2, Pb, Nb, Mo, Ta, and W. The absolute leakage flux spectra were measured in the energy range 0.5 to 12 MeV using a calibrated NE213 liquid scintillator neutron spectrometer. Absolute calculations of the spectra were made using version 3 ENDF/B cross sections and an S sub n discrete ordinates multigroup transport code. Generally excellent agreement was obtained for Be, CH2, Pb, and Mo, and good agreement was observed for Nb although discrepancies were observed for some energy ranges. Poor comparative results, obtained for Ta and W, are attributed to unsatisfactory nonelastic cross sections. The experimental sphere leakage flux spectra are tabulated and serve as possible benchmarks for these elements against which reevaluated cross sections may be tested.

  13. Neutron-capture gamma-ray data for obtaining elemental abundances from planetary spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, Robert; Frankle, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    Determination of elemental abundances is a top scientific priority of most planetary missions. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is an excellent method to determine elemental abundances using gamma rays made by nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray particles and by the decay of radioactive nuclides [Re73,Re78]. Many important planetary gamma rays are made by neutron-capture reactions. However, much of the data for the energies and intensities of neutron-capture gamma rays in the existing literature [e.g. Lo81] are poor [RF99,RF00]. With gamma-ray spectrometers having recently returned data from Lunar Prospector and NEAR and soon to be launch to Mars, there is a need for good data for neutron-capture gamma rays.

  14. On the Energy Spectra of Individual Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailyan, B. G.; Briggs, M. S.; Cramer, E. S.; Connaughton, V.; Dwyer, J. R.; Fitzpatrick, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) receives enough photons from some TGFs that spectral fitting of individual TGFs is possible. Previous TGF spectral fits relied upon summing the data from many TGFs. However, this spectral analysis of individual GBM TGFs is difficult because the number of photons is only adequate and because the extreme intensity of TGFs requires the analysis to correct for spectral distortions caused by pulse pileup. For each TGF in the sample, we compare Monte Carlo simulated TGF spectra to the observed detector counts. For each comparison, the best fit intensity is found, including correcting the predicted spectrum for pulse pileup. Using likelihood, we determine which of the simulations are consistent with each TGF, thus constraining the properties (e.g., altitude, beam width, etc.) of the TGF.

  15. A satellite investigation of energy flux and inferred potential drop in auroral electron energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meniett, J. D.; Burch, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Because predicted relationship (epsilon directly varies with V squared) between auroral electron energy flux (epsilon) and the inferred acceleration potential drop (V) for accelerated Maxwellian distributions was favorably tested by other using sounding rocket data for the limiting case of eVE 1 (where Ec is the characteristic energy of the accelerated Maxwellian distribution) and for a single inverted-V observed by the Injun 5 satellite, data from Atmosphere D were used to extend these studies over the range .2 eV/Ec 5 and for a wide range of latitudes and local times on both the nightside and the dayside. Results show good agreement with the full accelerated Maxwellian model. An analytical approximation to the electron energy flux was derived which better describes the data over the range .2 eV/Ec approximated 3. Analyses of individual energy spectra at small and large pitch angles through well-defined inverted-V structures suggest that the altitude of the inferred potential drop maximizes near the center of the inverted-V's.

  16. Statistical simulation of the energy spectra of field-emission electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, N. V.; Antonov, A. Yu.; Demchenko, N. S.

    2017-02-01

    Random energies of electrons that escape from the source in the course of field emission are simulated using energy spectra. A relationship of the random values of total energy and the energy related to the normal (with respect to surface) component of momentum is established. A family of quadrature formulas needed for the integration of the distribution density of particles is analyzed. A hypothesis on the compliance of selected random energies with desired distribution laws is statistically tested.

  17. Energy Distributions and spectra of Orion B stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R. E.; Chaffee, F.

    1972-01-01

    New MK spectral types and energy distributions are presented for B stars in Orion for which far ultraviolet flux excesses have recently been discovered. Significant differences between HD spectral energy distributions show the Orion late B stars to have smaller Balmer discontinuities than do field stars of the same spectral types. For the late B stars, these effects cause the 1500 A fluxes to be under-estimated by approximately 0.5 mag. No comparable systematic effects were found for the early B stars.

  18. Calculating vibrational spectra using modified Shepard interpolated potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Christian R; Manthe, Uwe

    2008-07-14

    A potential energy interpolation approach based on modified Shepard interpolation and specifically designed for calculation of vibrational states is presented. The importance of the choice of coordinates for the rate of convergence is demonstrated. Studying the vibrational states of the water molecule as a test case, a coordinate system comprised of inverse bond distances and trigonometric functions of the bond angle is found to be particularly efficient. Different sampling schemes used to locate the reference points in the modified Shepard interpolation are investigated. A final scheme is recommended, which allows the construction of potential energy surfaces to sub-wave-number accuracy.

  19. Energy spectra and fluence of the neutrons produced in deformed space-time conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardone, F.; Rosada, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, spectra of energy and fluence of neutrons produced in the conditions of deformed space-time (DST), due to the violation of the local Lorentz invariance (LLI) in the nuclear interactions are shown for the first time. DST-neutrons are produced by a mechanical process in which AISI 304 steel bars undergo a sonication using ultrasounds with 20 kHz and 330 W. The energy spectrum of the DST-neutrons has been investigated both at low (less than 0.4 MeV) and at high (up to 4 MeV) energy. We could conclude that the DST-neutrons have different spectra for different energy intervals. It is therefore possible to hypothesize that the DST-neutrons production presents peculiar features not only with respect to the time (asynchrony) and space (asymmetry) but also in the neutron energy spectra.

  20. Energy Spectra of Strongly Stratified and Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalov, Alex; Nicolaenko, Basil; Zhou, Ye

    1998-01-01

    Turbulence under strong stratification and rotation is usually characterized as quasi-two dimensional turbulence. We develop a "quasi-two dimensional" energy spectrum which changes smoothly between the Kolmogorov -5/3 law (no stratification), the -2 scalings of Zhou for the case of strong rotation, as well as the -2 scalings for the case of strong rotation and stratification. For strongly stratified turbulence, the model may give the -2 scaling predicted by Herring; and the -5/3 scaling indicated by some mesoscale observations.

  1. Atomic Energy Levels. As Derived From the Analyses of Optical Spectra. Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1958-05-01

    Tantalum, Tungsten, Rhenium, Osmium, Iridium, Platinum, Gold, Mercury, Thallium, Lead, Bismuth, Polonium, Radon, Radium, and Actinium Accesion For NTIS...covers the elements Molybdenum through Lanthanum, Z=42 through 57; and Hafnium through Actinium , Z=72 through 89. It includes 124 spectra, and is...it ----------------- 189 Radium 88 R& i------------------- 231 Mwcury 80 Hg i------------------ 191 R t--------- 3 Hg i ----------------- 196 Actinium

  2. Differential neutron energy spectra measured on spacecraft low Earth orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.; Dudkin, E.V.; Potapov, Yu.V.; Akopova, A.B.; Melkumyan, L.V. |

    1995-03-01

    Two methods for measuring neutrons in the range from thermal energies to dozens of MeV were used. In the first method, alpha-particles emitted from the (sup 6) Li(n,x)T reaction are detected with the help of plastic nuclear track detectors, yielding results on thermal and resonance neutrons. Also, fission foils are used to detect fast neutrons. In the second method, fast neutrons are recorded by nuclear photographic emulsions (NPE). The results of measurements on board various satellites are presented. The neutron flux density does not appear to correlate clearly with orbital parameters. Up to 50% of neutrons are due to albedo neutrons from the atmosphere while the fluxes inside the satellites are 15-20% higher than those on the outside. Estimates show that the neutron contribution to the total equivalent radiation dose reaches 20-30%.

  3. Differential neutron energy spectra measured on spacecraft low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Dudkin, E. V.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Akopova, A. B.; Melkumyan, L. V.

    1995-01-01

    Two methods for measuring neutrons in the range from thermal energies to dozens of MeV were used. In the first method, alpha-particles emitted from the (sup 6) Li(n.x)T reaction are detected with the help of plastic nuclear track detectors, yielding results on thermal and resonance neutrons. Also, fission foils are used to detect fast neutrons. In the second method, fast neutrons are recorded by nuclear photographic emulsions (NPE). The results of measurements on board various satellites are presented. The neutron flux density does not appear to correlate clearly with orbital parameters. Up to 50% of neutrons are due to albedo neutrons from the atmosphere while the fluxes inside the satellites are 15-20% higher than those on the outside. Estimates show that the neutron contribution to the total equivalent radiation dose reaches 20-30%.

  4. Mass measurement using energy spectra in three-body decays

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin; Wardlow, Kyle

    2016-05-24

    In previous works we have demonstrated how the energy distribution of massless decay products in two body decays can be used to measure the mass of decaying particles. In this study, we show how such results can be generalized to the case of multi-body decays. The key ideas that allow us to deal with multi-body final states are an extension of our previous results to the case of massive decay products and the factorization of the multi-body phase space. The mass measurement strategy that we propose is distinct from alternative methods because it does not require an accurate reconstruction of the entire event, as it does not involve, for instance, the missing transverse momentum, but rather requires measuring only the visible decay products of the decay of interest. To demonstrate the general strategy, we study a supersymmetric model wherein pair-produced gluinos each decay to a stable neutralino and a bottom quark-antiquark pair via an off -shell bottom squark. The combinatorial background stemming from the indistinguishable visible final states on both decay sides can be treated by an “event mixing” technique, the performance of which is discussed in detail. In conclusion, taking into account dominant backgrounds, we are able to show that the mass of the gluino and, in favorable cases, that of the neutralino can be determined by this mass measurement strategy.

  5. Mass measurement using energy spectra in three-body decays

    DOE PAGES

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin; ...

    2016-05-24

    In previous works we have demonstrated how the energy distribution of massless decay products in two body decays can be used to measure the mass of decaying particles. In this study, we show how such results can be generalized to the case of multi-body decays. The key ideas that allow us to deal with multi-body final states are an extension of our previous results to the case of massive decay products and the factorization of the multi-body phase space. The mass measurement strategy that we propose is distinct from alternative methods because it does not require an accurate reconstruction ofmore » the entire event, as it does not involve, for instance, the missing transverse momentum, but rather requires measuring only the visible decay products of the decay of interest. To demonstrate the general strategy, we study a supersymmetric model wherein pair-produced gluinos each decay to a stable neutralino and a bottom quark-antiquark pair via an off -shell bottom squark. The combinatorial background stemming from the indistinguishable visible final states on both decay sides can be treated by an “event mixing” technique, the performance of which is discussed in detail. In conclusion, taking into account dominant backgrounds, we are able to show that the mass of the gluino and, in favorable cases, that of the neutralino can be determined by this mass measurement strategy.« less

  6. [Selective excitation spectra and energy level structure of Dy3+:ThO2 crystal].

    PubMed

    Yin, M; Krupa, J C

    2001-08-01

    Dy3+:ThO2 crystal was grown by the flux technique for the first time. The emission spectra, excitation spectra and fluorescence decay curves were measured and discussed. By using emission spectra obtained under selective dye laser excitation at 12 K, together with the crystal-field theory, the site symmetry of Dy3+ ions in ThO2 was determined as C3 nu and its energy level structure was tabulated. The lifetime of radiative level 4F9/2 was also determined as 0.40 ms.

  7. Simulation of electron energy loss spectra of nanomaterials with linear-scaling density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, E. W.; Ratcliff, L. E.; Payne, M. C.; Haynes, P. D.; Hine, N. D. M.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental techniques for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combine high energy resolution with high spatial resolution. They are therefore powerful tools for investigating the local electronic structure of complex systems such as nanostructures, interfaces and even individual defects. Interpretation of experimental electron energy loss spectra is often challenging and can require theoretical modelling of candidate structures, which themselves may be large and complex, beyond the capabilities of traditional cubic-scaling density functional theory. In this work, we present functionality to compute electron energy loss spectra within the onetep linear-scaling density functional theory code. We first demonstrate that simulated spectra agree with those computed using conventional plane wave pseudopotential methods to a high degree of precision. The ability of onetep to tackle large problems is then exploited to investigate convergence of spectra with respect to supercell size. Finally, we apply the novel functionality to a study of the electron energy loss spectra of defects on the (1 0 1) surface of an anatase slab and determine concentrations of defects which might be experimentally detectable.

  8. A versatile detector system to measure the change states, mass compositions and energy spectra of interplanetary and magnetosphere ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1977-01-01

    An instrument is described for measuring the mass and charge state composition as well as the energy spectra and angular distributions of 0.5 to 350 kev/charge ions in interplanetary space and in magnetospheres of planets such as Jupiter and earth. Electrostatic deflection combined with a time-of-flight and energy measurement allows three-parameter analysis of output signals from which the mass, charge states, and energy are determined. Post-acceleration by 30 kV extends the energy range of the detector system into the solar wind and magnetosphere plasma regime. Isotopes of H and He are easily resolved as are individual elements up to Ne and the dominant elements up to and including Fe. This instrument has an extremely large dynamic range in intensity and is sensitive to rare elements even in the presence of high intensity radiation, and is adapted for interplanetary, deep-space, and out-of-the-ecliptic missions, as well as for flights on spacecraft orbiting Jupiter and earth.

  9. Prototype development for real-time monitoring of neutron energy spectra in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Takada, Masashi; Yajima, Kazuaki; Goka, Tateo; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Nakamura, Takashi

    A prototype instrument for real-time monitoring of neutron spectra in a spacecraft has been developed for ISS and future interplanetary missions to moon and Mars. The monitor consists of a phoswich-type scintillation detector with a photomultiplier and a data processing unit including an unfolding program running on Windows PC. The monitor detects the signals of high-energy neutrons(>5MeV) separately from other particles and can give a whole energy spectra by incorporating the low to middle energy spectra that are estimated by calculation or with another detector such as a Bonner-Ball neutron spectrometer. The prototype has been processed in calibrations at accelerator facilities in Japan and measurements on a business jet aircraft. Results of the observations were compared to model calculations using the PHITS code.

  10. Energy Spectra of Abundant Cosmic-ray Nuclei in Sources, According to the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, A. D.; Sokolskaya, N. V.; Zatsepin, V. I.

    2017-03-01

    One of the main results of the ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) experiment is a collection of energy spectra of abundant cosmic-ray nuclei: protons, He, C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe measured in terms of energy per particle in the energy range from 50 GeV to tens of teraelectronvolts. In this paper, the ATIC energy spectra of abundant primary nuclei are back-propagated to the spectra in sources in terms of magnetic rigidity using a leaky-box approximation of three different GALPROP-based diffusion models of propagation that fit the latest B/C data of the AMS-02 experiment. It is shown that the results of a comparison of the slopes of the spectra in sources are weakly model dependent; therefore the differences of spectral indices are reliable data. A regular growth of the steepness of spectra in sources in the range of magnetic rigidity of 50–1350 GV is found for a charge range from helium to iron. This conclusion is statistically reliable with significance better than 3.2 standard deviations. The results are discussed and compared to the data of other modern experiments.

  11. The extent of power-law energy spectra in collisionless relativistic magnetic reconnection in pair plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Cerutti, B.; Nalewajko, K.; Begelman, M. C.

    2015-12-30

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we characterize the energy spectra of particles accelerated by relativistic magnetic reconnection (without guide field) in collisionless electron–positron plasmas, for a wide range of upstream magnetizations σ and system sizes L. The particle spectra are well-represented by a power law ${\\gamma }^{-\\alpha }$, with a combination of exponential and super-exponential high-energy cutoffs, proportional to σ and L, respectively. As a result, for large L and σ, the power-law index α approaches about 1.2.

  12. The extent of power-law energy spectra in collisionless relativistic magnetic reconnection in pair plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Cerutti, B.; ...

    2015-12-30

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we characterize the energy spectra of particles accelerated by relativistic magnetic reconnection (without guide field) in collisionless electron–positron plasmas, for a wide range of upstream magnetizations σ and system sizes L. The particle spectra are well-represented by a power lawmore » $${\\gamma }^{-\\alpha }$$, with a combination of exponential and super-exponential high-energy cutoffs, proportional to σ and L, respectively. As a result, for large L and σ, the power-law index α approaches about 1.2.« less

  13. Monte Carlo analysis of energy dependent anisotropy of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kakonyi, Robert; Erdelyi, Miklos; Szabo, Gabor

    2009-09-15

    The energy resolved emission angle dependence of x-ray spectra was analyzed by MCNPX (Monte Carlo N particle Monte Carlo) simulator. It was shown that the spectral photon flux had a maximum at a well-defined emission angle due to the anisotropy of the bremsstrahlung process. The higher the relative photon energy, the smaller the emission angle belonging to the maximum was. The trends predicted by the Monte Carlo simulations were experimentally verified. The Monte Carlo results were compared to both the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine spectra table and the SPEKCALCV1.0 code.

  14. Unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from experimental transmission data, with direct independent validation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In a recent computational study, an improved physics-based approach was proposed for unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data. In this approach, energy differentiation is improved by simultaneously using transmission data for multiple attenuators and detectors, and the unfolding robustness is improved by using a four-parameter functional form to describe the photon spectrum. The purpose of the current study is to validate this approach experimentally, and to demonstrate its application on a typical clinical linac. Methods: The validation makes use of the recent transmission measurements performed on the Vickers research linac of National Research Council Canada. For this linac, the photon spectra were previously measured using a NaI detector, and the incident electron parameters are independently known. The transmission data are for eight beams in the range 10-30 MV using thick Be, Al and Pb bremsstrahlung targets. To demonstrate the approach on a typical clinical linac, new measurements are performed on an Elekta Precise linac for 6, 10 and 25 MV beams. The different experimental setups are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included. Results: For the validation on the research linac, the 95% confidence bounds of the unfolded spectra fall within the noise of the NaI data. The unfolded spectra agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using independently known electron parameters) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 4.5%. The accuracy of unfolding the incident electron energy is shown to be {approx}3%. A transmission cutoff of only 10% is suitable for accurate unfolding, provided that the other components of the proposed approach are implemented. For the demonstration on a clinical linac, the unfolded incident electron energies and their 68% confidence bounds for the 6, 10 and 25 MV beams are 6.1 {+-} 0.1, 9.3 {+-} 0.1, and 19.3 {+-} 0.2 MeV, respectively. The unfolded spectra

  15. A triangular element based on generalized potential energy concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, G. R.; Gallagher, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Stiffness equations are formulated for a doubly-curved triangular thin shell finite element. The strain energy component of the potential energy is first expressed in terms of displacements and displacement gradients with the aid of consistent deep shell strain-displacement equations. The element in-plane and normal displacement fields are approximated by complete cubic polynomials. These functions do not satisfy the interelement displacement admissibility conditions. Satisfaction is forced by the imposition of constraint conditions on the interelement boundaries; the constraints represent the modification of the potential energy. Some numerical results for a pinched cylinder, a cylindrical sphere, and a pinched sphere are examined.

  16. Two-dimensional energy spectra in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Dileep; Baidya, Rio; Monty, Jason; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    The current study measures the two-dimensional (2D) spectra of streamwise velocity component (u) in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer for the first time. A 2D spectra shows the contribution of streamwise (λx) and spanwise (λy) length scales to the streamwise variance at a given wall height (z). 2D spectra could be a better tool to analyse spectral scaling laws as it is devoid of energy aliasing errors that could be present in one-dimensional spectra. A novel method is used to calculate the 2D spectra from the 2D correlation of u which is obtained by measuring velocity time series at various spanwise locations using hot-wire anemometry. At low Reynolds number, the shape of the 2D spectra at a constant energy level shows λy √{ zλx } behaviour at larger scales which is in agreement with the literature. However, at high Reynolds number, it is observed that the square-root relationship gradually transforms into a linear relationship (λy λx) which could be caused by the large packets of eddies whose length grows proportionately to the growth of its width. Additionally, we will show that this linear relationship observed at high Reynolds number is consistent with attached eddy predictions. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support from the Australian Research Council.

  17. A Study of the Elements Copper through Uranium in Sirius A: Contributions from STIS and Ground-Based Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, C. R.; Ayres, T. R.; Castelli, F.; Gulliver, A. F.; Monier, R.; Wahlgren, G. M.

    2016-08-01

    We determine abundances or upper limits for all of the 55 stable elements from copper to uranium for the A1 Vm star Sirius. The purpose of the study is to assemble the most complete picture of elemental abundances with the hope of revealing the chemical history of the brightest star in the sky, apart from the Sun. We also explore the relationship of this hot metallic-line (Am) star to its cooler congeners, as well as the hotter, weakly- or non-magnetic Mercury-manganese (HgMn) stars. Our primary observational material consists of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra taken with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph in the ASTRAL project. We have also used archival material from the COPERNICUS satellite, and from the HST Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph, as well as ground-based spectra from Furenlid, Westin, Kurucz, Wahlgren, and their coworkers, ESO spectra from the UVESPOP project, and NARVAL spectra retrieved from PolarBase. Our analysis has been primarily by spectral synthesis, and in this work we have had the great advantage of extensive atomic data unavailable to earlier workers. We find most abundances as well as upper limits range from 10 to 100 times above solar values. We see no indication of the huge abundance excesses of 1000 or more that occur among many chemically peculiar stars of the upper main sequence. The picture of Sirius as a hot Am star is reinforced.

  18. Relation between fine structure of energy spectra for pulsating aurora electrons and frequency spectra of whistler mode chorus waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Y.; Saito, S.; Seki, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Kataoka, R.; Asamura, K.; Katoh, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Sakanoi, T.; Hirahara, M.; Oyama, S.; Kurita, S.; Santolik, O.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the origin of the fine structure of the energy spectrum of precipitating electrons for the pulsating aurora (PsA) observed by the low-altitude Reimei satellite. The Reimei satellite achieved simultaneous observations of the optical images and precipitating electrons of the PsA from satellite altitude (~620 km) with resolution of 40 ms. The main modulation of precipitation, with a few seconds, and the internal modulations, with a few hertz, that are embedded inside the main modulations are identified above ~3 keV. Moreover, stable precipitations at ~1 keV are found for the PsA. A "precipitation gap" is discovered between two energy bands. We identify the origin of the fine structure of the energy spectrum for the precipitating electrons using the computer simulation on the wave-particle interaction between electrons and chorus waves. The lower band chorus (LBC) bursts cause the main modulation of energetic electrons, and the generation and collapse of the LBC bursts determines on-off switching of the PsA. A train of rising tone elements embedded in the LBC bursts drives the internal modulations. A close set of upper band chorus (UBC) waves causes the stable precipitations at ~1 keV. We show that a wave power gap around the half gyrofrequency at the equatorial plane in the magnetosphere between LBC and UBC reduces the loss rate of electrons at the intermediate energy range, forming a gap of precipitating electrons in the ionosphere.

  19. Source energy spectra from demodulation of solar particle data by interplanetary and coronal transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez-Madrigal, M.; Rivero, F.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    1985-01-01

    The data on source energy spectra of solar cosmic rays (SCR), i.e. the data on the spectrum form and on the absolute SCR are of interest for three reasons: (1) the SCR contain the energy comparable to the total energy of electromagnetic flare radiation (less than or equal to 10 to the 32nd power ergs); (2) the source spectrum form indicates a possible acceleration mechanism (or mechanism); and (3) the accelerated particles are efficiently involved in nuclear electromagnetic and plasma processes in the solar atmosphere. Therefore, the data on SCR source spectra are necessary for a theoretical description of the processes mentioned and for the formulation of the consistent flare model. Below it is attempted to sound solar particle sources by means of SCR energy spectrum obtained near the Sun, at the level of the roots of the interplanetary field lines in the upper solar corona. Data from approx. 60 solar proton events (SPE) between 1956-1981. These data were obtained mainly by the interplanetary demodulation of observed fluxes near the Earth. Further, a model of coronal azimuthal transport is used to demodulate those spectra, and to obtain the source energy spectra.

  20. VIBA-Lab 3.0: Computer program for simulation and semi-quantitative analysis of PIXE and RBS spectra and 2D elemental maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlić, Ivica; Mekterović, Darko; Mekterović, Igor; Ivošević, Tatjana

    2015-11-01

    VIBA-Lab is a computer program originally developed by the author and co-workers at the National University of Singapore (NUS) as an interactive software package for simulation of Particle Induced X-ray Emission and Rutherford Backscattering Spectra. The original program is redeveloped to a VIBA-Lab 3.0 in which the user can perform semi-quantitative analysis by comparing simulated and measured spectra as well as simulate 2D elemental maps for a given 3D sample composition. The latest version has a new and more versatile user interface. It also has the latest data set of fundamental parameters such as Coster-Kronig transition rates, fluorescence yields, mass absorption coefficients and ionization cross sections for K and L lines in a wider energy range than the original program. Our short-term plan is to introduce routine for quantitative analysis for multiple PIXE and XRF excitations. VIBA-Lab is an excellent teaching tool for students and researchers in using PIXE and RBS techniques. At the same time the program helps when planning an experiment and when optimizing experimental parameters such as incident ions, their energy, detector specifications, filters, geometry, etc. By "running" a virtual experiment the user can test various scenarios until the optimal PIXE and BS spectra are obtained and in this way save a lot of expensive machine time.

  1. Excitonic spectra and energy band structure of ZnAl2Se4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syrbu, N. N.; Zalamai, V. V.; Tiron, A. V.; Tiginyanu, I. M.

    2015-11-01

    Absorption, reflection and wavelength modulated reflection spectra were investigated in ZnAl2Se4 crystals. The energy positions of ground and excited states for three excitonic series (А, В and С) were determined. The main parameters of excitons and more precise values of energy intervals V1(Γ7)-C1(Γ6), V2(Γ6)-C1(Γ6), and V3(Γ7)-C1(Γ6) were estimated. Values of splitting due to crystal field and spin-orbital interaction were calculated. Effective masses of electrons (mC1∗) and holes (mV1∗, mV2∗, mV3∗) were estimated. Reflection spectra contours in excitonic region were calculated using dispersion equations. Optical functions for E > Eg from measured reflection spectra were assigned on the base of Kramers-Kronig relations.

  2. Reconstructing supernova-neutrino spectra using low-energy beta beams.

    PubMed

    Jachowicz, N; McLaughlin, G C

    2006-05-05

    Neutrinos are the principal messengers reaching us from the center of a supernova. Terrestrial neutrino telescopes can provide precious information about the processes in the core of the star. But the information that a neutrino detector can supply is restricted by the fact that little experimental data on the neutrino-nucleus cross sections exist and by the uncertainties in theoretical calculations. In this Letter, we propose a novel procedure that determines the response of a target nucleus in a supernova-neutrino detector, by using low-energy beta beams. We show that fitting "synthetic" spectra, constructed by taking linear combinations of beta-beam spectra, to the original supernova-neutrino spectra reproduces the folded differential cross sections very accurately. Comparing the response in a detector to these synthetic responses provides a direct way to determine the main parameters of the supernova-neutrino energy distribution.

  3. Effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra measured by proportional gas counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Tanaka, M.; Isozumi, S.; Isozumi, Y.; Tosaki, M.; Sugiyama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Air exerts a negative effect on radiation detection using a gas counter because oxygen contained in air has a high electron attachment coefficient and can trap electrons from electron-ion pairs created by ionization from incident radiation in counting gas. This reduces radiation counts. The present study examined the influence of air on energy and rise-time spectra measurements using a proportional gas counter. In addition, a decompression procedure method was proposed to reduce the influence of air and its effectiveness was investigated. For the decompression procedure, the counting gas inside the gas counter was decompressed below atmospheric pressure before radiation detection. For the spectrum measurement, methane as well as various methane and air mixtures were used as the counting gas to determine the effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra. Results showed that the decompression procedure was effective for reducing or eliminating the influence of air on spectra measurement using a proportional gas counter. (authors)

  4. Comparison between Monte Carlo and experimental aluminum and silicon electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapor, Maurizio; Calliari, Lucia; Scarduelli, Giorgina

    2011-07-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is described and used to calculate the energy distribution spectra of backscattered electrons from Al and Si. For the simulations, elastic scattering cross sections are calculated by numerically solving the Dirac equation in a central field. Inelastic scattering cross sections are computed within the dielectric response theory developed by Ritchie, and by Tung et al. Extension from the optical case to non-zero momentum transfer is done according to Ritchie and Howie. To evaluate surface and bulk contributions to the spectra, the Monte Carlo model treats the surface excitations according to the Werner differential surface and volume excitation probability theory. The Monte Carlo calculations are compared with the experimental reflection electron energy loss (REEL) spectra acquired in our laboratory.

  5. Internal energy distribution of peptides in electrospray ionization : ESI and collision-induced dissociation spectra calculation.

    PubMed

    Pak, Alireza; Lesage, Denis; Gimbert, Yves; Vékey, Károly; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2008-04-01

    The internal energy of ions and the timescale play fundamental roles in mass spectrometry. The main objective of this study is to estimate and compare the internal energy distributions of different ions (different nature, degree of freedom 'DOF' and fragmentations) produced in an electrospray source (ESI) of a triple-quadrupole instrument (Quattro I Micromass). These measurements were performed using both the Survival Yield method (as proposed by De Pauw) and the MassKinetics software (kinetic model introduced by Vékey). The internal energy calibration is the preliminary step for ESI and collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra calculation. meta-Methyl-benzylpyridinium ion and four protonated peptides (YGGFL, LDIFSDF, LDIFSDFR and RLDIFSDF) were produced using an electrospray source. These ions were used as thermometer probe compounds. Cone voltages (V(c)) were linearly correlated with the mean internal energy values () carried by desolvated ions. These mean internal energy values seem to be slightly dependent on the size of the studied ion. ESI mass spectra and CID spectra were then simulated using the MassKinetics software to propose an empirical equation for the mean internal energy () versus cone voltage (V(c)) for different source temperatures (T): < E(int) > = [405 x 10(-6) - 480 x 10(-9) (DOF)] V(c)T + E(therm)(T). In this equation, the E(therm)(T) parameter is the mean internal energy due to the source temperature at 0 V(c).

  6. Method for measuring dose-equivalent in a neutron flux with an unknown energy spectra and means for carrying out that method

    DOEpatents

    Distenfeld, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    A method for measuring the dose-equivalent for exposure to an unknown and/or time varing neutron flux which comprises simultaneously exposing a plurality of neutron detecting elements of different types to a neutron flux and combining the measured responses of the various detecting elements by means of a function, whose value is an approximate measure of the dose-equivalent, which is substantially independent of the energy spectra of the flux. Also, a personnel neutron dosimeter, which is useful in carrying out the above method, comprising a plurality of various neutron detecting elements in a single housing suitable for personnel to wear while working in a radiation area.

  7. Improved Experimental and Theoretical Energy Levels of Carbon I from Solar Infrared Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Edward S.; Geller, Murray

    1997-01-01

    We have improved the energy levels in neutral carbon using high resolution infrared solar spectra. The main source is the ATMOS spectrum measured by the Fourier transaform spectroscopy technique from 600 to 4800 cm-1, supplemented by the MARK IV balloon data, covering from 4700 to 5700 cm-1.

  8. Filter-fluorescer measurement of low-voltage simulator x-ray energy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, G.T.; Craven, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray energy spectra of the Maxwell Laboratories MBS and Physics International Pulserad 737 were measured using an eight-channel filter-fluorescer array. The PHOSCAT computer code was used to calculate channel response functions, and the UFO code to unfold spectrum.

  9. The energy calibration of x-ray absorption spectra using multiple-beam diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hagelstein, M.; Cunis, S. ); Frahm, R. ); Rabe, P. )

    1992-01-01

    A new method for calibrating the energy scale of x-ray absorption spectra from an energy dispersive spectrometer has been developed. Distinct features in the diffracted intensity of the curved silicon crystal monochromator have been assigned to multiple-beam diffraction. The photon energies of these structures can be calculated if the precise spacing of the diffracting planes and the orientation of the crystal relative to the incident synchrotron radiation are known. The evaluation of Miller indices of operative reflections and the calculation of the corresponding photon energy is presented. The assignment of operative reflexes is simplified if the monochromator crystal can be rotated around the main diffracting vector {bold H}.

  10. Determination of high-energy x-ray spectra by photoactivation.

    PubMed

    Nath, R; Schulz, R J

    1976-01-01

    The determination of high-energy x-ray spectra has required scintillation spectrometers with massive shielding, neutron time-of-flight spectrometers, or the tedious counting of electron tracks in nuclear emulsions. A new approach has been developed which takes advantage of the energy dependence of photoactivation cross sections. Radioactivity is produced in a small packet of C, Cu, Co, Y, Zr, and Au foils by approximately 5000 rad (tissue). Since the amount of radioactivity produced in each foil is given by the integral of the product of photonuclear cross section and differential photon fluence, a numerical method for unfolding the spectrum is required, and the orthonormal expansion has been employed for this purpose. The photoactivation method has been used to determine the x-ray spectra produced by 30-MeV electrons incident upon thin and thick tungsten targets, and filtered by equivalent amounts of lead and aluminum. These spectra have been compared to calculated thin-target spectra as well as to those determined by a neutron time-of-flight spectrometer. The central-axis and off-axis x-ray spectra produced by a 33-MeV betatron have also been determined.

  11. Measurements of plasma spectra from hot dense elements and mixtures at conditions relevant to the solar radiative zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarty, D. J.; Hill, E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Allan, P.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Hobbs, L. M. R.; James, S. F.; Morton, J.; Sircombe, N.; Upcraft, L.; Harris, J. W. O.; Shepherd, R.; Marley, E.; Magee, E.; Emig, J.; Nilsen, J.; Rose, S. J.

    2017-03-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy has been used to study hot dense plasmas produced using high power laser irradiation of dot samples buried in low Z foils of plastic or diamond. By combining a high contrast short pulse (picosecond timescale) laser beam operating in second harmonic with long pulse (nanosecond timescale) laser beams in third harmonic, and with pulse shaping of the long pulse beams, a range of plasma temperatures from 400eV up to 2.5keV and electron densities from 5e22 up to 1e24/cc have been accessed. Examples are given of measurements of dense plasma effects such as ionization potential depression and line-broadening from the K-shell emission spectra of a range of low Z elements and mixtures and compared to model prediction. Detailed spectra from measurements of the L-shell emission from mid-Z elements are also presented for an example spectrum of germanium. These data are at conditions found in stellar interiors and in particular in the radiative zone of the sun. The plasma conditions are inferred from comparison of the measured spectra to detailed modeling using atomic kinetics and spectral synthesis codes.

  12. Geant4 Predictions of Energy Spectra in Typical Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabra, M. S.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of energy spectra inside spacecraft is important for protecting astronauts as well as sensitive electronics from the harmful effects of space radiation. Such knowledge allows one to confidently map the radiation environment inside the vehicle. The purpose of this talk is to present preliminary calculations for energy spectra inside a spherical shell shielding and behind a slab in typical space radiation environment using the 3D Monte-Carlo transport code Geant4. We have simulated proton and iron isotropic sources and beams impinging on Aluminum and Gallium arsenide (GaAs) targets at energies of 0.2, 0.6, 1, and 10 GeV/u. If time permits, other radiation sources and beams (_, C, O) and targets (C, Si, Ge, water) will be presented. The results are compared to ground-based measurements where available.

  13. Energy of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic waves with point and continuous spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, M.; Fukumoto, Y.

    2008-08-01

    Energy of waves (or eigenmodes) in an ideal fluid and plasma is formulated in the noncanonical Hamiltonian context. By imposing the kinematical constraint on perturbations, the linearized Hamiltonian equation provides a formal definition of wave energy not only for eigenmodes corresponding to point spectra but also for singular ones corresponding to a continuous spectrum. The latter becomes dominant when mean fields have inhomogeneity originating from shear or gradient of the fields. The energy of each wave is represented by the eigenfrequency multiplied by the wave action, which is nothing but the action variable and, moreover, is associated with a derivative of a suitably defined dispersion relation. The sign of the action variable is crucial to the occurrence of Hopf bifurcation in Hamiltonian systems of finite degrees of freedom [M. G. Krein, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. A 73, 445 (1950)]. Krein's idea is extended to the case of coalescence between point and continuous spectra.

  14. Proton Transmitting Energy Spectra and Transmission Electron Microscope Examinations of Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chun-yu; Xia, Yue-yuan; Zhang, Jian-hua; Mu, Yu-guang; Wang, Rui-jin; Liu, Ji-tian; Liu, Xiang-dong; Yu, Zeng-liang

    1999-02-01

    Transmission energy spectra of 530 keV H+ ion penetrating 140 μm thick seed coat of maize and fruit peel of grape with thickness of 100 μm were measured. The result indicates that these thick biological targets, as seen by the penetrating ions, are inhomogeneous, and there are open "channel like" paths along which the incident ions can transmit the targets easily. While most of the incident ions are stopped in the targets, some of the transmitting ions only lose a small fraction of their initial incident energy. The transmission energy spectra show a pure electronic stopping feature. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographes taken from the samples of seed coat of maize and fruit peel of tomato with thickness of 60 μm indicate that 150 keV electron beam from the TEM can penetrate the thick samples to give very good images with clear contrasts.

  15. Russian measurements of neutron energy spectra on the Mir orbital station.

    PubMed

    Lyagushin, V I; Dudkin, V E; Potapov, Y V; Sevastianov, V D

    2001-06-01

    Results of the experiments on neutron energy spectra measurements within broad energy range from 5 x 10(-7) to 2 x 10(2) MeV aboard the Mir orbital station and equivalent neutron dose estimation are presented. Four measurement techniques were used during the experiments. The shape of spectra and their absolute values are in good agreement. According to those experiments, an equivalent neutron dose depends upon effective shielding thickness and spacecraft mass. The neutron dose mentioned is comparable with that of ionizing radiation. Neutron flux levels measured aboard the Mir station have shown that a neutron spectrometer involving broad energy range will be used within the radiation monitoring systems in manned space flights.

  16. Symmetry breaking gives rise to energy spectra of three states of matter

    PubMed Central

    Bolmatov, Dima; Musaev, Edvard T.; Trachenko, K.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental task of statistical physics is to start with a microscopic Hamiltonian, predict the system's statistical properties and compare them with observable data. A notable current fundamental challenge is to tell whether and how an interacting Hamiltonian predicts different energy spectra, including solid, liquid and gas phases. Here, we propose a new idea that enables a unified description of all three states of matter. We introduce a generic form of an interacting phonon Hamiltonian with ground state configurations minimising the potential. Symmetry breaking SO(3) to SO(2), from the group of rotations in reciprocal space to its subgroup, leads to emergence of energy gaps of shear excitations as a consequence of the Goldstone theorem, and readily results in the emergence of energy spectra of solid, liquid and gas phases. PMID:24077388

  17. A study of the composition and energy spectra of anomalous cosmic rays using the geomagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mewaldt, R.A.; Cummings, J.R.; Leske, R.A.; Selesnick, R.S.; Stone, E.C.

    1996-03-15

    The authors use instrumentation on SAMPEX and the Earth`s field as a magnetic rigidity filter in a {open_quotes}double spectrometer{close_quotes} approach to measure the composition and energy spectra of anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) with Z>6. A {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} sample of anomalous cosmic ray C, N, O, and Ne is obtained, with no significant evidence for other species. The bulk of ACRs are now known to be singly-charged, and the geomagnetic filter allows their energy spectra to be measured to higher energies than before. The anomalous oxygen spectrum is found to extend to at least {approx} 100 MeV/nuc, which has implications for models of the acceleration of these ions. 27 refs., 3 fig., 1 tab.

  18. EVOLUTION OF MAGNETIC HELICITY AND ENERGY SPECTRA OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongqi; Brandenburg, Axel; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2016-03-10

    We adopt an isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field to estimate the magnetic energy and helicity spectra as well as current helicity spectra of two individual active regions (NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11515) and the change of the spectral indices during their development as well as during the solar cycle. The departure of the spectral indices of magnetic energy and current helicity from 5/3 are analyzed, and it is found that it is lower than the spectral index of the magnetic energy spectrum. Furthermore, the fractional magnetic helicity tends to increase when the scale of the energy-carrying magnetic structures increases. The magnetic helicity of NOAA 11515 violates the expected hemispheric sign rule, which is interpreted as an effect of enhanced field strengths at scales larger than 30–60 Mm with opposite signs of helicity. This is consistent with the general cycle dependence, which shows that around the solar maximum the magnetic energy and helicity spectra are steeper, emphasizing the large-scale field.

  19. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES IN THE EJECTA OF OLD CLASSICAL NOVAE FROM LATE-EPOCH SPITZER SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Helton, L. Andrew; Vacca, William D.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Woodward, Charles E.; Shenoy, Dinesh P.; Wagner, R. Mark; Evans, Aneurin; Krautter, Joachim; Schwarz, Greg J.; Starrfield, Sumner

    2012-08-10

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared IRS spectra, supplemented by ground-based optical observations, of the classical novae V1974 Cyg, V382 Vel, and V1494 Aql more than 11, 8, and 4 years after outburst, respectively. The spectra are dominated by forbidden emission from neon and oxygen, though in some cases, there are weak signatures of magnesium, sulfur, and argon. We investigate the geometry and distribution of the late time ejecta by examination of the emission line profiles. Using nebular analysis in the low-density regime, we estimate lower limits on the abundances in these novae. In V1974 Cyg and V382 Vel, our observations confirm the abundance estimates presented by other authors and support the claims that these eruptions occurred on ONe white dwarfs (WDs). We report the first detection of neon emission in V1494 Aql and show that the system most likely contains a CO WD.

  20. Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra of cosmic radiation in low Earth orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, T.A.; Watts, J.W. Jr.; Akopova, A.B.; Magradze, N.V.; Dudkin, V.E.; Kovalev, E.E.; Potapov, Yu.V.; Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.; Benton, E.R. ||

    1995-03-01

    Integral linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of cosmic radiation (CR) particles were measured on five Cosmos series spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO). Particular emphasis is placed on results of the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite which carried a set of joint U.S.S.R.-U.S.A. radiation experiments involving passive detectors that included thermoluminescent detectors (TLD`s), plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD`s), fission foils, nuclear photo-emulsions, etc. which were located both inside and outside the spacecraft. Measured LET spectra are compared with those theoretically calculated. Results show that there is some dependence of LET spectra on orbital parameters. The results are used to estimate the CR quality factor (QF) for the COSMOS 1887 mission.

  1. Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra of cosmic radiation in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Akopova, A. B.; Magradze, N. V.; Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Integral linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of cosmic radiation (CR) particles were measured on five Cosmos series spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO). Particular emphasis is placed on results of the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite which carried a set of joint U.S.S.R.-U.S.A. radiation experiments involving passive detectors that included thermoluminescent detectors (TLD's), plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's), fission foils, nuclear photo-emulsions, etc. which were located both inside and outside the spacecraft. Measured LET spectra are compared with those theoretically calculated. Results show that there is some dependence of LET spectra on orbital parameters. The results are used to estimate the CR quality factor (QF) for the COSMOS 1887 mission.

  2. New Fe I Level Energies and Line Identifications from Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.; Kurucz, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of the Fe I atom is critical to many areas of astrophysics and beyond. Measurements of the energies of its high-lying levels remain woefully incomplete, however, despite extensive laboratory and solar analysis. In this work, we use high-resolution archival absorption-line ultraviolet and optical spectra of stars whose warm temperatures favor moderate Fe I excitation. We derive the energy for a particular upper level in Kurucz's semiempirical calculations by adopting a trial value that yields the same wavelength for a given line predicted to be about as strong as that of a strong unidentified spectral line observed in the stellar spectra, then checking the new wavelengths of other strong predicted transitions that share the same upper level for coincidence with other strong observed unidentified lines. To date, this analysis has provided the upper energies of 66 Fe I levels. Many new energy levels are higher than those accessible to laboratory experiments; several exceed the Fe I ionization energy. These levels provide new identifications for over 2000 potentially detectable lines. Almost all of the new levels of odd parity include UV lines that were detected but unclassified in laboratory Fe I absorption spectra, providing an external check on the energy values. We motivate and present the procedure, provide the resulting new energy levels and their uncertainties, list all the potentially detectable UV and optical new Fe I line identifications and their gf values, point out new lines of astrophysical interest, and discuss the prospects for additional Fe I energy level determinations.

  3. Kinetic energies to analyze the experimental auger electron spectra by density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Kazunaka

    2016-02-01

    In the Auger electron spectra (AES) simulations, we define theoretical modified kinetic energies of AES in the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The modified kinetic energies correspond to two final-state holes at the ground state and at the transition-state in DFT calculations, respectively. This method is applied to simulate Auger electron spectra (AES) of 2nd periodic atom (Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F)-involving substances (LiF, beryllium, boron, graphite, GaN, SiO2, PTFE) by deMon DFT calculations using the model molecules of the unit cell. Experimental KVV (valence band electrons can fill K-shell core holes or be emitted during KVV-type transitions) AES of the (Li, O) atoms in the substances agree considerably well with simulation of AES obtained with the maximum kinetic energies of the atoms, while, for AES of LiF, and PTFE substance, the experimental F KVV AES is almost in accordance with the spectra from the transitionstate kinetic energy calculations.

  4. Energy-loss of He ions in carbon allotropes studied by elastic resonance in backscattering spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosaki, Mitsuo; Rauhala, Eero

    2015-10-01

    Backscattering spectra for 4He ions incident on carbon allotropes have been measured in the energy range from 4.30 to 4.95 MeV in steps of 50-100 keV at scattering angles of 106° and 170°. We used three carbon allotropes: graphite, diamond and amorphous carbon. For all these allotropes, we can observe the sharp (4He, 12C) elastic nuclear resonance at the He ion energy of 4.265 MeV in the backscattering spectra. By varying the incident He energy, we have systematically analyzed the profiles of the resonance peaks to study the energy-loss processes: stopping cross-sections and energy-loss straggling around the interesting region of the stopping maximum at about 500 keV. We focus on the resonance profiles and investigate an allotropic effect concerning the energy-loss. Furthermore, an energy bunching effect on the straggling is presented and the mechanism is discussed.

  5. MULTI-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS FROM MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. IV. ALPHA ELEMENT DISTRIBUTIONS IN MILKY WAY SATELLITE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Smith, Graeme H.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Sohn, Sangmo Tony

    2011-02-01

    We derive the star formation histories of eight dwarf spheroidal (dSph) Milky Way satellite galaxies from their alpha element abundance patterns. Nearly 3000 stars from our previously published catalog comprise our data set. The average [{alpha}/Fe] ratios for all dSphs follow roughly the same path with increasing [Fe/H]. We do not observe the predicted knees in the [{alpha}/Fe] versus [Fe/H] diagram, corresponding to the metallicity at which Type Ia supernovae begin to explode. Instead, we find that Type Ia supernova ejecta contribute to the abundances of all but the most metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -2.5) stars. We have also developed a chemical evolution model that tracks the star formation rate, Types II and Ia supernova explosions, and supernova feedback. Without metal enhancement in the supernova blowout, massive amounts of gas loss define the history of all dSphs except Fornax, the most luminous in our sample. All six of the best-fit model parameters correlate with dSph luminosity but not with velocity dispersion, half-light radius, or Galactocentric distance.

  6. Quasiparticle energies, excitons, and optical spectra of few-layer black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Vy; Fei, Ruixiang; Yang, Li

    2015-12-01

    We report first-principles GW-Bethe-Salpeter-equation (BSE) studies of excited-state properties of few-layer black phosphorus (BP) (phosphorene). With improved GW computational methods, we obtained converged quasiparticle band gaps and optical absorption spectra by the single-shot (G0W0) procedure. Moreover, we reveal fine structures of anisotropic excitons, including the series of one-dimensional like wave functions, spin singlet-triplet splitting, and electron-hole binding energy spectra by solving BSE. An effective-mass model is employed to describe these electron-hole pairs, shedding light on estimating the exciton binding energy of anisotropic two-dimensional semiconductors without expensive ab initio simulations. Finally, the anisotropic optical response of BP is explained by using optical selection rules based on the projected single-particle density of states at band edges.

  7. Precision measurements of nuclear CR energy spectra and composition with the AMS-02 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiandrini, E.

    2016-05-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 02 (AMS-02) is a large acceptance high-energy physics experiment operating since May 2011 on board the International Space Station. More than 60 billion events have been collected by the instrument in the first four years of operation. AMS-02 offers a unique opportunity to study the Cosmic Rays (CRs) since it measures the spectra of all the species simultaneously. We report on the precision measurements of primary and secondary nuclear spectra, in the GeV-TeV energy interval. These measurements allow for the first time a detailed study of the spectral index variation with rigidity providing a new insight on the origin and propagation of CR.

  8. Abundances of the light elements from UV (HST) and red (ESO) spectra in the very old star HD 84937

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spite, M.; Peterson, R. C.; Gallagher, A. J.; Barbuy, B.; Spite, F.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: In order to provide a better basis for the study of mechanisms of nucleosynthesis of the light elements beyond hydrogen and helium in the oldest stars, the abundances of C, O, Mg, Si, P, S, K, and Ca have been derived from UV-HST and visible-ESO high resolution spectra in the old, very metal-poor star HD 84937, at a metallicity that is 1/200 that of the Sun's. For this halo main-sequence turnoff star, the abundance determination of P and S are the first published determinations. Methods: The LTE profiles of the lines were computed and fitted to the observed spectra. Wherever possible, we compared the abundances derived from the UV spectrum to abundances derived from the visible or near-infrared spectra, and also corrected the derived abundances for non-LTE effects. Three-dimensional (3D) CO5BOLD model atmospheres have been used to determine the abundances of C and O from molecular CH and OH bands. Results: The abundances of these light elements relative to iron in HD 84937 are found to agree well with the abundances of these elements in classical metal-poor stars. Our HD 84937 carbon abundance determination points toward a solar (or mildly enhanced above solar) value of [C/Fe]. The modest overabundance of the α elements of even atomic number Z, typical of halo turnoff stars, is confirmed in this example. The odd-Z element P is found to be somewhat deficient in HD 84937, at [P/Fe] = -0.32, which is again consistent with the handful of existing determinations for turnoff stars of such low metallicity. We show that the abundance of oxygen, deduced from the OH band from 3D computations, is not compatible with the abundance deduced from the red oxygen triplet. This incompatibility is explained by the existence of a chromosphere heating the shallow layers of the atmosphere where the OH band, in 3D computations, is mainly formed. Conclusions: The abundance ratios are compared to the predictions of models of galactic nucleosynthesis and evolution. Based on

  9. The Energy Spectra of Proton and Helium Measured from the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, H. S.; Seo, E. S.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon experiment is designed to investigate the composition and energy spectra of cosmic rays at the highest energies currently accessible from direct measurements, the region up to 100 TeV. The instrument consists of a silicon matrix for charge measurement, a graphite target (0.75 nuclear interaction length) to induce hadronic fragmentation, 3 scintillator strip hodoscopes for triggering and helping reconstruct trajectory, and a BGO calorimeter (18 radiation lengths) to measure the energy of incident particles. ATIC had two successful Long Duration Balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo, Antarctica: from 12/28/00 to 01/13/01 and from 12/29/02 to 01/18/03. We present the energy spectra of proton and helium extracted from the ATIC flights, over the energy range from 100 GeV to 100 TeV, and compare them with the results from other experiments at both the lower and higher energy ends.

  10. The Effects of Low- and High-Energy Cutoffs on Solar Flare Microwave and Hard X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Microwave and hard x-ray spectra provide crucial information about energetic electrons and their environment in solar flares. These spectra are becoming better determined with the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) and the recent launch of the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The proposed Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR) promises even greater advances in radio observations of solar flares. Both microwave and hard x-ray spectra are sensitive to cutoffs in the electron distribution function. The determination of the high-energy cutoff from these spectra establishes the highest electron energies produced by the acceleration mechanism, while determination of the low-energy cutoff is crucial to establishing the total energy in accelerated electrons. This paper will show computations of the effects of both high- and low-energy cutoffs on microwave and hard x-ray spectra. The optically thick portion of a microwave spectrum is enhanced and smoothed by a low-energy cutoff, while a hard x-ray spectrum is flattened below the cutoff energy. A high-energy cutoff steepens the microwave spectrum and increases the wavelength at which the spectrum peaks, while the hard x-ray spectrum begins to steepen at photon energies roughly an order of magnitude below the electron cutoff energy. This work discusses how flare microwave and hard x-ray spectra can be analyzed together to determine these electron cutoff energies. This work is supported in part by the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  11. Comparison of species-resolved energy spectra from ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, J.; Manweiler, J. W.; Armstrong, T. P.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Gerrard, A. J.; Gkioulidou, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a comparison between energy spectra measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument and the Van Allen Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) for two significant and distinct events in early 2013. The first is an impulsive solar particle event on March 17th. While intense, this event presented no significant surprises in terms of its composition or anisotropy characteristics, thus providing a good baseline for response of the trapped radiation belts as observed by the Van Allen Probes. The second solar event occurred late May 22nd and early May 23rd. This event has a much greater concentration of medium and heavy ions than the St. Patrick's Day event, as well as having very peculiar energy spectra with evidence of two distinct populations. During the St. Patrick's Day Event, the energy spectra for helium, carbon, oxygen, neon, silicon, and iron all show the same spectral power law slope -3.1. The event shows strong anisotropy with intensities differing by a factor of four for both protons and Z>1 ions. The late May event also has strong anisotropy, and in the same directions as the St. Patrick's Day Event, but with very different composition and energy spectra. The spectra are much harder with power law spectral slopes of -0.5. Additionally, there is a significant spectral bump at 3 MeV/nuc for helium that is not present in the spectra of the heavier ions. The intensities of the heavier ions, however, show an increase that is an order of magnitude greater than the increase seen for helium. The March 17 RBSPICE observations show multiple injection events lasting for less than an hour each during the Van Allen Probes B apogees. These injections are seen in protons as well as Helium and only somewhat observed in Oxygen. Spectral slopes for the observations range from approximately -5 during quiet times to double peaked events with a spectral slope of approximately -2 at the beginning of the injection

  12. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  13. Pyroxene Spectroscopy: Effects of Major Element Composition on Near, Mid and Far-Infrared Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, R. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Dyar, M. D.

    2005-01-01

    Pyroxene is one of the most common minerals in both evolved and undifferentiated solid bodies of the solar system. Various compositions of pyroxene have been directly studied in meteorites and lunar samples and remotely observed by telescopic and orbital measurements of the moon, Mars, Mercury, and several classes of asteroids. Laboratory studies of pyroxene spectra have shown that absorption features diagnostic of pyroxene in both the near and mid infrared are composition dependent. The challenge for remote analyses has been to reduce the level of ambiguity to allow a quantitative assessment of mineral chemistry. This study focuses on the analysis of a comprehensive set of synthetic Ca-Fe-Mg pyroxenes from the visible through far-IR (0.3-50 m) to address the fundamental constraints of crystal structure on absorption.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Line Spectra of the Elements (Reader+ 1980-1981)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, J.

    1996-10-01

    This catalog contains wavelength information for 99 different atomic species. The wavelengths for about 46,610 spectral lines of neutral through quadruply ionized atoms are tabulated. The information is presented in a general table of headers and references for each element and for each element a table of relative intensities, wavelengths ordered numerically, chemical elements, and stages of ionization indicated for each line in the wavelength range 40 to 40,000 Angstroms. Listed in the 99 data files are lines that appear in emission from the vacuum ultraviolet to the far infrared. For most atoms these lines are chosen from much larger lists so as to include the stronger observed lines in each spectral region. Below 2000 Angstroms the wavelengths are in vacuum; above 2000 Angstroms the wavelengths are in air. Wavelengths given to three decimal places are suitable for spectrograph calibration purpose such as Ne, Ar, Kr, Fe in the air region and C, N, O, Si, and Cu in the vacuum region. The intensity estimates are useful only as a rough indication of the appearance of a spectrum. The literature references as they appear the the the Handbook of Chemistry and Physics are given in a separate file. (3 data files).

  15. Generalized Potential Energy Finite Elements for Modeling Molecular Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chatzieleftheriou, Stavros; Adendorff, Matthew R; Lagaros, Nikos D

    2016-10-24

    The potential energy of molecules and nanostructures is commonly calculated in the molecular mechanics formalism by superimposing bonded and nonbonded atomic energy terms, i.e. bonds between two atoms, bond angles involving three atoms, dihedral angles involving four atoms, nonbonded terms expressing the Coulomb and Lennard-Jones interactions, etc. In this work a new, generalized numerical simulation is presented for studying the mechanical behavior of three-dimensional nanostructures at the atomic scale. The energy gradient and Hessian matrix of such assemblies are usually computed numerically; a potential energy finite element model is proposed herein where these two components are expressed analytically. In particular, generalized finite elements are developed that express the interactions among atoms in a manner equivalent to that invoked in simulations performed based on the molecular dynamics method. Thus, the global tangent stiffness matrix for any nanostructure is formed as an assembly of the generalized finite elements and is directly equivalent to the Hessian matrix of the potential energy. The advantages of the proposed model are identified in terms of both accuracy and computational efficiency. In the case of popular force fields (e.g., CHARMM), the computation of the Hessian matrix by implementing the proposed method is of the same order as that of the gradient. This analysis can be used to minimize the potential energy of molecular systems under nodal loads in order to derive constitutive laws for molecular systems where the entropy and solvent effects are neglected and can be approximated as solids, such as double stranded DNA nanostructures. In this context, the sequence dependent stretch modulus for some typical base pairs step is calculated.

  16. Localization, time histories, and energy spectra of a new type of recurrent high-energy transient source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atteia, J.-L.; Boer, M.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Kouveliotou, C.

    1987-01-01

    The detection of a recurrent high-energy transient source which is neither a classical X-ray nor a gamma-ray burster, but whose properties are intermediate between the two, is reported. The energy spectra of 12 recurrent events are found to be soft, characterized by kT's of 34-56 keV. The time histories are short with rise and fall times as fast as about 10 ms. The source location is a 0.12 sq deg region about 10 deg from the Galactic center.

  17. Low-energy photons in high-energy photon fields--Monte Carlo generated spectra and a new descriptive parameter.

    PubMed

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay; Rühmann, Antje; Poppe, Björn

    2011-09-01

    The varying low-energy contribution to the photon spectra at points within and around radiotherapy photon fields is associated with variations in the responses of non-water equivalent dosimeters and in the water-to-material dose conversion factors for tissues such as the red bone marrow. In addition, the presence of low-energy photons in the photon spectrum enhances the RBE in general and in particular for the induction of second malignancies. The present study discusses the general rules valid for the low-energy spectral component of radiotherapeutic photon beams at points within and in the periphery of the treatment field, taking as an example the Siemens Primus linear accelerator at 6 MV and 15 MV. The photon spectra at these points and their typical variations due to the target system, attenuation, single and multiple Compton scattering, are described by the Monte Carlo method, using the code BEAMnrc/EGSnrc. A survey of the role of low energy photons in the spectra within and around radiotherapy fields is presented. In addition to the spectra, some data compression has proven useful to support the overview of the behaviour of the low-energy component. A characteristic indicator of the presence of low-energy photons is the dose fraction attributable to photons with energies not exceeding 200 keV, termed P(D)(200 keV). Its values are calculated for different depths and lateral positions within a water phantom. For a pencil beam of 6 or 15 MV primary photons in water, the radial distribution of P(D)(200 keV) is bellshaped, with a wide-ranging exponential tail of half value 6 to 7 cm. The P(D)(200 keV) value obtained on the central axis of a photon field shows an approximately proportional increase with field size. Out-of-field P(D)(200 keV) values are up to an order of magnitude higher than on the central axis for the same irradiation depth. The 2D pattern of P(D)(200 keV) for a radiotherapy field visualizes the regions, e.g. at the field margin, where changes of

  18. Electronic spectra of jet-cooled isoindoline: Spectroscopic determination of energy difference between conformational isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Sei'ichi; Okuyama, Katsuhiko

    2010-04-01

    The electronic spectra of jet-cooled isoindoline between the electronic ground (S0) state and the ππ ∗ lowest-excited singlet state (S1) were observed by the fluorescence excitation and single-vibronic-level dispersed fluorescence methods. The low-frequency progression due to the puckering vibration appeared in both spectra. Analysis of dispersed spectra together with geometry optimization at the level of B3LYP/6-311+G(d) indicated the presence of conformational isomers possessing axial and equatorial N-H bonds with respect to the molecular plane. The 0-0 bands of the axial and equatorial conformers were measured at 37 022 and 36 761 cm-1, respectively. Three common levels in the S1 state accessible from the respective S0-state zero levels were observed. From their transition frequencies, the S0-state energy difference between the isomers was determined to be 47.7±0.2 cm-1, where the axial conformer was more stable. In the S1 state, the energy difference was 213.7±0.2 cm-1, and the equatorial conformer was more stable. The cause of switching from a stable conformation upon excitation is discussed in terms of the electron conjugation between the π∗ orbital in benzene and the lone pair orbital of nitrogen.

  19. Sources of High-Energy Emission in the Green Pea Galaxies: New Constraints from Magellan Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Derek Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The recently discovered Green Pea galaxies display extreme starburst activity and may be some of the only possible Lyman continuum emitting galaxies at low redshift. Green Peas are characterized by their unusually high [O III]/[O II] ratios, similar to the ratios observed in high-redshift galaxies. In addition, the presence of the high-energy He II 4686 line shows that the Green Peas are highly ionized. However, the origin of the He II emission in the Green Peas, and many other starburst galaxies, is still an open question. We analyze IMACS and MagE spectra from the Magellan telescopes in order to evaluate the most probable cause of this He II emission. We also analyze other properties like dust content, temperature and density, and kinematic components. Our IMACS spectra show no Wolf-Rayet (WR) features. We set upper limits on the WR populations in our sample and conclude that Wolf-Rayet stars are not a likely candidate for the He II emission. With deeper MagE spectra we investigate energetic shocks as a possible source of the He II, and move one step closer to uncovering the origin of high-energy photons in these unique starbursts.

  20. Response of mean turbulent energy dissipation rate and spectra to concentrated wall suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyewola, O.; Djenidi, L.; Antonia, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    The response of mean turbulent energy dissipation rate and spectra to concentrated suction applied through a porous wall strip has been quantified. Both suction and no suction data of the spectra collapsed reasonably well for Kolmogorov normalised wavenumber k {1/*} > 0.2. Similar results were also observed for second-order structure functions (not shown) for Kolmogorov normalised radius r* < 10. Although, the quality of collapsed is poorer for transverse component, the result highlights that Kolmogorov similarity hypothesis is reasonably well satisfied. However, the suction results shows a significant departure from the no suction case of the Kolmogorov normalised spectra and second-order structure functions for k {1/*} < 0.2 and r* > 20, respectively. The departure at the larger scales with collapse at the small scales suggests that suction induce a change in the small-scale motion. This is also reflected in the alteration of mean turbulent energy dissipation rate and Taylor microscale Reynolds number. This change is a result of the weakening of the large-scale structures. The effect is increased as the suction rate is increased.

  1. Measurements of the secondary particle energy spectra in the Space Shuttle.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Patel, J U; Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of the energy spectra of secondary particles produced by galactic cosmic rays and trapped protons due to the nuclear interactions of these particles with the Shuttle shielding provide a powerful tool for validating radiation transport codes. A code validated in this way can be used to better estimate the dose and dose equivalent to body organs, measurements that cannot be made directly. The principal cause of single event upsets in electronic devices in the region of the South Atlantic Anomaly is secondary particles, and even in the region of galactic cosmic radiation a significant fraction is produced by secondary particles. In this paper, we describe the first direct measurements of the energy spectra of secondary protons, deuterons, tritons, 3He and 4He produced by galactic cosmic rays inside the Space Shuttle using a charged particle spectrometer. A comparison of these spectra with radiation transport code HZETRN showed reasonably good agreement for secondary protons. However, the code seriously underestimated the flux of all other light ions. The code has been modified to include pick-up and knock-on processes. The modified code leads to good agreement for deuterons and 3He but not for other light ions. This revised code leads to about 10% higher dose equivalent than the original code under moderate shielding, if we assume that higher charge ion fluxes are correctly predicted by the model.

  2. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 436 - Energy Program Conservation Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Energy Program Conservation Elements D Appendix D to Part 436 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Pt. 436, App. D Appendix D to Part 436—Energy Program Conservation Elements (a) In all successful...

  3. 10 CFR 420.17 - Optional elements of State Energy Program plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Optional elements of State Energy Program plans. 420.17 Section 420.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION STATE ENERGY PROGRAM Formula Grant Procedures § 420.17 Optional elements of State Energy Program plans. (a) Other appropriate activities...

  4. 10 CFR 420.17 - Optional elements of State Energy Program plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Optional elements of State Energy Program plans. 420.17 Section 420.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION STATE ENERGY PROGRAM Formula Grant Procedures § 420.17 Optional elements of State Energy Program plans. (a) Other appropriate activities...

  5. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 436 - Energy Program Conservation Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Energy Program Conservation Elements D Appendix D to Part 436 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Pt. 436, App. D Appendix D to Part 436—Energy Program Conservation Elements (a) In all successful...

  6. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 436 - Energy Program Conservation Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Energy Program Conservation Elements D Appendix D to Part 436 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Pt. 436, App. D Appendix D to Part 436—Energy Program Conservation Elements (a) In all successful...

  7. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 436 - Energy Program Conservation Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Energy Program Conservation Elements D Appendix D to Part 436 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Pt. 436, App. D Appendix D to Part 436—Energy Program Conservation Elements (a) In all successful...

  8. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 436 - Energy Program Conservation Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Energy Program Conservation Elements D Appendix D to Part 436 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Pt. 436, App. D Appendix D to Part 436—Energy Program Conservation Elements (a) In all successful...

  9. Calculations of the heights, periods, profile parameters, and energy spectra of wind waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korneva, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    Sea wave behavior calculations require the precalculation of wave elements as well as consideration of the spectral functions of ocean wave formation. The spectrum of the random wave process is largely determined by the distribution of energy in the actual wind waves observed on the surface of the sea as expressed in statistical and spectral characteristics of the sea swell.

  10. Spectra and mass composition of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays from point sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, Nikolai N.

    2012-04-01

    We present spectra and mass composition of cosmic rays incoming to the Earth in the energy range (0.5−2)·10{sup 20} eV. As their sources we consider Seyfert galaxies located at distances ∼<40 Mpc, following an acceleration model for such moderate-power objects. Mass composition of the particles at sources is assumed to be mixed. Generation spectra are described by a function E{sup −γ{sub 0}}, where γ{sub 0} is an arbitrary parameter. It is shown that the assumptions adopted make it possible to describe experimental data provided by HiRes and Pierre Auger Observatory, using different values of γ{sub 0}.

  11. Comprehensive study of the surface peak in charge-integrated low-energy ion scattering spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Draxler, M.; Gruber, R.; Bauer, P.; Beikler, R.; Taglauer, E.; Schmid, K.; Ermolov, S. N.

    2003-08-01

    Low-energy ion scattering is very surface sensitive if scattered ions are analyzed. By time-of-flight (TOF) techniques, the neutral and the charge-integrated spectra (ions plus neutrals) are obtained, which yield information about deeper layers. It is well known that charge integrated spectra may exhibit a surface peak which is more pronounced for heavier projectiles, e.g., Ne ions. Aiming at a more profound physical understanding of this surface peak, we performed TOF experiments and computer simulations for H, He, and Ne projectiles scattered from a polycrystalline copper target. Measurements were done in the range of 1-9 keV for a scattering angle of 129 degree sign under UHV conditions. The simulations were performed using the MARLOWE code for the given experimental parameters and a polycrystalline target. In the experiments, a pronounced surface peak was observed at low energies, which fades away at higher energies. This peak is quantitatively reproduced by the simulation. Several atomic layers may contribute to the surface peak, depending on the energy. Analyzing the contributions of the individual outermost atomic layers, one finds that the binary collisions of the projectiles with atoms in the first and the second layer yield a narrow energy distribution, while the contribution from the deeper layers is dominated by multiple scattering and therefore exhibits a very broad energy spectrum. It is shown that the appearance of a more or less pronounced surface peak is due to the relative contributions of single scattering and multiple scattering and thus depends on the projectile energy and mass.

  12. A model of galactic cosmic rays for use in calculating linear energy transfer spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Chenette, D.; Clark, R.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Guzik, T. G.; Pyle, K. R.; Sang, Y.; Wefel, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) contain fully stripped nuclei, from Hydrogen to beyond the Iron group, accelerated to high energies and are a major component of the background radiation encountered by satellites and interplanetary spacecraft. This paper presents a GCR model which is based upon our current understanding of the astrophysics of GCR transport through interstellar and interplanetary space. The model can be used to predict the energy spectra for all stable and long-lived radioactive species from H to Ni over an energy range from 50 to 50,000 MeV/nucleon as a function of a single parameter, the solar modulation level phi. The details of this model are summarized, phi is derived for the period 1974 to present, and results from this model during the 1990/1991 Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) mission are presented.

  13. Spatially and momentum resolved energy electron loss spectra from an ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kinyanjui, M. K. Kaiser, U.; Benner, G.; Pavia, G.; Boucher, F.; Habermeier, H.-U.; Keimer, B.

    2015-05-18

    We present an experimental approach which allows for the acquisition of spectra from ultra-thin films at high spatial, momentum, and energy resolutions. Spatially and momentum (q) resolved electron energy loss spectra have been obtained from a 12 nm ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer using a nano-beam electron diffraction based approach which enabled the acquisition of momentum resolved spectra from individual, differently oriented nano-domains and at different positions of the PrNiO{sub 3} thin layer. The spatial and wavelength dependence of the spectral excitations are obtained and characterized after the analysis of the experimental spectra using calculated dielectric and energy loss functions. The presented approach makes a contribution towards obtaining momentum-resolved spectra from nanostructures, thin film, heterostructures, surfaces, and interfaces.

  14. NOTE: Near surface photon energy spectra outside a 6 MV field edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. R.; Mountford, P. J.

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between a 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray energy spectrum outside the field edge near a phantom surface, and the corresponding spectrum on the central axis. The Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A was used to calculate the spectra on the central axis and at 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm from the edge of a 4 × 4 cm2, 10 × 10 cm2 and 15 × 15 cm2 field. Compared to the spectrum on the central axis, the spectra outside the field edge showed two distinct regions: a broad peak below about 0.5 MeV, and a lower amplitude, less rapidly changing region at higher energies from 0.5 to 6 MeV. The lower energy peak was due to scattered photons, and the higher energy component was due mainly to primary photons transmitted through the jaws of the secondary collimator. The potential impact of these spectral differences on critical organ photon dosimetry was determined by calculating the ratio of the sensitivity of a Scanditronix EDD-5 diode and of a LiF:Mg:Ti thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) outside the field edge to their respective sensitivity at the calibration position on the central axis. The lower energy peak combined with the non-uniform energy sensitivity of each detector produced up to a two-thirds overestimate of x-ray dose outside the field by the diode, whereas the response ratio of the TLD was about unity. These results indicated that a similar evaluation was required for profile measurements of a dynamic wedged field and measurements in an intensity modulated beam with either type of detector.

  15. Time dependence of energy spectra of brachytherapy sources and its impact on the half and the tenth value layers

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ning J.; Chen Zhe; Hearn, Robert A.; Rodgers, Joseph J.; Nath, Ravinder

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Several factors including radionuclide purity influence the photon energy spectra from sealed brachytherapy sources. The existence of impurities and trace elements in radioactive materials as well as the substrate and encapsulation may not only alter the spectrum at a given time but also cause change in the spectra as a function of time. The purpose of this study is to utilize a semiempirical formalism, which quantitatively incorporates this time dependence, to calculate and evaluate the shielding requirement impacts introduced by this time dependence for a {sup 103}Pd source. Methods: The formalism was used to calculate the NthVL thicknesses in lead for a {sup 103}Pd model 200 seed. Prior to 2005, the {sup 103}Pd in this source was purified to a level better than 0.006% of the total {sup 103}Pd activity, the key trace impurity consisting of {sup 65}Zn. Because {sup 65}Zn emits higher energy photons and has a much longer half-life of 244 days compared to {sup 103}Pd, its presence in {sup 103}Pd seeds led to a time dependence of the photon spectrum and other related physical quantities. This study focuses on the time dependence of the NthVL and the analysis of the corresponding shielding requirements. Results: The results indicate that the first HVL and the first TVL in lead steadily increased with time for about 200 days and then reached a plateau. The increases at plateau were more than 1000 times compared to the corresponding values on the zeroth day. The second and third TVLs in lead reached their plateaus in about 100 and 60 days, respectively, and the increases were about 19 and 2.33 times the corresponding values on the zeroth day, respectively. All the TVLs demonstrated a similar time dependence pattern, with substantial increases and eventual approach to a plateau. Conclusions: The authors conclude that the time dependence of the emitted photon spectra from brachytherapy sources can introduce substantial variations in the values of the NthVL with

  16. Estimating stellar atmospheric parameters, absolute magnitudes and elemental abundances from the LAMOST spectra with Kernel-based principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, M.-S.; Liu, X.-W.; Shi, J.-R.; Yuan, H.-B.; Huang, Y.; Luo, A.-L.; Zhang, H.-W.; Zhao, Y.-H.; Zhang, J.-N.; Ren, J.-J.; Chen, B.-Q.; Wang, C.; Li, J.; Huo, Z.-Y.; Zhang, W.; Wang, J.-L.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate determination of stellar atmospheric parameters and elemental abundances is crucial for Galactic archaeology via large-scale spectroscopic surveys. In this paper, we estimate stellar atmospheric parameters - effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g and metallicity [Fe/H], absolute magnitudes MV and MKs, α-element to metal (and iron) abundance ratio [α/M] (and [α/Fe]), as well as carbon and nitrogen abundances [C/H] and [N/H] from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectra with a multivariate regression method based on kernel-based principal component analysis, using stars in common with other surveys (Hipparcos, Kepler, Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment) as training data sets. Both internal and external examinations indicate that given a spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) better than 50, our method is capable of delivering stellar parameters with a precision of ˜100 K for Teff, ˜0.1 dex for log g, 0.3-0.4 mag for MV and MKs, 0.1 dex for [Fe/H], [C/H] and [N/H], and better than 0.05 dex for [α/M] ([α/Fe]). The results are satisfactory even for a spectral SNR of 20. The work presents first determinations of [C/H] and [N/H] abundances from a vast data set of LAMOST, and, to our knowledge, the first reported implementation of absolute magnitude estimation directly based on a vast data set of observed spectra. The derived stellar parameters for millions of stars from the LAMOST surveys will be publicly available in the form of value-added catalogues.

  17. Measurement of anisotropic angular distributions of photon energy spectra for I-125 brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Unno, Yasuhiro; Yunoki, Akira; Kurosawa, Tadahiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Sato, Yasushi; Hino, Yoshio

    2012-09-01

    The angular distribution of photon energy spectra emitted from an I-125 brachytherapy source was measured using a specially designed jig in the range of ±70° in the plane of the long axis of the source. It is important to investigate the angular dependence of photon emissions from these sources for the calibration of the air kerma rate. The results show that the influence of the distributions between 0° and ±8° is small enough to allow a calibration using current primary instruments which have a large entrance window.

  18. Measurement of day and night neutrino energy spectra at SNO and constraints on neutrino mixing parameters.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Q R; Allen, R C; Andersen, T C; Anglin, J D; Barton, J C; Beier, E W; Bercovitch, M; Bigu, J; Biller, S D; Black, R A; Blevis, I; Boardman, R J; Boger, J; Bonvin, E; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Browne, M C; Bullard, T V; Bühler, G; Cameron, J; Chan, Y D; Chen, H H; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Clifford, E T H; Cowan, J H M; Cowen, D F; Cox, G A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Davidson, W F; Doe, P J; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Ferraris, A P; Ford, R J; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Frank, E D; Frati, W; Gagnon, N; Germani, J V; Gil, S; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A S; Hamian, A A; Handler, W B; Haq, R U; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hepburn, J D; Heron, H; Hewett, J; Hime, A; Howe, M; Hykawy, J G; Isaac, M C P; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Jillings, C; Jonkmans, G; Kazkaz, K; Keener, P T; Klein, J R; Knox, A B; Komar, R J; Kouzes, R; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lay, M; Lee, H W; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Locke, W; Luoma, S; Lyon, J; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Manor, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McDonald, D S; McFarlane, K; McGregor, G; Meijer Drees, R; Mifflin, C; Miller, G G; Milton, G; Moffat, B A; Moorhead, M; Nally, C W; Neubauer, M S; Newcomer, F M; Ng, H S; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Novikov, V M; O'Neill, M; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Omori, M; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Poon, A W P; Radcliffe, T J; Roberge, A; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rosendahl, S S E; Rowley, J K; Rusu, V L; Saettler, E; Schaffer, K K; Schwendener, M H; Schülke, A; Seifert, H; Shatkay, M; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, A R; Smith, M W E; Spreitzer, T; Starinsky, N; Steiger, T D; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Storey, R S; Sur, B; Tafirout, R; Tagg, N; Tanner, N W; Taplin, R K; Thorman, M; Thornewell, P M; Trent, P T; Tserkovnyak, Y I; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Waltham, C E; Wang, J-X; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wittich, P; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M

    2002-07-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has measured day and night solar neutrino energy spectra and rates. For charged current events, assuming an undistorted 8B spectrum, the night minus day rate is 14.0%+/-6.3%(+1.5%)(-1.4%) of the average rate. If the total flux of active neutrinos is additionally constrained to have no asymmetry, the nu(e) asymmetry is found to be 7.0%+/-4.9%(+1.3%)(-1.2%). A global solar neutrino analysis in terms of matter-enhanced oscillations of two active flavors strongly favors the large mixing angle solution.

  19. Energy and Power Spectra of Circinus X-1 in the Crisis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming-Xuan; Han, Wan-Qiang; Yu, Jin-Jiang; Wu, Hai-Bin; Cao, He-Fei

    2007-12-01

    Cir X-1 is a low mass X-ray binary. The color-color diagram and the hardness intensity diagram (HID) are shown by dissimilar figures in different periods. The authors use the transformation period in which the X-ray flow of Cir X-1 changes from high to low to discuss the HID by the corresponding energy spectra and timing characters, and they also compare the results in 1977. They have found new effect on the X-ray radiation with intensity changes of the source.

  20. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    UNH was assigned the responsibility to use their accelerator neutron measurements to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution. Direct accelerator-based measurements by UNH of the energy-dependent efficiencies for detecting neutrons with energies from 36 to 720 MeV in NaI were compared with Monte Carlo TASC calculations. The calculated TASC efficiencies are somewhat lower (by about 20%) than the accelerator results in the energy range 70-300 MeV. The measured energy-loss spectrum for 207 MeV neutron interactions in NaI were compared with the Monte Carlo response for 200 MeV neutrons in the TASC indicating good agreement. Based on this agreement, the simulation was considered to be sufficiently accurate to generate a neutron response library to be used by UNH in modifying the TASC fitting program to include a neutron component in the flare spectrum modeling. TASC energy-loss data on the 1991 June 11 flare was transferred to UNH. Also included appendix: Gamma-rays and neutrons as a probe of flare proton spectra: the solar flare of 11 June 1991.

  1. ENERGY SPECTRA OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY COSMIC-RAY NUCLEI MEASURED WITH TRACER

    SciTech Connect

    Obermeier, A.; Ave, M.; Boyle, P.; Hoeppner, Ch.; Mueller, D.; Hoerandel, J.

    2011-11-20

    The Transition Radiation Array for Cosmic Energetic Radiation (TRACER) cosmic-ray detector, first flown on long-duration balloon (LDB) in 2003 for observations of the major primary cosmic-ray nuclei from oxygen (Z = 8) to iron (Z = 26), has been upgraded to also measure the energies of the lighter nuclei, including the secondary species boron (Z = 5). The instrument was used in another LDB flight in 2006. The properties and performance of the modified detector system are described, and the analysis of the data from the 2006 flight is discussed. The energy spectra of the primary nuclei carbon (Z = 6), oxygen, and iron over the range from 1 GeV amu{sup -1} to 2 TeV amu{sup -1} are reported. The data for oxygen and iron are found to be in good agreement with the results of the previous TRACER flight. The measurement of the energy spectrum of boron also extends into the TeV amu{sup -1} region. The relative abundances of the primary nuclei, such as carbon, oxygen, and iron, above {approx}10 GeV amu{sup -1} are independent of energy, while the boron abundance, i.e., the B/C abundance ratio, decreases with energy as expected. However, there is an indication that the previously reported E {sup -0.6} dependence of the B/C ratio does not continue to the highest energies.

  2. Hybrid energy harvesting systems, using piezoelectric elements and dielectric polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornogolub, Alexandru; Cottinet, Pierre-Jean; Petit, Lionel

    2016-09-01

    Interest in energy harvesting applications has increased a lot during recent years. This is especially true for systems using electroactive materials like dielectric polymers or piezoelectric materials. Unfortunately, these materials despite multiple advantages, present some important drawbacks. For example, many dielectric polymers demonstrated high energy densities; they are cheap, easy to process and can be easily integrated in many different structures. But at the same time, dielectric polymer generators require an external energy supply which could greatly compromise their autonomy. Piezoelectric systems, on the other hand, are completely autonomous and can be easily miniaturized. However, most common piezoelectric materials present a high rigidity and are brittle by nature and therefore their integration could be difficult. This paper investigates the possibility of using hybrid systems combining piezoelectric elements and dielectric polymers for mechanical energy harvesting applications and it is focused mainly on the problem of electrical energy transfer. Our objective is to show that such systems can be interesting and that it is possible to benefit from the advantages of both materials. For this, different configurations were considered and the problem of their optimization was addressed. The experimental work enabled us to prove the concept and identify the main practical limitations.

  3. Study on the validity region of Energy Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangjie; Chen, Hualing; Zhu, Danhui; Zhang, Wenbo

    2014-04-01

    The validity domain of Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) is studied in this paper. The validity region and criterion of EFEA are studied theoretically from the formation of reverberant plane wave field, one of the main assumptions of EFEA. The studies are acquired by virtue of the equation of radiative energy transfer method, a similar wave method that can express the direct field and its conversion relationship with reverberant field exactly. The result shows that the SEA criterion of diffuse field derived by Le Bot can be used as a good indicator for the EFEA validity. Numerical simulations on a rectangular plate with different physical parameters are applied to validate the criterion. The validity region and the diagrams of validity of EFEA are assessed and discussed. Some noteworthy conclusions about EFEA are drawn.

  4. The cyclopropene radical cation: Rovibrational level structure at low energies from high-resolution photoelectron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilatou, K.; Michaud, J. M.; Baykusheva, D.; Grassi, G.; Merkt, F.

    2014-08-14

    The cyclopropene radical cation (c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +}) is an important but poorly characterized three-membered-ring hydrocarbon. We report on a measurement of the high-resolution photoelectron and photoionization spectra of cyclopropene and several deuterated isotopomers, from which we have determined the rovibrational energy level structure of the X{sup ~+} {sup 2}B{sub 2} ground electronic state of c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +} at low energies for the first time. The synthesis of the partially deuterated isotopomers always resulted in mixtures of several isotopomers, differing in their number of D atoms and in the location of these atoms, so that the photoelectron spectra of deuterated samples are superpositions of the spectra of several isotopomers. The rotationally resolved spectra indicate a C{sub 2v}-symmetric R{sub 0} structure for the ground electronic state of c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +}. Two vibrational modes of c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +} are found to have vibrational wave numbers below 300 cm{sup −1}, which is surprising for such a small cyclic hydrocarbon. The analysis of the isotopic shifts of the vibrational levels enabled the assignment of the lowest-frequency mode (fundamental wave number of ≈110 cm{sup −1} in c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +}) to the CH{sub 2} torsional mode (ν{sub 8}{sup +}, A{sub 2} symmetry) and of the second-lowest-frequency mode (≈210 cm{sup −1} in c-C{sub 3}H{sub 4}{sup +}) to a mode combining a CH out-of-plane with a CH{sub 2} rocking motion (ν{sub 15}{sup +}, B{sub 2} symmetry). The potential energy along the CH{sub 2} torsional coordinate is flat near the equilibrium structure and leads to a pronounced anharmonicity.

  5. Source spectra, moment, and energy for recent eastern mediterranean earthquakes: calibration of international monitoring system stations

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K M; Hofstetter, A; Rodgers, A J; Walter, W R

    2000-07-26

    In the past several years there have been several large (M{sub w} > 7.0) earthquakes in the eastern Mediterranean region (Gulf of Aqaba, Racha, Adana, etc.), many of which have had aftershock deployments by local seismological organizations. In addition to providing ground truth data (GT << 5 km) that is used in regional location calibration and validation, the waveform data can be used to aid in calibrating regional magnitudes, seismic discriminants, and velocity structure. For small regional events (m{sub b} << 4.5), a stable, accurate magnitude is essential in the development of realistic detection threshold curves, proper magnitude and distance amplitude correction processing, formation of an M{sub s}:m{sub b} discriminant, and accurate yield determination of clandestine nuclear explosions. Our approach provides a stable source spectra from which M{sub w} and m{sub b} can be obtained without regional magnitude biases. Once calibration corrections are obtained for earthquakes, the coda-derived source spectra exhibit strong depth-dependent spectral peaking when the same corrections are applied to explosions at the Nevada Test Site (Mayeda and Walter, 1996), chemical explosions in the recent ''Depth of Burial'' experiment in Kazahkstan (Myers et al., 1999), and the recent nuclear test in India. For events in the western U.S. we found that total seismic energy, E, scales as M{sub o}{sup 0.25} resulting in more radiated energy than would be expected under the assumptions of constant stress-drop scaling. Preliminary results for events in the Middle East region also show this behavior, which appears to be the result of intermediate spectra fall-off (f{sup 1.5}) for frequencies ranging between {approx}0.1 and 0.8 Hz for the larger events. We developed a Seismic Analysis Code (SAC) coda processing command that reads in an ASCII flat file that contains calibration information specific for a station and surrounding region, then outputs a coda-derived source spectra

  6. Energy Spectra of Higher Reynolds Number Turbulence by the DNS with up to 122883 Grid Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Kaneda, Yukio; Morishita, Koji; Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Uno, Atsuya

    2014-11-01

    Large-scale direct numerical simulations (DNS) of forced incompressible turbulence in a periodic box with up to 122883 grid points have been performed using K computer. The maximum Taylor-microscale Reynolds number Rλ, and the maximum Reynolds number Re based on the integral length scale are over 2000 and 105, respectively. Our previous DNS with Rλ up to 1100 showed that the energy spectrum has a slope steeper than - 5 / 3 (the Kolmogorov scaling law) by factor 0 . 1 at the wavenumber range (kη < 0 . 03). Here η is the Kolmogorov length scale. Our present DNS at higher resolutions show that the energy spectra with different Reynolds numbers (Rλ > 1000) are well normalized not by the integral length-scale but by the Kolmogorov length scale, at the wavenumber range of the steeper slope. This result indicates that the steeper slope is not inherent character in the inertial subrange, and is affected by viscosity.

  7. Single molecule studies of a ladder type conjugated polymer: vibronic spectra, line widths, and energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Zickler, Martin F; Feist, Florian A; Jacob, Josemon; Müllen, Klaus; Basché, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy are employed to investigate single poly(ladder-type pentaphenylene) (LPPentP) molecules dispersed in thin poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films at 1.2 K. Emission spectra of single chains show single as well as multi-chromophore emission indicating variegated communication along the chains. The vibronic structure in the emission spectra resembles the one found for other ladder-type polymers. Purely electronic zero-phonon lines in emission are substantially broadened, most probably due to fast spectral diffusion. By surmounting the limitations of emission spectroscopy, nonemitting donor chromophores, which transfer their excitation energy in a radiationless manner to emitting chromophores, are accessed by excitation spectroscopy. Remarkably, by comparing the data of emitting and nonemitting chromophores a contribution to the zero-phonon excitation line width has to be considered which places a lower limit on the estimated energy transfer time of several picoseconds between adjacent chromophores. Finally, the data indicate qualitatively a restricted flexibility of LPPentP compared to poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV).

  8. Planck Early Results. XV. Spectral Energy Distributions and Radio Continuum Spectra of Northern Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Amaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Berdyugin, A.; Bernard, J. P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources. based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multi frequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase of development, shape the radio spectra as they move in the relativistic jet. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data, including the Planck ERCSC data, were calculated. SED modelling methods are discussed, with an emphasis on proper. physical modelling of the synchrotron bump using multiple components. Planck ERCSC data also suggest that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum could be much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The implications of this are discussed for the acceleration mechanisms effective in blazar shock. Furthermore in many cases the Planck data indicate that gamma-ray emission must originate in the same shocks that produce the radio emission.

  9. High energy cosmic ray physics with underground muons in MACRO. II. Primary spectra and composition

    SciTech Connect

    Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Castellano, M.; De Cataldo, G.; De Marzo, C.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Giglietto, N.; Guarnaccia, P.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Montaruli, T.; Raino, A.; Spinelli, P.; Cecchini, S.; Dekhissi, H.; Fantini, R.; Giacomelli, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Margiotta-Neri, A.; Patrizii, L.; Popa, V.; Serra-Lugaresi, P.; Spurio, M.; Togo, V.; Hong, J.T.; Kearns, E.; Okada, C.; Orth, C.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Barish, B.C.; Goretti, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Michael, D.G.; Nolty, R.; Peck, C.W.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C.W.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Battistoni, G.; Bilokon, H.; Bloise, C.; Carboni, M.; Chiarella, V.; Forti, C.; Iarocci, E.; Marini, A.; Patera, V.; Ronga, F.; Satta, L.; Sciubba, A.; Spinetti, M.; Valente, V.; Antolini, R.; Bosio, T.; Di Credico, A.; Grillo, A.; Gustavino, C.; Mikheyev, S.; Parlati, S.; Reynoldson, J.; Scapparone, E.; Bower, C.; Habig, A.; Hawthorne, A.; Heinz, R.; Miller, L.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; De Mitri, I.; Monacelli, P.; Bernardini, P.; Mancarella, G.; Martello, D.; Palamara, O.; Petrera, S.; Pistilli, P.; Ricciardi, M.; Surdo, A.; Baker, R.; and others

    1997-08-01

    Multimuon data from the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso have been analyzed using a new method, which allows one to estimate the primary cosmic ray fluxes. The estimated all-particle spectrum is higher and flatter than the one obtained from direct measurements but is consistent with EAS array measurements. The spectral indexes of the fitted energy spectrum are 2.56{plus_minus}0.05 for E{lt}500 TeV and 2.9{plus_minus}0.3 for E{gt}5000 TeV with a gradual change at intermediate energies. The average mass number shows little dependence on the primary energy below 1000 TeV, with a value of 10.1{plus_minus}2.5 at 100 TeV. At higher energies the best fit average mass shows a mild increase with energy, even though no definite conclusion can be reached taking into account errors. The fitted spectra cover a range from {approximately} 50 TeV up to several thousand TeV. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Neutron energy spectra unfolding from foil activation detector measurements with MINUIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghour, A.; Seghour, F. Z.

    2005-12-01

    A method for unfolding neutron energy spectra from foil activation measurements using the multiparameter function minimisation routine MINUIT of Cernlib has been developed. It is based on the expansion of the neutron energy distribution on a set of parameters that are fitted to minimise the square sum of differences between the measured and calculated activities under smoothness and shape constraints. A modified square sum of differences expression weighted by each activation detector response contribution over the whole neutron energy range is proposed and compared with the classical square sum formulation. The proposed unfolding procedure is first illustrated by a set of 15 detectors to simulate reaction rates calculated using a typical neutron reactor energy spectrum. The demonstration of the proposed method is next achieved using measured reaction rates of the Arkansas Nuclear One power plant (ANO) benchmark spectrum of the Neutron Metrology File (NMF-90). Results of the proposed method were compared with those obtained by STAYNL and MSANDB unfolding codes using the same input data and were found in good agreement with the measured activities. The developed procedure is found to have an interesting advantage in unfolding neutron energy distribution in cases of a lack of information on the a priori solution. This has been illustrated by unfolding the JOYO MK-II fast breeder reactor neutron spectrum, using a set of experimental activation rates without a guess solution.

  11. Energy spectra of massive two-body decay products and mass measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Hong, Sungwoo; Kim, Doojin

    2016-04-26

    Here, we have recently established a new method for measuring the mass of unstable particles produced at hadron colliders based on the analysis of the energy distribution of a massless product from their two-body decays. The central ingredient of our proposal is the remarkable result that, for an unpolarized decaying particle, the location of the peak in the energy distribution of the observed decay product is identical to the (fixed) value of the energy that this particle would have in the rest-frame of the decaying particle, which, in turn, is a simple function of the involved masses. In addition, we utilized the property that this energy distribution is symmetric around the location of peak when energy is plotted on a logarithmic scale. The general strategy was demonstrated in several specific cases, including both beyond the standard model particles, as well as for the top quark. In the present work, we generalize this method to the case of a massive decay product from a two-body decay; this procedure is far from trivial because (in general) both the above-mentioned properties are no longer valid. Nonetheless, we propose a suitably modified parametrization of the energy distribution that was used successfully for the massless case, which can deal with the massive case as well. We test this parametrization on concrete examples of energy spectra of Z bosons from the decay of a heavier supersymmetric partner of top quark (stop) into a Z boson and a lighter stop. After establishing the accuracy of this parametrization, we study a realistic application for the same process, but now including dominant backgrounds and using foreseeable statistics at LHC14, in order to determine the performance of this method for an actual mass measurement. The upshot of our present and previous work is that, in spite of energy being a Lorentz-variant quantity, its distribution emerges as a powerful tool for mass measurement at hadron colliders.

  12. Energy spectra of massive two-body decay products and mass measurement

    DOE PAGES

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Hong, Sungwoo; ...

    2016-04-26

    Here, we have recently established a new method for measuring the mass of unstable particles produced at hadron colliders based on the analysis of the energy distribution of a massless product from their two-body decays. The central ingredient of our proposal is the remarkable result that, for an unpolarized decaying particle, the location of the peak in the energy distribution of the observed decay product is identical to the (fixed) value of the energy that this particle would have in the rest-frame of the decaying particle, which, in turn, is a simple function of the involved masses. In addition, wemore » utilized the property that this energy distribution is symmetric around the location of peak when energy is plotted on a logarithmic scale. The general strategy was demonstrated in several specific cases, including both beyond the standard model particles, as well as for the top quark. In the present work, we generalize this method to the case of a massive decay product from a two-body decay; this procedure is far from trivial because (in general) both the above-mentioned properties are no longer valid. Nonetheless, we propose a suitably modified parametrization of the energy distribution that was used successfully for the massless case, which can deal with the massive case as well. We test this parametrization on concrete examples of energy spectra of Z bosons from the decay of a heavier supersymmetric partner of top quark (stop) into a Z boson and a lighter stop. After establishing the accuracy of this parametrization, we study a realistic application for the same process, but now including dominant backgrounds and using foreseeable statistics at LHC14, in order to determine the performance of this method for an actual mass measurement. The upshot of our present and previous work is that, in spite of energy being a Lorentz-variant quantity, its distribution emerges as a powerful tool for mass measurement at hadron colliders.« less

  13. Impact of rare earth element added filters on the X-ray beam spectra: a Monte Carlo approach.

    PubMed

    Eskandarlou, Amir; Jafari, Amir Abbas; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Zehtabian, Mehdi; Faghihi, Reza; Shokri, Abbas; Pourolajal, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of added filters including conventional and rare earth materials for dental radiography tasks was investigated using a simulation approach. Current study focuses on the combination of a range of various filters to investigate the reduction of radiation absorbed dose and improving the quality of a radiography image. To simulate the X-ray beam spectrum, a MCNP5 code was applied. Relative intensity, beam quality, and mean energy were investigated for a typical dental radiography machine. The impact of different rare-earth materials with different thicknesses and tube voltages on the X-ray spectrum was investigated. For Aluminum as a conventional filter, the modeled X-ray spectra and HVL values were in a good agreement with those reported by IPEM. The results showed that for a 70 kVp voltage, with an increase of the thickness and atomic number of a given added filters, an increase of HVL values were observed. However, with the increase of the attenuator thickness, X-ray beam intensity decreases. For mean energy, different results were observed. It was also found that rare earth made filters reduce high energy X-ray radiation due to k-edge absorption. This leads to an ideal beam for intra-oral radiography tasks. However, as a disadvantage of rare earth added filters, the reduction of the tube output levels should also be considered.

  14. Energy Spectra, Composition, and Other Properties of Ground-Level Events During Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; COhen, C. M. S.; Labrador, A. W.; Leske, R. A.; Looper, M. D.; Haggerty, D. K.; Mason, G. M.; Mazur, J. E.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2012-01-01

    We report spacecraft measurements of the energy spectra of solar protons and other solar energetic particle properties during the 16 Ground Level Events (GLEs) of Solar Cycle 23. The measurements were made by eight instruments on the ACE, GOES, SAMPBX, and STEREO spacecraft and extend from approximately 0.1 to approximately 500-700 MeV. All of the proton spectra exhibit spectral breaks at energies ranging from approximately 2 to approximately 46 MeV and all are well fit by a double power-law shape. A comparison of GLE events with a larger sample of other solar energetic particle (SEP) events shows that the typical spectral indices are harder in GLE events, with a mean slope of -3.18 at greater than 40 MeV/nuc. In the energy range 45 to 80 MeV/nucleon about approximately 50% of GLE events have properties in common with impulsive He-3-rich SEP events, including enrichments in Ne/O, Fe/O, Ne-22/Ne-20, and elevated mean charge states of Fe. These He-3 rich events contribute to the seed population accelerated by CME-driven shocks. An analysis is presented of whether highly-ionized Fe ions observed in five events could be due to electron stripping during shock acceleration in the low corona. Making use of stripping calculations by others and a coronal density model, we can account for events with mean Fe charge states of (Q(sub Fe) is approximately equal to +20 if the acceleration starts at approximately 1.24-1.6 solar radii, consistent with recent comparisons of CME trajectories and type-II radio bursts. In addition, we suggest that gradual stripping of remnant ions from earlier large SEP events may also contribute a highly-ionized suprathermal seed population. We also discuss how observed SEP spectral slopes relate to the energetics of particle acceleration in GLE and other large SEP events.

  15. Magnetic field effects on the energy deposition spectra of MV photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, C; Stanescu, T; Fallone, B G

    2009-01-21

    Several groups worldwide have proposed various concepts for improving megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy that involve irradiating patients in the presence of a magnetic field-either for image guidance in the case of hybrid radiotherapy-MRI machines or for purposes of introducing tighter control over dose distributions. The presence of a magnetic field alters the trajectory of charged particles between interactions with the medium and thus has the potential to alter energy deposition patterns within a sub-cellular target volume. In this work, we use the MC radiation transport code PENELOPE with appropriate algorithms invoked to incorporate magnetic field deflections to investigate electron energy fluence in the presence of a uniform magnetic field and the energy deposition spectra within a 10 microm water sphere as a function of magnetic field strength. The simulations suggest only very minor changes to the electron fluence even for extremely strong magnetic fields. Further, calculations of the dose-averaged lineal energy indicate that a magnetic field strength of at least 70 T is required before beam quality will change by more than 2%.

  16. Charge composition and energy spectra of ancient solar flare heavy nuclei. [in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, J. N.; Lal, D.; Macdougall, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear tracks in olivine grains from three carbonaceous chondrites are analyzed to determine the energy spectra and charge compositions of solar flare heavy nuclei during the early history of the solar system. Track length measurements of grains irradiated before compaction into meteorites over 4 billion years ago were performed accompanied by calibration experiments using heavy ion beams from an accelerator to identify tracks formed by very heavy (Z between 20 and 28) and very very heavy (Z greater than or equal to 30) groups of nuclei in the Murchison, Murray and Cold Bokkeveld meteorite grains. The time-averaged spectral shape of the solar flare very heavy nuclei is found to be similar to that obtained in lunar sample studies and direct observations. The meteorite grains also reproduce the currently observed enrichment of low-energy heavy ions in solar cosmic rays with respect to photospheric levels, with enhancement factors from 2 to 12 in the energy interval 6-10 MeV/n. Variations of very very heavy/very heavy nuclei abundance ratios within individual kinetic energy intervals are interpreted as representing possible changes of solar flare activity on time scales of 10,000 years.

  17. Free-energy predictions and absorption spectra calculations for supramolecular nanocarriers and their photoactive cargo.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Adriana; Tang, Sicheng; Raymo, Françisco M

    2017-04-13

    We reconstructed the free-energy landscape for supramolecular nanoparticles of amphiphilic methacrylated-based co-polymers. Their self-assembly in aqueous solution and encapsulation of borondipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivatives were enforced through atomistic free-energy simulations. The BODIPY binding modes detected in each of the free-energy basins were validated through a comparison of theoretical absorption spectra, calculated at the TD-DFT level, to their experimental counterparts. The nanoparticle distribution is controlled within a thermodynamic regime, with free-energy barriers approaching 8 kcal mol(-1), enabling the existence of different-sized nanoparticles in aqueous solution at room temperature. Two types of supramolecular morphologies were identified. One is compact and spherical in shape and the other is large and donut-like, with the former more stable than the latter by 4 kcal mol(-1). The morphology of the supramolecular host affects the binding mode of the BODIPY guests. Stacked BODIPY aggregates are encapsulated in the spherical nanocarriers, whereas isolated chromophores associate with the donut-shaped assemblies.

  18. BATSE observations of gamma-ray burst spectra. 2: Peak energy evolution in bright, long bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, L. A.; Band, D. L.; Matteson, J. L.; Briggs, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Preece, R. D.; Paciesas, W. S.; Teegarden, B. J.; Palmer, D. M.; Schaefer, B. E.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate spectral evolution in 37 bright, long gamma-ray bursts observed with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) spectroscopy detectors. High-resolution spectra are chracterized by the energy of the peak of nu F(sub nu), and the evolution of this quantity is examined relative to the emission intensity. In most cases it is found that this peak energy either rises with or slightly precedes major intensity increases and softens for the remainder of the pulse. Interpulse emission is generally harder early in the burst. For bursts with multiple intensity pulses, later spikes tend to be softer than earlier ones, indicating that the energy of the peak of nu F(sub nu) is bounded by an envelope which decays with time. Evidence is found that bursts in which the bulk of the flux comes well after the event which triggers the instrument tend to show less peak energy variability and are not as hard as several bursts in which the emission occurs promptly after the trigger. Several recently proposed burst models are examined in light of these results and no qualitative conflicts with the observations presented here are found.

  19. Neutron Energy Spectra and Yields from the 7Li(p,n) Reaction for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessler, M.; Friedman, M.; Schmidt, S.; Shor, A.; Berkovits, D.; Cohen, D.; Feinberg, G.; Fiebiger, S.; Krása, A.; Paul, M.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Reifarth, R.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrons produced by the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction close to threshold are widely used to measure the cross section of s-process nucleosynthesis reactions. While experiments have been performed so far with Van de Graaff accelerators, the use of RF accelerators with higher intensities is planned to enable investigations on radioactive isotopes. In parallel, high-power Li targets for the production of high-intensity neutrons at stellar energies are developed at Goethe University (Frankfurt, Germany) and SARAF (Soreq NRC, Israel). However, such setups pose severe challenges for the measurement of the proton beam intensity or the neutron fluence. In order to develop appropriate methods, we studied in detail the neutron energy distribution and intensity produced by the thick-target 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and compared them to state-of- the-art simulation codes. Measurements were performed with the bunched and chopped proton beam at the Van de Graaff facility of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) using the time-of-flight (TOF) technique with thin (1/8") and thick (1") detectors. The importance of detailed simulations of the detector structure and geometry for the conversion of TOF to a neutron energy is stressed. The measured neutron spectra are consistent with those previously reported and agree well with Monte Carlo simulations that include experimentally determined 7Li(p,n) cross sections, two-body kinematics and proton energy loss in the Li-target.

  20. Impact of low-energy photons on the characteristics of prompt fission γ -ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, A.; Billnert, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we report on a new study of prompt γ -rays from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf . Photons were measured in coincidence with fission fragments by employing four different lanthanide halide scintillation detectors. Together with results from a previous work of ours, we determined characteristic parameters with high precision, such as the average γ -ray multiplicity ν¯γ=(8.29 ±0.13 ), the average energy per photon ɛγ=(0.80 ±0.02 ) MeV, and the total γ -ray energy release per fission Eγ ,tot=(6.65 ±0.10 ) MeV. The excellent agreement between the individual results obtained in all six measurements proves the good repeatability of the applied experimental technique. The impact of low-energy photons, i.e., below 500 keV, on prompt fission γ -ray spectra characteristics has been investigated as well by comparing our results with those taken with the DANCE detector system, which appears to suffer from absorption effects in the low-energy region. Correction factors for this effect were estimated, giving results comparable to ours as well as to historical ones. From this we demonstrate that the different techniques of determining the average γ -ray multiplicity, either from a properly measured and normalized spectrum or a measured multiplicity distribution, give equivalent and consistent results.

  1. Modeling of fluorescence line-narrowed spectra in weakly coupled dimers in the presence of excitation energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chen; Reppert, Mike; Feng, Ximao; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2014-07-21

    This work describes simple analytical formulas to describe the fluorescence line-narrowed (FLN) spectra of weakly coupled chromophores in the presence of excitation energy transfer (EET). Modeling studies for dimer systems (assuming low fluence and weak coupling) show that the FLN spectra (including absorption and emission spectra) calculated for various dimers using our model are in good agreement with spectra calculated by: (i) the simple convolution method and (ii) the more rigorous treatment using the Redfield approach [T. Renger and R. A. Marcus, J. Chem. Phys. 116, 9997 (2002)]. The calculated FLN spectra in the presence of EET of all three approaches are very similar. We argue that our approach provides a simplified and computationally more efficient description of FLN spectra in the presence of EET. This method also has been applied to FLN spectra obtained for the CP47 antenna complex of Photosystem II reported by Neupane et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 4214 (2010)], which indicated the presence of uncorrelated EET between pigments contributing to the two lowest energy (overlapping) exciton states, each mostly localized on a single chromophore. Calculated and experimental FLN spectra for CP47 complex show very good qualitative agreement.

  2. CODA-DERIVED SOURCE SPECTRA, MOMENT MAGNITUDES, AND ENERGY-MOMENT SCALING IN THE WESTERN ALPS

    SciTech Connect

    Morasca, P; Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Walter, W

    2004-02-03

    A stable estimate of the earthquake source spectra in the western Alps is obtained using an empirical method based on coda envelope amplitude measurements described by Mayeda et al. (2003) for events ranging between M{sub W} {approx} 1.0 to {approx}5.0. We calibrated path corrections for consecutive narrow frequency bands ranging between 0.2 and 25.0-Hz using a simple 1-D model for 5 three-component stations of the Regional Seismic network of Northwestern Italy (RSNI). The 1-D assumption performs well, even though the region is characterized by a complex structural setting involving strong lateral variations in the Moho depth. For frequencies less than 1.0-Hz, we tied our dimensionless, distance-corrected coda amplitudes to an absolute scale in units of dyne-cm by using independent moment magnitudes from long-period waveform modeling for 3 moderate magnitude events in the region. For the higher frequencies, we used small events as empirical Green's functions, with corner frequencies above 25.0-Hz. For each station, the procedure yields frequency-dependent corrections that account for site effects, including those related to f{sub max}, as well as those related to S-to-coda transfer function effects. After the calibration was completed, the corrections were applied to the entire data-set composed of 957 events. Our findings using the coda-derived source spectra are summarized as follows: (1) We derived stable estimates of seismic moment, M{sub 0}, (and hence M{sub W}) as well as radiated S-wave energy, (E{sub S}), from waveforms recorded by as few as one station, for events that were too small to be waveform modeled (i.e., events less than M{sub W} {approx}3.5); (2) The source spectra were used to derive an equivalent local magnitude, M{sub L(coda)}, that is in excellent agreement with the network averaged values using direct S-waves; (3) Scaled energy, {tilde e} = E{sub R}/M{sub 0}, where E{sub R}, the radiated seismic energy, is comparable to results from other

  3. Large-scale kinetic energy spectra from Eulerian analysis of EOLE wind data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desbois, M.

    1975-01-01

    A data set of 56,000 winds determined from the horizontal displacements of EOLE balloons at the 200 mb level in the Southern Hemisphere during the period October 1971-February 1972 is utilized for the computation of planetary- and synoptic-scale kinetic energy space spectra. However, the random distribution of measurements in space and time presents some problems for the spectral analysis. Two different approaches are used, i.e., a harmonic analysis of daily wind values at equi-distant points obtained by space-time interpolation of the data, and a correlation method using the direct measurements. Both methods give similar results for small wavenumbers, but the second is more accurate for higher wavenumbers (k above or equal to 10). The spectra show a maximum at wavenumbers 5 and 6 due to baroclinic instability and then decrease for high wavenumbers up to wavenumber 35 (which is the limit of the analysis), according to the inverse power law k to the negative p, with p close to 3.

  4. High energy X-ray spectra of cygnus XR-1 observed from OSO-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    X-ray spectra of Cygnus XR-1 were measured with the scintillation spectrometer on board the OSO-8 satellite during a period of one and one-half to three weeks in each of the years from 1975 to 1977. Observations were made when the source was both in a high state and in a low state. Typical spectra of the source between 15 and 250 keV are presented. The observed pivoting effect is consistent with two temperature accretion disk models of the X-ray emitting region. No significant break in the spectrum occurred at energies up to 150 keV. The high state as defined in the 3 to 6 keV bandwidth was found to be the higher luminosity state of the X-ray source. One transition from a low to a high state occurred during observations. The time of occurrence of this and other transitions is consistent with the hypothesis that all intensity transitions occur near periastron of the binary system, and that such transitions are caused by changes in the mass transfer rate between the primary and the accretion disk around the secondary.

  5. Modular multi-element high energy particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Coon, Darryl D.; Elliott, John P.

    1990-01-02

    Multi-element high energy particle detector modules comprise a planar heavy metal carrier of tungsten alloy with planar detector units uniformly distributed over one planar surface. The detector units are secured to the heavy metal carrier by electrically conductive adhesive so that the carrier serves as a common ground. The other surface of each planar detector unit is electrically connected to a feedthrough electrical terminal extending through the carrier for front or rear readout. The feedthrough electrical terminals comprise sockets at one face of the carrier and mating pins porjecting from the other face, so that any number of modules may be plugged together to create a stack of modules of any desired number of radiation lengths. The detector units each comprise four, preferably rectangular, p-i-n diode chips arranged around the associated feedthrough terminal to form a square detector unit providing at least 90% detector element coverage of the carrier. Integral spacers projecting from the carriers extend at least partially along the boundaries between detector units to space the p-i-n diode chips from adjacent carriers in a stack. The spacers along the perimeters of the modules are one-half the width of the interior spacers so that when stacks of modules are arranged side by side to form a large array of any size or shape, distribution of the detector units is uniform over the entire array.

  6. Modular multi-element high energy particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Coon, D.D.; Elliott, J.P.

    1990-01-02

    Multi-element high energy particle detector modules comprise a planar heavy metal carrier of tungsten alloy with planar detector units uniformly distributed over one planar surface. The detector units are secured to the heavy metal carrier by electrically conductive adhesive so that the carrier serves as a common ground. The other surface of each planar detector unit is electrically connected to a feedthrough electrical terminal extending through the carrier for front or rear readout. The feedthrough electrical terminals comprise sockets at one face of the carrier and mating pins projecting from the other face, so that any number of modules may be plugged together to create a stack of modules of any desired number of radiation lengths. The detector units each comprise four, preferably rectangular, p-i-n diode chips arranged around the associated feedthrough terminal to form a square detector unit providing at least 90% detector element coverage of the carrier. Integral spacers projecting from the carriers extend at least partially along the boundaries between detector units to space the p-i-n diode chips from adjacent carriers in a stack. The spacers along the perimeters of the modules are one-half the width of the interior spacers so that when stacks of modules are arranged side by side to form a large array of any size or shape, distribution of the detector units is uniform over the entire array. 5 figs.

  7. Low-Energy Excitation Spectra in the Excitonic Phase of Cobalt Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoki; Sugimoto, Koudai; Ohta, Yukinori

    2017-04-01

    We study the excitonic phase and low-energy excitation spectra of perovskite cobalt oxides. Constructing the five-orbital Hubbard model defined on the three-dimensional cubic lattice for the 3d bands of Pr0.5Ca0.5CoO3, we calculate the excitonic susceptibility in the normal state in the random-phase approximation (RPA) to show the presence of the instability toward excitonic condensation. On the basis of the excitonic ground state with a magnetic multipole obtained in the mean-field approximation, we calculate the dynamical susceptibility of the excitonic phase in the RPA and find that there appear a gapless collective excitation in the spin-transverse mode (Goldstone mode) and a gapful collective excitation in the spin-longitudinal mode (Higgs mode). The experimental relevance of our results is discussed.

  8. Unfolding neutron energy spectra from foil activation detector measurements with the Gold algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghour, A.; Seghour, F. Z.

    2001-01-01

    In this work, the Gold algorithm is applied to the unfolding of neutron reactor energy spectra from reaction rates data of multiple foil activation detectors. Such a method, which forms the basis of a developed unfolding computer program called SAYD, has the advantage of not requiring a priori knowledge on the spectrum in the unfolding process. The program SAYD is first illustrated by synthesized reaction rates data calculated using a semi-empirical formulation of a typical intermediate and fast neutron reactor spectrum. The demonstration of the unfolding program SAYD is next achieved using measured reaction rates of the Arkansas Nuclear One power plant (ANO) benchmark spectrum by comparing results of SAYD program with those obtained by STAYNL and MSANDB unfolding codes.

  9. Solar Modulation of Low-Energy Antiproton and Proton Spectra Measured by BESS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, John W.; Abe, Ko; Fuke, Hideyuki; Haino, Sadakazu; Hams, Thomas; Horikoshi, Atsushi; Kim, Ki-Chun; Lee, MooHyun; Makida, Yashuhiro; Matsuda, Shinya; Moiseev, Alexander; Nishimura, Jun; Nozaki, Mitsuaki

    2007-01-01

    The spectra of low-energy cosmic-ray protons and antiprotons have been measured by BESS in nine high-latitude balloon flights between 1993 and 2004. These measurements span a range of solar activity from the previous solar minimum through solar ma>:im%am and the onset of the present solar minimum, as well as a solar magnetic field reversal from positive to negative in 2000. Because protons and antiprotons differ only in charge sign, these simultaneous measurements provide a sensitive probe of charge dependent solar modulation. The antiproton to proton ratio measured by BESS is consistent with simple spherically symmetric models of solar modulation during the Sun's positive polarity phase, but favor charge-sign-dependent drift models during the negative phase. The BESS measurements will be presented and compared to various models of solar modulation.

  10. DT High Energy Measurements and Comparison of Multiple Spectra in a He-4 Gas Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Hannah E.; Zhu, Ting; Gokhale, Sasmit; Parker, Cody; Richard, Andrea; Massey, Thomas; Baciak, James E.; Enqvisst, Andreas; Jordan, Kelly A.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron spectroscopy is important for a variety of applications to nuclear energy, national security, and basic science research. Currently, organic scintillator neutron detectors are used as a diagnostic tool for neutron spectroscopy in DT fusion research. However, these neutron measurements generate contaminants in common organics from deuteron or carbon break-up that affects the light output spectrum. A potential solution to this problem is to use a He-4 fast neutron gas scintillator detector system. He-4 has excellent gamma rejection due to a low charge density, pulse shape discrimination, and lower light yield and deposited energy from gamma interactions. The detector will also not degrade due to high intensity background gamma radiation. The detector was irradiated with 14.1 MeV neutrons at the Edwards Accelerator Lab at Ohio University. We report on the effectiveness of the He-4 detector system to measure the resulting high energy neutrons and compare this spectrum to other neutron spectra taken with this detector.

  11. Neutron influences and energy spectra in the Cosmos-2044 biosatellite orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Akopova, A. B.; Melkumyan, L. V.; Rshtuni, Sh. B.; Benton, E, V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Joint Soviet-American measurements of the neutron component of space radiation (SR) were carried out during the flight of the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos-2044. Neutron flux densities and differential energy spectra were measured inside and on the external surface of the spacecraft. Three energy intervals were employed: thermal (E(sub n) less than or equal to 0.2 eV), resonance (0.2 eV less than E(sub n) less than 1.0 MeV) and fast (E(sub n) greater than or equal to 1.0 MeV) neutrons. The first two groups were measured with U.S. (6)LiF detectors, while fast neutrons were recorded both by U.S. fission foils and Soviet nuclear emulsions. Estimations were made of the contributions to absorbed and equivalent doses from each neutron energy interval and a correlation was presented between fast neutron fluxes, measured outside the satellite, and the phase of solar activity (SA). Average dose equivalent rates of 0.018 and 0.14 mrem d(exp -1) were measured for thermal and resonance neutrons, respectively, outside the spacecraft. The corresponding values for fast neutrons were 3.3 (U.S.) and 1.8 (U.S.S.R.) mrem d(exp -1). Inside the spacecraft, a value of 3.5 mrem d(exp -1) was found.

  12. Neutron fluences and energy spectra in the Cosmos-2044 biosatellite orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Akopova, A. B.; Melkumyan, L. V.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    Joint Soviet-American measurements of the neutron component of space radiation (SR) were carried out during the flight of the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos-2044. Neutron flux densities and differential energy spectra were measured inside and on the external surface of the spacecraft. Three energy intervals were employed: thermal (En < or = 0.2 eV), resonance (0.2 eV < En < 1.0 MeV) and fast (En > or = 1.0 MeV) neutrons. The first two groups were measured with U.S. 6LiF detectors, while fast neutrons were recorded both by U.S. fission foils and Soviet nuclear emulsions. Estimations were made of the contributions to absorbed and equivalent doses from each neutron energy interval and a correlation was presented between fast neutron fluxes, measured outside the satellite, and the phase of solar activity (SA). Average dose equivalent rates of 0.018 and 0.14 mrem d-1 were measured for thermal and resonance neutrons, respectively, outside the spacecraft. The corresponding values for fast neutrons were 3.3 (U.S.) and 1.8 (U.S.S.R.) mrem d-1. Inside the spacecraft, a value of 3.5 mrem d-1 was found.

  13. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1998-01-01

    The accomplishments of the participation in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest investigator program is summarized in this report. The work involved the study of Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET)/Total Absorption Shower Counter(TASC) flare data. The specific accomplishments were the use of the accelerator neutron measurements obtained at the University of New Hampshire to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution, and to determine a high energy neutron contribution to the emissions from the 1991 June 11, solar flare. The next step in the analysis of this event was doing fits to the TASC energy-loss spectra as a function of time. A significant hardening of the solar proton spectrum over time was found for the flare. Further data was obtained from the Yohkoh HXT time histories and images for the 1991 October 27 flare. The results to date demonstrate that the TASC spectral analysis contributes crucial information on the particle spectrum interacting at the Sun. The report includes a paper accepted for publication, a draft of a paper to be delivered at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference and an abstract of a paper to be presented at the Meeting of the American Physical Society.

  14. Accurate halo-model matter power spectra with dark energy, massive neutrinos and modified gravitational forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, A. J.; Heymans, C.; Lombriser, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Steele, O. I.; Winther, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an accurate non-linear matter power spectrum prediction scheme for a variety of extensions to the standard cosmological paradigm, which uses the tuned halo model previously developed in Mead et al. We consider dark energy models that are both minimally and non-minimally coupled, massive neutrinos and modified gravitational forces with chameleon and Vainshtein screening mechanisms. In all cases, we compare halo-model power spectra to measurements from high-resolution simulations. We show that the tuned halo-model method can predict the non-linear matter power spectrum measured from simulations of parametrized w(a) dark energy models at the few per cent level for k < 10 h Mpc-1, and we present theoretically motivated extensions to cover non-minimally coupled scalar fields, massive neutrinos and Vainshtein screened modified gravity models that result in few per cent accurate power spectra for k < 10 h Mpc-1. For chameleon screened models, we achieve only 10 per cent accuracy for the same range of scales. Finally, we use our halo model to investigate degeneracies between different extensions to the standard cosmological model, finding that the impact of baryonic feedback on the non-linear matter power spectrum can be considered independently of modified gravity or massive neutrino extensions. In contrast, considering the impact of modified gravity and massive neutrinos independently results in biased estimates of power at the level of 5 per cent at scales k > 0.5 h Mpc-1. An updated version of our publicly available HMCODE can be found at https://github.com/alexander-mead/hmcode.

  15. Observations of solar flare photon energy spectra from 20 keV to 7 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Watanabe, H.; Nitta, N.

    1985-01-01

    Solar flare photon energy spectra in the 20 keV to 7 MeV range are derived from the Apr. 1, Apr. 4, apr. 27 and May 13, 1981 flares. The flares were observed with a hard X-ray and a gamma-ray spectrometers on board the Hinotori satellite. The results show that the spectral shape varies from flare to flare and the spectra harden in energies above about 400 keV. Effects of nuclear line emission on the continuum and of higher energy electron bremsstrahlung are considered to explain the spectral hardening.

  16. Constructing multiscale gravitational energy spectra from molecular cloud surface density PDF - interplay between turbulence and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Xing; Burkert, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Gravity is believed to be important on multiple physical scales in molecular clouds. However, quantitative constraints on gravity are still lacking. We derive an analytical formula which provides estimates on multiscale gravitational energy distribution using the observed surface density probability distribution function (PDF). Our analytical formalism also enables one to convert the observed column density PDF into an estimated volume density PDF, and to obtain average radial density profile ρ(r). For a region with N_col ˜ N^{-γ _N}, the gravitational energy spectra is E_p(k)˜ k^{-4(1 - 1/γ _N)}. We apply the formula to observations of molecular clouds, and find that a scaling index of -2 of the surface density PDF implies that ρ ˜ r-2 and Ep(k) ˜ k-2. The results are valid from the cloud scale (a few parsec) to around ˜ 0.1 pc. Because of the resemblance the scaling index of the gravitational energy spectrum and the that of the kinetic energy power spectrum of the Burgers turbulence (where E ˜ k-2), our result indicates that gravity can act effectively against turbulence over a multitude of physical scales. This is the critical scaling index which divides molecular clouds into two categories: clouds like Orion and Ophiuchus have shallower power laws, and the amount of gravitational energy is too large for turbulence to be effective inside the cloud. Because gravity dominates, we call this type of cloud g-type clouds. On the other hand, clouds like the California molecular cloud and the Pipe nebula have steeper power laws, and turbulence can overcome gravity if it can cascade effectively from the large scale. We call this type of cloud t-type clouds. The analytical formula can be used to determine if gravity is dominating cloud evolution when the column density PDF can be reliably determined.

  17. R-matrix description of particle energy spectra produced by low-energy 3H + 3H reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Brune, C. R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; ...

    2015-07-20

    An R-matrix model for three-body final states is presented and applied to a recent measurement of the neutron energy spectrum from the 3H + 3H→ 2n + α reaction. The calculation includes the n alpha and n n interactions in the final state, angular momentum conservation, antisymmetrization, and the interference between different channels. A good fit to the measured spectrum is obtained, where clear evidence for the 5He ground state is observed. The model is also used to predict the alpha-particle spectrum from 3H + 3H as well as particle spectra from 3He + 3He. The R-matrix approach presented heremore » is very general, and can be adapted to a wide variety of problems with three-body final states.« less

  18. Comparison of measured and calculated neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra behind an in-line shielded duct

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.; Tang, J.S.

    1982-05-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV neutrons through a 0.30-m-diameter duct having a length-to-diameter ratio of 2.83 that is partially plugged with a 0.15 m diameter, 0.51 m long shield comprised of alternating layers of stainless steel type 304 and borated polyethylene have been carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared at several locations relative to the mouth of the duct. The measured spectra were obtained using an NE-213 liquid scintillator detector with pulse shape discrimination methods used to simultaneously resolve neutron and gamma ray events. The calculated spectra were obtained using a computer code network that incorporates two radiation transport methods: discrete ordinates (with P/sub 3/ multigroup cross sections) and Monte Carlo (with continuous point cross sections). The two radiation transport methods are required to account for neutrons that singly scatter from the duct to the detectors. The calculated and measured neutron energy spectra above 850 keV agree with 5 to 50% depending on detector location and neutron energy. The calculated and measured gamma ray energy spectra above 750 keV are also in favorable agreement, approx. 5 to 50%, depending on detector location and gamma ray energy.

  19. AUTOMATED ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION DETERMINATION AND CORRELATION OF PRECURSOR WITH PRODUCT IONS BASED ON ORTHOGONAL ACCELERATION, TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTRA

    EPA Science Inventory

    For more than a decade in our laboratory, elemental compositions of ions in mass spectra havebeen routinely determined by measuring exact masses and relative isotopic abundances of ions in isotopicclusters using a GC coupled to a double focusing mass spectrometer.1 HPLC interfac...

  20. Computer-aided screening system for cervical precancerous cells based on field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray images and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusman, Yessi; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Hasikin, Khairunnisa; Kurnia, Rahmadi; Osman, Noor Azuan Bin Abu; Teoh, Kean Hooi

    2016-10-01

    The capability of field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDX) to scan material structures at the microlevel and characterize the material with its elemental properties has inspired this research, which has developed an FE-SEM/EDX-based cervical cancer screening system. The developed computer-aided screening system consisted of two parts, which were the automatic features of extraction and classification. For the automatic features extraction algorithm, the image and spectra of cervical cells features extraction algorithm for extracting the discriminant features of FE-SEM/EDX data was introduced. The system automatically extracted two types of features based on FE-SEM/EDX images and FE-SEM/EDX spectra. Textural features were extracted from the FE-SEM/EDX image using a gray level co-occurrence matrix technique, while the FE-SEM/EDX spectra features were calculated based on peak heights and corrected area under the peaks using an algorithm. A discriminant analysis technique was employed to predict the cervical precancerous stage into three classes: normal, low-grade intraepithelial squamous lesion (LSIL), and high-grade intraepithelial squamous lesion (HSIL). The capability of the developed screening system was tested using 700 FE-SEM/EDX spectra (300 normal, 200 LSIL, and 200 HSIL cases). The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity performances were 98.2%, 99.0%, and 98.0%, respectively.

  1. Direct Observation of the Superconducting Energy Gap in the Conductivity Spectra of Thin Niobium Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronin, A. V.; Dressel, M.; Pimenov, A.; Loidl, A.; Roshchin, I. V.; Greene, L. H.

    1998-03-01

    High-quality niobium thin films are grown by planar magnetron sputter deposition on sapphire substrates. The electrodynamic response of Nb in the frequency range above and below the energy gap 2Δ is studied in both the normal and superconducting states. The amplitude and the phase of the transmission through the Nb film measured in the 5-30cm-1 frequency range using a coherent source interferometer allowed direct determination of both components of the complex conductivity. Below the superconducting transition temperature (T_c=8.3K for a 150Åthick film) the superconducting energy gap is observed to increase when the temperature is decreased. The temperature dependence of the conductivity spectra is described by BCS formalism with finite scattering. The gap is estimated to be 2Δ(0)=24cm-1 (3 meV) at T=0, therefore 2Δ(0)=4.1 k_bT_c. [1] ^Present Address: General Phys. Inst., RAS, Russia. Support: ^#BMBF (EKM 13N6917), Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Russian Foundation for Basic Research; ^*DoE through MRL (DEFG02-91ER45439). [1] A.V. Pronin et al., Phys.Rev.B (submitted).

  2. Nuclear composition and energy spectra in the 1969 April 12 solar-particle event.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Reames, D. V.

    1972-01-01

    Measurement of the charge composition for several of the multicharged nuclei and the energy spectra for hydrogen, helium, and medium (6 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 9) nuclei in the Apr. 12, 1969, solar-particle event. The energy/nucleon spectral shape of the medium nuclei was again the same as that of the helium nuclei, and the ratio of these two species was consistent with the present best average of 58 plus or minus 5. By combining the results obtained here with previous work, improved estimates of the Ne/O and Mg/O values of 0.16 plus or minus 0.03 and 0.056 plus or minus 0.014, respectively, were obtained. Silicon and sulfur abundances relative to O were determined to be 0.208 plus or minus 0.008 plus or minus 0.006, respectively, and 85% confidence upper limits for Ar and Ca relative to O of 0.017 and 0.010 were obtained. Previously, these last four nuclei had only been listed as a group.

  3. Charge, energy, and LET spectra measurements of charged particles in P0006 experiment of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Csige, I.; Oda, K.; Henke, R. P.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Frigo, L. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Derrickson, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements are under way of the charged particle radiation environment of the LDEF satellite using stacks of plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) placed in different locations of the satellite. In the initial work, the charge, energy, and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of charged particles were measured with CR-39 double layer PNTDs located on the west end of the satellite. Primary and secondary stopping heavy ions as well as relativistic galactic cosmic rays (mostly iron particles) were measured separately. The results will be compared with similar measurements in other locations on LDEF with different orientation and shielding conditions. The remarkably detailed study of the charged particle radiation environment of the LDEF satellite will lead to a better understanding of the radiation environment of the Space Station Freedom. It will enable more accurate prediction of single event upsets (SEUs) in microelectronics and, especially, more accurate assessment of the risk, contributed by the different components of the radiation field to the health and safety of crew members.

  4. FITPULS: a code for obtaining analytic fits to aggregate fission-product decay-energy spectra. [In FORTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    LaBauve, R.J.; George, D.C.; England, T.R.

    1980-03-01

    The operation and input to the FITPULS code, recently updated to utilize interactive graphics, are described. The code is designed to retrieve data from a library containing aggregate fine-group spectra (150 energy groups) from fission products, collapse the data to few groups (up to 25), and fit the resulting spectra along the cooling time axis with a linear combination of exponential functions. Also given in this report are useful results for aggregate gamma and beta spectra from the decay of fission products released from /sup 235/U irradiated with a pulse (10/sup -4/ s irradiation time) of thermal neutrons. These fits are given in 22 energy groups that are the first 22 groups of the LASL 25-group decay-energy group structure, and the data are expressed both as MeV per fission second and particles per fission second; these pulse functions are readily folded into finite fission histories. 65 figures, 11 tables.

  5. Neutron spectra and dose equivalents calculated in tissue for high-energy radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Followill, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrons are by-products of high-energy radiation therapy and a source of dose to normal tissues. Thus, the presence of neutrons increases a patient’s risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer. Although neutrons have been thoroughly studied in air, little research has been focused on neutrons at depths in the patient where radiosensitive structures may exist, resulting in wide variations in neutron dose equivalents between studies. In this study, we characterized properties of neutrons produced during high-energy radiation therapy as a function of their depth in tissue and for different field sizes and different source-to-surface distances (SSD). We used a previously developed Monte Carlo model of an accelerator operated at 18 MV to calculate the neutron fluences, energy spectra, quality factors, and dose equivalents in air and in tissue at depths ranging from 0.1 to 25 cm. In conjunction with the sharply decreasing dose equivalent with increased depth in tissue, the authors found that the neutron energy spectrum changed drastically as a function of depth in tissue. The neutron fluence decreased gradually as the depth increased, while the average neutron energy decreased sharply with increasing depth until a depth of approximately 7.5 cm in tissue, after which it remained nearly constant. There was minimal variation in the quality factor as a function of depth. At a given depth in tissue, the neutron dose equivalent increased slightly with increasing field size and decreasing SSD; however, the percentage depth-dose equivalent curve remained constant outside the primary photon field. Because the neutron dose equivalent, fluence, and energy spectrum changed substantially with depth in tissue, we concluded that when the neutron dose equivalent is being determined at a depth within a patient, the spectrum and quality factor used should be appropriate for depth rather than for in-air conditions. Alternately, an appropriate percent depth-dose equivalent curve should

  6. Element levels in birch and spruce wood ashes: green energy?

    PubMed

    Reimann, Clemens; Ottesen, Rolf Tore; Andersson, Malin; Arnoldussen, Arnold; Koller, Friedrich; Englmaier, Peter

    2008-04-15

    Production of wood ash has increased strongly in the last ten years due to the increasing popularity of renewable and CO(2)-neutral heat and energy production via wood burning. Wood ashes are rich in many essential plant nutrients. In addition they are alkaline. The idea of using the waste ash as fertiliser in forests is appealing. However, wood is also known for its ability to strongly enrich certain heavy metals from the underlying soils, e.g. Cd, without any anthropogenic input. Concentrations of 26 chemical elements (Ag, As, Au, B, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sb, Sr, Ti, and Zn) in 40 samples each of birch and spruce wood ashes collected along a 120 km long transect in southern Norway are reported. The observed maximum concentrations are 1.3 wt.% Pb, 4.4 wt.% Zn and 203 mg/kg Cd in birch wood ashes. Wood ashes can thus contain very high heavy metal concentrations. Spreading wood ashes in a forest is a major anthropogenic interference with the natural biogeochemical cycles. As with the use of sewage sludge in agriculture the use of wood ashes in forests clearly needs regulation.

  7. Channeling effects observed in energy-loss spectra of nitrogen ions scattered off a Pt(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, A.; Heiland, W.; Jensen, J.; Juaristi, J. I.; Arnau, A.

    2001-11-01

    We present measured energy-loss spectra of nitrogen ions, which are scattered off a (1×2) missing row reconstructed Pt(110) single-crystal surface. The primary energy is varied from below 1 keV up to above 1 MeV, i.e., 0.04v0energies. Experimental results are compared with theoretical energy-loss values obtained from trajectory and stopping power calculations of charged particles scattered under grazing incidence conditions from metallic surfaces. The stopping power is calculated using the scattering theory formalism. Different trajectory classes are found by the calculations and assigned to different contributions in the energy-loss spectra. Regarding the simplicity of the presented model the agreement with the experiment is good.

  8. [Vegetation stress spectra and their relations with the contents of metal elements within the plant leaves in metal mines in Heilongjiang].

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-bo; Zhou, Chao; Wang, Jin-nian

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, Duobao Mt. and Tong Mt. were taken as examples. The spectra of the crown or leaf of the vegetation were collected. Fourteen metal elements in the rock, soil (A, B, C) and vegetation (root, trunk, leaf), and biological chemical parameters were measured. It was indicated that different metal elements were selected and enriched in different vegetation. The red edge position (REP) and the absorbing depth are related to biological chemical parameters. A multivariable regression equation was built between the absorption depths and the contents of metal elements. The relative coefficients between the absorbing depths and chemical elements, including Co, Cu, N, Mo, Ag, Sb, W, Pb and As, are greater than 0.75. Thus, it is important to analyze and measure the contents of metal elements by hyper-spectral remote sensing of vegetation stress spectrum.

  9. AKARI observations of brown dwarfs. IV. Effect of elemental abundances on near-infrared spectra between 1.0 and 5.0 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Sorahana, S.; Yamamura, I.

    2014-09-20

    The detection of the CO{sub 2} absorption band at 4.2 μm in brown dwarf spectra by AKARI has made it possible to discuss CO{sub 2} molecular abundance in brown dwarf atmospheres. In our previous studies, we found an excess in the 4.2 μm CO{sub 2} absorption band of three brown dwarf spectra, and suggested that these deviations were caused by high C and O elemental abundances in their atmospheres. To validate this hypothesis, we have constructed a set of models of brown dwarf atmospheres with various elemental abundance patterns, and we investigate the variations of the molecular composition and the thermal structure, and how they affect the near-infrared spectra between 1.0 and 5.0 μm. The 4.2 μm CO{sub 2} absorption band in some late-L and T dwarfs taken by AKARI is stronger or weaker than predicted by corresponding models with solar abundance. By comparing the CO{sub 2} band in the model spectra to the observed near-infrared spectra, we confirm possible elemental abundance variations among brown dwarfs. We find that the band strength is especially sensitive to O abundance, but C is also needed to reproduce the entire near-infrared spectra. This result indicates that both the C and O abundances should increase and decrease simultaneously for brown dwarfs. We find that a weaker CO{sub 2} absorption band in a spectrum can also be explained by a model with lower 'C and O' abundances.

  10. Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) Predictions for a Floor-Equipped Composite Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2011-01-01

    Comet Enflow is a commercially available, high frequency vibroacoustic analysis software founded on Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) and Energy Boundary Element Analysis (EBEA). Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) was validated on a floor-equipped composite cylinder by comparing EFEA vibroacoustic response predictions with Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and experimental results. Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) predictions were made using the commercial software program VA One 2009 from ESI Group. The frequency region of interest for this study covers the one-third octave bands with center frequencies from 100 Hz to 4000 Hz.

  11. The origin of thermal component in the transverse momentum spectra in high energy hadronic processes

    DOE PAGES

    Bylinkin, Alexander A.; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Rostovtsev, Andrei A.

    2014-12-15

    The transverse momentum spectra of hadrons produced in high energy collisions can be decomposed into two components: the exponential ("thermal") and the power ("hard") ones. Recently, the H1 Collaboration has discovered that the relative strength of these two components in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) depends drastically upon the global structure of the event - namely, the exponential component is absent in the diffractive events characterized by a rapidity gap. We discuss the possible origin of this effect and speculate that it is linked to confinement. Specifically, we argue that the thermal component is due to the effective event horizon introducedmore » by the confining string, in analogy to the Hawking-Unruh effect. In diffractive events, the t-channel exchange is color-singlet and there is no fragmenting string - so the thermal component is absent. The slope of the soft component of the hadron spectrum in this picture is determined by the saturation momentum that drives the deceleration in the color field, and thus the Hawking-Unruh temperature. We analyze the data on non-diffractive pp collisions and find that the slope of the thermal component of the hadron spectrum is indeed proportional to the saturation momentum.« less

  12. Finite temperature effects on the X-ray absorption spectra of energy related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Tod; Prendergast, David

    2014-03-01

    We elucidate the role of room-temperature-induced instantaneous structural distortions in the Li K-edge X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of crystalline LiF, Li2SO4, Li2O, Li3N and Li2CO3 using high resolution X-ray Raman spectroscopy (XRS) measurements and first-principles density functional theory calculations within the eXcited electron and Core Hole (XCH) approach. Based on thermodynamic sampling via ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we find calculated XAS in much better agreement with experiment than those computed using the rigid crystal structure alone. We show that local instantaneous distortion of the atomic lattice perturbs the symmetry of the Li 1 s core-excited-state electronic structure, broadening spectral line-shapes and, in some cases, producing additional spectral features. This work was conducted within the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  13. The origin of thermal component in the transverse momentum spectra in high energy hadronic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bylinkin, Alexander A.; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Rostovtsev, Andrei A.

    2014-12-15

    The transverse momentum spectra of hadrons produced in high energy collisions can be decomposed into two components: the exponential ("thermal") and the power ("hard") ones. Recently, the H1 Collaboration has discovered that the relative strength of these two components in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) depends drastically upon the global structure of the event - namely, the exponential component is absent in the diffractive events characterized by a rapidity gap. We discuss the possible origin of this effect and speculate that it is linked to confinement. Specifically, we argue that the thermal component is due to the effective event horizon introduced by the confining string, in analogy to the Hawking-Unruh effect. In diffractive events, the t-channel exchange is color-singlet and there is no fragmenting string - so the thermal component is absent. The slope of the soft component of the hadron spectrum in this picture is determined by the saturation momentum that drives the deceleration in the color field, and thus the Hawking-Unruh temperature. We analyze the data on non-diffractive pp collisions and find that the slope of the thermal component of the hadron spectrum is indeed proportional to the saturation momentum.

  14. A comparison of depth dependence of dose and linear energy transfer spectra in aluminum and polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    A set of four tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs), with their detector heads at the centers of 0 (bare), 3, 7 and 9-inch-diameter aluminum spheres, were flown on Shuttle flight STS-89. Five such detectors at the centers of polyethylene spheres were flown 1 year earlier on STS-81. The results of dose-depth dependence for the two materials convincingly show the merits of using material rich in hydrogen to decrease the radiation exposure to the crew. A comparison of the calculated galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) absorbed dose and dose-equivalent rates using the radiation transport code HZETRN with nuclear fragmentation model NUCFRG2 and the measured GCR absorbed dose rates and dose-equivalent rates shows that they agree within root mean square (rms) error of 12.5 and 8.2%, respectively. However, there are significant depth-dependent differences in the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra. A comparison for trapped protons using the proton transport code BRYNTRN and the AP-8 MIN trapped-proton model shows a systematic bias, with the model underpredicting dose and dose-equivalent rates. These results show the need for improvements in the radiation transport and/or fragmentation models.

  15. Energy spectra unfolding of fast neutron sources using the group method of data handling and decision tree algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Abolfazl; Afrakoti, Iman Esmaili Paeen

    2017-04-01

    Accurate unfolding of the energy spectrum of a neutron source gives important information about unknown neutron sources. The obtained information is useful in many areas like nuclear safeguards, nuclear nonproliferation, and homeland security. In the present study, the energy spectrum of a poly-energetic fast neutron source is reconstructed using the developed computational codes based on the Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) and Decision Tree (DT) algorithms. The neutron pulse height distribution (neutron response function) in the considered NE-213 liquid organic scintillator has been simulated using the developed MCNPX-ESUT computational code (MCNPX-Energy engineering of Sharif University of Technology). The developed computational codes based on the GMDH and DT algorithms use some data for training, testing and validation steps. In order to prepare the required data, 4000 randomly generated energy spectra distributed over 52 bins are used. The randomly generated energy spectra and the simulated neutron pulse height distributions by MCNPX-ESUT for each energy spectrum are used as the output and input data. Since there is no need to solve the inverse problem with an ill-conditioned response matrix, the unfolded energy spectrum has the highest accuracy. The 241Am-9Be and 252Cf neutron sources are used in the validation step of the calculation. The unfolded energy spectra for the used fast neutron sources have an excellent agreement with the reference ones. Also, the accuracy of the unfolded energy spectra obtained using the GMDH is slightly better than those obtained from the DT. The results obtained in the present study have good accuracy in comparison with the previously published paper based on the logsig and tansig transfer functions.

  16. Preliminary investigations of Monte Carlo Simulations of neutron energy and LET spectra for fast neutron therapy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.K.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    No fast neutron therapy facility has been built with optimized beam quality based on a thorough understanding of the neutron spectrum and its resulting biological effectiveness. A study has been initiated to provide the information necessary for such an optimization. Monte Carlo studies will be used to simulate neutron energy spectra and LET spectra. These studies will be bench-marked with data taken at existing fast neutron therapy facilities. Results will also be compared with radiobiological studies to further support beam quality ptimization. These simulations, anchored by this data, will then be used to determine what parameters might be optimized to take full advantage of the unique LET properties of fast neutron beams. This paper will present preliminary work in generating energy and LET spectra for the Fermilab fast neutron therapy facility.

  17. COMPARISONS OF THE FINITE-ELEMENT-WITH-DISCONTIGUOUS-SUPPORT METHOD TO CONTINUOUS-ENERGY MONTE CARLO FOR PIN-CELL PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect

    A. T. Till; M. Hanuš; J. Lou; J. E. Morel; M. L. Adams

    2016-05-01

    The standard multigroup (MG) method for energy discretization of the transport equation can be sensitive to approximations in the weighting spectrum chosen for cross-section averaging. As a result, MG often inaccurately treats important phenomena such as self-shielding variations across a material. From a finite-element viewpoint, MG uses a single fixed basis function (the pre-selected spectrum) within each group, with no mechanism to adapt to local solution behavior. In this work, we introduce the Finite-Element-with-Discontiguous-Support (FEDS) method, whose only approximation with respect to energy is that the angular flux is a linear combination of unknowns multiplied by basis functions. A basis function is non-zero only in the discontiguous set of energy intervals associated with its energy element. Discontiguous energy elements are generalizations of bands and are determined by minimizing a norm of the difference between snapshot spectra and their averages over the energy elements. We begin by presenting the theory of the FEDS method. We then compare to continuous-energy Monte Carlo for one-dimensional slab and two-dimensional pin-cell problem. We find FEDS to be accurate and efficient at producing quantities of interest such as reaction rates and eigenvalues. Results show that FEDS converges at a rate that is approximately first-order in the number of energy elements and that FEDS is less sensitive to weighting spectrum than standard MG.

  18. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moix, Jeremy M.; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters.

  19. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moix, Jeremy M; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters.

  20. A Monte Carlo study of the energy spectra and transmission characteristics of scattered radiation from x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Platten, David John

    2014-06-01

    Existing data used to calculate the barrier transmission of scattered radiation from computed tomography (CT) are based on primary beam CT energy spectra. This study uses the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system and Epp user code to determine the energy spectra of CT scatter from four different primary CT beams passing through an ICRP 110 male reference phantom. Each scatter spectrum was used as a broad-beam x-ray source in transmission simulations through seventeen thicknesses of lead (0.00-3.50 mm). A fit of transmission data to lead thickness was performed to obtain α, β and γ parameters for each spectrum. The mean energy of the scatter spectra were up to 12.3 keV lower than that of the primary spectrum. For 120 kVp scatter beams the transmission through lead was at least 50% less than predicted by existing data for thicknesses of 1.5 mm and greater; at least 30% less transmission was seen for 140 kVp scatter beams. This work has shown that the mean energy and half-value layer of CT scatter spectra are lower than those of the corresponding primary beam. The transmission of CT scatter radiation through lead is lower than that calculated with currently available data. Using the data from this work will result in less lead shielding being required for CT scanner installations.

  1. Simulated vibrational spectra of aflatoxins and their demethylated products and the estimation of the energies of the demethylation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billes, Ferenc; Móricz, Ágnes M.; Tyihák, Ernő; Mikosch, Hans

    2006-06-01

    The structure of four natural mycotoxins, the aflatoxin B 1, B 2, G 1 and G 2 and their demethylated products were optimized with quantum chemical method. The energies and the thermodynamic functions of the molecules were calculated and applied to calculation of the reaction energies of the demethylations. Further results of the calculations are the vibrational force constants, the infrared spectra of the molecules and the assignments of the spectral bands.

  2. Comparison of univariate and multivariate models for prediction of major and minor elements from laser-induced breakdown spectra with and without masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb I.; Giguere, Stephen; Lepore, Kate; Byrne, Sarah; Boucher, Thomas; Carey, CJ; Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2016-09-01

    This study uses 1356 spectra from 452 geologically-diverse samples, the largest suite of LIBS rock spectra ever assembled, to compare the accuracy of elemental predictions in models that use only spectral regions thought to contain peaks arising from the element of interest versus those that use information in the entire spectrum. Results show that for the elements Si, Al, Ti, Fe, Mg, Ca, Na, K, Ni, Mn, Cr, Co, and Zn, univariate predictions based on single emission lines are by far the least accurate, no matter how carefully the region of channels/wavelengths is chosen and despite the prominence of the selected emission lines. An automated iterative algorithm was developed to sweep through all 5485 channels of data and select the single region that produces the optimal prediction accuracy for each element using univariate analysis. For the eight major elements, use of this technique results in a 35% improvement in prediction accuracy; for minors, the improvement is 13%. The best wavelength region choice for any given univariate analysis is likely to be an inherent property of the specific training set that cannot be generalized. In comparison, multivariate analysis using partial least-squares (PLS) almost universally outperforms univariate analysis. PLS using all the same wavelength regions from the univariate analysis produces results that improve in accuracy by 63% for major elements and 3% for minor element. This difference is likely a reflection of signal to noise ratios, which are far better for major elements than for minor elements, and likely limit their prediction accuracy by any technique. We also compare predictions using specific wavelength ranges for each element against those employing all channels. Masking out channels to focus on emission lines from a specific element that occurs decreases prediction accuracy for major elements but is useful for minor elements with low signals and proportionally much higher noise; use of PLS rather than univariate

  3. Analysis of Electron and Antineutrino Energy Spectra from Fissile Samples under Irradiation based on Gross Theory of Beta-decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Tachibana, T.; Chiba, S.

    2016-06-01

    We applied the gross theory of β-decay to calculate the reactor electron and antineutrino ({{{bar ν }}{e}}) spectra emitted from 235,238U and 239,241Pu by summing up all the contributions from a large number of decaying fission-products (FPs). We make it clear what kinds of transition types and FP nuclides are important to shape the lepton spectra. After taking the ambiguity in the current data for fission yields and Qβ-values into account, we suggested a possibility that the high-energy part of the widely referred electron-spectra by Schreckenbach et al., almost only one experimental data set available now, might possibly be too low. Arguments on a special role of the odd(Z)-odd(N) nuclides and on the consistency between U-238 and other fissiles in the experimental data lead to the importance of a new and independent measurement of electron energy spectra which could be converted into the reactor {{{bar ν }}{e}} spectra.

  4. A comparison of broadband source spectra, seismic energies, and stress drops of the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1988 Armenian earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, H. )

    1990-08-01

    Broadband source spectra of the 1989 Loma Prieta (M{sub W} = 6.9) and 1988 Armenian (M{sub W} = 6.7) earthquakes are computed at periods from 1 to 50 sec using digitally-recorded teleseismic P body waves. The effects of attenuation, geometrical spreading, and radiation pattern are removed from the spectra of individual stations, which are then averaged. The source spectra of the Loma Prieta and Armenian earthquakes are higher for their seismic moments than the spectra of 11 intraplate earthquakes studied by Zhuo and Kanamori (1987), which in turn are 2 to 4 times larger than average spectra of interplate subduction zone earthquakes. The seismically radiated energy can be computed from the source spectrum using Haskell's (1964) formulation assuming a point source with no directivity. An Orowan stress drop can be obtained from the seismic energy and moment. The Orowan stress drops for the Loma Prieta and Armenian earthquakes are both about 20 bars, significantly higher than Orowan stress drops of recent large interplate earthquakes. There is a positive correlation between the Orowan stress drops and the estimated repeat times, consistent with the notion that mechanical fault strength increases with increasing interseismic period.

  5. Energy spectra of three electrons in SiGe/Si/SiGe laterally coupled triple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Y. F.; Wang, L.; Liu, Z.; Wu, M. W.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the energy spectra of three electrons in SiGe/Si/SiGe equilateral triangular and symmetric linear triple quantum dots in the presence of magnetic (in either Faraday or Voigt configuration) and electric fields with only the lowest valley eigenstate being relevant by using the real-space configuration interaction method. The strong electron-electron Coulomb interaction, which is crucial to the energy spectra, is explicitly calculated whereas the weak spin-orbit coupling is treated perturbatively. In both equilateral triangular and symmetric linear triple quantum dots, we find doublet-quartet transition of ground-state spin configuration by varying dot size or interdot distance in the absence of external fields. This transition has not been reported in the literature on triple quantum dots. In the magnetic-field (Faraday configuration) dependence of energy spectra, we find anticrossings with large energy splittings between the energy levels with the same spin state in the absence of the spin-orbit coupling. This anticrossing behavior originates from the triple quantum dot confinement potential. In addition, with the inclusion of the spin-orbit coupling, we find that all the intersections shown in the equilateral triangular case become anticrossing whereas only part of the intersections in symmetric linear case show anticrossing behavior in the presence of magnetic field in either the Faraday or Voigt configuration. All the anticrossing behaviors are analyzed based on symmetry consideration. Moreover, we show that the electric field can effectively influence the energy levels and the charge configurations.

  6. Moments, magnitudes, and radiated energies of non-volcanic tremor near Cholame, CA, from ground motion spectra at UPSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, Joe B.; McGarr, A.

    2011-01-01

    By averaging the spectra of events within two episodes of tremor (on Jan. 21 and 24, 2005) across the 12 stations of UPSAR, we improved the S/N sufficiently to define source spectra. Analysis of eleven impulsive events revealed attenuation-corrected spectra of displacement similar to those of earthquakes, with a low-frequency plateau, a corner frequency, and a high frequency decay proportional to f−2. Seismic moments, M0, estimated from these spectra range from about 3 to 10 × 1011 N-m or moment magnitudes in the range 1.6 to 1.9. The corner frequencies range from 2.6 to 7.2 Hz and, if interpreted in the same way as for earthquakes, indicate low stress drops that vary from 0.001 to 0.04 MPa. Seismic energies, estimated from the ground motion spectra, vary from 0.2 × 105 to 4.4 × 105 J, or apparent stresses in the range 0.002 to 0.02 MPa. The low stress parameters are consistent with a weak fault zone in the lower crust at the depth of tremor. In contrast, the same analysis on a micro-earthquake, located near Cholame (depth = 10.3 km), revealed a stress drop of 0.5 MPa and an apparent stress of 0.02 MPa. Residual spectra from ω−2 model fits to the displacement spectra of the non-volcanic tremor events show peaks near 4 Hz that are not apparent in the spectra for the microearthquake nor for the spectrum of earth noise. These spectral peaks may indicate that tremor entails more than shear failure reminiscent of mechanisms, possibly entailing fluid flow, associated with volcanic tremor or deep volcanic earthquakes.

  7. Simulation studies for operating electron beam ion trap at very low energy for disentangling edge plasma spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Xuelong; Fei Zejie; Xiao Jun; Lu Di; Hutton, Roger; Zou Yaming

    2012-07-15

    Electron beam ion traps (EBITs) are very useful tools for disentanglement studies of atomic processes in plasmas. In order to assist studies on edge plasma spectroscopic diagnostics, a very low energy EBIT, SH-PermEBIT, has been set up at the Shanghai EBIT lab. In this work, simulation studies for factors which hinder an EBIT to operate at very low electron energies were made based on the Tricomp (Field Precision) codes. Longitudinal, transversal, and total kinetic energy distributions were analyzed for all the electron trajectories. Influences from the electron current and electron energy on the energy depression caused by the space charge are discussed. The simulation results show that although the energy depression is most serious along the center of the electron beam, the electrons in the outer part of the beam are more likely to be lost when an EBIT is running at very low energy. Using the simulation results to guide us, we successfully managed to reach the minimum electron beam energy of 60 eV with a beam transmission above 57% for the SH-PermEBIT. Ar and W spectra were measured from the SH-PermEBIT at the apparent electron beam energies (read from the voltage difference between the electron gun cathode and the central drift tube) of 60 eV and 1200 eV, respectively. The spectra are shown in this paper.

  8. Radiation anomaly detection algorithms for field-acquired gamma energy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ron; Guss, Paul; Mitchell, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    The Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing a tactical, networked radiation detection system that will be agile, reconfigurable, and capable of rapid threat assessment with high degree of fidelity and certainty. Our design is driven by the needs of users such as law enforcement personnel who must make decisions by evaluating threat signatures in urban settings. The most efficient tool available to identify the nature of the threat object is real-time gamma spectroscopic analysis, as it is fast and has a very low probability of producing false positive alarm conditions. Urban radiological searches are inherently challenged by the rapid and large spatial variation of background gamma radiation, the presence of benign radioactive materials in terms of the normally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), and shielded and/or masked threat sources. Multiple spectral anomaly detection algorithms have been developed by national laboratories and commercial vendors. For example, the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) a one-dimensional deterministic radiation transport software capable of calculating gamma ray spectra using physics-based detector response functions was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The nuisance-rejection spectral comparison ratio anomaly detection algorithm (or NSCRAD), developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, uses spectral comparison ratios to detect deviation from benign medical and NORM radiation source and can work in spite of strong presence of NORM and or medical sources. RSL has developed its own wavelet-based gamma energy spectral anomaly detection algorithm called WAVRAD. Test results and relative merits of these different algorithms will be discussed and demonstrated.

  9. Calculation of delayed-neutron energy spectra in a QRPA-Hauser-Feshbach model

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Moller, Peter; Wilson, William B

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical {beta}-delayed-neutron spectra are calculated based on the Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA) and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Neutron emissions from an excited daughter nucleus after {beta} decay to the granddaughter residual are more accurately calculated than in previous evaluations, including all the microscopic nuclear structure information, such as a Gamow-Teller strength distribution and discrete states in the granddaughter. The calculated delayed-neutron spectra agree reasonably well with those evaluations in the ENDF decay library, which are based on experimental data. The model was adopted to generate the delayed-neutron spectra for all 271 precursors.

  10. Revealing discriminating power of the elements in edible sea salts: Line-intensity correlation analysis from laser-induced plasma emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yonghoon; Ham, Kyung-Sik; Han, Song-Hee; Yoo, Jonghyun; Jeong, Sungho

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the discriminating power of the elements in edible sea salts using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). For the ten different sea salts from South Korea, China, Japan, France, Mexico and New Zealand, LIBS spectra were recorded in the spectral range between 190 and 1040 nm, identifying the presence of Na, Cl, K, Ca, Mg, Li, Sr, Al, Si, Ti, Fe, C, O, N, and H. Intensity correlation analysis of the observed emission lines provided a valuable insight into the discriminating power of the different elements in the sea salts. The correlation analysis suggests that the elements with independent discrimination power can be categorized into three groups; those that represent dissolved ions in seawater (K, Li, and Mg), those that are associated with calcified particles (Ca and Sr), and those that are present in soils contained in the sea salts (Al, Si, Ti, and Fe). Classification models using a few emission lines selected based on the results from intensity correlation analysis and full broadband LIBS spectra were developed based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and their performances were compared. Our results indicate that effective combination of a few emission lines can provide a dependable model for discriminating the edible sea salts and the performance is not much degraded from that based on the full broadband spectra. This can be rationalized by the intensity correlation results.

  11. The knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrum from the simultaneous EAS charged particles and muon density spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijay, Biplab; Banik, Prabir; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-09-01

    In this work we examine with the help of Monte Carlo simulation whether a consistent primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays emerges from both the experimentally observed total charged particles and muon size spectra of cosmic ray extensive air showers considering primary composition may or may not change beyond the knee of the energy spectrum. It is found that EAS-TOP observations consistently infer a knee in the primary energy spectrum provided the primary is pure unchanging iron whereas no consistent primary spectrum emerges from simultaneous use of the KASCADE observed total charged particle and muon spectra. However, it is also found that when primary composition changes across the knee the estimation of spectral index of total charged particle spectrum is quite tricky, depends on the choice of selection of points near the knee in the size spectrum.

  12. Study of electron transition energies between anions and cations in spinel ferrites using differential UV-vis absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L. C.; Wu, L. Q.; Li, S. Q.; Li, Z. Z.; Tang, G. D.; Qi, W. H.; Ge, X. S.; Ding, L. L.

    2016-07-01

    It is very important to determine electron transition energies (Etr) between anions and different cations in order to understand the electrical transport and magnetic properties of a material. Many authors have analyzed UV-vis absorption spectra using the curve (αhν)2 vs E, where α is the absorption coefficient and E(=hν) is the photon energy. Such an approach can give only two band gap energies for spinel ferrites. In this paper, using differential UV-vis absorption spectra, dα/dE vs E, we have obtained electron transition energies (Etr) between the anions and cations, Fe2+ and Fe3+ at the (A) and [B] sites and Ni2+ at the [B] sites for the (A)[B]2O4 spinel ferrite samples CoxNi0.7-xFe2.3O4 (0.0≤x≤0.3), CrxNi0.7Fe2.3-xO4 (0.0≤x≤0.3) and Fe3O4. We suggest that the differential UV-vis absorption spectra should be accepted as a general analysis method for determining electron transition energies between anions and cations.

  13. Measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux by Super-Kamiokande: Energy spectra, geomagnetic effects, and solar modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, E.; Okumura, K.; Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakajima, T.; Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Orii, A.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Takeda, A.; Tanaka, H.; Tomura, T.; Wendell, R. A.; Akutsu, R.; Irvine, T.; Kajita, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Labarga, L.; Fernandez, P.; Gustafson, J.; Kachulis, C.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Berkman, S.; Nantais, C. M.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tobayama, S.; Goldhaber, M.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Weatherly, P.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Takhistov, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Hill, J.; Hong, N.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Park, R. G.; Himmel, A.; Li, Z.; O'Sullivan, E.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Jang, J. S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S. N.; Friend, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yano, T.; Cao, S. V.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Huang, K.; Kikawa, T.; Minamino, A.; Nakaya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Mijakowski, P.; Frankiewicz, K.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C. K.; Li, X.; Palomino, J. L.; Wilking, M. J.; Yanagisawa, C.; Fukuda, D.; Ishino, H.; Kayano, T.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Xu, C.; Kuno, Y.; Tacik, R.; Kim, S. B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Totsuka, Y.; Suda, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Bronner, C.; Hartz, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Suzuki, Y.; Vagins, M. R.; Martin, J. F.; Konaka, A.; Chen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Wilkes, R. J.; Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive study of the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy region from sub-GeV up to several TeV using the Super-Kamiokande (SK) water Cherenkov detector is presented in this paper. The energy and azimuthal spectra, and variation over time, of the atmospheric νe+ν¯ e and νμ+ν¯μ fluxes are measured. The energy spectra are obtained using an iterative unfolding method by combining various event topologies with differing energy responses. The azimuthal spectra depending on energy and zenith angle, and their modulation by geomagnetic effects, are also studied. A predicted east-west asymmetry is observed in both the νe and νμ samples at 8.0 σ and 6.0 σ significance, respectively, and an indication that the asymmetry dipole angle changes depending on the zenith angle was seen at the 2.2 σ level. The measured energy and azimuthal spectra are consistent with the current flux models within the estimated systematic uncertainties. A study of the long-term correlation between the atmospheric neutrino flux and the solar magnetic activity cycle is performed, and a weak preference for a correlation was seen at the 1.1 σ level, using SK-I-SK-IV data spanning a 20-year period. For several particularly strong solar activity periods, corresponding to Forbush decrease events, no theoretical prediction is available but a deviation below the typical neutrino event rate is seen at the 2.4 σ level. The seasonal modulation of the neutrino flux is also examined, but the change in flux at the SK site is predicted to be negligible, and, as expected, no evidence for a seasonal correlation is seen.

  14. Effects of Incident Electron Fluence and Energy on the Election Yield Curves and Emission Spectra of Dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Alec; Dennison, J. R.; Thomson, Clint

    2005-01-01

    We present an experimental study of evolution of electron emission yields and spectra as a result of internal charge build up due to electron dose. Reliable total, backscattered and secondary yield curves and electron emission spectra for un-charged insulators using a low fluence, pulsed electron beam (= or < 5 microsec at = or < 3 nA/sq mm or = or < 10(exp 5) e/sq mm per pulse) with low energy electron and UV flooding to neutralize the charging between pulses. Quantifiable changes in yield curves are observed due to < 100 fC/sq mm fluences for several excellent dielectric thin film materials. We find good agreement with a phenomenological argument based on insulator charging predicted by the yield curve; this includes an approximately linear decrease in the magnitude of the yield as incident energies approach the crossover energies and an exponential decrease in yield as accumulated internal charge reduces the landing energy to asymptotically approach a steady state surface charge and unity yield. We also find that the exponential decay of yield curves with fluence exhibit an energy dependent decay constant, alpha(E), over a broad range of incident energies below, between and above the crossover energies. Finally, we present some preliminary physics-based models for this energy dependence and attempt to relate our charging measurements to knowledge of how charge is deposited within the insulator, the mechanisms for charge trapping and transport, and how the profile of trapped charge affects the transport and emission of charges from insulators.

  15. HEAO 1 A-2 low-energy detector X-ray spectra of the Lupus Loop and SN 1006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leahy, D. A.; Nousek, J.; Hamilton, A. J. S.

    1991-01-01

    The Lupus Loop and SN 1006 were observed by the A-2 low-energy detector proportional counters on the HEAO 1 satellite as part of the all-sky survey. As a result of a major advance in understanding of detector response and background accurate analysis of the data has become possible. Soft X-ray spectra for both supernova remnants were constructed from the PHA data taken during the scanning observations. Single-temperature and two-temperature Raymond-Smith models were fitted to the observed spectra. In addition, power-law and power-law plus one-temperature models were fitted to the spectrum of SN 1006. Only two-component models provide an adequate description for both Lupus Loop and SN 1006 spectra. The temperatures, column densities, and emission measures are significantly more accurate than previous results.

  16. HEAO 1 A-2 low-energy detector X-ray spectra of the Lupus Loop and SN 1006

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, D.A.; Nousek, J.; Hamilton, A.J.S. Pennsylvania State University, University Park Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO )

    1991-06-01

    The Lupus Loop and SN 1006 were observed by the A-2 low-energy detector proportional counters on the HEAO 1 satellite as part of the all-sky survey. As a result of a major advance in understanding of detector response and background accurate analysis of the data has become possible. Soft X-ray spectra for both supernova remnants were constructed from the PHA data taken during the scanning observations. Single-temperature and two-temperature Raymond-Smith models were fitted to the observed spectra. In addition, power-law and power-law plus one-temperature models were fitted to the spectrum of SN 1006. Only two-component models provide an adequate description for both Lupus Loop and SN 1006 spectra. The temperatures, column densities, and emission measures are significantly more accurate than previous results. 29 refs.

  17. Mapping of light elements with the ANSTO high energy heavy ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegele, Rainer; Cohen, David D.

    2000-03-01

    7.62 MeV He was used to study the distribution of a wide range of elements in mineral sands. At this energy both He induced X-ray emission and a high energy resonance in oxygen can be applied simultaneously. The two techniques were used to study the distribution of elements ranging from sulfur to zirconium as well as oxygen.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: New FeI level energies from stellar spectra (Peterson+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. C.; Kurucz, R. L.

    2015-02-01

    The spectrum of the Fe I atom is critical to many areas of astrophysics and beyond. Measurements of the energies of its high-lying levels remain woefully incomplete, however, despite extensive laboratory and solar analysis. In this work, we use high-resolution archival absorption-line ultraviolet and optical spectra of stars whose warm temperatures favor moderate Fe I excitation. We derive the energy for a particular upper level in Kurucz's semiempirical calculations by adopting a trial value that yields the same wavelength for a given line predicted to be about as strong as that of a strong unidentified spectral line observed in the stellar spectra, then checking the new wavelengths of other strong predicted transitions that share the same upper level for coincidence with other strong observed unidentified lines. To date, this analysis has provided the upper energies of 66 Fe I levels. Many new energy levels are higher than those accessible to laboratory experiments; several exceed the Fe I ionization energy. These levels provide new identifications for over 2000 potentially detectable lines. Almost all of the new levels of odd parity include UV lines that were detected but unclassified in laboratory Fe I absorption spectra, providing an external check on the energy values. We motivate and present the procedure, provide the resulting new energy levels and their uncertainties, list all the potentially detectable UV and optical new Fe I line identifications and their gf values, point out new lines of astrophysical interest, and discuss the prospects for additional Fe I energy level determinations. (3 data files).

  19. Influence of Finite Element Software on Energy Release Rates Computed Using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Goetze, Dirk; Ransom, Jonathon (Technical Monitor)

    2006-01-01

    Strain energy release rates were computed along straight delamination fronts of Double Cantilever Beam, End-Notched Flexure and Single Leg Bending specimens using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). Th e results were based on finite element analyses using ABAQUS# and ANSYS# and were calculated from the finite element results using the same post-processing routine to assure a consistent procedure. Mixed-mode strain energy release rates obtained from post-processing finite elem ent results were in good agreement for all element types used and all specimens modeled. Compared to previous studies, the models made of s olid twenty-node hexahedral elements and solid eight-node incompatible mode elements yielded excellent results. For both codes, models made of standard brick elements and elements with reduced integration did not correctly capture the distribution of the energy release rate acr oss the width of the specimens for the models chosen. The results suggested that element types with similar formulation yield matching results independent of the finite element software used. For comparison, m ixed-mode strain energy release rates were also calculated within ABAQUS#/Standard using the VCCT for ABAQUS# add on. For all specimens mod eled, mixed-mode strain energy release rates obtained from ABAQUS# finite element results using post-processing were almost identical to re sults calculated using the VCCT for ABAQUS# add on.

  20. Localizing INTEGRAL Sources with Chandra: X-Ray and Multi-wavelength Identifications and Energy Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Chaty, Sylvain; Rodriguez, Jerome; Rahoui, Farid; Halpern, Jules; Kalemci, Emrah; Özbey Arabaci, Mehtap

    2012-08-01

    We report on Chandra observations of 18 hard X-ray (>20 keV) sources discovered with the INTEGRAL satellite near the Galactic plane. For 14 of the INTEGRAL sources, we have uncovered one or two potential Chandra counterparts per source. These provide soft X-ray (0.3-10 keV) spectra and subarcsecond localizations, which we use to identify counterparts at other wavelengths, providing information about the nature of each source. Despite the fact that all of the sources are within 5° of the plane, four of the IGR sources are active galactic nuclei (AGNs; IGR J01545+6437, IGR J15391-5307, IGR J15415-5029, and IGR J21565+5948) and four others are likely AGNs (IGR J03103+5706, IGR J09189-4418, IGR J16413-4046, and IGR J16560-4958) based on each of them having a strong IR excess and/or extended optical or near-IR emission. We compare the X-ray and near-IR fluxes of this group of sources to those of AGNs selected by their 2-10 keV emission in previous studies and find that these IGR AGNs are in the range of typical values. There is evidence in favor of four of the sources being Galactic (IGR J12489-6243, IGR J15293-5609, IGR J16173-5023, and IGR J16206-5253), but only IGR J15293-5609 is confirmed as a Galactic source as it has a unique Chandra counterpart and a parallax measurement from previous optical observations that puts its distance at 1.56 ± 0.12 kpc. The 0.3-10 keV luminosity for this source is (1.4+1.0 - 0.4) × 1032 erg s-1, and its optical/IR spectral energy distribution is well described by a blackbody with a temperature of 4200-7000 K and a radius of 12.0-16.4 R ⊙. These values suggest that IGR J15293-5609 is a symbiotic binary with an early K-type giant and a white dwarf accretor. We also obtained likely Chandra identifications for IGR J13402-6428 and IGR J15368-5102, but follow-up observations are required to constrain their source types.

  1. Oxygen-induced changes in electron-energy-loss spectra for Al, Be and Ni. [Al; Be; Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, H.H.; Landers, R.; Kleiman, G.G. , 13081-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brasil); Zehner, D.M. )

    1999-09-01

    Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) data are presented to illustrate line shape changes that occur as a result of oxygen interaction with metal surfaces. The metals were aluminum, beryllium and nickel. Core-level EELS data were taken for excitations from Al(2p), Be(1s), Ni(3p/3s) and O(1s) levels to the conduction band (CB) density of states (DOS) of the materials. The primary beam energies for the spectra were 300, 450, 300, and 1135 eV, respectively. The data are presented in both the (as measured) first-derivative and the integral forms. The integral spectra were corrected for coherent background losses and analyzed for CB DOS information. These spectra were found to be in qualitative agreement with published experimental and theoretical studies of these materials. One peak in the spectra for Al oxide is analyzed for its correlation with excitonic screening of the Al(2p) core hole. Similar evidence for exciton formation is found in the Ni(3p) spectra for Ni oxide. Data are also presented showing oxygen-induced changes in the lower-loss-energy EELS curves that, in the pure metal, are dominated by plasmon-loss and interband-transition signals. Single-scattering loss profiles in the integral form of the data were calculated using a procedure of Tougaard and Chorkendorff [S. Tougaard and I. Chorkendorff, Phys. Rev. B. [bold 35], 6570 (1987)]. For all three oxides these profiles are dominated by a feature with a loss energy of around 20[endash]25 eV. Although this feature has been ascribed by other researchers as due to bulk plasmon losses in the oxide, an alternative explanation is that the feature is simply due to O(2s)-to-CB-level excitations. An even stronger feature is found at 7 eV loss energy for Ni oxide. Speculation is given as to its source. The line shapes in both the core-level and noncore-level spectra can also be used simply as [open quotes]fingerprints[close quotes] of the surface chemistry of the materials. Our data were taken using commercially

  2. Gamma-ray spectra from low-energy positron annihilation processes in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoguang; Wang, Meishan; Zhu, Yinghao; Liu, Yang; Yang, Chuanlu; Wang, Dehua

    2016-11-01

    The theoretical γ -ray spectra from positron-electron annihilation process in a wide variety of atoms and molecules are studied. The theoretical Doppler broadened γ -ray spectra for core, inner valence, and outer valence electrons of these molecules are studied systematically. The present results show that the experimental γ -ray spectra agree well with inner valence electrons, especially the lowest occupied valence orbital electrons rather than the outer valence electrons. These inner valence electrons show a strong correlation with the corresponding available experimental measurements. These findings are interesting because the outer valence electrons have been supposed to have larger probability annihilating with positrons rather than the inner valence electrons. The present work also suggests that the accurate positron wave functions must be involved to identify the dominance of the bound electrons clearly in positron-electron annihilation process.

  3. Quantum-chemical modeling of energy parameters and vibrational spectra of chain and cyclic clusters of monohydric alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, P.; Doroshenko, I.; Pogorelov, V.

    2014-05-01

    The specific peculiarities of alcohols such as heightened viscosity, boiling temperature and surface tension can be explained by the capability of their molecules to form relatively stable associates named clusters due to hydrogen bonding. In present work the stability of different chain-like and cyclic clusters of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and 1-hexanol was investigated by means of quantum-chemical simulation and particular by recently developed DFT exchange-correlation functional M06-2X. The relative stability of the cluster structure was evaluated by the total energy per molecule at low temperatures (where all alcohols exist in solid state) and by the changing of the free Gibbs energy upon cluster formation at the room temperature. For the verification of revealed results the conformity of calculated IR spectra of the most stable cluster structures with the experimental IR spectra at different temperatures was analyzed.

  4. Phonon self-energy and origin of anomalous neutron scattering spectra in SnTe and PbTe thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chen; Ma, Jie; May, Andrew F; Cao, Huibo; Christianson, Andrew D; Ehlers, Georg; Singh, David J; Sales, Brian C; Delaire, Olivier A

    2014-01-01

    The anharmonic lattice dynamics of rock-salt thermoelectric compounds SnTe and PbTe are investigated with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and first-principles calculations. The experiments show that, surprisingly, although SnTe is closer to the ferroelectric instability, phonon spectra in PbTe exhibit a more anharmonic character. This behavior is reproduced in first-principles calculations of the temperature-dependent phonon self-energy. Our simulations reveal how the nesting of phonon dispersions induces prominent features in the self-energy, which account for the measured INS spectra and their temperature dependence. We establish that the phase-space for three-phonon scattering processes, rather than just the proximity to the lattice instability, is the mechanism determining the complex spectrum of the transverse-optical ferroelectric mode.

  5. Energy spectra of a spin-½ XY spin molecule interacting with a single mode field cavity: Numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, H.; Donkov, A. A.; Chamati, H.

    2016-10-01

    In a previous paper [J.Phys.: Conf. Ser. 682 (2016) 012032] we studied analytically the energy spectra of a finite-size spin ½ XY chain (molecule) coupled at an arbitrary spin site to a single mode of an electromagnetic field via the Jaynes-Cummings model. We considered spin rings and open spin molecules with up to 4 spins and an interaction restricted to nearest-neighbours. Here we extend our investigation, addressing numerically the energy spectra of molecules of up to 10 spins with nearest-neighbour or long- range interaction. Furthermore we analyze the behaviour of an invariant operator, constructed by combining the magnetization of the spin-chain and the total number of photons in the system. We found a strong dependence on the number (even or odd) of sites in the molecules. This study is aimed at finding the appropriate combination of the physical parameters that could make the system suitable for use in quantum computations.

  6. Phonon self-energy and origin of anomalous neutron scattering spectra in SnTe and PbTe thermoelectrics.

    PubMed

    Li, C W; Hellman, O; Ma, J; May, A F; Cao, H B; Chen, X; Christianson, A D; Ehlers, G; Singh, D J; Sales, B C; Delaire, O

    2014-05-02

    The anharmonic lattice dynamics of rock-salt thermoelectric compounds SnTe and PbTe are investigated with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and first-principles calculations. The experiments show that, surprisingly, although SnTe is closer to the ferroelectric instability, phonon spectra in PbTe exhibit a more anharmonic character. This behavior is reproduced in first-principles calculations of the temperature-dependent phonon self-energy. Our simulations reveal how the nesting of phonon dispersions induces prominent features in the self-energy, which account for the measured INS spectra and their temperature dependence. We establish that the phase space for three-phonon scattering processes, combined with the proximity to the lattice instability, is the mechanism determining the complex spectrum of the transverse-optic ferroelectric mode.

  7. Comment on "Gamma-ray spectra from low-energy positron annihilation processes in molecules"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. G.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2017-03-01

    In the article by Ma et al. [Phys. Rev. A 94, 052709 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.94.052709], γ -ray spectra for positron annihilation on molecules were calculated in the independent-particle approximation with the positron wave function set to unity. Based on comparisons with experimental data, they concluded that inner valence electrons play a dominant role in positron annihilation. These conclusions are incorrect and resulted from fallacious analysis that ignored the known effect of the positron wave function on the spectra.

  8. The effect of dispersion forces on the interaction energies and far infrared spectra of protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ralf

    2015-06-07

    We could show by means of dispersion-corrected DFT calculations that the interaction energy in protic ionic liquids can be dissected into Coulomb interaction, hydrogen bonding and dispersion interaction. The H-bond energy as well as the dispersion energy can be quantified to be 50 kJ mol(-1) each representing ten percent of the overall interaction energy. The dispersion interaction could be dissected into two portions. One third could be related to the dispersion interaction within an ion-pair enhancing the H-bond strength, two thirds stem from dispersion interaction between the ion-pairs. This distribution of dispersion interaction is reflected in the far infrared (FIR) spectra. The H-bond band is shifted weaker than the low frequency band where the latter indicates diffuse cation-anion interaction and H-bond bending motions. Finally, we can dissect the different types of interaction energies indicating their characteristic influence on vibrational modes in the FIR.

  9. Measurement of energy spectra of small-angle scattering and distribution of optical microinhomogeneities in laser ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Tverdokhleb, P E; Shepetkin, Yu A; Steinberg, I Sh; Belikov, A Yu; Vatnik, S M; Vedin, I A; Kurbatov, P F

    2014-06-30

    The energy spectra of small-angle light scattering from the samples of Nd:YAG ceramics and the spatial distributions of optical microinhomogeneities in them are measured. The spatial profiles of microinhomogeneities are found using the collinear heterodyne microprobe technique. Based on the obtained data, the comparison of noise and lasing characteristics of foreign and domestic samples of laser ceramics is carried out. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  10. [Study of laser energy in multi-element detection of pulverized coal flow with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Ping; Lu, Ji-Dong; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Shi-He; Yao, Shun-Chun; Pan, Feng-Ping; Dong, Xuan; Zhang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    The logical range of laser power density and optimum laser power density were explored for multi-element analysis of pulverized coal flow with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in the present paper. The range of laser energy was chosen from 20 to 160 mJ in the experiment. Pulverized coal less than 200 microm in diameter of particles fell freely through feeder outlet and the rate of flow was controlled by screw feeder. Emissions were collected with pulse laser at 1 064 nm focusing on pulverized coal flow and plasma was generated. The intensity and cause of fluctuation of emission spectra at various laser energy levels were studied. A suitable range of laser power density is from 14.4 to 34.4 GW x cm(-2), and the optimum laser power density is 19.5 GW x cm(-2) for the determination of pulverized coal flow with LIBS.

  11. MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH ENERGY COMPONENT OF THE X-RAY SPECTRA INTHE VENUS ECR ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; Benitez, Janilee Y.; Lyneis, Claude M.; Todd,Damon S.; Ropponen,Tommi; Ropponen,Janne; Koivisto, Hannu; Gammino, Santo

    2007-11-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for Nuclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental set-up to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different than for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper we will discuss the experimental set-up for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the correction for detector efficiency, the shielding of the detector and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates in dependence of various ion source parameters such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power and heating frequency.

  12. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Ropponen, T.; Ropponen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Gammino, S.

    2008-03-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for NUclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet, adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different from that for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper, we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates depending on various ion source parameters, such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency.

  13. Light element production by low energy nuclei from massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Casse, M.; Ramaty, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Orion complex is a source of gamma rays attributed to the de-excitation of fast carbon and oxygen nuclei excited through interactions with ambient hydrogen and helium. This has consequences for the production and evolution of light isotopes in the Galaxy, as massive stars appear as prolific sources of C-O rich low energy nuclei. The different stages of massive star evolution are considered in relation to the acceleration of nuclei to moderate energies. It is concluded that the low energy nuclear component originating from massive stars plays a larger role than the usual Galactic cosmic rays in shaping the evolution of Li-6, Be-9, B-10 and B-11, especially in the early Galactic evolution. The enhancement of the B-11/B-10 ratio observed in meteorites and in the interstellar medium is attributed to the interaction of low energy carbon nuclei with ambient H and to a lesser degree, to neutrino spallation.

  14. The physical basis for estimating wave-energy spectra with the radar ocean-wave spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Frederick C.

    1987-01-01

    The derivation of the reflectivity modulation spectrum of the sea surface for near-nadir-viewing microwave radars using geometrical optics is described. The equations required for the derivation are presented. The derived reflectivity modulation spectrum provides data on the physical basis of the radar ocean-wave spectrometer measurements of ocean-wave directional spectra.

  15. a Measurement of MU, P and he Energy Spectra at the Small Atmospheric Depth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.

    2004-04-01

    The cosmic-ray proton, helium, and muon spectra at small atmospheric depths of 4.5 - 28 g/cm2 were precisely measured during the slow descending period of the BESS-2001 balloon flight. The variation of atmospheric secondary particle fluxes as a function of atmospheric depth provides fundamental information to study hadronic interactions of the primary cosmic rays with the atmosphere.

  16. 78 FR 35658 - Spectra Energy Corp., Application for a New or Amended Presidential Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ....-Canada border near Wild ] Horse, Montana, to Caster, Wyoming and includes five pump stations. The Express.... Spectra affirms that operation and maintenance of the permitted facilities will remain substantially the... Presidential Permits for the construction, connection, operation, or maintenance at the borders of the...

  17. Raman spectra of normal and cancerous mouse mammary gland tissue using near infrared excitation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Vaman; Serhatkulu, G. K.; Dai, H.; Shukla, N.; Weber, R.; Thakur, J. S.; Freeman, D. C.; Pandya, A. K.; Auner, G. W.; Naik, R.; Miller, R. F.; Cao, A.; Klein, M. D.; Rabah, R.

    2006-03-01

    Raman spectra of normal mammary gland tissues, malignant mammary gland tumors, and lymph nodes have been recorded using fresh tissue from mice. Tumors were induced in mice by subcutaneously injecting 4T1 BALB/c mammary tumor (a highly malignant) cell line. The Raman spectra were collected using the same tissues that were examined by histopathology for determining the cancerous/normal state of the tissue. Differences in various peak intensities, peak shifts and peak ratios were analyzed to determine the Raman spectral features that differentiate mammary gland tumors from non-tumorous tissue. Tissues that were confirmed by pathology as cancerous (tumors) show several distinctive features in the Raman spectra compared to the spectra of the normal tissues. For example, the cancerous tissues show Raman peaks at 621, 642, 1004, 1032, 1175 and 1208 cm-1 that are assignable to amino acids containing aromatic side-chains such as phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine. Further, the cancerous tissues show a greatly reduced level of phospholipids compared to the normal tissues. The Raman spectral regions that are sensitive to pathologic alteration in the tissue will be discussed.

  18. Elemental abundance analyses with DAO spectrograms. VII - The late normal B stars Pi Ceti, 134 Tauri, 21 Aquilae, and Nu Capricorni and the use of Reticon spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents elemental abundance analyses of sharp-lined normal late B stars. These stars exhibit mostly near-solar abundances, but each star also shows a few abundances which are a factor of 2 less than solar. The coadded photographic spectrograms are supplemented with Reticon data. A comparison of 261 equivalent widths on 2.4 A/mm spectra of sharp-lined B and A stars shows that the Reticon equivalent widths are about 95 percent of the coadded equivalent mean. The H-gamma profiles of the coadded and Reticon spectra for eight sharp-lined stars show generally good agreement. The generally high quality of the coadded data produced from 10 or more spectrograms is confirmed using the REDUCE graphics-oriented computed reduction code. For five stars, metal lines which fall in the gap between the U and V plates are analyzed using Reticon data.

  19. Extreme ultraviolet ionization of pure He nanodroplets: Mass-correlated photoelectron imaging, Penning ionization, and electron energy-loss spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Buchta, D.; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M.; Krishnan, S. R.; Moshammer, R.; Brauer, N. B.; Drabbels, M.; O’Keeffe, P.; Coreno, M.; Devetta, M.; Di Fraia, M.; Callegari, C.; Richter, R.; Prince, K. C.; Ullrich, J.

    2013-08-28

    The ionization dynamics of pure He nanodroplets irradiated by Extreme ultraviolet radiation is studied using Velocity-Map Imaging PhotoElectron-PhotoIon COincidence spectroscopy. We present photoelectron energy spectra and angular distributions measured in coincidence with the most abundant ions He{sup +}, He{sub 2}{sup +}, and He{sub 3}{sup +}. Surprisingly, below the autoionization threshold of He droplets, we find indications for multiple excitation and subsequent ionization of the droplets by a Penning-like process. At high photon energies we observe inelastic collisions of photoelectrons with the surrounding He atoms in the droplets.

  20. On Integral Upper Limits Assuming Power-law Spectra and the Sensitivity in High-energy Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, Max L.

    2017-02-01

    The high-energy non-thermal universe is dominated by power-law-like spectra. Therefore, results in high-energy astronomy are often reported as parameters of power-law fits, or, in the case of a non-detection, as an upper limit assuming the underlying unseen spectrum behaves as a power law. In this paper, I demonstrate a simple and powerful one-to-one relation of the integral upper limit in the two-dimensional power-law parameter space into the spectrum parameter space and use this method to unravel the so-far convoluted question of the sensitivity of astroparticle telescopes.

  1. Probing the multiscale interplay between gravity and turbulence - power-law-like gravitational energy spectra of the Orion Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Xing; Burkert, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Gravity plays a determining role in the evolution of the molecular ISM. In 2016, we proposed a measure called gravitational energy spectrum to quantify the importance of gravity on multiple physical scales. In this paper, using a wavelet-based decomposition technique, we derive the gravitational energy spectra of the Orion A and the Orion B molecular cloud from observational data. The gravitational energy spectra exhibit power-law-like behaviours. From a few parsec down to ˜0.1 pc scale, the Orion A and Orion B molecular cloud have Ep(k) ˜ k-1.88 and Ep(k) ˜ k-2.09, respectively. These scaling exponents are close to the scaling exponents of the kinetic energy power spectrum of compressible turbulence (where E ˜ k-2), with a near-equipartition of turbulent versus gravitational energy on multiple scales. This provides a clear evidence that gravity is able to counteract effectively against turbulent motion for these length-scales. The results confirm our earlier analytical estimates. For the Orion A molecular cloud, gravity inevitably dominates turbulence inside the cloud. Our results provide a clear observational proof that gravity is playing a determining role in the evolution these molecular clouds from the cloud scale down to ˜ 0.1 pc. However, turbulence is likely to dominate in clouds such as California. The method is general and should be applicable to all the astrophysical problems where gravity plays a role.

  2. X-Ray Spectra of Young Pulsars and Their Wind Nebulae: Dependence on Spin-Down Energy Loss Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.

    2003-01-01

    An observational model is presented for the spectra of young rotation-powered pulsars and their nebulae based on a study of nine bright Crab-like pulsar systems observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory. A significant correlation is discovered between the X-ray spectra of these pulsars and that of their associated pulsar wind nebulae, both of which are observed to be a function of the spin-down energy loss rate, E. The 2-10 keV spectra of these objects are well characterized by an absorbed power-law model with photon indices, Gamma, in the range of 0.6 < Gamma (sub PSR) < 2.1 and 1.3 < Gamma(sub PWN) < 2.3, for the pulsars and their nebulae, respectively. A linear regression fit relating these two sets of indexes yields Gamma(sub PWN) = 0.91 +/- 0.18 + (0.66 +/- 0.11) Gamma (sub PSR), with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.97. The spectra of these pulsars are found to steepen as Gamma = Gamma(sub max) + alpha E (exp -1/2), with Gamma(sub max) providing an observational limit on the spectral slopes of young rotation-powered pulsars. These results reveal basic properties of young pulsar systems, allow new observational constraints on models of pulsar wind emission, and provide a means of predicting the energetics of pulsars lacking detected pulsations.

  3. Core-level spectra and binding energies of transition metal nitrides by non-destructive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy through capping layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greczynski, G.; Primetzhofer, D.; Lu, J.; Hultman, L.

    2017-02-01

    We present the first measurements of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core level binding energies (BE:s) for the widely-applicable group IVb-VIb polycrystalline transition metal nitrides (TMN's) TiN, VN, CrN, ZrN, NbN, MoN, HfN, TaN, and WN as well as AlN and SiN, which are common components in the TMN-based alloy systems. Nitride thin film samples were grown at 400 °C by reactive dc magnetron sputtering from elemental targets in Ar/N2 atmosphere. For XPS measurements, layers are either (i) Ar+ ion-etched to remove surface oxides resulting from the air exposure during sample transfer from the growth chamber into the XPS system, or (ii) in situ capped with a few nm thick Cr or W overlayers in the deposition system prior to air-exposure and loading into the XPS instrument. Film elemental composition and phase content is thoroughly characterized with time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and x-ray diffraction. High energy resolution core level XPS spectra acquired with monochromatic Al Kα radiation on the ISO-calibrated instrument reveal that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer that substantially affects the extracted binding energy values. These spectra-modifying effects of Ar+ ion bombardment increase with increasing the metal atom mass due to an increasing nitrogen-to-metal sputter yield ratio. The superior quality of the XPS spectra obtained in a non-destructive way from capped TMN films is evident from that numerous metal peaks, including Ti 2p, V 2p, Zr 3d, and Hf 4f, exhibit pronounced satellite features, in agreement with previously published spectra from layers grown and analyzed in situ. In addition, the N/metal concentration ratios are found to be 25-90% higher than those obtained from the corresponding ion-etched surfaces, and in most cases agree very well with the RBS and ToF-E ERDA values. The N 1 s BE:s extracted from

  4. Calculated stacking-fault energies of elemental metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengaard, N. M.; Skriver, H. L.

    1993-05-01

    We have performed ab initio calculations of twin, intrinsic, and extrinsic face-centered-cubic stacking faults for all the 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals by means of a Green's-function technique, based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding and atomic-sphere approximations. The results are in excellent agreement with recent layer Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green's-function calculations where stacking-fault energies for Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, and Au were found by means of the so-called force theorem. We find that the self-consistent fault energies for all the metals in the three transition series vary with atomic number essentially as the calculated structural energy differences between the face-centered-cubic and the hexagonal-close-packed phases. In addition we find that the simple relations between the different types of fault energies predicted by models based on the local atomic coordination are obeyed to a high degree of accuracy.

  5. The calculation of proportional counter energy-deposition spectra from experimental data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigerwalt, J. E.; Baily, N. A.

    1973-01-01

    The experimental approach considered requires the measurement of energy-absorption distributions for a set of pathlengths which define a biological volume. A suitable folding procedure is necessary to produce composite energy-absorption distributions. The investigation is concerned with the quality of the prediction of energy-deposition distributions, taking into account distributions measured with a proportional counter.

  6. Electronic and Crystal-field Effects in the Fine Structure of Electron Energy-loss Spectra of Manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, W.; Tao, J.; Varela, M.; Pennycook, S.J.; Pantelides, S.T.

    2009-02-23

    The fine structure of oxygen-K electron energy-loss spectra (EELS) of transition-metal oxides is known to correlate with nominal oxidation states (NOSs) that are often interpreted as charge states. Here we report calculations of O-K EELS in La{sub x}Ca{sub 1-x}MnO{sub 3} that agree with measured spectra and show that the variation in the prepeak's intensity with doping is controlled by the orbital occupancy of the majority-spin Mn 3d states, while its width is controlled by crystal-field splitting. The results confirm an earlier conclusion that the NOS extracted from EELS corresponds only to orbital occupancies, while the physical charge renders all atoms electrically neutral, even in so-called ionic crystals.

  7. Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Energy: Summaries of Program Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Kaganovich, I; Seidl, P A; Briggs, R J; Faltens, A; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Logan, B G

    2011-02-28

    The goal of the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is to apply high-current accelerator technology to IFE power production. Ion beams of mass {approx}100 amu and kinetic energy {>=} 1 GeV provide efficient energy coupling into matter, and HIF enjoys R&D-supported favorable attributes of: (1) the driver, projected to be robust and efficient; see 'Heavy Ion Accelerator Drivers.'; (2) the targets, which span a continuum from full direct to full indirect drive (and perhaps fast ignition), and have metal exteriors that enable injection at {approx}10 Hz; see 'IFE Target Designs'; (3) the near-classical ion energy deposition in the targets; see 'Beam-Plasma Interactions'; (4) the magnetic final lens, robust against damage; see 'Final Optics-Heavy Ion Beams'; and (5) the fusion chamber, which may use neutronically-thick liquids; see 'Liquid-Wall Chambers.' Most studies of HIF power plants have assumed indirect drive and thick liquid wall protection, but other options are possible.

  8. ANALYSIS OF SPACE CHARGE DRIVEN MODULATION IN ELECTRON BUNCH ENERGY SPECTRA.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAFTAN,T.YU,L.H.

    2003-08-22

    As was discussed earlier [1,2] longitudinal space charge force in initially nonuniform bunch transforms density fluctuations into energy modulation along the bunch. For characterization of the resulted energy modulation one can chirp the bunch using accelerator section, located upstream of beam spectrometer, and record energy spectrum of such chirped bunch. Measured spectrum shows structure with parameters, depending on the bunch properties. In this paper we present analysis of the structure in the bunch energy spectrum and its connection with energy modulation along the bunch.

  9. Energy Dispersive X-ray Tomography for 3D Elemental Mapping of Individual Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Thomas J. A.; Lewis, Edward A.; Haigh, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy within the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) provides accurate elemental analysis with high spatial resolution, and is even capable of providing atomically resolved elemental maps. In this technique, a highly focused electron beam is incident upon a thin sample and the energy of emitted X-rays is measured in order to determine the atomic species of material within the beam path. This elementally sensitive spectroscopy technique can be extended to three dimensional tomographic imaging by acquiring multiple spectrum images with the sample tilted along an axis perpendicular to the electron beam direction. Elemental distributions within single nanoparticles are often important for determining their optical, catalytic and magnetic properties. Techniques such as X-ray tomography and slice and view energy dispersive X-ray mapping in the scanning electron microscope provide elementally sensitive three dimensional imaging but are typically limited to spatial resolutions of > 20 nm. Atom probe tomography provides near atomic resolution but preparing nanoparticle samples for atom probe analysis is often challenging. Thus, elementally sensitive techniques applied within the scanning transmission electron microscope are uniquely placed to study elemental distributions within nanoparticles of dimensions 10-100 nm. Here, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy within the STEM is applied to investigate the distribution of elements in single AgAu nanoparticles. The surface segregation of both Ag and Au, at different nanoparticle compositions, has been observed. PMID:27403838

  10. Error localization of finite element updating model based on element strain energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zi; Zang, Chaoping; Wang, Xiaowei; Jiang, Yuying

    2016-09-01

    An error localization indicator based on modal strain energy changes is proposed and used for selecting design parameters to be updated in model updating process. Taking an aeroengine combustor casing structure as an example, the ‘supermodel’ of combustor casing was established and validated with the test data and the reduced model (also called the design model) was built with the simplification of modelling. By comparing the modal strain energy changes between ‘supermodel’ and design model of combustor casing, the error locations of the reduced combustor casing modelling was highlighted by the error localization indicator. Then, the updating parameters of the design model were selected as the areas with significant variations of modal strain energy changes based on the error localization indicator. Defining the updating object function with the minimum of natural frequency errors between the FE model prediction and the modal test data, model updating of the design combustor casing model based sensitivity analysis method was carried out using the experimental modal data. After model updating, the maximum frequency error of the first ten modes was decreased from 27.1% to 1.2%, compared with the test data. The result shows the effectiveness of the proposed method and certain significance in parameter selection for model updating.

  11. Determination Of The Elements In The Olive Oil Responsible For The Luminescence Spectra Using A Green Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawaz, Saiof; Mahmod, Al-gafary; Lamia, Al-mamouly

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we were able to record luminescence spectra of olive, sunflower, corn, gourd and laurel oils, chlorophyll and carotene by using an argon laser (488-514 nm) and second harmonic Nd-YAG laser (532 nm) along with a monochromator whose spectral range is 400-900 nm. Only when the luminescence light is vertical to laser light, two new peaks 540 nm and 673 nm have been detected with the latter one is more intense. In discussing our results, we succeeded in determining which materials in olive oil are responsible for producing the luminescence spectral peak; 673 nm. The experimental data has shown that the chlorophyll is the main part of the olive components which gives the olive oil luminescence spectral peak; 673 nm. The other luminescence spectral peak; 540 nm was common to all different kinds of oil in general.

  12. Calculation of synthetic spectra of stars with consideration for magnetic field effect and stratification of chemical elements with depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    The computer code SynthM of spectrum synthesis in magnetic stellar atmospheres under the assumption of LTE in plane-parallel atmosphere is described. The comparison of calculated Stokes IQUV shows good agreement between SynthM and N. Piskunov's SynthMag codes. We carried out test calculation of synthetic profiles of selected lines observed in spectrum of β CrB. SynthM code allows one to calculate synthetic spectra with present abundances stratification. The code allows us to use two built-in analytical models of stellar magnetic field configuration. Also, it is possible to use arbitrary model of magnetic field configuration by setting the modulus and direction of field for each integrating node of a surface grid.

  13. Rapid and non-destructive analysis of metallic dental restorations using X-ray fluorescence spectra and light-element sampling tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuhashi, K.; Uo, M.; Kitagawa, Y.; Watari, F.

    2012-12-01

    IntroductionRecently, allergic diseases caused by dental metals have been increasing. Therefore, rapid and accurate analytical methods for the metal restorations in the oral cavities of patients are required. The purpose of this study was to develop a non-destructive extraction method for dental alloys, along with a subsequent, rapid and accurate elemental analysis. Materials and methodSamples were obtained by polishing the surfaces of metal restorations using a dental rotating tool with disposable buffs and polishing pastes. As materials for the analysis, three dental alloys were used. To compare the sampling and analysis efficiencies, two buffs and seven pastes were used. After polishing the surface of a metal restoration, the buff was analyzed using X-ray scanning analytical microscopy (XSAM). ResultsThe efficiency of the analysis was judged based on the sampling rate achieved and the absence of disturbing elements in the background in fluorescence X-ray spectra. The best results were obtained for the combination of TexMet as a buff with diamond as a paste. This combination produced a good collection efficiency and a plain background in the fluorescence X-ray spectra, resulting in a high precision of the analysis.

  14. Comet deflection by directed energy: a finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madajian, Jonathan; Griswold, Janelle; Gandra, Anush; Hughes, Gary B.; Zhang, Qicheng; Rupert, Nic; Lubin, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Comets and Asteroids are viable threats to our planet; if these space rocks are smaller than 25 meters, they burn up in the atmosphere, but if they are wider than 25 meters they can cause damage to the impact area. Anything more than one to two kilometers can have worldwide effects, furthermore a mile-wide asteroid travelling at 30,000 miles per hour has the energy equal to a megaton bomb and is very likely to wipe out most of the life on Earth. Residents near Chelyabinsk, Russia experienced the detrimental effects of a collision with a Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) on 15 February 2013 as a 20 m object penetrated the atmosphere above that city. The effective yield from this object was approximately 1/2 Megaton TNT equivalent (Mt), or that of a large strategic warhead. The 1908 Tunguska event, also over Russia, is estimated to have had a yield of approximately 15 Mt and had the potential to kill millions of people had it come down over a large city1. In the face of such danger a planetary defense system is necessary and this paper proposes a design for such a system. DE-STAR (Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and exploRation) is a phased array laser system that can be used to oblate, deflect and de-spin asteroids and comets.

  15. High Energy Cosmic Ray Electron Spectra measured from the ATIC Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Batkov, K. E.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Balloon Experiment (ATIC) is specifically designed for high energy cosmic ray ion detection. From simulation and a CERN beam test exposure we find that the design consisting of a graphite target and an energy detection device, a totally active calorimeter of BGO scintillator, gives us sufficient information to distinguish electrons from protons up to the TeV energy range. Balloon observations were successfully carried out over Antarctica in both 2000/2001 and 2002/2003 for a total of more than 35 days. This paper presents preliminary results on the spectrum of high energy electrons observed in the first ATIC flight.

  16. The beta-SiC(100) surface studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayan, M.

    1986-01-01

    The beta-SiC(100) surface has been studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, high resolution electron energy loss spectra (HREELS), and core level excitation EELS. Two new Si-terminated phases have been discovered, one with (3 x 2) symmetry, and the other with (2 x 1) symmetry. Models are presented to describe these phases. New results, for the C-rich surface, are presented and discussed. In addition, core level excitation EELS results are given and compared with theory.

  17. The 3d9-3d84p Transitions in the Spectra of Highly-Ionized Elements Yttrium to Silver (Y XIII-Ag XXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyart, Jean-François; Klapisch, Marcel; Schwob, Jean-Louis; Schweitzer, Naftaly

    1982-09-01

    Two hundred and ninety-five lines of the spectra of cobalt-like ions Y XII, Zr XIV, Nb XV, Mo XVI, Ru XVIII, Rh XIX, Pd XX and Ag XXI have been classified as 3d9-3d84p transitions. They involve 250 energy levels which are described by 21 parameters with a root-mean-square deviation of 290 cm-1. The scaling factors of radial integrals calculated by the Hartree-Fock method have been fitted as well as effective electrostatic parameters. The validity of the results is based on isoelectronic regularities and has been checked by extrapolations to the known spectra of Br IX and Sn XXIV. Predictions are given for Kr X, Rb XI, Sr XII, Cd XXII and In XXIII.

  18. Structure of fragment energy spectra in spontaneous fission of sup 242 Cm and fast-neutron fission of sup 242 m Am

    SciTech Connect

    Fomushkin, E.F.; Vinogradov, Y.I.; Gavrilov, V.V.; Novoselov, G.F.; Shvetsov, A.M.

    1989-05-01

    A technique for measurement of the energy spectra of fission fragments is discussed. The fine structure found in the spectra of fragments from spontaneous fission of {sup 242}Cm and fast-neutron fission of {sup 242{ital m}}Am is analyzed. The quantitative parameters of the structure and their analogy with the characteristics of cold fission are discussed.

  19. New Fe i Level Energies and Line Identifications from Stellar Spectra. II. Initial Results from New Ultraviolet Spectra of Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.; Kurucz, Robert L.; Ayres, Thomas R.

    2017-04-01

    The Fe i spectrum is critical to many areas of astrophysics, yet many of the high-lying levels remain uncharacterized. To remedy this deficiency, Peterson & Kurucz identified Fe i lines in archival ultraviolet and optical spectra of metal-poor stars, whose warm temperatures favor moderate Fe i excitation. Sixty-five new levels were recovered, with 1500 detectable lines, including several bound levels in the ionization continuum of Fe i. Here, we extend the previous work by identifying 59 additional levels, with 1400 detectable lines, by incorporating new high-resolution UV spectra of warm metal-poor stars recently obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. We provide gf values for these transitions, both computed as well as adjusted to fit the stellar spectra. We also expand our spectral calculations to the infrared, confirming three levels by matching high-quality spectra of the Sun and two cool stars in the H-band. The predicted gf values suggest that an additional 3700 Fe i lines should be detectable in existing solar infrared spectra. Extending the empirical line identification work to the infrared would help confirm additional Fe i levels, as would new high-resolution UV spectra of metal-poor turnoff stars below 1900 Å.

  20. The Crab nebula energy origin and its high frequency radiation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machabeli, George Z.; Rogava, A.; Chkheidze, N.; Osmanov, Z.; Shapakidze, D.

    2016-06-01

    > In the present work there is presented a model describing transfer of the Crab pulsar's spin-down energy into the powerful synchrotron emission of the nebula. The process of the energy transfer consists of several consecutive stages. The physical processes underlying the theoretical model provide us with the synchrotron emission spectrum, which fits well with the observed one.

  1. Overview of reaction mechanisms for calculating the high energy component of fast-nucleon induced gamma spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F.S.

    1995-02-21

    This presentation reviews the current status of quantum mechanical models for understanding the high-energy component of gamma spectra resulting from radiative capture of fast nucleons; i.e., the part of the spectrum that is not amenable to standard statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach) treatments. These models are based on the direct-semidirect (DSD) model and its variants. Included are recent results on the extension of the DSD model to unbound final states, a discussion of problems and improvements in understanding the form factors in this model, and a brief discussion of a model closely related to the DSD, the pure-resonance model.

  2. Intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in methyl substituted pentanes as revealed by high energy CH-stretching overtone spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Bryan R.; Mohammadi, M. Ali; Thomson, James A.

    1981-10-01

    The overtone spectra of pentane and 12 methyl substituted pentanes are measured in the liquid phase in the region of the pure local mode overtones corresponding to ΔvCH = 3, 4, 5, and 6. The local mode structure of the spectra is discussed. The local mode frequencies ωCH and diagonal local mode anharmonicities XCH for the methyl oscillators are obtained from an analysis of the spectra. The change in ωCH and XCH with increased methyl substitution is related to a barrier to large amplitude vibrational motion arising from steric crowding. The height of this barrier is obtained from dissociation energies calculated from ωCH and XCH by taking the local methyl CH stretching potential to be a Lippincott-Schroeder potential. The methyl steric interactions are described in terms of nonbonded Lennard-Jones and Morse potentials. The parameters for these nonbonded potentials are calculated from the barrier heights and structural information obtained from molecular models for their least strained conformations. These parameters are used to identify a positional dependence in methyl steric hindrance. Force constants evaluated from the nonbonded potentials are correlated with bulk liquid properties.

  3. Quantitative Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency measurements using simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Sanam; Hannagan, John; Rigby, Paul; Pfleger, Kevin; Corry, Ben

    2013-02-01

    Accurate quantification of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using intensity-based methods is difficult due to the overlap of fluorophore excitation and emission spectra. Consequently, mechanisms are required to remove bleedthrough of the donor emission into the acceptor channel and direct excitation of the acceptor when aiming to excite only the donor fluorophores. Methods to circumvent donor bleedthrough using the unmixing of emission spectra have been reported, but these require additional corrections to account for direct excitation of the acceptor. Here we present an alternative method for robust quantification of FRET efficiencies based upon the simultaneous spectral unmixing of both excitation and emission spectra. This has the benefit over existing methodologies in circumventing the issue of donor bleedthrough and acceptor cross excitation without the need for additional corrections. Furthermore, we show that it is applicable with as few as two excitation wavelengths and so can be used for quantifying FRET efficiency in microscope images as easily as for data collected on a spectrofluorometer. We demonstrate the accuracy of the approach by reproducing efficiency values in well characterized FRET standards: HEK cells expressing a variety of linked cerulean and venus fluorescent proteins. Finally we describe simple ImageJ plugins that can be used to calculate and create images of FRET efficiencies from microscope images.

  4. Functional Domain Walls as Active Elements for Energy Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Junqiao

    2016-10-12

    In the past five years in the duration of this project (July 2011-July 2016), we have made a wide range of achievements in both basic research and energy applications along the direction planned in the original proposal. These achievements were reflected by 13 articles published in peer-reviewed journals including Nature Communications, Nano Letters, etc., and one currently in revision at Science. These papers have been accumulatively cited for more than 660 times as of October 2016, according to Web of Science statistics. Specifically, we have made impactful discoveries in the following fields. Basic Research. We have investigated in depth the materials physics of the representative quantum material, VO2, on which most of our project is anchored. We have discovered that independent diffusion of heat and charge in the absence of quasiparticles in metallic VO2 leads to an anomalously low electronic thermal conductivity, dramatically violating the Wiedemann-Franz law, which is a robust law governing behavior of normal conductors stating that free electrons transport heat proportionally to the charge they transport. In addition, we have discovered a peculiar thermal rectification effect based on its phase transition, as well as a gating response of the phase transition. In parallel to the work on VO2, we have also made breakthroughs in investigation of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs): we have experimentally demonstrate a strong anisotropy in in-plane thermal conductivity of black phosphorous, discovered a new, unusual member of the TMDs family, ReS2, where the bulk behaves as monolayers due to electronic and vibrational decoupling, unusual interaction between physi-sorbed molecules and 2D semiconductors, and thermally driven crossover from indirect toward direct bandgap in some 2D TMDs. Applications. Based on the understanding and knowledge gained from the basic investigation, we have developed novel tools and

  5. Waste to energy--key element for sustainable waste management.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Paul H; Rechberger, Helmut

    2015-03-01

    Human activities inevitably result in wastes. The higher the material turnover, and the more complex and divers the materials produced, the more challenging it is for waste management to reach the goals of "protection of men and environment" and "resource conservation". Waste incineration, introduced originally for volume reduction and hygienic reasons, went through a long and intense development. Together with prevention and recycling measures, waste to energy (WTE) facilities contribute significantly to reaching the goals of waste management. Sophisticated air pollution control (APC) devices ensure that emissions are environmentally safe. Incinerators are crucial and unique for the complete destruction of hazardous organic materials, to reduce risks due to pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, and for concentrating valuable as well as toxic metals in certain fractions. Bottom ash and APC residues have become new sources of secondary metals, hence incineration has become a materials recycling facility, too. WTE plants are supporting decisions about waste and environmental management: They can routinely and cost effectively supply information about chemical waste composition as well as about the ratio of biogenic to fossil carbon in MSW and off-gas.

  6. Waste to energy – key element for sustainable waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Paul H. Rechberger, Helmut

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • First paper on the importance of incineration from a urban metabolism point of view. • Proves that incineration is necessary for sustainable waste management. • Historical and technical overview of 100 years development of MSW incineration. - Abstract: Human activities inevitably result in wastes. The higher the material turnover, and the more complex and divers the materials produced, the more challenging it is for waste management to reach the goals of “protection of men and environment” and “resource conservation”. Waste incineration, introduced originally for volume reduction and hygienic reasons, went through a long and intense development. Together with prevention and recycling measures, waste to energy (WTE) facilities contribute significantly to reaching the goals of waste management. Sophisticated air pollution control (APC) devices ensure that emissions are environmentally safe. Incinerators are crucial and unique for the complete destruction of hazardous organic materials, to reduce risks due to pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, and for concentrating valuable as well as toxic metals in certain fractions. Bottom ash and APC residues have become new sources of secondary metals, hence incineration has become a materials recycling facility, too. WTE plants are supporting decisions about waste and environmental management: They can routinely and cost effectively supply information about chemical waste composition as well as about the ratio of biogenic to fossil carbon in MSW and off-gas.

  7. Dual spectra and mixed energy cascade of turbulence in the wavelet representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneveau, Charles

    1991-01-01

    The wavelet-transformed Navier-Stokes equations are used to define quantities such as the transfer of kinetic energy and the flux of kinetic energy through scale r at position x. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent shear flow reveal that although their mean spatial values agree with their traditional counterparts in Fourier space, their spatial variability at every scale is very large, exhibiting non-Gaussian statistics. The local flux of energy involving scales smaller than some r also exhibits large spatial intermittency, and it is negative quite often, indicative of local inverse cascades.

  8. Simulation of Photon energy Spectra Using MISC, SOURCES, MCNP and GADRAS

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Lucas P.; Shores, Erik F.; Myers, Steven C.; Felsher, Paul D.; Garner, Scott E.; Solomon, Clell J. Jr.

    2012-08-14

    The detector response functions included in the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) are a valuable resource for simulating radioactive source emission spectra. Application of these response functions to the results of three-dimensional transport calculations is a useful modeling capability. Using a 26.2 kg shell of depleted uranium (DU) as a simple test problem, this work illustrates a method for manipulating current tally results from MCNP into the GAM file format necessary for a practical link to GADRAS detector response functions. MISC (MCNP Intrinsic Source Constructor) and SOURCES 4C were used to develop photon and neutron source terms for subsequent MCNP transport, and the resultant spectrum is shown to be in good agreement with that from GADRAS. A 1 kg DU sphere was also modeled with the method described here and showed similarly encouraging results.

  9. Feynman scaling violation on baryon spectra in pp collisions at LHC and cosmic ray energies

    SciTech Connect

    Arakelyan, G. H.; Merino, C. Pajares, C.; Shabelski, Yu. M.

    2013-03-15

    A significant asymmetry in baryon/antibaryon yields in the central region of high energy collisions is observed when the initial state has nonzero baryon charge. This asymmetry is connected with the possibility of baryon charge diffusion in rapidity space. Such a diffusion should decrease the baryon charge in the fragmentation region and translate into the corresponding decrease of the multiplicity of leading baryons. As a result, a new mechanism for Feynman scaling violation in the fragmentation region is obtained. Another numerically more significant reason for the Feynman scaling violation comes from the fact that the average number of cut Pomerons increases with initial energy. We present the quantitative predictions of the Quark-Gluon String Model for the Feynman scaling violation at LHC energies and at even higher energies that can be important for cosmic ray physics.

  10. Energy and Angular Spectra of Albedo Protons and Neutrons Emitted from Hydrated Layers of Lunar Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Zaman, F.; Schwadron, N. A.; Wilson, J. K.; Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Mazur, J. E.; Looper, M. D.

    2016-11-01

    Energy and angular yields of albedo protons and neutrons emitted from the lunar surface as a function of hydration layer thickness in the lunar regolith using the MCNP computer code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory are presented.

  11. The TDF System for Thermonuclear Plasma Reaction Rates, Mean Energies and Two-Body Final State Particle Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Warshaw, S I

    2001-07-11

    The rate of thermonuclear reactions in hot plasmas as a function of local plasma temperature determines the way in which thermonuclear ignition and burning proceeds in the plasma. The conventional model approach to calculating these rates is to assume that the reacting nuclei in the plasma are in Maxwellian equilibrium at some well-defined plasma temperature, over which the statistical average of the reaction rate quantity {sigma}v is calculated, where {sigma} is the cross-section for the reaction to proceed at the relative velocity v between the reacting particles. This approach is well-understood and is the basis for much nuclear fusion and astrophysical nuclear reaction rate data. The Thermonuclear Data File (TDF) system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Warshaw 1991), which is the topic of this report, contains data on the Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates for various light nuclear reactions and the correspondingly Maxwellian-averaged energy spectra of the particles in the final state of those reactions as well. This spectral information closely models the output particle and energy distributions in a burning plasma, and therefore leads to more accurate computational treatments of thermonuclear burn, output particle energy deposition and diagnostics, in various contexts. In this report we review and derive the theoretical basis for calculating Maxwellian-averaged thermonuclear reaction rates, mean particle energies, and output particle spectral energy distributions for these reactions in the TDF system. The treatment of the kinematics is non-relativistic. The current version of the TDF system provides exit particle energy spectrum distributions for two-body final state reactions only. In a future report we will discuss and describe how output particle energy spectra for three- and four-body final states can be developed for the TDF system. We also include in this report a description of the algorithmic implementation of the

  12. Handbook of Monochromatic XPS Spectra, Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crist, B. Vincent

    2000-10-01

    This handbook is one of three containing an invaluable collection of research grade XPS Spectra. Each handbook concentrates on a specific family of materials (the elements and their native oxides, semiconductors and polymers) and is entirely self-contained. The introductory section to each handbook includes comprehensive information about the XPS instrument used, the materials and the advanced methods used to collect the spectra. Energy resolution settings, instrument characteristics, energy referencing methods, traceability, energy scale calibration details and transmission function are all reported. Among the many valuable features included in each of these handbooks are: ? All spectra were measured by using AlK monochromatic X-rays ? All spectra were collected in a self-consistent manner to maximise data reliability and quality ? All peaks in the wide spectra are fully annotated and accompanied by detailed atom % tables that report BEs for each of the labelled peaks ? Each high-energy resolution spectrum is peak-fitted and accompanied by detailed tables containing binding energies, FWHMs and relative percentages. In this volume 'Semiconductors' are contained XPS Spectra from a wide range of semiconductive materials and related materials, a rare tool for scientists and analysts in this area. Exclusive features of this volume include: ? Binding energies are accurate to +/- 0.08eV ? Charge compensation was done with a flood-gun mesh-screen system ? Valence band spectra document the occupied density of states (DOS) and the fundamental electronic nature of the semi-conductive materials analysed ? Analyses were done: "as received", "freshly fractured in air", "ion etched" and "chemically treated" ? Alphabetically organised by chemical abbreviations for ease of locating each material This handbook is an invaluable reference for materials scientists and electrical engineers in industry, academia and government laboratories interested in the analysis of semiconductors

  13. Modeling collision energy transfer in APCI/CID mass spectra of PAHs using thermal-like post-collision internal energy distributions.

    PubMed

    Solano, Eduardo A; Mohamed, Sabria; Mayer, Paul M

    2016-10-28

    The internal energy transferred when projectile molecular ions of naphthalene collide with argon gas atoms was extracted from the APCI-CID (atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization collision-induced dissociation) mass spectra acquired as a function of collision energy. Ion abundances were calculated by microcanonical integration of the differential rate equations using the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus rate constants derived from a UB3LYP/6-311G+(3df,2p)//UB3LYP/6-31G(d) fragmentation mechanism and thermal-like vibrational energy distributions pME,Tchar. The mean vibrational energy excess of the ions was characterized by the parameter Tchar ("characteristic temperature"), determined by fitting the theoretical ion abundances to the experimental breakdown graph (a plot of relative abundances of the ions as a function of kinetic energy) of activated naphthalene ions. According to these results, the APCI ion source produces species below Tchar = 1457 K, corresponding to 3.26 eV above the vibrational ground state. Subsequent collisions heat the ions up further, giving rise to a sigmoid curve of Tchar as a function of Ecom (center-of-mass-frame kinetic energy). The differential internal energy absorption per kinetic energy unit (dEvib/dEcom) changes with Ecom according to a symmetric bell-shaped function with a maximum at 6.38 ± 0.32 eV (corresponding to 6.51 ± 0.27 eV of vibrational energy excess), and a half-height full width of 6.30 ± 1.15 eV. This function imposes restrictions on the amount of energy that can be transferred by collisions, such that a maximum is reached as kinetic energy is increased. This behavior suggests that the collisional energy transfer exhibits a pronounced increase around some specific value of energy. Finally, the model is tested against the CID mass spectra of anthracene and pyrene ions and the corresponding results are discussed.

  14. Modeling collision energy transfer in APCI/CID mass spectra of PAHs using thermal-like post-collision internal energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, Eduardo A.; Mohamed, Sabria; Mayer, Paul M.

    2016-10-01

    The internal energy transferred when projectile molecular ions of naphthalene collide with argon gas atoms was extracted from the APCI-CID (atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization collision-induced dissociation) mass spectra acquired as a function of collision energy. Ion abundances were calculated by microcanonical integration of the differential rate equations using the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus rate constants derived from a UB3LYP/6-311G+(3df,2p)//UB3LYP/6-31G(d) fragmentation mechanism and thermal-like vibrational energy distributions p M (" separators=" E , T char ) . The mean vibrational energy excess of the ions was characterized by the parameter Tchar ("characteristic temperature"), determined by fitting the theoretical ion abundances to the experimental breakdown graph (a plot of relative abundances of the ions as a function of kinetic energy) of activated naphthalene ions. According to these results, the APCI ion source produces species below Tchar = 1457 K, corresponding to 3.26 eV above the vibrational ground state. Subsequent collisions heat the ions up further, giving rise to a sigmoid curve of Tchar as a function of Ecom (center-of-mass-frame kinetic energy). The differential internal energy absorption per kinetic energy unit (dEvib/dEcom) changes with Ecom according to a symmetric bell-shaped function with a maximum at 6.38 ± 0.32 eV (corresponding to 6.51 ± 0.27 eV of vibrational energy excess), and a half-height full width of 6.30 ± 1.15 eV. This function imposes restrictions on the amount of energy that can be transferred by collisions, such that a maximum is reached as kinetic energy is increased. This behavior suggests that the collisional energy transfer exhibits a pronounced increase around some specific value of energy. Finally, the model is tested against the CID mass spectra of anthracene and pyrene ions and the corresponding results are discussed.

  15. Comparison between X-rays spectra and their effective energies in small animal CT tomographic imaging and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Mahdjoub; Mimi, Malika; Bentourkia, M'hamed

    2017-03-01

    Small animal CT imaging and dosimetry usually rely on X-ray radiation produced by X-ray tubes. These X-rays typically cover a large energy range. In this study, we compared poly-energetic X-ray spectra against estimated equivalent (effective) mono-energetic beams with the same number of simulated photons for small animal CT imaging and dosimetry applications. Two poly-energetic X-ray spectra were generated from a tungsten anode at 50 and 120 kVp. The corresponding effective mono-energetic beams were established as 36 keV for the 50 kVp spectrum and 49.5 keV for the 120 kVp spectrum. To assess imaging applications, we investigated the spatial resolution by a tungsten wire, and the contrast-to-noise ratio in a reference phantom and in a realistic mouse phantom. For dosimetry investigation, we calculated the absorbed dose in a segmented digital mouse atlas in the skin, fat, heart and bone tissues. Differences of 2.1 and 2.6% in spatial resolution were respectively obtained between the 50 and 120 kVp poly-energetic spectra and their respective 36 and 49.5 keV mono-energetic beams. The differences in contrast-to-noise ratio between the poly-energetic 50 kVp spectrum and its corresponding mono-energetic 36 keV beam for air, fat, brain and bone were respectively -2.9, -0.2, 11.2 and -4.8%, and similarly between the 120 kVp and its effective energy 49.5 keV: -11.3, -20.2, -4.2 and -13.5%. Concerning the absorbed dose, for the lower X-ray beam energies, 50 kVp against 36 keV, the poly-energetic radiation doses were higher than the mono-energetic doses. Instead, for the higher X-ray beam energies, 120 kVp and 49.5 keV, the absorbed dose to the bones and lungs were higher for the mono-energetic 49.5 keV. The intensity and energy of the X-ray beam spectrum have an impact on both imaging and dosimetry in small animal studies. Simulations with mono-energetic beams should take into account these differences in order to study biological effects or to be compared to

  16. Ab initio study of electron energy loss spectra of bulk bismuth up to 100 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timrov, Iurii; Markov, Maxime; Gorni, Tommaso; Raynaud, Michèle; Motornyi, Oleksandr; Gebauer, Ralph; Baroni, Stefano; Vast, Nathalie

    2017-03-01

    The dynamical charge-density response of bulk bismuth has been studied within time-dependent density functional perturbation theory, explicitly accounting for spin-orbit coupling. The use of the Liouville-Lanczos approach allows us to calculate electron energy loss spectra for excitation energies as large as 100 eV. Effects of 5 d semicore electronic states, spin-orbit coupling, exchange and correlation, local fields, and anisotropy are thoroughly investigated. The account of the 5 d states in the calculation turns out to be crucial to correctly describe the loss spectra above 10 eV and, in particular, the position and shape of the bulk-plasmon peak at 14.0 eV at vanishing transferred momentum. Our calculations reveal the presence of interband transitions at 16.3 eV, which had never been discussed before. The origin of the peak at 5.8 eV is revisited as due to mixed interband and collective excitations. Finally, our study supplements the lack of experiments at finite transferred momenta.

  17. Modeling of electron energy spectra and mobilities in semi-metallic Hg1-xCdxTe quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melezhik, E. O.; Gumenjuk-Sichevska, J. V.; Sizov, F. F.

    2015-11-01

    Electron mobility, energy spectra, and intrinsic carrier concentrations in the n-type Hg0.32Cd0.68Te/Hg1-xCdxTe/Hg0.32Cd0.68Te quantum well (QW) in semi-metallic state are numerically modeled. Energy spectra and wave functions were calculated in the framework of the 8-band k-p Hamiltonian. In our model, electron scattering on longitudinal optical phonons, charged impurities, and holes has been taken into account, and the mobility has been calculated by an iterative solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. Our results show that the increase of the electron concentration in the well enhances the screening of the 2D electron gas, decreases the hole concentration, and can ultimately lead to a high electron mobility at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The increase of the electron concentration in the QW could be achieved in situ by delta-doping of barriers or by applying the top-gate potential. Our modeling has shown that for low molar composition x the concentration of holes in the well is high in a wide range of electron concentrations; in this case, the purity of samples does not significantly influence the electron mobility. These results are important in the context of establishing optimal parameters for the fabrication of high-mobility Hg1-xCdxTe quantum wells able to operate at liquid nitrogen temperature and thus suitable for applications in terahertz detectors.

  18. Extraction of the sound velocity from rapidity spectra: Evidence for QGP formation at FAIR/RHIC-BES energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinheimer, J.; Bleicher, M.

    2012-07-01

    We analyze longitudinal pion spectra from √{s_{NN}}=2 GeV to &sqrt{s_{NN}}=20; GeV within Landau's hydrodynamical model and the UrQMD hybrid approach. From the measured data on the widths of the pion rapidity spectra, we extract the sound velocity c s 2 in the dense stage of the reactions. It is found that the sound velocity has a local minimum (indicating the softest point in the equation of state, EoS) at √{s_{NN}}=4-9 GeV, an energy range accessible at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) as well as the RHIC-Beam Energy Scan (RHIC-BES). This softening of the EoS is compatible with the formation of a QGP at the onset of deconfinement. The extracted sound velocities are then used to calculate an excitation function for the mean transverse mass of pions from the hybrid model. We find that, above √{s_{NN}} ≈ 10 GeV, even the lowest c s 2 gives a considerably larger < m_T > of pions compared to data.

  19. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature.

  20. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature.

  1. Survey of quantitative data on the solar energy and its spectra distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of available quantitative data on the total and spectral solar irradiance at ground level and outside the atmosphere. Measurements from research aircraft have resulted in the currently accepted NASA/ASTM standards of the solar constant and zero air mass solar spectral irradiance. The intrinsic variability of solar energy output and programs currently under way for more precise measurements from spacecraft are discussed. Instrumentation for solar measurements and their reference radiation scales are examined. Insolation data available from the records of weather stations are reviewed for their applicability to solar energy conversion. Two alternate methods of solarimetry are briefly discussed.

  2. Hausdorff and Packing Spectra, Large Deviations, and Free Energy for Branching Random Walks in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, Najmeddine; Barral, Julien

    2014-10-01

    Consider an -valued branching random walk (BRW) on a supercritical Galton Watson tree. Without any assumption on the distribution of this BRW we compute, almost surely and simultaneously, the Hausdorff and packing dimensions of the level sets E( K) of infinite branches in the boundary of the tree (endowed with its standard metric) along which the averages of the BRW have a given closed connected set of limit points K. This goes beyond multifractal analysis, which only considers those level sets when K ranges in the set of singletons . We also give a 0-∞ law for the Hausdorff and packing measures of the level sets E({ α}), and compute the free energy of the associated logarithmically correlated random energy model in full generality. Moreover, our results complete the previous works on multifractal analysis by including the levels α which do not belong to the range of the gradient of the free energy. This covers in particular a situation that was until now badly understood, namely the case where a first order phase transition occurs. As a consequence of our study, we can also describe the whole singularity spectrum of Mandelbrot measures, as well as the associated free energy function (or L q -spectrum), when a first order phase transition occurs.

  3. Dispersive dielectrics and time reversal: Free energies, orthogonal spectra, and parity in dissipative media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasgow, Scott Alan; Corson, John; Verhaaren, Chris

    2010-07-01

    Free energies of dissipative media are reviewed. Then we use free-energy-optimal excitation and de-excitation fields to generate a dielectric’s time-reversal spectrum, with several properties: a) The spectrum generalizes the time-reversal parity from “even” and “odd” of conservative systems to an interval [-1,+1] of “time-reversal eigenvalues” λ in dissipative media. b) It yields eigenmodes that are complete: any state of the medium is optimally excitable or de-excitable by them. c) These excitations are orthogonal with respect to the work function of the medium and, so, d) characterize field excitations for the given medium that, when superimposed, only do work on the medium, not on each other via the medium-field interaction mechanism. Notions of en masse potential and kinetic energy in the dissipative medium arise through even (λ=+1) and odd (λ=-1) parity, but also other energy notions via alternative parity (|λ|<1) under time reversal.

  4. Time-development of energy spectra in the simulation of quantum turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shinji; Tsubota, Makoto; Vinen, W. F.

    2012-12-01

    Bradley et al. studied experimentally the emission of vortex rings by a vibrating grid in superfluid 3He-B.1. They observed a sharp transition from ballistic propagation of vortex rings at low grid velocities to a cloud of quantum turbulence at higher velocities, the turbulence being generated by coalescence of the rings. This behaviour is consistent with the results of a full Biot-Savart numerical simulation with the vortex filament model.2 Bradley et al suggested that in the quantum turbulent regime a Kolmogorov energy spectrum develops at small wave numbers (presumably less than 2π/l, where l is the vortex line spacing) and they suggested that the observed rate of free decay of the turbulence is consistent with this idea. In this work we have studied numerically the time-development of the energy spectrum. For the separated rings the spectrum contains very little energy at small wave numbers. After the transition to turbulence the energy at small wavenumbers increases, but it remains much less than would be the case for a Kolmogorov spectrum. We consider why the assumptions underlying the numerical simulations do not lead to the generation of a Kolmogorov spectrum.

  5. Derivation of dielectric function and inelastic mean free path from photoelectron energy-loss spectra of amorphous carbon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Denis; Godet, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Photoelectron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (PEELS) is a highly valuable non destructive tool in applied surface science because it gives access to both chemical composition and electronic properties of surfaces, including the near-surface dielectric function. An algorithm is proposed for real materials to make full use of experimental X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). To illustrate the capabilities and limitations of this algorithm, the near-surface dielectric function ε(ℏω) of a wide range of amorphous carbon (a-C) thin films is derived from energy losses measured in XPS, using a dielectric response theory which relates ε(ℏω) and the bulk plasmon (BP) loss distribution. Self-consistent separation of bulk vs surface plasmon excitations, deconvolution of multiple BP losses and evaluation of Bethe-Born sensitivity factors for bulk and surface loss distributions are crucial to obtain several material parameters: (1) energy loss function for BP excitation, (2) dielectric function of the near-surface material (3-5 nm depth sensitivity), (3) inelastic mean free path, λP (E0), for plasmon excitation, (4) surface excitation parameter, (5) effective number NEFF of valence electrons participating in the plasma oscillation. This photoelectron energy loss spectra analysis has been applied to a-C and a-C:H films grown by physical and chemical methods with a wide range of (sp3/sp2 + sp3) hybridization, optical gap and average plasmon energy values. Different methods are assessed to accurately remove the photoemission peak tail at low loss energy (0-10 eV) due to many-body interactions during the photo-ionization process. The σ + π plasmon excitation represents the main energy-loss channel in a-C; as the C atom density decreases, λP (970 eV) increases from 1.22 nm to 1.6 nm, assuming a cutoff plasmon wavenumber given by a free electron model. The π-π* and σ-σ* transitions observed in the retrieved dielectric function are discussed as a function of the average (sp3/sp

  6. Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies Program: 1981 work-element appraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The Division of Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) has employed a work element appraisal methodology that enables a systematic comparison of the various research and development (R and D) work elements within its program. The work element analysis is dependent upon the potential of the R and D to affect future energy savings, critical fuel substitution, and other public benefits such as environmental impacts. This report summarizes the process and results of the application of this appraisal methodology to the ECUT work elements proposed for FY 1983 funding. The context of the appraisal is outlined to clarify its role and purpose in the planning and budgeting cycle. Implementation of the process, including the data development and the appraisal review session, is also discussed, along with the impact of the appraisal results on ECUT's total planning system and on the preparation of the FY 1983 budget.

  7. On the Energy Spectra of GeV/TeV Cosmic Ray Leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, Lukasz; Petrosian, Vahe; Blandford, Roger D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-08-19

    Recent observations of cosmic ray electrons from several instruments have revealed various degrees of deviation in the measured electron energy distribution from a simple power-law, in a form of an excess around 0.1 to 1 TeV energies. An even more prominent deviation and excess has been observed in the fraction of cosmic ray positrons around 10 and 100 GeV energies. These observations have received considerable attention and many theoretical models have been proposed to explain them. The models rely on either dark matter annihilation/decay or specific nearby astrophysical sources, and involve several additional assumptions regarding the dark matter distribution or particle acceleration. In this paper we show that the observed excesses in the electron spectrum may be easily reproduced without invoking any unusual sources other than the general diffuse Galactic components of cosmic rays. The model presented here assumes a power-law injection of electrons (and protons) by supernova remnants, and evaluates their expected energy spectrum based on a simple kinetic equation describing the propagation of charged particles in the interstellar medium. The primary physical effect involved is the Klein-Nishina suppression of the electron cooling rate around TeV energies. With a very reasonable choice of the model parameters characterizing the local interstellar medium, we can reproduce the most recent observations by Fermi and HESS experiments. Interestingly, in our model the injection spectral index of cosmic ray electrons becomes comparable to, or even equal to that of cosmic ray protons. The Klein-Nishina effect may also affect the propagation of the secondary e{sup {+-}} pairs, and therefore modify the cosmic ray positron-to-electron ratio. We have explored this possibility by considering two mechanisms for production of e{sup {+-}} pairs within the Galaxy. The first is due to the decay of {pi}{sup {+-}}'s produced by interaction of cosmic ray nuclei with ambient protons

  8. MULTI-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS FROM MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. II. CATALOG OF STARS IN MILKY WAY DWARF SATELLITE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Rockosi, Constance M.; Geha, Marla C.; Sneden, Christopher; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Majewski, Steven R.; Siegel, Michael

    2010-12-15

    We present a catalog of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances for 2961 stars in eight dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way (MW): Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I, Sextans, Leo II, Canes Venatici I, Ursa Minor, and Draco. For the purposes of validating our measurements, we also observed 445 red giants in MW globular clusters and 21 field red giants in the MW halo. The measurements are based on Keck/DEIMOS medium-resolution spectroscopy (MRS) combined with spectral synthesis. We estimate uncertainties in [Fe/H] by quantifying the dispersion of [Fe/H] measurements in a sample of stars in monometallic globular clusters (GCs). We estimate uncertainties in Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances by comparing to high-resolution spectroscopic abundances of the same stars. For this purpose, a sample of 132 stars with published high-resolution spectroscopy in GCs, the MW halo field, and dwarf galaxies has been observed with MRS. The standard deviations of the differences in [Fe/H] and ([{alpha}/Fe]) (the average of [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) between the two samples is 0.15 and 0.16, respectively. This catalog represents the largest sample of multi-element abundances in dwarf galaxies to date. The next papers in this series draw conclusions on the chemical evolution, gas dynamics, and star formation histories from the catalog presented here. The wide range of dwarf galaxy luminosity reveals the dependence of dwarf galaxy chemical evolution on galaxy stellar mass.

  9. Energy Spectra Stemming from Interactions of Alfvén Waves and Turbulent Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mininni, P. D.; Pouquet, A.

    2007-12-01

    We present a numerical analysis of an incompressible decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence run on a grid of 15363 points. The Taylor Reynolds number at the maximum of dissipation is ≈1100, and the initial condition is a superposition of large-scale Arn’old-Beltrami-Childress flows and random noise at small scales, with no uniform magnetic field. The initial kinetic and magnetic energies are equal, with negligible correlation. The resulting energy spectrum is a combination of two components, each moderately resolved. Isotropy obtains in the large scales, with a spectral law compatible with the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan theory stemming from the weakening of nonlinear interactions due to Alfvén waves; scaling of structure functions confirms the non-Kolmogorovian nature of the flow in this range. At small scales, weak turbulence emerges with a k⊥-2 spectrum, the perpendicular direction referring to the local quasiuniform magnetic field.

  10. ON THERMALIZATION IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS AND THE PEAK ENERGIES OF PHOTOSPHERIC SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Vurm, Indrek; Piran, Tsvi; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2013-02-20

    The low-energy spectral slopes of the prompt emission of most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are difficult to reconcile with radiatively efficient optically thin emission models irrespective of the radiation mechanism. An alternative is to ascribe the radiation around the spectral peak to a thermalization process occurring well inside the Thomson photosphere. This quasi-thermal spectrum can evolve into the observed non-thermal shape by additional energy release at moderate to small Thomson optical depths, which can readily give rise to the hard spectral tail. The position of the spectral peak is determined by the temperature and Lorentz factor of the flow in the thermalization zone, where the total number of photons carried by the jet is established. To reach thermalization, dissipation alone is not sufficient and photon generation requires an efficient emission/absorption process in addition to scattering. We perform a systematic study of all relevant photon production mechanisms searching for possible conditions in which thermalization can take place. We find that a significant fraction of the available energy should be dissipated at intermediate radii, {approx}10{sup 10} to a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm, and the flow there should be relatively slow: the bulk Lorentz factor could not exceed a few tens for all but the most luminous bursts with the highest E {sub pk} values. The least restrictive constraint for successful thermalization, {Gamma} {approx}< 20, is obtained if synchrotron emission acts as the photon source. This requires, however, a non-thermal acceleration deep below the Thomson photosphere transferring a significant fraction of the flow energy to relativistic electrons with Lorentz factors between 10 and 100. Other processes require bulk flow Lorentz factors of order of a few for typical bursts. We examine the implications of these results to different GRB photospheric emission models.

  11. Sharp low-energy feature in single-particle spectra due to forward scattering in d-wave cuprate superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung Hwan; Bok, Jin Mo; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhou, X J; Varma, C M; Choi, Han-Yong

    2014-08-01

    There is an enormous interest in the renormalization of the quasiparticle (qp) dispersion relation of cuprate superconductors both below and above the critical temperature T_{c} because it enables the determination of the fluctuation spectrum to which the qp's are coupled. A remarkable discovery by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a sharp low-energy feature (LEF) in qp spectra well below the superconducting energy gap but with its energy increasing in proportion to T_{c} and its intensity increasing sharply below T_{c}. This unexpected feature needs to be reconciled with d-wave superconductivity. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of ARPES data from Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+δ} (Bi2212) using Eliashberg equations to show that the qp scattering rate due to the forward scattering impurities far from the Cu-O planes is modified by the energy gap below T_{c} and shows up as the LEF. This is also a necessary step to analyze ARPES data to reveal the spectrum of fluctuations promoting superconductivity.

  12. A variational algebraic method used to study the full vibrational spectra and dissociation energies of some specific diatomic systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Sun, Weiguo; Fu, Jia; Fan, Qunchao; Ma, Jie; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang; Feng, Hao; Li, Huidong

    2014-01-03

    The algebraic method (AM) proposed by Sun et al. is improved to be a variational AM (VAM) to offset the possible experimental errors and to adapt to the individual energy expansion nature of different molecular systems. The VAM is used to study the full vibrational spectra {Eυ} and the dissociation energies De of (4)HeH(+)-X(1)Σ(+), (7)Li2-1(3)Δg,Na2-C(1)Πu,NaK-7(1)Π, Cs2-B(1)Πu and (79)Br2-β1g((3)P2) diatomic electronic states. The results not only precisely reproduce all known experimental vibrational energies, but also predict correct dissociation energies and all unknown high-lying levels that may not be given by the original AM or other numerical methods or experimental methods. The analyses and the skill suggested here might be useful for other numerical simulations and theoretical fittings using known data that may carry inevitable errors.

  13. The effect of turbulent kinetic energy on inferred ion temperature from neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T. J.

    2014-07-15

    Measuring the width of the energy spectrum of fusion-produced neutrons from deuterium (DD) or deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas is a commonly used method for determining the ion temperature in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. In a plasma with a Maxwellian distribution of ion energies, the spread in neutron energy arises from the thermal spread in the center-of-mass velocities of reacting pairs of ions. Fluid velocities in ICF are of a similar magnitude as the center-of-mass velocities and can lead to further broadening of the neutron spectrum, leading to erroneous inference of ion temperature. Motion of the reacting plasma will affect DD and DT neutrons differently, leading to disagreement between ion temperatures inferred from the two reactions. This effect may be a contributor to observations over the past decades of ion temperatures higher than expected from simulations, ion temperatures in disagreement with observed yields, and different temperatures measured in the same implosion from DD and DT neutrons. This difference in broadening of DD and DT neutrons also provides a measure of turbulent motion in a fusion plasma.

  14. Energy Spectra and High Frequency Oscillations in 4U 0614+091

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, E. C.; Kaaret, P.; Chen, K.; Tavani, M.; Barret, D.; Bloser, P.; Grindlay, J.; Harmon, B. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of the high frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in 4U 0614+091, combining timing and spectral analysis of RXTE (Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer) observations. The energy spectrum of the source can be described by a power law plus a blackbody component. The blackbody has a variable temperature (kT approximately 0.8 to 1.4 keV) and accounts for 10 to 25% of the total energy flux. The power law flux and photon index also vary (F approximately 0.8 to 1.6 x 10(exp -9) erg/sq cm.s and alpha approximately 2.0 to 2.8 respectively). We find a robust correlation of the frequency of the higher frequency QPO with the flux of the blackbody. The source follows the same relation even in observations separated by several months. The QPO frequency does not have a similarly unique correlation with the total flux or the flux of the power law component. The RMS amplitudes of the higher frequency QPO rise with energy but are consistent with a constant for the lower frequency QPO. These results may be interpreted in terms of a beat frequency model for the production of the high frequency QPOs.

  15. Higher energy states in the CO dimer: millimeter-wave spectra and rovibrational calculations.

    PubMed

    Surin, Leonid A; Fourzikov, Dmitri N; Giesen, Thomas F; Schlemmer, Stephan; Winnewisser, Gisbert; Panfilov, Victor A; Dumesh, Boris S; Vissers, Gé W M; van der Avoird, Ad

    2007-12-13

    New extensive millimeter-wave measurements of the 12C16O dimer have been made, and more than 300 new spectral transitions have been observed in the frequency range 81-135 GHz. A joint analysis of these and previous millimeter-wave data yielded the precise location of 33 new energy levels of A+ symmetry and 20 levels of A- symmetry. These energy levels are located at 8-18 cm(-1) above the zero-point level. Some of them belong to already known stacks, and others make up 9 new stacks of the dimer. Newly determined stacks have K=0, 1, and, for the first time, 2, where K is the projection of the total angular momentum on the intermolecular axis. The energy levels from accompanying rovibrational calculations with the use of a recently developed hybrid CCSD(T)/DFT-SAPT potential are in very good agreement with experiment. Analysis of the calculated wave functions revealed that two new stacks of A+ symmetry with K=2 correspond to overall rotation of the dimer while the other newly observed stacks belong to the geared bend overtone modes. The ground vibrational states of the two "isomers" found are more or less localized at the two minima in the potential surface, whereas all the geared bend excited states show a considerable amount of delocalization.

  16. Energy conserving discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method for the Vlasov-Poisson system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madaule, Éric; Restelli, Marco; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new, energy conserving, spectral element, discontinuous Galerkin method for the approximation of the Vlasov-Poisson system in arbitrary dimension, using Cartesian grids. The method is derived from the one proposed in [4], with two modifications: energy conservation is obtained by a suitable projection operator acting on the solution of the Poisson problem, rather than by solving multiple Poisson problems, and all the integrals appearing in the finite element formulation are approximated with Gauss-Lobatto quadrature, thereby yielding a spectral element formulation. The resulting method has the following properties: exact energy conservation (up to errors introduced by the time discretization), stability (thanks to the use of upwind numerical fluxes), high order accuracy and high locality. For the time discretization, we consider both Runge-Kutta methods and exponential integrators, and show results for 1D and 2D cases (2D and 4D in phase space, respectively).

  17. Finite element solution for energy conservation using a highly stable explicit integration algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Manhardt, P. D.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical derivation of a finite element solution algorithm for the transient energy conservation equation in multidimensional, stationary multi-media continua with irregular solution domain closure is considered. The complete finite element matrix forms for arbitrarily irregular discretizations are established, using natural coordinate function representations. The algorithm is embodied into a user-oriented computer program (COMOC) which obtains transient temperature distributions at the node points of the finite element discretization using a highly stable explicit integration procedure with automatic error control features. The finite element algorithm is shown to posses convergence with discretization for a transient sample problem. The condensed form for the specific heat element matrix is shown to be preferable to the consistent form. Computed results for diverse problems illustrate the versatility of COMOC, and easily prepared output subroutines are shown to allow quick engineering assessment of solution behavior.

  18. The role of high-energy synchrotron radiation in biomedical trace element research

    SciTech Connect

    Pounds, J.G.; Long, G.J.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper will present the results of an investigation of the distribution of essential elements in the normal hepatic lobule. the liver is the organ responsible for metabolism and storage of most trace elements. Although parenchymal hepatocytes are rather uniform histologically, morphometry, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and microdissection with microchemical investigations have revealed marked heterogeneity on a functional and biochemical level. Hepatocytes from the periportal and perivenous zones of the liver parrenchyma differ in oxidative energy metabolism, glucose uptake and output, unreagenesis, biotransformation, bile acid secretion, and palsma protein synthesis and secretion. Although trace elements are intimately involved in the regulation and maintenance of these functions, little is known regarding the heterogeneity of trace element localization of the liver parenchyma. Histochemical techniques for trace elements generally give high spatial resolution, but lack specificity and stoichiometry. Microdissection has been of marginal usefulness for trace element analyses due to the very small size of the dissected parenchyma. The characteristics of the high-energy x-ray microscope provide an effective approach for elucidating the trace element content of these small biological structures or regions. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Wave energy in white dwarf atmospheres. I - Magnetohydrodynamic energy spectra for homogeneous DB and layered DA stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Zdzislaw E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiative damping of acoustic and MHD waves that propagate through white dwarf photospheric layers is studied, and other damping processes that may be important for the propagation of the MHD waves are calculated. The amount of energy remaining after the damping processes have occurred in different types of waves is estimated. The results show that lower acoustic fluxes should be expected in layered DA and homogeneous DB white dwarfs than had previously been estimated. Acoustic emission manifests itself in an enhancement of the quadrupole term, but this term may become comparable to or even lower than the dipole term for cool white dwarfs. Energy carried by the acoustic waves is significantly dissipated in deep photospheric layers, mainly because of radiative damping. Acoustically heated corona cannot exist around DA and DB white dwarfs in a range T(eff) = 10,000-30,000 K and for log g = 7 and 8. However, relatively hot and massive white dwarfs could be exceptions.

  20. Measurement of the spectra of low energy electrons resulting from Auger transitions induced by the annihilation of low energy positrons implanted at The Ag (100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastry, Karthik; Joglekar, Prasad; Weiss, A. H.; Fazleev, N. G.

    2013-04-01

    A few percent of positrons bound to a solid surface annihilate with core electrons resulting in highly excited atoms containing core holes. These core holes may be filled in an auto-ionizing process in which a less tightly bound electron drops into the hole and the energy difference transferred to an outgoing "Auger electron." Because the core holes are created by annihilation and not impact it is possible to use very low energy positron beams to obtain annihilation induced Auger signals. The Auger signals so obtained have little or none of the large impact induced secondary electron background that interferes with measurements of the low energy Auger spectra obtained using the much higher incident energies necessary when using electron or photon beams. Here we present the results of measurements of the energy spectrum of low energy electrons emitted as a result of Positron Annihilation Induce Auger Electron Emission [1] from a clean Ag (100) surface. The measurements were performed using the University of Texas Arlington Time of Flight Positron Annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectrometer (T-O-F-PAES) System [2]. A strong double peak was observed at ˜35eV corresponding to the N2VV and N3VV Auger transitions in agreement with previous PAES studies [3].

  1. ROSAT Energy Spectra of Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, N. S.

    1999-01-01

    The 0.1-2.4 keV bandpass of the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) offers an opportunity to study the very soft X-ray continuum of bright low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). In 46 pointed observations, 23 LMXBs were observed with count rates between 0.4 and 165.4 counts s-1. The survey identified a total of 29 different luminosity levels, which are compared with observations and identified spectral states from other missions. The atoll source 4U 1705-44 was observed near Eddington luminosities in an unusually high intensity state. Spectral analysis provided a measure of the interstellar column density for all 49 observations. The sensitivity of spectral fits depends strongly on column density. Fits to highly absorbed spectra are merely insensitive toward any particular spectral model. Sources with column densities well below 1022 cm-2 are best fitted by power laws, while the blackbody model gives clearly worse fits to the data. Most single-component fits from sources with low column densities, however, are not acceptable at all. The inclusion of a blackbody component in eight sources can improve the fits significantly. The obtained emission radii of less than 5 km suggest emission from the neutron star surface. In 10 sources acceptable fits can only be achieved by including soft-line components. With a spectral resolution of the PSPC of 320-450 eV, between 0.6 and 1.2 keV unresolved broad-line features were detected around 0.65, 0.85, and 1.0 keV. The line fluxes range within 10-11 and 10-12 ergs cm-2 s-1, with equivalent widths between 24 and 210 eV. In LMC X-2, 2S 0918-549, and 4U 1254-690, line emission is indicated for the first time. The soft emission observed in 4U 0614+091 compares with recent ASCA results, with a new feature indicated at 1.31 keV. The deduced line fluxes in 4U 1820-30 and Cyg X-2 showed variability of a factor of 2 within timescales of 1-2 days. Average fluxes of line components in 4U 1820-30 varied by the same factor over a

  2. Electronic structure and spectroscopy of nucleic acid bases: Ionization energies, ionization-induced structural changes, and photoelectron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Dolgikh, Stanislav; Landau, Arie; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2010-08-02

    We report high-level ab initio calculations and single-photon ionization mass spectrometry study of ionization of adenine (A), thymine (T), cytosine (C) and guanine (G). For thymine and adenine, only the lowest-energy tautomers were considered, whereas for cytosine and guanine we characterized five lowest-energy tautomeric forms. The first adiabatic and several vertical ionization energies were computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method for ionization potentials with single and double substitutions. Equilibrium structures of the cationic ground states were characterized by DFT with the {omega}B97X-D functional. The ionization-induced geometry changes of the bases are consistent with the shapes of the corresponding molecular orbitals. For the lowest-energy tautomers, the magnitude of the structural relaxation decreases in the following series G > C > A > T, the respective relaxation energies being 0.41, 0.32, 0.25 and 0.20 eV. The computed adiabatic ionization energies (8.13, 8.89, 8.51-8.67 and 7.75-7.87 eV for A,T,C and G, respectively) agree well with the onsets of the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves (8.20 {+-} 0.05, 8.95 {+-} 0.05, 8.60 {+-} 0.05 and 7.75 {+-} 0.05 eV). Vibrational progressions for the S{sub 0}-D{sub 0} vibronic bands computed within double-harmonic approximation with Duschinsky rotations are compared with previously reported experimental photoelectron spectra.

  3. A theoretical investigation of spectra utilization for a CMOS based indirect detector for dual energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyvas, N.; Martini, N.; Koukou, V.; Michail, C.; Sotiropoulou, P.; Valais, I.; Kandarakis, I.; Fountos, G.

    2015-09-01

    Dual Energy imaging is a promising method for visualizing masses and microcalcifications in digital mammography. Currently commercially available detectors may be suitable for dual energy mammographic applications. The scope of this work was to theoretically examine the performance of the Radeye CMOS digital indirect detector under three low- and high-energy spectral pairs. The detector was modeled through the linear system theory. The pixel size was equal to 22.5μm and the phosphor material of the detector was a 33.9 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor screen. The examined spectral pairs were (i) a 40kV W/Ag (0.01cm) and a 70kV W/Cu (0.1cm) target/filter combinations, (ii) a 40kV W/Cd (0.013cm) and a 70kV W/Cu (0.1cm) target/filter combinations and (iii) a 40kV W/Pd (0.008cm) and a 70kV W/Cu (0.1cm) target/filter combinations. For each combination the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE), showing the signal to noise ratio transfer, the detector optical gain (DOG), showing the sensitivity of the detector and the coefficient of variation (CV) of the detector output signal were calculated. The second combination exhibited slightly higher DOG (326 photons per X-ray) and lower CV (0.755%) values. In terms of electron output from the RadEye CMOS, the first two combinations demonstrated comparable DQE values; however the second combination provided an increase of 6.5% in the electron output.

  4. Energy and dissipation range spectra in the inertial range of homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakhot, V.; She, Z.-S.; Orszag, S. A.

    A study is conducted of deviations from Kolmogorov's inertial-range scaling behavior using the dynamical 'renormalization group' (RNG) analysis of turbulence; RNG has been found to yield good predictions for inertial-range statistics including the Kolmogorov and the Batchelor-Obukhov-Corrsin constants. Attention is given to the implications of the deviations for higher-order statistics of small-scale turbulence. It was established by Edwards (1964) that the relation between the exponent of the inertial range energy spectrum and that of the Gaussian force correlation spectrum is independent of the perturbation expansion. It is presently shown that this relationship holds even for higher-order correlation functions.

  5. Electron momentum spectroscopy study of amantadine: binding energy spectra and valence orbital electron density distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinyuk, I. V.; Zheng, Y.; Brion, C. E.

    2000-11-01

    The electron binding energy spectrum and valence orbital electron momentum density distributions of amantadine (1-aminoadamantane), an important anti-viral and anti-Parkinsonian drug, have been measured by electron momentum spectroscopy. Theoretical momentum distributions, calculated at the 6-311++G** and AUG-CC-PVTZ levels within the target Hartree-Fock and also the target Kohn-Sham density functional theory approximations, show good agreement with the experimental results. The results for amantadine are also compared with those for the parent molecule, adamantane, reported earlier (Chem. Phys. 253 (2000) 41). Based on the comparison tentative assignments of the valence region ionization bands of amantadine have been made.

  6. The relation between the electron energy loss spectra of hafnia and its dielectric function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Maarten; Grande, Pedro Luis

    2014-12-01

    Recently two papers have been published deriving the dielectric function from hafnia from electron energy loss data (Jin et al. Applied Physics Letters 100 083713 (2006), Behar et al. Phys. Rev A. 80 062901 (2009)). The obtained dielectric functions are compared in their optical limit and differ considerably. Here we try to clarify the situation by presenting new experimental data and review the analysis procedure used in the earlier work. We conclude that the discrepancy is most likely caused by a shortcoming in the way that the momentum-dependence of the dielectric function is modelled.

  7. Electronic energy loss spectra from mono-layer to few layers of phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Brij; Thakur, Rajesh; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    Using first principles calculations, electronic and optical properties of few-layers phosphorene has been investigated. Electronic band structure show a moderate band gap of 0.9 eV in monolayer phosphorene which decreases with increasing number of layers. Optical properties of few-layers of phosphorene in infrared and visible region shows tunability with number of layers. Electron energy loss function has been plotted and huge red shift in plasmonic behaviours is found. These tunable electronic and optical properties of few-layers of phosphorene can be useful for the applications of optoelectronic devices.

  8. Non-Destructive Study of Bulk Crystallinity and Elemental Composition of Natural Gold Single Crystal Samples by Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Rakovan, John; Shinohara, Takenao; Kockelmann, Winfried; Losko, Adrian S.; Vogel, Sven C.

    2017-01-01

    Energy-resolved neutron imaging enables non-destructive analyses of bulk structure and elemental composition, which can be resolved with high spatial resolution at bright pulsed spallation neutron sources due to recent developments and improvements of neutron counting detectors. This technique, suitable for many applications, is demonstrated here with a specific study of ~5–10 mm thick natural gold samples. Through the analysis of neutron absorption resonances the spatial distribution of palladium (with average elemental concentration of ~0.4 atom% and ~5 atom%) is mapped within the gold samples. At the same time, the analysis of coherent neutron scattering in the thermal and cold energy regimes reveals which samples have a single-crystalline bulk structure through the entire sample volume. A spatially resolved analysis is possible because neutron transmission spectra are measured simultaneously on each detector pixel in the epithermal, thermal and cold energy ranges. With a pixel size of 55 μm and a detector-area of 512 by 512 pixels, a total of 262,144 neutron transmission spectra are measured concurrently. The results of our experiments indicate that high resolution energy-resolved neutron imaging is a very attractive analytical technique in cases where other conventional non-destructive methods are ineffective due to sample opacity. PMID:28102285

  9. Non-Destructive Study of Bulk Crystallinity and Elemental Composition of Natural Gold Single Crystal Samples by Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Rakovan, John; Shinohara, Takenao; Kockelmann, Winfried; Losko, Adrian S.; Vogel, Sven C.

    2017-01-01

    Energy-resolved neutron imaging enables non-destructive analyses of bulk structure and elemental composition, which can be resolved with high spatial resolution at bright pulsed spallation neutron sources due to recent developments and improvements of neutron counting detectors. This technique, suitable for many applications, is demonstrated here with a specific study of ~5–10 mm thick natural gold samples. Through the analysis of neutron absorption resonances the spatial distribution of palladium (with average elemental concentration of ~0.4 atom% and ~5 atom%) is mapped within the gold samples. At the same time, the analysis of coherent neutron scattering in the thermal and cold energy regimes reveals which samples have a single-crystalline bulk structure through the entire sample volume. A spatially resolved analysis is possible because neutron transmission spectra are measured simultaneously on each detector pixel in the epithermal, thermal and cold energy ranges. With a pixel size of 55 μm and a detector-area of 512 by 512 pixels, a total of 262,144 neutron transmission spectra are measured concurrently. The results of our experiments indicate that high resolution energy-resolved neutron imaging is a very attractive analytical technique in cases where other conventional non-destructive methods are ineffective due to sample opacity.

  10. Non-Destructive Study of Bulk Crystallinity and Elemental Composition of Natural Gold Single Crystal Samples by Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tremsin, Anton S; Rakovan, John; Shinohara, Takenao; Kockelmann, Winfried; Losko, Adrian S; Vogel, Sven C

    2017-01-19

    Energy-resolved neutron imaging enables non-destructive analyses of bulk structure and elemental composition, which can be resolved with high spatial resolution at bright pulsed spallation neutron sources due to recent developments and improvements of neutron counting detectors. This technique, suitable for many applications, is demonstrated here with a specific study of ~5-10 mm thick natural gold samples. Through the analysis of neutron absorption resonances the spatial distribution of palladium (with average elemental concentration of ~0.4 atom% and ~5 atom%) is mapped within the gold samples. At the same time, the analysis of coherent neutron scattering in the thermal and cold energy regimes reveals which samples have a single-crystalline bulk structure through the entire sample volume. A spatially resolved analysis is possible because neutron transmission spectra are measured simultaneously on each detector pixel in the epithermal, thermal and cold energy ranges. With a pixel size of 55 μm and a detector-area of 512 by 512 pixels, a total of 262,144 neutron transmission spectra are measured concurrently. The results of our experiments indicate that high resolution energy-resolved neutron imaging is a very attractive analytical technique in cases where other conventional non-destructive methods are ineffective due to sample opacity.

  11. SYNCHROTRON POLARIZATION AND SYNCHROTRON SELF-ABSORPTION SPECTRA FOR A POWER-LAW PARTICLE DISTRIBUTION WITH FINITE ENERGY RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S. E-mail: souichaoui@usthb.dz

    2011-12-10

    We have derived asymptotic forms for the degree of polarization of the optically thin synchrotron and for synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) spectra assuming a power-law particle distribution of the form N({gamma}) {approx} {gamma}{sup -p} with {gamma}{sub 1} < {gamma} < {gamma}{sub 2}, especially for a finite high-energy limit, {gamma}{sub 2}, in the case of an arbitrary pitch angle. The new results inferred concern more especially the high-frequency range x >> {eta}{sup 2} with parameter {eta} = {gamma}{sub 2}/{gamma}{sub 1}. The calculated SSA spectra concern instantaneous photon emission where cooling effects are not considered. They have been obtained by also ignoring likely effects such as Comptonization, pair creation and annihilation, as well as magnetic photon splitting. To that aim, in addition to the two usual absorption frequencies, a third possible one has been derived and expressed in terms of the Lambert W function based on the analytical asymptotic form of the absorption coefficient, {alpha}{sub {nu}}, for the high-frequency range {nu} >> {nu}{sub 2} (with {nu}{sub 2} the synchrotron frequency corresponding to {gamma}{sub 2}). We have shown that the latter frequency may not have realistic applications in astrophysics, except in the case of an adequate set of parameters allowing one to neglect Comptonization effects. More detailed calculations and discussions are presented.

  12. Synchrotron Polarization and Synchrotron Self-absorption Spectra for a Power-law Particle Distribution with Finite Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2011-12-01

    We have derived asymptotic forms for the degree of polarization of the optically thin synchrotron and for synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) spectra assuming a power-law particle distribution of the form N(γ) ~ γ-p with γ1 < γ < γ2, especially for a finite high-energy limit, γ2, in the case of an arbitrary pitch angle. The new results inferred concern more especially the high-frequency range x Gt η2 with parameter η = γ2/γ1. The calculated SSA spectra concern instantaneous photon emission where cooling effects are not considered. They have been obtained by also ignoring likely effects such as Comptonization, pair creation and annihilation, as well as magnetic photon splitting. To that aim, in addition to the two usual absorption frequencies, a third possible one has been derived and expressed in terms of the Lambert W function based on the analytical asymptotic form of the absorption coefficient, αν, for the high-frequency range ν Gt ν2 (with ν2 the synchrotron frequency corresponding to γ2). We have shown that the latter frequency may not have realistic applications in astrophysics, except in the case of an adequate set of parameters allowing one to neglect Comptonization effects. More detailed calculations and discussions are presented.

  13. Measurements of the linear energy transfer spectra on the Mir orbital station and comparison with radiation transport models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Konradi, A.; Atwell, W.; Golightly, M. J.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Petrov, V. M.; Tchernykh, I. V.; Shurshakov, V. A.; Lobakov, A. P.

    1996-01-01

    A tissue equivalent proportional counter designed to measure the linear energy transfer spectra (LET) in the range 0.2-1250 keV/micrometer was flown in the Kvant module on the Mir orbital station during September 1994. The spacecraft was in a 51.65 degrees inclination, elliptical (390 x 402 km) orbit. This is nearly the lower limit of its flight altitude. The total absorbed dose rate measured was 411.3 +/- 4.41 microGy/day with an average quality factor of 2.44. The galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) dose rate was 133.6 microGy/day with a quality factor of 3.35. The trapped radiation belt dose rate was 277.7 microGy/day with an average quality factor of 1.94. The peak rate through the South Atlantic Anomaly was approximately 12 microGy/min and nearly constant from one pass to another. A detailed comparison of the measured LET spectra has been made with radiation transport models. The GCR results are in good agreement with model calculations; however, this is not the case for radiation belt particles and again points to the need for improving the AP8 omni-directional trapped proton models.

  14. Determination of the Effective Ground State Potential Energy Function of Ozone from High-Resolution Infrared Spectra.

    PubMed

    Tyuterev; Tashkun; Jensen; Barbe; Cours

    1999-11-01

    The effective ground state potential energy function of the ozone molecule near the C(2v) equilibrium configuration was obtained in a least-squares fit to the largest sample of experimental, high-resolution vibration-rotation data used for this purpose so far. The fitting is based on variational calculations carried out with the extended Morse Oscillator Rigid Bender Internal Dynamics model. The potential function is expanded in Morse-type functions of the stretching variables and in cosine of the bending angle. The present calculation produces results in significantly better agreement with experiment than previous determinations of the potential energy surface, and the energies predicted with the new surface are sufficiently accurate to be useful for the assignment of new high-resolution spectra. The rms (root-mean-square) deviation of the fit of rovibrational data up to J = 5 is 0.02 cm(-1). For the set of all 60 band centers of the (16)O(3) molecule included in the Atlas of Ozone Line Parameters, the rms deviation is 0.025 cm(-1), and for all band centers determined so far from high-resolution spectra, including those recently observed and assigned in Reims corresponding to highly excited stretching and bending vibrations (v(1) + v(2) + v(3) = 6), the rms deviation is 0.1 cm(-1). The "dark states" that produce resonance perturbations in the observed bands are described with experimental accuracy up to the (v(1)v(2)v(3)) = (080) state. Extrapolation tests demonstrate the predictive power of the potential function obtained: rotational extrapolation up to J = 10 for the 11 lowest vibrational states results in an rms deviation of 0.06cm(-1). Also, vibrational energies measured by low-resolution Raman spectroscopy (which were not included in the input data for the fit) are calculated within the experimental accuracy (rms = 1.6 cm(-1)) of the experimental values up to the dissociation limit. The statistical analysis suggests that the accuracy of the equilibrium

  15. Energy spectra of proton and nuclei of primary cosmic rays in energy region 10 TeV/particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandritskaya, K. V.; Sazhina, G. P.; Sokolskaya, N. V.; Varkovitskaya, A. Y.; Zamchalova, E. A.; Zatsepin, V. I.

    1985-01-01

    To investigate the chemical composition of primary cosmic rays, several emulsion chambers were exposed at a 10.8 g/sq cm. depth in the stratosphere. Each chamber has the area of 0.92x0.46 sq m. and the depth of 14 c.u. The exposure time of chambers processed by now is 260 hours. The detecting layers were X-ray films and nuclear emulsions, which allowed to measure an energy of cascade and a type of primary particle. Results and techniques are described.

  16. Reconstruction of Time-Resolved Neutron Energy Spectra in Z-Pinch Experiments Using Time-of-flight Method

    SciTech Connect

    Rezac, K.; Klir, D.; Kubes, P.; Kravarik, J.

    2009-01-21

    We present the reconstruction of neutron energy spectra from time-of-flight signals. This technique is useful in experiments with the time of neutron production in the range of about tens or hundreds of nanoseconds. The neutron signals were obtained by a common hard X-ray and neutron fast plastic scintillation detectors. The reconstruction is based on the Monte Carlo method which has been improved by simultaneous usage of neutron detectors placed on two opposite sides from the neutron source. Although the reconstruction from detectors placed on two opposite sides is more difficult and a little bit inaccurate (it followed from several presumptions during the inclusion of both sides of detection), there are some advantages. The most important advantage is smaller influence of scattered neutrons on the reconstruction. Finally, we describe the estimation of the error of this reconstruction.

  17. Extensions of the direct-semidirect model for calculating the high energy component of fast-nucleon induced gamma spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F S

    2000-05-22

    This section reviews extensions and variations of the direct-semidirect (DSD) model for understanding the high-energy component of gamma spectra resulting from radiative capture of fast nucleons; i.e., the part of the spectrum that is not amenable to standard statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach) treatments. We describe recent results on the extension of the DSD model to unbound final states, including comparison with proton and neutron capture data. The importance of including convective-current magnetic radiation to explain proton capture angular distributions in the 30 MeV region is shown. We conclude with a brief discussion of a model closely related to the DSD, the pure-resonance model.

  18. Kinetic-energy matrix elements for atomic Hylleraas-CI wave functions.

    PubMed

    Harris, Frank E

    2016-05-28

    Hylleraas-CI is a superposition-of-configurations method in which each configuration is constructed from a Slater-type orbital (STO) product to which is appended (linearly) at most one interelectron distance rij. Computations of the kinetic energy for atoms by this method have been difficult due to the lack of formulas expressing these matrix elements for general angular momentum in terms of overlap and potential-energy integrals. It is shown here that a strategic application of angular-momentum theory, including the use of vector spherical harmonics, enables the reduction of all atomic kinetic-energy integrals to overlap and potential-energy matrix elements. The new formulas are validated by showing that they yield correct results for a large number of integrals published by other investigators.

  19. Anharmonic Effects on the Electron-Energy Spectra of Surface Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyasu, Janice Carol

    First, we consider the effect of lateral interactions on double losses and overtones in electron-energy-loss studies of surface vibrations. We develop a theory of two-phonon losses in the dipole-dominated regime of small -angle scattering. Our calculation employs the simple model of an ordered overlayer of molecules adsorbed on a crystal surface. With this model, we can identify two features; one which corresponds to the double loss and another which corresponds the excitation of an overtone. We then study the role of lateral interactions in each. We find that the presence of lateral interactions affects the position of the overtone relative to the double loss, and influences both its width and shape. The implications of these results are discussed, particularly as they relate to estimates of dissociation energies by the Birge-Sponer procedure. Next, we consider the anharmonic damping of adsorbate vibrations, with specific applications to species (S, O, and CO) adsorbed on the Ni(100) and Ni(111) surfaces. Our attention is restricted to adsorbate modes that can decay by two-phonon processes to one substrate phonon and either another substrate mode phonon or to a phonon of a mode that is localized on the adsorbate. The magnitude and temperature variation of the linewidth of adsorbate modes by this mechanism is explored; we find that near room temperature the calculated linewidths vary linearly with temperature. We also simulate the inhomogeneous broadening produced by disorder by considering the eigenfrequencies of infrared -active modes. Finally, we consider the diffuse scattering of electrons from surfaces by long-wavelength, acoustic phonons. The mechanism that we explore is the modulation of the image potential from ripples induced in the surface profile by thermally-excited surface and bulk phonons. We compare our results with earlier studies, and with the scattering produced by the dynamic-dipole moment of the surface atoms.

  20. The weakly bound He-HCCCN complex: High-resolution microwave spectra and intermolecular potential-energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topic, Wendy C.; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2005-08-01

    Rotational spectra of the weakly bound He-HCCCN and He-DCCCN van der Waals complexes were observed using a pulsed-nozzle Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer in the 7-26-GHz frequency region. Nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structures due to the N14 and D nuclei (both with nuclear-spin quantum number I =1) were resolved and assigned. Both strong a and weaker b-type transitions were observed and the assigned transitions were used to fit the parameters of a distortable asymmetric rotor model. The dimers are floppy, near T-shaped complexes. Three intermolecular potential-energy surfaces were calculated using the coupled-cluster method with single and double excitations and noniterative inclusion of triple excitations. Bound-state rotational energy levels supported by these surfaces were determined. The quality of the potential-energy surfaces was assessed by comparing the experimental and calculated transition frequencies and also the corresponding spectroscopic parameters. Simple scaling of the surfaces improved both the transition frequencies and spectroscopic constants. Five other recently reported surfaces [O. Akin-Ojo, R. Bukowski, and K. Szalewicz, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 8379 (2003)], calculated using a variety of methods, and their agreement with spectroscopic properties of He-HCCCN are discussed.

  1. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition Hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multipinhole x-ray imager.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Sook; Dewald, E D; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; MacGowan, B J; Maddox, B R; Milovich, J L; Prasad, R R; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Thomas, C A

    2010-10-01

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside Hohlraums is important to the national ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes with four independent filter combinations to image entire Hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87× during the Hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with Hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 10-40 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser-plasma interactions rather than from Hohlraum hydrodynamics.

  2. Elemental electron energy loss mapping of a precipitate in a multi-component aluminium alloy.

    PubMed

    Mørtsell, Eva A; Wenner, Sigurd; Longo, Paolo; Andersen, Sigmund J; Marioara, Calin D; Holmestad, Randi

    2016-07-01

    The elemental distribution of a precipitate cross section, situated in a lean Al-Mg-Si-Cu-Ag-Ge alloy, has been investigated in detail by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and aberration corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). A correlative analysis of the EELS data is connected to the results and discussed in detail. The energy loss maps for all relevant elements were recorded simultaneously. The good spatial resolution allows elemental distribution to be evaluated, such as by correlation functions, in addition to being compared with the HAADF image. The fcc-Al lattice and the hexagonal Si-network within the precipitates were resolved by EELS. The combination of EELS and HAADF-STEM demonstrated that some atomic columns consist of mixed elements, a result that would be very uncertain based on one of the techniques alone. EELS elemental mapping combined with a correlative analysis have great potential for identification and quantification of small amounts of elements at the atomic scale.

  3. Photofragmentation spectra of halogenated methanes in the VUV photon energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Cartoni, Antonella; Bolognesi, Paola; Fainelli, Ettore; Avaldi, Lorenzo

    2014-05-14

    In this paper an investigation of the photofragmentation of dihalomethanes CH{sub 2}X{sub 2} (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and chlorinated methanes (CH{sub n}Cl{sub 4−n} with n = 0–3) with VUV helium, neon, and argon discharge lamps is reported and the role played by the different halogen atoms is discussed. Halogenated methanes are a class of molecules used in several fields of chemistry and the study of their physical and chemical proprieties is of fundamental interest. In particular their photodissociation and photoionization are of great importance since the decomposition of these compounds in the atmosphere strongly affects the environment. The results of the present work show that the halogen-loss is the predominant fragmentation channel for these molecules in the VUV photon energy range and confirm their role as reservoir of chlorine, bromine, and iodine atoms in the atmosphere. Moreover, the results highlight the peculiar feature of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} as a source of both fluorine and hydrogen atoms and the characteristic formation of I{sub 2}{sup +} and CH{sub 2}{sup +} ions from the photofragmentation of the CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} molecule.

  4. Energy spectra of 2D gravity and capillary waves with narrow frequency band excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashova, E.

    2012-02-01

    In this letter we present a new method, called increment chain equation method (ICEM), for computing a cascade of distinct modes in a two-dimensional weakly nonlinear wave system generated by narrow frequency band excitation. The ICEM is a means for computing the quantized energy spectrum as an explicit function of frequency ω0 and stationary amplitude A0 of excitation. The physical mechanism behind the generation of the quantized cascade is modulation instability. The ICEM can be used in numerous 2D weakly nonlinear wave systems with narrow frequency band excitation appearing in hydrodynamics, nonlinear optics, electrodynamics, convection theory etc. In this letter the ICEM is demonstrated with examples of gravity and capillary waves with dispersion functions ω(k)~k1/2 and ω(k)~k3/2, respectively, and for two different levels of nonlinearity ɛ=A0k0: small (ɛ~0.1 to 0.25) and moderate (ɛ~0.25 to 0.4).

  5. RELATIVE COMPOSITION AND ENERGY SPECTRA OF LIGHT NUCLEI IN COSMIC RAYS: RESULTS FROM AMS-01

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Berdugo, J.; Allaby, J.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Azzarello, P.; Battiston, R.; Anderhub, H.; Ao, L.; Arefiev, A.; Arruda, L.; Barao, F.; Barreira, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Becker, R.; Becker, U.; Bene, P.

    2010-11-20

    Measurement of the chemical and isotopic composition of cosmic rays is essential for the precise understanding of their propagation in the galaxy. While the model parameters are mainly determined using the B/C ratio, the study of extended sets of ratios can provide stronger constraints on the propagation models. In this paper, the relative abundances of light-nuclei lithium, beryllium, boron, and carbon are presented. The secondary-to-primary ratios Li/C, Be/C, and B/C have been measured in the kinetic energy range 0.35-45 GeV nucleon{sup -1}. The isotopic ratio {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li is also determined in the magnetic rigidity interval 2.5-6.3 GV. The secondary-to-secondary ratios Li/Be, Li/B, and Be/B are also reported. These measurements are based on the data collected by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-01 during the STS-91 space shuttle flight in 1998 June. Our experimental results are in substantial agreement with other measurements, where they exist. We describe our light-nuclei data with a diffusive-reacceleration model. A 10%-15% overproduction of Be is found in the model predictions and can be attributed to uncertainties in the production cross-section data.

  6. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. I. Full cumulant expansions and system-bath entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    We study the Förster resonant energy transfer rate, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. The multichromophoric Förster theory (MCFT) is determined from an overlap integral of generalized matrices related to the donor’s emission and acceptor’s absorption spectra, which are obtained via a full 2nd-order cumulant expansion technique developed in this work. We calculate the spectra and MCFT rate for both localized and delocalized systems, and calibrate the analytical 2nd-order cumulant expansion with the exact stochastic path integral method. We present three essential findings: (i) The role of the initial entanglement between the donor and its bath is found to be crucial in both the emission spectrum and the MCFT rate. (ii) The absorption spectra obtained by the cumulant expansion method are nearly identical to the exact spectra for both localized and delocalized systems, even when the system-bath coupling is far from the perturbative regime. (iii) For the emission spectra, the cumulant expansion can give reliable results for localized systems, but fail to provide reliable spectra of the high-lying excited states of a delocalized system, when the system-bath coupling is large and the thermal energy is small. This paper also provides a simple golden-rule derivation of the MCFT, reviews existing methods, and motivates further developments in the subsequent papers.

  7. Elemental contrast imaging with a polychromatic laboratory x-ray source using energy-discriminating detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokhana, Viona S. K.; Arhatari, Bendicta D.; Gureyev, Timur E.; Abbey, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Determining the specific spatial distributions of elements within compound samples is of critical importance to a range of applied research fields. The usual approaches to obtaining elemental contrast involve measurement of the characteristic peaks associated with x-ray fluorescence or measuring the x-ray transmission as a function of energy. In the laboratory these measurements are challenging due to the polychromaticity and lack of tunability of the source. Here we demonstrate how newly developed, high-resolution, energy-discriminating area detector technology can be exploited to enhance elemental contrast. The detector we employ here is the Pixirad area detector which can simultaneously have up to four separate colour channels. We also discuss the potential of this new technology in the context of tomographic imaging of soft tissue.

  8. Non-thermal Electron Acceleration in Low Mach Number Collisionless Shocks. I. Particle Energy Spectra and Acceleration Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinyi; Sironi, Lorenzo; Narayan, Ramesh

    2014-10-01

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (Ms <~ 5) shocks is revealed by radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with Ms = 3 and a quasi-perpendicular pre-shock magnetic field. We find that about 15% of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p ~= 2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift acceleration (SDA). The accelerated electrons are then reflected back upstream where their interaction with the incoming flow generates magnetic waves. In turn, the waves scatter the electrons propagating upstream back toward the shock for further energization via SDA. In summary, the self-generated waves allow for repeated cycles of SDA, similarly to a sustained Fermi-like process. This mechanism offers a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  9. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. I. Particle energy spectra and acceleration mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-10-20

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (M{sub s} ≲ 5) shocks is revealed by radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with M{sub s} = 3 and a quasi-perpendicular pre-shock magnetic field. We find that about 15% of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p ≅ 2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift acceleration (SDA). The accelerated electrons are then reflected back upstream where their interaction with the incoming flow generates magnetic waves. In turn, the waves scatter the electrons propagating upstream back toward the shock for further energization via SDA. In summary, the self-generated waves allow for repeated cycles of SDA, similarly to a sustained Fermi-like process. This mechanism offers a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  10. Far-Infrared and Raman Spectra and The Ring-Twisting Potential Energy Function of 1,3-Cyclohexadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrey, Daniel; Choo, Jaebum; Laane, Jaan

    2001-10-01

    The nu19 (A2) ring-twisting vibration of 1,3-cyclohexadiene has been analyzed from the vapor-phase Raman and infrared spectra. The Raman spectrum shows nine ring-twisting transitions in the 116 - 199 cm-1 region. The far-infrared spectrum confirms five of these transitions, despite the fact that the vibration is infrared forbidden in the C2v (planar) approximation. Other Raman and infrared combination bands verify the assignments and provide information on the vibrational coupling. A coordinate dependent kinetic energy expansion for the ring-twisting motion was calculated, and this was used to determine the ring-twisting potential function, which has a barrier to planarity of 1132 cm-1 and energy minima corresponding to twisting angles of 9.1º and 30.1º. Ab initio calculations were also carried out using Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with a large number of different basis sets. The various ab initio calculations gave barriers to planarity in the 1197 - 1593 cm-1 range and calculated vibrational frequencies in excellent agreement with the experimental values.

  11. A model for meteoritic and lunar 40Ar/39Ar age spectra: Addressing the conundrum of multi-activation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, T. Mark; Heizler, M. T.; Warren, P. H.

    2016-11-01

    Results of whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating analyses of extra-terrestrial materials have been used to constrain the timing of impacts in the inner solar system, solidification of the lunar magma ocean, and development of planetary magnetic fields. Despite the importance of understanding these events, the samples we have in hand are non-ideal due to mixed provenance, isotopic disturbances from potentially multiple heating episodes, and laboratory artifacts such as nuclear recoil. Although models to quantitatively assess multi-domain, diffusive 40Ar* loss have long been applied to terrestrial samples, their use on extra-terrestrial materials has been limited. Here we introduce a multi-activation energy, multi-diffusion domain model and apply it to 40Ar/39Ar temperature-cycling, step-heating data for meteoritic and lunar samples. We show that age spectra of extra-terrestrial materials, the Jilin chondrite (K-4) and Apollo 16 lunar breccia (67514 , 43), yielding seemingly non-ideal behavior commonly interpreted as either laboratory artifacts or localized shock heating of pyroxene, are meaningful and can be understood in context of the presence of multi-diffusion domains containing multiple activation energies. Internally consistent results from both the meteoritic and lunar samples reveal high-temperature/short duration thermal episodes we interpret as due to moderate shock heating.

  12. The effect of lipid content on the elemental composition and energy capacity of yeast biomass.

    PubMed

    Minkevich, Igor G; Dedyukhina, Emiliya G; Chistyakova, Tat'yana I

    2010-10-01

    Oleaginous yeasts (18 strains) were grown in ethanol media under various cultivation conditions (33 biomass samples). It was found that lipid and lipid-free fractions of dry biomass have elemental composition and biomass reductivity very close to values which can be considered as biological constants. The energy content of dry biomass strongly depended on the total lipid content. When the lipid content was 64%, the energy value of dry biomass reached 73% of diesel oil; therefore, oleaginous microorganisms can be a promising source of biodiesel fuel. The approach used in this work makes it possible to determine the energy value of biomass by its elemental composition without application of laborious and expensive calorimetric measurements of combustion heats.

  13. Could the extensive use of rare elements in renewable energy technologies become a cause for concern?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, A. M.; Reuter, B.; Hamacher, T.

    2015-08-01

    The energy transformation process beginning to take place in many countries as a response to climate change will reduce substantially the consumption of fossil fuels, but at the same time cause a large increase in the demand for other raw materials. Whereas it is difficult to estimate the quantities of, for example, iron, copper and aluminium required, the situation is somewhat simpler for the rare elements that might be needed in a sustainable energy economy based largely on photovoltaic sources, wind and possibly nuclear fusion. We consider briefly each of these technologies and discuss the supply risks associated with the rare elements required, if they were to be used in the quantities that might be required for a global energy transformation process. In passing, we point out the need in resource studies to define the terms "rare", "scarce" and "critical" and to use them in a consistent way.

  14. Principal spectra describing magnetooptic permittivity tensor in cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamrlová, Jana; Legut, Dominik; Veis, Martin; Pištora, Jaromír; Hamrle, Jaroslav

    2016-12-01

    We provide unified phenomenological description of magnetooptic effects being linear and quadratic in magnetization. The description is based on few principal spectra, describing elements of permittivity tensor up to the second order in magnetization. Each permittivity tensor element for any magnetization direction and any sample surface orientation is simply determined by weighted summation of the principal spectra, where weights are given by crystallographic and magnetization orientations. The number of principal spectra depends on the symmetry of the crystal. In cubic crystals owning point symmetry we need only four principal spectra. Here, the principal spectra are expressed by ab initio calculations for bcc Fe, fcc Co and fcc Ni in optical range as well as in hard and soft x-ray energy range, i.e. at the 2p- and 3p-edges. We also express principal spectra analytically using modified Kubo formula.

  15. Primary proton and helium spectra in the energy range 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 14th eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Ogata, T.; Saito, T.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Parnell, T. A.; Jones, W. V.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of proton and helium spectra have been made in the energy range 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 14th eV. Large area thin emulsion calorimeters were used in the Japanese American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment balloon flight series. Power indices of the integral spectra for both nuclei are consistent with published data at lower energies. Absolute intensities are also consistent for helium and proton fluxes with extrapolations of previous data. No steepening of the proton spectrum is indicated.

  16. R-matrix description of particle energy spectra produced by low-energy 3H + 3H reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, C. R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Bacher, A. D.; Hale, G. M.; Paris, M. W.

    2015-07-20

    An R-matrix model for three-body final states is presented and applied to a recent measurement of the neutron energy spectrum from the 3H + 3H→ 2n + α reaction. The calculation includes the n alpha and n n interactions in the final state, angular momentum conservation, antisymmetrization, and the interference between different channels. A good fit to the measured spectrum is obtained, where clear evidence for the 5He ground state is observed. The model is also used to predict the alpha-particle spectrum from 3H + 3H as well as particle spectra from 3He + 3He. The R-matrix approach presented here is very general, and can be adapted to a wide variety of problems with three-body final states.

  17. A measurement of the energy spectra and relative abundance of the cosmic-ray H and He isotopes over a broad energy range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Yushak, S. M.

    1983-01-01

    The measurements reported of these isotopes were made using two sets of detectors during the same minimum modulation period in 1977. One measurement was made with a balloon-borne telescope, the other with telescopes on the Voyager spacecraft. It is noted that together they provide the widest energy range yet available for studying these isotopes: 14-150 MeV per nucleon for H2 and 10-290 MeV per nucleon for He-3. The simultaneous helium isotope observations are used to give a mutually consistent picture of galactic propagation and solar modulation. The data define the form of the interstellar H-1 and He-4 spectra, an interstellar matter path length for both H-1 and He-4, and a total residual modulation for He-4. The H-2 observations suggest a picture that is very similar for the galactic propagation of H-1 and He-4.

  18. XUV spectra of 2nd transition row elements: identification of 3d-4p and 3d-4f transition arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokasani, Ragava; Long, Elaine; Maguire, Oisin; Sheridan, Paul; Hayden, Patrick; O'Reilly, Fergal; Dunne, Padraig; Sokell, Emma; Endo, Akira; Limpouch, Jiri; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2015-12-01

    The use of laser produced plasmas (LPPs) in extreme ultraviolet/soft x-ray lithography and metrology at 13.5 nm has been widely reported and recent research efforts have focused on developing next generation sources for lithography, surface morphology, patterning and microscopy at shorter wavelengths. In this paper, the spectra emitted from LPPs of the 2nd transition row elements from yttrium (Z = 39) to palladium (Z = 46), with the exception of zirconium (Z = 40) and technetium (Z = 43), produced by two Nd:YAG lasers which delivered up to 600 mJ in 7 ns and 230 mJ in 170 ps, respectively, are reported. Intense emission was observed in the 2-8 nm spectral region resulting from unresolved transition arrays (UTAs) due to 3d-4p, 3d-4f and 3p-3d transitions. These transitions in a number of ion stages of yttrium, niobium, ruthenium and rhodium were identified by comparison with results from Cowan code calculations and previous studies. The theoretical data were parameterized using the UTA formalism and the mean wavelength and widths were calculated and compared with experimental results.

  19. Relationship between energy flux Q and mean energy of auroral electron spectra based on radar data from the 1987 CEDAR Campaign at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, D.J.; Hecht, J.H.; Christensen, A.B.; Kelly, J.

    1994-10-01

    The incoherent scatter radar at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland, measured electron density profiles from 90 to 500 km during four auroral events over a 3-hour period on February 28, 1987. The profiles were obtained with the radar pointed along the magnetic field near zenith at 15-s intervals. Under the assumption that proton/H atom precipitation was unimportant during these events a representation of the incident electron flux was obtained by fitting calculated profiles with measured profiles in the vicinity of their peaks (lower E region). Maxwellian and Gaussian electron distributions with high- and low-energy tails were used to generate the calculated profiles. The distributions were specified in terms of average energy and energy flux Q. The authors find that they can clearly distinguish between profiles that result from a Maxwellian incident electron spectrum and those that result from a Gaussian spectrum. Interpreting Gaussian and Maxwellian spectra as representative of discrete and diffuse aurora, respectively, the measurements indicated good correlation between and Q for discrete aurora, while essentially no correlation was observed for diffuse aurora. This is consistent with current understanding that discrete auroras are produced by electrons accelerated by magnetic field-aligned potential drops whereas diffuse auroras are produced by pitch angle diffusion of plasma sheet electrons into the loss cone. 27 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Energy spectra of plasma sheet ions and electrons from about 50 eV/e to about 1 MeV during plamsa temperature transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.; Mitchell, D. G.; Williams, D. J.; Frank, L. A.; Huang, C. Y.; Eastman, T. E.

    1988-01-01

    ISEE-1 charged-particle measurements obtained during eight plasma temperature transitions (PTTs) in 1978-1979 are compiled in tables and graphs and analyzed in detail, comparing the ion and electron differential energy spectra with the predictions of theoretical models. PTTs are defined as approximately 1-h periods of low bulk plasma velocity and steadily increasing or decreasing thermal energy. A Maxwellian distribution is found to be inadequate in describing the PTT energy spectra, but velocity-exponential and kappa distributions are both successful, the latter especially at higher energies. The power-law index kappa varies from PTT to PTT, but the high-energy spectral index and overall shape of the distribution remain constant during a PTT; both spatial and temporal effects are observed.

  1. Calculation of gain and luminescence spectra of quantum-cascade laser structures taking into account asymmetric emission line broadening

    SciTech Connect

    Ushakov, D V; Manak, I S; Kononenko, V K

    2010-05-26

    The energy levels, wave functions, and matrix elements of optical dipole transitions are calculated numerically for superlattice quantum-cascade structures. The effect of spectral broadening on the shape of emission spectra is estimated and semiphenomenological asymmetric profiles of emission line broadening are proposed. It is shown that the electroluminescence spectra well agree with the calculated spontaneous recombination spectra. (lasers)

  2. Calcium-based multi-element chemistry for grid-scale electrochemical energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Takanari; Kim, Hojong; Spatocco, Brian L.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2016-03-01

    Calcium is an attractive material for the negative electrode in a rechargeable battery due to its low electronegativity (high cell voltage), double valence, earth abundance and low cost; however, the use of calcium has historically eluded researchers due to its high melting temperature, high reactivity and unfavorably high solubility in molten salts. Here we demonstrate a long-cycle-life calcium-metal-based rechargeable battery for grid-scale energy storage. By deploying a multi-cation binary electrolyte in concert with an alloyed negative electrode, calcium solubility in the electrolyte is suppressed and operating temperature is reduced. These chemical mitigation strategies also engage another element in energy storage reactions resulting in a multi-element battery. These initial results demonstrate how the synergistic effects of deploying multiple chemical mitigation strategies coupled with the relaxation of the requirement of a single itinerant ion can unlock calcium-based chemistries and produce a battery with enhanced performance.

  3. Disentangling random thermal motion of particles and collective expansion of source from transverse momentum spectra in high energy collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hua-Rong; Liu, Fu-Hu; Lacey, Roy A.

    2016-12-01

    In the framework of a multisource thermal model, we describe experimental results of the transverse momentum spectra of final-state light flavor particles produced in gold-gold (Au-Au), copper-copper (Cu-Cu), lead-lead (Pb-Pb), proton-lead (p-Pb), and proton-proton (p -p) collisions at various energies, measured by the PHENIX, STAR, ALICE, and CMS Collaborations, by using the Tsallis-standard (Tsallis form of Fermi-Dirac or Bose-Einstein), Tsallis, and two- or three-component standard distributions which can be in fact regarded as different types of ‘thermometers’ or ‘thermometric scales’ and ‘speedometers’. A central parameter in the three distributions is the effective temperature which contains information on the kinetic freeze-out temperature of the emitting source and reflects the effects of random thermal motion of particles as well as collective expansion of the source. To disentangle both effects, we extract the kinetic freeze-out temperature from the intercept of the effective temperature (T) curve as a function of particle’s rest mass (m 0) when plotting T versus m 0, and the mean transverse flow velocity from the slope of the mean transverse momentum (< {p}T> ) curve as a function of mean moving mass (\\overline{m}) when plotting < {p}T> versus \\overline{m}.

  4. Quantum-mechanical study of energies, structures, and vibrational spectra of the H(D)Cl complexed with dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Boda, Łukasz Boczar, Marek; Gług, Maciej; Wójcik, Marek J.

    2015-11-28

    Interaction energies, molecular structure and vibrational frequencies of the binary complex formed between H(D)Cl and dimethyl ether have been obtained using quantum-chemical methods. Equilibrium and vibrationally averaged structures, harmonic and anharmonic wavenumbers of the complex and its deuterated isotopomer were calculated using harmonic and anharmonic second-order perturbation theory procedures with Density Functional Theory B3LYP and B2PLYP-D and ab initio Møller-Plesset second-order methods, and a 6-311++G(3d,3p) basis set. A phenomenological model describing anharmonic-type vibrational couplings within hydrogen bonds was developed to explain the unique broadening and fine structure, as well as the isotope effect of the Cl–H and Cl–D stretching IR absorption bands in the gaseous complexes with dimethyl ether, as an effect of hydrogen bond formation. Simulations of the rovibrational structure of the Cl–H and Cl–D stretching bands were performed and the results were compared with experimental spectra.

  5. Time evolution of endpoint energy of Bremsstrahlung spectra and ion production from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, Ollie; Ropponen, Tommi; Jones, Peter; Kalvas, Taneli

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) are used to produce high charge state heavy ion beams for the use of nuclear and materials science, for instance. The most powerful ECR ion sources today are superconducting. One of the problems with superconducting ECR ion sources is the use of high radio frequency (RF) power which results in bremsstrahlung radiation adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. In order to understand the electron heating process and timescales in the ECR plasma, time evolution measurement of ECR bremsstrahlung was carried out. In the measurements JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS was operated in a pulsed mode and bremsstrahlung data from several hundred RF pulses was recorded. Time evolution of ion production was also studied and compared to one of the electron heating theories. To analyze the measurement data at C++ program was developed. Endpoint energies of the bremsstrahlung spectra as a function of axial magnetic field strength, pressure and RF power are presented and ion production timescales obtained from the measurements are compared to bremsstrahlung emission timescales and one of the stochastic heating theories.

  6. Mean excitation energies for stopping powers in various materials composed of elements hydrogen through argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Kamaratos, E.; Chang, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The local plasma model is used to study the effects of the chemical and physical state of a medium on its stopping power. The relationship between that model and a more exact quantum treatment of bound systems is elucidated by examining related quantities in both theories for the case of one and two-electron systems. Atomic mean excitation energies and straggling parameters in the local plasma model are compared with the accurate calculations of Inokuti et al. (1975, 1978, 1981). The use of the Gordon-Kim electron gas model of molecular bonding is used to determine the effects of covalent chemical bond shifts on the mean excitation energies for elements of the first two rows. Calculations of mean excitation energies of ionic bonded substances are presented, and the mean excitation energies of metals are discussed.

  7. The effects of photon flux on energy spectra and imaging characteristics in a photon-counting x-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Cho, H-M; Kim, H-J; Choi, Y-N; Lee, S-W; Ryu, H-J; Lee, Y-J

    2013-07-21

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the effect of photon flux on the recorded energy spectrum and images produced with a photon-counting detector. We used a photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) x-ray detector (model PID350, Oy Ajat, Finland). The CdTe array was composed of 16 384 pixels, each 0.35 × 0.35 × 0.75 mm(3) in dimension. The photon flux is controlled by an additional aluminum filter (1, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mm). Images were acquired at three different tube voltages (50, 70 and 90 kVp) with various thicknesses of photon flux control (PFC) filters. The data acquisition time was changed to acquire an approximately equal number of counts within the selected energy window between different thicknesses of PFC filters at the same tube voltage. A phantom was manufactured to evaluate the photon flux effect on the image. The phantom was made from polymethyl methacrylate and four concentrations of iodine. The photon flux effect on the image was evaluated by the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) between iodine and the background material. The changes of photon flux affected the recorded energy spectra and image. The thickness of the PFC filter that showed the maximum SDNR differed according to the tube voltage. The 10 mm PFC filter showed the highest SDNR at 50 and 70 kVp, while the 30 mm PFC filter exhibited the highest SDNR at 90 kVp. The SDNR was improved up to, on average, 30-fold in optimal photon flux conditions which acquired a spectrum including the lowest electronic noise with no pulse pile-up effect. The results of this study showed that the photon flux affected not only the acquired energy spectrum but also the image. Based on these results, the spectral distortion correction should be considered in connection with the image that is the ultimate purpose of medical imaging.

  8. The effects of photon flux on energy spectra and imaging characteristics in a photon-counting x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H.-M.; Kim, H.-J.; Choi, Y.-N.; Lee, S.-W.; Ryu, H.-J.; Lee, Y.-J.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the effect of photon flux on the recorded energy spectrum and images produced with a photon-counting detector. We used a photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) x-ray detector (model PID350, Oy Ajat, Finland). The CdTe array was composed of 16 384 pixels, each 0.35 × 0.35 × 0.75 mm3 in dimension. The photon flux is controlled by an additional aluminum filter (1, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mm). Images were acquired at three different tube voltages (50, 70 and 90 kVp) with various thicknesses of photon flux control (PFC) filters. The data acquisition time was changed to acquire an approximately equal number of counts within the selected energy window between different thicknesses of PFC filters at the same tube voltage. A phantom was manufactured to evaluate the photon flux effect on the image. The phantom was made from polymethyl methacrylate and four concentrations of iodine. The photon flux effect on the image was evaluated by the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) between iodine and the background material. The changes of photon flux affected the recorded energy spectra and image. The thickness of the PFC filter that showed the maximum SDNR differed according to the tube voltage. The 10 mm PFC filter showed the highest SDNR at 50 and 70 kVp, while the 30 mm PFC filter exhibited the highest SDNR at 90 kVp. The SDNR was improved up to, on average, 30-fold in optimal photon flux conditions which acquired a spectrum including the lowest electronic noise with no pulse pile-up effect. The results of this study showed that the photon flux affected not only the acquired energy spectrum but also the image. Based on these results, the spectral distortion correction should be considered in connection with the image that is the ultimate purpose of medical imaging.

  9. Wind energy harvesting using a piezo-composite generating element (PCGE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Cam Minh Tri; Goo, Nam-Seo

    2010-04-01

    Energy can be reclaimed and stored for later use to recharge a battery or power a device through a process called energy harvesting. Piezoelectric is being widely investigated for use in harvesting surrounding energy sources such as sun, wind, tides, indoor lighting, body movement or machine vibration, etc. This paper introduces a wind energy harvesting device using a Piezo-Composite Generating Element (PCGE). The PCGE is composed of layers of carbon/epoxy, PZT ceramic, and glass/epoxy cured at an elevated temperature. In the prototype, The PCGE performs as a secondary beam element. One end of the PCGE is attached on the frame of the device. The fan blade rotates in the direction of the wind and hits the PCGE's tip. When the PCGE is excited, the effects of the beam deformation allow it to generate electric power. In wind tunnel experiments, the PCGE is excited to vibrate at its first natural frequency and generates the power up to 8.5 mW. The prototype can harvest energy in urban regions with minor wind movement.

  10. Influence of trace elements in human tissue in low-energy photon brachytherapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Shane A.; Landry, Guillaume; van Gils, Francis; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the dosimetric impact of trace elements in human tissues for low-energy photon sources used in brachytherapy. Monte Carlo dose calculations were used to investigate the dosimetric effect of trace elements present in normal or cancerous human tissues. The effect of individual traces (atomic number Z = 11-30) was studied in soft tissue irradiated by low-energy brachytherapy sources. Three other tissue types (prostate, adipose and mammary gland) were also simulated with varying trace concentrations to quantify the contribution of each trace to the dose distribution. The dose differences between cancerous and healthy prostate tissues were calculated in single- and multi-source geometries. The presence of traces in a tissue produces a difference in the dose distribution that is dependent on Z and the concentration of the trace. Low-Z traces (Na) have a negligible effect (<0.3%) in all tissues, while higher Z (K) had a larger effect (>3%). There is a potentially significant difference in the dose distribution between cancerous and healthy prostate tissues (4%) and even larger if compared to the trace-free composition (15%) in both single- and multi-sourced geometries. Trace elements have a non-negligible (up to 8% in prostate D90) effect on the dose in tissues irradiated with low-energy photon sources. This study underlines the need for further investigation into accurate determination of the trace composition of tissues associated with low-energy brachytherapy. Alternatively, trace elements could be incorporated as a source of uncertainty in dose calculations. This work was part of an invited presentation at the ‘International Workshop on Recent Advances in Monte Carlo Techniques for Radiation Therapy’, held in Montreal, June 8-10, 2011.

  11. A Monte Carlo-finite element model for strain energy controlled microstructural evolution - 'Rafting' in superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Srolovitz, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a specialized microstructural lattice model, MCFET (Monte Carlo finite element technique), which simulates microstructural evolution in materials in which strain energy has an important role in determining morphology. The model is capable of accounting for externally applied stress, surface tension, misfit, elastic inhomogeneity, elastic anisotropy, and arbitrary temperatures. The MCFET analysis was found to compare well with the results of analytical calculations of the equilibrium morphologies of isolated particles in an infinite matrix.

  12. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  13. Element partitioning in combustion- and gasification-based waste-to-energy units.

    PubMed

    Arena, Umberto; Di Gregorio, Fabrizio

    2013-05-01

    A critical comparison between combustion- and gasification-based waste-to-energy systems needs a deep knowledge of the mass flows of materials and elements inside and throughout the units. The study collected and processed data from several moving grate conventional incinerators and high-temperature shaft gasifiers with direct melting, which are in operation worldwide. A material and substance flow analysis was then developed to systematically assess the flows and stocks of materials and elements within each waste-to-energy unit, by connecting the sources, pathways, and intermediate and final sinks of each species. The patterns of key elements, such as carbon, chloride and heavy metals, in the different solid and gaseous output streams of the two compared processes have been then defined. The combination of partitioning coefficients with the mass balances on atomic species and results of mineralogical characterization from recent literatures was used to estimate a composition of bottom ashes and slags from the two types of waste-to-energy technologies. The results also allow to quantify some of the performance parameters of the units and, in particular, the potential reduction of the amount of solid residues to be sent to final disposal.

  14. Measurement of optical constants of Si and SiO2 from reflection electron energy loss spectra using factor analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, H.; Shinotsuka, H.; Yoshikawa, H.; Iwai, H.; Tanuma, S.; Tougaard, S.

    2010-04-01

    The energy loss functions (ELFs) and optical constants of Si and SiO2 were obtained from quantitative analysis of reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) by a new approach. In order to obtain the ELF, which is directly related to the optical constants, we measured series of angular and energy dependent REELS spectra for Si and SiO2. The λ(E )K(ΔE) spectra, which are the product of the inelastic mean free path (IMFP) and the differential inverse IMFP, were obtained from the measured REELS spectra. We used the factor analysis (FA) method to analyze series of λ(E )K(ΔE) spectra for various emission angles at fixed primary beam energy to separate the surface-loss and bulk-loss components. The extracted bulk-loss components enable to obtain the ELFs of Si and SiO2, which are checked by oscillator strength-sum and perfect-screening-sum rules. The real part of the reciprocal of the complex dielectric function was determined by Kramers-Kronig analysis of the ELFs. Subsequently, the optical constants of Si and SiO2 were calculated. The resulting optical constants in terms of the refractive index and the extinction coefficient for Si and SiO2 are in good agreement with Palik's reference data. The results demonstrate the general applicability of FA as an efficient method to obtain the bulk ELF and to determine the optical properties from REELS measurements.

  15. Experimental electron energy-loss spectra and cross sections for the 4/2/S - 4/2/P transition in Zn II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Newell, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra and differential cross sections are reported for inelastic scattering from Zn II. Measurements were carried out in a crossed electron beam-ion beam apparatus, at incident electron energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 75, 85, and 100 eV, and at a scattering angle of 14 deg. The present results are the first reported measurements of inelastic electron scattering from an ion.

  16. A Measurement of the Energy Spectra of Cosmic Rays from 20 to 1000 GeV Per Amu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Thoburn, C.; Smith, A. E.; Petruzzo, J. J., III; Austin, R. W.; Derrickson, J. H.; Parnell, T. A.; Masheder, M. R. W.; Fowler, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    The design features and operational performance from the test flight of the fourth generation of spherical geometry cosmic ray detectors developed at Bristol University (Bristol University Gas Scintillator 4 - BUGS-4) are presented. The flight from Ft. Sumner (NM) in Sept. 1993 was the premier flight of a large (1m radius) spherical drift chamber which also gave gas scintillation and Cerenkov signals. The combinations of this chamber with one gas and two solid Cerenkov radiators lead to a large aperture factor (4.5 m2sr), but low (approximately 3.5 g/sq cm) instrument mass over the energy sensitive range 1 to several hundred GeV/a. Moreover, one simple timing measurement determined the impact parameter which provided a trajectory (path length) correction for all detector elements. This innovative and efficient design will be of interest to experimental groups engaged in studies of energetic charged particles. Although there were technical problems on the flight, which were compounded by the total destruction of BUGS-4 by fire while landing in Oklahoma, there was a period of stable operation during which the instrument was exposed at float altitude (approximately 125,000 ft.) to high energy cosmic rays. We present the performance of the instrument as determined from the analysis of these data and an appraisal of its novel design features. Suggestions for design improvements in a future instrument are made.

  17. THE OLD, SUPER-METAL-RICH OPEN CLUSTER, NGC 6791—ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES IN TURN-OFF STARS FROM KECK/HIRES SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant Boesgaard, Ann; Lum, Michael G.; Deliyannis, Constantine P. E-mail: mikelum@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2015-02-01

    The study of star clusters has advanced our understanding of stellar evolution, Galactic chemical evolution, and nucleosynthesis. Here we investigate the composition of turn-off stars in the intriguing open cluster, NGC 6791, which is old, but super-metal-rich with high-resolution (R = 46,000) Keck/HIRES spectra. We find [Fe/H] = +0.30 ± 0.02 from measurements of some 40 unblended, unsaturated lines of both Fe I and Fe II in eight turn-off stars. Our O abundances come from the O I triplet near 7774 Å and we perform a differential analysis relative to the Sun from our Lunar spectrum also obtained with Keck/HIRES. The O results are corrected for small nLTE effects. We find consistent ratios of [O/Fe]{sub n} with a mean of –0.06 ± 0.02. This is low with respect to field stars that are also both old and metal-rich and continue the trend of decreasing [O/Fe] with increasing [Fe/H]. The small range in our oxygen abundances is consistent with a single population of stars. Our results for the alpha elements [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe] are near solar and compare well with those of the old, metal-rich field stars. The two Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, are consistent with Fe. These turn-off-star abundances provide benchmark abundances to investigate whether there are any observable abundance differences with the giants that might arise from nuclear-burning and dredge-up processes. Determinations of upper limits were found for Li by spectrum synthesis and are consistent with the upper limits in similar stars in the relatively old, super-metal-rich cluster NGC 6253. Our results support the prediction from standard theory that higher-metallicity stars deplete more Li. Probably no stars in NGC 6791 have retained their initial Li.

  18. Abundances in bulge stars from high-resolution, near-IR spectra. I. The CNO elements observed during the science verification of CRIRES at VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryde, N.; Edvardsson, B.; Gustafsson, B.; Eriksson, K.; Käufl, H. U.; Siebenmorgen, R.; Smette, A.

    2009-03-01

    Context: The formation and evolution of the Milky Way bulge is not yet well understood and its classification is ambiguous. Constraints can, however, be obtained by studying the abundances of key elements in bulge stars. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine the chemical evolution of C, N, O, and a few other elements in stars in the Galactic bulge, and to discuss the sensitivities of the derived abundances from molecular lines. Methods: High-resolution, near-infrared spectra in the H band were recorded using the CRIRES spectrometer on the Very Large Telescope. Due to the high and variable visual extinction in the line-of-sight towards the bulge, an analysis in the near-IR is preferred. The C, N, and O abundances can all be determined simultaneously from the numerous molecular lines in the wavelength range observed. Results: The three giant stars in Baade's window presented here are the first bulge stars observed with CRIRES during its science verification observations. We have especially determined the C, N, and O abundances, with uncertainties of less than 0.20 dex, from CO, CN, and OH lines. Since the systematic uncertainties in the derived C, N, and O abundances due to uncertainties in the stellar fundamental parameters, notably T_eff, are significant, a detailed discussion of the sensitivities of the derived abundances is included. We find good agreement between near-IR and optically determined O, Ti, Fe, and Si abundances. Two of our stars show a solar [C+N/Fe], suggesting that these giants have experienced the first dredge-up and that the oxygen abundance should reflect the original abundance of the giants. The two giants fit into the picture, in which there is no significant difference between the oxygen abundance in bulge and thick-disk stars. Our determination of the sulphur abundances is the first for bulge stars. The high [S/Fe] values for all the stars indicate a high star-formation rate in an early phase of the bulge evolution. Based on

  19. The Old, Super-metal-rich Open Cluster, NGC 6791—Elemental Abundances in Turn-off Stars from Keck/HIRES Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Lum, Michael G.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.

    2015-02-01

    The study of star clusters has advanced our understanding of stellar evolution, Galactic chemical evolution, and nucleosynthesis. Here we investigate the composition of turn-off stars in the intriguing open cluster, NGC 6791, which is old, but super-metal-rich with high-resolution (R = 46,000) Keck/HIRES spectra. We find [Fe/H] = +0.30 ± 0.02 from measurements of some 40 unblended, unsaturated lines of both Fe I and Fe II in eight turn-off stars. Our O abundances come from the O I triplet near 7774 Å and we perform a differential analysis relative to the Sun from our Lunar spectrum also obtained with Keck/HIRES. The O results are corrected for small nLTE effects. We find consistent ratios of [O/Fe]n with a mean of -0.06 ± 0.02. This is low with respect to field stars that are also both old and metal-rich and continue the trend of decreasing [O/Fe] with increasing [Fe/H]. The small range in our oxygen abundances is consistent with a single population of stars. Our results for the alpha elements [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe] are near solar and compare well with those of the old, metal-rich field stars. The two Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, are consistent with Fe. These turn-off-star abundances provide benchmark abundances to investigate whether there are any observable abundance differences with the giants that might arise from nuclear-burning and dredge-up processes. Determinations of upper limits were found for Li by spectrum synthesis and are consistent with the upper limits in similar stars in the relatively old, super-metal-rich cluster NGC 6253. Our results support the prediction from standard theory that higher-metallicity stars deplete more Li. Probably no stars in NGC 6791 have retained their initial Li.

  20. Variations in energy spectra and water-to-material stopping-power ratios in three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated photon fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Si Young; Liu, H. Helen; Mohan, Radhe; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2007-04-15

    Because of complex dose distributions and dose gradients that are created in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), photon- and electron-energy spectra might change significantly with spatial locations and doses. This study examined variations in photon- and electron-energy spectra in 3D-CRT and IMRT photon fields. The effects of spectral variations on water-to-material stopping-power ratios used in Monte Carlo treatment planning systems and the responses of energy-dependent dosimeters, such as thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and radiographic films were further studied. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used to simulate megavoltage 3D-CRT and IMRT photon fields. The photon- and electron-energy spectra were calculated in 3D water phantoms and anthropomorphic phantoms based on the fluence scored in voxel grids. We then obtained the water-to-material stopping-power ratios in the local voxels using the Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Changes in the responses of films and TLDs were estimated based on the calculated local energy spectra and published data on the dosimeter energy dependency. Results showed that the photon-energy spectra strongly depended on spatial positions and doses in both the 3D-CRT and IMRT fields. The relative fraction of low-energy photons (<100 keV) increased inversely with the photon dose in low-dose regions of the fields. A similar but smaller effect was observed for electrons in the phantoms. The maximum variation of the water-to-material stopping-power ratio over the range of calculated dose for both 3D-CRT and IMRT was negligible (<1.0%) for ICRU tissue, cortical bone, and soft bone and less than 3.6% for dry air and lung. Because of spectral softening at low doses, radiographic films in the phantoms could over-respond to dose by more than 30%, whereas the over-response of TLDs was less than 10%. Thus, spatial variations of the photon- and electron-energy spectra should be considered

  1. SU-E-T-796: Variation of Surface Photon Energy Spectra On Bone Heterogeneity and Beam Obliquity Between Flattened and Unflattened Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, J; Owrangi, A; Grigorov, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study investigates the spectra of surface photon energy and energy fluence in the bone heterogeneity and beam obliquity using flattened and unflattened photon beams. The spectra were calculated in a bone and water phantom using Monte Carlo simulation (the EGSnrc code). Methods: Spectra of energy, energy fluence and mean energy of the 6 MV flattened and unflattened photon beams (field size = 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}) produced by a Varian TrueBEAM linear accelerator were calculated at the surfaces of a bone and water phantom using Monte Carlo simulations. The spectral calculations were repeated with the beam angles turned from 0° to 15°, 30° and 45° in the phantoms. Results: It is found that the unflattened photon beams contained more photons in the low-energy range of 0 – 2 MeV than the flattened beams with a flattening filter. Compared to the water phantom, both the flattened and unflattened beams had slightly less photons in the energy range < 0.4 MeV when a bone layer of 1 cm is present under the phantom surface. This shows that the presence of the bone decreased the low-energy photons backscattered to the phantom surface. When the photon beams were rotated from 0° to 45°, the number of photon and mean photon energy increased with the beam angle. This is because both the flattened and unflattened beams became more hardened when the beam angle increased. With the bone heterogeneity, the mean energies of both photon beams increased correspondingly. This is due to the absorption of low-energy photons by the bone, resulting in more significant beam hardening. Conclusion: The photon spectral information is important in studies on the patient’s surface dose enhancement when using unflattened photon beams in radiotherapy.

  2. Non-contact measurement of partial gas pressure and distribution of elemental composition using energy-resolved neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Losko, A. S.; Vogel, S. C.; Byler, D. D.; McClellan, K. J.; Bourke, M. A. M.; Vallerga, J. V.

    2017-01-01

    Neutron resonance absorption imaging is a non-destructive technique that can characterize the elemental composition of a sample by measuring nuclear resonances in the spectrum of a transmitted beam. Recent developments in pixelated time-of-flight imaging detectors coupled with pulsed neutron sources pose new opportunities for energy-resolved imaging. In this paper we demonstrate non-contact measurements of the partial pressure of xenon and krypton gases encapsulated in a steel pipe while simultaneously passing the neutron beam through high-Z materials. The configuration was chosen as a proof of principle demonstration of the potential to make non-destructive measurement of gas composition in nuclear fuel rods. The pressure measured from neutron transmission spectra (˜739 ± 98 kPa and ˜751 ± 154 kPa for two Xe resonances) is in relatively good agreement with the pressure value of ˜758 ± 21 kPa measured by a pressure gauge. This type of imaging has been performed previously for solids with a spatial resolution of ˜ 100 μm. In the present study it is demonstrated that the high penetration capability of epithermal neutrons enables quantitative mapping of gases encapsulate within high-Z materials such as steel, tungsten, urania and others. This technique may be beneficial for the non-destructive testing of bulk composition of objects (such as spent nuclear fuel assemblies and others) containing various elements opaque to other more conventional imaging techniques. The ability to image the gaseous substances concealed within solid materials also allows non-destructive leak testing of various containers and ultimately measurement of gas partial pressures with sub-mm spatial resolution.

  3. Power flow as a complement to statistical energy analysis and finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Present methods of analysis of the structural response and the structure-borne transmission of vibrational energy use either finite element (FE) techniques or statistical energy analysis (SEA) methods. The FE methods are a very useful tool at low frequencies where the number of resonances involved in the analysis is rather small. On the other hand SEA methods can predict with acceptable accuracy the response and energy transmission between coupled structures at relatively high frequencies where the structural modal density is high and a statistical approach is the appropriate solution. In the mid-frequency range, a relatively large number of resonances exist which make finite element method too costly. On the other hand SEA methods can only predict an average level form. In this mid-frequency range a possible alternative is to use power flow techniques, where the input and flow of vibrational energy to excited and coupled structural components can be expressed in terms of input and transfer mobilities. This power flow technique can be extended from low to high frequencies and this can be integrated with established FE models at low frequencies and SEA models at high frequencies to form a verification of the method. This method of structural analysis using power flo and mobility methods, and its integration with SEA and FE analysis is applied to the case of two thin beams joined together at right angles.

  4. The Rovibrational Spectra of trans- and cis-HOCO, Calculated by MULTIMODE with ab Initio Potential Energy and Dipole Moment Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stuart; Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M

    2017-02-17

    The code MULTIMODE is used in its reaction path version, along with ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces introduced earlier, to predict the infrared spectra of both trans and cis forms of HOCO at temperatures 296 and 15 K. All six fundamentals are isolated for each isomer and temperature, and their main features examined, paying particular attention to the OH stretch fundamental, whose spectrum has been reported experimentally for trans-HOCO. The current spectra for cis-HOCO, while not of "spectroscopic" accuracy, should be sufficient to aid in new experimental efforts to record the spectrum of this isomer.

  5. Low-Energy Collision-Induced Dissociation Mass Spectra of Protonated p-Toluenesulfonamides Derived from Aliphatic Amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialecki, Jason B.; Weisbecker, Carl S.; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2014-06-01

    Collision-induced fragmentation of protonated N-alkyl- p-toluenesulfonamides primarily undergo either an elimination of the amine to form CH3-(C6H4)-SO2 + cation ( m/z 155) or an alkene to form a cation for the protonated p-toluenesulfonamide ( m/z 172). To comprehend the fragmentation pathways, several deuterated analogs of N-decyl- p-toluenesulfonamides were prepared and evaluated. Hypothetically, two mechanisms, both of which involve ion-neutral complexes, can be envisaged. In one mechanism, the S-N bond fragments to produce an intermediate [sulfonyl cation/amine] complex, which dissociates to afford the m/z 155 cation (Pathway A). In the other mechanism, the C-N bond dissociates to produce a different intermediate complex. The fragmentation of this [ p-toluenesulfonamide/carbocation] complex eliminates p-toluenesulfonamide and releases the carbocation (Pathway B). Computations carried out by the Hartree-Fock method suggested that the Pathway B is more favorable. However, a peak for the carbocation is observed only when the carbocation formed is relatively stable. For example, the spectrum of N-phenylethyl- p-toluenesulfonamide is dominated by the peak at m/z 105 for the incipient phenylethyl cation, which rapidly isomerizes to the remarkably stable methylbenzyl cation. The peaks for the carbocations are weak or absent in the spectra of most of N-alkyl- p-toluenesulfonamides because alkyl carbocations, such as the decyl cation, rearrange to more stable secondary cations by 1,2-hydride and alkyl shifts. The energy freed is not dissipated, but gets internalized, causing the carbocation to dissociate either by transferring a proton to the sulfonamide or by releasing smaller alkenes to form smaller carbocations. The loss of the positional integrity in this way was proven by deuterium labeling experiments.

  6. Merging elemental and macronutrient approaches for a comprehensive study of energy and nutrient flows.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Shawn M; Jeyasingh, Punidan D

    2016-11-01

    Global warming and predation risk can have important impacts on animal physiology and life histories that can have consequences for ecosystem function. Zhang et al. () recently tested the separate and interactive effects of warming and predation risk on the body composition of Daphnia magna. By measuring both the elemental and biochemical composition of individuals, they showed that D. magna body elemental composition responded opposite to theoretical predictions and previous studies but that these changes were explained by adaptive life-history shifts in allocation to protein in eggs versus body lipid reserves. Photograph by Joachim Mergeay. Zhang, C., Jansen, M., De Meester, L. & Stoks, R. (2016) Energy storage and fecundity explain deviations from ecological stoichiometry predictions under global warming and size-selective predation. Journal of Animal Ecology 85, 1431-1441. Understanding the mechanisms through which energy and nutrients flow through ecosystems is critical to predicting and mitigating the consequences of climate change and other ecological disturbances. Ecological stoichiometry and nutritional geometry, using data on elements and macromolecules, respectively, have independently made major contributions towards this goal. Zhang et al. () provide data demonstrating that these two major frameworks can provide complementary insight into the consequences of global warming and predation risk for the physiology and life-history traits of a key aquatic herbivore, Daphnia magna. This study should catalyse further work to unite these two parallel and complementary frameworks.

  7. Optical glow spectra arising from low-energy N2, N2(+) and electron bombardment of MgF2 surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qi, J.; Barnes, A. V.; Espy, S. L.; Riehl-Chudoba, M.; Sun, C.-N.; Albridge, R. G.; Tolk, N. H.

    1991-01-01

    Photon emission spectra resulting from the impact of N2, N2(+), and electron beams on magnesium fluoride in an ultrahigh vacuum environment were measured and compared for beam energies in the range 200-2000 eV. Unexpectedly, only the ion- and electron-induced spectra exhibited broad fluorescence. The observed data suggest that the broad fluorescence arising from low-energy ion bombardment is due primarily to the transfer of electronic energy to the surface by resonance or Auger neutralization. Since molecular nitrogen is a major constituent of the atmosphere at orbital altitudes, these measurements bear directly on radiation-induced glow and erosion processes on surfaces of spacecraft in low-earth orbit.

  8. Photon mass energy transfer coefficients for elements z=1 to 92 and 48 additional substances of dosimetric interest.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki

    2014-07-01

    Photon mass energy transfer coefficient is an essential factor when converting photon energy fluence into kinetic energy released per unit mass (kerma). Although mass attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficients can be looked up in databases, the mass energy transfer coefficient values are still controversial. In this paper, the photon mass energy transfer coefficients for elements Z=1-92 were calculated based on cross-sectional data for each photon interaction type. Mass energy transfer coefficients for 48 compounds and/or mixtures of dosimetric interest were calculated from coefficient data for elements using Bragg's additivity rule. We additionally developed software that can search these coefficient data for any element or substance of dosimetric interest. The database and software created in this paper should prove useful for radiation measurements and/or dose calculations.

  9. Element Specific Magnetic Anisotropy Energy of Alternately Layered FeNi Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, Masako; Amemiya, Kenta

    2011-07-01

    The element specific magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of alternately layered FeNi thin films grown on Ni (4-20 MLs)/Cu(001) is investigated by means of the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE). Although surface Fe is known to show strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, the Ni-sandwiched Fe layer has a tiny MAE of 10+/-40 µeV. On the other hand, the Fe-sandwiched Ni layer has a positive MAE of 60+/-30 µeV. The total MAE simulated from the XMCD analysis shows good agreement with the MOKE result. We demonstrate that in-situ analysis of the element specific MAE gives a possible strategy for manipulating the magnetic anisotropy of multilayers.

  10. Welders' pneumoconiosis: tissue elemental microanalysis by energy dispersive x ray analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, A; Schlueter, D P; Pintar, K; Bemis, E L; Siegesmund, K A

    1988-01-01

    Histological examination on lung tissue obtained from 10 symptomatic welders was performed by two certified pathologists without the knowledge of the patients' clinical condition. In all cases, there was some degree of interstitial fibrosis; in five the degree of fibrosis was considered to be moderate to pronounced. The tissue was also analysed by energy dispersive x ray analysis and elemental contents were compared with age matched controls. There was a large amount of iron in the lungs of welders but the silicon content did not differ from the control subjects. No specific foreign element was detected. It is concluded that (1) interstitial pulmonary fibrosis is seen in some welders and (2) the cause of fibrosis does not appear to be coexisting silicosis. Images PMID:3342182

  11. Construction of minimum energy high-order Helmholtz bases for structured elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Caio F.; Suzuki, Jorge L.; Bittencourt, Marco L.

    2016-02-01

    We present a construction procedure for high-order expansion bases for structured finite elements specific for the operator under consideration. The procedure aims to obtain bases in such way that the condition numbers for the element matrices are almost constant or have a moderate increase in terms of the polynomial order. The internal modes of the mass and stiffness matrices are made simultaneously diagonal and the minimum energy concept is used to make the boundary modes orthogonal to the internal modes. The performance of the proposed bases is compared to the standard basis using Jacobi polynomials. This is performed through numerical examples for Helmholtz problem and transient linear elasticity employing explicit and implicit time integration algorithms and the conjugate gradient method with diagonal, SSOR and Gauss-Seidel pre-conditioners. The sparsity patterns, conditioning and solution costs are investigated. A significant speedup and reduction in the number of iterations are obtained when compared to the standard basis.

  12. Interpretation of features in the cosmic ray proton and helium energy spectra in terms of a local source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    Recent measurements using the AMS-02 cosmic ray (CR) spectrometer have shown structure in the spectra of protons and helium nuclei, structure that had been seen earlier but with lower precision. We interpret the measurements in terms of there having been an important contribution from a local supernova from which CRs have diffused to Earth. The characteristics of the source make it likely to be the same as that responsible for the structure in the positron and antiproton spectra.

  13. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  14. The Internal Pressure and Cohesive Energy Density of Liquid Metallic Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Yizhak

    2017-02-01

    The internal pressures, P_{int}, of practically all the liquid metallic elements in the periodic table up to plutonium (except highly radioactive ones) at their melting points were calculated from data in the literature. They are compared with the respective cohesive energy densities, ced, obtained from the literature data too. The ratios P_{int}{/}ced for various liquids are ranked as follows: molten salts < polar/hydrogen-bonded molecular solvents ˜ liquid metals < room temperature ionic liquids < nonpolar molecular solvents, and the reverse of this list reflects the relative strengths of the mutual interactions of the particles constituting these liquids.

  15. Relativistically parametrized extended Hueckel calculations. 11. Energy bands for elemental tellurium and polonium

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, L.L.

    1987-06-17

    An extension of the REX relativistically parametrized extended Hueckel LCAO molecular orbital method to periodic solids is outlined. The method provides a simple and systematic approach to the description of the spin-orbit splitting of energy bands. The method is illustrated with results for the main-group elements tellurium and polonium, with trigonal-helical and simple-cubic structures, respectively. The helical structure of tellurium is described as a distortion of a simple-cubic structure, with the distortion being quenched in the case of polonium by its very large spin-orbit coupling. 36 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  16. Core-level binding-energy shifts for the metallic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Börje; Mårtensson, Nils

    1980-05-01

    A general treatment of core-level binding-energy shifts in metals relative to the free atom is introduced and applied to all elemental metals in the Periodic Table. The crucial ingredients of the theoretical description are (a) the assumption of a fully screened final state in the metallic case and (b) the (Z+1) approximation for the screening valence charge distribution around the core-ionized site. This core-ionized site is, furthermore, treated as an impurity in an otherwise perfect metal. The combination of the complete screening picture and the (Z+1) approximation makes it possible to introduce a Born-Haber cycle which connects the initial state with the final state of the core-ionization process. From this cycle it becomes evident that the main contributions to the core-level shift are the cohesive energy difference between the (Z+1) and Z metal and an appropriate ionization energy of the (Z+1) atom (usually the first ionization potential). The appearance of the ionization potential in the shift originates from the assumption of a charge-neutral final state, while the contribution from the cohesive energies essentially describes the change of bonding properties between the initial and final state of the site. The calculated shifts show very good agreement with available experimental values (at present, for 19 elements). For the other elements we have made an effort to combine experimental ionization potentials with theoretical calculations in order to obtain accurate estimates of some of the atomic-core-level binding energies. Such energies together with measured metallic binding energies give "pseudoexperimental" shifts for many elements. Our calculated core-level shifts agree exceedingly well also with these data. For some of the transition elements the core-level shift shows a deviating behavior in comparison with that of neighboring elements. This is shown to be due to a difference in the atomic ground-state configuration, such as, for example, d5s in

  17. Correlations Between Variations in Solar EUV and Soft X-Ray Irradiance and Photoelectron Energy Spectra Observed on Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Brain, D. A.; Mitchell, D. L.; Bailey, S. M.; Chamberlin, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV; 10-120 nm) and soft X-ray (XUV; 0-10 nm) radiation are major heat sources for the Mars thermosphere as well as the primary source of ionization that creates the ionosphere. In investigations of Mars thermospheric chemistry and dynamics, solar irradiance models are used to account for variations in this radiation. Because of limited proxies, irradiance models do a poor job of tracking the significant variations in irradiance intensity in the EUV and XUV ranges over solar rotation time scales when the Mars-Sun-Earth angle is large. Recent results from Earth observations show that variations in photoelectron energy spectra are useful monitors of EUV and XUV irradiance variability. Here we investigate photoelectron energy spectra observed by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Electron Reflectometer (ER) and the FAST satellite during the interval in 2005 when Earth, Mars, and the Sun were aligned. The Earth photoelectron data in selected bands correlate well with calculations based on 1 nm resolution observations above 27 nm supplemented by broadband observations and a solar model in the 0-27 nm range. At Mars, we find that instrumental and orbital limitations to the identifications of photoelectron energy spectra in MGS/ER data preclude their use as a monitor of solar EUV and XUV variability. However, observations with higher temporal and energy resolution obtained at lower altitudes on Mars might allow the separation of the solar wind and ionospheric components of electron energy spectra so that they could be used as reliable monitors of variations in solar EUV and XUV irradiance than the time shifted, Earth-based, F(10.7) index currently used.

  18. Correlations between variations in solar EUV and soft X-ray irradiance and photoelectron energy spectra observed on Mars and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Brain, D. A.; Mitchell, D. L.; Bailey, S. M.; Chamberlin, P. C.

    2013-11-01

    extreme ultraviolet (EUV; 10-120 nm) and soft X-ray (XUV; 0-10 nm) radiation are major heat sources for the Mars thermosphere as well as the primary source of ionization that creates the ionosphere. In investigations of Mars thermospheric chemistry and dynamics, solar irradiance models are used to account for variations in this radiation. Because of limited proxies, irradiance models do a poor job of tracking the significant variations in irradiance intensity in the EUV and XUV ranges over solar rotation time scales when the Mars-Sun-Earth angle is large. Recent results from Earth observations show that variations in photoelectron energy spectra are useful monitors of EUV and XUV irradiance variability. Here we investigate photoelectron energy spectra observed by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Electron Reflectometer (ER) and the FAST satellite during the interval in 2005 when Earth, Mars, and the Sun were aligned. The Earth photoelectron data in selected bands correlate well with calculations based on 1 nm resolution observations above 27 nm supplemented by broadband observations and a solar model in the 0-27 nm range. At Mars, we find that instrumental and orbital limitations to the identifications of photoelectron energy spectra in MGS/ER data preclude their use as a monitor of solar EUV and XUV variability. However, observations with higher temporal and energy resolution obtained at lower altitudes on Mars might allow the separation of the solar wind and ionospheric components of electron energy spectra so that they could be used as reliable monitors of variations in solar EUV and XUV irradiance than the time shifted, Earth-based, F10.7 index currently used.

  19. Measurement of very forward neutron energy spectra for 7 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Berti, E.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G.; D'Alessandro, R.; Del Prete, M.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Kawade, K.; Makino, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubayashi, E.; Menjo, H.; Mitsuka, G.; Muraki, Y.; Okuno, Y.; Papini, P.; Perrot, A.-L.; Ricciarini, S.; Sako, T.; Sakurai, N.; Sugiura, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tamura, T.; Tiberio, A.; Torii, S.; Tricomi, A.; Turner, W. C.; Zhou, Q. D.

    2015-11-01

    The Large Hadron Collider forward (LHCf) experiment is designed to use the LHC to verify the hadronic-interaction models used in cosmic-ray physics. Forward baryon production is one of the crucial points to understand the development of cosmic-ray showers. We report the neutron-energy spectra for LHC √{ s} = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the pseudo-rapidity η ranging from 8.81 to 8.99, from 8.99 to 9.22, and from 10.76 to infinity. The measured energy spectra obtained from the two independent calorimeters of Arm1 and Arm2 show the same characteristic feature before unfolding the detector responses. We unfolded the measured spectra by using the multidimensional unfolding method based on Bayesian theory, and the unfolded spectra were compared with current hadronic-interaction models. The QGSJET II-03 model predicts a high neutron production rate at the highest pseudo-rapidity range similar to our results, and the DPMJET 3.04 model describes our results well at the lower pseudo-rapidity ranges. However, no model perfectly explains the experimental results over the entire pseudo-rapidity range. The experimental data indicate a more abundant neutron production rate relative to the photon production than any model predictions studied here.

  20. Finite Element Analysis of an Energy Absorbing Sub-floor Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Scott C.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Advanced General Aviation Transportation Experiments program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center is conducting tests to design energy absorbing structures to improve occupant survivability in aircraft crashes. An effort is currently underway to design an Energy Absorbing (EA) sub-floor structure which will reduce occupant loads in an aircraft crash. However, a recent drop test of a fuselage specimen with a proposed EA sub-floor structure demonstrated that the effects of sectioning the fuselage on both the fuselage section's stiffness and the performance of the EA structure were not fully understood. Therefore, attempts are underway to model the proposed sub-floor structure on computers using the DYCAST finite element code to provide a better understanding of the structure's behavior in testing, and in an actual crash.

  1. Energy Finite Element Analysis Developments for Vibration Analysis of Composite Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahopoulos, Nickolas; Schiller, Noah H.

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) has been utilized successfully for modeling complex structural-acoustic systems with isotropic structural material properties. In this paper, a formulation for modeling structures made out of composite materials is presented. An approach based on spectral finite element analysis is utilized first for developing the equivalent material properties for the composite material. These equivalent properties are employed in the EFEA governing differential equations for representing the composite materials and deriving the element level matrices. The power transmission characteristics at connections between members made out of non-isotropic composite material are considered for deriving suitable power transmission coefficients at junctions of interconnected members. These coefficients are utilized for computing the joint matrix that is needed to assemble the global system of EFEA equations. The global system of EFEA equations is solved numerically and the vibration levels within the entire system can be computed. The new EFEA formulation for modeling composite laminate structures is validated through comparison to test data collected from a representative composite aircraft fuselage that is made out of a composite outer shell and composite frames and stiffeners. NASA Langley constructed the composite cylinder and conducted the test measurements utilized in this work.

  2. Elemental analysis of mining wastes by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, O.; Queralt, I.; Carvalho, M. L.; Garcia, G.

    2007-08-01

    An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) tri-axial geometry experimental spectrometer has been employed to determine the concentrations of 13 different elements (K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr and Pb) in mine wastes from different depths of two mine tailings from the Cartagena-La Union (Spain) mining district. The elements were determined and quantified using the fundamental parameters method. The concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were compared to the values from the European and Spanish legislation to evaluate the environmental risk and to classify the wastes as inert wastes or as wastes that have to be control land-filled. The results obtained demonstrate that these wastes can be considered as inert for the considered elements, apart from the concentration levels of Zn and Pb. Whilst Zn slightly overpasses the regulatory levels, Pb mean value exceeds three to six times the value to be considered as Class I potential land-filling material.

  3. Efficient and accurate evaluation of potential energy matrix elements for quantum dynamics using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alborzpour, Jonathan P.; Tew, David P.; Habershon, Scott

    2016-11-01

    Solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using a linear combination of basis functions, such as Gaussian wavepackets (GWPs), requires costly evaluation of integrals over the entire potential energy surface (PES) of the system. The standard approach, motivated by computational tractability for direct dynamics, is to approximate the PES with a second order Taylor expansion, for example centred at each GWP. In this article, we propose an alternative method for approximating PES matrix elements based on PES interpolation using Gaussian process regression (GPR). Our GPR scheme requires only single-point evaluations of the PES at a limited number of configurations in each time-step; the necessity of performing often-expensive evaluations of the Hessian matrix is completely avoided. In applications to 2-, 5-, and 10-dimensional benchmark models describing a tunnelling coordinate coupled non-linearly to a set of harmonic oscillators, we find that our GPR method results in PES matrix elements for which the average error is, in the best case, two orders-of-magnitude smaller and, in the worst case, directly comparable to that determined by any other Taylor expansion method, without requiring additional PES evaluations or Hessian matrices. Given the computational simplicity of GPR, as well as the opportunities for further refinement of the procedure highlighted herein, we argue that our GPR methodology should replace methods for evaluating PES matrix elements using Taylor expansions in quantum dynamics simulations.

  4. Determination of neutron spectra within the energy of 1 keV to 1 MeV by means of reactor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeyeva, Victoria; Destouches, Christophe; Lyoussi, Abdallah; Thiollay, Nicolas; Vigneau, Olivier; Korschinek, Gunther; Carcreff, Hubert

    2015-07-01

    The standard procedure for neutron reactor dosimetry is based on neutron irradiation of a target and its post-irradiation analysis by Gamma and/or X-ray spectrometry. Nowadays, the neutron spectra can be easily characterized for thermal and fast energies (respectively 0.025 eV and >1 MeV). In this work we propose a new target and an innovating post-irradiation technique of analysis in order to detect the neutron spectra within the energy of 1 keV to 1 MeV. This article will present the calculations performed for the selection of a suitable nuclear reaction and isotope, the results predicted by simulations, the irradiation campaign that is proposed and the post-irradiation technique of analysis. (authors)

  5. Determination of color-octet matrix elements from e+e- processes at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Feng; Qiao, Cong-Feng; Chao, Kuang-Ta

    1997-08-01

    We present an analysis of the preliminary experimental data of direct J/ψ production in e+e- processes at low energies. We find that the color-octet contributions are crucially important to the cross section in this energy region, and their inclusion produces a good description of the data. By fitting to the data, we extract the individual values of two color-octet matrix elements: ~1.1×10-2 GeV3; /m2c~7.4×10-3 GeV3. We discuss the allowed range of the two matrix elements constrained by the theoretical uncertainties. We find that is poorly determined because it is sensitive to the variation of the choice of mc, αs and . However, /m2c is quite stable [about (6-9)×10-3 GeV3] when the parameters vary in reasonable ranges. The uncertainties due to large experimental errors are also discussed.

  6. Enhancement of X-ray Energy Deposition via Heavy Element Sensitization in Biological Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara; Pradhan, Anil; Nahar, Sultana; Barth, Rolf

    2015-05-01

    Energy (dose) deposition by low vs. high energy x-rays (LEX & HEX), approximately E ~ 100 keV and E > 1 MeV respectively, was studied in biological matter sensitized with heavy elements (high-Z or HZ) to improve radiation therapy of cancer. Computations and simulations show that LEX interact favorably with HZ sensitizers by depositing more dose than HEX. LEX photons effectively photoionize deep inner electronic shells and release cell-killing Auger electrons near malignant cells embedded with HZ atoms. HEX photons predominantly Compton scatter with little interaction, even with HZ elements. Monte Carlo simulations show that in comparison to unsensitized tissue, LEX irradiation of HZ-sensitized models resulted in up to a factor of 2 increase in dose deposition relative to HEX. To validate the studies, in vitro experiments were performed using 2 distinct cancer cell types treated with Pt-based sensitizers, then irradiated with a LEX 160 KV x-ray source and a HEX 6 MV LINAC employed in radiation therapy. The experiments support numerical simulations, and demonstrate several factors lower survival of HZ-sensitized cells irradiated with LEX compared with HEX.

  7. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source (abstract only)

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Ropponen, T.; Ropponen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Gammino, S.

    2008-02-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (versatile ECR for nuclear science), produce large amounts of x rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different than for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates in dependence of various ion source parameters such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency.

  8. Monomeric C-phycocyanin at room temperature and 77 K. Resolution of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the individual chromophores and the energy-transfer rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA ); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. )

    1993-09-23

    At both room temperature (RT) and 77 K, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the three individual chromophore types ([alpha][sub 84], [beta][sub 84], and [beta][sub 155]) found in monomeric C-phycocyanin ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]), isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, were resolved along with the rates of energy transfer between the chromophores. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the [beta][sub 155] chromophore, was useful in effecting this resolution. At RT, the single broad peak in the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) was resolved into its three-component spectra by comparing the steady-state absorption spectra of the isolated wild-type [alpha] subunit of PC ([alpha][sup PC]) (containing only the [alpha][sub 84] chromophore) with those of the monomeric PCs isolated from the mutant strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) and the wild-type strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]). At 77 K, the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) splits into two peaks. This partial resolution at 77 K of the chromophore spectra of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) when compared with the 77 K absorption spectra of [alpha][sup PC], [beta][sup PC], and ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) provided a confirmation of our RT assignments of the chromophore absorption spectra. 38 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-06-01

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  10. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  11. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra.

    PubMed

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Fleming, Graham R; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  12. Government-to-private sector energy programs: Identification of common elements leading to successful implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Keith M.

    This dissertation examines six distinct government energy programs implemented in the United States during the last three decades. A common element within these programs is an attempt by government to drive commercialization of energy technologies leading to changes in energy production or consumptive behavior. We seek to understand the factors that lead to success or failure of these programs with two goals in mind. The first is theoretical in that we test a hypothesis that market-based energy programs have substantially higher success rates than command-and-control programs. The second goal is operational in nature, in which we desire to identify common factors within energy programs that lead either to program success or to failure. We investigate and evaluate three market-based and three command-and-control energy programs. The market-based programs include the federal Corporate Average Fuel Economy and Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Control programs as well as Colorado's Amendment 37. The command-and-control programs include the federal Synthetic Fuels Corporation and Corn Based Ethanol programs as well as Colorado's Solar Electric Power program. We conduct the analysis of each program based on composite methodology derived from leading academics within the Policy Sciences. From our research findings, we conclude that both market-based and command-and-control programs can achieve their legislative goals and objectives, resulting in permanent changes in energy production or consumptive behavior. However, we also find that the economic efficiency is the differentiator between market-based and command-and-control programs. Market-based programs, because of the inherent flexibility, allow participants to react to changing economic and/or technical conditions. In contrast, command-and-control programs lack such flexibility and often result in economic inefficiency when economic conditions change. The financial incentives incorporated in the three command

  13. Generating a Reduced-energy Antiproton beam using Channeling Electrostatic elements (GRACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, Gerard; Pacifico, Nicola; Aegis Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    A device was designed for Generating a Reduced-energy Antiproton-beam using Channeling Electrostatic elements (GRACE). A series of einzel lenses and electrodes are used to create a slow beam of antiprotons with tunable mean energy (0 to 16 keV with root mean squared value below 20%) using antiprotons (mean energy of 5 MeV) from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN. Degrader foil is in place, so GRACE further deflects the beam bunches away from the annihilation products, focusing them on a 14 mm x 14 mm detector. Manufacturing parameters were found using simulations written in C++. The device is currently in use by the Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy (AEgIS) collaboration at CERN, which seeks to measure the sign of the gravitational constant for antimatter by performing interferometry studies on an antihydrogen beam. GRACE delivers on the order of 10 events per beam bunch from the AD. Antiprotons will eventually be used together with a pulse of positronium atoms to make antihydrogen atoms with horizontal velocity. GRACE is being used to perform intermediary experiments concerning interferometry of antiprotons, an important stepping stone on the way to measuring the sign of gravity. Special thanks to Boston University Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program, Lawrence Sulak, and Michael Doser.

  14. Parallel elastic elements improve energy efficiency on the STEPPR bipedal walking robot

    DOE PAGES

    Mazumdar, Anirban; Spencer, Steven J.; Hobart, Clinton; ...

    2016-11-23

    This study describes how parallel elastic elements can be used to reduce energy consumption in the electric motor driven, fully-actuated, STEPPR bipedal walking robot without compromising or significantly limiting locomotive behaviors. A physically motivated approach is used to illustrate how selectively-engaging springs for hip adduction and ankle flexion predict benefits for three different flat ground walking gaits: human walking, human-like robot walking and crouched robot walking. Based on locomotion data, springs are designed and substantial reductions in power consumption are demonstrated using a bench dynamometer. These lessons are then applied to STEPPR (Sandia Transmission-Efficient Prototype Promoting Research), a fully actuatedmore » bipedal robot designed to explore the impact of tailored joint mechanisms on walking efficiency. Featuring high-torque brushless DC motors, efficient low-ratio transmissions, and high fidelity torque control, STEPPR provides the ability to incorporate novel joint-level mechanisms without dramatically altering high level control. Unique parallel elastic designs are incorporated into STEPPR, and walking data shows that hip adduction and ankle flexion springs significantly reduce the required actuator energy at those joints for several gaits. These results suggest that parallel joint springs offer a promising means of supporting quasi-static joint torques due to body mass during walking, relieving motors of the need to support these torques and substantially improving locomotive energy efficiency.« less

  15. Parallel elastic elements improve energy efficiency on the STEPPR bipedal walking robot

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumdar, Anirban; Spencer, Steven J.; Hobart, Clinton; Salton, Jonathan; Quigley, Morgan; Wu, Tingfan; Bertrand, Sylvain; Pratt, Jerry; Buerger, Stephen P.

    2016-11-23

    This study describes how parallel elastic elements can be used to reduce energy consumption in the electric motor driven, fully-actuated, STEPPR bipedal walking robot without compromising or significantly limiting locomotive behaviors. A physically motivated approach is used to illustrate how selectively-engaging springs for hip adduction and ankle flexion predict benefits for three different flat ground walking gaits: human walking, human-like robot walking and crouched robot walking. Based on locomotion data, springs are designed and substantial reductions in power consumption are demonstrated using a bench dynamometer. These lessons are then applied to STEPPR (Sandia Transmission-Efficient Prototype Promoting Research), a fully actuated bipedal robot designed to explore the impact of tailored joint mechanisms on walking efficiency. Featuring high-torque brushless DC motors, efficient low-ratio transmissions, and high fidelity torque control, STEPPR provides the ability to incorporate novel joint-level mechanisms without dramatically altering high level control. Unique parallel elastic designs are incorporated into STEPPR, and walking data shows that hip adduction and ankle flexion springs significantly reduce the required actuator energy at those joints for several gaits. These results suggest that parallel joint springs offer a promising means of supporting quasi-static joint torques due to body mass during walking, relieving motors of the need to support these torques and substantially improving locomotive energy efficiency.

  16. Charge, energy and LET spectra of high LET primary and secondary particles in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors of the P0006 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csige, I.; Frigo, L. A.; Benton, E. V.; Oda, K.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the charge, energy and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of about 800 high LET (LET(sub infinity) H2O greater than 50 keV/micron) particles in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors in the P0006 experiment of LDEF. Primary particles with residual range at the reference surface greater than about 2 microns and secondary particles produced in the detector material with total range greater than about 4 microns were measured. We have used a multi-etch technique and an internal calibration to identify and measure the energy of the particles at the reference surface. The LET spectrum was obtained from the charge and energy distribution of the particles.

  17. Streaming of 14-MeV neutrons through an iron duct: comparison of measured neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra with results calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Barnes, J.M.; Soran, P.D.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra resulting from the streaming of 14 MeV neutrons through a 0.30-m-diameter duct (length-to-diameter ratio = 2.83) have been calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The calculated spectra are compared with measured data and data calculated previously using a combination of discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo methods. Comparisons are made at twelve detector locations on and off the duct axis for neutrons with energies above 850 keV and for gamma rays with energies above 750 keV. The neutron spectra calculated using MCNP agree with the measured data within approx. 5 to approx. 50%, depending on detector location and neutron energy. Agreement with the measured gamma-ray spectra is also within approx. 5 to approx. 50%. The spectra obtained with MCNP are also in favorable agreement with the previously calculated data and were obtained with less calculational effort.

  18. Rapid, Automated Determination of Elemental Compositions of Ions in Mass Spectra Obtained with an Open-Air Ion Source (2 of 2)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An inexpensive autosampler for a DART/TOFMS provides mass spectra from analytes absorbed on 76 cotton swab, wipe samples in 7.5 min. A field sample carrier simplifies sample collection and provides swabs nearly ready for analysis to the lab. Applications of the high throughput pr...

  19. 10 CFR 420.17 - Optional elements of State Energy Program plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... peak demands for energy and improve the efficiency of energy supply systems, including electricity... following: (1) Program activities of public education to promote energy efficiency, renewable energy, and... adequate and reliable energy supplies, including greater energy efficiency, that meet applicable...

  20. 10 CFR 420.17 - Optional elements of State Energy Program plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... peak demands for energy and improve the efficiency of energy supply systems, including electricity... following: (1) Program activities of public education to promote energy efficiency, renewable energy, and... adequate and reliable energy supplies, including greater energy efficiency, that meet applicable...

  1. A parametric finite element method for solid-state dewetting problems with anisotropic surface energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Weizhu; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Quan

    2017-02-01

    We propose an efficient and accurate parametric finite element method (PFEM) for solving sharp-interface continuum models for solid-state dewetting of thin films with anisotropic surface energies. The governing equations of the sharp-interface models belong to a new type of high-order (4th- or 6th-order) geometric evolution partial differential equations about open curve/surface interface tracking problems which include anisotropic surface diffusion flow and contact line migration. Compared to the traditional methods (e.g., marker-particle methods), the proposed PFEM not only has very good accuracy, but also poses very mild restrictions on the numerical stability, and thus it has significant advantages for solving this type of open curve evolution problems with applications in the simulation of solid-state dewetting. Extensive numerical results are reported to demonstrate the accuracy and high efficiency of the proposed PFEM.

  2. A finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. II. Nonadiabaticity on coupled potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Warehime, Mick; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.

    2015-01-21

    This is the second in a series of papers detailing a MATLAB based implementation of the finite element method applied to collinear triatomic reactions. Here, we extend our previous work to reactions on coupled potential energy surfaces. The divergence of the probability current density field associated with the two electronically adiabatic states allows us to visualize in a novel way where and how nonadiabaticity occurs. A two-dimensional investigation gives additional insight into nonadiabaticity beyond standard one-dimensional models. We study the F({sup 2}P) + HCl and F({sup 2}P) + H{sub 2} reactions as model applications. Our publicly available code (http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM) is general and easy to use.

  3. High Energy PIXE at the ARRONAX Facility for Multi Elemental Analysis of Thick Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumeir, C.; Haddad, F.; Metivier, V.; Servagent, N.; de la Bernardie, X.; Garrido, E.; Ragheb, D.

    2011-12-01

    Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) using high energy protons is a nondestructive multi-elemental technique that can analyze medium and heavy trace elements on thick samples. A new experimental setup is being built at the ARRONAX facility (Nantes, France) for this purpose. Experiments on multi-layer targets have been made in order to identify the sequences and to measure the different layer thicknesses. Our approach is to consider the relative intensities of Kα/Kβ lines in different layers as well as the gamma intensity ray ratio from each layer versus the reference layer. Two multi-layer targets were used: the first one composed of 10 μm Au, 30μm Bi and 250 μm Cu, and the second composed of 125 μm Ti, 10 μm Au and 50 μm Ag. In both cases, we used Al 100 μm as a reference layer. This work emphasizes the importance of having both X-ray and gamma-ray information in multi-layer analyses.

  4. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy pp and pp¯ collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; ...

    2015-06-22

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energymore » $pp$ and $$p\\bar p $$ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of $$1/p_T^n$$ at high $$p_T$$. The power index $n$ is 4-5 for jet production and is slightly greater for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest $$p_T$$ region in $pp$ collisions at LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole $$p_T$$ region at central rapidity in $pp$ collisions at LHC. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power index of UA1 jet spectra over an extended $$p_T$$ region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX Collaborations in high-energy $pp$ and $$p \\bar p$$ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that can be cast into a single-particle non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution. Lastly, because of such a connection, the non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution can be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high energy $pp$ and $$p\\bar p$$ collisions.« less

  5. LASER SPECTROSCOPY AND TRACE ELEMENT ANALYSIS Chapter from the Energy and Environment Division Annual Report 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Various, Authors

    1981-05-01

    In order to control pollutants resulting from energy production and utilization, adequate methods are required for monitoring the level of various substances often present at low concentrations. The Energy and Environment Division Applied Research in Laser Spectroscopy & Analytical Techniques Program is directed toward meeting these needs, Emphasis is on the development of physical methods, as opposed to conventional chemical analysis techniques. The advantages, now widely recognized, include ultra-high sensitivity coupled with minimal sample preparation. In some instances physical methods provide multi-parameter measurements which often provide the only means of achiev·ing the sensitivity necessary for the detection of trace contaminants. Work is reported in these areas: APPLIED PHYSICS AND LASER SPECTROSCOPY RESEARCH; MICROPROCESSOR CONTROLLER ANODIC STRIPPING VOLTAMETER FOR TRACE METALS ANALYSIS IN WATER; THE SURVEY OF INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING; THE POSSIBLE CHRONDRITIC NATURE OF THE DANISH CRETACEOUS~TERTIARY BOUNDARY; IMPROVEMENT OF THE SENSITIVITY AND PRECISION OF NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS OF SOME ELEMENTS IN PLANKTON AND PLANKTONIC FISH; and SOURCES OF SOME SECONDARILY WORKED OBSIDIAN ARTIFACTS FROM TIKAL, GUATEMALA.

  6. Element Cycling and Energy Flux Responses in Ecosystem Simulations Conducted at the Chinese Lunar Palace-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chen; Fu, Yuming; Xie, Beizhen; Wang, Minjuan; Liu, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS) address interactions between organisms and their environment as an integrated system through the study of factors that regulate the pools and fluxes of materials and energy through ecological systems. As a simple model, using BLSS is very important in the investigation of element cycling and energy flux for sustainable development on Earth. A 105-day experiment with a high degree of closure was carried out in this system from February to May, 2014, with three volunteers. The results indicate that 247 g·d-1 carbon was imported into the system from stored food. Most hydrogen is circulated as water, and more than 99% H2O can be lost through leaf transpiration into the atmosphere. A total of 1.8 g·d-1 "unknown oxygen" emerged between the input and output of the plant growth module. For the urine processing module, 20.5% nitrogen was reused and 5.35 g·d-1 was put into the nutrient solution.

  7. The Equilibrium and Pre-equilibrium Triton Emission Spectra of Some Target Nuclei for ( n, xt) Reactions up to 45 MeV Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Kaplan, A.; Aydın, A.; Özkorucuklu, S.; Büyükuslu, H.; Yıldırım, G.

    2010-08-01

    Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. So, working out the systematics of ( n,t) reaction cross sections and triton emission differential data are important for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, ( n,xt) reactions for some target nuclei as 16O, 27Al, 59Co and 209Bi have been investigated up to 45 MeV incident neutron energy. In the calculations of the triton emission spectra, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been used. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  8. Reflection Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy of Iron Monosilicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshin, A. S.; Igumenov, A. Yu.; Mikhlin, Yu. L.; Pchelyakov, O. P.; Zhigalov, V. S.

    2017-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectra, reflection electron energy loss spectra, and inelastic electron scattering cross section spectra of iron monosilicide FeSi are investigated. It is shown that the spectra of inelastic electron scattering cross section have advantages over the reflection electron energy loss spectra in studying the processes of electron energy losses. An analysis of the fine structure of the inelastic electron scattering cross section spectra allows previously unresolved peaks to be identified and their energy, intensity, and nature to be determined. The difference between energies of fitting loss peaks in the spectra of inelastic electron scattering cross section of FeSi and pure Fe are more substantial than the chemical shifts in X-ray photoelectron spectra, which indicates the possibility of application of the fine structure of the spectra of inelastic electron scattering cross section for elemental analysis.

  9. Electrolyser and fuel cells, key elements for energy and life support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockstahler, Klaus; Funke, Helmut; Lucas, Joachim

    Both, Electrolyser and Fuel Cells are key elements for regenerative energy and life support systems. Electrolyser technology is originally intended for oxygen production in manned space habitats and in submarines, through splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. Fuel cells serve for energy production through the reaction, triggered in the presence of an electrolyte, between a fuel and an oxidant. Now combining both technologies i.e. electrolyser and fuel cell makes it a Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFCS). In charge mode, i.e. with energy supplied e.g. by solar cells, the electrolyser splits water into hydrogen and oxygen being stored in tanks. In discharge mode, when power is needed but no energy is available, the stored gases are converted in the fuel cell to generate electricity under the formation of water that is stored in tanks. Rerouting the water to the electrolyser makes it a closed-loop i.e. regenerative process. Different electrolyser and fuel cell technologies are being evolved. At Astrium emphasis is put on the development of an RFCS comprised of Fixed Alkaline Electrolyser (FAE) and Fuel Cell (AFC) as such technology offers a high electrical efficiency and thus reduced system weight, which is important in space applications. With increasing power demand and increasing discharge time an RFCS proves to be superior to batteries. Since the early technology development multiple design refinements were done at Astrium, funded by the European Space Agency ESA and the German National Agency DLR as well as based on company internal R and T funding. Today a complete RFCS energy system breadboard is established and the operational behavior of the system is being tested. In parallel the electrolyser itself is subject to design refinement and testing in terms of oxygen production in manned space habitats. In addition essential features and components for process monitoring and control are being developed. The present results and achievements and the dedicated

  10. Comparative assessment of density functional methods for evaluating essential parameters to simulate SERS spectra within the excited state energy gradient approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Mozhdeh; Jamshidi, Zahra

    2016-05-01

    The prospect of challenges in reproducing and interpretation of resonance Raman properties of molecules interacting with metal clusters has prompted the present research initiative. Resonance Raman spectra based on the time-dependent gradient approximation are examined in the framework of density functional theory using different methods for representing the exchange-correlation functional. In this work the performance of different XC functionals in the prediction of ground state properties, excitation state energies, and gradients are compared and discussed. Resonance Raman properties based on time-dependent gradient approximation for the strongly low-lying charge transfer states are calculated and compared for different methods. We draw the following conclusions: (1) for calculating the binding energy and ground state geometry, dispersion-corrected functionals give the best performance in comparison to ab initio calculations, (2) GGA and meta GGA functionals give good accuracy in calculating vibrational frequencies, (3) excited state energies determined by hybrid and range-separated hybrid functionals are in good agreement with EOM-CCSD calculations, and (4) in calculating resonance Raman properties GGA functionals give good and reasonable performance in comparison to the experiment; however, calculating the excited state gradient by using the hybrid functional on the hessian of GGA improves the results of the hybrid functional significantly. Finally, we conclude that the agreement of charge-transfer surface enhanced resonance Raman spectra with experiment is improved significantly by using the excited state gradient approximation.

  11. On the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient and spectra of inner radiation belt particles - Analytic solutions and comparison with numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphalen, H.; Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical method by which the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient may be deduced from spectral observations of the particle population at the inner edge of the earth's radiation belts is presented. This region has previously been analyzed with numerical techniques; in this report an analytical treatment that illustrates characteristic limiting cases in the L shell range where the time scale of Coulomb losses is substantially shorter than that of radial diffusion (L approximately 1-2) is given. It is demonstrated both analytically and numerically that the particle spectra there are shaped by the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient regardless of the spectral shapes of the particle populations diffusing inward from the outer radiation zone, so that from observed spectra the energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient can be determined. To insure realistic simulations, inner zone data obtained from experiments on the DIAL, AZUR, and ESRO 2 spacecraft have been used as boundary conditions. Excellent agreement between analytic and numerical results is reported.

  12. Source spectra of the gravity waves obtained from momentum flux and kinetic energy over Indian region: Comparison between observations and model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramitha, M.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Vijaya Bhaskar Rao, S.

    2017-02-01

    Using 8 years (May 2006 to March 2014) of high resolution and high accuracy GPS radiosonde observations available from a tropical station Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), India, we have investigated the climatology of gravity wave energy and zonal momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere. We also obtained best fit spectrum model for the gravity waves (GWs) for this tropical station. In general, strong annual variation in the energy and momentum flux with maximum during Indian summer monsoon is observed in the lower stratospheric region (18-25 km). By considering different source spectra, we have applied Gravitywave Regional or Global RAy Tracer (GROGRAT) model run on monthly basis using the source spectrum values at different altitudes on the ERA-Interim background fields to obtain the kinetic energy and zonal momentum fluxes for each of the spectra considered. These simulated fluxes are compared with the observed fluxes to arrive at the best fit spectrum model. It is found that the spectrum which represents the convection transient mountain mechanism that is purely anti-symmetric and anisotropic in nature is the best fit model for Gadanki location. This information would be useful in parameterization of the GWs in numerical models over Indian region.

  13. Characterization of high-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron energy spectra and ambient dose equivalents of 80-389 MeV 7Li(p,n) reactions using a time-of-flight method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Satoh, Daiki; Araki, Shouhei; Yashima, Hiroshi; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Masuda, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Nakao, Noriaki; Shima, Tatsushi; Kin, Tadahiro; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    We completed a series of measurements on mono-energetic neutron energy spectra of the 7Li(p,n) reaction with 80-389-MeV protons in the 100-m time-of-flight (TOF) tunnel at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics cyclotron facility. For that purpose, we measured neutron energy spectra of the 80-, 100- and 296-MeV proton incident reactions, which had not been investigated in our previous studies. The neutron peak intensity was 0.9-1.1×1010 neutrons/sr/μC in the incident proton energy region of 80-389 MeV, and it was almost independent of the incident proton energy. The contribution of peak intensity of the spectrum to the total intensity integrated with energies above 3 MeV varied between 0.38 and 0.48 in the incident proton energy range of 80-389 MeV. To consider the correction required to derive a response in the peak region from the measured total responses of neutron monitors in the 100-m TOF tunnel, we proposed the subtraction method using energy spectra between 0° and 25°. The normalizing factor k against 25° neutron fluence to equalize it to 0° neutron fluence in the continuum region ranges from 0.74 to 1.02 depending on the incident proton energy and angle measured. Even without the TOF method, the subtraction method with the k factor almost decreases the response in the continuum region of a neutron spectrum against the total response of neutron monitors.

  14. A measurement of the energy spectra of cosmic rays from 20 to 1000 GeV per amu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Y.; Hayashi, T.; Thoburn, C.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, John W., Jr.; Fowler, P. H.; Masheder, M. R. W.; Derrickson, James H.

    1991-01-01

    A group collaboration was made in the development of the Bristol University Gas Spectrometer number 4 (BUGS 4). The BUGS 4 detector is designed to measure the charge spectrum for species between oxygen and the iron peak as a function of energy per nucleon, between 20 and 1000 GeV/amu. It is particularly concerned with energies above 50 GeV/amu. The high energy component is considerably less affected by propagation through the interstellar medium than the lower energy component and is expected to approach the original charge spectrum of the source more closely. This information allows one to unravel the effects of cosmic ray production, acceleration, and propagation. The detector is described in total detail. The method of estimating the charge and energy of a cosmic ray depends on the energy of the particle. Calculations and experiments lead to the expectation of a nearly constant charge resolution of about 0.2 charge units over the whole energy range except 4.5 less than gamma less than 20. In this band, the experiment is insensitive to energy. A balloon flight is planned in 1993.

  15. Energy spectra of the hyperbolic and second Poeschl-Teller like potentials solved by new exact quantization rule

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Shihai Gonzalez-Cisneros, A.

    2008-05-15

    A new exact quantization rule simplifies the calculation of the energy levels for the exactly solvable quantum system. In this work we calculate the energy levels of the Schroedinger equation with the hyperbolic potential by this quantization rule. The corresponding eigenfunction is also derived for completeness. The second Poeschl-Teller like potential case is also carried out.

  16. Low-energy spectra of differential conductivity and shot noise in tunnel junctions based on superconductors with suppression of the order parameter at the S-N interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogolovskii, M.; Zhitlukhina, E.; Egorov, O.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of an anomalous structure in the differential conductivity of tunnel junctions based on high-temperature superconductors as a result of degradation of their surface layer is analyzed. This feature is in the form of two peaks near an energy gap separated by a region of suppressed conductivity. One peak is usually high and sharp, while the other is much more spread out. Differential conductivity and shot noise spectra in contacts of a normal injector with s- and d-type superconductors are calculated and compared. It is shown that combined measurements of these two characteristics can provide new information on the kinetics of transport processes in these structures.

  17. Effects of Fission Yield Data in the Calculation of Antineutrino Spectra for ^{235}U(n,fission) at Thermal and Fast Neutron Energies.

    PubMed

    Sonzogni, A A; McCutchan, E A; Johnson, T D; Dimitriou, P

    2016-04-01

    Fission yields form an integral part of the prediction of antineutrino spectra generated by nuclear reactors, but little attention has been paid to the quality and reliability of the data used in current calculations. Following a critical review of the thermal and fast ENDF/B-VII.1 ^{235}U fission yields, deficiencies are identified and improved yields are obtained, based on corrections of erroneous yields, consistency between decay and fission yield data, and updated isomeric ratios. These corrected yields are used to calculate antineutrino spectra using the summation method. An anomalous value for the thermal fission yield of ^{86}Ge generates an excess of antineutrinos at 5-7 MeV, a feature which is no longer present when the corrected yields are used. Thermal spectra calculated with two distinct fission yield libraries (corrected ENDF/B and JEFF) differ by up to 6% in the 0-7 MeV energy window, allowing for a basic estimate of the uncertainty involved in the fission yield component of summation calculations. Finally, the fast neutron antineutrino spectrum is calculated, which at the moment can only be obtained with the summation method and may be relevant for short baseline reactor experiments using highly enriched uranium fuel.

  18. Effects of fission yield data in the calculation of antineutrino spectra for U235(n,fission) at thermal and fast neutron energies

    DOE PAGES

    Sonzogni, A. A.; McCutchan, E. A.; Johnson, T. D.; ...

    2016-04-01

    Fission yields form an integral part of the prediction of antineutrino spectra generated by nuclear reactors, but little attention has been paid to the quality and reliability of the data used in current calculations. Following a critical review of the thermal and fast ENDF/B-VII.1 235U fission yields, deficiencies are identified and improved yields are obtained, based on corrections of erroneous yields, consistency between decay and fission yield data, and updated isomeric ratios. These corrected yields are used to calculate antineutrino spectra using the summation method. An anomalous value for the thermal fission yield of 86Ge generates an excess of antineutrinosmore » at 5–7 MeV, a feature which is no longer present when the corrected yields are used. Thermal spectra calculated with two distinct fission yield libraries (corrected ENDF/B and JEFF) differ by up to 6% in the 0–7 MeV energy window, allowing for a basic estimate of the uncertainty involved in the fission yield component of summation calculations. Lastly, the fast neutron antineutrino spectrum is calculated, which at the moment can only be obtained with the summation method and may be relevant for short baseline reactor experiments using highly enriched uranium fuel.« less

  19. Estimation of percentage body fat by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry: evaluation by in vivo human elemental composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ZiMian; Heymsfield, Steven B.; Chen, Zhao; Zhu, Shankuan; Pierson, Richard N.

    2010-05-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is widely applied for estimating body fat. The percentage of body mass as fat (%fat) is predicted from a DXA-estimated RST value defined as the ratio of soft tissue attenuation at two photon energies (e.g., 40 keV and 70 keV). Theoretically, the RST concept depends on the mass of each major element in the human body. The DXA RST values, however, have never been fully evaluated by measured human elemental composition. The present investigation evaluated the DXA RST value by the total body mass of 11 major elements and the DXA %fat by the five-component (5C) model, respectively. Six elements (i.e. C, N, Na, P, Cl and Ca) were measured by in vivo neutron activation analysis, and potassium (i.e. K) by whole-body 40K counting in 27 healthy adults. Models were developed for predicting the total body mass of four additional elements (i.e. H, O, Mg and S). The elemental content of soft tissue, after correction for bone mineral elements, was used to predict the RST values. The DXA RST values were strongly associated with the RST values predicted from elemental content (r = 0.976, P < 0.001), although there was a tendency for the elemental-predicted RST to systematically exceed the DXA-measured RST (mean ± SD, 1.389 ± 0.024 versus 1.341 ± 0.024). DXA-estimated %fat was strongly associated with 5C %fat (24.4 ± 12.0% versus 24.9 ± 11.1%, r = 0.983, P < 0.001). DXA RST is evaluated by in vivo elemental composition, and the present study supports the underlying physical concept and accuracy of the DXA method for estimating %fat.

  20. Estimation of percentage body fat by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry: evaluation by in vivo human elemental composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, ZiMian; Heymsfield, Steven B; Chen, Zhao; Zhu, Shankuan; Pierson, Richard N

    2010-05-07

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is widely applied for estimating body fat. The percentage of body mass as fat (%fat) is predicted from a DXA-estimated R(ST) value defined as the ratio of soft tissue attenuation at two photon energies (e.g., 40 keV and 70 keV). Theoretically, the R(ST) concept depends on the mass of each major element in the human body. The DXA R(ST) values, however, have never been fully evaluated by measured human elemental composition. The present investigation evaluated the DXA R(ST) value by the total body mass of 11 major elements and the DXA %fat by the five-component (5C) model, respectively. Six elements (i.e. C, N, Na, P, Cl and Ca) were measured by in vivo neutron activation analysis, and potassium (i.e. K) by whole-body (40)K counting in 27 healthy adults. Models were developed for predicting the total body mass of four additional elements (i.e. H, O, Mg and S). The elemental content of soft tissue, after correction for bone mineral elements, was used to predict the R(ST) values. The DXA R(ST) values were strongly associated with the R(ST) values predicted from elemental content (r = 0.976, P < 0.001), although there was a tendency for the elemental-predicted R(ST) to systematically exceed the DXA-measured R(ST) (mean +/- SD, 1.389 +/- 0.024 versus 1.341 +/- 0.024). DXA-estimated %fat was strongly associated with 5C %fat (24.4 +/- 12.0% versus 24.9 +/- 11.1%, r = 0.983, P < 0.001). DXA R(ST) is evaluated by in vivo elemental composition, and the present study supports the underlying physical concept and accuracy of the DXA method for estimating %fat.

  1. Advanced light element and low energy X-ray line analysis using Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS) with Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salge, T.; Palasse, L.; Berlin, J.; Hansen, B.; Terborg, R.; Falke, M.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: Characterization at the micro- to nano-scale is crucial for understanding many processes in earth, planetary, material and biological sciences. The composition of thin electron transparent samples can be analyzed in the nm-range using transmission electron microscopes (TEM) or, specific sample holders provided, in the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Nevertheless both methods often require complex sample preparation. An alternative method is to analyze bulk samples with a FE-SEM. In order to decrease the excitation volume for generated X-rays, low accelerating voltages (HV<10) are required. Consequently, only low to intermediate energy X-ray lines can be evaluated and many peak overlaps have to be deconvoluted since the high energy range is not available. Methods: A BRUKER Quantax EDS system with an XFlash Silicon Drift Detector acquired EDS spectra in spectrum images. To separate overlapping peaks, an extended atomic database [1] was used. For single channel EDS the electron beam current, solid angle, take-off angle and exposure time can be optimized to investigate the element composition. Multiple SDD setups ensure an even higher efficiency and larger collection angles for the X-ray analysis than single channel detectors. Shadowing effects are minimized in element distribution maps so that samples can be investigated quickly and sometimes in a close to natural state, with little preparation. A new type of EDS detector, the annular four channel SDD (XFlash 5060F), is placed between the pole piece and sample. It covers a very large solid angle (1.1 sr) and allows sufficient data collection at low beam currents on beam sensitive samples with substantial surface topography. Examples of applications: Results demonstrate that SDD-based EDS analysis contributes essential information on the structure at the micro- to nano scale of the investigated sample types. These include stardust analogue impact experiments [2], Chicxulub asteroid

  2. Energy Spectrum and Optical Absorption Spectra of Fullerene C76 Isomers and Endohedral Metal Complexes on Their Basis Within the Limits of the Concept of a Strongly Correlated State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Yu. A.; Lobanov, B. V.; Murzashev, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    The energy spectra of five fullerene C76 isomers are calculated for the Hubbard model in the static fluctuation approximation. Based on the spectra obtained, the optical absorption spectra of pure fullerene C76 represented by the isomer of symmetry D2 and endohedral Lu2@C76, Sm@C76, and DySc2N@C76 metal complexes are calculated. The calculated optical absorption spectra agree qualitatively well with the available experimental data, thereby indicating a need to consider the strong Coulomb interactions in the study of the π-electron fullerene subsystem.

  3. Predictions of thermal buckling strengths of hypersonic aircraft sandwich panels using minimum potential energy and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal buckling characteristics of hypersonic aircraft sandwich panels of various aspect ratios were investigated. The panel is fastened at its four edges to the substructures under four different edge conditions and is subjected to uniform temperature loading. Minimum potential energy theory and finite element methods were used to calculate the panel buckling temperatures. The two methods gave fairly close buckling temperatures. However, the finite element method gave slightly lower buckling temperatures than those given by the minimum potential energy theory. The reasons for this slight discrepancy in eigensolutions are discussed in detail. In addition, the effect of eigenshifting on the eigenvalue convergence rate is discussed.

  4. Depth dependence of absorbed dose, dose equivalent and linear energy transfer spectra of galactic and trapped particles in polyethylene and comparison with calculations of models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A matched set of five tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs), embedded at the centers of 0 (bare), 3, 5, 8 and 12-inch-diameter polyethylene spheres, were flown on the Shuttle flight STS-81 (inclination 51.65 degrees, altitude approximately 400 km). The data obtained were separated into contributions from trapped protons and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). From the measured linear energy transfer (LET) spectra, the absorbed dose and dose-equivalent rates were calculated. The results were compared to calculations made with the radiation transport model HZETRN/NUCFRG2, using the GCR free-space spectra, orbit-averaged geomagnetic transmission function and Shuttle shielding distributions. The comparison shows that the model fits the dose rates to a root mean square (rms) error of 5%, and dose-equivalent rates to an rms error of 10%. Fairly good agreement between the LET spectra was found; however, differences are seen at both low and high LET. These differences can be understood as due to the combined effects of chord-length variation and detector response function. These results rule out a number of radiation transport/nuclear fragmentation models. Similar comparisons of trapped-proton dose rates were made between calculations made with the proton transport model BRYNTRN using the AP-8 MIN trapped-proton model and Shuttle shielding distributions. The predictions of absorbed dose and dose-equivalent rates are fairly good. However, the prediction of the LET spectra below approximately 30 keV/microm shows the need to improve the AP-8 model. These results have strong implications for shielding requirements for an interplanetary manned mission.

  5. Momentum-Dependent Lifetime Broadening of Electron Energy Loss Spectra: A Self-Consistent Coupled-Plasmon Model.

    PubMed

    Bourke, J D; Chantler, C T

    2015-02-05

    The complex dielectric function and associated energy loss spectrum of a condensed matter system is a fundamental material parameter that determines both the optical and electronic scattering behavior of the medium. The common representation of the electron energy loss function (ELF) is interpreted as the susceptibility of a system to a single- or bulk-electron (plasmon) excitation at a given energy and momentum and is commonly derived as a summation of noninteracting free-electron resonances with forms constrained by adherence to some externally determined optical standard. This work introduces a new causally constrained momentum-dependent broadening theory, permitting a more physical representation of optical and electronic resonances that agrees more closely with both optical attenuation and electron scattering data. We demonstrate how the momentum dependence of excitation resonances may be constrained uniquely by utilizing a coupled-plasmon model, in which high-energy excitations are able to relax into lower-energy excitations within the medium. This enables a robust and fully self-consistent theory with no free or fitted parameters that reveals additional physical insight not present in previous work. The new developments are applied to the scattering behavior of solid molybdenum and aluminum. We find that plasmon and single-electron lifetimes are significantly affected by the presence of alternate excitation channels and show for molybdenum that agreement with high-precision electron inelastic mean free path data is dramatically improved for energies above 20 eV.

  6. Above-threshold ionization of Mg by linearly and circularly polarized laser fields: Origin of the subpeaks in the photoelectron energy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Takashi; Buica, Gabriela

    2006-08-15

    We theoretically investigate above-threshold ionization of Mg by linearly and circularly polarized fs laser pulses. We find that the above-threshold ionization peaks are accompanied by small subpeaks for both linearly and circularly polarized pulses. We interpret the physical origin of the subpeaks as above-threshold ionization from the low-lying bound states which are far off-resonantly excited by the spectral wing of the pulse. This interpretation is confirmed by our comparative numerical studies. Furthermore, we provide a clear explanation of why this kind of subpeak in the photoelectron energy spectra has not been reported for smaller photon energies with Mg and other commonly used atoms such as H and rare gas atoms.

  7. Performing elemental microanalysis with high accuracy and high precision by scanning electron microscopy/silicon drift detector energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/SDD-EDS).

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    Electron-excited X-ray microanalysis performed in the scanning electron microscope with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) is a core technique for characterization of the microstructure of materials. The recent advances in EDS performance with the silicon drift detector (SDD) enable accuracy and precision equivalent to that of the high spectral resolution wavelength-dispersive spectrometer employed on the electron probe microanalyzer platform. SDD-EDS throughput, resolution, and stability provide practical operating conditions for measurement of high-count spectra that form the basis for peak fitting procedures that recover the characteristic peak intensities even for elemental combination where severe peak overlaps occur, such PbS, MoS2, BaTiO3, SrWO4, and WSi2. Accurate analyses are also demonstrated for interferences involving large concentration ratios: a major constituent on a minor constituent (Ba at 0.4299 mass fraction on Ti at 0.0180) and a major constituent on a trace constituent (Ba at 0.2194 on Ce at 0.00407; Si at 0.1145 on Ta at 0.0041). Accurate analyses of low atomic number elements, C, N, O, and F, are demonstrated. Measurement of trace constituents with limits of detection below 0.001 mass fraction (1000 ppm) is possible within a practical measurement time of 500 s.

  8. ZnO thin film piezoelectric MEMS vibration energy harvesters with two piezoelectric elements for higher output performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peihong; Du, Hejun

    2015-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin film piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based vibration energy harvesters with two different designs are presented. These harvesters consist of a silicon cantilever, a silicon proof mass, and a ZnO piezoelectric layer. Design I has a large ZnO piezoelectric element and Design II has two smaller and equally sized ZnO piezoelectric elements; however, the total area of ZnO thin film in two designs is equal. The ZnO thin film is deposited by means of radio-frequency magnetron sputtering method and is characterized by means of XRD and SEM techniques. These ZnO energy harvesters are fabricated by using MEMS micromachining. The natural frequencies of the fabricated ZnO energy harvesters are simulated and tested. The test results show that these two energy harvesters with different designs have almost the same natural frequency. Then, the output performance of different ZnO energy harvesters is tested in detail. The effects of series connection and parallel connection of two ZnO elements on the load voltage and power are also analyzed. The experimental results show that the energy harvester with two ZnO piezoelectric elements in parallel connection in Design II has higher load voltage and higher load power than the fabricated energy harvesters with other designs. Its load voltage is 2.06 V under load resistance of 1 MΩ and its maximal load power is 1.25 μW under load resistance of 0.6 MΩ, when it is excited by an external vibration with frequency of 1300.1 Hz and acceleration of 10 m/s(2). By contrast, the load voltage of the energy harvester of Design I is 1.77 V under 1 MΩ resistance and its maximal load power is 0.98 μW under 0.38 MΩ load resistance when it is excited by the same vibration.

  9. IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotational-vibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy levels and transition wavenumbers for H216O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan; Bernath, Peter F.; Brown, Linda R.; Campargue, Alain; Császár, Attila G.; Daumont, Ludovic; Gamache, Robert R.; Hodges, Joseph T.; Naumenko, Olga V.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Vandaele, Ann Carine; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Al Derzi, Afaf R.; Fábri, Csaba; Fazliev, Alexander Z.; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Gordon, Iouli E.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Mizus, Irina I.

    2013-03-01

    This is the third of a series of articles reporting critically evaluated rotational-vibrational line positions, transition intensities, and energy levels, with associated critically reviewed labels and uncertainties, for all the main isotopologues of water. This paper presents experimental line positions, experimental-quality energy levels, and validated labels for rotational-vibrational transitions of the most abundant isotopologue of water, H216O. The latest version of the MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) line-inversion procedure is used to determine the rovibrational energy levels of the electronic ground state of H216O from experimentally measured lines, together with their self-consistent uncertainties, for the spectral region up to the first dissociation limit. The spectroscopic network of H216O containstwo components, an ortho (o) and a para (p) one. For o-H216O and p-H216O, experimentally measured, assigned, and labeled transitions were analyzed from more than 100 sources. The measured lines come from one-photon spectra recorded at room temperature in absorption, from hot samples with temperatures up to 3000 K recorded in emission, and from multiresonance excitation spectra which sample levels up to dissociation. The total number of transitions considered is 184 667 of which 182 156 are validated: 68 027 between para states and 114 129 ortho ones. These transitions give rise to 18 486 validated energy levels, of which 10 446 and 8040 belong to o-H216O and p-H216O, respectively. The energy levels, including their labeling with approximate normal-mode and rigid-rotor quantum numbers, have been checked against ones determined from accurate variational nuclear motion computations employing exact kinetic energy operators as well as against previous compilations of energy levels. The extensive list of MARVEL lines and levels obtained are deposited in the supplementary data of this paper, as well as in a distributed information system

  10. Variability of seismic source spectra, estimated stress drop, and radiated energy, derived from cohesive-zone models of symmetrical and asymmetrical circular and elliptical ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Y.; Shearer, P. M.

    2015-02-01

    Large variability of earthquake stress drops and scaled energy has been commonly reported in the literature, but it is difficult to assess how much of this variability is caused by underlying physical source processes rather than simply observational uncertainties. Here we examine a variety of dynamically realistic rupture scenarios for circular and elliptical faults and investigate to what extent the variability in seismically estimated stress drops and scaled energy comes from differences in source geometry, rupture directivity, and rupture speeds. We numerically simulate earthquake source scenarios using a cohesive-zone model with the small-scale yielding limit, where the solution approaches a singular crack model with spontaneous healing of slip. Compared to symmetrical circular source models, asymmetrical models result in larger variability of estimated corner frequencies and scaled energy over the focal sphere. The general behavior of the spherical averages of corner frequencies and scaled energy in the subshear regime extends to the supershear regime, although shear Mach waves generated by the propagation of supershear rupture lead to much higher corner frequency and scaled energy estimates locally. Our results suggest that at least a factor of 2 difference in the spherical average of corner frequencies is expected in observational studies simply from variability in source characteristics almost independent of the actual stress drops, translating into a factor of 8 difference in estimated stress drops. Furthermore, radiation efficiency estimates derived from observed seismic spectra should not be directly interpreted as describing rupture properties unless there are independent constraints on rupture speed and geometry.

  11. Ab initio potential energy surface and predicted microwave spectra for Ar--OCS dimer and structures of Arn--OCS (n = 2-14) clusters.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hua; Guo, Yong; Xue, Ying; Xie, Daiqian

    2006-07-15

    An ab initio potential energy surface for the Ar--OCS dimer was calculated using the coupled-cluster singles and doubles with noniterative inclusion of connected triples [CCSD(T)] with a large basis set containing bond functions. The interaction energies were obtained by the supermolecular approach with the full counterpoise correction for the basis set superposition error. The CCSD(T) potential was found to have two minima corresponding to the T-shaped and the collinear Ar--SCO structures. The two-dimensional discrete variable representation method was employed to calculate the rovibrational energy levels for five isotopomers Ar--OCS, Ar--OC34S, Ar--O13CS, Ar--18OCS, and Ar--17OCS. The calculated pure rotational transition frequencies for the vibrational ground state of the five isotopomers are in good agreement with the observed values. The corresponding microwave spectra show that the b-type transitions (Delta Ka = +/-1) are significantly stronger than the a-type transitions (Delta Ka = 0). Minimum-energy structures of the Ar2--OCS trimer were been determined with MP2 optimization, whereas the minimum-energy structures of the Arn--OCS clusters with n = 3-14 were obtained with the pairwise additive potentials. It was found that there are two minima corresponding to one distorted tetrahedral structure and one planar structure for the ternary complex. The 14 nearest neighbor Ar atoms form the first solvation shell around the OCS molecule.

  12. Inequality spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-03-01

    Inequality indices are widely applied in economics and in the social sciences as quantitative measures of the socioeconomic inequality of human societies. The application of inequality indices extends to size-distributions at large, where these indices can be used as general gauges of statistical heterogeneity. Moreover, as inequality indices are plentiful, arrays of such indices facilitate high-detail quantification of statistical heterogeneity. In this paper we elevate from arrays of inequality indices to inequality spectra: continuums of inequality indices that are parameterized by a single control parameter. We present a general methodology of constructing Lorenz-based inequality spectra, apply the general methodology to establish four sets of inequality spectra, investigate the properties of these sets, and show how these sets generalize known inequality gauges such as: the Gini index, the extended Gini index, the Rényi index, and hill curves.

  13. The use of IR, magnetism, reflectance, and mass spectra together with thermal analyses in structure investigation of codeine phosphate complexes of d-block elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayed, M. A.; El-shahat, M. F.; Abdullah, S. M.

    2005-06-01

    Codeine is an analgesic with uses similar to morphines, but it is of much less effect, i.e., it had a mild sedative effect; codeine is usually used as the phosphate form (Cod.P) and is often administrated by mouth with aspirin of paracetamol. Due to its serious use, if it is in large dose, attention is paid in this research to the synthesis and stereochemistry of new iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, and zinc complexes of this drug in both solution and the solid states. The spectra of these complexes in solution and the study of their stoichiometry refer to the formation of 1:1 ratio of metal (M) to ligand (L). The steriochemical structures of the solid complexes were studied on the basis of their analytical, spectroscopic, magnetic, and thermal data. Infrared spectra proved the presence of M sbnd O bonds. Magnetic susceptibility and solid reflectance spectral measurements were used to infer the structures. The prepared complexes were found to have the general formulae [ML(OH) x(H 2O) y](H 2O) zH 3PO 4, M: Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II), x = 1, y = 0, z = 0; M: Fe(II), x = 1, y = 2, z = 1; Fe(III), x = 2, y = 1, z = 0; Co(III), x = 0, y = 2, z = 1; Zn(II), x = 1, y = 0, z = 3; and L: (Cod.P) of the general formula C 18H 24NO 7P (anhydrate). Octahedral, tetrahedral, and square planer structures were proposed for these complexes depending upon the magnetic and reflectance data and were confirmed by detailed mass and thermal analyses comparative studies.

  14. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence spectra for the monitoring of Cd toxicity in a bio-energy crop (Jatropha curcas).

    PubMed

    Marques, Marise Conceição; do Nascimento, Clístenes Williams Araújo

    2013-10-05

    The vegetation of metal-contaminated soils using non-edible crops can be a safe and economical technique for Cd immobilization and the remediation of contaminated sites. Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) exhibits a relative tolerance to heavy metals and potential for biofuel production. The study was performed to monitor the Cd-induced alterations in jatropha plants by X-ray chlorophyll fluorescence. The Cd effects on photosynthetic pigments, the mineral composition of plants, defense enzyme activity and soluble proteins were also studied. Plants were grown for 20days in a nutrient solution with five Cd contents: 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40μmolL(-1); a control with no Cd addition was also monitored. The analysis of the chlorophyll fluorescence spectra allowed detecting alterations caused by Cd toxicity in the jatropha plants. The mineral composition of the plants was affected by the Cd doses; however, the Fe and Mg contents were not significantly reduced, which most likely improved the effects on the contents of the photosynthetic pigments. Because of its relative tolerance to Cd, Jatropha curcas may be a promising species to revegetate Cd-contaminated sites. Considering the long period needed to phytoremediate soils, the combination of remediation with bioenergy production could be an attractive option.

  15. Imaging and two-dimensional spectra of the IR-bright galaxy NGC 2146 - A recent low-energy merger?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Lo, E.; Neff, S. G.; Stanford, S. A.; Unger, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    New data are presented on the IR-luminous galaxy NGC 2146 from several sources: direct imaging in B, R, and H-alpha; IR imaging in the J, H, and K bands; long-slit spectroscopy at optical and IR wavelengths; and scanning etalon observations in H-alpha. The results allow measurement of the interstellar extinction in the dust lane, and estimation of the true luminosity of the galaxy and nuclear regions. The spectra indicate that there is no active nucleus, and measure the changing ratio of forbidden to permitted lines across the galaxy. IR images and colors indicate the existence of a significant population of hot young stars in the central regions of the system. The H-alpha velocity maps show the full radial-velocity pattern, and suggest that the system consists of a disturbed disk and a merging or interacting arm which connects to the inner dust and radio structures. Outer H-alpha and H I structures appear to be the earlier remnants of this spiraling merger.

  16. ON ESTIMATING THE HIGH-ENERGY CUTOFF IN THE X-RAY SPECTRA OF BLACK HOLES VIA REFLECTION SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    García, Javier A.; Steiner, James F.; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Keck, Mason L.; Dauser, Thomas; Wilms, Jörn E-mail: jem@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: keckm@bu.edu

    2015-08-01

    The fundamental parameters describing the coronal spectrum of an accreting black hole are the slope Γ of the power-law continuum and the energy E{sub cut} at which it rolls over. Remarkably, this latter parameter can be accurately measured for values as high as 1 MeV by modeling the spectrum of X-rays reflected from a black hole accretion disk at energies below 100 keV. This is possible because the details in the reflection spectrum, rich in fluorescent lines and other atomic features, are very sensitive to the spectral shape of the hardest coronal radiation illuminating the disk. We show that by fitting simultaneous NuSTAR (3–79 keV) and low-energy (e.g., Suzaku) data with the most recent version of our reflection model relxill one can obtain reasonable constraints on E{sub cut} at energies from tens of keV up to 1 MeV, for a source as faint as 1 mCrab in a 100 ks observation.

  17. Testing model energy spectra of charged particles produced in hadron interactions on the basis of atmospheric muons

    SciTech Connect

    Dedenko, L. G.; Roganova, T. M.; Fedorova, G. F.

    2015-10-15

    An original method for calculating the spectrum of atmospheric muons with the aid of the CORSIKA 7.4 code package and numerical integration is proposed. The first step consists in calculating the energy distribution of muons for various fixed energies of primary-cosmic-ray particles and within several chosen hadron-interaction models included in the CORSIKA 7.4 code package. After that, the spectrum of atmospheric muons is calculated via integrating the resulting distribution densities with the chosen spectrum of primary-cosmic-ray particles. The atmospheric-muon fluxes that were calculated on the basis of the SIBYLL 2.1, QGSJET01, and QGSJET II-04 models exceed the predictions of the wellknown Gaisser approximation of this spectrum by a factor of 1.5 to 1.8 in the range of muon energies between about 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4} GeV.Under the assumption that, in the region of extremely highmuon energies, a dominant contribution to the muon flux comes from one to two generations of charged π{sup ±} and K{sup ±} mesons, the production rate calculated for these mesons is overestimated by a factor of 1.3 to 1.5. This conclusion is confirmed by the results of the LHCf and TOTEM experiments.

  18. A reverse Monte Carlo method for deriving optical constants of solids from reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, B.; Sun, Y.; Mao, S. F.; Zhang, Z. M.; Jin, H.; Yoshikawa, H.; Tanuma, S.; Ding, Z. J.

    2013-06-01

    A reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method is developed to obtain the energy loss function (ELF) and optical constants from a measured reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectrum by an iterative Monte Carlo (MC) simulation procedure. The method combines the simulated annealing method, i.e., a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of oscillator parameters, surface and bulk excitation weighting factors, and band gap energy, with a conventional MC simulation of electron interaction with solids, which acts as a single step of MCMC sampling in this RMC method. To examine the reliability of this method, we have verified that the output data of the dielectric function are essentially independent of the initial values of the trial parameters, which is a basic property of a MCMC method. The optical constants derived for SiO2 in the energy loss range of 8-90 eV are in good agreement with other available data, and relevant bulk ELFs are checked by oscillator strength-sum and perfect-screening-sum rules. Our results show that the dielectric function can be obtained by the RMC method even with a wide range of initial trial parameters. The RMC method is thus a general and effective method for determining the optical properties of solids from REELS measurements.

  19. A reverse Monte Carlo method for deriving optical constants of solids from reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Da, B.; Sun, Y.; Ding, Z. J.; Mao, S. F.; Zhang, Z. M.; Jin, H.; Yoshikawa, H.; Tanuma, S.

    2013-06-07

    A reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method is developed to obtain the energy loss function (ELF) and optical constants from a measured reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectrum by an iterative Monte Carlo (MC) simulation procedure. The method combines the simulated annealing method, i.e., a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of oscillator parameters, surface and bulk excitation weighting factors, and band gap energy, with a conventional MC simulation of electron interaction with solids, which acts as a single step of MCMC sampling in this RMC method. To examine the reliability of this method, we have verified that the output data of the dielectric function are essentially independent of the initial values of the trial parameters, which is a basic property of a MCMC method. The optical constants derived for SiO{sub 2} in the energy loss range of 8-90 eV are in good agreement with other available data, and relevant bulk ELFs are checked by oscillator strength-sum and perfect-screening-sum rules. Our results show that the dielectric function can be obtained by the RMC method even with a wide range of initial trial parameters. The RMC method is thus a general and effective method for determining the optical properties of solids from REELS measurements.

  20. Quantitative analysis of electron energy loss spectra and modelling of optical properties of multilayer systems for extreme ultraviolet radiation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Gusenleitner, S.; Hauschild, D.; Reinert, F.; Handick, E.

    2014-03-28

    Ruthenium capped multilayer coatings for use in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation regime have manifold applications in science and industry. Although the Ru cap shall protect the reflecting multilayers, the surface of the heterostructures suffers from contamination issues and surface degradation. In order to get a better understanding of the effects of these impurities on the optical parameters, reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) measurements of contaminated and H cleaned Ru multilayer coatings were taken at various primary electron beam energies. Experiments conducted at low primary beam energies between 100 eV and 1000 eV are very surface sensitive due to the short inelastic mean free path of the electrons in this energy range. Therefore, influences of the surface condition on the above mentioned characteristics can be appraised. In this paper, it can be shown that carbon and oxide impurities on the mirror surface decrease the transmission of the Ru cap by about 0.75% and the overall reflectance of the device is impaired as the main share of the non-transmitted EUV light is absorbed in the contamination layer.

  1. Synchrotron activation radiotherapy: Effects of dose-rate and energy spectra to tantalum oxide nanoparticles selective tumour cell radiosentization enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, E.; Lerch, M.; Tehei, M.; Konstantinov, K.; Guatelli, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Corde, S.

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is unique in its ability to deliver dose at high dose rates using kiloelectronvolt photons. We are investigating the use of Tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) nano-structured particles (NSPs) that are to date unexplored in synchrotron radiation fields as they have high atomic number (Z=73) are biocompatible and are therefore potential radio sensitizers. We exposed cell culture flasks containing 9L gliosarcoma tumour cells or Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) non-tumour cells to the NSPs and treated the cells using a broad synchrotron beam (140 keV median energy; average dose rate of 50 Gy/s) at the Australian Synchrotron. We compare the results with those from similar cells treated using a conventional 150 kVp orthovoltage field (dose rate of 0.0127 Gy/s). The results reveal that the high dose-rate synchrotron irradiation is more effective at killing the 9L cells relative to the MDCK cells than the orthovoltage irradiation. On the other hand, the NSPs are more effective at radiosensitizing the 9L cells compared to the MDCK cells in the orthovoltage radiation field, which is due to the NSP energy dependence in the kilovoltage energy range. Both the dose rate and energy spectrum need to be considered in future studies with synchrotron activation radiotherapy (SART).

  2. New Measurements of Doubly Ionized Iron Group Spectra by High Resolution Fourier Transform and Grating Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smillie, D. G.; Pickering, J. C.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R. J.; Smith, Peter L.; Nave, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report new measurements of doubly ionized iron group element spectra, important in the analysis of B-type (hot) stars whose spectra they dominate. These measurements include Co III and Cr III taken with the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer and measurements of Co III taken with the normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at NIST, below 135 nm. We report new Fe III grating spectra measurements to complement our FT spectra. Work towards transition wavelengths, energy levels and branching ratios (which, combined with lifetimes, produce oscillator strengths) for these ions is underway.

  3. Reply to "Comment on `Gamma-ray spectra from low-energy positron annihilation processes in molecules' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoguang; Wang, Meishan; Zhu, Yinghao; Yang, Chuanlu

    2017-03-01

    In reply to the Comment of Green et al. [Phys. Rev. A 95, 036701 (2017)., 10.1103/PhysRevA.95.036701] on our paper [Phys. Rev. A 94, 052709 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.94.052709], we reconfirm that all the conclusions are based on the observation and the comparisons of the theoretical and experimental data. One criticism of Green et al. [Phys. Rev. A 95, 036701 (2017)., 10.1103/PhysRevA.95.036701] concerns the positrophilic electrons and the inner valence electrons. The inner valence electrons or positrophilic electrons show most agreeable widths with the corresponding experimental measurements due to their narrowest momentum distributions for all 59 molecules. However, we agree with the criticism of Green et al. [Phys. Rev. A 95, 036701 (2017)., 10.1103/PhysRevA.95.036701] and reconfirm that this agreement does not represent the dominance of the inner valence in the annihilation process. In this Reply, we will clarify the difference between agreement and dominance and illustrate with some figures. Another criticism is about the approximation used in our paper. We emphasize that the averaged discrepancy of 34.2% for these molecules of the theoretical γ -ray spectra from the experimental measurements is due to the neglect of the positron-electron correlations, vibrational couplings, virtual-state formation, even tunneling of core electrons not the neglect of the positron wave function. In this Reply, we will show, even in this zero-order approximation, these positron-induced effects in the electron-positron annihilation process of molecules can also be analyzed with more corrections and explanations.

  4. Strain energy density gradients in bone marrow predict osteoblast and osteoclast activity: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Webster, Duncan; Schulte, Friederike A; Lambers, Floor M; Kuhn, Gisela; Müller, Ralph

    2015-03-18

    Huiskes et al. hypothesized that mechanical strains sensed by osteocytes residing in trabecular bone dictate the magnitude of load-induced bone formation. More recently, the mechanical environment in bone marrow has also been implicated in bone׳s response to mechanical stimulation. In this study, we hypothesize that trabecular load-induced bone formation can be predicted by mechanical signals derived from an integrative µFE model, incorporating a description of both the bone and marrow phase. Using the mouse tail loading model in combination with in vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) we tracked load induced changes in the sixth caudal vertebrae of C57BL/6 mice to quantify the amount of newly mineralized and eroded bone volumes. To identify the mechanical signals responsible for adaptation, local morphometric changes were compared to micro-finite element (µFE) models of vertebrae prior to loading. The mechanical parameters calculated were strain energy density (SED) on trabeculae at bone forming and resorbing surfaces, SED in the marrow at the boundary between bone forming and resorbing surfaces, along with SED in the trabecular bone and marrow volumes. The gradients of each parameter were also calculated. Simple regression analysis showed mean SED gradients in the trabecular bone matrix to significantly correlate with newly mineralized and eroded bone volumes R(2)=0.57 and 0.41, respectively, p<0.001). Nevertheless, SED gradients in the marrow were shown to be the best predictor of osteoblastic and osteoclastic activity (R(2)=0.83 and 0.60, respectively, p<0.001). These data suggest that the mechanical environment of the bone marrow plays a significant role in determining osteoblast and osteoclast activity.

  5. Average bond energies between boron and elements of the fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh groups of the periodic table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altshuller, Aubrey P

    1955-01-01

    The average bond energies D(gm)(B-Z) for boron-containing molecules have been calculated by the Pauling geometric-mean equation. These calculated bond energies are compared with the average bond energies D(exp)(B-Z) obtained from experimental data. The higher values of D(exp)(B-Z) in comparison with D(gm)(B-Z) when Z is an element in the fifth, sixth, or seventh periodic group may be attributed to resonance stabilization or double-bond character.

  6. [Results of measuring the charge and energy spectra of heavy nuclei on board the artificial Earth satellite Kosmos-936].

    PubMed

    Dashin, S A; Marennyĭ, A M; Gertsen, G P

    1982-01-01

    The measurements were performed using a package of dielectric track detectors mounted behind the shield of 60-80 kg.m-2 thick. The charge of nuclei was determined from the complete track length. As a result, 1915 tracks of nuclei with Z greater than or equal to 6 in the energy range 100-450 MeV/nuclon were detected and identified. The differential charge spectrum of nuclei with 6 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 28 and the energy spectrum of nuclei of the iron group were built. For iron nuclei the following ration of isotope groups was obtained: (Fe52 + Fe53 + Fe54): (Fe55 + Fe56 + Fe57) : (Fe58 + Fe59 + Fe60) = (0.30 +/- 0.08) = (0.49 +/- 0.10) : (0.21 +/- 0.05).

  7. Energy spectra and electromagnetic transition rates of {sup 160,162,164}Gd in the projected Hartree-Fock model

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorui, S. K.; Raina, P. K.; Praharaj, C. R.; Patra, S. K.; Naik, Z.

    2014-08-14

    Band structure and electromagnetic properties of bands of {sup 160,162,164}Gd are studied theoretically upto high spin values using self-consisstent mean field theory. Predictions for the band structures are made. A K = 6{sup −} isomer at fairly low energy is predicted. Four quasi-particle bands involving i{sub 13/2} neutron and h{sub 11/2} protons are also studied.

  8. First-principles characterization of the energy landscape and optical spectra of green fluorescent protein along the A→I→B proton transfer route.

    PubMed

    Grigorenko, Bella L; Nemukhin, Alexander V; Polyakov, Igor V; Morozov, Dmitry I; Krylov, Anna I

    2013-08-07

    Structures and optical spectra of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) forms along the proton transfer route A→I→B are characterized by first-principles calculations. We show that in the ground electronic state the structure representing the wild-type (wt) GFP with the neutral chromophore (A-form) is lowest in energy, whereas the systems with the anionic chromophore (B- and I-forms) are about 1 kcal/mol higher. In the S65T mutant, the structures with the anionic chromophore are significantly lower in energy than the systems with the neutral chromophore. The role of the nearby amino acid residues in the chromophore-containing pocket is re-examined. Calculations reveal that the structural differences between the I- and B-forms (the former has a slightly red-shifted absorption relative to the latter) are based not on the Thr203 orientation, but on the Glu222 position. In the case of wt-GFP, the hydrogen bond between the chromophore and the His148 residue stabilizes the structures with the deprotonated phenolic ring in the I- and B-forms. In the S65T mutant, concerted contributions from the His148 and Thr203 residues are responsible for a considerable energy gap between the lowest energy structure of the B type with the anionic chromophore from other structures.

  9. Gas Phase Raman Spectra of Butadiene and BUTADIENE-d_{6} and the Internal Rotation Potential Energy Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boopalachandran, Praveenkumar; Laane, Jaan; Craig, Norman C.

    2009-06-01

    The Raman spectrum of butadiene has been previously reported by Carreira and by Engeln and co-workers. Both studies reported a series of bands corresponding to double quantum jumps of ν_{13}, the internal rotation vibration, of the trans rotamer. Both studies also reported weaker bands assigned to the higher energy conformer. Carriera assigned these to the cis form while Engeln assigned them to the gauche form. Recent high level calculations by Feller and Craig also assign the higher energy form as gauche. In the present study we report the gas phase Raman spectrum of butadiene and its d_{6} isotopomer at both 25^°C and 260^°C. Several new spectral features in the 330 to 210 cm^{-1} region were observed and the effect of heating on the band intensities was studied. In addition, combination bands were observed in the 630 to 690 cm^{-1} (ν_{12} + ν_{13}) and 1130 to 1180 cm^{-1} (ν_{10} + ν_{13}) regions. A periodic potential energy function with V_{1}, V_{2}, V_{3}, V_{4}, and V_{6} terms was utilized to fit the data. This function was compared to the results from previous work and to the theoretical calculation. L. Carreira, J. Phys. Chem. 62, 3851 (1975). R. Engeln, D. Consalvo, and J. Reuss, J. Chem. Phys. 160, 427 (1992). D. Feller and N. C. Craig, J. Phys. Chem. 113, 1601 (2009).

  10. Electron energy-loss spectra calculations and experiments as a tool for the identification of a lamellar C{sub 3}N{sub 4} compound

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, P.; Boucher, F.; Mauchamp, V.; Ouvrard, G.; Goglio, G.; Foy, D.

    2006-05-15

    In order to identify a poorly crystallized lamellar C{sub 3}N{sub 4} compound using electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we first concentrate on model compounds, namely, graphite at the carbon K edge and hexagonal boron nitride at both K edges. We show that extremely good agreement can be obtained between experimental spectra and ab initio calculations using the WIEN2k program [P. Blaha, K. Schwarz, P. Sorantin, and S. B. Trickey, Comput. Phys. Commun. 59, 399 (1990)]. Because the calculations are based on the density functional theory considering independent quasiparticles, they are generally believed to be inadequate to rigorously describe the excitation process. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that the spectra, when divided into two regions, above and below the ionization energy, can be simulated over a 50 eV energy range. In these materials, the first region must be simulated taking into account the electronic relaxation around a full core hole. For the second part starting usually 10-12 eV above the threshold, only a very small or no core hole at all should be introduced for the relaxation. Furthermore, we show that an empirical formula is sufficient but necessary to take into account the lifetime of the electron in the excited state. After discussion of these results on model compounds, we clearly identify the limits and benefits of these comparisons and apply them to an unknown structure. The experimental spectra were recorded at low temperature in order to avoid beam damages. They are compared with those calculated for various structures having compositions close to C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. From these core-loss studies, as well as from the corresponding low-loss ones, the structure of our sample is shown to be locally very close to that of the (C{sub 3}N{sub 3}){sub 2}(NH){sub 3} lamellar compound described by Kawaguchi and Noziak [Chem. Mater.7, 257 (1995)]. This structure can also be viewed as a defective hexagonal C{sub 3}N{sub 4} lamellar structure (with ABA

  11. Electron energy-loss spectra calculations and experiments as a tool for the identification of a lamellar C3N4 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, P.; Boucher, F.; Goglio, G.; Foy, D.; Mauchamp, V.; Ouvrard, G.

    2006-05-01

    In order to identify a poorly crystallized lamellar C3N4 compound using electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we first concentrate on model compounds, namely, graphite at the carbon K edge and hexagonal boron nitride at both K edges. We show that extremely good agreement can be obtained between experimental spectra and ab initio calculations using the WIEN2k program [P. Blaha, K. Schwarz, P. Sorantin, and S. B. Trickey, Comput. Phys. Commun. 59, 399 (1990)]. Because the calculations are based on the density functional theory considering independent quasiparticles, they are generally believed to be inadequate to rigorously describe the excitation process. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that the spectra, when divided into two regions, above and below the ionization energy, can be simulated over a 50eV energy range. In these materials, the first region must be simulated taking into account the electronic relaxation around a full core hole. For the second part starting usually 10-12eV above the threshold, only a very small or no core hole at all should be introduced for the relaxation. Furthermore, we show that an empirical formula is sufficient but necessary to take into account the lifetime of the electron in the excited state. After discussion of these results on model compounds, we clearly identify the limits and benefits of these comparisons and apply them to an unknown structure. The experimental spectra were recorded at low temperature in order to avoid beam damages. They are compared with those calculated for various structures having compositions close to C3N4 . From these core-loss studies, as well as from the corresponding low-loss ones, the structure of our sample is shown to be locally very close to that of the (C3N3)2(NH)3 lamellar compound described by Kawaguchi and Noziak [Chem. Mater.7, 257 (1995)]. This structure can also be viewed as a defective hexagonal C3N4 lamellar structure (with ABA stacking), rendering this compound most suitable for a further high

  12. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  13. Radioactive sample effects on EDXRF spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Christopher G

    2008-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a rapid, straightforward method to determine sample elemental composition. A spectrum can be collected in a few minutes or less, and elemental content can be determined easily if there is adequate energy resolution. Radioactive alpha emitters, however, emit X-rays during the alpha decay process that complicate spectral interpretation. This is particularly noticeable when using a portable instrument where the detector is located in close proximity to the instrument analysis window held against the sample. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from specimens containing plutonium-239 (a moderate alpha emitter) and americium-241 (a heavy alpha emitter). These specimens were then analyzed with a wavelength dispersive XRF (WDXRF) instrument to demonstrate the differences to which sample radiation-induced X-ray emission affects the detectors on these two types of XRF instruments.

  14. Influence of CP violation on energy spectra in K ± → π±π±π∓ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, E. P.

    1993-11-01

    Using the chiral σ-model with broken U(3) L ⊗ U(3) R symmetry we have calculated in the p4-approximation a difference between the slope parameters g+ and g- describing the energy distributions of "odd" pions in K + → π+π+π- and K -→ π-π-π+ decays. The result is ( g+- g-)/( g++ g-)=-(1.9±0.8)×10 -s2s3 sin δ, where s2, s3 and δ are the parameters of the Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix.

  15. 10 CFR 420.17 - Optional elements of State Energy Program plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., practice manuals, and testing for each area of energy efficiency technology) to building designers and... feasibility studies for projects that utilize renewable energy and energy efficiency resource technologies in... facilitate and encourage the voluntary use of renewable energy technologies for eligible participants...

  16. Strain-energy-release rate analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen using the finite-element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Raju, I. S.; Obrien, T. K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite-element analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen was performed using 8-node isoparametric, parabolic elements to evaluate compliance and mode II strain energy release rates, G sub II. The G sub II values were computed using two different techniques: the virtural crack-closure technique (VCCT) and the rate of change of compliance with crack length (compliance derivative method). The analysis was performed for various crack-length-to-semi-span (a/L) ratios ranging from 0.2 to 0.9. Three material systems representing a wide range of material properties were analyzed. The compliance and strain energy release rates of the specimen calculated with the present finite-element analysis agree very well with beam theory equations including transverse shear. The G sub II values calculated using the compliance derivative method compared extremely well with those calculated using the VCCT. The G sub II values obtained by the compliance derivative method using the top or bottom beam deflections agreed closely with each other. The strain energy release rates from a plane-stress analysis were higher than the plane-strain values by only a small percentage, indicating that either assumption may be used in the analysis. The G sub II values for one material system calculated from the finite-element analysis agreed with one solution in the literature and disagreed with the other solution in the literature.

  17. Strain energy release rate analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen using the finite-element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Raju, I. S.; O'Brien, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite-element analysis of the end-notched flexure specimen was performed using 8-node isoparametric, parabolic elements to evaluate compliance and mode II strain energy release rates, G sub II. The G sub II values were computed using two different techniques: the virtual crack-closure technique (VCCT) and the rate of change of compliance with crack length (compliance derivative method). The analysis was performed for various crack-length-to-semi-span (a/L) ratios ranging from 0.2 to 0.9. Three material systems representing a wide range of material properties were analyzed. The compliance and strain energy release rates of the specimen calculated with the present finite-element analysis agree very well with beam theory equations including transverse shear. The G sub II values calculated using the compliance derivative method compared extremely well with those calculated using the VCCT. The G sub II values obtained by the compliance derivative method using the top or bottom beam deflections agreed closely with each other. The strain energy release rates from a plane-stress analysis were higher than the plane-strain values by only a small percentage, indicating that either assumption may be used in the analysis. The G sub II values for one material system calculated from the finte-element analysis agreed with one solution in the literature and disagreed with the other solution in the literature.

  18. Effects of alloying element and temperature on the stacking fault energies of dilute Ni-base superalloys.

    PubMed

    Shang, S L; Zacherl, C L; Fang, H Z; Wang, Y; Du, Y; Liu, Z K

    2012-12-19

    A systematic study of stacking fault energy (γ(SF)) resulting from induced alias shear deformation has been performed by means of first-principles calculations for dilute Ni-base superalloys (Ni(23)X and Ni(71)X) for various alloying elements (X) as a function of temperature. Twenty-six alloying elements are considered, i.e., Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Ir, Mn, Mo, Nb, Os, Pd, Pt, Re, Rh, Ru, Sc, Si, Ta, Tc, Ti, V, W, Y, Zn, and Zr. The temperature dependence of γ(SF) is computed using the proposed quasistatic approach based on a predicted γ(SF)-volume-temperature relationship. Besides γ(SF), equilibrium volume and the normalized stacking fault energy (Γ(SF) = γ(SF)/Gb, with G the shear modulus and b the Burgers vector) are also studied as a function of temperature for the 26 alloying elements. The following conclusions are obtained: all alloying elements X studied herein decrease the γ(SF) of fcc Ni, approximately the further the alloying element X is from Ni on the periodic table, the larger the decrease of γ(SF) for the dilute Ni-X alloy, and roughly the γ(SF) of Ni-X decreases with increasing equilibrium volume. In addition, the values of γ(SF) for all Ni-X systems decrease with increasing temperature (except for Ni-Cr at higher Cr content), and the largest decrease is observed for pure Ni. Similar to the case of the shear modulus, the variation of γ(SF) for Ni-X systems due to various alloying elements is traceable from the distribution of (magnetization) charge density: the spherical distribution of charge density around a Ni atom, especially a smaller sphere, results in a lower value of γ(SF) due to the facility of redistribution of charges. Computed stacking fault energies and the related properties are in favorable accord with available experimental and theoretical data.

  19. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host–guest complex (TTFcCBPQT4+). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host–guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. Finally, however, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  20. Reduction in database search space by utilization of amino acid composition information from electron transfer dissociation and higher-energy collisional dissociation mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Thomas A; Kryuchkov, Fedor; Kjeldsen, Frank

    2012-08-07

    With high-mass accuracy and consecutively obtained electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), reliable (≥97%) and sensitive fragment ions have been extracted for identification of specific amino acid residues in peptide sequences. The analytical benefit of these specific amino acid composition (AAC) ions is to restrict the database search space and provide identification of peptides with higher confidence and reduced false negative rates. The 6706 uniquely identified peptide sequences determined with a conservative Mascot score of >30 were used to characterize the AAC ions. The loss of amino acid side chains (small neutral losses, SNLs) from the charge reduced peptide radical cations was studied using ETD. Complementary AAC information from HCD spectra was provided by immonium ions. From the ETD/HCD mass spectra, 5162 and 6720 reliable SNLs and immonium ions were successfully extracted, respectively. Automated application of the AAC information during database searching resulted in an average 3.5-fold higher confidence level of peptide identification. In addition, 4% and 28% more peptides were identified above the significance level in a standard and extended search space, respectively.