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Sample records for elements heavy-cluster emitters

  1. Optical elements for optimal brightness of single emitter devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homburg, O.; Jarczynski, M.; Mitra, T.

    2011-03-01

    Semiconductor lasers play an important role in many applications. Depending on the wavelength of the emitted laser light in the blue (e.g. 405-445 nm), red (~ 650 nm), near infrared (780 - 1070 nm) and e.g. the eye-safe wavelength region around 1500 nm a manifold of applications exist. Due to their increasing power and brightness single emitter devices are becoming increasingly widely used for the assembly and packaging of high power diode lasers. In the near infrared typical emitter widths are 50, 90 (100) and 200 μm with power levels available > 15 W. Also larger stripes are available - up to 1000 μm - with power levels > 25W. For highest power laser devices not only the power of the emitter is important - but of equal importance is the subsequent optics to collect all the emitted power while maintaining the brightness of the source. High NA acylindrical micro-lenses very well account for the strong asymmetric emitter characteristics of the fast and slow axis and thus, result in best collimation and coupling efficiencies in contrast to spherical lenses. LIMO's cost-effective micro-optics wafer technology is most suited for such acylindrical optics. It allows the manufacture of different materials to cover wavelengths ranges from the UV to the NIR, e.g. 380 - 2000 nm. Since both sides of a wafer can be structured with crossed cylindrical lenses one single monolithic optical element simultaneously shapes the fast and slow axis of the emitted light. Additionally, mechanical reference planes can be integrated in such monolithic optics for precise and simple integration. Application examples for collimation and fiber coupling optics in the near infrared as well as focussing/pump optics in the blue wavelength range are shown.

  2. Emittance estimation by an ion optical element with variable focusing strength and a viewing target

    SciTech Connect

    Maeder, J.; Rossbach, J.; Maimone, F.; Spaedtke, P.; Tinschert, K.; Lang, R.; Sun, L.; Cao, Y.; Zhao, H.

    2010-02-15

    The emittance of an extracted ion beam can be estimated to first order by a series of three linear independent profile measurements. This estimation is restricted to the evaluation of an upper limit of the emittance value for a homogeneous, nonfilamented beam. The beam is assumed to be round, respectively elliptical, without any structure of the intensity distribution, no space charge has been assumed for the drifting beam, and the optics is assumed to be linear. Instead of using three different drift sections, a linear focusing element with three different focusing strengths can be used. Plotting the beam radius as function of focusing strength, three independent solutions can be used to calculate the Twiss parameters {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} and furthermore the emittance {epsilon}. Here we describe the measurements which have been performed with the SECRAL ion source at Institute of Modern Physics Lanzhou.

  3. Simulation of the enhancement factor from an individual 3D hemisphere-on-post field emitter by using finite elements method.

    PubMed

    Roveri, D S; Sant'Anna, G M; Bertan, H H; Mologni, J F; Alves, M A R; Braga, E S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D computational framework for evaluating electrostatic properties of a single field emitter characterized by the hemisphere-on-post geometry. Numerical simulations employed the finite elements method by using Ansys-Maxwell software. Extensive parametric simulations were focused on the threshold distance from which the emitter field enhancement factor (γ) becomes independent from the anode-substrate gap (G). This investigation allowed demonstrating that the ratio between G and the emitter height (h) is a reliable reference for a broad range of emitter dimensions; furthermore, results permitted establishing G/h ≥ 2.2 as the threshold condition for setting the anode without affecting γ.

  4. Nonlinear stopping of heavy clusters in matter: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2007-05-01

    When impacting on a solid, heavy cluster atoms are stopped less then equi-velocity atoms. Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we study this so-called clearing-the-way effect systematically for the exemplary case of Au n clusters ( n = 1-402) bombarding a solid Ar target with energies in the range of Eat = 10-1000 eV/atom. We find that cluster stopping is reduced by a factor n- β with respect to that of equi-velocity atoms. The exponent β decreases from 0.46 at Eat = 10 eV/atom to 0.17 at Eat = 1000 eV/atom.

  5. High temperature fuel/emitter system for advanced thermionic fuel elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Helen H.; Bremser, Albert H.; Gontar, Alexander; Fiviesky, Evgeny

    1997-01-01

    Specialists in space applications are currently focusing on bimodal power systems designed to provide both electric power and thermal propulsion (Kennedy, 1994 and Houts, 1995). Our work showed that thermionics is a viable technology for nuclear bimodal power systems. We demonstrated that materials for a thermionic fuel-emitter combination capable of performing at operating temperatures of 2473 K are not only possible but available. The objective of this work, funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Space and Defense Power Systems, was to evaluate the compatibility of fuel material consisting of an uranium carbide/tantalum carbide solid solution with an emitter material consisting of a monocrystalline tungsten-niobium alloy. The uranium loading of the fuel material was 70 mole% uranium carbide. The program was successfully accomplished by a B&W/SIA LUTCH team. Its workscope was integrated with tasks being performed at both Babcock & Wilcox, Lynchburg Research Center, Lynchburg, Virginia, and SIA LUTCH, Podolsk, Russia. Samples were fabricated by LUTCH and seven thermal tests were performed in a hydrogen atmosphere. The first preliminary test was performed at 2273 K by LUTCH, and the remaining six tests were performed At B&W. Three tests were performed at 2273 K, two at 2373 K, and the final test at 2473 K. The results showed that the fuel and emitter materials were compatible in the presence of hydrogen. No evidence of liquid formation, dissolution of the uranium carbide from the uranium carbide/tantalum carbide solid solution, or diffusion of the uranium into the monocrystalline tungsten alloy was observed. Among the highlights of the program was the successful export of the fuel samples from Russia and their import into the US by commercial transport. This paper will discuss the technical aspects of this work.

  6. Odd-even staggering of heavy cluster spontaneous emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poenaru, D. N.; Greiner, W.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Plonski, I. H.

    1986-12-01

    Experimentally observed enhanced14C and24Ne emission rates from even-even parents in comparison with that from even-odd or odd-even nuclei are explained in the framework of the analytical superasymmetric fission model, by taking various prescriptions for the zero point vibration energy of even-even, even-odd, odd-even and odd-odd emitters. Longer half-lives than previously computed are obtained by extrapolating the present prescriptions to emitted clusters heavier than24Ne.

  7. Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a small particle selective emitter for converting thermal energy into narrow band radiation with high efficiency. The small particle selective emitter is used in combination with a photovoltaic array to provide a thermal to electrical energy conversion device. An energy conversion apparatus of this type is called a thermo-photovoltaic device. In the first embodiment, small diameter particles of a rare earth oxide are suspended in an inert gas enclosed between concentric cylinders. The rare earth oxides are used because they have the desired property of large emittance in a narrow wavelength band and small emittance outside the band. However, it should be emphasized that it is the smallness of the particles that enhances the radiation property. The small particle selective emitter is surrounded by a photovoltaic array. In an alternate embodiment, the small particle gas mixture is circulated through a thermal energy source. This thermal energy source can be a nuclear reactor, solar receiver, or combustor of a fossil fuel.

  8. Selective emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a small particle selective emitter for converting thermal energy into narrow band radiation with high efficiency. The small particle selective emitter is used in combination with a photovoltaic array to provide a thermal to electrical energy conversion device. An energy conversion apparatus of this type is called a thermo-photovoltaic device. In the first embodiment, small diameter particles of a rare earth oxide are suspended in an inert gas enclosed between concentric cylinders. The rare earth oxides are used because they have the desired property of large emittance in a narrow wavelength band and small emittance outside the band. However, it should be emphasized that it is the smallness of the particles that enhances the radiation property. The small particle selective emitter is surrounded by a photovoltaic array. In an alternate embodiment, the small particle gas mixture is circulated through a thermal energy source. This thermal energy source can be a nuclear reactor, solar receiver, or combustor of a fossil fuel.

  9. Brownian Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekov, Roumen

    2016-06-01

    A Brownian harmonic oscillator, which dissipates energy either by friction or via emission of electromagnetic radiation, is considered. This Brownian emitter is driven by the surrounding thermo-quantum fluctuations, which are theoretically described by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is shown how the Abraham-Lorentz force leads to dependence of the half-width on the peak frequency of the oscillator amplitude spectral density. It is found that for the case of a charged particle moving in vacuum at zero temperature, its root-mean-square velocity fluctuation is a universal constant, equal to roughly 1/18 of the speed of light. The relevant Fokker-Planck and Smoluchowski equations are also derived.

  10. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1995-01-01

    Providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure.

  11. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  12. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  13. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housng, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  14. Emittance Theory for Thin Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of high temperature garnet materials such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) doped with rare earths are currently being investigated as selective emitters. This paper presents a radiative transfer analysis of the thin film emitter. From this analysis the emitter efficiency and power density are calculated. Results based on measured extinction coefficients for erbium-YAG and holmium-YAG are presented. These results indicated that emitter efficiencies of 50 percent and power densities of several watts/sq cm are attainable at moderate temperatures (less than 1750 K).

  15. Emittance Theory for Cylindrical Fiber Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1998-01-01

    A fibrous rare earth selective emitter is approximated as an infinitely long cylinder. The spectral emittance, epsilon(lambda), is obtained by solving the radiative transfer equations with appropriate boundary conditions and uniform temperature. For optical depths, Kappa(R) = alpha(lambda)R, where alpha(lambda) is the extinction coefficient and R is the cylinder radius, greater than 1 the spectral emittance is nearly at its maximum value. There is an optimum cylinder radius, R(opt), for maximum emitter efficiency, eta(E). Values for R(opt) are strongly dependent on the number of emission bands of the material. The optimum radius decreases slowly with increasing emitter temperature, while the maximum efficiency and useful radiated power increase rapidly with increasing temperature.

  16. Floating emitter solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  17. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  18. Photonically engineered incandescent emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2003-08-26

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  19. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  20. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  1. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  2. The DIORAMA Neutron Emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, James Russell

    2016-05-05

    Emission of neutrons in a given event is modeled by the DioramaEmitterNeutron object, a subclass of the abstract DioramaEmitterModule object. The GenerateEmission method of this object is the entry point for generation of a neutron population for a given event. Shown in table 1, this method requires a number of parameters to be defined in the event definition.

  3. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  4. Nanoelectrospray Emitter Arrays Providing Inter-Emitter Electric Field Uniformity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Arrays of electrospray ionization (ESI) emitters have been reported previously as a means of enhancing ionization efficiency or signal intensity. A key challenge when working with multiple, closely spaced ESI emitters is overcoming the deleterious effects caused by electrical interference among neighboring emitters. Individual emitters can experience different electric fields depending on their relative position in the array, such that it becomes difficult to operate all of the emitters optimally for a given applied potential. In this work, we have developed multi-nanoESI emitters arranged with a circular pattern, which enable the constituent emitters to experience a uniform electric field. The performance of the circular emitter array was compared to a single emitter and to a previously developed linear emitter array, which verified that improved electric field uniformity was achieved with the circular arrangement. The circular arrays were also interfaced with a mass spectrometer via a matching multi-capillary inlet, and the results were compared with those obtained using a single emitter. By minimizing inter-emitter electric field inhomogeneities, much larger arrays having closer emitter spacing should be feasible. PMID:18553942

  5. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  6. Cancer from internal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    Irradiation from internal emitters, or internally deposited radionuclides, is an important component of radiation exposures encountered in the workplace, home, or general environment. Long-term studies of human populations exposed to various internal emitters by different routes of exposure are producing critical information for the protection of workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to examine recent developments and discuss their potential importance for understanding lifetime cancer risks from internal emitters. The major populations of persons being studied for lifetime health effects from internally deposited radionuclides are well known: Lung cancer in underground miners who inhaled Rn progeny, liver cancer from persons injected with the Th-containing radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast, bone cancer from occupational or medical intakes of {sup 226}Ra or medical injections of {sup 224}Ra, and thyroid cancer from exposures to iodine radionuclides in the environment or for medical purposes.

  7. RFI emitter location techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The possibility is discussed of using Doppler techniques for determining the location of ground based emitters causing radio frequency interference with low orbiting satellites. An error analysis indicates that it is possible to find the emitter location within an error range of 2 n.mi. The parameters which determine the required satellite receiver characteristic are discussed briefly along with the non-real time signal processing which may by used in obtaining the Doppler curve. Finally, the required characteristics of the satellite antenna are analyzed.

  8. Effect of Temperature Gradient on Thick Film Selective Emitter Emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Clark, Eric B.; Chen, Zheng

    1997-01-01

    A temperature gradient across a thick (greater than or equal to .1 mm) film selective emitter will produce a significant reduction in the spectral emittance from the no temperature gradient case. Thick film selective emitters of rare earth doped host materials such as yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) are examples where temperature gradient effects are important. In this paper a model is developed for the spectral emittance assuming a linear temperature gradient across the film. Results of the model indicate that temperature gradients will result in reductions the order of 20% or more in the spectral emittance.

  9. Close proximity electrostatic effect from small clusters of emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall’Agnol, Fernando F.; de Assis, Thiago A.

    2017-10-01

    Using a numerical simulation based on the finite-element technique, this work investigates the field emission properties from clusters of a few emitters at close proximity, by analyzing the properties of the maximum local field enhancement factor (γm ) and the corresponding emission current. At short distances between the emitters, we show the existence of a nonintuitive behavior, which consists of the increasing of γm as the distance c between the emitters decreases. Here we investigate this phenomenon for clusters with 2, 3, 4 and 7 identical emitters and study the influence of the proximity effect in the emission current, considering the role of the aspect ratio of the individual emitters. Importantly, our results show that peripheral emitters with high aspect-ratios in large clusters can, in principle, significantly increase the emitted current as a consequence only of the close proximity electrostatic effect (CPEE). This phenomenon can be seen as a physical mechanism to produce self-oscillations of individual emitters. We discuss new insights for understanding the nature of self-oscillations in emitters based on the CPEE, including applications to nanometric oscillators.

  10. Reappraisal of solid selective emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    New rare earth oxide emitters show greater efficiency than previous emitters. As a result, based on a simple model the efficiency of these emitters was calculated. Results indicate that the emission band of the selective emitter must be at relatively low energy (less than or equal to .52 eV) to obtain maximum efficiency at moderate emitter temperatures (less than or equal to 1500 K). Thus low bandgap energy PV materials are required to obtain an efficient thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system. Of the 4 specific rare earths (Nd, Ho, Er, Yb) studied Ho has the largest efficiency at moderate temperatures (72 percent at 1500 K). A comparison was made between a selective emitter TPV system and a TPV system that uses a thermal emitter plus a band pass filter to make the thermal emitter behave like a selective emitter. Results of the comparison indicate that only for very optimistic filter and thermal emitter properties will the filter TPV system have a greater efficiency than the selective emitter system.

  11. Rare Earth Garnet Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.75, sup 4)|(sub 15/2) - (sup 4)|(sub 13/2),for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.65, (sup 5)|(sub 7) - (sup 5)|(sub 8) for Ho-YAG) at 1500 K. In addition, low out-of-band spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda) less than 0.2, suggest these materials would be excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500 K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. Selective emitters in the near IR are of special interest for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. The most promising solid selective emitters for use in a TPV system are rare earth oxides. Early spectral emittance work on rare earth oxides showed strong emission bands in the infrared (0.9 - 3 microns). However, the emittance outside the emission band was also significant and the efficiency of these emitters was low. Recent improvements in efficiency have been made with emitters fabricated from fine (5 - 10 microns) rare earth oxide fibers similar to the Welsbach mantle used in gas lanterns. However, the rare earth garnet emitters are more rugged than the mantle type emitters. A thin film selective emitter on a low emissivity substrate such as gold, platinum etc., is rugged and easily adapted to a wide variety of thermal sources. The garnet structure and its many subgroups have been successfully used as hosts for rare earth ions, introduced as substitutional

  12. Rare earth garnet selective emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.74, ((4)l(sub 15/2)) - ( (4)l(sub13/2)), for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.65, ((5)l(sub 7))-((5)l(sub 8)) for Ho-YAG) at excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in the thermophotovoltaics (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. This paper presents normal spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda), measurements of holmium (Ho), and erbium (Er) doped YAG thin film selective emitters at 1500 K, and compares those results with the theoretical spectral emittance.

  13. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  14. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  15. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  16. Tuneable superradiant thermal emitter assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallawaarachchi, Sudaraka; Premaratne, Malin; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Maini, Philip K.

    2017-04-01

    Superradiance is a signature effect in quantum photonics that explains the collective enhancement of emission power by a factor of N2 when N emitters are placed in subwavelength proximity. Although the effect is inherently transient, successful attempts have been made to sustain it in the steady-state regime. Until recently, the effects of superradiance were not considered to be applicable to thermal emitters due to their intrinsic incoherent nature. Novel nanophotonic thermal emitters display favorable coherent characteristics that enable them to obey principles of superradiance. However, published analytical work on conventional superradiant thermal emitter assemblies shows an anomalous power scaling of 1 /N , and therefore increasing the number of thermal emitters leads to a degeneration of power at resonance. This phenomenon immediately renders the effect of thermal superradiance futile since it cannot outperform noncoupled emitters in the steady-state regime. We propose an alternative assembly of thermal emitters with specific features that improves the power scaling while maintaining the effects of superradiance. In essence, we show that our emitter assembly achieves superior power delivery over conventional noncoupled emitter systems at resonance. Additionally, this assembly has the ability to be tuned to operate at specific resonant frequencies, which is a vital requirement for applications such as photothermal cancer therapy.

  17. A MEMS-based infrared emitter array for combat identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San, Haisheng; Chen, Xuyuan; Xu, Peng; Li, Fangqiang; Cheng, Meiying

    2008-04-01

    The silicon-based MEMS (MEMS: microelectromechanical systems) Infrared (IR) emitter arrays of 1x2, 2x2 and 3x3 elements are presented. The MEMS infrared emitters were fabricated on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The resistively heated poly-silicon membrane fabricated by using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process on backside of SOI wafer make a low thermal mass structure, thus this IR-emitter can be modulated at high frequency. A heavily boron doping technology enable the supporting silicon layer to absorb the infrared radiation. As a result, the self-heating effect will reduce the power loss. By using the SOI wafer, the fabrication processes are simplified, and the production costs are decreased. In experiment, the surface temperature distribution of IR emitter arrays were measured by thermal imaging system, and the optical spectrum and modulation characteristics were measured by spectroradiometer. The measured results show that the IR emitter arrays exhibit a strong emission in middle infrared range, and the modulation frequency at 0.5 modulation depth is about 30Hz. The emitter arrays are expected to improve performance by using suspended membrane and sealed package structure. It is expected that the IR emitter arrays can be used for increasing the visible intensity and distance in the application of infrared Combat Identification.

  18. EMITTANCE COMPENSATION FOR MAGNETIZED BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    Emittance compensation is a well established technique for minimizing the emittance of an electron beam from a RF photo-cathode gun. Longitudinal slices of a bunch have a small emittance, but due to the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and time dependent RF fields they are not focused in the same way, so that the direction of their phase ellipses diverges in phase space and the projected emittance is much larger. Emittance compensation reverses the divergence. At the location where the slopes of the phase ellipses coincide the beam is accelerated, so that the space charge forces are reduced. A recipe for emittance compensation is given in. For magnetized beams (where the angular momentum is non-zero) such emittance compensation is not sufficient because variations in the slice radius lead to variations in the angular speed and therefore to an increase of emittance in the rotating game. We describe a method and tools for a compensation that includes the beam magnetization.

  19. Thin-Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.

    1993-01-01

    Direct conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy using a photovoltaic cell is called thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. One way to make this an efficient process is to have the thermal energy source be an efficient selective emitter of radiation. The emission must be near the band-gap energy of the photovoltaic cell. One possible method to achieve an efficient selective emitter is the use of a thin film of rare-earth oxides. The determination of the efficiency of such an emitter requires analysis of the spectral emittance of the thin film including scattering and reflectance at the vacuum-film and film-substrate interfaces. Emitter efficiencies (power emitted in emission band/total emitted power) in the range 0.35-0.7 are predicted. There is an optimum optical depth to obtain maximum efficiency. High emitter efficiencies are attained only for low (less than 0.05) substrate emittance values, both with and without scattering. The low substrate emittance required for high efficiency limits the choice of substrate materials to highly reflective metals or high-transmission materials such as sapphire.

  20. Emittance compensation in split photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floettmann, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The compensation of correlated emittance contributions is of primary importance to optimize the performance of high brightness photoinjectors. While only extended numerical simulations can capture the complex beam dynamics of space-charge-dominated beams in sufficient detail to optimize a specific injector layout, simplified models are required to gain a deeper understanding of the involved dynamics, to guide the optimization procedure, and to interpret experimental results. In this paper, a slice envelope model for the emittance compensation process in a split photoinjector is presented. The emittance term is included in the analytical solution of the beam envelope in a drift, which is essential to take the emittance contribution due to a beam size mismatch into account. The appearance of two emittance minima in the drift is explained, and the matching into the booster cavity is discussed. A comparison with simulation results points out effects which are not treated in the envelope model, such as overfocusing and field nonlinearities.

  1. Highly directional thermal emitter

    DOEpatents

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  2. Towards graphane field emitters.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuyi; Cole, Matthew T; Li, Chi; Zhou, Yanhuai; Collins, Clare M; Kang, Moon H; Parmee, Richard J; Lei, Wei; Zhang, Xiaobing; Dai, Qing; Milne, William I; Wang, Baoping

    2015-12-10

    We report on the improved field emission performance of graphene foam (GF) following transient exposure to hydrogen plasma. The enhanced field emission mechanism associated with hydrogenation has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, plasma spectrophotometry, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The observed enhanced electron emissionhas been attributed to an increase in the areal density of lattice defects and the formation of a partially hydrogenated, graphane-like material. The treated GF emitter demonstrated a much reduced macroscopic turn-on field (2.5 V μm(-1)), with an increased maximum current density from 0.21 mA cm(-2) (pristine) to 8.27 mA cm(-2) (treated). The treated GFs vertically orientated protrusions, after plasma etching, effectively increased the local electric field resulting in a 2.2-fold reduction in the turn-on electric field. The observed enhancement is further attributed to hydrogenation and the subsequent formation of a partially hydrogenated structured 2D material, which advantageously shifts the emitter work function. Alongside augmentation of the nominal crystallite size of the graphitic superstructure, surface bound species are believed to play a key role in the enhanced emission. The hydrogen plasma treatment was also noted to increase the emission spatial uniformity, with an approximate four times reduction in the per unit area variation in emission current density. Our findings suggest that plasma treatments, and particularly hydrogen and hydrogen-containing precursors, may provide an efficient, simple, and low cost means of realizing enhanced nanocarbon-based field emission devices via the engineered degradation of the nascent lattice, and adjustment of the surface work function.

  3. Towards graphane field emitters

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shuyi; Li, Chi; Zhou, Yanhuai; Collins, Clare M.; Kang, Moon H.; Parmee, Richard J.; Zhang, Xiaobing; Milne, William I.; Wang, Baoping

    2015-01-01

    We report on the improved field emission performance of graphene foam (GF) following transient exposure to hydrogen plasma. The enhanced field emission mechanism associated with hydrogenation has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, plasma spectrophotometry, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The observed enhanced electron emissionhas been attributed to an increase in the areal density of lattice defects and the formation of a partially hydrogenated, graphane-like material. The treated GF emitter demonstrated a much reduced macroscopic turn-on field (2.5 V μm–1), with an increased maximum current density from 0.21 mA cm–2 (pristine) to 8.27 mA cm–2 (treated). The treated GFs vertically orientated protrusions, after plasma etching, effectively increased the local electric field resulting in a 2.2-fold reduction in the turn-on electric field. The observed enhancement is further attributed to hydrogenation and the subsequent formation of a partially hydrogenated structured 2D material, which advantageously shifts the emitter work function. Alongside augmentation of the nominal crystallite size of the graphitic superstructure, surface bound species are believed to play a key role in the enhanced emission. The hydrogen plasma treatment was also noted to increase the emission spatial uniformity, with an approximate four times reduction in the per unit area variation in emission current density. Our findings suggest that plasma treatments, and particularly hydrogen and hydrogen-containing precursors, may provide an efficient, simple, and low cost means of realizing enhanced nanocarbon-based field emission devices via the engineered degradation of the nascent lattice, and adjustment of the surface work function. PMID:28066543

  4. Spring structure for a thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, D.T.

    1992-03-17

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs. 7 figs.

  5. Spring structure for a thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1992-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  6. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2013-10-29

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  7. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli [El Cerrito, CA; Fabbri, Jason D [San Francisco, CA; Melosh, Nicholas A [Menlo Park, CA; Hussain, Zahid [Orinda, CA; Shen, Zhi-Xun [Stanford, CA

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  8. Visible Spectrum Incandescent Selective Emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sonsight Inc.

    2004-04-30

    The purpose of the work performed was to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel bi-layer selective emitter. Selective emitters are incandescent radiant bodies with emissivities that are substantially larger in a selected part of the radiation spectrum, thereby significantly shifting their radiated spectral distribution from that of a blackbody radiating at the same temperature. The major research objectives involved answering the following questions: (1) What maximum VIS/NIR radiant power and emissivity ratios can be attained at 2650 K? (2) What is the observed emitter body life and how does its performance vary with time? (3) What are the design tradeoffs for a dual heating approach in which both an internally mounted heating coil and electrical resistance self-heating are used? (4) What are the quantitative improvements to be had from utilizing a bi-layer emitter body with a low emissivity inner layer and a partially transmissive outer layer? Two approaches to obtaining selective emissivity were investigated. The first was to utilize large optical scattering within an emitter material with a spectral optical absorption that is much greater within the visible spectrum than that within the NIR. With this approach, an optically thick emitter can radiate almost as if optically thin because essentially, scattering limits the distance below the surface from which significant amounts of internally generated radiation can emerge. The performance of thin emitters was also investigated (for optically thin emitters, spectral emissivity is proportional to spectral absorptivity). These emitters were fabricated from thin mono-layer emitter rods as well as from bi-layer rods with a thin emitter layer mounted on a substrate core. With an initially estimated energy efficiency of almost three times that of standard incandescent bulbs, a number of energy, economic and environmental benefits such as less energy use and cost, reduced CO{sub 2} emissions, and no mercury contamination

  9. Emittance measurements from the LLUMC proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Gillespie, G. H.; Hubbard, J.; Sanders, E.

    2005-12-01

    A new method of calculating beam emittances at the extraction point of a particle accelerator is presented. The technique uses the optimization programs NPSOL and MINOS developed at Stanford University in order to determine the initial values of beam size, divergence and correlation parameters (i.e. beam sigma matrix, σij) that best fit measured beam parameters. These σij elements are then used to compute the Twiss parameters α, β, and the phase space area, ε, of the beam at the extraction point. Beam size measurements in X and Y throughout the transport line were input to the optimizer along with the magnetic elements of bends, quads, and drifts. The σij parameters were optimized at the accelerator's extraction point by finding the best agreement between these measured beam sizes and those predicted by TRANSPORT. This expands upon a previous study in which a "trial and error" technique was used instead of the optimizer software, and which yielded similar results. The Particle Beam Optics Laboratory (PBO Lab™) program used for this paper integrates particle beam optics and other codes into a single intuitive graphically-based computing environment. This new software provides a seamless interface between the NPSOL and MINOS optimizer and TRANSPORT calculations. The results of these emittance searches are presented here for the eight clinical energies between 70 and 250 MeV currently being used at LLUMC.

  10. Physics and simulation of photonic crystal Purcell light emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzigmann, Bernd; Römer, Friedhard

    2008-02-01

    Photonic crystal membrane microcavities (PCMC) exhibit modes with highest quality factors and ultrasmall volume at the same time. This makes them the ideal solid state implementation for studying cavity quantum electrodynamics, as a quantum emitter such as a quantum dot can be placed at an electric field maximum with only moderate technological effort. Ultimately, this shall lead to novel classes of light emitters, such as highe efficiency LEDs or devices for quantum information processing. This paper discusses PCMC's operating in the weak coupling regime, shows an efficient and realistic simulation method based on the finite element method, and the design trade-offs for cavities used as light emitters. Finally, a comparison to measured spectra illustrates technological aspects.

  11. Measurement of longitudinal emittance growth using a laser-induced neutralization method

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, V.W.; Garcia, R.; Johnson, K.F.; Saadatmand, K.; Sander, O.R.; Sandoval, D.; Shinas, M.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-induced neutralization technique, LINDA, has been used to study the longitudinal emittance of the 5-MeV H{sup {minus}} beam exiting the drift-tube Linac (DTL) of the Los Alamos Accelerator Test Stand (ATS). By using multiple laser intersection points, longitudinal emittance growths over drift distances of 23.6 and 30.6 cm were measured. Subsequently, a beam transport line, which consisted of one arm of a beam funnel, was substituted for the drift space. Measurements show that the elements of the funnel constrain emittance growth while the H{sup {minus}} beam is contained within these transport elements.

  12. Combustion powered thermophotovoltaic emitter system

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The US Naval Academy (USNA) has recently completed an engineering design project for a high temperature thermophotovoltaic (TPV) photon emitter. The final apparatus was to be portable, completely self contained, and was to incorporate cycle efficiency optimization such as exhaust stream recuperation. Through computer modeling and prototype experimentation, a methane fueled emitter system was designed from structural ceramic materials to fulfill the high temperature requirements necessary for high system efficiency. This paper outlines the engineering design process, discusses obstacles and solutions encountered, and presents the final design.

  13. Emitter location errors in electronic recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuszewski, Jan; Dikta, Anna

    2017-04-01

    The paper describes some of the problems associated with emitter location calculations. This aspect is the most important part of the series of tasks in the electronic recognition systems. The basic tasks include: detection of emission of electromagnetic signals, tracking (determining the direction of emitter sources), signal analysis in order to classify different emitter types and the identification of the sources of emission of the same type. The paper presents a brief description of the main methods of emitter localization and the basic mathematical formulae for calculating their location. The errors' estimation has been made to determine the emitter location for three different methods and different scenarios of emitters and direction finding (DF) sensors deployment in the electromagnetic environment. The emitter has been established using a special computer program. On the basis of extensive numerical calculations, the evaluation of precise emitter location in the recognition systems for different configuration alignment of bearing devices and emitter was conducted. The calculations which have been made based on the simulated data for different methods of location are presented in the figures and respective tables. The obtained results demonstrate that calculation of the precise emitter location depends on: the number of DF sensors, the distances between emitter and DF sensors, their mutual location in the reconnaissance area and bearing errors. The precise emitter location varies depending on the number of obtained bearings. The higher the number of bearings, the better the accuracy of calculated emitter location in spite of relatively high bearing errors for each DF sensor.

  14. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.; Petillo, J. J.

    2015-05-18

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  15. Ultra Low Emittance Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson,J.

    2008-06-23

    This paper outlines the special issues for reaching sub-nm emittance in a storage ring. Effects of damping wigglers, intra-beam scattering and lifetime issues, dynamic aperture optimization, control of optics, and their interrelations are covered in some detail. The unique choices for the NSLS-II are given as one example.

  16. Comparison of Tungsten and Molybdenum Based Emitters for Advanced Thermionic Space Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsing H.; Dickinson, Jeffrey W.; Klein, Andrew C.; Lamp, Thomas R.

    1994-07-01

    Variations to the Advanced Thermionic Initiative thermionic fuel element are analyzed. Analysis included neutronic modeling with MCNP for criticality determination and thermal power distribution, and thermionic performance modeling with TFEHX. Changes to the original ATI configuration include the addition of W-HfC wire to the emitter for high temperature creep resistance improvement and substitution of molybdenum for the tungsten base material. Results from MCNP showed that all the tungsten used in the coating and base material must be 100% W-184 to obtain criticality. The presence of molybdenum in the emitter base affects the neutronic performance of the TFE by increasing the emitter neutron absorption cross section. Due to the reduced thermal conductivity for the molybdenum based emitter, a higher temperature is obtained resulting in a greater electrical power production. The thermal conductivity and resistivity of the composite emitter region were derived for the W-Mo composite and used in TFEHX.

  17. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  18. Automatic emittance measurement at the ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Malone, R.; Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-07-01

    An automatic emittance measurement system to characterize the transverse emittance of the electron beam produced by the BNL photocathode electron gun is described. The system utilize a VAX workstation and a Spiricon beam analyzer. A operator window (created through the Vista control software package) controls the emittance measurement system and the graphic presentation of the results. Quadrupole variation method is used for the ATF automatic emittance measurement system. A simple emittance formula was derived to study the performance of the quadrupole variation method, and compared with the ATF experimental data is also presented.

  19. Carbon nanotubes as field emitter.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rujia; Hu, Junqing; Song, Yuelin; Wang, Na; Chen, Huihui; Chen, Haihua; Wu, Jianghong; Sun, Yangang; Chen, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as a promising material of electron field emitters. They exhibit extraordinary field emission properties because of their high electrical conductivity, high aspect ratio "needle like" shape for optimum geometrical field enhancement, and remarkable thermal stability. In this Review, we emphasize the estimation and influencing factors of CNTs' emission properties, and discuss in detail the emission properties of macroscopic CNT cathodes, especially fabricated by transplant methods, and describe recent progress on understanding of CNT field emitters and analyze issues related to applications of CNT based cold cathodes in field emission display (FED). We foresee that CNT-FED will take an important place in display technologies in the near future.

  20. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  1. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Transverse Emittance Reduction with Tapered Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yi; Chao, Alex; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is proposed by J.M. Peterson in 1980s and recently by B. Carlsten. In this paper, we present the physical model of tapered energy-loss foil and analyze the emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance. The study shows that, to reduce transverse emittance, one should collimate at least 4% of particles which has either much low energy or large transverse divergence. The multiple coulomb scattering is not trivial, leading to a limited emittance reduction ratio. Small transverse emittances are of essential importance for the accelerator facilities generating free electron lasers, especially in hard X-ray region. The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is recently proposed by B. Carlsten [1], and can be traced back to J.M. Peterson's work in 1980s [2]. Peterson illustrated that a transverse energy gradient can be produced with a tapered energy-loss foil which in turn leads to transverse emittance reduction, and also analyzed the emittance growth from the associated multiple coulomb scattering. However, what Peterson proposed was rather a conceptual than a practical design. In this paper, we build a more complete physical model of the tapered foil based on Ref. [2], including the analysis of the transverse emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance and confirming the results by various numerical simulations. The eigen emittance equals to the projected emittance when there is no cross correlation in beam's second order moments matrix [3]. To calculate the eigen emittances, it requires only to know the beam distribution at the foil exit. Thus, the analysis of emittance reduction and the optics design of the subsequent beam line section can be separated. In addition, we can combine the effects of multiple coulomb scattering and transverse energy gradient together in the beam matrix and analyze their net effect. We find that,when applied to an

  3. EMITTANCE CONTROL FOR VERY SHORT BUNCHES

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K

    2004-07-20

    Many recent accelerator projects call for the production of high energy bunches of electrons or positrons that are simultaneously short, intense, and have small emittances. Examples of such projects are the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FEL's, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). A major challenge is keeping in check forces that increase beam emittances in accelerator components, such as: wakefields of accelerator structures and surface roughness, and coherent synchrotron radiation. We describe such forces and discuss emittance control.

  4. Emittance Growth in the NLCTA First Chicane

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    In this paper, the emittance growth in the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator) first chicane region is evaluated by simulation studies. It is demonstrated that the higher order fields of the chicane dipole magnet and the dipole corrector magnet (which is attached on the quadrupoles) are the main contributions for the emittance growth, especially for the case with a large initial emittance ({gamma}{epsilon}{sub 0} = 5 {micro}m for instance). These simulation results agree with the experimental observations.

  5. Coherent polarization locking of a diode emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, S. P.; Phua, P. B.

    2010-02-01

    Coherent beam combining has been actively explored as a technique to increase the brightness of laser sources. Passive phase-locking of a diode array in a common resonator, in particular, is an attractive approach owing to its inherent simplicity and good beam quality. In this work, we present the coherent combining of an array of diode emitters in a conventional diode bar configuration using the coherent polarization locking technique. An external laser cavity is designed so that the diode emissions from several 976 nm diode emitters are spatially overlapped via a series of birefringent walk-off crystals and passively phase-locked by a polarizing beam splitter. The key optical element in this beam combining scheme is the novel YVO4 birefringent spatial beam combiner that not only provides spatial overlap, but also identical optical path lengths for the diode beams. This facilitates design of the cavity for achieving a close match between the mode size of the Gaussian beam and the asymmetric emitting area at the front facet of the diode emitters. The phase-locking technique, coupled with the required standard bulk optical crystals and standard diode bar configuration, yields a robust laser architecture which retains the advantages of diode lasers in terms of cost, size and wavelength tunability. With the coherent combining of four diode emitters, we achieved a nearly diffraction limited beam at 1030 mW, which represents a 50 times increase in brightness over the standard incoherent diode bar. The coherent locking approach is highly scalable. Further experiments to coherently combine eight to sixteen diode emitters are in progress.

  6. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  7. An ESS system for ECRIS Emittance Research

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Sun, L.T.; He, W.; Ma, L.; Zhang, Z.M.; Zhao, H.Y.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhang, X.Z.; Guo, X.H.; Ma, B.H.; Li, J.; Wang, H.; Li, J.Y.; Li, X.X.; Feng, Y.C.; Lu, W.

    2005-03-15

    An emittance scanner named Electric-Sweep Scanner had been designed and fabricated in IMP. And it has been set up on the LECR3 beam line for the ion beam quality study. With some development, the ESS system has become a relatively dependable and reliable emittance scanner. Its experiment error is about 10 percent. We have done a lot of experiments of emittance measurement on LECR3 ion source, and have researched the relations between ion beam emittance and the major parameters of ECR ion source. The reliability and accuracy test results are presented in this paper. And the performance analysis is also discussed.

  8. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  9. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-17

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to their emitter/absorber interfaces, especially for high-efficiency cells with improved bulk properties. When interface defect states are located at efficient recombination energies, performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e. defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV /= 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a 'cliff' (.delta..EC < 0 eV) is likely to allow many holes in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. In addition, a thin and highly-doped emitter can invert the absorber, form a large hole barrier, and decrease device performance losses due to high interface defect density. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. Other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ..delta..EC. These materials are predicted to yield higher

  10. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-01

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔEC ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔEC, often referred to as a "spike," creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔEC ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a "cliff" (ΔEC < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔEC of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔEC. These materials are predicted to yield higher voltages and would therefore be

  11. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao Sites, James R.; Kanevce, Ana

    2016-06-21

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔE{sub C} ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔE{sub C}, often referred to as a “spike,” creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔE{sub C} ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a “cliff” (ΔE{sub C} < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔE{sub C} of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔE{sub C}. These

  12. Chemical regeneration of emitter surface increases thermionic diode life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breiteieser, R.

    1966-01-01

    Chemical regeneration of sublimated emitter electrode increases the operating efficiency and life of thermionic diodes. A gas which forms chemical compounds with the sublimated emitter material is introduced into the space between the emitter and the collector. The compounds migrate to the emitter where they decompose and redeposit the emitter material.

  13. Emittance studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Free-Electron Laser (FEL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsten, B. E.; Feldman, D. W.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Stein, W. E.; Warren, R. W.

    Recent emittance studies at the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) have indicated several areas of concern in the linac and beamline feeding the wiggler. Four emittance growth mechanisms of special importance have been studied. First, a rapid growth of the electron beam's emittance immediately after the spherical gridded Pierce gun resulted, in part, from the long time required for our pulsing electronics to ramp the grid voltage up at the start and down at the end of the pulse, which created a pulse with a cosine-like current distribution as a function of time. The growth was compounded by the extremely small radial beam size (almost a waist) leaving the gun. In addition, we saw evidence of electrostatic charging of the insulators in the gun, reducing the quality of the electron beam further. Second, the action of the solenoidal focusing fields in the low-voltage bunching region was studied, and criteria for a minimum emittance growth were established. Third, maximum misalignment angles and displacements for various elements of the beamline were calculated for the desired low emittance growth. Finally, emittance growth in the horizontal dimension through the nonisochronous bend caused by varying energy depression on the particles due to longitudinal wake fields was both calculated and observed. In addition, we measured energy depressions caused by the wake fields generated by various other elements in the beamline. Strategies were developed to relieve the magnitude of these wake-field effects.

  14. Emittance studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Feldman, D.W.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent emittance studies at the Los Alamos FEL have indicated several areas of concern in the linac and beamline feeding the wiggler. Four emittance growth mechanisms of special importance have been studied. First, a rapid growth of the electron beam's emittance immediately after the spherical gridded Pierce gun resulted, in part, from the long time required for our pulsing electronics to ramp the grid voltage up at the start and down at the end of the pulse, which created a pulse with a cosine-like current distribution as a function of time. The growth was compounded by the extremely small radial beam size (almost a waist) leaving the gun. In addition, we saw evidence of electrostatic charging of the insulators in the gun, reducing the quality of the electron beam further. Second, the action of the solenoidal focusing fields in the low-voltage bunching region was studied, and criteria for a minimum emittance growth were established. Third, maximum misalignment angles and displacements for various elements of the beamline were calculated for the desired low emittance growth. Finally, emittance growth in the horizontal dimension through the nonisochronous bend caused by varying energy depression on the particles due to longitudinal wake fields was both calculated and observed. In addition, we measured energy depressions caused by the wake fields generated by various other elements in the beamline. Strategies were developed to relieve the magnitude of these wake-field effects. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  15. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  16. Emittance growth in rippled solenoidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Emittance growth results due to accelerating gaps, and magnetic field gaps in induction accelerators. The analytic technique previously used to study electric field induced emittance growth for immersed source beams is extended to include solenoid fringing field effects in the present work. These results have application to industrial induction accelerators and to high brightness Free Electron Laser drivers. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  17. Negative Ion Beam Extraction and Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Andrew J. T.

    2007-08-10

    The use of magnetic fields to both aid the production of negative ions and suppress the co-extracted electrons causes the emittance and hence the divergence of the negative ion beam to increase significantly due to the plasma non-uniformity from jxB drift. This drift distorts the beam-plasma meniscus and experimental results of the beam emittance are presented, which show that non-uniformity causes the square of the emittance to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the extracted current density. This can cause the divergence of the negative ion beam to be significantly larger than its positive ion counterpart. By comparing results from positive and negative ion beam emittances from the same source, it is also possible to draw conclusions about their vulnerability to magnetic effects. Finally emittances of caesiated and un-caesiated negative ion beams are compared to show how the surface and volume modes of production interact.

  18. Directional emittance surface measurement system and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puram, Chith K. (Inventor); Daryabeigi, Kamran (Inventor); Wright, Robert (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process for measuring the variation of directional emittance of surfaces at various temperatures using a radiometric infrared imaging system. A surface test sample is coated onto a copper target plate provided with selective heating within the desired incremental temperature range to be tested and positioned onto a precision rotator to present selected inclination angles of the sample relative to the fixed positioned and optically aligned infrared imager. A thermal insulator holder maintains the target plate on the precision rotator. A screen display of the temperature obtained by the infrared imager, and inclination readings are provided with computer calculations of directional emittance being performed automatically according to equations provided to convert selected incremental target temperatures and inclination angles to relative target directional emittance values. The directional emittance of flat black lacquer and an epoxy resin measurements obtained are in agreement with the predictions of the electromagnetic theory and with directional emittance data inferred from directional reflectance measurements made on a spectrophotometer.

  19. New approach to obtain boron selective emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Moehlecke, A.; Luque, A.

    1994-12-31

    Selective emitters, used in high efficiency solar cells, need a series of oxidations and photolithographic steps that render the process more expensive. In this paper, a new way to make selective emitters using boron is presented. The main feature of this approach is to save oxide growths and photolithographic processes and it is based on the property of boron doped silicon surfaces to be resistant to anisotropic etchings like the one performed during the texturization. Using this characteristic of boron emitter surfaces, the authors can obtain a highly doped emitter under metal grid and simultaneously a shield to avoid texture on these surfaces. First cells were processed and short wavelength response of p{sup +}nn{sup +} solar cells was enhanced by using lightly doped boron emitters in the uncovered area.

  20. TPV Systems with Solar Powered Tungsten Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, A. S.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Khvostikova, O. A.; Gazaryan, P. Y.; Sorokina, S. V.; Andreev, V. M.

    2007-02-22

    A solar TPV generator development and characterization are presented. A double stage sunlight concentrator ensures 4600x concentration ratio. TPV modules based on tungsten emitters and GaSb cells were designed, fabricated and tested at indoor and outdoor conditions. The performance of tungsten emitter under concentrated solar radiation was analyzed. Emitter temperatures in the range of 1400-2000 K were measured, depending on the emitter size. The light distribution in the module has been characterized, 1x1 cm GaSb TPV cells were fabricated with the use of the Zn-diffusion and LPE technologies. The cell efficiency of 19% under illumination by a tungsten emitter (27% under spectra cut-off at {lambda} > 1820 nm) heated up to 1900-2000 K had been derived from experimentally measured PV parameters. The series connection of PV cells was ensured by the use of BeO ceramics. The possibilities of system performance improvement are discussed.

  1. Emittance measurements of the CLIO electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaput, R.; Devanz, G.; Joly, P.; Kergosien, B.; Lesrel, J.

    1997-02-01

    We have designed a setup to measure the transverse emittance at the CLIO accelerator exit, based on the "3 gradients" method. The beam transverse size is measured simply by scanning it with a steering coil across a fixed jaw and recording the transmitted current, at various quadrupole strengths. A code then performs a complete calculation of the emittance using the transfer matrix of the quadrupole instead of the usual classical lens approximation. We have studied the influence of various parameters on the emittance: Magnetic field on the e-gun and the peak current. We have also improved a little the emittance by replacing a mismatched pipe between the buncher and accelerating section to avoid wake-field effects; The resulting improvements of the emittance have led to an increase in the FEL emitted power.

  2. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  3. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  4. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  5. Microlensless interdigitated photoconductive terahertz emitters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Prabhu, S S

    2015-01-26

    We report here fabrication of interdigitated photoconductive antenna (iPCA) terahertz (THz) emitters based on plasmonic electrode design. Novel design of this iPCA enables it to work without microlens array focusing, which is otherwise required for photo excitation of selective photoconductive regions to avoid the destructive interference of emitted THz radiation from oppositely biased regions. Benefit of iPCA over single active region PCA is, photo excitation can be done at larger area hence avoiding the saturation effect at higher optical excitation density. The emitted THz radiation power from plasmonic-iPCAs is ~2 times more than the single active region plasmonic PCA at 200 mW optical excitation, which will further increase at higher optical powers. This design is expected to reduce fabrication cost of photoconductive THz sources and detectors.

  6. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  7. Variable Emittance Electrochromic Devices for Satellite Thermal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiryont, Hulya; Shannon, Kenneth C.

    2007-01-01

    An all-solid-state electrochromic device (ECD) was designed for electronic variable emissivity (VE) control. In this paper, a low weight (5g/m2) electrochromic thermal control device, the EclipseVEECD™, is detailed as a viable thermal control system for spacecraft outer surface temperatures. Discussion includes the technology's performance, satellite applications, and preparations for space based testing. This EclipseVEECD™ system comprises substrate/mirror electrode/active element/IR transparent electrode layers. This system tunes and modulates reflection/emittance from 5 μm to 15 μm region. Average reflectance/emittance modulation of the system from the 400 K to 250 K region is about 75%, while at room temperature (9.5 micron) reflectance/emittance is around 90%. Activation voltage of the EclipseVEECD™ is around ±1 Volt. The EclipseVEECD™ can be used as a smart thermal modulator for the thermal control of satellites and spacecraft by monitoring and adjusting the amount of energy emitted from the outer surfaces. The functionality of the EclipseVEECD™ was successfully demonstrated in vacuum using a multi-purpose heat dissipation/absorption test module, the EclipseHEAT™. The EclipseHEAT™ has been successfully flight checked and integrated onto the United States Naval Alchemy MidSTAR satellite, scheduled to launch December 2006.

  8. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light.

  9. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light.

  10. Portable infrared reflectometer for evaluating emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Skowronski, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Optical methods are frequently used to evaluate the emittance of candidate spacecraft thermal control materials. One new optical method utilizes a portable infrared reflectometer capable of obtaining spectral reflectance of an opaque surface in the range of 2 to 25 microns using a Michelson-Type FTIR interferometer. This miniature interferometer collects many infrared spectra over a short period of time. It also allows the size of the instrument to be small such that spectra can be collected in the laboratory or in the field. Infrared spectra are averaged and integrated with respect to the room temperature black body spectrum to yield emittance at 300 K. Integrating with respect to other black body spectra yields emittance values at other temperatures. Absorption bands in the spectra may also be used for chemical species identification. The emittance of several samples was evaluated using this portable infrared reflectometer, an old infrared reflectometer equipped with dual rotating black body cavities, and a bench top thermal vacuum chamber. Samples for evaluation were purposely selected such that a range of emittance values and thermal control material types would be represented, including polished aluminum, Kapton®, silvered Teflon®, and the inorganic paint Z-93-P. Results indicate an excellent linear relationship between the room temperature emittance calculated from infrared spectral data and the emittance obtained from the dual rotating black body cavities and thermal vacuum chamber. The prospect of using the infrared spectral data for chemical species identification will also be discussed. .

  11. The preservation of low emittance flat beams

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1993-04-01

    Many future linear collider designs require beams with very small transverse emittances and large emittance ratios {epsilon}{sub x} {much_gt} {epsilon}{sub y}. In this paper, we will discuss issues associated with the preservation of these small emittances during the acceleration of the beams. The primary sources of transverse emittance dilution in a high energy linear accelerator are the transverse wakefields, the dispersive errors, RF deflections, and betatron coupling. We will discuss the estimation of these effects and the calculation of tolerances that will limit the emittance dilution with a high degree of confidence. Since the six-dimensional emittance is conserved and only the projected emittances are increased, these dilutions can be corrected if the beam has not filamented (phase mixed). We discuss methods of correcting the dilutions and easing the tolerances with beam-based alignment and steering techniques, and non-local trajectory bumps. Finally, we discuss another important source of luminosity degradation, namely, pulse-to-pulse jitter.

  12. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:21728281

  13. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  14. Narrowband terahertz emitters using metamaterial films.

    PubMed

    Alves, Fabio; Kearney, Brian; Grbovic, Dragoslav; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2012-09-10

    In this article we report on metamaterial-based narrowband thermal terahertz (THz) emitters with a bandwidth of about 1 THz. Single band emitters designed to radiate in the 4 to 8 THz range were found to emit as high as 36 W/m(2) when operated at 400 °C. Emission into two well-separated THz bands was also demonstrated by using metamaterial structures featuring more complex unit cells. Imaging of heated emitters using a microbolometer camera fitted with THz optics clearly showed the expected higher emissivity from the metamaterial structure compared to low-emissivity of the surrounding aluminum.

  15. Emittance growth due to Tevatron flying wires

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M; Eddy, Nathan

    2004-06-01

    During Tevatron injection, Flying Wires have been used to measure the transverse beam size after each transfer from the Main Injector in order to deduce the transverse emittances of the proton and antiproton beams. This amounts to 36 + 9 = 45 flies of each of 3 wire systems, with an individual wire passing through each beam bunch twice during a single ''fly''. below they estimate the emittance growth induced by the interaction of the wires with the particles during these measurements. Changes of emittance from Flying Wire measurements conducted during three recent stores are compared with the estimations.

  16. Thermophotovoltaic emitter material selection and design

    SciTech Connect

    Saxton, P.C.; Moran, A.L.; Harper, M.J.; Lindler, K.W.

    1997-07-01

    Thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is a potentially attractive direct energy conversion technology. It reduces the need for complex machinery with moving parts and maintenance. TPV generators can be run from a variety of heat sources including waste heat for smaller scale operations. The US Naval Academy`s goal was to build a small experimental thermophotovoltaic generator powered by combustion gases from a General Electric T-58 helicopter gas turbine. The design of the generator imposes material limitations that directly affect emitter and structural materials selection. This paper details emitter material goals and requirements, and the methods used to select suitable candidate emitter materials for further testing.

  17. Online clustering algorithms for radar emitter classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Lee, Jim P Y; Senior; Li, Lingjie; Luo, Zhi-Quan; Wong, K Max

    2005-08-01

    Radar emitter classification is a special application of data clustering for classifying unknown radar emitters from received radar pulse samples. The main challenges of this task are the high dimensionality of radar pulse samples, small sample group size, and closely located radar pulse clusters. In this paper, two new online clustering algorithms are developed for radar emitter classification: One is model-based using the Minimum Description Length (MDL) criterion and the other is based on competitive learning. Computational complexity is analyzed for each algorithm and then compared. Simulation results show the superior performance of the model-based algorithm over competitive learning in terms of better classification accuracy, flexibility, and stability.

  18. Wiring up pre-characterized single-photon emitters by laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.; Sontheimer, B.; Nikolay, N.; Schell, A. W.; Fischer, J.; Naber, A.; Benson, O.; Wegener, M.

    2016-08-01

    Future quantum optical chips will likely be hybrid in nature and include many single-photon emitters, waveguides, filters, as well as single-photon detectors. Here, we introduce a scalable optical localization-selection-lithography procedure for wiring up a large number of single-photon emitters via polymeric photonic wire bonds in three dimensions. First, we localize and characterize nitrogen vacancies in nanodiamonds inside a solid photoresist exhibiting low background fluorescence. Next, without intermediate steps and using the same optical instrument, we perform aligned three-dimensional laser lithography. As a proof of concept, we design, fabricate, and characterize three-dimensional functional waveguide elements on an optical chip. Each element consists of one single-photon emitter centered in a crossed-arc waveguide configuration, allowing for integrated optical excitation and efficient background suppression at the same time.

  19. A MEMS-based thermal infrared emitter for an integrated NDIR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaza, C.; Salleras, M.; Sabaté, N.; Santander, J.; Cané, C.; Fonseca, L.

    2011-06-01

    Micromachined thermal infrared emitters using heavily boron doped silicon as active material have been developed. The proposed fabrication process allows the integration of infrared emitters with arrays of thermopile infrared detectors to achieve integrated non dispersive infrared (NDIR) microspectrometers. A set of emitters with a common radiating silicon slab size (1100x300x8μm3) has been successfully fabricated and characterized. The working temperature of Joule heated radiating elements has been controlled by means of DC or pulsed electric signals, up to temperatures exceeding 800°C. Measured thermal time constants, in the order of 50 ms, enable direct electrical modulation of emitted radiation up to a frequency of 5Hz with full modulation depth. The temperature distribution in the radiating element has been analyzed with infrared thermal imaging.

  20. Wiring up pre-characterized single-photon emitters by laser lithography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Sontheimer, B; Nikolay, N; Schell, A W; Fischer, J; Naber, A; Benson, O; Wegener, M

    2016-08-10

    Future quantum optical chips will likely be hybrid in nature and include many single-photon emitters, waveguides, filters, as well as single-photon detectors. Here, we introduce a scalable optical localization-selection-lithography procedure for wiring up a large number of single-photon emitters via polymeric photonic wire bonds in three dimensions. First, we localize and characterize nitrogen vacancies in nanodiamonds inside a solid photoresist exhibiting low background fluorescence. Next, without intermediate steps and using the same optical instrument, we perform aligned three-dimensional laser lithography. As a proof of concept, we design, fabricate, and characterize three-dimensional functional waveguide elements on an optical chip. Each element consists of one single-photon emitter centered in a crossed-arc waveguide configuration, allowing for integrated optical excitation and efficient background suppression at the same time.

  1. Wiring up pre-characterized single-photon emitters by laser lithography

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Q.; Sontheimer, B.; Nikolay, N.; Schell, A. W.; Fischer, J.; Naber, A.; Benson, O.; Wegener, M.

    2016-01-01

    Future quantum optical chips will likely be hybrid in nature and include many single-photon emitters, waveguides, filters, as well as single-photon detectors. Here, we introduce a scalable optical localization-selection-lithography procedure for wiring up a large number of single-photon emitters via polymeric photonic wire bonds in three dimensions. First, we localize and characterize nitrogen vacancies in nanodiamonds inside a solid photoresist exhibiting low background fluorescence. Next, without intermediate steps and using the same optical instrument, we perform aligned three-dimensional laser lithography. As a proof of concept, we design, fabricate, and characterize three-dimensional functional waveguide elements on an optical chip. Each element consists of one single-photon emitter centered in a crossed-arc waveguide configuration, allowing for integrated optical excitation and efficient background suppression at the same time. PMID:27507165

  2. Intrinsic emittance reduction in transmission mode photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeri; Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    High quantum efficiency (QE) and low emittance electron beams provided by multi-alkali photocathodes make them of great interest for next generation high brightness photoinjectors. Spicer's three-step model well describes the photoemission process; however, some photocathode characteristics such as their thickness have not yet been completely exploited to further improve the brightness of the generated electron beams. In this work, we report on the emittance and QE of a multi-alkali photocathode grown onto a glass substrate operated in transmission and reflection modes at different photon energies. We observed a 20% reduction in the intrinsic emittance from the reflection to the transmission mode operation. This observation can be explained by inelastic electron-phonon scattering during electrons' transit towards the cathode surface. Due to this effect, we predict that thicker photocathode layers will further reduce the intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated by photocathodes operated in transmission mode.

  3. Intrinsic emittance reduction in transmission mode photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeri Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-03-21

    High quantum efficiency (QE) and low emittance electron beams provided by multi-alkali photocathodes make them of great interest for next generation high brightness photoinjectors. Spicer's three-step model well describes the photoemission process; however, some photocathode characteristics such as their thickness have not yet been completely exploited to further improve the brightness of the generated electron beams. In this work, we report on the emittance and QE of a multi-alkali photocathode grown onto a glass substrate operated in transmission and reflection modes at different photon energies. We observed a 20% reduction in the intrinsic emittance from the reflection to the transmission mode operation. This observation can be explained by inelastic electron-phonon scattering during electrons' transit towards the cathode surface. Due to this effect, we predict that thicker photocathode layers will further reduce the intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated by photocathodes operated in transmission mode.

  4. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K. N.; Perkins, L. T.; Pickard, D. S.; Weber, M.; Williams, M. D.

    1996-03-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source is planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 μm patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of a rf-generated plasma.

  5. Arc-textured high emittance radiator surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    High emittance radiator surfaces are produced by arc-texturing. This process produces such a surface on a metal by scanning it with a low voltage electric arc from a carbon electrode in an inert environment.

  6. Emitters of N-photon bundles.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, C Sánchez; Del Valle, E; Tudela, A González; Müller, K; Lichtmannecker, S; Kaniber, M; Tejedor, C; Finley, J J; Laussy, F P

    2014-07-01

    Controlling the ouput of a light emitter is one of the basic tasks of photonics, with landmarks such as the laser and single-photon sources. The development of quantum applications makes it increasingly important to diversify the available quantum sources. Here, we propose a cavity QED scheme to realize emitters that release their energy in groups, or "bundles" of N photons, for integer N. Close to 100% of two-photon emission and 90% of three-photon emission is shown to be within reach of state of the art samples. The emission can be tuned with system parameters so that the device behaves as a laser or as a N-photon gun. The theoretical formalism to characterize such emitters is developed, with the bundle statistics arising as an extension of the fundamental correlation functions of quantum optics. These emitters will be useful for quantum information processing and for medical applications.

  7. Energy efficiency of electron plasma emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesski, V. G.

    2011-12-15

    Electron emission influence from gas-discharge plasma on plasma emitter energy parameters is considered. It is shown, that electron emission from plasma is accompanied by energy contribution redistribution in the gas-discharge from plasma emitter supplies sources-the gas-discharge power supply and the accelerating voltage power supply. Some modes of electron emission as a result can be realized: 'a probe measurements mode,' 'a transitive mode,' and 'a full switching mode.'.

  8. Enhanced Light Emitters Based on Metamaterials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-30

    Enhanced Light Emitters based on Metamaterials We report the development of light emitters based on hyperbolic metamaterials . During the 18 month...layer, use of a high refractive index contrast grating to out-couple light from active hyperbolic metamaterials . We also successfully demonstrated for...the first time simultaneous enhancement in spontaneous emission ad light extraction from active metamaterial structures. The views, opinions and/or

  9. Coaxial inverted geometry transistor having buried emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, R. J.; Cress, S. B.; Dunn, W. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The invention relates to an inverted geometry transistor wherein the emitter is buried within the substrate. The transistor can be fabricated as a part of a monolithic integrated circuit and is particularly suited for use in applications where it is desired to employ low actuating voltages. The transistor may employ the same doping levels in the collector and emitter, so these connections can be reversed.

  10. Charge neutrality in heavily doped emitters

    SciTech Connect

    del Alamo, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    The applicability of the quasineutrality approximation to modern emitters of solar cells is analytically reviewed. It is shown that this approximation is fulfilled in more than 80% of the depth of a typical solar-cell emitter, being particularly excellent in the heavily doped regions beneath the surface where most of the heavy doping effects arise. Our conclusions are in conflict with Redfield's recent affirmations.

  11. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  12. Plasmons in doped finite carbon nanotubes and their interactions with fast electrons and quantum emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vega, Sandra; Cox, Joel D.; de Abajo, F. Javier García

    2016-08-01

    We study the potential of highly doped finite carbon nanotubes to serve as plasmonic elements that mediate the interaction between quantum emitters. Similar to graphene, nanotubes support intense plasmons that can be modulated by varying their level of electrical doping. These excitations exhibit large interaction with light and electron beams, as revealed upon examination of the corresponding light extinction cross-section and electron energy-loss spectra. We show that quantum emitters experience record-high Purcell factors, while they undergo strong mutual interaction mediated by their coupling to the tube plasmons. Our results show the potential of doped finite nanotubes as tunable plasmonic materials for quantum optics applications.

  13. 3D-FEM electrical-thermal-mechanical analysis and experiment of Si-based MEMS infrared emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Na; Chen, Ran-Bin; San, Hai-Sheng; Chen, Xu-Yuan

    2016-11-01

    Designs, simulations, and fabrications of silicon-based MEMS infrared (IR) emitters for gas sensing application are presented. A 3D finite element method (3D-FEM) was used to analyze the coupled electrical-thermal-mechanical properties of a bridge hotplate structure (BHS) IR emitter and closed hotplate structure (CHS) IR emitter using Joule heating and thermal expansion models of COMSOL™. The IR absorptions of n- and p-silicon were calculated for the design of self-heating structure. The BHS and CHS IR emitters were fabricated synchronously using micro-electromechanical systems technology for a direct performance comparison. Both types of IR emitters were characterized by electrical and optical measurements. The experimental results show that BHS IR emitters have higher radiation density, lower power consumption, and faster frequency-response than CHS IR emitters due to the use of a thermal isolation structure and self-heating structure. Meanwhile, the simulated results agree well with the corresponding measured results, which indicate that the 3D-FEM-model is effective and can be used in the optimal design of electro-thermal devices.

  14. Field-emitter arrays for vacuum microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.; Rosengreen, A.; Brodie, Ivor

    1991-01-01

    An ongoing program on microfabricated field-emitter arrays has produced a gated field-emitter tip structure with submicrometer dimensions and techniques for fabricating emitter arrays with tip packaging densities of up to 1.5 x 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Arrays have been fabricated over areas varying from a few micrometers up to 13 cm in diameter. Very small overall emitter size, materials selection, and rigorous emitter-tip processing procedures have contributed to reducing the potential required for field emission to tens of volts. Emission current densities of up to 100 A/sq cm have been achieved with small arrays of tips, and 100-mA total emission is commonly produced with arrays 1 mm in diameter containing 10,000 tips. Transconductances of 5.0 micro-S per tip have been demonstrated, indicating that 50 S/sq cm should be achievable with tip densities of 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Details of the cathode arrays and a variety of performance characteristics are discussed.

  15. Variable emittance behavior of smart radiative coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Fan, Desong; Li, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Smart radiative coating on yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate was prepared by the sol-gel La{}1-xSr x MnO3 (x = 0.125, 0.175 and 0.2) nanoparticles and the binder composed of terpineol and ethyl cellulose. The crystallized structure, grain size, chemical compositions, magnetization and the surface morphology were characterized. The thermal radiative properties of coating in the infrared range was evaluated from infrared reflectance spectra at various temperatures. A single perovskite structure is detected in sol-gel nanoparticles with size 200 nm. Magnetization measurement reveals that room temperature phase transition samples can be obtained by appropriate Sr substitution. The influence of surface conditions and sintering temperature on the emittance of coating was observed. For rough coatings with root-mean-square roughness 640 nm (x = 0.125) and 800 nm (x = 0.175) , its emittance increment is 0.24 and 0.26 in in the temperature range of 173-373 K. Increasing sintering temperature to 1673 K, coating emittance variation improves to 0.3 and 0.302 respectively. After mechanical polishing treatment, the emittance increment of coatings are enhanced to 0.31 and 0.3, respectively. The results suggested that the emittance variation can be enhanced by reducing surface roughness and increasing sintering temperature of coating.

  16. Emittance control in Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshkov, S.; Tajima, T.; Chiu, C.; Breitling, F.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper we summarize our recent effort and results in theoretical study of the emittance issues of multistaged Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) in TeV energy range. In such an energy regime the luminosity and therefore the emittance requirements become very stringent and tantamount to the success or failure of such an accelerator. The system of such a machine is very sensitive to jitters due to misalignment between the beam and the wakefield. In particular, the effect of jitters in the presence of a strong focusing wakefield and initial longitudinal phase space spread of the beam leads to severe transverse emittance degradation of the beam. To improve the emittance we introduce several methods: a mitigated wakefield focusing by working with a plasma channel, an approximately synchronous acceleration in a superunit setup, the "horn" model based on exactly synchronous acceleration achieved through plasma density variation and lastly an algorithm based on minimization of the final beam emittance to actively control the stage displacement of such an accelerator.

  17. Integrated photonic crystal selective emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Yehia, Omar; Bermel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Converting blackbody thermal radiation to electricity via thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is inherently inefficient. Photon recycling using cold-side filters offers potentially improved performance but requires extremely close spacing between the thermal emitter and the receiver, namely a high view factor. Here, we propose an alternative approach for thermal energy conversion, the use of an integrated photonic crystal selective emitter (IPSE), which combines two-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitters and filters into a single device. Finite difference time domain and current transport simulations show that IPSEs can significantly suppress sub-bandgap photons. This increases heat-to-electricity conversion for photonic crystal based emitters from 35.2 up to 41.8% at 1573 K for a GaSb photovoltaic (PV) diode with matched bandgaps of 0.7 eV. The physical basis of this enhancement is a shift from a perturbative to a nonperturbative regime, which maximized photon recycling. Furthermore, combining IPSEs with nonconductive optical waveguides eliminates a key difficulty associated with TPV: the need for precise alignment between the hot selective emitter and cool PV diode. The physical effects of both the IPSE and waveguide can be quantified in terms of an extension of the concept of an effective view factor.

  18. Quantitative deconvolution of human thermal infrared emittance.

    PubMed

    Arthur, D T J; Khan, M M

    2013-01-01

    The bioheat transfer models conventionally employed in etiology of human thermal infrared (TIR) emittance rely upon two assumptions; universal graybody emissivity and significant transmission of heat from subsurface tissue layers. In this work, a series of clinical and laboratory experiments were designed and carried out to conclusively evaluate the validity of the two assumptions. Results obtained from the objective analyses of TIR images of human facial and tibial regions demonstrated significant variations in spectral thermophysical properties at different anatomic locations on human body. The limited validity of the two assumptions signifies need for quantitative deconvolution of human TIR emittance in clinical, psychophysiological and critical applications. A novel approach to joint inversion of the bioheat transfer model is also introduced, levering the deterministic temperature-dependency of proton resonance frequency in low-lipid human soft tissue for characterizing the relationship between subsurface 3D tissue temperature profiles and corresponding TIR emittance.

  19. Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N.

    2012-12-21

    Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

  20. Solid-state single-photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk; Toth, Milos

    2016-10-01

    Single-photon emitters play an important role in many leading quantum technologies. There is still no 'ideal' on-demand single-photon emitter, but a plethora of promising material systems have been developed, and several have transitioned from proof-of-concept to engineering efforts with steadily improving performance. Here, we review recent progress in the race towards true single-photon emitters required for a range of quantum information processing applications. We focus on solid-state systems including quantum dots, defects in solids, two-dimensional hosts and carbon nanotubes, as these are well positioned to benefit from recent breakthroughs in nanofabrication and materials growth techniques. We consider the main challenges and key advantages of each platform, with a focus on scalable on-chip integration and fabrication of identical sources on photonic circuits.

  1. Emittance studies at the Los Alamos national laboratory free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsten, B. E.; Feldman, D. W.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Sollid, J. E.; Stein, W. E.; Warren, R. W.

    1988-10-01

    Recent emittance studies at the Los Alamos FEL have indicated several areas of concern in the linac and beamline feeding the wiggler. These studies included both experimental measurements and computer simulations. The beamline starts with a 5 A micropulse from the thermionic cathode in the gun. After bunching by velocity modulation and acceleration to 20 MeV in a 1300 MHz standing wave accelerator, the beam current is roughly 250 A. Final bunching to 800 A is performed in the nonisochronous bend that rotates the electrons onto the axis of the wiggler and the optical cavity. Four emittance growth mechanisms of special importance have been studied. First, a rapid growth of the electron beam's emittance immediately after the spherical gridded Pierce gun resulted, in part, from the long time required for our pulsing electronics to ramp the grid voltage up at the start and down at the end of the pulse, which created a pulse with a cosine-like current distribution as a function of time. The growth was compounded by the extremely small radial beam size (almost a waist) leaving the gun. In addition, we saw evidence of electrostatic charging of the insulators in the gun, reducing the quality of the electron beam further. Second the action of the solenoidal focusing fields in the low-voltage bunching region was studied, and criteria for a minimum emittance growth were established. Third, maximum misalignment angles and displacements for various elements of the beamline were calculated for the desired low emittance growth. Finally, emittance growth in the horizontal dimensions through the nonisochronous bend caused by varying energy depression on the particles due to longitudinal wake fields was both calculated and observed. In addition, we measured energy depressions caused by the wake fields generated by various other elements in the beamline. Strategies were developed to relieve the magnitude of these wake-field effects.

  2. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2016-12-01

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence.

  3. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes

    PubMed Central

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R.J. Dwayne

    2016-01-01

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence. PMID:28008918

  4. Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-28

    MOT-OOO1AF I Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters Prepared by DI Jeffrey C. Buchholz E L ri: 8 James P. Stec OCT C "t989 Mary C...Schutte Micro -Optics Technologies, Inc. 8608 University Green #5 Middleton, WI 53562 28 September 1989 D,:?UqflON SA2". N’.’ _ Disuibunon Uanu-ted Contract...Title Report Date Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters 28 September 1989 Authors Jeffrey C. Buchholz, James P. Stec, Mary C. Schutte

  5. Field emitter technologies for nanovision science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, H.; Neo, Y.; Aoki, T.; Nagao, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kanemaru, S.

    2009-10-01

    We have been investigating an ultra fine field emission display (FED) and an ultra fine CdTe X-ray image sensor for creating nanovision science. For an ultra fine FED with a sub-micron pixel, we have developed a volcano-structured double-gated field emitter arrays with a capability of focusing electron beam without serous reduction in emission current. For an ultra fine X-ray image sensor, we have proposed and demonstrated a novel CdTe X-ray sensor consisting of a CdTe diode and field emitter array.

  6. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters to nanowires towards the construction of a new platform for strong light-matter interaction. The control over such a platform might open new doors for quantum information processing and quantum sensing at the nanoscale and for the study of fundamental physics in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

  7. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  8. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  9. Determination and error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kumar, R.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. From the theory of remote sensing of surface temperatures, an equation of the upper bound of absolute error of emittance was determined. It showed that the absolute error decreased with an increase in contact temperature, whereas, it increased with an increase in environmental integrated radiant flux density. Change in emittance had little effect on the absolute error. A plot of the difference between temperature and band radiance temperature vs. emittance was provided for the wavelength intervals: 4.5 to 5.5 microns, 8 to 13.5 microns, and 10.2 to 12.5 microns.

  10. A study of emittance growth in the recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnaswamy Gounder et al.

    2001-07-20

    We investigate processes contributing to emittance growth in the Fermilab Recycler Ring. In addition to beam-gas multiple scattering, we also examine other external factors such as Main Injector ramping affecting the emittance growth.

  11. Emittance Characteristics of High-Brightness H- Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P.; Keller, R.; Thomae, R. W.; Thomason, J.; Sherman, J.; Alessi, J.

    2002-11-01

    A survey of emittance characteristics from high-brightness, H- ion sources has been undertaken. Representative examples of each important type of H- source for accelerator application are investigated: A magnetron surface plasma source (BNL) a multi-cusp-surface-conversion source (LANL) a Penning source (RAL-ISIS) and a multi-cusp-volume source (LBNL). Presently, comparisons between published emittance values from different ion sources are difficult largely because of different definitions used in reported emittances and the use of different data reduction techniques in analyzing data. Although seldom discussed in the literature, rms-emittance values often depend strongly on the method employed to separate real beam from background. In this work, the problem of data reduction along with software developed for emittance analysis is discussed. Raw emittance data, obtained from the above laboratories, is analyzed using a single technique and normalized rms and 90% area-emittance values are determined along with characteristic emittance versus beam fraction curves.

  12. Sectoral thermal emitter for testing of modern IR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulski, R.; Piątkowski, T.; Polakowski, H.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents multi-sector stable IR grey body radiation source, that can be used for testing of MRT. Its main element is monolithic metal plate with a test pattern, made of material with high thermal conductivity. On the surface of the test plate the sectors of different emissivity are created during manufacturing process. As a result when viewed by a thermal camera those sectors exhibit thermal contrast depending mainly on the radiative properties of each sector. The value of thermal contrast between particular sectors can be adjusted by changing the temperature of a test plate with respect to ambient. The emissivity values of particular sectors have been calculated and the procedure of adjusting the thermal contrast has been described, as well as the technology used to create the test plate. The model of described emitter has been tested and the results of temperature values obtained from thermal camera were compared with theoretical, calculated figures. The proposed emitter is dedicated for testing and calibrating of modern observations IR systems.

  13. Emittance growth rates for displaced beams

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O.A. |

    1993-05-01

    Emittance growth rates have been previously analyzed for nonuniform beams in linear channels and for initially uniform mismatched beams in nonlinear channels. These studies were for centered beams. Additional emittance growth can arise in cases where the beam is initially displaced. The purpose of this study is to obtain growth rates for displaced beams. This work differs from studies involving random displacement of electrodes. Our analysis assumes instead that the focusing system is perfectly aligned but that the beam is initially displaced with respect to the equilibrium axis. If the focusing force is slightly nonlinear, we find a gradual transfer of the potential energy of beam displacement into kinetic energy associated with emittance growth. We present explicit results for the emittance growth distance as a function of the nonlinearity of the channel. These results will have practical importance for designers of accelerators and transport systems when setting realistic tolerances for initial beam alignment. These tolerances will depend on the nonlinearity and the length of the system.

  14. Aluminum oxide film thickness and emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1991-11-01

    Aluminum reactor components which are not actively cooled could be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Radiative heat transfer is the dominant heat transfer process in this scenario and therefore the emittance of these components is of interest. Of particular interest are the safety rod thimbles and Mark 60B blanket assemblies; for the K Reactor, these components have been exposed to low temperature (< 55{degrees}C) moderator for about a year. The average moderator temperature was assumed to be 30{degrees}C. The Al oxide film thickness at this temperature, after one year of exposure, is predicted to be 6.4 {mu}m {plus minus} 10%; insensitive to exposure time. Dehydration of the film during the gamma heating accident would result in a film thickness of 6.0 {mu}m {plus minus} 11%. Total hemispherical emittance is predicted to be 0.69 at 96{degrees}C, decreasing to 0.45 at 600{degrees}C. Some phenomena which would tend to yield thicker oxide films in the reactor environment relative to those obtained under experimental conditions were neglected and the predicted film thickness values are therefore conservative. The emittance values predicted for a given film thickness are also conservative. The conservativisms inherent in the predicted emittance are particularly relevant for uncertainty analysis of temperatures generated using these values.

  15. Aluminum oxide film thickness and emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1991-11-01

    Aluminum reactor components which are not actively cooled could be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Radiative heat transfer is the dominant heat transfer process in this scenario and therefore the emittance of these components is of interest. Of particular interest are the safety rod thimbles and Mark 60B blanket assemblies; for the K Reactor, these components have been exposed to low temperature (< 55{degrees}C) moderator for about a year. The average moderator temperature was assumed to be 30{degrees}C. The Al oxide film thickness at this temperature, after one year of exposure, is predicted to be 6.4 {mu}m {plus_minus} 10%; insensitive to exposure time. Dehydration of the film during the gamma heating accident would result in a film thickness of 6.0 {mu}m {plus_minus} 11%. Total hemispherical emittance is predicted to be 0.69 at 96{degrees}C, decreasing to 0.45 at 600{degrees}C. Some phenomena which would tend to yield thicker oxide films in the reactor environment relative to those obtained under experimental conditions were neglected and the predicted film thickness values are therefore conservative. The emittance values predicted for a given film thickness are also conservative. The conservativisms inherent in the predicted emittance are particularly relevant for uncertainty analysis of temperatures generated using these values.

  16. Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-10-10

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  17. Light modulated switches and radio frequency emitters

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon T.; Tallerico, Paul J.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  18. Simple-to-prepare multipoint field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sominskii, G. G.; Taradaev, E. P.; Tumareva, T. A.; Mishin, M. V.; Kornishin, S. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate multitip field emitters prepared by electroerosion treatment of the surface of molybdenum samples. Their characteristics are determined for operation with a protecting activated fullerene coating. Our experiments indicate that such cathodes are promising for high-voltage electron devices operating in technical vacuum.

  19. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  20. Optical transition radiation beam emittance diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1994-10-10

    We have developed several analytic and experimental techniques to measure the divergence and emittance of charged particle beams, which employ optical transition radiation (OTR) produced from thin intercepting foils. OTR`s directionality, promptness, linearity, polarization, and the sensitivity of its angular distribution to energy and divergence, can be all exploited to diagnose the spatial distribution, energy, and emittance of a charged particle beam. We describe the techniques we have developed to separately determine the {ital x} and {ital y} emittances of a beam at an {ital x} or {ital y} waist using OTR from a single foil or a two foil OTR interferometer. These methods have proven to be especially valuable for diagnosing low emittance electron beams produced by FEL accelerators, which range in energy from 17 to 110 Mev. However, we have shown that there is no inherent theoretical limit to the utility of these methods for much higher energy lepton or hadron beams. The advantages of OTR methods over those commonly used to diagnose beam properties are described.

  1. Emittance growth from space-charge forces

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1991-01-01

    Space-charge-induced emittance growth has become a topic of much recent interest for designing the low-velocity sections of high- intensity, high-brightness accelerators and beam-transport channels. In this paper we review the properties of the space-charge force, and discuss the concepts of matching, space-charge and emittance-dominated beams, and equilibrium beams and their characteristics. This is followed by a survey of some of the work over the past 25 years to identify the mechanisms of this emittance growth in both ion and electron accelerators. We summarize the overall results in terms of four distinct mechanisms whose characteristics we describe. Finally, we show numerical simulation results for the evolution of initial rms-mismatched laminar beams. The examples show that for space-charge dominated beams, the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a highly choatic filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. In the examples we have studied the halo contains only a few percent of the particles, but contributes about half of the emittance growth. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Self-powered radiation detector with conductive emitter support

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.F.; Goldstein, N.P.; Playfoot, K.C.

    1981-05-12

    A more reliable self-powered radiation detector structure and method of manufacture is provided by a detector structure in which a relatively ductile centrally disposed conductive emitter wire supports and is in electrical contact with a generally tubular emitter electrode. The detector is fabricated by swaging and the ductile center wire insures that electrical discontinuities of the emitter are minimized.

  3. What is so super about super-emitters? Characterizing methane high emitters from natural gas infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala Araiza, D.; Lyon, D. R.; Alvarez, R.; Harriss, R. C.; Palacios, V.; Hamburg, S.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions across the natural gas supply chain are dominated at any one time by a few high-emitters (super-emitters or fat-tail of the distribution), often underrepresented in published datasets used to construct emission inventories. Characterization of high-emitters is essential for improving emission estimates based on atmospheric data (top-down) and emission inventories (bottom-up). The population of high-emitters (e.g. 10-20% of sites that account for 80-90% of the emissions) is temporally and spatially dynamic. As a consequence, it is challenging to design sampling methods and construct estimates that accurately represent their frequency and magnitude of emissions. We present new methods to derive facility-specific emission distribution functions that explicitly integrate the influence of the relatively rare super-emitters. These methods were applied in the Barnett Shale region to construct a custom emission inventory that is then compared to top-down emission estimates for the region. We offer a methodological framework relevant to the design of future sampling campaigns, in which these high-emitters are seamlessly incorporated to representative emissions distributions. This framework can be applied to heterogeneous oil and gas production regions across geographies to obtain accurate regional emission estimates. Additionally, we characterize emissions relative to the fraction of a facility's total methane throughput; an effective metric to identify sites with excess emissions resulting from avoidable operating conditions, such as malfunctioning equipment (defined here as functional super-emitters). This work suggests that identifying functional super-emitters and correcting their avoidable operating conditions would result in significant emission reductions. However, due to their spatiotemporal dynamic behavior, achieving and maintaining uniformly low emissions across the entire population of sites will require mitigation steps (e.g. leak detection

  4. Facet engineering of high power single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Levi, Moshe; Shamay, Moshe; Tesler, Renana; Rappaport, Noam; Don, Yaroslav; Karni, Yoram; Schnitzer, Itzhak; Sicron, Noam; Shusterman, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    The ever increasing demand for high-power, high-reliability operation of single emitters at 9xx nm wavelengths requires the development of laser diodes with improved facet regions immune to both catastrophic and wear-out failure modes. In our study, we have evaluated several laser facet definition technologies in application to 90 micron aperture single emitters in asymmetric design (In)GaAs/AlGaAs based material emitting at 915, 925 and 980nm. A common epitaxy and emitter design makes for a straightforward comparison of the facet technologies investigated. Our study corroborates a clear trend of increasing difficulty in obtaining reliable laser operation from 980nm down to 915nm. At 980nm, one can employ dielectric facet passivation with a pre-clean cycle delivering a device lifetime in excess of 3,000 hours at increasing current steps. At 925nm, quantum-well intermixing can be used to define non-absorbing mirrors giving good device reliability, albeit with a large efficiency penalty. Vacuum cleaved emitters have delivered excellent reliability at 915nm, and can be expected to perform just as well at 925 and 980nm. Epitaxial regrowth of laser facets is under development and has yet to demonstrate an appreciable reliability improvement. Only a weak correlation between start-of-life catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) levels and reliability was established. The optimized facet design has delivered maximum powers in excess of 19 MW/sq.cm (rollover limited) and product-grade 980nm single emitters with a slope efficiency of >1 W/A and a peak efficiency of >60%. The devices have accumulated over 1,500 hours of CW operation at 11W. A fiber-coupled device emits 10W ex-fiber with 47% efficiency.

  5. Spectral and Total Normal Emittance of Reusable Surface Insulation Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantsios, A. G.; Edwards, S. F.; Dicus, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of spectral and total normal emittance have been made on three types of reusable external insulation materials proposed for space shuttles. Emittances were measured in the spectral range 1 to 15 micrometer at temperatures of 800 K and 1100 K using a radiometric measurement technique. Results indicated that the total normal emittance of these materials was less than 0.8 between 800 K and 1300 K. The total normal emittance decreased with increasing temperature. The three ceramic coating candidate materials exhibited a similar spectral emittance distribution.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF EMITTANCE ANALYSIS SOFTWARE FOR ION BEAM CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, M. J.; Liu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Transverse beam emittance is a crucial property of charged particle beams that describes their angular and spatial spread. It is a fi gure of merit frequently used to determine the quality of ion beams, the compatibility of an ion beam with a given beam transport system, and the ability to suppress neighboring isotopes at on-line mass separator facilities. Generally a high quality beam is characterized by a small emittance. In order to determine and improve the quality of ion beams used at the Holifi eld Radioactive Ion beam Facility (HRIBF) for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research, the emittances of the ion beams are measured at the off-line Ion Source Test Facilities. In this project, emittance analysis software was developed to perform various data processing tasks for noise reduction, to evaluate root-mean-square emittance, Twiss parameters, and area emittance of different beam fractions. The software also provides 2D and 3D graphical views of the emittance data, beam profi les, emittance contours, and RMS. Noise exclusion is essential for accurate determination of beam emittance values. A Self-Consistent, Unbiased Elliptical Exclusion (SCUBEEx) method is employed. Numerical data analysis techniques such as interpolation and nonlinear fi tting are also incorporated into the software. The software will provide a simplifi ed, fast tool for comprehensive emittance analysis. The main functions of the software package have been completed. In preliminary tests with experimental emittance data, the analysis results using the software were shown to be accurate.

  7. EMITTANCE GROWTH IN THE FEL RF-GUN

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander

    2002-08-20

    A high brightness and low emittance is of crucial importance for the SASE-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility. Therefore a Photo-RF-Gun has been installed as particle source. Numerical simulations with codes like ASTRA [1] and MAFIA [2] show that the space charge dominated processes inside the RF-Gun contribute significantly to the emittance. In this paper we present the results of detailed studies with MAFIA TS2 which clarify the effects resulting in emittance growth for space charge dominated beams. It is shown that the resulting emittance can be minimized by changing the laser parameters like pulse length and spot size on the cathode. Additionally we present the concept of slice emittances which allows a more precise prediction of the real transverse emittance achievable with an emittance compensation scheme.

  8. Edge enhancement control in linear arrays of ungated field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    In arrays of ungated field emitters, the field enhancement factor of each emitter decreases as the distance between the emitters decreases, an effect known as screening. At the edge of these arrays, emitters experience reduced screening, leading to higher field enhancement factors than emitters at the array center, causing nonuniform emission across the array. Here, we consider this effect in linear arrays of ungated field emitters spaced at distances comparable to their heights, which is the regime that generally maximizes their average current density. A Line Charge Model is used to assess the degree to which these edge effects propagate into the array interior, and to study the impact of varying the height, location, and tip radius of emitters at the ends of an array on the edge enhancement. It is shown that each of these techniques can accomplish this edge enhancement control, but each has advantages and disadvantages that will be discussed.

  9. Nullspace MUSIC and Improved Radio Frequency Emitter Geolocation from a Mobile Antenna Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintz, Andrew L.

    geolocates multiple simultaneous and co-frequency emitters in spite of highly erratic DOA estimates. We also mitigate manifold mismatch by applying the Direct Mapping Method (DMM). DMM averages DOA spectra on the earth(apostrophe)s surface and estimates the emitter locations directly from the composite spectrum. In the example results presented, our goal is to geolocate four diversely polarized emitters with a seven-element antenna array. This is too challenging for MAAE and DMM. We fuse Nullspace MUSIC and DMM into the novel Nullspace DMM algorithm and demonstrate that Nullspace DMM locates all emitters. Finally, we apply the proposed geolocation algorithms to real-world experimental data. A six-element antenna array and Data Collection System (DCS) were installed on a small aircraft. The DCS recorded signals from four live transmitters during a three-hour flight over Columbus, Ohio. The four emitters were geolocated from various segments of the flight. As expected, individual DOA estimates were erratic and widespread due to the airplane(apostrophe)s perturbations of the measured array manifold. MAAE and DMM locate at most three of the four emitters. On the other hand, Nullspace DMM yields unambiguous estimates for every emitter in every flight segment. The successful experimental trials show that Nullspace DMM could significantly enhance airborne emitter geolocation in missions such as RF spectrum enforcement, locating unknown transmitters for defense, and search and rescue operations.

  10. Integrated compact optical vortex beam emitters.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xinlun; Wang, Jianwei; Strain, Michael J; Johnson-Morris, Benjamin; Zhu, Jiangbo; Sorel, Marc; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Thompson, Mark G; Yu, Siyuan

    2012-10-19

    Emerging applications based on optical beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) will probably require photonic integrated devices and circuits for miniaturization, improved performance, and enhanced functionality. We demonstrate silicon-integrated optical vortex emitters, using angular gratings to extract light confined in whispering gallery modes with high OAM into free-space beams with well-controlled amounts of OAM. The smallest device has a radius of 3.9 micrometers. Experimental characterization confirms the theoretical prediction that the emitted beams carry exactly defined and adjustable OAM. Fabrication of integrated arrays and demonstration of simultaneous emission of multiple identical optical vortices provide the potential for large-scale integration of optical vortex emitters on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible silicon chips for wide-ranging applications.

  11. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.

    2004-12-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  12. Photonic Crystal Emitters for Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmakh, Veronika; Chan, Walker R.; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Soljacic, Marin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Celanovic, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of 2D photonic crystal (PhC) thermal emitters for a millimeter-scale hydrocarbon TPV microgenerator as a possible replacement for batteries in portable microelectronics, robotics, etc. In our TPV system, combustion heats a PhC emitter to incandescence and the resulting radiation is converted by a low-bandgap TPV cell. The PhC tailors the photonic density of states to produce spectrally confined thermal emission that matches the bandgap of the TPV cell, enabling high heat-to-electricity conversion efficiency. The work builds on a previously developed fabrication process to produce a square array of cylindrical cavities in a metal substrate. We will present ongoing incremental improvements in the optical and thermo-mechanical properties, the fabrication process, and the system integration, as recently combined with fabrication using novel materials, such as sputtered coatings, to enable a monolithic system.

  13. Computing Eigen-Emittances from Tracking Data

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.

    2014-09-18

    In a strongly nonlinear system the particle distribution in the phase space may develop long tails which contribution to the covariance (sigma) matrix should be suppressed for a correct estimate of the beam emittance. A method is offered based on Gaussian approximation of the original particle distribution in the phase space (Klimontovich distribution) which leads to an equation for the sigma matrix which provides efficient suppression of the tails and cannot be obtained by introducing weights. This equation is easily solved by iterations in the multi-dimensional case. It is also shown how the eigen-emittances and coupled optics functions can be retrieved from the sigma matrix in a strongly coupled system. Finally, the developed algorithm is applied to 6D ionization cooling of muons in HFOFO channel.

  14. FIrpic: archetypal blue phosphorescent emitter for electroluminescence.

    PubMed

    Baranoff, Etienne; Curchod, Basile F E

    2015-05-14

    FIrpic is the most investigated bis-cyclometallated iridium complex in particular in the context of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) because of its attractive sky-blue emission, high emission efficiency, and suitable energy levels. In this Perspective we review the synthesis, structural characterisations, and key properties of this emitter. We also survey the theoretical studies and summarise a series of selected monochromatic electroluminescent devices using FIrpic as the emitting dopant. Finally we highlight important shortcomings of FIrpic as an emitter for OLEDs. Despite the large body of work dedicated to this material, it is manifest that the understanding of photophysical and electrochemical processes are only broadly understood mainly because of the different environment in which these properties are measured, i.e., isolated molecules in solvent vs. device.

  15. Development of arrayed microcolumns and field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Seob; Bok Lee, Young; Choi, Sung Woong; Kim, Hyung Woo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Ahn, Seung Joon; Oh, Tae Sik; Song, Yoon-Ho; Chon Park, Byong; Jong Lim, Sun

    2017-06-01

    Electron beam devices have been widely used for inspection or lithography processes. The multibeam technology based on arrayed microcolumns has been developed to overcome the low throughput issue. However, the multicolumn system has some drawbacks such as complexity, electron optics, and electron source. The first drawback is the difficulty in multicolumn assembly. In particular, the alignment process of a source lens and a tip requires sophisticated techniques. The second drawback is that the e-beam characteristics of microcolumns constituting the multicolumn differ from column to column. To solve the first drawback, a sub-5-nm-resolution probe beam optic design with a simple structure and a two-dimensional carbon nanotube (2D-CNT) electron emitter instead of the widely used tungsten field emitter tip have been studied.

  16. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John

    2014-11-04

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  17. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John [Menlo Park, CA

    2012-07-17

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  18. Is there life after thermal emitters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutenko, V.

    2007-04-01

    In this report, we examine whether photonic IR emitters are able to compete with advanced thermal microemitter technology in testing and stimulating IR sensors, including forward-looking IR missile warning systems, IR search-and-track devices, and missile seekers. We consider fundamentals, technology, and parameters of photonic devices as well as their pros and cons in respect to thermal emitters. In particular, we show that photonic devices can from platform for next generation of multi-spectral and hyper-spectral dynamic scene simulation devices operating inside MWIR and LWIR bands with high spectral output density and able to simulate dynamically cold scenes (without cryogenic cooling) and low observable with very high frame rate.

  19. Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev

    2009-05-01

    Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.

  20. RF Emitter Tracking and Intent Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-21

    the US Navy. The paper communicated that the Navy requires accurate detecting , locating and tracking of mobile RF emitters. The system design used...x3 are voltage readings taken from different locations in the substation . PA and PB represent the probabilities of a real fault and fake fault...Borghetti, “A Review of Anomaly Detection in Automated Surveillance,” IEEE Transactions on Systems , Man, and Cybernetics, Part C: Applications and Reviews

  1. Controlled emittance blow up in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Steimel, J.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    We have designed and commissioned a system which blows up the transverse emittance of the anti-proton beam without affecting the proton beam. It consists of a bandwidth limited noise source centered around the betatron tune, a power amplifier and a directional stripline kicker. The amount of blow up is controlled by the amount of energy delivered to the anti-protons betatron bands.

  2. Complementary methods of transverse emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zagel, James; Hu, Martin; Jansson, Andreas; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yan, Ming-Jen; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    Several complementary transverse emittance monitors have been developed and used at the Fermilab accelerator complex. These include Ionization profile Monitors (IPM), Flying Wires, Schottky detectors and a Synchrotron Light Monitor (Synchlite). Mechanical scrapers have also been used for calibration purposes. This paper describes the various measurement devices by examining their basic features, calibration requirements, systematic uncertainties, and applications to collider operation. A comparison of results from different kinds of measurements is also presented.

  3. Emittance of a Field Emission Electron Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-05

    mode within the wiggler in order for the laser threshold to be reached. The mode is characterized by a waist radius w and a divergence , the product...the field line red or curved compared to a massive particle trajectory blue or straight. The field lines originate on the surface at s ,zs and...emitter surface s ,zs and along the evalu- ation plane h ,zh. The equivalent sphere characterized by a , is also shown. The red curved line

  4. ALMA deep field in SSA22: Blindly detected CO emitters and [C II] emitter candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayatsu, Natsuki H.; Matsuda, Yuichi; Umehata, Hideki; Yoshida, Naoki; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. Mark; Ivison, Rob; Kohno, Kotaro; Tamura, Yoichi; Kubo, Mariko; Iono, Daisuke; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kawabe, Ryohei; Nagao, Tohru; Inoue, Akio K.; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Lee, Minju; Ao, Yiping; Fujimoto, Seiji; Izumi, Takuma; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Ikarashi, Soh; Yamada, Toru

    2017-06-01

    We report the identification of four millimeter line-emitting galaxies with the Atacama Large Milli/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in SSA22 Field (ADF22). We analyze the ALMA 1.1-mm survey data, with an effective survey area of 5 arcmin2, frequency ranges of 253.1-256.8 and 269.1-272.8 GHz, angular resolution of 0{^''.}7 and rms noise of 0.8 mJy beam-1 at 36 km s-1 velocity resolution. We detect four line-emitter candidates with significance levels above 6σ. We identify one of the four sources as a CO(9-8) emitter at z = 3.1 in a member of the proto-cluster known in this field. Another line emitter with an optical counterpart is likely a CO(4-3) emitter at z = 0.7. The other two sources without any millimeter continuum or optical/near-infrared counterpart are likely to be [C II] emitter candidates at z = 6.0 and 6.5. The equivalent widths of the [C II] candidates are consistent with those of confirmed high-redshift [C II] emitters and candidates, and are a factor of 10 times larger than that of the CO(9-8) emitter detected in this search. The [C II] luminosity of the candidates are 4-7 × 108 L⊙. The star formation rates (SFRs) of these sources are estimated to be 10-20 M⊙ yr-1 if we adopt an empirical [C II] luminosity-SFR relation. One of them has a relatively low S/N ratio, but shows features characteristic of emission lines. Assuming that at least one of the two candidates is a [C II] emitter, we derive a lower limit of [C II]-based star formation rate density (SFRD) at z ∼ 6. The resulting value of >10-2 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3 is consistent with the dust-uncorrected UV-based SFRD. Future millimeter/submillimeter surveys can be used to detect a number of high-redshift line emitters, with which to study the star formation history in the early universe.

  5. Apparatus and method for improving radiation coherence and reducing beam emittance

    DOEpatents

    Csonka, Paul L.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for increasing the coherence and reducing the emittance of a beam-shaped pulse operates by splitting the pulse into multiple sub-beams, delaying the propagation of the various sub-beams by varying amounts, and then recombining the sub-beams by means of a rotating optical element to form a pulse of longer duration with improved transverse coherence.

  6. Fuel elements of thermionic converters

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, R.L.; Gontar, A.S.; Nelidov, M.V.; Nikolaev, Yu.V.; Schulepov, L.N.

    1997-01-01

    Work on thermionic nuclear power systems has been performed in Russia within the framework of the TOPAZ reactor program since the early 1960s. In the TOPAZ in-core thermionic convertor reactor design, the fuel element`s cladding is also the thermionic convertor`s emitter. Deformation of the emitter can lead to short-circuiting and is the primary cause of premature TRC failure. Such deformation can be the result of fuel swelling, thermocycling, or increased unilateral pressure on the emitter due to the release of gaseous fission products. Much of the work on TRCs has concentrated on preventing or mitigating emitter deformation by improving the following materials and structures: nuclear fuel; emitter materials; electrical insulators; moderator and reflector materials; and gas-exhaust device. In addition, considerable effort has been directed toward the development of experimental techniques that accurately mimic operational conditions and toward the creation of analytical and numerical models that allow operational conditions and behavior to be predicted without the expense and time demands of in-pile tests. New and modified materials and structures for the cores of thermionic NPSs and new fabrication processes for the materials have ensured the possibility of creating thermionic NPSs for a wide range of powers, from tens to several hundreds of kilowatts, with life spans of 5 to 10 years.

  7. An Observation of a Transverse to Longitudinal Emittance Exchange at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Koeth, Timothy W

    2009-05-01

    An experimental program to perform a proof of principle of transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange (ϵxin ↔ ϵzout and ϵxin ↔ ϵzout) has been developed at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector. A new beamline, including two magnetic dogleg channels and a TM110 deflecting mode radio frequency cavity, were constructed for the emittance exchange experiment. The first priority was a measurement of the Emittance Exchange beamline transport matrix. The method of difference orbits was used to measure the transport matrix. Through varying individual beam input vector elements, such as xin, x'in, yin, y'in, zin, or δin, and measuring the changes in all of the beam output vector's elements, xout, x'out, yout, y'out, zout, δout, the full 6 x 6 transport matrix was measured. The measured emittance exchange transport matrix was in overall good agreement with our calculated transport matrix. A direct observation of an emittance exchange was performed by measuring the electron beam's characteristics before and after the emittance exchange beamline. Operating with a 14.3 MeV, 250pC electron bunch, ϵzin of 21.1 ± 1.5 mm • mrad was observed to be exchanged with ϵxout of 20.8 ± 2.00 mm • mrad. Diagnostic limitations in the ϵzout measurement did not account for an energy-time correlation, thus potentially returning values larger than the actual longitudinal emittance. The ϵxin of 4.67 ± 0.22 mm • mrad was observed to be exchanged with ϵzout of 7.06 ± 0.43 mm • mrad. The apparent ϵzoutgrowth is consistent with calculated values in which the correlation term is neglected.

  8. Magnet design for a low-emittance storage ring.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Martin; Anderberg, Bengt; Lindgren, Lars Johan

    2014-09-01

    The MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring, currently under construction, pursues the goal of low electron beam emittance by using a multi-bend achromat magnet lattice, which is realised by having several consecutive magnet elements precision-machined out of a common solid iron block, 2.3-3.4 m long. With this magnet design solution, instead of having 1320 individual magnets, the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring is built up using 140 integrated `magnet block' units, containing all these magnet elements. Major features of this magnet block design are compactness, vibration stability and that the alignment of magnet elements within each unit is given by the mechanical accuracy of the CNC machining rather than individual field measurement and adjustment. This article presents practical engineering details of implementing this magnet design solution, and mechanical + magnetic field measurement results from the magnet production series. At the time of writing (spring 2014), the production series, which is totally outsourced to industry, is roughly half way through, with mechanical/magnetic QA conforming to specifications. It is the conclusion of the authors that the MAX IV magnet block concept, which has sometimes been described as new or innovative, is from a manufacturing point of view simply a collection of known mature production methods and measurement procedures, which can be executed at fixed cost with a low level of risk.

  9. Magnet design for a low-emittance storage ring

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Martin; Anderberg, Bengt; Lindgren, Lars-Johan

    2014-01-01

    The MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring, currently under construction, pursues the goal of low electron beam emittance by using a multi-bend achromat magnet lattice, which is realised by having several consecutive magnet elements precision-machined out of a common solid iron block, 2.3–3.4 m long. With this magnet design solution, instead of having 1320 individual magnets, the MAX IV 3 GeV storage ring is built up using 140 integrated ‘magnet block’ units, containing all these magnet elements. Major features of this magnet block design are compactness, vibration stability and that the alignment of magnet elements within each unit is given by the mechanical accuracy of the CNC machining rather than individual field measurement and adjustment. This article presents practical engineering details of implementing this magnet design solution, and mechanical + magnetic field measurement results from the magnet production series. At the time of writing (spring 2014), the production series, which is totally outsourced to industry, is roughly half way through, with mechanical/magnetic QA conforming to specifications. It is the conclusion of the authors that the MAX IV magnet block concept, which has sometimes been described as new or innovative, is from a manufacturing point of view simply a collection of known mature production methods and measurement procedures, which can be executed at fixed cost with a low level of risk. PMID:25177980

  10. Efficient, deep-blue TADF-emitters for OLED display applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volz, Daniel; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the mobile display market is strongly shifting towards AMOLED technology, in order to enable curved and flexible displays. This leads to a growing demand for highly efficient OLED emitters to reduce the power consumption and increase display resolution at the same time. While highly efficient green and red OLEDs already found their place in commercial OLED-displays, the lack of efficient blue emitters is still an issue. Consequently, the active area for blue is considerably larger than for green and red pixels, to make up for the lower efficiency. We intend to close this efficiency-gap with novel emitters based on thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) technology. Compared to state-of-the-art fluorescent dopants, the efficiency of TADF-emitters is up to four times higher. At the same time, it is possible to design them in a way to maintain deep blue emission, i.e. CIE y < 0.2. These aspects are relevant to produce efficient high resolution AMOLED displays. Apart from these direct customer benefits, our TADF technology does not contain any rare elements, which allows for the fabrication of sustainable OLED technology. In this work, we highlight one of our recently developed blue TADF materials. Basic material properties as well as first device results are discussed. In a bottom-emitting device, a CIEx/CIEy coordinate of (0.16/0.17) was achieved with efficiency values close to 20% EQE.

  11. Emissivity Tuned Emitter for RTPV Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carl M. Stoots; Robert C. O'Brien; Troy M. Howe

    2012-03-01

    Every mission launched by NASA to the outer planets has produced unexpected results. The Voyager I and II, Galileo, and Cassini missions produced images and collected scientific data that totally revolutionized our understanding of the solar system and the formation of the planetary systems. These missions were enabled by the use of nuclear power. Because of the distances from the Sun, electrical power was produced using the radioactive decay of a plutonium isotope. Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in the past and currently used Multi-Mission RTGs (MMRTGs) provide power for space missions. Unfortunately, RTGs rely on thermocouples to convert heat to electricity and are inherently inefficient ({approx} 3-7% thermal to electric efficiency). A Radioisotope Thermal Photovoltaic (RTPV) power source has the potential to reduce the specific mass of the onboard power supply by increasing the efficiency of thermal to electric conversion. In an RTPV, a radioisotope heats an emitter, which emits light to a photovoltaic (PV) cell, which converts the light into electricity. Developing an emitter tuned to the desired wavelength of the photovoltaic is a key part in increasing overall performance. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have built a Thermal Photovoltaic (TPV) system, that utilizes a simulated General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) from a MMRTG to heat a tantalum emitter. The GPHS is a block of graphite roughly 10 cm by 10 cm by 5 cm. A fully loaded GPHS produces 250 w of thermal power and weighs 1.6 kgs. The GRC system relies on the GPHS unit radiating at 1200 K to a tantalum emitter that, in turn, radiates light to a GaInAs photo-voltaic cell. The GRC claims system efficiency of conversion of 15%. The specific mass is around 167 kg/kWe. A RTPV power source that utilized a ceramic or ceramic-metal (cermet) matrix would allow for the combination of the heat source, canister, and emitter into one compact unit, and allow variation in size

  12. Recombination processes in passivated boron-implanted black silicon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Gastrow, Guillaume; Ortega, Pablo; Alcubilla, Ramon; Husein, Sebastian; Nietzold, Tara; Bertoni, Mariana; Savin, Hele

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we study the recombination mechanisms in ion-implanted black silicon (bSi) emitters and discuss their advantages over diffused emitters. In the case of diffusion, the large bSi surface area increases emitter doping and consequently Auger recombination compared to a planar surface. The total doping dose is on the contrary independent of the surface area in implanted emitters, and as a result, we show that ion implantation allows control of emitter doping without compromise in the surface aspect ratio. The possibility to control surface doping via implantation anneal becomes highly advantageous in bSi emitters, where surface passivation becomes critical due to the increased surface area. We extract fundamental surface recombination velocities Sn through numerical simulations and obtain the lowest values at the highest anneal temperatures. With these conditions, an excellent emitter saturation current (J0e) is obtained in implanted bSi emitters, reaching 20 fA/cm2 ± 5 fA/cm2 at a sheet resistance of 170 Ω/sq. Finally, we identify the different regimes of recombination in planar and bSi emitters as a function of implantation anneal temperature. Based on experimental data and numerical simulations, we show that surface recombination can be reduced to a negligible contribution in implanted bSi emitters, which explains the low J0e obtained.

  13. Wavelength locking of single emitters and multi-emitter modules: simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Rappaport, Noam; Peleg, Ophir; Berk, Yuri; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Baskin, Ilya; Levy, Moshe

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-stabilized high-brightness single emitters are commonly used in fiber-coupled laser diode modules for pumping Yb-doped lasers at 976 nm, and Nd-doped ones at 808 nm. We investigate the spectral behavior of single emitters under wavelength-selective feedback from a volume Bragg (or hologram) grating (VBG) in a multi-emitter module. By integrating a full VBG model as a multi-layer thin film structure with commercial raytracing software, we simulated wavelength locking conditions as a function of beam divergence and angular alignment tolerances. Good correlation between the simulated VBG feedback strength and experimentally measured locking ranges, in both VBG misalignment angle and laser temperature, is demonstrated. The challenges of assembling multi-emitter modules based on beam-stacked optical architectures are specifically addressed, where the wavelength locking conditions must be achieved simultaneously with high fiber coupling efficiency for each emitter in the module. It is shown that angular misorientation between fast and slow-axis collimating optics can have a dramatic effect on the spectral and power performance of the module. We report the development of our NEON-S wavelength-stabilized fiber laser pump module, which uses a VBG to provide wavelength-selective optical feedback in the collimated portion of the beam. Powered by our purpose-developed high-brightness single emitters, the module delivers 47 W output at 11 A from an 0.15 NA fiber and a 0.3 nm linewidth at 976 nm. Preliminary wavelength-locking results at 808 nm are also presented.

  14. Delay modeling of bipolar ECL/EFL (Emitter-Coupled Logic/Emitter-Follower-Logic) circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Andrew T.

    1986-08-01

    This report deals with the development of a delay-time model for timing simulation of large circuits consisting of Bipolar ECL(Emitter-Coupled Logic) and EFL (Emitter-Follower-Logic) networks. This model can provide adequate information on the performance of the circuits with a minimum expenditure of computation time. This goal is achieved by the use of proper circuit transient models on which analytical delay expressions can be derived with accurate results. The delay-model developed in this report is general enough to handle complex digital circuits with multiple inputs or/and multiple levels. The important effects of input slew rate are also included in the model.

  15. Rare Earth Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie T.; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study presents a spectral emittance model for films and cylinders of rare earth doped yttrium aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical film spectral emittances was found for erbium and holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. For operating conditions of interest, the film emitter experiences a linear temperature variation whereas the cylinder emitter has a more advantageous uniform temperature. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For holminum aluminum garnet film the efficiency is 0.35 at 1446K but only 0.27 at 1270 K.

  16. The Quantum Efficiency and Thermal Emittance of Metal Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David H.; Schmerge, John F.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    Modern electron beams have demonstrated the brilliance needed to drive free electron lasers at x-ray wavelengths, with the principle improvements occurring since the invention of the photocathode gun. The state-of-the-art normalized emittance electron beams are now becoming limited by the thermal emittance of the cathode. In both DC and RF photocathode guns, details of the cathode emission physics strongly influence the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance. Therefore improving cathode performance is essential to increasing the brightness of beams. It is especially important to understand the fundamentals of cathode quantum efficiency and thermal emittance. This paper investigates the relationship between the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance of metal cathodes using the Fermi-Dirac model for the electron distribution. We derive the thermal emittance and its relationship to the quantum efficiency, and compare our results to those of others.

  17. Emittance measurements of Space Shuttle orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caram, Jose M.; Bouslog, Stanley A.; Cunnington, George R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral and total normal emittance of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) used on Space Shuttle nose cap and wing leading edges has been measured at room temperature and at surface temperatures of 1200 to 2100 K. These measurements were made on virgin and two flown RCC samples. Room temperature directional emittance data were also obtained and were used to determine the total hemispherical emittance of RCC as a function of temperature. Results of the total normal emittance for the virgin samples showed good agreement with the current RCC emittance design curve; however, the data from the flown samples showed an increase in the emittance at high temperature possibly due to exposure from flight environments.

  18. Characterization of radiant emitters used in food processing.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, B J; Farkas, B E; Keener, K M

    2003-01-01

    Radiant emissions from short, medium, and long wavelength thermal radiant emitter systems typically used for food processing applications were quantified. Measurements included heat flux intensity, emitter surface temperature, and spectral wavelength distribution. Heat flux measurements were found highly dependent on the incident angle and the distance from the emitter facing. The maximum flux measured was 5.4 W/cm2. Emitter surface temperature measurements showed that short wavelength radiant systems had the highest surface temperature and greatest thermal efficiency. The emitter spectral distributions showed that radiant emitter systems had large amounts of far infrared energy emission greater than 3 microm when compared to theoretical blackbody curves. The longer wavelength energy would likely cause increased surface heating for most high moisture content food materials.

  19. Plasmonic superradiance of two emitters near a metal nanorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protsenko, I. E.; Uskov, A. V.; Chen, Xue-Wen; Xu, Hongxing

    2017-06-01

    Quantum emitters, such as quantum dots or dye molecules, pumped and situated close to plasmonic nanostructures resonantly excite surface plasmon-polaritons (SPPs). Excitation efficiency increases with the number of emitters because the SPP field synchronizes dipole oscillations of emitters, in analogy with superradiance (SR) in free space. Using a fully quantum mechanical model for two emitters coupled to a single metal nanorod, we predict that plasmonic SR increases the SPP generation yield of a single emitter by up to 15%. Such ‘plasmonic SR’ enhancement of SPP generation is stationary and takes place even at strong dissipation, dephasing and under incoherent pumping. Solid-state quantum emitters with blinking behaviors may be used to demonstrate plasmonic SR. Plasmonic SR may be useful for excitation of non-radiative SPP modes in plasmonic waveguides and lowering the threshold of plasmonic nanolasers.

  20. Active spacecraft potential control: An ion emitter experiment. [Cluster mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedler, W.; Goldstein, R.; Hamelin, M.; Maehlum, B. N.; Troim, J.; Olsen, R. C.; Pedersen, A.; Grard, R. J. L.; Schmidt, R.; Rudenauer, F.

    1988-01-01

    The cluster spacecraft are instrumented with ion emitters for charge neutralization. The emitters produce indium ions at 6 keV. The ion current is adjusted in a feedback loop with instruments measuring the spacecraft potential. The system is based on the evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. The design of the active spacecraft potential control instruments, and the ion emitters is presented.

  1. Separation of temperature and emittance in remotely sensed radiance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Anne B.; Alley, Ronald E.

    1992-01-01

    The remote determination of surface temperature and surface spectral emittance by use of airborne or satellite-borne thermal infrared instruments is not straightforward. The radiance measured is a function of surface temperature, the unknown surface spectral emittance, and absorption and emission in the intervening atmosphere. With a single measurement, the solution for temperature and spectral emittance is undedetermined. This article reviews two of the early approximate methods which have been fairly widely used to approach this problem.

  2. Thermal emittance measurements of a cesium potassium antimonide photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarov, Ivan; Cultrera, Luca; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Maxson, Jared; Roussel, William

    2011-05-01

    Thermal emittance measurements of a CsK2Sb photocathode at several laser wavelengths are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. The thermal emittance is 0.56±0.03 mm mrad/mm(rms) at 532 nm wavelength. The results are compared with a simple photoemission model and found to be in a good agreement.

  3. Sub-nm emittance lattice design for CANDLE storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Zanyan, G.; Sahakyan, V.; Tsakanov, V.

    2016-10-01

    The most effective way to increase the brilliance of synchrotron light sources is the reduction of beam emittance. Following the recent developments in low emittance lattice design, a new sub-nm emittance lattice based on implementation of multi-band achromat concept and application of longitudinal gradient bending magnets was developed for CANDLE storage ring. The paper presents the main design considerations, linear and non-linear beam dynamics aspects of the new lattice proposed.

  4. Emittance calculations for the Stanford Linear Collider injector

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; Helm, R.H.; Lee, M.J.; Miller, R.H.; Blocker, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    A series of measurements have been performed to determine the emittance of the high intensity, single bunch beam that is to be injected into the Stanford Linear Collider. On-line computer programs were used to control the Linac for the purpose of data acquisition and to fit the data to a model in order to deduce the beam emittance. This paper will describe the method of emittance calculation and present some of the measurement results.

  5. Fabrication of a Cryogenic Terahertz Emitter for Bolometer Focal Plane Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James; Brown, Ari; Wollack, Edward

    2012-01-01

    A fabrication process is reported for prototype emitters of THz radiation, which operate cryogenically, and should provide a fast, stable blackbody source suitable for characterization of THz devices. The fabrication has been demonstrated and, at the time of this reporting, testing was underway. The emitter is similar to a monolithic silicon bolometer in design, using both a low-noise thermometer and a heater element on a thermally isolated stage. An impedance-matched, high-emissivity coat ing is also integrated to tune the blackbody properties. This emitter is designed to emit a precise amount of power as a blackbody spectrum centered on terahertz frequencies. The emission is a function of the blackbody temperature. An integrated resistive heater and thermometer system can control the temperature of the blackbody with greater precision than previous incarnations of calibration sources that relied on blackbody emission. The emitter is fabricated using a silicon- on-insulator substrate wafer. The buried oxide is chosen to be less than 1 micron thick, and the silicon device thickness is 1-2 microns. Layers of phosphorus compensated with boron are implanted into and diffused throughout the full thickness of the silicon device layer to create the thermometer and heater components. Degenerately doped wiring is implanted to connect the devices to wire-bondable contact pads at the edge of the emitter chip. Then the device is micromachined to remove the thick-handle silicon behind the thermometer and heater components, and to thermally isolate it on a silicon membrane. An impedance- matched emissive coating (ion assisted evaporated Bi) is applied to the back of the membrane to enable high-efficiency emission of the blackbody spectrum.

  6. Environmental awareness for sensor and emitter employment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kenneth K.; Wilson, D. Keith

    2010-04-01

    Environmental Awareness for Sensor and Emitter Employment (EASEE) is a flexible, object-oriented software design for predicting environmental effects on the performance of battlefield sensors and detectability of signal emitters. Its decision-support framework facilitates many sensor and emitter modalities and can be incorporated into battlespace command and control (C2) systems. Other potential applications include immersive simulation, force-on-force simulation, and virtual prototyping of sensor systems and signal-processing algorithms. By identifying and encoding common characteristics of Army problems involving multimodal signal transmission and sensing into a flexible software architecture in the Java programming language, EASEE seeks to provide an application interface enabling rapid integration of diverse signal-generation, propagation, and sensor models that can be implemented in many client-server environments. Its explicit probabilistic modeling of signals, systematic consideration of many complex environmental and mission-related factors affecting signal generation and propagation, and computation of statistical metrics characterizing sensor performance facilitate a highly flexible approach to signal modeling and simulation. EASEE aims to integrate many disparate statistical formulations for modeling and processing many types of signals, including infrared, acoustic, seismic, radiofrequency, and chemical/biological. EASEE includes objects for representing sensor data, inferences for target detection and/or direction, signal transmission and processing, and state information (such as time and place). Various transmission and processing objects are further grouped into platform objects, which fuse data to make various probabilistic predictions of interest. Objects representing atmospheric and terrain environments with varying degrees of fidelity enable modeling of signal generation and propagation in diverse and complex environments.

  7. Infrared spectral normal emittance/emissivity comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanssen, L.; Wilthan, B.; Filtz, J.-R.; Hameury, J.; Girard, F.; Battuello, M.; Ishii, J.; Hollandt, J.; Monte, C.

    2016-01-01

    The National Measurement Institutes (NMIs) of the United States, Germany, France, Italy and Japan, have joined in an inter-laboratory comparison of their infrared spectral emittance scales. This action is part of a series of supplementary inter-laboratory comparisons (including thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity) sponsored by the Consultative Committee on Thermometry (CCT) Task Group on Thermophysical Quantities (TG-ThQ). The objective of this collaborative work is to strengthen the major operative National Measurement Institutes' infrared spectral emittance scales and consequently the consistency of radiative properties measurements carried out worldwide. The comparison has been performed over a spectral range of 2 μm to 14 μm, and a temperature range from 23 °C to 800 °C. Artefacts included in the comparison are potential standards: oxidized Inconel, boron nitride, and silicon carbide. The measurement instrumentation and techniques used for emittance scales are unique for each NMI, including the temperature ranges covered as well as the artefact sizes required. For example, all three common types of spectral instruments are represented: dispersive grating monochromator, Fourier transform and filter-based spectrometers. More than 2000 data points (combinations of material, wavelength and temperature) were compared. Ninety-eight percent (98%) of the data points were in agreement, with differences to weighted mean values less than the expanded uncertainties calculated from the individual NMI uncertainties and uncertainties related to the comparison process. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  8. Technology Status of Thermionic Fuel Elements for Space Nuclear Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, J. W.; Yang, L.

    1984-01-01

    Thermionic reactor power systems are discussed with respect to their suitability for space missions. The technology status of thermionic emitters and sheath insulator assemblies is described along with testing of the thermionic fuel elements.

  9. Emittance and energy control in the NLC main linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Kubo, K.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ruth, R.D.; Thompson, K.A.; Zimmermann, F.

    1995-06-01

    The authors discuss tolerances and correction schemes needed to control single- and multi-bunch emittance in the NLC main linacs. Specifications and design of emittance diagnostic stations will be presented. Trajectory correction schemes appropriate to simultaneously controlling the emittance of a multibunch train and the emittance of individual bunches within the train will be discussed. The authors discuss control of bunch-to-bunch energy spread using a ramped RF pulse generated by phase-modulating the SLED-II input. Tolerances on ions, wake fields, quadrupole alignment, and accelerating structure alignment will be given.

  10. Analysis of Slice Transverse Emittance Evolution ina Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Ding, Y.; Qiang, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-17

    The slice transverse emittance of an electron beam is of critical significance for an x-ray FEL. In a photocathode RF gun, the slice transverse emittance is not only determined by the emission process, but also influenced strongly by the non-linear space charge effect. In this paper, we study the slice transverse emittance evolution in a photocathode RF gun using a simple model that includes effects of RF acceleration, focusing, and space charge force. The results are compared with IMPACT-T space charge simulations and may be used to understand the development of the slice emittance in an RF gun.

  11. Theoretical study of transverse-longitudinal emittance coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H; Davidson, R C; Chung, M; Barnard, J J; Wang, T F

    2011-04-14

    The effect of a weakly coupled periodic lattice in terms of achieving emittance exchange between the transverse and longitudinal directions is investigated using the generalized Courant-Snyder theory for coupled lattices. Recently, the concept and technique of transverse-longitudinal emittance coupling have been proposed for applications in the Linac Coherent Light Source and other free-electron lasers to reduce the transverse emittance of the electron beam. Such techniques can also be applied to the driver beams for the heavy ion fusion and beam-driven high energy density physics, where the transverse emittance budget is typically tighter than the longitudinal emittance. The proposed methods consist of one or several coupling components which completely swap the emittances of one of the transverse directions and the longitudinal direction at the exit of the coupling components. The complete emittance exchange is realized in one pass through the coupling components. In the present study, we investigate the effect of a weakly coupled periodic lattice in terms of achieving emittance exchange between the transverse and longitudinal directions. A weak coupling component is introduced at every focusing lattice, and we would like to determine if such a lattice can realize the function of emittance exchange.

  12. Efficient low-temperature thermophotovoltaic emitters from metallic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Prashant; Han, Sang Eon; Stein, Andreas; Norris, David J

    2008-10-01

    We examine the use of metallic photonic crystals as thermophotovoltaic emitters. We coat silica woodpile structures, created using direct laser writing, with tungsten or molybdenum. Optical reflectivity and thermal emission measurements near 650 degrees C demonstrate that the resulting structures should provide efficient emitters at relatively low temperatures. When matched to InGaAsSb photocells, our structures should generate over ten times more power than solid emitters while having an optical-to-electrical conversion efficiency above 32%. At such low temperatures, these emitters have promise not only in solar energy but also in harnessing geothermal and industrial waste heat.

  13. Injection of large transverse emittance EBIS beams in booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.

    2011-10-10

    During the commissioning of EBIS beams in Booster in November 2010 and in April, May and June 2011, it was found that the transverse emittances of the EBIS beams just upstream of Booster were much larger than expected. Beam emittances of 11{pi} mm milliradians had been expected, but numbers 3 to 4 times larger were measured. Here and throughout this note the beam emittance, {pi}{epsilon}{sub 0}, is taken to be the area of the smallest ellipse that contains 95% of the beam. We call this smallest ellipse the beam ellipse. If the beam distribution is gaussian, the rms emittance of the distribution is very nearly one sixth the area of the beam ellipse. The normalized rms emittance is the rms emittance times the relativistic factor {beta}{gamma} = 0.06564. This amounts to 0.12{pi} mm milliradians for the 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse. In [1] we modeled the injection and turn-by-turn evolution of an 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse in the horizontal plane in Booster. It was shown that with the present injection system, up to 4 turns of this beam could be injected and stored in Booster without loss. In the present note we extend this analysis to the injection of larger emittance beams. We consider only the emittance in the horizontal plane. Emittance in the vertical plane and the effects of dispersion are treated in [2].

  14. Multi-channel polarized thermal emitter

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Constant, Kristen P

    2013-07-16

    A multi-channel polarized thermal emitter (PTE) is presented. The multi-channel PTE can emit polarized thermal radiation without using a polarizer at normal emergence. The multi-channel PTE consists of two layers of metallic gratings on a monolithic and homogeneous metallic plate. It can be fabricated by a low-cost soft lithography technique called two-polymer microtransfer molding. The spectral positions of the mid-infrared (MIR) radiation peaks can be tuned by changing the periodicity of the gratings and the spectral separation between peaks are tuned by changing the mutual angle between the orientations of the two gratings.

  15. High efficiency quasi-monochromatic infrared emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucoli, Giovanni; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Besbes, Mondher; Benisty, Henri; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2014-02-01

    Incandescent radiation sources are widely used as mid-infrared emitters owing to the lack of alternative for compact and low cost sources. A drawback of miniature hot systems such as membranes is their low efficiency, e.g., for battery powered systems. For targeted narrow-band applications such as gas spectroscopy, the efficiency is even lower. In this paper, we introduce design rules valid for very generic membranes demonstrating that their energy efficiency for use as incandescent infrared sources can be increased by two orders of magnitude.

  16. High efficiency quasi-monochromatic infrared emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Brucoli, Giovanni; Besbes, Mondher; Benisty, Henri Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad

    2014-02-24

    Incandescent radiation sources are widely used as mid-infrared emitters owing to the lack of alternative for compact and low cost sources. A drawback of miniature hot systems such as membranes is their low efficiency, e.g., for battery powered systems. For targeted narrow-band applications such as gas spectroscopy, the efficiency is even lower. In this paper, we introduce design rules valid for very generic membranes demonstrating that their energy efficiency for use as incandescent infrared sources can be increased by two orders of magnitude.

  17. Multiple emitter location and signal parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. O.

    1986-03-01

    Multiple signal classification (MUSIC) techniques involved in determining the parameters of multiple wavefronts arriving at an antenna array are discussed. A MUSIC algorithm is described, which provides asymptotically unbiased estimates of (1) the number of signals, (2) directions of arrival (or emitter locations), (3) strengths and cross correlations among the incident waveforms, and (4) the strength of noise/interference. The example of the use of the algorithm as a multiple frequency estimator operating on time series is examined. Comparisons of this method with methods based on maximum likelihood and maximum entropy, as well as conventional beamforming, are presented.

  18. Emittance growth from transient coherent synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, C.L.; Li, R.; Bisognano, J.J.

    1996-10-01

    If the energies of individual particles in a bunch change as the bunch traverses a bending system, even if it is achromatic, betatron oscillations can be excited. Consequently, the transverse emittance of the bunch will grow as it moves downstream. Short bunches may be particularly susceptible to emission of coherent synchrotron radiation which can act back on the particles to change their energies and trajectories. Because a bend spans a well-defined length and angle, the bunch-excited wakefield and its effect back on the bunch are inherently transient. We outline a recently developed theory of this effect and apply it to example bending systems.

  19. Monitoring airborne alpha-emitter contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, P.L.; Koster, J.E.; Conaway, J.G.; Bounds, J.A.; Whitley, C.W.; Steadman, P.A.

    1998-02-01

    Facilities that may produce airborne alpha emitter contamination require a continuous air monitoring (CAM) system. However, these traditional CAMs have difficulty in environments with large quantities of non-radioactive particulates such as dust and salt. Los Alamos has developed an airborne plutonium sensor (APS) for the REBOUND experiment at the Nevada Test Site which detects alpha contamination directly in the air, and so is less vulnerable to the problems associated with counting activity on a filter. In addition, radon compensation is built into the detector by the use of two measurement chambers.

  20. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Capece, Angela M.; Katz, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al2O3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  1. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, James E. Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2016-01-14

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  2. Micro-electrospray with stainless steel emitters.

    PubMed

    Shui, Wenqing; Yu, Yanling; Xu, Xuejiao; Huang, Zhenyu; Xu, Guobing; Yang, Pengyuan

    2003-01-01

    The physical processes underlying micro-electrospray (micro-ES) performance were investigated using a stainless steel (SS) emitter with a blunt tip. Sheathless micro-ES could be generated at a blunt SS tip without any tapering or sanding if ESI conditions were optimized. The Taylor cone was found to shrink around the inner diameter of the SS tubing, which permitted a low flow rate of 150 nL/min for sheathless microspray on the blunt tip (100 microm i.d. x 400 microm o.d.). It is believed that the wettability and/or hydrophobicity of SS tips are responsible for their micro-ES performance. The outlet orifice was further nipped to reduce the size of the spray cone and limit the flow rate to 50-150 nL/min, resulting in peptide detection down to attomole quantities consumed per spectrum. The SS emitter was also integrated into a polymethylmethacrylate microchip and demonstrated satisfactory performance in the analysis and identification of a myoglobin digest.

  3. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Hart, T. L.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Oliveros, S. J.; Perera, L. P.; Neuffer, D. V.

    2015-04-15

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 µs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift in the ring until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87 %.

  4. Optical study of lithographically defined, subwavelength plasmonic wires and their coupling to embedded quantum emitters.

    PubMed

    Bracher, G; Schraml, K; Ossiander, M; Frédérick, S; Finley, J J; Kaniber, M

    2014-02-21

    We present an optical investigation of surface plasmon polaritons propagating along nanoscale Au-wires, lithographically defined on GaAs substrates. A two-axis confocal microscope was used to perform spatially and polarization resolved measurements in order to confirm the guiding of surface plasmon polaritons over lengths ranging from 5 to 20 μm along nanowires with a lateral dimension of only ≈ 100 nm. Finite difference time domain simulations are used to corroborate our experimental observations, and highlight the potential to couple proximal quantum emitters to propagating plasmon modes in such extreme subwavelength devices. Our findings are of strong relevance for the development of semiconductor based integrated plasmonic and active quantum plasmonic nanosystems that merge quantum emitters with nanoscale plasmonic elements.

  5. A compact time reversal emitter-receiver based on a leaky random cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Trung-Dung; Hies, Thomas; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-11-01

    Time reversal acoustics (TRA) has gained widespread applications for communication and measurements. In general, a scattering medium in combination with multiple transducers is needed to achieve a sufficiently large acoustical aperture. In this paper, we report an implementation for a cost-effective and compact time reversal emitter-receiver driven by a single piezoelectric element. It is based on a leaky cavity with random 3-dimensional printed surfaces. The random surfaces greatly increase the spatio-temporal focusing quality as compared to flat surfaces and allow the focus of an acoustic beam to be steered over an angle of 41°. We also demonstrate its potential use as a scanner by embedding a receiver to detect an object from its backscatter without moving the TRA emitter.

  6. A chip-scale, telecommunications-band frequency conversion interface for quantum emitters.

    PubMed

    Agha, Imad; Ates, Serkan; Davanço, Marcelo; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2013-09-09

    We describe a chip-scale, telecommunications-band frequency conversion interface designed for low-noise operation at wavelengths desirable for common single photon emitters. Four-wave-mixing Bragg scattering in silicon nitride waveguides is used to demonstrate frequency upconversion and downconversion between the 980 nm and 1550 nm wavelength regions, with signal-to-background levels > 10 and conversion efficiency of ≈ -60 dB at low continuous wave input pump powers (< 50 mW). Finite element simulations and the split-step Fourier method indicate that increased input powers of ≈ 10 W (produced by amplified nanosecond pulses, for example) will result in a conversion efficiency > 25 % in existing geometries. Finally, we present waveguide designs that can be used to connect shorter wavelength (637 nm to 852 nm) quantum emitters with 1550 nm.

  7. A compact time reversal emitter-receiver based on a leaky random cavity

    PubMed Central

    Luong, Trung-Dung; Hies, Thomas; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Time reversal acoustics (TRA) has gained widespread applications for communication and measurements. In general, a scattering medium in combination with multiple transducers is needed to achieve a sufficiently large acoustical aperture. In this paper, we report an implementation for a cost-effective and compact time reversal emitter-receiver driven by a single piezoelectric element. It is based on a leaky cavity with random 3-dimensional printed surfaces. The random surfaces greatly increase the spatio-temporal focusing quality as compared to flat surfaces and allow the focus of an acoustic beam to be steered over an angle of 41°. We also demonstrate its potential use as a scanner by embedding a receiver to detect an object from its backscatter without moving the TRA emitter. PMID:27811957

  8. Determination the total neutron yields of several semiconductor compounds using various alpha emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Ramadhan Hayder; Sabr, Barzan Nehmat

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, the cross-sections of (α,n) reactions available in the literature as a function of α-particle energies for light and medium elements have been rearranged for α-particle energies from near threshold up to 10 MeV in steps of (0.050MeV) using the (Excel and Matlab) computer programs. The obtained data were used to calculate the neutron yields (n/106α) using the quick basic-computer program (Simpson Rules). The stopping powers of alpha particle energies from near threshold to 10 MeV for light and medium elements such as (nat.Be,10B,11B,13C,14N,nat.O,nat.F,nat.Mg,nat.Al,29Si,30Si, nat.P and 46.48Ti) have been calculated using the Zeigler formula. The kinetic energies (Tα) and the branching ratios of each α-emitters such as (211Bi, 210Po, 211Po, 215Po, 217At, 218Rn, 219Rn, 222Rn, 224Ra, 226Ra, 215Th, 228Th, 232U, 234U, 236U, 238U, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 245Es, 252Fm, 254Fm, 256Fm, 257Fm and 257Md) are taken into consideration to calculate the mean kinetic energy . The polynomial expressions were used to fitting the calculated weighted average of neutron yields (n/106α) for natural light and medium elements such as (Be, B, C, N, O, F, Mg, Al, Si, P and Ti) to determine the adopted neutron yields from the best fitting equation with minimum (CHISQ) at mean kinetic energies of various α-emitters. The total neutron yields (n/s/gx/ppmi) of the mentioned natural light and medium elements have been calculated using the adopted neutron yields (n/106α) from the fitting equations at mean kinetic energies of various α-emitters. The total neutron yields (n/s/gα-emitters/gcompounds) of semiconductor compounds such as (AlN, AlP, BN, BP, SiC, TiO2, BeSiN2, MgCN2, MgSiN2 and MgSiP2) have been calculated by mixing (1gram) of compounds with (1gram) of pure α-emitters using the quick basic computer program. The aim of the present work is to constructed and fabricate the neutron sources theoretically

  9. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  10. Nanophotonic structures for coupling to quantum emitters in the visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Jennifer Tze-Heng

    This thesis is about the design, fabrication, and characterization of nanophotonic elements in the visible that can enhance light-matter interaction for single quantum emitters. We focus on two material systems: single photon sources based on the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond with improved spontaneous emission rates and collection efficiencies, and passive TiO 2 devices that comprise a potentially broadband (from the visible to the infrared), low loss photonics platform and that are suitable for probing and manipulating single colloidal quantum dots. We first discuss the requirements for using color center emission in bulk diamond crystals for potential applications in quantum information processing, and provide examples of using nanowire structures and planar resonators made in diamond for engineering the NV center's pump and collection efficiencies, and spontaneous emission rates, respectively. We also describe the integration of diamond with plasmonic structures. We have designed and implemented diamond-silver apertures for broadband enhancements of the spontaneous emission rates of NV centers. We show that shallow-implanted NV centers in diamond nanoposts provide a good system for controlling the NV center spontaneous emission rates, allowing for quenched emission with long lifetimes in the bare case, and enhanced emission with fast decay rates (corresponding to a Purcell factor of around 6) when coated with silver. We add plasmonic gratings around the diamond-silver apertures to improve the collection efficiency of the system, and observe over two-fold improvement in collection. We demonstrate the fabrication of chip-scale linear optical elements such as waveguides and racetrack resonators in low-loss TiO2 thin films. The fabricated waveguides operate over a wide bandwidth with propagation losses from 30 dB/cm in the visible to 4 dB/cm in the IR, while racetrack resonators can critically couple to waveguides and have quality factors as high as

  11. Emittance growth due to negative-mass instability above transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, King-Yuen

    1994-08-01

    Due to space-charge effect, there is a growth of bunch emittance across transition as a result of negative-mass instability. The models of growth at cutoff frequency and growth from high-frequency Schottky noise are reviewed. The difficulties of performing reliable simulations are discussed. An intuitive self-bunching model for estimating emittance growth is presented.

  12. Emittance growth due to dipole ripple and sextupole

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, H.J.; Ellison, J.A.; Syphers, M.J.; Newberger, B.S.

    1993-05-01

    Ripple in the power supplies for storage ring magnets can have adverse effects on the circulating beams: orbit distortion and emittance growth from dipole ripple, tune modulation and dynamic aperture reduction from quadrupole ripple, etc. In this paper, we study the effects of ripple in the horizontal bending field of the SSC in the presence of nonlinearity, in particular, the growth in beam emittance.

  13. Surface Coatings for Low Emittance in the Thermal Surveillance Band

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    transparent but conducting coatings on glass [4] and (3) the solar energy industry , where surface coatings are required for solar collectors which...increase in coating emittance [10]. 0 Research into low emittance paint is mainly carried out in the solar energy industry [11, 12] and can be

  14. Spectral beam combining of multi-single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baohua; Guo, Weirong; Guo, Zhijie; Xu, Dan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Thomas; Chen, Xiaohua

    2016-03-01

    Spectral beam combination expands the output power while keeps the beam quality of the combined beam almost the same as that of a single emitter. Spectral beam combination has been successfully achieved for high power fiber lasers, diode laser arrays and diode laser stacks. We have recently achieved the spectral beam combination of multiple single emitter diode lasers. Spatial beam combination and beam transformation are employed before beams from 25 single emitter diode lasers can be spectrally combined. An average output power about 220W, a spectral bandwidth less than 9 nm (95% energy), a beam quality similar to that of a single emitter and electro-optical conversion efficiency over 46% are achieved. In this paper, Rigorous Coupled Wave analysis is used to numerically evaluate the influence of emitter width, emitter pitch and focal length of transform lens on diffraction efficiency of the grating and spectral bandwidth. To assess the chance of catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD), the optical power in the internal cavity of a free running emitter and the optical power in the grating external cavity of a wavelength locked emitter are theoretically analyzed. Advantages and disadvantages of spectral beam combination are concluded.

  15. Experimental Results of a Single Emittance Compensation Solenoidal Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. T.; Wang, X. J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Miller, R. H.; Skaritka, J.

    1997-05-01

    A new iron dominated single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet was designed to be integrated with the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-Band Photocathode RF Gun. This emittance compensated photoinjector is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility. It has produced a 300 pC electron bunches with a normalized rms transverse emittance of ɛ_n,rms = 0.7 π mm mrad. POISSON field maps were used with PARMELA to optimize the emittance compensation solenoidal magnet design. Magnetic field measurements show that at the cathode plane Bz <= 10 gauss for a peak magnetic field of B_z,max = 3 KG. Which is in agreement with POISSON simulation. A single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet will produces a initial angular momentum of the electron bunch that manifests itself in a initial magnetic emittance term that cannot be eliminated. This magnetic emittance ɛ_mag,n,rms scales as 0.01 π mm mrad per gauss at the cathode. Which is in agreement with PARMELA simulations. Experimental beam dynamics results are presented that show spot size and emittance as a function of cathode magnetic field. These results are compared to theory and simulations.

  16. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  17. Microfabricated emitter array for an ionic liquid electrospray thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Kaito; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Takao, Yoshinori

    2017-06-01

    We have fabricated needle-shaped emitters on a Si wafer by a MEMS process, and measured the voltage-current characteristics and the frequency dependence of a bipolar pulse voltage for ionic liquid electrospray thrusters, which can be mounted on nanosatellites ( ≲ 10 kg). Although the extracted current did not increase with increasing number of emitters, probably owing to the lack of uniformity of the emitters fabricated, we have demonstrated that the emitted current depends on the gap distance between the emitter and the extractor grid electrode, and low frequencies of the bipolar pulse voltage are desirable for thruster operation. Moreover, the Bosch process is required for fabricating a reservoir of ionic liquid, which prevents undesirable electrical short circuits, and the minimum emitter pitch to prevent loss of ion beams to the extractor is estimated to be about 400 µm.

  18. Power flow from a dipole emitter near an optical antenna.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kevin C Y; Jun, Young Chul; Seo, Min-Kyo; Brongersma, Mark L

    2011-09-26

    Current methods to calculate the emission enhancement of a quantum emitter coupled to an optical antenna of arbitrary geometry rely on analyzing the total Poynting vector power flow out of the emitter or the dyadic Green functions from full-field numerical simulations. Unfortunately, these methods do not provide information regarding the nature of the dominant energy decay pathways. We present a new approach that allows for a rigorous separation, quantification, and visualization of the emitter output power flow captured by an antenna and the subsequent reradiation power flow to the far field. Such analysis reveals unprecedented details of the emitter/antenna coupling mechanisms and thus opens up new design strategies for strongly interacting emitter/antenna systems used in sensing, active plasmonics and metamaterials, and quantum optics.

  19. Transit time and charge storage measurements in heavily doped emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Park, J. S.; Hwang, B. Y.

    1986-01-01

    A first direct measurement of the minority-carrier transit time in a transparent heavily doped emitter layer is reported. The value was obtained by a high-frequency conductance method recently developed and used for low-doped Si. The transit time coupled with the steady-state current enables the determination of the quasi-static charge stored in the emitter and the quasi-static emitter capacitance. Using a transport model, from the measured transit time, the value for the minority-carrier diffusion coefficient and mobility is estimated. The measurements were done using a heavily doped emitter of the Si p(+)-n-p bipolar transistor. The new result indicates that the position-averaged minority-carrier diffusion coefficients may be much smaller than the corresponding majority-carrier values for emitters having a concentration ranging from about 3 x 10 to the 19th per cu cm to 10 to the 20th per cu cm.

  20. Radiative performance of rare earth garnet thin film selective emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, R.A.; Chubb, D.L.; Good, B.S.

    1994-08-01

    In this paper the authors present the first emitter efficiency results for the thin film 40 percent Er-1.5 percent Ho YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet, Y3Al5O12) and 25 percent Ho YAG selective emitter at 1500 K with a platinum substrate. Spectral emittance and emissive power measurements were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.2 microns). Emitter efficiency and power density are significantly improved with the addition of multiple rare earth dopants. Predicted efficiency results are presented for an optimized (equal power density in the Er, (4)I[sub 15/2]-(4)I[sub 13/2] at 1.5 microns, and Ho, (5)I[sub 7]-(5)I[sub 8] at 2.0 micron emission bands) Er-Ho YAG thin film selective emitter.

  1. Transit time and charge storage measurements in heavily doped emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Park, J. S.; Hwang, B. Y.

    1986-01-01

    A first direct measurement of the minority-carrier transit time in a transparent heavily doped emitter layer is reported. The value was obtained by a high-frequency conductance method recently developed and used for low-doped Si. The transit time coupled with the steady-state current enables the determination of the quasi-static charge stored in the emitter and the quasi-static emitter capacitance. Using a transport model, from the measured transit time, the value for the minority-carrier diffusion coefficient and mobility is estimated. The measurements were done using a heavily doped emitter of the Si p(+)-n-p bipolar transistor. The new result indicates that the position-averaged minority-carrier diffusion coefficients may be much smaller than the corresponding majority-carrier values for emitters having a concentration ranging from about 3 x 10 to the 19th per cu cm to 10 to the 20th per cu cm.

  2. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi; Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi

    2009-11-01

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I- V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6×109 A/m 2 sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  3. Radiative Performance of Rare Earth Garnet Thin Film Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present the first emitter efficiency results for the thin film 40 percent Er-1.5 percent Ho YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet, Y3Al5O12) and 25 percent Ho YAG selective emitter at 1500 K with a platinum substrate. Spectral emittance and emissive power measurements were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.2 microns). Emitter efficiency and power density are significantly improved with the addition of multiple rare earth dopants. Predicted efficiency results are presented for an optimized (equal power density in the Er, (4)I(sub 15/2)-(4)I(sub 13/2) at 1.5 microns, and Ho, (5)I(sub 7)-(5)I(sub 8) at 2.0 micron emission bands) Er-Ho YAG thin film selective emitter.

  4. GTF Transverse and Longitudinal Emittance Data Analysis Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-07

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. Measurements at the GTF include quadrupole scan transverse emittance measurements and linac phase scan longitudinal emittance measurements. Typically the beam size is measured on a screen as a function of a quadrupole current or linac phase and the beam matrix is then fit to the measured data. Often the emittance which is the final result of the measurement is the only number reported. However, the method used to reduce the data to the final emittance value can have a significant effect on the result. This paper describes in painful detail the methods used to analyze the transverse and longitudinal emittance data collected at the GTF.

  5. Theory and measurements of emittance preservation in plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, Joel

    2016-12-01

    In this dissertation, we examine the preservation and measurement of emittance in the plasma wakefield acceleration blowout regime. Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) is a revolutionary approach to accelerating charged particles that has been demonstrated to have the potential for gradients orders of magnitude greater than traditional approaches. The application of PWFA to the design of a linear collider will make new high energy physics research possible, but the design parameters must first be shown to be competitive with traditional methods. Emittance preservation is necessary in the design of a linear collider in order to maximize luminosity. We examine the conditions necessary for circular symmetry in the PWFA blowout regime, and demonstrate that current proposals meet these bounds. We also present an application of beam lamentation which describes the process of beam parameter and emittance matching. We show that the emittance growth saturates as a consequence of energy spread in the beam. The initial beam parameters determine the amount of emittance growth, while the contribution of energy spread is negligible. We also present a model for ion motion in the presence of a beam that is much more dense than the plasma. By combining the model of ion motion and emittance growth, we find the emittance growth due to ion motion is minimal in the case of marginal ion motion. In addition, we present a simulation that validates the ion motion model, which is under further development to examine emittance growth of both marginal and pronounced ion motion. Finally, we present a proof-of-concept of an emittance measurement which may enable the analysis of emittance preservation in future PWFA experiments.

  6. Powerful ultrawideband rf emitters: status and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agee, Forrest J.; Scholfield, David W.; Prather, William D.; Burger, Jeffrey W.

    1995-09-01

    Ultra-wideband emitters are of interest for a variety of potential applications that range from radar transmitters to communications applications. This technology is of current interest to the USAF Phillips Laboratory where theoretical and experimental efforts have been underway for a number of years. Research into the production of ultra-wideband sources at the Phillips Laboratory has been accomplished along several different technology lines. The approaches include three main thrusts: 1) very powerful hydrogen spark gap pulsers, 2) compact hydrogen gas switches in conjunction with high gain ultra-wideband antennas and, 3) solid state switched array antennas. This paper reviews the progress-to-date along these lines and identifies some pacing research obastacles that limit further improvements.

  7. Odd-odd deformed proton emitters.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, L S; Maglione, E

    2001-02-26

    Proton decay from odd-odd deformed nuclei is a long-standing unsolved problem. We present for the first time an exact solution using single particle Nilsson resonances. The lifetime is found to depend strongly on the single particle level occupied by the unpaired neutron, allowing a clear assignment of its Nilsson level. The emitters 112Cs, 140Ho, 150Lu, and 150Lu(m) are considered. The agreement with the experimental data is very good with deformations 0.1

  8. Plasma treatment for producing electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Don Mayo; Walter, Kevin Carl

    2001-01-01

    Plasma treatment for producing carbonaceous field emission electron emitters is disclosed. A plasma of ions is generated in a closed chamber and used to surround the exposed surface of a carbonaceous material. A voltage is applied to an electrode that is in contact with the carbonaceous material. This voltage has a negative potential relative to a second electrode in the chamber and serves to accelerate the ions toward the carbonaceous material and provide an ion energy sufficient to etch the exposed surface of the carbonaceous material but not sufficient to result in the implantation of the ions within the carbonaceous material. Preferably, the ions used are those of an inert gas or an inert gas with a small amount of added nitrogen.

  9. Gamma emitters in Hong Kong water

    SciTech Connect

    Shun-Yin, L.; Chung-Keung, M.; Wai-Kwok, N.; Shiu-Chun, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Radioactivity in water originates from natural and artificial sources. The development of a nuclear powerplant near Hong Kong necessitates that attention be given to formulating techniques to assess the possible resultant environmental radioactive contamination. Water samples collected from various sites in Hong Kong in the spring and summer of 1987, representing seawater, river water, reservoir water, drinking water, and underground water were studied through gamma-ray spectral analysis. Only gamma emitters in the U238 and Th232 series and K40 were detected. No fission product was detected with specific activity above 0.1 Bq/kg. The data could be the baseline for future monitoring of the radioactivity released from a nuclear plant being built at a 50-km distance from Hong Kong. The variation of detected specific activities may be due to geological differences and the effect of plants. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  10. New strongly deformed proton emitter: 117La

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soramel, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; Stroe, L.; Müller, L.; Bonetti, R.; Poli, G. L.; Malerba, F.; Bianchi, E.; Andrighetto, A.; Guo, J. Y.; Li, Z. C.; Maglione, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Signorini, C.; Liu, Z. H.; Ruan, M.; Ivaşcu, M.; Broude, C.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ferreira, L. S.

    2001-03-01

    The decay by proton emission of the 117La nucleus has been studied via the 310 MeV 58Ni+64Zn reaction. The nucleus has two levels that decay to the ground state of 116Ba with Ep=783(6) keV (T1/2=22(5) ms] and Ep=933(10) keV [T1/2=10(5) ms]. Calculations performed for a deformed proton emitter reproduce quite well the experimental results confirming that 117La is strongly deformed (β2~0.3). Spin and parity of the two p-decaying levels have been determined as well: 3/2+ for the ground state and 9/2+ for the Ex=151(12) keV excited state.

  11. Lyman Alpha Emitters and Galaxy Formation Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, S.; Kovac, K.; Somerville, R.; Moustakas, L.; Rhoads, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    The Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey has successfully identified the population of young Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies predicted about 35 years ago. High equivalent widths of the Lyman-alpha line in these sources suggest that they are a very young (age < 107 years), metal poor, population of stars at redshifts 4.5 and 5.7, making them very interesting objects to study in the context of galaxy formation scenarios. We have begun to do exactly this using the correlation function of LALA galaxies. While the strong correlation function indicates massive halos, the volume density of Lyman-alpha sources and the faint continuum levels indicate low-mass stellar systems. This discrepancy can be resolved by postulating multiple emitters in a single halo.

  12. Magnetic field emission gun with zirconiated emitter.

    PubMed

    Troyon, M

    1989-03-01

    A magnetic-field-superimposed field emission gun with low aberrations and equipped with a zirconiated tungsten emitter has been developed for applications where very stable high probe currents are required. It has been tested on a conventional electron microscope at 10 kV and on an electron beam testing system at 1 kV. Probe current i = 250 nA in a probe size d = 0.4 micron is obtained at 10 kV; at 1 kV the resolution is 0.1 micron with i = 5 nA, and 0.4 micron with i = 30 nA. For these probe currents, the spatial broadening effect due to electron-electron interactions in the beam is the preponderant factor limiting the probe size.

  13. Detectability of a Direct Sequence Emitter within a Network of Direct Sequence Emitters,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    interception over 1/R propagation paths requires very large, ground-based antennas in order to achieve a usable intercept Signal-to- Noise Ratio (SNR). On...the other hand, free space, 1/R 2 propagation paths provide intercept receivers with signal power levels well above tne thermal noise power even when...large enough to resolve individual emitters are too large to put on aircraft as required to achieve the necessary free space propagation. Hence, the

  14. Determination and error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements by remote sensing. [of leaves, soil and plant canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental determinations of the emittance of soils and leaves are reviewed, and an error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements is developed as an aid to remote sensing applications. In particular, an equation for the upper bound of the absolute error in an emittance determination is derived. The absolute error is found to decrease with an increase in contact temperature and to increase with an increase in environmental integrated radiant flux density. The difference between temperature and band radiance temperature is plotted as a function of emittance for the wavelength intervals 4.5 to 5.5 microns, 8 to 13.5 microns and 10.2 to 12.5 microns.

  15. Physical electrostatics of small field emitter arrays/clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Richard G.

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to improve qualitative understanding of electrostatic influences on apex field enhancement factors (AFEFs) for small field emitter arrays/clusters. Using the "floating sphere at emitter-plate potential" (FSEPP) model, it re-examines the electrostatics and mathematics of three simple systems of identical post-like emitters. For the isolated emitter, various approaches are noted. An adequate approximation is to consider only the effects of sphere charges and (for significantly separated emitters) image charges. For the 2-emitter system, formulas are found for charge-transfer ("charge-blunting") effects and neighbor-field effects, for widely spaced and for "sufficiently closely spaced" emitters. Mutual charge-blunting is always the dominant effect, with a related (negative) fractional AFEF-change δtwo. For sufficiently small emitter spacing c, |δtwo| varies approximately as 1/c; for large spacing, |δtwo| decreases as 1/c3. In a 3-emitter equispaced linear array, differential charge-blunting and differential neighbor-field effects occur, but differential charge-blunting effects are dominant, and cause the "exposed" outer emitters to have higher AFEF (γ0) than the central emitter (γ1). Formulas are found for the exposure ratio Ξ = γ0/γ1, for large and for sufficiently small separations. The FSEPP model for an isolated emitter has accuracy around 30%. Line-charge models (LCMs) are an alternative, but an apparent difficulty with recent LCM implementations is identified. Better descriptions of array electrostatics may involve developing good fitting equations for AFEFs derived from accurate numerical solution of Laplace's equation, perhaps with equation form(s) guided qualitatively by FSEPP-model results. In existing fitting formulas, the AFEF-reduction decreases exponentially as c increases, which is different from the FSEPP-model formulas. This discrepancy needs to be investigated, using systematic Laplace-based simulations and appropriate results

  16. Single-Particle Dynamics in Electron Storage Rings with Extremely Low Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-05-31

    Electron storage rings are widely used for high luminosity colliders, damping rings in high-energy linear colliders, and synchrotron light sources. They have become essential facilities to study high-energy physics and material and medical sciences. To further increase the luminosity of colliders or the brightness of synchrotron light sources, the beam emittance is being continually pushed downward, recently to the nanometer region. In the next decade, another order of reduction is expected. This requirement of ultra-low emittance presents many design challenges in beam dynamics, including better analysis of maps and improvement of dynamic apertures. To meet these challenges, we have refined transfer maps of common elements in storage rings and developed a new method to compute the resonance driving terms as they are built up along a beamline. The method is successfully applied to a design of PEP-X as a future light source with 100-pm emittance. As a result, we discovered many unexpected cancelations of the fourth-order resonance terms driven by sextupoles within an achromat.

  17. Space Charge Correction on Emittance Measurement of Low Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Treado, Colleen J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

    2012-09-07

    The goal of any particle accelerator is to optimize the transport of a charged particle beam along a set path by confining the beam to a small region close to the design trajectory and directing it accurately along the beamline. To do so in the simplest fashion, accelerators use a system of magnets that exert approximately linear electromagnetic forces on the charged beam. These electromagnets bend the beam along the desired path, in the case of bending magnets, and constrain the beam to the desired area through alternating focusing and defocusing effects, in the case of quadrupole magnets. We can model the transport of such a beam through transfer matrices representing the actions of the various beamline elements. However, space charge effects, produced from self electric fields within the beam, defocus the beam and must be accounted for in the calculation of beam emittance. We present below the preliminary results of a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through an accelerator and measure the emittance under the influence of space charge effects. We demonstrate the method of correctly calculating the emittance of a beam under space charge effects using a least square fit to determine the initial properties of the beam given the beam size measured at a specific point after transport.

  18. Emittance growth mechanisms for laser-accelerated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Andreas J; Fuchs, J; Sentoku, Y; Sotnikov, V; Bakeman, M; Antici, P; Cowan, T E

    2007-05-01

    In recent experiments the transverse normalized rms emittance of laser-accelerated MeV ion beams was found to be < 0.002 mm mrad, which is at least 100 times smaller than the emittance of thermal ion sources used in accelerators [T. E. Cowan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 204801 (2004)]. We investigate the origin for the low emittance of laser-accelerated proton beams by studying several candidates for emittance-growth mechanisms. As our main tools, we use analytical models and one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that have been modified to include binary collisions between particles. We find that the dominant source of emittance is filamentation of the laser-generated hot electron jets that drive the ion acceleration. Cold electron-ion collisions that occur before ions are accelerated contribute less than ten percent of the final emittance. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the experiment, for which we present a refined analysis relating emittance to temperature, a better representative of the fundamental beam physics.

  19. The gas phase emitter effect of lanthanum within ceramic metal halide lamps and its dependence on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhrmann, C.; Hoebing, T.; Bergner, A.; Groeger, S.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J.; Denissen, C.; Suijker, J.

    2015-08-07

    The gas phase emitter effect increases the lamp lifetime by lowering the work function and, with it, the temperature of the tungsten electrodes of metal halide lamps especially for lamps in ceramic vessels due to their high rare earth pressures. It is generated by a monolayer on the electrode surface of electropositive atoms of certain emitter elements, which are inserted into the lamp bulb by metal iodide salts. They are vaporized, dissociated, ionized, and deposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface within the cathodic phase of lamp operation with a switched-dc or ac-current. The gas phase emitter effect of La and the influence of Na on the emitter effect of La are studied by spatially and phase-resolved pyrometric measurements of the electrode tip temperature, La atom, and ion densities by optical emission spectroscopy as well as optical broadband absorption spectroscopy and arc attachment images by short time photography. An addition of Na to the lamp filling increases the La vapor pressure within the lamp considerably, resulting in an improved gas phase emitter effect of La. Furthermore, the La vapor pressure is raised by a heating of the cold spot. In this way, conditions depending on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency are identified, at which the temperature of the electrodes becomes a minimum.

  20. The gas phase emitter effect of lanthanum within ceramic metal halide lamps and its dependence on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhrmann, C.; Hoebing, T.; Bergner, A.; Groeger, S.; Denissen, C.; Suijker, J.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J.

    2015-08-01

    The gas phase emitter effect increases the lamp lifetime by lowering the work function and, with it, the temperature of the tungsten electrodes of metal halide lamps especially for lamps in ceramic vessels due to their high rare earth pressures. It is generated by a monolayer on the electrode surface of electropositive atoms of certain emitter elements, which are inserted into the lamp bulb by metal iodide salts. They are vaporized, dissociated, ionized, and deposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface within the cathodic phase of lamp operation with a switched-dc or ac-current. The gas phase emitter effect of La and the influence of Na on the emitter effect of La are studied by spatially and phase-resolved pyrometric measurements of the electrode tip temperature, La atom, and ion densities by optical emission spectroscopy as well as optical broadband absorption spectroscopy and arc attachment images by short time photography. An addition of Na to the lamp filling increases the La vapor pressure within the lamp considerably, resulting in an improved gas phase emitter effect of La. Furthermore, the La vapor pressure is raised by a heating of the cold spot. In this way, conditions depending on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency are identified, at which the temperature of the electrodes becomes a minimum.

  1. Stimulated longitudinal emittance growth in the Main Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, G.; Ieiri, T.

    1989-03-01

    During fixed target operations -- beam intensity is limited by coherent instabilities in both the Main Ring and Tevatron. The growth rates for instabilities are generally inversely proportional to the proton bunch length. Since fixed target operations are insensitive to the longitudinal emittance of the beams, bunch spreaders are employed to increase the emittance, and hence the bunch length. Emittance growth is stimulated by injecting noise onto either the RF phase or amplitude control voltages. Test results of the efficiency of various stimulation schemes are reported. The design of a bunch length monitor, used to measure the effect of the bunch spreader, is also presented. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 #6;± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  3. Thermal limit to the intrinsic emittance from metal photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jun Nasiatka, J.; Wan, Weishi; Karkare, Siddharth; Padmore, Howard A.; Smedley, John

    2015-09-28

    Measurements of the intrinsic emittance and transverse momentum distributions obtained from a metal (antimony thin film) photocathode near and below the photoemission threshold are presented. Measurements show that the intrinsic emittance is limited by the lattice temperature of the cathode as the incident photon energy approaches the photoemission threshold. A theoretical model to calculate the transverse momentum distributions near this photoemission threshold is presented. An excellent match between the experimental measurements and the theoretical calculations is demonstrated. These measurements are relevant to low emittance electron sources for Free Electron Lasers and Ultrafast Electron Diffraction experiments.

  4. New Low Emittance Lattice for the Super-B Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Bettoni, S.; Paoloni, E.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2011-10-21

    New low emittance lattices have been designed for the asymmetric SuperB accelerator, aiming at a luminosity of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Main optics features are two alternating arc cells with different horizontal phase advance, decreasing beam emittance and allowing at the same time for easy chromaticity correction in the arcs. Emittance can be further reduced by a factor of two for luminosity upgrade. Spin rotation schemes for the e{sup -} beam have been studied to provide longitudinal polarization at the IP, and implementation into the lattice is in progress.

  5. Longitudinal emittance growth due to nonlinear space charge effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Y. Y.; Yu, Simon S.; Barnard, John J.; Seidl, Peter A.

    2012-03-01

    Emittance posts limits on the key requirements of final pulse length and spot size on target in heavy ion fusion drivers. In this paper, we show studies on the effect of nonlinear space charge on longitudinal emittance growth in the drift compression section. We perform simulations, using the 3D PIC code WARP, for a high current beam under conditions of bends and longitudinal compression. The linear growth rate for longitudinal emittance turns out to depend only on the peak line charge density, and is independent of pulse length, velocity tilt, and/or the pipe and beam size. This surprisingly simple result is confirmed by simulations and analytic calculations.

  6. The dust nature of micro field emitters in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.; Petrov, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    Field emission currents emitted by micro-emitters are a limiting factor for the operational gradients of accelerating radio frequency (rf) cavities. Within the rf field emission theory the existence of needle like micro field emitters with very high length relative to the radius and corresponding high enhancement factor (β) is assumed. In this article the hypothesis that micro field emitters consists of long chains of conductive micro-particles is considered. Five different forces acting onto the particles in a high rf field are considered and the respective equations are derived. Some experimental observations and their explanation within this hypothesis are discussed.

  7. Method and apparatus for multispray emitter for mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Lin, Yuehe

    2004-12-14

    A method and apparatus that utilizes two or more emitters simultaneously to form an electrospray of a sample that is then directed into a mass spectrometer, thereby increasing the total ion current introduced into an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer, given a liquid flow rate of a sample. The method and apparatus are most conveniently constructed as an array of spray emitters fabricated on a single chip, however, the present invention encompasses any apparatus wherein two or more emitters are simultaneously utilized to form an electrospray of a sample that is then directed into a mass spectrometer.

  8. Observation of picometer vertical emittance with a vertical undulator.

    PubMed

    Wootton, K P; Boland, M J; Dowd, R; Tan, Y-R E; Cowie, B C C; Papaphilippou, Y; Taylor, G N; Rassool, R P

    2012-11-09

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic.

  9. Emittance Compensation in a Flat Beam RF Photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Anderson, S.; Colby, E.; Serafini, L.

    1997-05-01

    The beam dynamics of a flat beam rf photoinjector, which is intended to produce asymmetric emittances for linear collider applications, are analyzed, by both analytical and computational methods. The analytical model is a generalization of the recently developed theory of emittance compensation in round beams(L.Serafini, and J.B. Rosenzweig, submitted to Physical Review E.), in which a new mode of laminar flow beam dynamics, the invariant envelope, is found to give the ideal conditions for emittance minimization. Three-dimensional rf and beam dynamics simulations are used to iluminate the analytical results. abstract.

  10. A resonance-free nano-film airborne ultrasound emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daschewski, Maxim; Harrer, Andrea; Prager, Jens; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Beck, Uwe; Lange, Thorid; Weise, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we present a novel thermo-acoustic approach for the generation of broad band airborne ultrasound and investigate the applicability of resonance-free thermo-acoustic emitters for very short high pressure airborne ultrasound pulses. We report on measurements of thermo-acoustic emitter consisting of a 30 nm thin metallic film on a usual soda-lime glass substrate, generating sound pressure values of more than 140 dB at 60 mm distance from the transducer and compare the results with conventional piezoelectric airborne ultrasound transducers. Our experimental investigations show that such thermo-acoustic devices can be used as broad band emitters using pulse excitation.

  11. Design of a minimum emittance nBA lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. Y.

    1998-04-01

    An attempt to design a minimum emittance n-bend achromat (nBA) lattice has been made. One distinct feature is that dipoles with two different lengths were used. As a multiple bend achromat, five bend achromat lattices with six superperiod were designed. The obtained emittace is three times larger than the theoretical minimum. Tunes were chosen to avoid third order resonances. In order to correct first and second order chromaticities, eight family sextupoles were placed. The obtained emittance of five bend achromat lattices is almost equal to the minimum emittance of five bend achromat lattice consisting of dipoles with equal length.

  12. Plasmonic enhancement engineering of semiconductor light emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, John Timothy Irvine

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are light sources of great technological importance because of their wide spectral tunability, long lifetimes, and potentially high energy efficiency. It is widely observed, however, that LEDs based on all relevant material platforms exhibit degraded internal quantum efficiency as the emission wavelength is shifted into the green part of the visible spectrum. Increasing device efficiency in this spectral region has therefore become the focus of intense research. In this work we study the use of plasmonic metallic nanostructures as a method for enhancing LED efficiency. Electromagnetic fields are known to exhibit resonances near metallic nanostructures originating from collective oscillations of the electron gas on the metal surface. Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) confined to the surface of a planar metal film, and localized surface plasmons (LSPs) confined to the surface of a nanostructure, feature unique optical properties such as large near optical fields and large modal densities. These spatial and spectral properties are highly dependent on the material and geometric properties of the nanostructure, allowing for extensive engineering of the plasmonic system to meet application needs. Plasmonic nanostructures are currently being studied for use in a wide range of applications such as waveguiding, bio-sensing, surface-enhanced spectroscopy, solid state light emission, and solar cells. Coupling into both SPP and LSP modes can enhance the spontaneous emission rate of a nearby radiating dipole, by virtue of their large associated local optical fields and high density of modes. Effective scattering of the excited plasmonic resonances into the radiation continuum can then lead to large enhancements in radiated field intensity. In this work, we have studied the application of various metallic nanostructures to nitride semiconductor light emitters to enhance their emission efficiency. Numerical investigations have been conducted to

  13. Engineered Emitters for Improved Silicon Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Ronak A.

    In 2014, installation of 5.3GW of new Photovoltaic (PV) systems occurred in the United States, raising the total installed capacity to 16.36GW. Strong growth is predicted for the domestic PV market with analysts reporting goals of 696GW by 2020. Conventional single crystalline silicon cells are the technology of choice, accounting for 90% of the installations in the global commercial market. Cells made of GaAs offer higher efficiencies, but at a substantially higher cost. Thin film technologies such as CIGS and CdTe compete favorably with multi-crystalline Si (u-Si), but at 20% efficiency, still lag the c-Si cell in performance. The c-Si cell can be fabricated to operate at approximately 25% efficiency, but commercially the efficiencies are in the 18-21% range, which is a direct result of cost trade-offs between process complexity and rapid throughput. With the current cost of c-Si cell modules at nearly 0.60/W. The technology is well below the historic metric of 1/W for economic viability. The result is that more complex processes, once cost-prohibitive, may now be viable. An example is Panasonic's HIT cell which operates in the 22-24% efficiency range. To facilitate research and development of novel PV materials and techniques, RIT has developed a basic solar cell fabrication process. Student projects prior to this work had produced cells with 12.8% efficiency using p type substrates. This thesis reports on recent work to improve cell efficiencies while simultaneously expanding the capability of the rapid prototyping process. In addition to the p-Si substrates, cells have been produced using n-Si substrates. The cell emitter, which is often done with a single diffusion or implant has been re-engineered using a dual implant of the same dose. This dual-implanted emitter has been shown to lower contact resistance, increase Voc, and increase the efficiency. A p-Si substrate cell has been fabricated with an efficiency of 14.6% and n-Si substrate cell with a 13

  14. Red surface emitters: powerful and fast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Heinz; Ballmann, Tabitha; Butendeich, Rainer; Rossbach, Robert; Raabe, Bernd; Jetter, Michael; Scholz, Ferdinand

    2003-12-01

    Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) in the GaInP/AlGaInP material system have experienced a rapid development in their short history. In general lasers from that material system are suitable for a huge number of applications beginning with TV lasers and high power lasers for edge emitters, continuing with optical data storage, medical applications as well as data communication in cars, air planes, offices and between computers as application field for VCSELs. Especially automotive applications show the highest requirements on a laser with respect to operation temperature and power. In this talk we draw out the problems of the material system AlGaInP and its implications for laser applications. We discuss the epitaxial and technological solutions to overcome at least a part of these inherent problems. We will discuss the possible power that we can expect from VCSELs emitting in the range between 650 nm to 670 nm. We got from our lasers 5 mW, CW @ RT, 670nm and 2.5mW, CW@RT, 650 nm. We emphasize the role of doping, Bragg mirror grading, suitable detuning of cavity mode and gain, and optimisation of the contact layer and control of the oxide aperture in the VCSEL structure to get improved operation characteristics at higher temperatures. From the analysis of high frequency measurements, we could evaluate modulation bandwidths between 4 GHz and 10 GHz. The application of polyimide as a dielectric isolation material shows the potential to obtain modulation bandwidths beyond 10 GHz. For the intrinsic modulation bandwidth we get a value of 25 GHz, which is near the value edge emitters show. A more detailed discussion on photon lifetimes and carrier transport times will be given in the talk. Red light emitting VCSELS driven with short current pulses showed laser emission up to + 160°C case temperature. Thus, a CW operation up to +120°C can be expected after further improvement of power generation (decrease of series resistance) and heat spreading (optimized

  15. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  16. LASERS: Transversely diode-pumped passively Q-switched erbium glass laser emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, V. N.; Izyneev, A. A.; Sadovoi, A. G.; Sadovskii, P. I.; Sorokina, O. A.

    2008-03-01

    The properties of a laser diode array-pumped passively Q-switched ytterbium-erbium glass laser emitter are studied. It is found experimentally that the maximum output energy is achieved when the diameter of the TEM00 mode is 0.65-0.77 of the transverse size of the active element. By using two 100-W linear laser diode arrays with the output power not exceeding 70% of the maximum power, 5 mJ was achieved in a 50-ns diffraction-limited single pulse for the efficiency (with respect to the pump radiation energy) of 1.35%.

  17. Theoretical model for angular grating-based integrated optical vortex beam emitters.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiangbo; Cai, Xinlun; Chen, Yujie; Yu, Siyuan

    2013-04-15

    We develop a theoretical model for the recently reported integrated optical vortex beam emitters that incorporate angular gratings in microring resonators. Using azimuthally polarized dipole oscillators to represent emissions scattered from the grating elements that are located along the inner wall of the ring waveguide, we obtain expressions for far-field components under the paraxial approximation. The results show that the emission is of the form of cylindrical vector Bessel beams with exactly defined optical orbital angular momentum, and can have azimuthal, radial, and longitudinal field components after propagation. The calculation results for field distributions in both near and far zone agree well with the experimental results.

  18. High-throughput realization of an infrared selective absorber/emitter by DUV microsphere projection lithography.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Rezaei, Mohsen; Dexheimer, Eric; Mohseni, Hooman

    2016-01-22

    In this paper, we present a low-cost and high-throughput nanofabrication method to realize metasurfaces that have selective absorption/emission in the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We have developed DUV projection lithography to produce arbitrary patterns with sub-80 nm feature sizes. As examples of practical applications, we experimentally demonstrate structures with single and double spectral absorption/emission features, and in close agreement with numerical simulation. The fundamental mechanism of perfect absorption is discussed as well. Selective infrared absorbers/emitters are critical elements in realizing efficient thermophotovoltaic cells and high-performance biosensors.

  19. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Connolly, R; Liu, C.; Summers, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2014-08-15

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  20. Single-knob beam line for transverse emittance partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Kester, O. K.; Groening, L.; Leibrock, H.; Maier, M.; Rottländer, P.

    2013-04-01

    Flat beams feature unequal emittances in the horizontal and vertical phase space. Such beams were created successfully in electron machines by applying effective stand-alone solenoid fringe fields in the electron gun. Extension of this method to ion beams was proposed conceptually. The present paper is on the decoupling capabilities of an ion beam emittance transfer line. The proposed beam line provides a single-knob tool to partition the horizontal and vertical rms emittances, while keeping the product of the two emittances constant as well as the transverse rms Twiss parameters (αx,y and βx,y) in both planes. It is shown that this single knob is the solenoid field strength.

  1. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward Van Der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso De Mello

    2016-02-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.

  2. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    DOE PAGES

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; ...

    2016-02-19

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters,more » do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Furthermore, photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.« less

  3. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    SciTech Connect

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-02-19

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Furthermore, photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.

  4. Rare Earth Doped High Temperature Ceramic Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study develops a spectral emittance model for films of rare earth containing materials. Although there are several possible rare earth doped high temperature materials, this study was confined to rare earth aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral emittances was found for erbium, thulium and erbium-holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of these films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For thulium aluminum garnet the efficiency is 0.38 at 1700 K but only 0.19 at 1262 K.

  5. Single-photon emitters in GaSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonndorf, Philipp; Schwarz, Stefan; Kern, Johannes; Niehues, Iris; Del Pozo-Zamudio, Osvaldo; Dmitriev, Alexander I.; Bakhtinov, Anatoly P.; Borisenko, Dmitry N.; Kolesnikov, Nikolai N.; Tartakovskii, Alexander I.; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, Steffen; Bratschitsch, Rudolf

    2017-06-01

    Single-photon sources are important building blocks for quantum information technology. Emitters based on solid-state systems provide a viable route to integration in photonic devices. Here, we report on single-photon emitters in the layered semiconductor GaSe. We identify the exciton and biexciton transition of the quantum emitters with power-dependent photoluminescence and photon statistics measurements. We find evidence that the localization of the excitons is related to deformations of the GaSe crystal, caused by nanoscale selenium inclusions, which are incorporated in the crystal. These deformations give rise to local strain fields, which induce confinement potentials for the excitons. This mechanism lights the way for the controlled positioning of single-photon emitters in GaSe on the nanoscale.

  6. Emittance of TD-NiCr after simulated reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. K.; Dicus, D. L.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of simulated reentry heating on the emittance of TD-NiCr were investigated. Groups of specimens with three different preconditioning treatments were exposed to 6, 24, and 30 half-hour simulated reentry exposure cycles in a supersonic arc tunnel at each of three conditions intended to produce surface temperatures of 1255, 1365, and 1475 K. Emittance was determined at 1300 K on specimens which were preconditioned only and specimens after completion of reentry simulation exposure. Oxide morphology and chemistry were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. A consistent relationship was established between oxide morphology and total normal emittance. Specimens with coarser textured oxides tended to have lower emittances than specimens with finer textured oxides.

  7. Localization of Narrowband Single Photon Emitters in Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Bray, Kerem; Sandstrom, Russell; Elbadawi, Christopher; Fischer, Martin; Schreck, Matthias; Shimoni, Olga; Lobo, Charlene; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-03-23

    Diamond nanocrystals that host room temperature narrowband single photon emitters are highly sought after for applications in nanophotonics and bioimaging. However, current understanding of the origin of these emitters is extremely limited. In this work, we demonstrate that the narrowband emitters are point defects localized at extended morphological defects in individual nanodiamonds. In particular, we show that nanocrystals with defects such as twin boundaries and secondary nucleation sites exhibit narrowband emission that is absent from pristine individual nanocrystals grown under the same conditions. Critically, we prove that the narrowband emission lines vanish when extended defects are removed deterministically using highly localized electron beam induced etching. Our results enhance the current understanding of single photon emitters in diamond and are directly relevant to fabrication of novel quantum optics devices and sensors.

  8. Nanobubble induced formation of quantum emitters in monolayer semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Gabriella D.; Ajayi, Obafunso A.; Li, Xiangzhi; Zhu, X.-Y.; Hone, James; Strauf, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    The recent discovery of exciton quantum emitters in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) has triggered renewed interest of localized excitons in low-dimensional systems. Open questions remain about the microscopic origin previously attributed to dopants and/or defects as well as strain potentials. Here we show that the quantum emitters can be deliberately induced by nanobubble formation in WSe2 and BN/WSe2 heterostructures. Correlations of atomic-force microscope and hyperspectral photoluminescence images reveal that the origin of quantum emitters and trion disorder is extrinsic and related to 10 nm tall nanobubbles and 70 nm tall wrinkles, respectively. We further demonstrate that ‘hot stamping’ results in the absence of 0D quantum emitters and trion disorder. The demonstrated technique is useful for advances in nanolasers and deterministic formation of cavity-QED systems in monolayer materials.

  9. Innovative energy efficient low-voltage electron beam emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felis, Kenneth P.; Avnery, Tovi; Berejka, Anthony J.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced electron beams (AEB) has developed a modular, low voltage (80-125 keV), high beam current (up to 40 ma), electron emitter with typically 25 cm of beam width, that is housed in an evacuated, returnable chamber that is easy to plug in and connect. The latest in nanofabrication enables AEB to use an ultra-thin beam window. The power supply for AEB's emitter is based on solid-state electronics. This combination of features results in a remarkable electrical efficiency. AEB's electron emitter relies on a touch screen, computer control system. With 80 μm of unit density beam penetration, AEB's electron emitter has gained market acceptance in the curing of opaque, pigmented inks and coatings used on flexible substrates, metals and fiber composites and in the curing of adhesives in foil based laminates.

  10. CSR-induced emittance growth in achromats: Linear formalism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, M.

    2015-09-01

    We review the R-matrix formalism used to describe Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR)-induced projected emittance growth in electron beam transport lines and establish the connection with a description in terms of the dispersion-invariant function.

  11. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  12. Plasmonic nanochannel structure for narrow-band selective thermal emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyu; Clark, J. Kenji; Huang, Li-Chung; Ho, Ya-Lun; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques

    2017-06-01

    A plasmonic structure consisting of a periodic arrangement of vertical silicon nanochannels connected by U-shaped gold layers is demonstrated as a spectrally selective thermal emitter. The plasmonic nanochannel structure sustains a coupled mode between a surface plasmon polariton and a stationary surface plasmon resonance, which induces a strong and sharp resonance observed in the form of a reflectance dip in the far field. Upon heating the structure, a strong and narrow-bandwidth thermal emittance peak is observed with a maximum emittance value of 0.72 and a full-width-at-half-maximum of 248 nm at a wavelength of 5.66 μm, which corresponds to the reflectance dip wavelength. Moreover, we demonstrate the control of the emission peak wavelength by varying the period of the structure. The plasmonic nanochannel structure realizes a small-size and selective infrared thermal emitter, which is expected to be applicable as an infrared light source.

  13. Progress on the emitter wrap-through silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, J. M.; Buck, M. E.; Schubert, W. K.; Basore, P. A.

    The Emitter Wrap-Through (EWT) solar cell is a back-contacted solar cell with a carrier-collection junction (emitter) on the front surface. Elimination of grids from the front surface allows for higher performance by eliminating grid-obscuration losses and reducing series resistance, while keeping an emitter on the front surface maintains high collection efficiency in solar-grade materials with modest diffusion lengths. The EWT cell uses laser-drilled vias to wrap the emitter diffusion on the front surface to interdigitated contacts on the back surface. We report on progress towards demonstration of two concepts for the EWT cell. The first EWT concept uses a fabrication sequence based on heavily diffused grooves and plated metallizations, and the second EWT concept uses a single furnace step and screen-printed metallizations. We also report on demonstration of double-sided carrier collection in the EWT cell.

  14. The emittance of space radiator materials measured at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Difilippo, Frank; Barry, Jennifer; Kussmaul, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The spectral emittances of textured space radiator materials between 1.7 and 14.7 micrometer have been evaluated at room temperature and elevated temperature (630 C) in air. Heating in air caused a permanent increase in spectral emittance for all materials tested: HCl/ion beam textured 304 stainless steel, untextured Ti (6 percent Al, 4 percent V), and sandblasted Ti (6 percent Al, 4 percent V). Changes in the surface chemistry and/or surface morphology of these materials were also observed. Elevated temperature spectral emittance was measured in an argon atmosphere and compared to the measurements in air. Similarity between the room temperature and elevated temperature spectral emittance measurements was also investigated, and limited agreement was found.

  15. Recent Developments of Low-emittance Electron Gun for Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriki, Masao

    Recent developments of low-emittance electron guns for accelerator are reviewed. In the accelerator field, DC biased triode thermionic gun (Pierce type gun) has been widely used and is still conventional. On the other hand, because of strong demands on the high brightness electron beam by FEL and other advanced accelerator concepts based on linear accelerator, the low emittance beam generation becomes one of the most important issue in the accelerator science. The R&D effort is “accelerated” by two technological innovations, photo-cathode and RF gun. They made a large improvement on the beam emittance. After the explanations on the technical and physical aspects of the low emittance electron beam generation, advanced electron sources for accelerators are reviewed.

  16. Halo Formation And Emittance Growth of Positron Beams in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, P.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; O'Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2011-10-25

    An ultrarelativistic 28.5 GeV, 700-{micro}m-long positron bunch is focused near the entrance of a 1.4-m-long plasma with a density n{sub e} between {approx}10{sup 13} and {approx}5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. Partial neutralization of the bunch space charge by the mobile plasma electrons results in a reduction in transverse size by a factor of {approx}3 in the high emittance plane of the beam {approx}1 m downstream from the plasma exit. As n{sub e} increases, the formation of a beam halo containing {approx}40% of the total charge is observed, indicating that the plasma focusing force is nonlinear. Numerical simulations confirm these observations. The bunch with an incoming transverse size ratio of {approx}3 and emittance ratio of {approx}5 suffers emittance growth and exits the plasma with approximately equal sizes and emittances.

  17. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    PubMed Central

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots. PMID:26892489

  18. Design rules for core/shell nanowire resonant emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Da-Som; Kim, Sun-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    We study design principles to boost the extraction of light from core/shell GaN nanowire optical emitters. A full-vectorial electromagnetic simulation reveals that the extraction efficiency of an emitter within a nanowire cavity depends strongly on its position; the efficiency becomes maximized as the emitter's location approaches the center of the structure. The total extraction of light is sinusoidally modulated by the nanowire diameter, which is directly correlated with optical resonances. The introduction of a conformal dielectric coating on a nanowire leads to a dramatic enhancement in the extraction efficiency, which results from an increase in side emission owing to an optical antenna effect. A simple high-refractive-index dielectric coating approximately doubles the total extraction efficiency of a nanowire LED. These numerical findings will be valuable in providing strategies for high-efficiency nanowire-based optical emitters.

  19. Two-photon interference from two blinking quantum emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jöns, Klaus D.; Stensson, Katarina; Reindl, Marcus; Swillo, Marcin; Huo, Yongheng; Zwiller, Val; Rastelli, Armando; Trotta, Rinaldo; Björk, Gunnar

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effect of blinking on the two-photon interference measurement from two independent quantum emitters. We find that blinking significantly alters the statistics in the Hong-Ou-Mandel second-order intensity correlation function g(2 )(τ ) and the outcome of two-photon interference measurements performed with independent quantum emitters. We theoretically demonstrate that the presence of blinking can be experimentally recognized by a deviation from the gD(2 )(0 ) =0.5 value when distinguishable photons from two emitters impinge on a beam splitter. Our findings explain the significant differences between linear losses and blinking for correlation measurements between independent sources and are experimentally verified using a parametric down-conversion photon-pair source. We show that blinking imposes a mandatory cross-check measurement to correctly estimate the degree of indistinguishability of photons emitted by independent quantum emitters.

  20. Measurement of Emittance of Beam in the Debuncher During Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Halling, Mike

    1991-12-11

    The emittance of antiprotons in the debuncher was measured using two methods during normal stacking conditions. With 2.3 seconds of cooling the vertical emittance was found to be 3.6 {pi} mm-mr using scraper D:TJ308, and 2.9 {pi} mm-mr using the profile on SEM806. With 6.9 seconds of cooling time time the measured horizontal emittance was 2.1 {pi} mm-mr using D:RJ306 v.s. 1.9 {pi} mm-mr using SEM806; but with 2.3 seconds of cooling the measured emittance in the debuncher was larger than in the DTOA line, 4.5 {pi} mm-mr v.s. 2.8 {pi} mm-mr. This suggests that some beam is being scraped on a horizontal aperture restriction someplace in the extraction process.

  1. Work functions of hafnium nitride thin films as emitter material for field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Yasuhito Fujiwara, Sho; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2016-05-15

    The work functions of hafnium nitride thin films prepared by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering were investigated in vacuum, before and after surface cleaning processes, with a view of improving the properties of as-fabricated field emitter arrays comprising hafnium nitride emitters. The measurement of the work function was first performed for the as-deposited films and then for films subjected to surface cleaning process, either thermal treatment or ion bombardment. Thermal treatment at a maximum temperature of 300 °C reduced the work function by 0.7 eV. Once the film was heated, the work function maintained the reduced value, even after cooling to room temperature. A little change in the work function was observed for the second and third thermal treatments. The ion bombardment was conducted by exposing the sample to a thin plasma for different sample bias conditions and processing times. When the sample was biased at −10 V, the work function decreased by 0.6 eV. The work function reduction became saturated in the early stage of the ion bombardment. When the sample was biased at −50 V, the work function exhibited different behaviors, that is, first it decreased rapidly and then increased in response to the increase in processing time. The lowest attainable work function was found to be 4.00 eV. It should be noted that none of the work function values reported in this paper were obtained using surfaces that were demonstrated to be free from oxygen contamination. The present results suggest that the current–voltage characteristics of a field emitter array can be improved by a factor of 25–50 by the examined postprocesses.

  2. Sources of Emittance in RF Photocathode Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David

    2016-12-11

    Advances in electron beam technology have been central to creating the current generation of x-ray free electron lasers and ultra-fast electron microscopes. These once exotic devices have become essential tools for basic research and applied science. One important beam technology for both is the electron source which, for many of these instruments, is the photocathode RF gun. The invention of the photocathode gun and the concepts of emittance compensation and beam matching in the presence of space charge and RF forces have made these high-quality beams possible. Achieving even brighter beams requires a taking a finer resolution view of the electron dynamics near the cathode during photoemission and the initial acceleration of the beam. In addition, the high brightness beam is more sensitive to degradation by the optical aberrations of the gun’s RF and magnetic lenses. This paper discusses these topics including the beam properties due to fundamental photoemission physics, space charge effects close to the cathode, and optical distortions introduced by the RF and solenoid fields. Analytic relations for these phenomena are derived and compared with numerical simulations.

  3. HETDEX: Evolution of Lyman Alpha Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Guillermo A.; Gebhardt, K.; Hill, G. J.; Gronwall, C.; Ciardullo, R.; Finkelstein, S.; Gawiser, E.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) will produce a sample of 800,000 Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) over the 1.9

  4. An electron transporting blue emitter for OLED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Boyuan; Luo, Jiaxiu; Li, Suyue; Xiao, Lixin; Sun, Wenfang; Chen, Zhijian; Qu, Bo; Gong, Qihuang

    2010-11-01

    After the premier commercialization of OLED in 1997, OLED has been considered as the candidate for the next generation of flat panel display. In comparison to liquid crystal display (LCD) and plasma display panel (PDP), OLED exhibits promising merits for display, e.g., flexible, printable, micro-buildable and multiple designable. Although many efforts have been made on electroluminescent (EL) materials and devices, obtaining highly efficient and pure blue light is still a great challenge. In order to improve the emission efficiency and purity of the blue emission, a new bipolar blue light emitter, 2,7-di(2,2':6',2"-terpyridine)- 2,7-diethynyl-9,9-dioctyl-9H-fluorene (TPEF), was designed and synthesized. A blue OLED was obtained with the configuration of ITO/PEDOT/PVK:CBP:TPEF/LiF/Al. The device exhibits a turn-on voltage of 9 V and a maximum brightness of 12 cd/m2 at 15 V. The device gives a deep blue emission located at 420 nm with the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.17, 0.10). We also use TPEF as electron transporting material in the device of ITO/PPV/TPEF/LiF/Al, the turn-on voltage is 3 V. It is proved the current in the device was enhanced indeed by using the new material.

  5. Monolithic semiconductor light emitter and amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Nils W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A semiconductor light emitter comprising a substrate of a semiconductor material having a pair of opposed surfaces and a body of semiconductor material on one of the surfaces. The body includes a pair of clad layers of opposite conductivity types having an intermediate quantum well region therebetween. The clad layers are of a semiconductor material which forms a heterojunction with the material of the quantum well region. The clad layers and the quantum well region form a waveguide which extends along the body. A plurality of gain sections are formed in the body spaced along and optically coupled by the waveguide. Each of the gain sections is adapted to generate light therein when a voltage is placed thereacross. One of the gain section has gratings at each end thereof which are adapted to reflect light back into the one gain section and thereby create a beam of light. The grating between the one gain section and an adjacent gain section is adapted to allow some of the light generated in the one gain section to pass therethrough along the waveguide to the next gain section. Each of the other gain sections have gratings adjacent an end opposite the first gain sections. The periods of the grating are such that no self-oscillation of the light in the waveguide occurs so that each of the other gain sections serve as single pass amplifiers. The gratings also direct the amplified light from the other gain sections out of the body.

  6. Spectroscopic research on infrared emittance of coal ash deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Saljnikov, Aleksandar; Komatina, Mirko; Gojak, Milan; Vucicevic, Biljana; Goricanec, Darko; Stevanovic, Zoran

    2009-11-15

    This paper deals with thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits on a pulverized coal combustion boiler of an electric power plant. Normal emittance spectra in the near to medium infrared (2.5-25 {mu}m) region and total normal emittances were measured on four kinds of ground ash deposits. Measurements were conducted in the 570-1460 K temperature range which is common for boiler furnaces, by both heating and cooling the ash samples, with the aim to study the effect of their thermal history. Dependence of emittance on wavelength, temperature and chemical composition was studied, too. Samples were tested for transparency (opacity) to verify the accuracy of results. It was determined that the thicknesses used for the ash powders are opaque for infrared radiation for thicknesses in the order of a millimeter. Tests have shown that spectral emittance increases with an increase of wavelength with a characteristic pattern common for all samples. Spectral normal emittance increases strongly with temperature at shorter wavelengths and remains high and unchanged at longer ones. Emittance spectra are not very sensitive to chemical composition of ashes especially beyond {lambda} {approx} 5 {mu}m. With an increase of temperature, total emittance of the powdered sample decreases to a minimum value around 1200 K. Further temperature rise induces an increase of total emittance due to sintering in the ash. On cooling, the emittance increases monotonically following the hysteresis. Quantitative directions for evaluating thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits for the merits of the safety design of boiler furnaces were proposed. That comprises correlating the experimentally obtained emittance spectra with curves of simple analytical form, i.e., a continuous function of minimum emittance vs. wavelength. The proposed method can be extended to other specimens from the same furnace and used to determine correlations for thermal calculation of old and design of new furnaces

  7. Internal emitter limits for iodine, radium and radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Schlenker, R.A.

    1984-08-15

    This paper identifies some of the issues which arise in the consideration of the derivation of new limits on exposure to internal emitters. Basic and secondary radiation protection limits are discussed. Terms are defined and applied to the limitation of risk from stochastic effects. Non-stochastic data for specific internal emitters (/sup 131/I and the radium isotopes) are presented. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative aspects of the limit setting problem. 65 references, 2 figures, 12 tables.

  8. Study of ultra-low emittance design for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. -H.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; /SLAC

    2015-09-17

    Since its 2003 construction, the SPEAR3 synchrotron light source at SLAC has continuously improved its performance by raising beam current, top-off injection, and smaller emittance. This makes SPEAR3 one of the most productive light sources in the world. Now, to further enhance the performance of SPEAR3, we are looking into the possibility of converting SPEAR3 to an ultra-low emittance storage ring within its site constraint.

  9. Bulk molybdenum field emitters by inductively coupled plasma etching.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ningli; Cole, Matthew T; Milne, William I; Chen, Jing

    2016-12-07

    In this work we report on the fabrication of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etched, diode-type, bulk molybdenum field emitter arrays. Emitter etching conditions as a function of etch mask geometry and process conditions were systematically investigated. For optimized uniformity, aspect ratios of >10 were achieved, with 25.5 nm-radius tips realised for masks consisting of aperture arrays some 4.45 μm in diameter and whose field electron emission performance has been herein assessed.

  10. Nanostructure TEM analysis of diamond cold cathode field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, Travis S.; Ghosh, Nikkon; Wittig, James Edward; Kang, Weng; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Unocic, Kinga A; Davidson, James; Tolk, Norman H.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond cold cathode devices have demonstrated significant potential as electron field emitters. Ultra-sharp diamond pyramidal tips (~5nm tip radius) have been fabricated and show improvement in emission when compared to conventional field emitters. However, the emission mechanisms in these complex diamond nanostructures are not well understood. Transmission electron microscopy performed in this study provides new insight into tip structure and composition with implications for field emission and diamond growth.

  11. A Smart Microwave Vacuum Electron Device (MVED) Using Field Emitters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-31

    Stellar Lateral Emitters The original program was based on receiving lateral, nano -layer carbon emitters from Stellar Micro Devices (SMD). Stellar...Leakage current in the cathodes have been a very large problem. With an increased leakage both the heat of the cathode and voltage drop across...perfom1ance. The tleld emission arrays intended for the experiment did not meet specifications, so alternative field emission cathodes were used. While these

  12. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz Results The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. Conclusions The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters. PMID:21658266

  13. Validated Analytical Model of a Pressure Compensation Drip Irrigation Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshery, Pulkit; Wang, Ruo-Qian; Taylor, Katherine; Tran, Davis; Winter, Amos

    2015-11-01

    This work is focused on analytically characterizing the behavior of pressure-compensating drip emitters in order to design low-cost, low-power irrigation solutions appropriate for off-grid communities in developing countries. There are 2.5 billion small acreage farmers worldwide who rely solely on their land for sustenance. Drip, compared to flood, irrigation leads to up to 70% reduction in water consumption while increasing yields by 90% - important in countries like India which are quickly running out of water. To design a low-power drip system, there is a need to decrease the pumping pressure requirement at the emitters, as pumping power is the product of pressure and flow rate. To efficiently design such an emitter, the relationship between the fluid-structure interactions that occur in an emitter need to be understood. In this study, a 2D analytical model that captures the behavior of a common drip emitter was developed and validated through experiments. The effects of independently changing the channel depth, channel width, channel length and land height on the performance were studied. The model and the key parametric insights presented have the potential to be optimized in order to guide the design of low-pressure, clog-resistant, pressure-compensating emitters.

  14. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters.

    PubMed

    Pantchenko, Oxana S; Seidman, Seth J; Guag, Joshua W; Witters, Donald M; Sponberg, Curt L

    2011-06-09

    The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz. The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  15. A thermionic energy converter with an electrolytically etched tungsten emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbels, G.H.M.; Metselaar, R. )

    1990-08-15

    The bare work functions of etched and unetched plasma-sprayed tungsten were found to be 4.8 and 4.5 eV, respectively. The electron emission of plasma-sprayed tungsten, both etched and unetched, was measured over a wide range of temperatures in a cesium atmosphere. Work functions were derived from the saturation current densities. In the ignited mode, current-voltage ({ital I}-{ital V}) characteristics were measured. The influence of the emitter, collector, and cesium reservoir temperatures on the {ital I}-{ital V} characteristics was investigated. Barrier indexes of 2.06 and 2.30 eV were found for etched and unetched tungsten emitters, respectively. At an emitter temperature of 1400 {degree}C, in the case of an unetched tungsten emitter a power density of 1.5 W/cm{sup 2} was found, while for an etched tungsten emitter it was 4.5 W/cm{sup 2}. This increased power density could be attributed to a lower collector work function. The lower cesiated collector work function resulted from the evaporation of oxygen, as WO{sub 3}, from the etched tungsten emitter.

  16. Beam emittance forming line of the CW race-track microtron of the institute of nuclear physics of Moscow State University (INP MSU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, A. S.; Gevorkyan, V. G.; Gorbatov, Yu. I.; Gribov, I. V.; Ibadov, A. Kh.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Korneenkov, V. A.; Lazutin, E. V.; Makulbekov, E. A.; Piskarev, I. M.; Platov, K. Yu.; Savitsky, A. B.; Shumakov, A. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Sorvin, V. M.; Tiunov, A. V.; Ushkanov, V. A.; Zinoviev, S. V.

    1989-06-01

    The transverse and longitudinal emittance forming line (EFL) of the race-track microtron of INP MSU is described. The work presents the principles of operation, parameters of EFL elements, description of rf power supply system and automated control system. The method of EFL tuning and experimental results are discussed.

  17. Decoupling intensity radiated by the emitter in distance estimation from camera to IR emitter.

    PubMed

    Cano-García, Angel E; Galilea, José Luis Lázaro; Fernández, Pedro; Infante, Arturo Luis; Pompa-Chacón, Yamilet; Vázquez, Carlos Andrés Luna

    2013-05-31

    Various models using radiometric approach have been proposed to solve the problem of estimating the distance between a camera and an infrared emitter diode (IRED). They depend directly on the radiant intensity of the emitter, set by the IRED bias current. As is known, this current presents a drift with temperature, which will be transferred to the distance estimation method. This paper proposes an alternative approach to remove temperature drift in the distance estimation method by eliminating the dependence on radiant intensity. The main aim was to use the relative accumulated energy together with other defined models, such as the zeroth-frequency component of the FFT of the IRED image and the standard deviation of pixel gray level intensities in the region of interest containing the IRED image. By using the abovementioned models, an expression free of IRED radiant intensity was obtained. Furthermore, the final model permitted simultaneous estimation of the distance between the IRED and the camera and the IRED orientation angle. The alternative presented in this paper gave a 3% maximum relative error over a range of distances up to 3 m.

  18. Decoupling Intensity Radiated by the Emitter in Distance Estimation from Camera to IR Emitter

    PubMed Central

    Cano-García, Angel E.; Galilea, José Luis Lázaro; Fernández, Pedro; Infante, Arturo Luis; Pompa-Chacón, Yamilet; Vázquez, Carlos Andrés Luna

    2013-01-01

    Various models using radiometric approach have been proposed to solve the problem of estimating the distance between a camera and an infrared emitter diode (IRED). They depend directly on the radiant intensity of the emitter, set by the IRED bias current. As is known, this current presents a drift with temperature, which will be transferred to the distance estimation method. This paper proposes an alternative approach to remove temperature drift in the distance estimation method by eliminating the dependence on radiant intensity. The main aim was to use the relative accumulated energy together with other defined models, such as the zeroth-frequency component of the FFT of the IRED image and the standard deviation of pixel gray level intensities in the region of interest containing the IRED image. By using the abovementioned models, an expression free of IRED radiant intensity was obtained. Furthermore, the final model permitted simultaneous estimation of the distance between the IRED and the camera and the IRED orientation angle. The alternative presented in this paper gave a 3% maximum relative error over a range of distances up to 3 m. PMID:23727954

  19. Metal Optics Based nanoLEDs: In Search of a Fast, Efficient, Nanoscale Light Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, Michael Scott

    Since the invention of the laser, stimulated emission has been the de facto king of optical communication. Lasers can be directly modulated at rates as high as 50GHz, much faster than a typical solid state light-emitting diode (LED) that is limited by spontaneous emission to <1GHz. Unfortunately, lasers have a severe scaling problem; they require large cavities operated at high power to achieve efficient lasing. A properly designed LED can be made arbitrarily small and still operate with high-efficiency. On-chip interconnects is an area that is in desperate need of a high-speed, low-power optical emitter that can enable on-chip links to replace current high-loss metal wires. In this work, I will show that by utilizing proper antenna design, a nanoLED can be created that is faster than a laser while still operating at >50% efficiency. I start by formulating an optical antenna circuit model whose elements are based completely off of antenna geometry. This allows for intuitive antenna design and suggests that rate enhancements up to ~3,000x are possible while keeping antenna efficiency >50%. Such a massive speed-up in spontaneous emission would enable an LED that can be directly modulated at 100's of GHz, much faster than any laser. I then use the circuit model to design an arch-dipole antenna, a dipole antenna with an inductive arch across the feedgap. I experimentally demonstrate a free-standing arch-dipole based nanoLED with rate enhancement of 115x and 66% antenna efficiency. Because the emitter is InGaAsP, a common III-V material, I experimentally show that this device can be easily and efficiently coupled into an InP waveguide. Experimental coupling efficiencies up to 70% are demonstrated and directional antennas are employed that offer front to back emission ratios of 3:1. Finally, I show that a nanoLED can still have high quantum yield by using a transition metal dichalcogenide, WSe2, as the emitter material. By coupling a monolayer of WSe2 to a cavity

  20. Silicon Carbide Emitter Turn-Off Thyristor

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Gangyao; Li, Jun; ...

    2008-01-01

    A novel MOS-conmore » trolled SiC thyristor device, the SiC emitter turn-off thyristor (ETO) is a promising technology for future high-voltage switching applications because it integrates the excellent current conduction capability of a SiC thyristor with a simple MOS-control interface. Through unity-gain turn-off, the SiC ETO also achieves excellent Safe Operation Area (SOA) and faster switching speeds than silicon ETOs. The world's first 4.5-kV SiC ETO prototype shows a forward voltage drop of 4.26 V at 26.5  A / cm 2 current density at room and elevated temperatures. Tested in an inductive circuit with a 2.5 kV DC link voltage and a 9.56-A load current, the SiC ETO shows a fast turn-off time of 1.63 microseconds and a low 9.88 mJ turn-off energy. The low switching loss indicates that the SiC ETO could operate at about 4 kHz if 100  W / cm 2 conduction and the 100  W / cm 2 turn-off losses can be removed by the thermal management system. This frequency capability is about 4 times higher than 4.5-kV-class silicon power devices. The preliminary demonstration shows that the SiC ETO is a promising candidate for high-frequency, high-voltage power conversion applications, and additional developments to optimize the device for higher voltage (>5 kV) and higher frequency (10 kHz) are needed.« less

  1. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  2. Novalike cataclysmic variables are significant radio emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppejans, Deanne L.; Körding, Elmar G.; Miller-Jones, James C. A.; Rupen, Michael P.; Knigge, Christian; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Groot, Paul J.

    2015-08-01

    Radio emission from non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs, accreting white dwarfs) could allow detailed studies of outflows and possibly accretion flows in these nearby, numerous and non-relativistic compact accretors. Up to now, however, very few CVs have been detected in the radio. We have conducted a Very Large Array pilot survey of four close and optically bright novalike CVs at 6 GHz, detecting three, and thereby doubling the number of radio detections of these systems. TT Ari, RW Sex and the old nova V603 Aql were detected in both of the epochs, while V1084 Her was not detected (to a 3σ upper limit of 7.8 μ {Jy} {beam}^{-1}). These observations clearly show that the sensitivity of previous surveys was typically too low to detect these objects and that non-magnetic CVs can indeed be significant radio emitters. The three detected sources show a range of properties, including flaring and variability on both short (˜200 s) and longer term (days) time-scales, as well as circular polarization levels of up to 100 per cent. The spectral indices range from steep to inverted; TT Ari shows a spectral turnover at ˜6.5 GHz, while the spectral index of V603 Aql flattened from α = 0.54 ± 0.05 to 0.16 ± 0.08 (Fν ∝ να) in the week between observations. This range of properties suggests that more than one emission process can be responsible for the radio emission in non-magnetic CVs. In this sample we find that individual systems are consistent with optically thick synchrotron emission, gyrosynchrotron emission or cyclotron maser emission.

  3. Fabrication of Gate-Electrode Integrated Carbon-Nanotube Bundle Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; Bronikowski, Michael; Luong, Edward; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    A continuing effort to develop carbon-nanotube-based field emitters (cold cathodes) as high-current-density electron sources has yielded an optimized device design and a fabrication scheme to implement the design. One major element of the device design is to use a planar array of bundles of carbon nanotubes as the field-emission tips and to optimize the critical dimensions of the array (principally, heights of bundles and distances between them) to obtain high area-averaged current density and high reliability over a long operational lifetime a concept that was discussed in more detail in Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters (NPO-40817), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 2 (February 2007), page 58. Another major element of the design is to configure the gate electrodes (anodes used to extract, accelerate, and/or focus electrons) as a ring that overhangs a recess wherein the bundles of nanotubes are located, such that by virtue of the proximity between the ring and the bundles, a relatively low applied potential suffices to generate the large electric field needed for emission of electrons.

  4. Emittance and Phase Space Tomography for the Fermilab Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, F.G.G.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.M.; Moore, C.D.; Newhart, D.L.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Fermilab Linac delivers a variable intensity, 400-MeV beam to the MuCool Test Area experimental hall via a beam line specifically designed to facilitate measurements of the Linac beam emittance and properties. A 10 m, dispersion-free and magnet-free straight utilizes an upstream quadrupole focusing triplet in combination with the necessary in-straight beam diagnostics to fully characterize the transverse beam properties. Since the Linac does not produce a strictly elliptical phase space, tomography must be performed on the profile data to retrieve the actual particle distribution in phase space. This is achieved by rotating the phase space distribution using different waist focusing conditions of the upstream triplet and performing a deconvolution of the profile data. Preliminary measurements using this diagnostic section are reported here. These data represent a first-pass measurement of the Linac emittance based on various techniques. It is clear that the most accurate representation of the emittance is given by the 3-profile approach. Future work will entail minimizing the beam spot size on MW5 to test and possibly improve the accuracy of the 2-profile approach. The 95% emittance is {approx} 18{pi} in the vertical and {approx} 13{pi} in the horizontal, which is especially larger than anticipated - 8-10{pi} was expected. One possible explanation is that the entire Linac pulse is extracted into the MTA beamline and during the first few microseconds, the feed forward and RF regulation are not stable. This may result in a larger net emittance observed versus beam injected into Booster, where the leading part of the Linac beam pulse is chopped. Future studies will clearly entail a measurement of the emittance vs. pulse length. One additional concern is that the Linac phase space is most likely aperture-defined and non-elliptical in nature. A non-elliptical phase-space determination would require a more elaborate analysis and provide another explanation of the

  5. Nanostructure-Induced Distortion in Single-Emitter Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kangmook; Ropp, Chad; Barik, Sabyasachi; Fourkas, John; Shapiro, Benjamin; Waks, Edo

    2016-09-14

    Single-emitter microscopy has emerged as a promising method of imaging nanostructures with nanoscale resolution. This technique uses the centroid position of an emitter's far-field radiation pattern to infer its position to a precision that is far below the diffraction limit. However, nanostructures composed of high-dielectric materials such as noble metals can distort the far-field radiation pattern. Previous work has shown that these distortions can significantly degrade the imaging of the local density of states in metallic nanowires using polarization-resolved imaging. But unlike nanowires, nanoparticles do not have a well-defined axis of symmetry, which makes polarization-resolved imaging difficult to apply. Nanoparticles also exhibit a more complex range of distortions, because in addition to introducing a high dielectric surface, they also act as efficient scatterers. Thus, the distortion effects of nanoparticles in single-emitter microscopy remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that metallic nanoparticles can significantly distort the accuracy of single-emitter imaging at distances exceeding 300 nm. We use a single quantum dot to probe both the magnitude and the direction of the metallic nanoparticle-induced imaging distortion and show that the diffraction spot of the quantum dot can shift by more than 35 nm. The centroid position of the emitter generally shifts away from the nanoparticle position, which is in contradiction to the conventional wisdom that the nanoparticle is a scattering object that will pull in the diffraction spot of the emitter toward its center. These results suggest that dielectric distortion of the emission pattern dominates over scattering. We also show that by monitoring the distortion of the quantum dot diffraction spot we can obtain high-resolution spatial images of the nanoparticle, providing a new method for performing highly precise, subdiffraction spatial imaging. These results provide a better understanding of the

  6. Nanostructure-Induced Distortion in Single-Emitter Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kangmook; Ropp, Chad; Barik, Sabyasachi; Fourkas, John; Shapiro, Benjamin; Waks, Edo

    2016-09-01

    Single-emitter microscopy has emerged as a promising method of imaging nanostructures with nanoscale resolution. This technique uses the centroid position of an emitters far-field radiation pattern to infer its position to a precision that is far below the diffraction limit. However, nanostructures composed of high-dielectric materials such as noble metals can distort the far-field radiation pattern. Nanoparticles also exhibit a more complex range of distortions, because in addition to introducing a high dielectric surface, they also act as efficient scatterers. Thus, the distortion effects of nanoparticles in single-emitter microscopy remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that metallic nanoparticles can significantly distort the accuracy of single-emitter imaging at distances exceeding 300 nm. We use a single quantum dot to probe both the magnitude and the direction of the metallic nanoparticle-induced imaging distortion and show that the diffraction spot of the quantum dot can shift by more than 35 nm. The centroid position of the emitter generally shifts away from the nanoparticle position, in contradiction to the conventional wisdom that the nanoparticle is a scattering object that will pull in the diffraction spot of the emitter towards its center. These results suggest that dielectric distortion of the emission pattern dominates over scattering. We also show that by monitoring the distortion of the quantum dot diffraction spot we can obtain high-resolution spatial images of the nanoparticle, providing a new method for performing highly precise, sub-diffraction spatial imaging. These results provide a better understanding of the complex near-field coupling between emitters and nanostructures, and open up new opportunities to perform super-resolution microscopy with higher accuracy.

  7. Transverse emittance dilution due to coupler kicks in linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brandon; Hoffstaetter, Georg H.

    2007-11-01

    One of the main concerns in the design of low emittance linear accelerators (linacs) is the preservation of beam emittance. Here we discuss one possible source of emittance dilution, the coupler kick, due to transverse electromagnetic fields in the accelerating cavities of the linac caused by the power coupler geometry. In addition to emittance growth, the coupler kick also produces orbit distortions. It is common wisdom that emittance growth from coupler kicks can be strongly reduced by using two couplers per cavity mounted opposite each other or by having the couplers of successive cavities alternate from above to below the beam pipe so as to cancel each individual kick. While this is correct, including two couplers per cavity or alternating the coupler location requires large technical changes and increased cost for superconducting cryomodules where cryogenic pipes are arranged parallel to a string of several cavities. We therefore analyze consequences of alternate coupler placements. We show here that alternating the coupler location from above to below compensates the emittance growth as well as the orbit distortions. For sufficiently large Q values, alternating the coupler location from before to after the cavity leads to a cancellation of the orbit distortion but not of the emittance growth, whereas alternating the coupler location from before and above to behind and below the cavity cancels the emittance growth but not the orbit distortion. We show that cancellations hold for sufficiently large Q values. These compensations hold even when each cavity is individually detuned, e.g., by microphonics. Another effective method for reducing coupler kicks that is studied is the optimization of the phase of the coupler kick so as to minimize the effects on emittance from each coupler. This technique is independent of the coupler geometry but relies on operating on crest. A final technique studied is symmetrization of the cavity geometry in the coupler region with

  8. Joint Lyman α emitters - quasars reionization constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S.; Ferrara, A.; Semelin, B.

    2012-06-01

    We present a novel method to investigate c reionization, using joint spectral information on high-redshift Lyman α emitters (LAEs) and quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). Although LAEs have been proposed as reionization probes, their use is hampered by the fact their Lyα line is damped not only by intergalactic H I but also internally by dust. Our method allows us to overcome such degeneracy. First, we carefully calibrate a reionization simulation with QSO absorption line experiments. Then we identify LAEs (? and equivalent width >20 Å) in two simulation boxes at z= 5.7 and 6.6 and we build synthetic images/spectra of a prototypical LAE. The surface brightness maps show the presence of a scattering halo extending up to 150 kpc from the galaxye. For each LAE we then select a small box of (10 h-1 Mpc)3 around it and derive the optical depth τ along three viewing axes. At redshift 5.7, we find that the Lyα transmissivity ?, almost independent of the halo mass. This constancy arises from the conspiracy of two effects: (i) the intrinsic Lyα line width and (ii) the infall peculiar velocity. At higher redshift, z= 6.6, where ? the transmissivity is instead largely set by the local H I abundance and ? consequently increases with halo mass, Mh, from 0.15 to 0.3. Although outflows are present, they are efficiently pressure confined by infall in a small region around the LAE; hence they only marginally affect transmissivity. Finally, we cast line of sight originating from background QSOs passing through foreground LAEs at different impact parameters, and compute the quasar transmissivity (?). At small impact parameters, d < 1 cMpc, a positive correlation between ? and Mh is found at z= 5.7, which tends to become less pronounced (i.e. flatter) at larger distances. Quantitatively, a roughly 10× increase (from 5 × 10-3 to 6 × 10-2) of ? is observed in the range log Mh= (10.4-11.6). This correlation becomes even stronger at z= 6.6. By cross-correlating ? and ?, we can obtain a

  9. Modeling field emitter arrays using nonlinear line charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Singh, Gaurav; Kumar, Raghwendra

    2016-09-01

    Modeling high aspect ratio field emitter arrays is a computational challenge due to the enormity of the resources involved. The line charge model (LCM) provides an alternate semi-analytical tool that has been used to model both infinite as well as finite sized arrays. It is shown that the linearly varying charge density used in the LCM generically mimics ellipsoidal emitters rather than a Cylindrical-Post-with-an-Ellipsoidal-Tip (CPET) that is typical of nanowires. Furthermore, generalizing the charge density beyond the linear regime allows for modeling shapes that are closer to a CPET. Emitters with a fixed base radius and a fixed apex radius are studied with a view to understanding the effect of nonlinearity on the tip enhancement factor and the emitter current in each case. Furthermore, an infinite square array of the CPET emitters is studied using the nonlinear line charge model, each having a height h =1500 μm and a base radius b =1.5 μm . It is found that for moderate external field strengths ( 0.3 -0.4 V /μm ), the array current density falls sharply for lattice spacings smaller than 4/3 h . Beyond this value, the maximal array current density can be observed over a range of lattice spacings and falls gradually thereafter.

  10. RF gun emittance correction using unsymmetrical RF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, L.; Rivolta, R.; Terzoli, L.; Pagani, C.

    1992-07-01

    The beam dynamics in RF guns is characterized by an optimum injection phase which minimizes the RF-field-induced emittance blowup: such a condition corresponds to a vanishing first order term in the phase dependence of the exit transverse momentum. Away from the optimum phase, a sharp increase of the emittance is found. In this paper we analyze the possibility of compensating for both the first and second order terms, in order to recover the minimum emittance value even at phases different from the optimum one. Our scheme is based on the use of an unsymmetrical RF cavity, added downstream of the gun cavity and fully uncoupled from it, in order to be independently phased. At the exit of this cavity the minimum emittance value can be recovered, the injection phase being a free parameter to be independently optimized. In this way higher injection phases can be exploited, where the longitudinal rms emittance displays a minimum, and long bunches extracted from the gun can be magnetically compressed more efficiently, achieving a significant beam brightness increase with respect to conventionally optimized RF guns. An analytical study of the beam dynamics inside the unsymmetrical RF cavity is presented, together with the results of some numerical simulations performed with the PIC code ITACA [L. Serafini and C. Pagani, Proc. 1st EPAC, Rome, June 1988 (Word Scientific) p. 866].

  11. Study of Abnormal Vertical Emittance Growth in ATF Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Alabau, M.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Alabau, M.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Le Meur, G.; Rimbault, C.; Touze, F.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.K.; Appleby, R.; Scarfe, A.; Kuroda, S.; White, G.R.; Woodley, M.; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Since several years, the vertical beam emittance measured in the Extraction Line (EXT) of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK, that will transport the electron beam from the ATF Damping Ring (DR) to the future ATF2 Final Focus beam line, is significantly larger than the emittance measured in the DR itself, and there are indications that it grows rapidly with increasing beam intensity. This longstanding problem has motivated studies of possible sources of this anomalous emittance growth. One possible contribution is non-linear magnetic fields in the extraction region experimented by the beam while passing off-axis through magnets of the DR during the extraction process. In this paper, simulations of the emittance growth are presented and compared to observations. These simulations include the effects of predicted non-linear field errors in the shared DR magnets and orbit displacements from the reference orbit in the extraction region. Results of recent measurements using closed orbit bumps to probe the relation between the extraction trajectory and the anomalous emittance growth are also presented.

  12. Fabrication of VO2-based multilayer structure with variable emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Cao, Yunzhen; Zhang, Yuzhi; Yan, Lu; Li, Ying

    2015-07-01

    VO2 film holds promise for smart radiation device (SRD) use because of its infrared reflection change through the semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT). In present study, a multilayer structure which consisted of VO2 layer, HfO2 layer and Ag layer was fabricated to achieve variable emittance based on the principle of reflection filter and SMT of VO2. It was found that with optimal 50 nm-thick VO2 layer, emittance of the multilayer structure could reversibly change from 0.13 at 30 °C to 0.68 at 80 °C with emittance variability of 0.55. Emittance hysteresis loop with transition temperature (Tc) of 58 °C and narrow width of 4 °C was obtained. Finally, multilayer structures with W-doped VO2 films were deposited and transition temperature decreased from 58 to 5 °C as W doping concentration increased from 0% to 3%, with Tc decreasing efficiency of -17.2 °C/at%. However, W doping also led to increased low temperature infrared absorption of VO2 film, which resulted in decreased emittance variability for the multilayer structure, from 0.55 to 0.37 as the W doping concentration in VO2 layer increase from 0% to 3%.

  13. Study of Lower Emittance Lattices for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Nosochkov, Yuri; Safranek, James A.; Wang, Lanfa; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    We study paths to significantly reduce the emittance of the SPEAR3 storage ring. Lattice possibilities are explored with the GLASS technique. New lattices are designed and optimized for practical dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. Various techniques are employed to optimize the nonlinear dynamics, including the Elegant-based genetic algorithm. Experimental studies are also carried out on the ring to validate the lattice design. The SPEAR3 storage ring is a third generation light source which has a racetrack layout with a circumference of 234.1 m. The requirement to maintain the photon beamline positions put a significant constraint on the lattice design. Consequently the emittance of SPEAR3 is not on par with some of the recently-built third generation light sources. The present operational lattice has an emittance of 10 nm. For the photon beam brightness of SSRL to remain competitive among the new or upgraded ring-based light sources, it is necessary to significantly reduce the emittance of SPEAR3. In this paper we report our ongoing effort to develop a lower emittance solution for SSRL. We first show the potential of the SPEAR3 lattice with results of the standard cell study using the GLASS technique. This is followed by a discussion of the design strategy for full-ring linear lattices. Several lattice options are compared. We then show the methods and results for dynamic aperture optimization. Experiments were also conducted on the SPEAR3 ring to implement the lattice and to measure the key lattice parameters.

  14. Tuning the Magnetic Transport of an Induction LINAC using Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T L; Brown, C G; Ong, M M; Paul, A C; Wargo, P E; Zentler, J M

    2006-08-11

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Flash X-Ray (FXR) machine is a linear induction accelerator used to produce a nominal 18 MeV, 3 kA, 65 ns pulse width electron beam for hydrodynamic radiographs. A common figure of merit for this type of radiographic machine is the x-ray dose divided by the spot area on the bremsstrahlung converter where a higher FOM is desired. Several characteristics of the beam affect the minimum attainable x-ray spot size. The most significant are emittance (chaotic transverse energy), chromatic aberration (energy variation), and beam motion (transverse instabilities and corkscrew motion). FXR is in the midst of a multi-year optimization project to reduce the spot size. This paper describes the effort to reduce beam emittance by adjusting the fields of the transport solenoids and position of the cathode. If the magnetic transport is not correct, the beam will be mismatched and undergo envelope oscillations increasing the emittance. We measure the divergence and radius of the beam in a drift section after the accelerator by imaging the optical transition radiation (OTR) and beam envelope on a foil. These measurements are used to determine an emittance. Relative changes in the emittance can be quickly estimated from the foil measurements allowing for an efficient, real-time study. Once an optimized transport field is determined, the final focus can be adjusted and the new x-ray spot measured. A description of the diagnostics and analysis is presented.

  15. Method of images applied to driven solid-state emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scerri, Dale; Santana, Ted S.; Gerardot, Brian D.; Gauger, Erik M.

    2017-04-01

    Increasing the collection efficiency from solid-state emitters is an important step towards achieving robust single-photon sources, as well as optically connecting different nodes of quantum hardware. A metallic substrate may be the most basic method of improving the collection of photons from quantum dots, with predicted collection efficiency increases of up to 50%. The established "method-of-images" approach models the effects of a reflective surface for atomic and molecular emitters by replacing the metal surface with a second fictitious emitter which ensures appropriate electromagnetic boundary conditions. Here, we extend the approach to the case of driven solid-state emitters, where exciton-phonon interactions play a key role in determining the optical properties of the system. We derive an intuitive polaron master equation and demonstrate its agreement with the complementary half-sided cavity formulation of the same problem. Our extended image approach offers a straightforward route towards studying the dynamics of multiple solid-state emitters near a metallic surface.

  16. Electrical control of optical emitter relaxation pathways enabled by graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielrooij, K. J.; Orona, L.; Ferrier, A.; Badioli, M.; Navickaite, G.; Coop, S.; Nanot, S.; Kalinic, B.; Cesca, T.; Gaudreau, L.; Ma, Q.; Centeno, A.; Pesquera, A.; Zurutuza, A.; de Riedmatten, H.; Goldner, P.; García de Abajo, F. J.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Koppens, F. H. L.

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the energy flow processes and the associated energy relaxation rates of a light emitter is of fundamental interest and has many applications in the fields of quantum optics, photovoltaics, photodetection, biosensing and light emission. Advanced dielectric, semiconductor and metallic systems have been developed to tailor the interaction between an emitter and its environment. However, active control of the energy flow from an emitter into optical, electronic or plasmonic excitations has remained challenging. Here, we demonstrate in situ electrical control of the relaxation pathways of excited erbium ions, which emit light at the technologically relevant telecommunication wavelength of 1.5 μm. By placing the erbium at a few nanometres distance from graphene, we modify the relaxation rate by more than a factor of three, and control whether the emitter decays into electron-hole pairs, emitted photons or graphene near-infrared plasmons, confined to <15 nm from the graphene sheet. These capabilities to dictate optical energy transfer processes through electrical control of the local density of optical states constitute a new paradigm for active (quantum) photonics and can be applied using any combination of light emitters and two-dimensional materials.

  17. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.W.

    1999-03-30

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and about 10{sup {minus}7} Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10{sup {minus}8} Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters. 2 figs.

  18. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kwan, Simon W.

    1999-01-01

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10.sup.-4 Torr and about 10.sup.-7 Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10.sup.-8 Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters.

  19. Development of a MEMS electrostatic condenser lens array for nc-Si surface electron emitters of the Massive Parallel Electron Beam Direct-Write system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, A.; Ikegami, N.; Yoshida, T.; Miyaguchi, H.; Muroyama, M.; Yoshida, S.; Totsu, K.; Koshida, N.; Esashi, M.

    2016-03-01

    Developments of a Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) electrostatic Condenser Lens Array (CLA) for a Massively Parallel Electron Beam Direct Write (MPEBDW) lithography system are described. The CLA converges parallel electron beams for fine patterning. The structure of the CLA was designed on a basis of analysis by a finite element method (FEM) simulation. The lens was fabricated with precise machining and assembled with a nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) electron emitter array as an electron source of MPEBDW. The nc-Si electron emitter has the advantage that a vertical-emitted surface electron beam can be obtained without any extractor electrodes. FEM simulation of electron optics characteristics showed that the size of the electron beam emitted from the electron emitter was reduced to 15% by a radial direction, and the divergence angle is reduced to 1/18.

  20. Thermionic fuel element technology status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, J. W.; Horner, M. W.; Yang, L.

    1985-01-01

    The results of research, conducted between the mid-1960s and 1973, on the multiconverter thermionic fuel elements (TFEs) that comprise the reactor core of an SP-100 thermionic reactor system are presented. Fueled-emitter technology, insulator technology and cell and TFE assembly technology of the prototypical TFEs which were tested in-pile and out-of-pile during these years are described. The proto-TFEs have demonstrated reproducible performance within 5 percent and no premature failures within the 1.5 yr of operation (with projected 3-yr lifetimes). The two primary life-limiting factors had been identified as thermionic emitter dimensional increase due to interactions with the fuel and electrical insulator structural damage from fast neutrons. Multiple options for extending TFE lifetimes to 7 yr or longer are available and will be investigated in the 1984-1985 SP-100 program for resolution of critical technology issues. Design diagrams and test graphs are included.

  1. Hafnia-plugged microcavities for thermal stability of selective emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Heon-Ju; Smyth, Katherine; Bathurst, Stephen; Chou, Jeffrey; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Joannopoulos, John; Saka, Nannaji; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2013-06-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of micro-cavities effectively control photon motion and selectively emit radiation tailored to the preferred bandgap of photovoltaic (PV) cells, thus enhancing the efficiency of thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. At the high operating temperatures, however, the micro- and nano-patterned structures of the selective emitters quickly lose their integrity--obliterating the tight tolerances required for precise spectral control. Even if oxidation, recrystallization, and grain growth could be avoided with single-crystal tungsten (W) selective emitters with vacuum packaging, surface diffusion, evaporation, and re-condensation are not avoidable in long-term operation at high temperatures. The concept of a planar array of plugged micro-cavities to suppress the curvature-dependent thermal degradation modes is proposed and tested. Based on scale-accelerated failure tests of silicon devices, the lifetime of W selective emitters operating at 1100 K is estimated to be at least 30 yr.

  2. Lithium plasma emitter for collisionless magnetized plasma experiment.

    PubMed

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Lee, Jyun-Yi; Huang, Yi-Jue; Syugu, Wun-Jheng; Song, Sung-Xuang; Hsieh, Tung-Yuan; Cheng, C Z

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a newly developed lithium plasma emitter, which can provide quiescent and low-temperature collisionless conditions for magnetized plasma experiments. This plasma emitter generates thermal emissions of lithium ions and electrons to produce a lithium plasma. Lithium type beta-eucryptite and lanthanum-hexaboride (LaB(6)) powders were mixed and directly heated with a tungsten heater to synthesize ion and electron emissions. As a result, a plasma with a diameter of ~15 cm was obtained in a magnetic mirror configuration. The typical range of electron density was 10(12)-10(13) m(-3) and that of electron temperature was 0.1-0.8 eV with the emitter operation temperature of about 1500 K. The amplitude fluctuations for the plasma density were lower than 1%. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  3. Gaseous Ultraviolet-Radiation Source with Electron Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiguchi, Seishiro; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2001-03-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) source is proposed. It resembles a dc-type plasma display panel (PDP) but the applied voltage is well below the breakdown voltage and an electron emitter is used. The advantage of the new UV source is that it can reduce energy dissipation due to creation of ions. Numerical calculations with pure xenon show an efficiency of 11% for the applied voltage of 210 V@. The emitter current of 1.3 mA/cm2 was needed to realize an UV-radiation energy equal to that of a conventional PDP@. The efficiency increased with decreasing applied voltage while the emitter current increased to obtain the same amount of UV-radiation energy.

  4. Fully tuneable, Purcell-enhanced solid-state quantum emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzzella, M. Xia, T.; Pagliano, F.; Birindelli, S.; Zobenica, Z.; Fiore, A.; Midolo, L.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.

    2015-10-05

    We report the full energy control over a semiconductor cavity-emitter system, consisting of single Stark-tunable quantum dots embedded in mechanically reconfigurable photonic crystal membranes. A reversible wavelength tuning of the emitter over 7.5 nm as well as an 8.5 nm mode shift are realized on the same device. Harnessing these two electrical tuning mechanisms, a single exciton transition is brought on resonance with the cavity mode at several wavelengths, demonstrating a ten-fold enhancement of its spontaneous emission. These results open the way to bring several cavity-enhanced emitters mutually into resonance and therefore represent a key step towards scalable quantum photonic circuits featuring multiple sources of indistinguishable single photons.

  5. Low Emittance Tuning Studies for SuperB

    SciTech Connect

    Liuzzo, Simone; Biagini, Maria; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Donald, Martin; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    SuperB[1] is an international project for an asymmetric 2 rings collider at the B mesons cm energy to be built in the Rome area in Italy. The two rings will have very small beam sizes at the Interaction Point and very small emittances, similar to the Linear Collider Damping Rings ones. In particular, the ultra low vertical emittances, 7 pm in the LER and 4 pm in the HER, need a careful study of the misalignment errors effects on the machine performances. Studies on the closed orbit, vertical dispersion and coupling corrections have been carried out in order to specify the maximum allowed errors and to provide a procedure for emittance tuning. A new tool which combines MADX and Matlab routines has been developed, allowing for both corrections and tuning. Results of these studies are presented.

  6. High efficiency and stable white OLED using a single emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jian

    2016-01-18

    The ultimate objective of this project was to demonstrate an efficient and stable white OLED using a single emitter on a planar glass substrate. The focus of the project is on the development of efficient and stable square planar phosphorescent emitters and evaluation of such class of materials in the device settings. Key challenges included improving the emission efficiency of molecular dopants and excimers, controlling emission color of emitters and their excimers, and improving optical and electrical stability of emissive dopants. At the end of this research program, the PI has made enough progress to demonstrate the potential of excimer-based white OLED as a cost-effective solution for WOLED panel in the solid state lighting applications.

  7. Biological treatment of clogged emitters in a drip irrigation system.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ustün; Anapali, Omer; Dönmez, Mesude Figen; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2005-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate microbial organisms that can be used for preventing clogging in drip irrigation systems caused by biological factors. A total of 25 fungi isolate and 121 bacterial strains were isolated from water samples collected from drip irrigation systems in tomato greenhouses in the eastern Anatolia region of Turkey in the spring season of 2001. Biological clogging of emitters in a model drip irrigation system was experimentally caused by application of the microorganisms (fungi and bacteria) isolated in the study. Three antagonistic bacterial strains in the genus Bacillus spp (ERZ, OSU-142) and Burkholdria spp (OSU-7) were used for treatment of biological clogging of the emitters. The results showed that the antagonistic bacterial strains tested have the potential to be used as anti-clogging agents for treatment of emitters in drip irrigation system. This is the first study that demonstrated that antagonistic microorganisms can be utilized for treatment of clogging in drip irrigation systems.

  8. Field Emission from Lateral Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guohai; Song, Yenan

    2016-10-01

    A field emission from a lateral emitter made by a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) yarn was investigated. The lateral emitter showed an excellent field emission performance with a low turn-on electric field of 1.13 V/um at an emission current of 1 uA, high emission current of 0.2 mA at an applied voltage of 700 V, and long-time emission stability for over 20 h without any significant current decay under an initial emission current of about 0.10 mA. The lateral emitter also demonstrated a uniform line emission pattern. It is suggested that the field emission occurs from the outmost MWCNTs which are protruding out from the yarn surface.

  9. Study of narrowband single photon emitters in polycrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Russell G.; Shimoni, Olga; Martin, Aiden A.; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-11-03

    Quantum information processing and integrated nanophotonics require robust generation of single photon emitters on demand. In this work, we demonstrate that diamond films grown on a silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition can host bright, narrowband single photon emitters in the visible—near infra-red spectral range. The emitters possess fast lifetime (∼several ns), absolute photostability, and exhibit full polarization at excitation and emission. Pulsed and continuous laser excitations confirm their quantum behaviour at room temperature, while low temperature spectroscopy is performed to investigate inhomogeneous broadening. Our results advance the knowledge of solid state single photon sources and open pathways for their practical implementation in quantum communication and quantum information processing.

  10. HIGH RESOLUTION EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT SNS FRONT END

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac accelerates an H- beam from 2.5MeV up to 1GeV. Recently the emittance scanner in the MEBT (2.5 MeV) was upgraded. In addition to the slit - harp measurement, we now can use a slit installed on the same actuator as the harp. In combination with a faraday cup located downstream in DTL part of the linac, it represents a classical slit-slit emittance measurement device. While a slit slit scan takes much longer, it is immune to harp related problems such as wire cross talk, and thus looks promising for accurate halo measurements. Time resolution of the new device seems to be sufficient to estimate the amount of beam in the chopper gap (the scanner is downstream of the chopper), and probably to measure its emittance. This paper describes the initial measurements with the new device and some model validation data.

  11. Intra-beam scattering studies for low emittance at BAPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Sai-Ke; Wang, Jiu-Qing; Xu, Gang; Jiao, Yi

    2015-06-01

    The target parameters of modern ultra-low emittance storage ring light sources are entering into a regime where intra-beam scattering (IBS) becomes important and, in the case of the Beijing Advanced Photon Source (BAPS), which is being designed at the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP), even a limitation for achieving the desired emittances in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for X-ray wavelengths (≈10 pm). Due to the low emittance, the IBS effect will be very strong. Accurate calculations are needed to check if the design goal (ɛh+ɛv = 20 pm) can be reached. In this paper, we present the results of numerical simulation studies of the IBS effect on a BAPS temporary design lattice.

  12. Emittance growth in the DARHT Axis-II Downstream Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August; Schulze, Martin E.

    2015-04-14

    Using a particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated the possibilities for emittance growth through the quadrupole magnets of the system used to transport the high-current electron beam from an induction accelerator to the bremsstrahlung converter target used for flash radiography. We found that even highly mismatched beams exhibited little emittance growth (< 6%), which we attribute to softening of their initial hard edge current distributions. We also used this PIC code to evaluate the accuracy of emittance measurements using a solenoid focal scan following the quadrupole magnets. If the beam is round after the solenoids, the simulations indicate that the measurement is highly accurate, but it is substantially inaccurate for elliptical beams

  13. SiC IR emitter design for thermophotovoltaic generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.; Ferguson, Luke; McCoy, Larry G.; Pernisz, Udo C.

    1996-02-01

    An improved ceramic spine disc burner/emitter for use in a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generator is described. A columnar infrared (IR) emitter consisting of a stack of silicon carbide (SiC) spine discs provides for both high conductance for the combustion gases and efficient heat transfer from the hot combustion gases to the emitter. Herein, we describe the design, fabrication, and testing of this SiC burner as well as the characterization of the IR spectrum it emits. We note that when the SiC column is surrounded with fused silica heat shields, these heat shields suppress the emitted power beyond 4 microns. Thus, a TPV generator using GaSb photovoltaic cells covered by simple dielectric filters can convert over 30% of the emitted IR radiation to DC electric power.

  14. Heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters using parametric down-conversion source

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Wu, Fang-Zhou; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Guo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Quantum repeater is the key element in quantum communication and quantum information processing. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving a heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. We design the compact quantum circuits for nonlocal entanglement generation, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification, and discuss the feasibility of our protocols with current experimental technology. In our scheme, we use a parametric down-conversion source instead of ideal single-photon sources to realize the heralded quantum repeater. Moreover, our protocols can turn faulty events into the detection of photon polarization, and the fidelity can reach 100% in principle. Our scheme is attractive and scalable, since it can be realized with artificial solid-state quantum systems. With developed experimental technique on controlling emitter-waveguide systems, the repeater may be very useful in long-distance quantum communication. PMID:27350159

  15. Enhanced Field Emission Properties from Carbon Nanotube Emitters Grown on NiCr Alloy Surfaces with Grain Boundary Effect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    NiCr Ni Cr NiCr Cr2O3 Ni O Cr A to m ic C on ce nt ra tio n (% ) Sputter Time (min) (b) (c) 5 μm (a) 384.9 0.0 405.3 7.1 769.5 115.2...Emitters Grown on NiCr Alloy Surfaces with Grain Boundary Effect 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...Emitters Grown on NiCr Alloy Surfaces with Grain Boundary Effect Setha Yim,1,2 Riichiro Ohta,1,3 Jessie L. Killian,4 Nathaniel B. Zuckerman,1 Emily

  16. Generation of high power pulsed terahertz radiation using a plasmonic photoconductive emitter array with logarithmic spiral antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Christopher W.; Hashemi, Mohammad R.; Jarrahi, Mona

    2014-02-24

    An array of 3 × 3 plasmonic photoconductive terahertz emitters with logarithmic spiral antennas is fabricated on a low temperature (LT) grown GaAs substrate and characterized in response to a 200 fs optical pump from a Ti:sapphire mode-locked laser at 800 nm wavelength. A microlens array is used to split and focus the optical pump beam onto the active area of each plasmonic photoconductive emitter element. Pulsed terahertz radiation with record high power levels up to 1.9 mW in the 0.1–2 THz frequency range is measured at an optical pump power of 320 mW. The record high power pulsed terahertz radiation is enabled by the use of plasmonic contact electrodes, enhancing the photoconductor quantum efficiencies, and by increasing the overall device active area, mitigating the carrier screening effect and thermal breakdown at high optical pump power levels.

  17. Suppression of cross coupling in an external resonator for a diode laser bar with 19 single emitters.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sarah; Hengesbach, Stefan; Westphalen, Thomas; Traub, Martin; Hoffmann, Dieter

    2015-02-15

    We present an external cavity in a quasi-Littrow configuration for a diode laser bar with 19 single emitters and the individual spectral stabilization, ranging from wavelengths between 970 and 980 nm corresponding to each emitter. The imaging of the vertical waveguide mode onto a blazed grating acting as a diffractive optical element is realized with a beam transformation system that swaps the vertical and lateral axes. Along with a feedback intensity of <10%, the reduction of the divergence due to a beam expander results in high losses for cross coupling modes. We demonstrate the possibility to suppress cross coupling and that even a process-related small smile error has a positive effect on the quality of the spectral stabilization in a quasi-Littrow configuration.

  18. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices.

  19. Observation of negative differential transconductance in tunneling emitter bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veenhuizen, Marc J.; Locatelli, Nicolas; Moodera, Jagadeesh; Chang, Joonyeon

    2009-08-01

    We report on measurement of negative differential transconductance (NDTC) of iron (Fe)/magnesium-oxide (MgO)/silicon tunneling emitter NPN bipolar transistors. Device simulations reveal that the NDTC is a consequence of an inversion layer at the tunneling-oxide/P-silicon interface for low base voltages. Electrons travel laterally through the inversion layer into the base and give rise to an increase in collector current. The NDTC results from the recombination of those electrons at the interface between emitter and base contact which is dependent on the base voltage. For larger base voltages, the inversion layer disappears marking the onset of normal bipolar transistor behavior.

  20. Back-contacted emitter GaAs solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, G.L.; Marti, A.; Algora, C. )

    1990-06-25

    A new device structure to improve the performance of concentrator GaAs solar cells is described and the first experimental results are reported. The reason for such an improvement relies on a drastic reduction of the shadowing and series resistance losses based on the possibility of back contacting the emitter region of the solar cell. The experimental results obtained with devices of these types, with a simplified structure, fabricated by liquid phase epitaxy, demonstrate the feasibility and correct operation of the proposed back contact of the emitter of the cells.

  1. LOW EMITTANCE ELECTRON BEAMS FOR THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    An electron cooler, based on an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under development for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RMIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will be the first electron cooler operating at high energy with bunched beams. In order to achieve sufficient cooling of the ion beams the electron have to have a charge of 5 nC and a normalized emittance less than 4 {mu}. This paper presents the progress in optimizing the injector and the emittance improvements from shaping the charge distribution in the bunch.

  2. Pyrometric method for measuring emittances at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestrín, J.; Rodríguez, J.; Carra, M. E.; Cañadas, I.; Roldan, M. I.; Barbero, J.; Marzo, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work an alternative method for emittance determination based on pyrometric measurements is presented. The measurement procedure has been applied to AISI 310S steel samples in the Plataforma Solar de Almería vertical axis solar furnace SF5. The experimental results show that emittance increases with increasing temperature and decreases with increasing wavelength. This behaviour is in agreement with experimental results obtained by other authors. Analysis of tests has revealed a good repeatability (1%) and accuracy (< 2%) of this measurement procedure.

  3. Distributed proximity sensor system having embedded light emitters and detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A distributed proximity sensor system is provided with multiple photosensitive devices and light emitters embedded on the surface of a robot hand or other moving member in a geometric pattern. By distributing sensors and emitters capable of detecting distances and angles to points on the surface of an object from known points in the geometric pattern, information is obtained for achieving noncontacting shape and distance perception, i.e., for automatic determination of the object's shape, direction and distance, as well as the orientation of the object relative to the robot hand or other moving member.

  4. Excellent oxidation endurance of boron nitride nanotube field electron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yenan; Song, Yoon-Ho; Milne, William I.; Jin Lee, Cheol

    2014-04-21

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are considered as a promising cold electron emission material owing to their negative electron affinity. BNNT field emitters show excellent oxidation endurance after high temperature thermal annealing of 600 °C in air ambient. There is no damage to the BNNTs after thermal annealing at a temperature of 600 °C and also no degradation of field emission properties. The thermally annealed BNNTs exhibit a high maximum emission current density of 8.39 mA/cm{sup 2} and show very robust emission stability. The BNNTs can be a promising emitter material for field emission devices under harsh oxygen environments.

  5. Thermal emittance and response time of a cesium antimonide photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Merluzzi, Richard; Nichols, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the intrinsic emittance and response time of a Cs3Sb photocathode are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. Photoemission response time is evaluated using a RF deflecting cavity synchronized to a picosecond laser pulse train. We find that Cs3Sb has both small mean transverse energy, 160 ± 10 meV at 532 nm laser wavelength, and a prompt response time (below the resolution of our measurement) making it a suitable material for high brightness electron photoinjectors.

  6. Emittance Measurements at the Langley Chemical Physics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.

    1960-01-01

    Total hemispherical emittance measurements are made routinely for materials which may be heated by electrical resistance methods over the temperature range of 600 degrees to 2,000 F by using a black-body reference method. This employs a conical black body and a thermopile detector with a calcium fluoride lens. Emittance is obtained by measuring the radiant flux from the specimen strip and comparing it with the flux from an equal area of the black-body cone at the same temperature. The temperature measurements are made by use of thermocouples. It is planned to extend the temperature range of this type of measurement to temperatures above 2,000 F. Another technique has been investigated for measuring emittance of materials not amenable to electrical heating or thermocouple attachment. This method uses a black-body-cavity furnace similar to that used in reference 5 to measure emittance of transparent materials such as glass. The method employs a heated black-body cavity in which the semicircular specimen is allowed to come to the equilibrium temperature of the cavity and then is rotated in front of a water-cooled viewing port where a sensitive thermistor detector alternately views the specimen surface and the black-body cavity. The ratio of the two readings gives the specimen emittance directly, for the temperature of the black body. The detector output is recorded on a fast Brown self-balancing potentiometer. The furnace is provided with a water-cooled blackened shutter which may be inserted behind the specimen to eliminate any transmitted black-body radiation if the specimen is transparent. This apparatus is capable of measuring total normal emittance over the temperature range of 1,000 degrees to 2,000 F. Preliminary data for boron nitride specimens of two thicknesses are shown where total normal emittance is plotted against temperature for two experimental conditions: (1) black-body radiation incident on the back of the specimen and (2) no black-body radiation

  7. Improved brightness on broad-area single emitter (BASE) modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlik, Susanne; Guarino, Andrea; Matuschek, Nicolai; Bättig, Rainer; Arlt, Sebastian; Lu, Denis; Zayer, Nadhum; Greatrex, Jeffery; Sverdlov, Boris; Valk, Bernd; Lichtenstein, Norbert

    2009-02-01

    In this communication we report on the approaches to increase the brightness of Bookham's latest generations of high power pump modules. Since the single-emitter laser diode is the essential building block in all module designs, the optimization of the device design towards higher wall-plug efficiency, higher brightness and better reliability is one focus of the ongoing development efforts at Bookham. By using an analytical simulation tool critical parameters for efficient emitter-fiber coupling as the beam divergence and coupling scheme could be identified.

  8. Uncorrelated Energy Spread and Longitudinal Emittance of a Photoinjector Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Stupakov, G.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2005-05-25

    Longitudinal phase space properties of a photoinjector beam are important in many areas of high-brightness beam applications such as bunch compression, transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange, and high-gain free-electron lasers. In this paper, we discuss both the rf and the space charge contributions to the uncorrelated energy spread of the beam generated from a laser-driven rf gun. We compare analytical expressions for the uncorrelated energy spread and the longitudinal emittance with numerical simulations and recent experimental results.

  9. The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response

    SciTech Connect

    Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R.; Pease, R.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Kosier, S.L.

    1998-03-01

    Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps.

  10. The wave-field from an array of periodic emitters driven simultaneously by a broadband pulse.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Steve; Hill, Samuel; Fan, Yichao; Rowlands, George

    2013-06-01

    The use of phased array methods are commonplace in ultrasonic applications, where controlling the variation of the phase between the narrowband emitters in an array facilitates beam steering and focusing of ultrasonic waves. An approach is presented here whereby emitters of alternating polarity arranged in a one-dimensional array are pulsed simultaneously, and have sufficiently wide, controlled bandwidth to emit a two-dimensional wave. This pulsed approach provides a rapid means of simultaneously covering a region of space with a wave-front, whereby any wave that scatters or reflects off a body to a detector will have a distinct arrival time and frequency. This is a general wave phenomenon with a potential application in radar, sonar, and ultrasound. The key result is that one can obtain a smooth, continuous wave-front emitted from the array, over a large solid angle, whose frequency varies as a function of angle to the array. Analytic and finite element models created to describe this phenomenon have been validated with experimental results using ultrasonic waves in metal samples.

  11. Nonlocal effects: relevance for the spontaneous emission rates of quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic structures.

    PubMed

    Filter, Robert; Bösel, Christoph; Toscano, Giuseppe; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    The spontaneous emission rate of dipole emitters close to plasmonic dimers are theoretically studied within a nonlocal hydrodynamic model. A nonlocal model has to be used since quantum emitters in the immediate environment of a metallic nanoparticle probe its electronic structure. Compared to local calculations, the emission rate is significantly reduced. The influence is mostly pronounced if the emitter is located close to sharp edges. We suggest to use quantum emitters to test nonlocal effects in experimentally feasible configurations.

  12. Noise effects, emittance control, and luminosity issues in laser wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshkov, Sergey Valeriev

    2001-09-01

    To reach the new high energy frontiers (higher than a TeV center of mass energy) new acceleration methods seem to be needed. Plasma based wakefield accelerator is one possible candidate which can provide an ultra high gradient acceleration and thus make the total acceleration distance reasonable. However, the final energy is not the only requirement. The accelerator should maintain an excellent beam quality to meet the luminosity requirements at the Inter action Point (IP). One of the most important figures of merit which describe the quality of the beam is its emittance. We study the particle dynamics in laser pulse-driven wakefields over multi-stages in a several TeV range center of mass energy e+e - collider. The approach is based on a map of phase space dynamics over a stage of wakefield acceleration induced by a laser pulse (or electron beam). The entire system of the collider is generated with a product of multiple maps of wakefields, drifts, and magnets, etc. This systems map may include offsets of various elements of the accelerator, representing noise and errors arising from the operation of such a complex device. We find that an unmitigated strong focusing of the wakefield coupled with the alignment errors of the position (or laser beam aiming) of each Wakefield stage and the unavoidable dispersion in individual particle betatron frequencies leads to a phase space mixing and causes a transverse emittance degradation. The rate of the emittance increase in the limit of constant energy is proportional to the number of stages, the energy of the particles, the betatron frequency, the square of the misalignment amplitude, and the square of the betatron phase shift over a single stage. The accelerator with a weakened focusing force in a channel can, therefore, largely suppress the emittance degradation. To improve the emittance we introduce several methods: a mitigated wakefield focusing by working with a plasma channel, an approximately synchronous acceleration

  13. Strong Coupling of Single Emitters to Surface Plasmons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    individual optical emitters and elec- tromagnetic excitations in conducting nanostructures. The excitations are optical plasmons that can be local- ized to...subwavelength dimensions. Under realistic conditions, the tight confinement causes optical emission to be almost entirely directed into the propagating...has been substantial interest in nanoscale optical devices based on the electromagnetic sur- face modes surface plasmons associated with subwave

  14. On the equivalent dose for Auger electron emitters.

    PubMed

    Howell, R W; Narra, V R; Sastry, K S; Rao, D V

    1993-04-01

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons are widely used in nuclear medicine (e.g., 99mTc, 123I, 201Tl) and biomedical research (e.g., 51Cr, 125I), and they are present in the environment (e.g., 40K, 55Fe). Depending on the subcellular distribution of the radionuclide, the biological effects caused by tissue-incorporated Auger emitters can be as severe as those from high-LET alpha particles. However, the recently adopted recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) provide no guidance with regard to calculating the equivalent dose for these radionuclides. The present work, using spermatogenesis in mouse testis as the experimental model, shows that the lethality of the prolific Auger emitter 125I is linearly dependent on the fraction of the radioactivity in the organ that is bound to DNA. This suggests that the equivalent dose for Auger emitters may have a similar linear dependence. Accordingly, a formalism for calculating the equivalent dose for Auger emitters is advanced within the ICRP framework.

  15. Limits to Electron Beam Emittance from Stochastic Coulomb Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman-Smith, Christopher; Padmore, Howard A.; Wan, Weishi

    2008-08-22

    Dense electron beams can now be generated on an ultrafast timescale using laser driven photo-cathodes and these are used for a range of applications from ultrafast electron defraction to free electron lasers. Here we determine a lower bound to the emittance of an electron beam limited by fundamental stochastic Coulomb interactions.

  16. Transverse beam emittance measurement using quadrupole variation at KIRAMS-430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Dong Hyun; Hahn, Garam; Park, Chawon

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce a 430 MeV/u carbon ion (12 C 6+) beam for medical therapy, the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) has carried out the development of a superconducting isochronous cyclotron, the KIRAMS-430. At the extraction of the cyclotron, an Energy Selection System (ESS) is located to modulate the fixed beam energy and to drive the ion beam through High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) into the treatment room. The beam emittance at the ion beamline is to be measured to provide information on designing a beam with high quality. The well-known quadrupole variation method was used to determine the feasibility of measuring the transverse beam emittance. The beam size measured at the beam profile monitor (BPM) is to be utilized and the transformation of beam by transfer matrix is to be applied being taken under various transport condition of varying quadrupole magnetic strength. Two different methods where beam optics are based on the linear matrix formalism and particle tracking with a 3-D magnetic field distribution obtained by using OPERA3D TOSCA, are applied to transport the beam. The fittings for the transformation parameters are used to estimate the transverse emittance and the twiss parameters at the entrance of the quadrupole in the ESS. Including several systematic studies, we conclude that within the uncertainty the estimated emittances are consistent with the ones calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. High-absorptance high-emittance anodic coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Huong Giang (Inventor); Chesterfield, John L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A colored anodic coating for use on surfaces of substrates, e.g. aluminum substrates in which it is desirable to maintain a high solar absorptance (a) and a high infrared emittance (e), particularly in low earth orbit space environments. This anodic coating is preferably a dark colored coating, and even more preferably a black coating. This coating allows a touch temperature within an acceptable design range to preclude burning of an astronaut in case of contact, but also allows a solar radiation absorption in an amount such that an a/e ratio of unity is achieved. The coating of the invention comprises a first layer in the form of an acid anodized colored anodic layer for achieving a high solar absorptance and a second or high emittance layer in the form of a clear acid anodized layer for achieving a high emittance. The entire coating is quite thin, e.g. 1-2 mils and is quite stable in a hostile space environment of the type encountered in a low earth orbit. The coating is obtained by first creating the high emittance clear anodized coating on the metal surface followed by anodizing using a colored anodizing process.

  18. Achieving ultra-high temperatures with a resistive emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Tom; Franks, Greg; Holmes, Nicholas; LaVeigne, Joe; Matis, Greg; McHugh, Steve; Norton, Dennis; Vengel, Tony; Lannon, John; Goodwin, Scott

    2016-05-01

    The rapid development of very-large format infrared detector arrays has challenged the IR scene projector community to also develop larger-format infrared emitter arrays to support the testing of systems incorporating these detectors. In addition to larger formats, many scene projector users require much higher simulated temperatures than can be generated with current technology in order to fully evaluate the performance of their systems and associated processing algorithms. Under the Ultra High Temperature (UHT) development program, Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. (SBIR) is developing a new infrared scene projector architecture capable of producing both very large format (>1024 x 1024) resistive emitter arrays and improved emitter pixel technology capable of simulating very high apparent temperatures. During earlier phases of the program, SBIR demonstrated materials with MWIR apparent temperatures in excess of 1400 K. New emitter materials have subsequently been selected to produce pixels that achieve even higher apparent temperatures. Test results from pixels fabricated using the new material set will be presented and discussed. A 'scalable' Read In Integrated Circuit (RIIC) is also being developed under the same UHT program to drive the high temperature pixels. This RIIC will utilize through-silicon via (TSV) and Quilt Packaging (QP) technologies to allow seamless tiling of multiple chips to fabricate very large arrays, and thus overcome the yield limitations inherent in large-scale integrated circuits. Results of design verification testing of the completed RIIC will be presented and discussed.

  19. What Exactly Is the Light Emitter of a Firefly?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2015-11-10

    Firefly bioluminescence attracts people by its glaring beauty and fascinating applications, but what is the light emitter of a firefly? The answer to this question has been explored since before the 1960s. The unanimously accepted answer is that excited-state oxyluciferin is the light emitter. The complexity of this question arises from the existence of six chemical forms (keto, enol, keto-1, enol-1, enol-1′, and enol-2) of oxyluciferin. After decades of experimental and theoretical efforts, a consistent conclusion was almost reached in 2011: excited-state keto-1 is the only light emitter in fireflies. However, the debate is raised again by the latest in vitro experimental results. This study will solve this contradiction via hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations combined with molecular dynamics (MD). The calculations were performed in the real protein for the six chemical forms of oxyluciferin and their corresponding analogues employed in the latest experiments. By considering the real environment, the pH value, and a possible equilibrium of the chemical forms of oxyluciferin in vivo, the calculated results indicate that the main emitter is still the excited-state keto-1 form.

  20. Low emittance injector design for free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, S.; Pedrozzi, M.; Reiche, S.

    2015-12-01

    Several parameters determine the performance of free electron lasers: the slice and the projected emittance, the slice energy spread, and the peak current are the most crucial ones. The peak current is essentially obtained by magnetic compression stages along the machine or occasionally assisted by velocity bunching at low energy. The minimum emittance and the alignment of the slices along the bunch are mainly determined in the low energy part of the accelerator (injector). Variations at the per-mille level of several parameters in this section of the machine strongly influence these quantities with highly nonlinear dynamic. We developed a numerical tool to perform the optimization of the injector. We applied this code to optimize the SwissFEL injector, assuming different gun designs, initial bunch lengths and intrinsic emittances. We obtained an emittance along the bunch of 0.14 mm mrad and around 0.08 mm mrad for the maximum and the minimum SwissFEL charges (200 and 10 pC, respectively). We applied the same tool to a running injector, where we automatized the optimization of the machine.

  1. Selective solar absorber emittance measurement at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, Philémon; Braillon, Julien; Raccurt, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    Durability of solar components for CSP (Concentrated Solar Power Plant) technologies is a key point to lower cost and ensure their large deployment. These technologies concentrated the solar radiation by means of mirrors on a receiver tube where it is collected as thermal energy. The absorbers are submitted to strong environmental constraints and the degradation of their optical properties (emittance and solar absorbance) have a direct impact on performance. The characterization of a material in such condition is complicated and requires advanced apparatuses, and different measurement methods exist for the determination of the two quantities of relevance regarding an absorber, which are its emittance and its solar absorbance. The objective is to develop new optical equipment for measure the emittance of this solar absorber at elevated temperature. In this paper, we present an optical bench developed for emittance measurement on absorbers is conditions of use. Results will be shown, with a discussion of some factors of influence over this measurement and how to control them.

  2. High-absorptance high-emittance anodic coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Huong Giang (Inventor); Chesterfield, John L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A colored anodic coating for use on surfaces of substrates, e.g. aluminum substrates in which it is desirable to maintain a high solar absorptance (.alpha.) and a high infrared emittance (.epsilon.), particularly in low earth orbit space environments. This anodic coating is preferably a dark colored coating, and even more preferably a black coating. This coating allows a touch temperature within an acceptable design range to preclude burning of an astronaut in case of contact, but also allows a solar radiation absorption in an amount such that an .alpha./.epsilon. ratio of unity is achieved. The coating of the invention comprises a first layer in the form of an acid anodized colored anodic layer for achieving a high solar absorptance and a second or high emittance layer in the form of a clear acid anodized layer for achieving a high emittance. The entire coating is quite thin, e.g. 1-2 mils and is quite stable in a hostile space environment of the type encountered in a low earth orbit. The coating is obtained by first creating the high emittance clear anodized coating on the metal surface followed by anodizing using a colored anodizing process.

  3. On the Equivalent Dose for Auger Electron Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Roger W.; Narra, Venkat R.; Sastry, Kandula S. R.; Rao, Dandamudi V.

    2012-01-01

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons are widely used in nuclear medicine (e.g., 99mTc, 123I, 201T1) and biomedical research (e.g., 51Cr, 125I), and they are present in the environment (e.g., 40K, 55Fe). Depending on the subcellular distribution of the radionuclide, the biological effects caused by tissue-incorporated Auger emitters can be as severe as those from high-LET α particles. However, the recently adopted recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) provide no guidance with regard to calculating the equivalent dose for these radionuclides. The present work, using spermatogenesis in mouse testis as the experimental model, shows that the lethality of the prolific Auger emitter 125I is linearly dependent on the fraction of the radioactivity in the organ that is bound to DNA. This suggests that the equivalent dose for Auger emitters may have a similar linear dependence. Accordingly, a formalism for calculating the equivalent dose for Auger emitters is advanced within the ICRP framework. PMID:8475256

  4. Emittance control and RF bunch compression in the NSRRC photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, W. K.; Hung, S. B.; Lee, A. P.; Chou, C. S.; Huang, N. Y.

    2011-05-01

    The high-brightness photoinjector being constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center is for testing new accelerator and light-source concepts. It is the so-called split photoinjector configuration in which a short solenoid magnet is used for emittance compensation. The UV-drive laser pulses are also shaped to produce uniform cylindrical bunches for further reduction of beam emittance. However, limited by the available power from our microwave power system, the nominal accelerating gradient in the S-band booster linac is set at 18 MV/m. A simulation study with PARMELA shows that the linac operating at this gradient fails to freeze the electron beam emittance at low value. A background solenoid magnetic field is applied for beam emittance control in the linac during acceleration. A satisfactory result that meets our preliminary goal has been achieved with the solenoid magnetic field strength at 0.1 T. RF bunch compression as a means to achieve the required beam brightness for high-gain free-electron laser experiments is also examined. The reduction of bunch length to a few hundred femtoseconds can be obtained.

  5. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Bryan J; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F

    2015-08-21

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission.

  6. Improved Photoresist Coating for Making CNT Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; Manohara, Harish

    2009-01-01

    An improved photoresist-coating technique has been developed for use in the fabrication of carbon-nanotube- (CNT) based field emitters is described. The improved photoresist coating technique overcomes what, heretofore, has been a major difficulty in the fabrication process.

  7. Investigation of emittance growth in the White Horse beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Lee, H.; Lemons, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    The equilibrium and stability of the neutral gas transport section of the White Horse beam accelerator is studied. It is found that the beam should be unstable from the two-stream instability and from beam-excited ion-acoustic waves, with the latter being a possible source of emittance growth in the beam. 11 references, 16 figures, 1 table.

  8. Beam Loss and Longitudinal Emittance Growth in SIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M.; Hofmann, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Spiller, P.; Hülsmann, P.; Franchetti, G.; Damerau, H.; König, H. Günter; Klingbeil, H.; Kumm, M.; Moritz, P.; Schütt, P.; Redelbach, A.

    2005-06-01

    Beam losses of several percent occur regularly in SIS. The onset occurs during the RF capture of the beam. Previous studies have revealed that the losses can come from the RF bucket at the start of acceleration being over filled due to the longitudinal bucket acceptance being too small, or due to the mismatch between the mean energy from the UNILAC and synchronous energy of the SIS. The beam losses as measured by a DC beam transformer however show in addition to the sharp initial drop, for the above reasons, a much slower decay in the beam intensity. The speculated cause comes from the incoherent transverse tune shift of the bunched beam, which forces particles into transverse resonant conditions. The longitudinal emittance growth is also another important issue for SIS. Past measurements from Schottky-noise pick-ups have shown a factor of 3-5 increase in the longitudinal emittance depending on the extraction energy; a large factor when compared against expectations from theory. These factors were calculated from the ratio between the normalized relative momentum spread of the DC beam before RF capture and after debunching. In this present work, tomographical techniques have been used to reconstruct the phasespace from a series of bunch profile measurements from a Beam Position Monitor (BPM). Therefore one can find the rate of growth in the longitudinal emittance from a series of high resolution BPM measurements along the RF ramp. Furthermore the initial phasespace density matrix from these reconstructions has been used to generate the initial population of macroparticles for the ESME longitudinal dynamics Particle-In-Cell code, thereby enabling a comparison between the longitudinal emittance growth of the beam under ideal conditions and that of the experiment. The longitudinal emittance growth (rms) during the acceleration (˜540ms) was approximately 20%, and that during the RF capture was estimated to have an upper limit of about 40%. Later measurements have also

  9. Using antennas separated in flight direction to avoid effect of emitter clock drift in geolocation

    SciTech Connect

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Bickel, Douglas L

    2012-10-23

    The location of a land-based radio frequency (RF) emitter is determined from an airborne platform. RF signaling is received from the RF emitter via first and second antennas. In response to the received RF signaling, signal samples for both antennas are produced and processed to determine the location of the RF emitter.

  10. Spacecraft charging control by thermal, field emission with lanthanum-hexaboride emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal, field emitters of lanthanum (or perhaps cerium) hexaboride (LaB6) with temperature variability up to about 1500K are suggested for spacecraft charging control. Such emitters operate at much lower voltages with considerably more control and add plasma-diagnostic versatility. These gains should outweigh the additional complexity of providing heat for the LaB6 thermal, field emitter.

  11. Experimentally minimized beam emittance from an L-band photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, M.; Stephan, F.; Asova, G.; Grabosch, H.-J.; Groß, M.; Hakobyan, L.; Isaev, I.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Jachmann, L.; Khojoyan, M.; Klemz, G.; Köhler, W.; Mahgoub, M.; Malyutin, D.; Nozdrin, M.; Oppelt, A.; Otevrel, M.; Petrosyan, B.; Rimjaem, S.; Shapovalov, A.; Vashchenko, G.; Weidinger, S.; Wenndorff, R.; Flöttmann, K.; Hoffmann, M.; Lederer, S.; Schlarb, H.; Schreiber, S.; Templin, I.; Will, I.; Paramonov, V.; Richter, D.

    2012-10-01

    High brightness electron sources for linac based free-electron lasers (FELs) are being developed at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ). Production of electron bunches with extremely small transverse emittance is the focus of the PITZ scientific program. The photoinjector optimization in 2008-2009 for a bunch charge of 1, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.1 nC resulted in measured emittance values which are beyond the requirements of the European XFEL [S. Rimjaem , Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 671, 62 (2012)NIMAER0168-900210.1016/j.nima.2011.12.101]. Several essential modifications were commissioned in 2010-2011 at PITZ, resulting in further improvement of the photoinjector performance. Significant improvement of the rf gun phase stability is a major contribution in the reduction of the measured transverse emittance. The old TESLA prototype booster was replaced by a new cut disk structure cavity. This allows acceleration of the electron beam to higher energies and supports much higher flexibility for stable booster operation as well as for longer rf pulses which is of vital importance especially for the emittance optimization of low charge bunches. The transverse phase space of the electron beam was optimized at PITZ for bunch charges in the range between 0.02 and 2 nC, where the quality of the beam measurements was preserved by utilizing long pulse train operation. The experimental optimization yielded worldwide unprecedented low normalized emittance beams in the whole charge range studied.

  12. Low Emittance Guns for the ILC Polarized Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clendenin, J. E.; Brachmann, A.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R. E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R. H.; Wang, J. W.; Zhou, F.

    2007-06-01

    Polarized electron beams generated by DC guns are routinely available at several accelerators including JLAB, Mainz and SLAC. These guns operate with a cathode bias on the order of -100 kV. To minimize space charge effects, relatively long bunches are generated at the gun and then compressed longitudinally external to the gun just before and during initial acceleration. For linear colliders, this compression is accomplished using a combination of rf bunchers. For the basic design of the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 120 kV DC photocathode gun is used to produce a series of nanosecond bunches that are each compressed by two sub-harmonic bunchers (SHBs) followed by an L-band buncher and capture section. The longitudinal bunching process results in a significantly higher emittance than produced by the gun alone. While high-energy experiments using polarized beams are not generally sensitive to the source emittance, there are several benefits to a lower source emittance including a simpler more efficient injector system and a lower radiation load during transport especially at bends as at the damping ring. For the ILC, the SHBs could be eliminated if the voltage of the gun is raised sufficiently. Simulations using the General Particle Tracer (GPT) package indicate that a cathode bias voltage of ⩾200 kV should allow both SHBs to be operated at 433 or even 650 MHz, while ⩾500 kV would be required to eliminate the SHBs altogether. Simulations can be used to determine the minimum emittance possible if the injector is designed for a given increased voltage. A possible alternative to the DC gun is an rf gun. Emittance compensation, routinely used with rf guns, is discussed for higher-voltage DC guns.

  13. Emittance growth of an electron beam in a periodic focusing channel due to transfer of longitudinal energy to transverse energy

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1998-12-31

    Most discussions about emittance growth and halo production for an intense electron beam in a periodic focusing channel assume that the total transverse energy is constant (or, in other words, that the transverse and longitudinal Hamiltonians are separable). Previous analyses that include variations in the total transverse energy are typically based on a transverse-longitudinal coupling that is either from two-dimensional space-charge modes or particle-particle Coulomb collisions. With the space-charge modes, the energy exchange between the transverse and longitudinal directions is periodic, and of constant magnitude. The total energy transfer for the case of the Coulomb collisions is negligible. This limited increase of energy in the transverse direction from these other effects will limit the amount of transverse emittance growth possible. In this paper, the authors investigate a mechanism in which there is a continual transfer of energy from the longitudinal direction to the transverse direction, leading to essentially unlimited potential transverse emittance growth. This mechanism is caused by an asymmetry of the beam`s betatron motion within the periodic focusing elements. This analysis is based on thermodynamic principles. This mechanism exists for both solenoids and quadrupole focusing, although only solenoid focusing is studied here.

  14. Boron liquid solution deposited by spray method for p-type emitter formation in crystalline Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panek, Piotr; Swatowska, Barbara; Dawidowski, Wojciech; Juel, Mari; Zieba, Paweł

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of n-type crystalline Si based solar cell using boron liquid solution (BLS) deposited by spray method for p-type emitter formation. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used for the analysis of surface composition and electronic states of elements at the glass layer of dopant (GLD) obtained from BLS. The investigation of the borosilicate glass layer (BSG) created on a base of GLD during diffusion process were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The diffusion profiles were determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and electrochemical capacitance-voltage (EC-V) techniques, whereas the solar cells were characterized by the light current-voltage (I-V) and spectral measurements. The influence of a doping process on a minority carrier lifetime of the Si wafers was detected by quasi-steady-state photoconductance technique. Application of the elaborated BSL allowed to obtain the p-type Si emitters from BSG layer which exhibits unproblematic etching behaviour after diffusion process and final fabrication of the solar cells with the fill factor of 74% and photoconversion efficiency of 13.04 %. The elaborated BLS is a source which offers an attractive practicable alternative to form emitters on the n-type Si substrate.

  15. Effect of the gas mixing technique on the plasma potential and emittance of the JYFL 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Suominen, P.; Ropponen, T.; Kalvas, T.; Heikkinen, P.; Koivisto, H.

    2005-09-01

    The effect of the gas mixing technique on the plasma potential, energy spread, and emittance of ion beams extracted from the JYFL 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been studied under various gas mixing conditions. The plasma potential and energy spread of the ion beams were studied with a plasma potential instrument developed at the Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä (JYFL). With the instrument the effects of the gas mixing on different plasma parameters such as plasma potential and the energy distribution of the ions can be studied. The purpose of this work was to confirm that ion cooling can explain the beneficial effect of the gas mixing on the production of highly charged ion beams. This was done by measuring the ion-beam current as a function of a stopping voltage in conjunction with emittance measurements. It was observed that gas mixing affects the shape of the beam current decay curves measured with low charge-state ion beams indicating that the temperature and/or the spatial distribution of these ions is affected by the mixing gas. The results obtained in the emittance measurements support the conclusion that the ion temperature changes due to the gas mixing. The effect of the energy spread on the emittance of different ion beams was also studied theoretically. It was observed that the emittance depends considerably on the dispersive matrix elements of the beam line transfer matrix. This effect is due to the fact that the dipole magnet is a dispersive ion optical component. The effect of the energy spread on the measured emittance in the bending plane of the magnet can be several tens of percent.

  16. Self-regulation of discharge in non-compensating subsurface drip irrigation emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Rodríguez, María; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Sánchez, Raúl; Juana, Luis; Castañón, Guillermo

    2014-05-01

    While studying emitter discharge variability of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in the laboratory, the authors found out a possible self-regulation effect of non-compensating emitter discharge. This is due to the interaction between effects of emitter discharge and soil pressure. As known, under certain circumstances, a positive pressure hs develops at the discharge point of a buried emitter. The hydraulic gradient between the emitter interior and the soil would then decrease compared to the situation where the emitter is on the surface. Thus, the discharge reduces, following: q=k·(h_0-h_s)x, where q is the emitter flow rate, h0 is the working pressure head, and k and x are the emitter coefficient and exponent, respectively. The soil pressure would act as a regulator. The emitters with a greater flow rate in surface irrigation would generate a higher pressure in the soil. Therefore, the subsurface irrigation discharge would be reduced to a greater extent than in emitters with a lower flow rate. Consequently, the flow emitter variability would be smaller in buried emitters than in surface ones. The above interaction would not be observed in compensating emitters, even for the same or greater soil pressure variability. Their elastomers keep the flow rate constant within a compensation range, provided that the hydraulic gradient between the emitter interior and the soil pressure is higher than the lower limit of this range. To confirm this hypothesis, simulations were performed for both uniform and heterogeneous soils reproducing the laboratory conditions (working pressure head and emitter discharge). When the soil has a high heterogeneity, the self-regulation effect was very small as compared to the variability caused by the soil. Nevertheless, the authors consider that this effect is worth to be studied. The objective of the paper is to perform new simulations in order to determine under which circumstances self-regulation would be significant and find thresholds

  17. A time-dependent model for plasma spectroscopy of K-shell emitters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. W.; Larsen, J. T.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information on the suite of computer codes called FLY that allow one to understand the plasma spectroscopy of K-shell emitters. The code suite provides the basics for designing and/or analysing experiments where single-electron spectra are to be observed. The models incorporated are capable of generating information on lithium-like, helium-like and hydrogenic species from Z = 2 to 26, i.e., from helium to iron. This restriction in atomic number is dictated by the availability of data and interest in these elements. The code suite runs on any UNIX workstation or PC, thus allowing access to fairly sophisticated models while providing graphical output of populations, intensities, optical depths, as well as detailed spectra including Stark broadened transitions.

  18. Experimental study of coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line at the A0-photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, Jayakar C.T.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Edwards, H.; Ruan, J.; Santucci, J.; Sun, Y.E.-; Church, M.; Piot, P.; /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U.

    2010-08-01

    Next generation accelerators will require a high current, low emittance beam with a low energy spread. Such accelerators will employ advanced beam conditioning systems such as emittance exchanger to manipulate high brightness beams. One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to investigate the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation could limit high current operation of the emittance exchanger. In this paper, we report on the preliminary experimental and simulation study of the coherent synchroton radiation (CSR) in the emittance exchange line at A0 photoinjector.

  19. Emittance growth saturation effect in synchrotron machines due to point-like perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, G.; Chen, S.

    1993-11-01

    Analytical estimation of the transverse emittance growth due to a point-like perturbation is performed for a proton synchrotron machine. This emittance growth is caused by the tune spread within the bunch. However, the emittance growth suffers a saturation effect caused by the same tune spread. Computer simulations on the emittance growth due to resistive wall instabilities and feedback systems verify qualitatively this emittance growth saturation effect. These simulations were accomplished in the Medium Energy Booster of the Superconducting Super Collider using the TADIMMI computer code.

  20. High-current lanthanum-hexaboride electron emitter for a quasi-stationary arc plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Davydenko, V. I. Ivanov, A. A. Shul’zhenko, G. I.

    2015-11-15

    A high-current electron emitter on the basis of lanthanum hexaboride is developed for quasi-stationary arc plasma generators of ion sources. The emitter consists of a set of LaB{sub 6} washers interleaved with washers made of thermally extended graphite. The emitter is heated by the current flowing through the graphite washers. The thermal regime of emitter operation during plasma generation is considered. The emitter has been successfully used in the ion sources of the diagnostic injectors of fast hydrogen atomic beams.

  1. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, David A

    2003-07-28

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 {pi} mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be {approx} 13 {pi} mm-mrad for 5 ps and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.5 {pi} mm-mrad.

  2. Emittance measurements from a laser-driven electron injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, David A.

    1999-11-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 Å, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately I π mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance- compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, S-band, high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be ~13 π mm-mrad for 5 ps, and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.15 π mm-mrad.

  3. Parallel nanomanufacturing via electrohydrodynamic jetting from microfabricated externally-fed emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de Leon, Philip J.; Hill, Frances A.; Heubel, Eric V.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-06-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of planar arrays of externally-fed silicon electrospinning emitters for high-throughput generation of polymer nanofibers. Arrays with as many as 225 emitters and with emitter density as large as 100 emitters cm-2 were characterized using a solution of dissolved PEO in water and ethanol. Devices with emitter density as high as 25 emitters cm-2 deposit uniform imprints comprising fibers with diameters on the order of a few hundred nanometers. Mass flux rates as high as 417 g hr-1 m-2 were measured, i.e., four times the reported production rate of the leading commercial free-surface electrospinning sources. Throughput increases with increasing array size at constant emitter density, suggesting the design can be scaled up with no loss of productivity. Devices with emitter density equal to 100 emitters cm-2 fail to generate fibers but uniformly generate electrosprayed droplets. For the arrays tested, the largest measured mass flux resulted from arrays with larger emitter separation operating at larger bias voltages, indicating the strong influence of electrical field enhancement on the performance of the devices. Incorporation of a ground electrode surrounding the array tips helps equalize the emitter field enhancement across the array as well as control the spread of the imprints over larger distances.

  4. Effect of beam emittance on self-modulation of long beams in plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.

    2015-12-15

    The initial beam emittance determines the maximum wakefield amplitude that can be reached as a result of beam self-modulation in the plasma. The wakefield excited by the fully self-modulated beam decreases linearly with the increase in the beam emittance. There is a value of initial emittance beyond which the self-modulation does not develop even if the instability is initiated by a strong seed perturbation. The emittance scale at which the wakefield is suppressed by a factor of two with respect to the zero-emittance case (the so called critical emittance) is determined by inability of the excited wave to confine beam particles radially and is related to beam and plasma parameters by a simple formula. The effect of beam emittance can be observed in several discussed self-modulation experiments.

  5. Emittance Measurements Relevant to a 250 W(sub t) Class RTPV Generator for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolford, Dave; Chubb, Donald; Clark, Eric; Pal, Anna Maria; Scheiman, Dave; Colon, Jack

    2009-01-01

    A proposed 250 Wt Radioisotope Thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) power system for utilization in lunar exploration and the subsequent exploration of Mars is described. Details of emitter selection are outlined for use in a maintenance free power supply that is productive over a 14-year mission life. Thorough knowledge of a material s spectral emittance is essential for accurate modeling of the RTPV system. While sometimes treated as a surface effect, emittance involves radiation from within a material. This creates a complex thermal gradient which is a combination of conductive and radiative heat transfer mechanisms. Emittance data available in the literature is a valuable resource but it is particular to the test sample s physical characteristics and the test environment. Considerations for making spectral emittance measurements relevant to RTPV development are discussed. Measured spectral emittance data of refractory emitter materials is given. Planned measurement system modifications to improve relevance to the current project are presented.

  6. Determination of the efficiency of commercially available dose calibrators for beta-emitters.

    PubMed

    Valley, Jean-François; Bulling, Shelley; Leresche, Michel; Wastiel, Claude

    2003-03-01

    The goals of this investigation are to determine whether commercially available dose calibrators can be used to measure the activity of beta-emitting radionuclides used in pain palliation and to establish whether manufacturer-supplied calibration factors are appropriate for this purpose. Six types of commercially available dose calibrators were studied. Dose calibrator response was controlled for 5 gamma-emitters used for calibration or typically encountered in routine use. For the 4 most commonly used beta-emitters ((32)P, (90)Sr, (90)Y, and (169)Er) dose calibrator efficiency was determined in the syringe geometry used for clinical applications. Efficiency of the calibrators was also measured for (153)Sm and (186)Re, 2 beta-emitters with significant gamma-contributions. Source activities were traceable to national standards. All calibrators measured gamma-emitters with a precision of +/-10%, in compliance with Swiss regulatory requirements. For beta-emitters, dose calibrator intrinsic efficiency depends strongly on the maximal energy of the beta-spectrum and is notably low for (169)Er. Manufacturer-supplied calibration factors give accurate results for beta-emitters with maximal beta-energy in the middle-energy range (1 MeV) but are not appropriate for use with low-energy ((169)Er) or high-energy ((90)Y) beta-emitters. beta-emitters with significant gamma-contributions behave like gamma-emitters. Commercially available dose calibrators have an intrinsic efficiency that is sufficient for the measurement of beta-emitters, including beta-emitters with a low maximum beta-energy. Manufacturer-supplied calibration factors are reliable for gamma-emitters and beta-emitters in the middle-energy range. For low- and high-energy beta-emitters, the use of manufacturer-supplied calibration factors introduces significant measurement inaccuracy.

  7. Lattice and emittance optimization techniques and the ALS brightness upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steier, C.; Madur, A.; Nishimura, H.; Robin, D.; Sannibale, F.; Sun, C.; Wan, W.; Yang, L.

    2011-09-01

    An upgrade project is under way to further improve the brightness of the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley Lab by reducing its horizontal emittance from 6.3 to 2.2 nm (effective emittance in the straights from 6.4 to 2.5 nm). This will result in a brightness increase by a factor of three for bend magnet beamlines and at least a factor of two for insertion device beamlines and will keep the ALS competitive with newer sources. This paper presents an overview of the upgrade project with emphasis on the nonlinear beam dynamics simulations. It also discusses in a more general way the techniques used at LBNL for finding optimum lattices (e.g. the ones with maximum brightness) and optimizing the particle dynamics, thereby increasing beam lifetime and stability.

  8. Extended Emitter Target Tracking Using GM-PHD Filter

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Youqing; Zhou, Shilin; Gao, Gui; Zou, Huanxin; Lei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    If equipped with several radar emitters, a target will produce more than one measurement per time step and is denoted as an extended target. However, due to the requirement of all possible measurement set partitions, the exact probability hypothesis density filter for extended target tracking is computationally intractable. To reduce the computational burden, a fast partitioning algorithm based on hierarchy clustering is proposed in this paper. It combines the two most similar cells to obtain new partitions step by step. The pseudo-likelihoods in the Gaussian-mixture probability hypothesis density filter can then be computed iteratively. Furthermore, considering the additional measurement information from the emitter target, the signal feature is also used in partitioning the measurement set to improve the tracking performance. The simulation results show that the proposed method can perform better with lower computational complexity in scenarios with different clutter densities. PMID:25490206

  9. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-09-02

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based on combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated together with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  10. Oxidation and emittance of superalloys in heat shield applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Clark, R. K.; Unnam, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recently developed superalloys that form alumina coatings have a high potential for heat shield applications for advanced aerospace vehicles at temperatures above 1095C. Both INCOLOY alloy MA 956 (of the Inco Alloys International, Inc.), an iron-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy, and CABOT alloy No. 214 (of the Cabot Corporation), an alumina-forming nickel-chromium alloy, have good oxidation resistance and good elevated temperature strength. The oxidation resistance of both alloys has been attributed to the formation of a thin alumina layer (alpha-Al2O3) at the surface. Emittance and oxidation data were obtained for simulated Space Shuttle reentry conditions using a hypersonic arc-heated wind tunnel. The surface oxides and substrate alloys were characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive X-ray analysis unit. The mass loss and emittance characteristics of the two alloys are discussed.

  11. Intrinsic normalized emittance growth in laser-driven electron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorati, M.; Bacci, A.; Benedetti, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Antici, P.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-based electron sources are attracting strong interest from the conventional accelerator community due to their unique characteristics in terms of high initial energy, low emittance, and significant beam current. Extremely strong electric fields (up to hundreds of GV/m) generated in the plasma allow accelerating gradients much higher than in conventional accelerators and set the basis for achieving very high final energies in a compact space. Generating laser-driven high-energy electron beam lines therefore represents an attractive challenge for novel particle accelerators. In this paper we show that laser-driven electrons generated by the nowadays consolidated TW laser systems, when leaving the interaction region, are subject to a very strong, normalized emittance worsening which makes them quickly unusable for any beam transport. Furthermore, due to their intrinsic beam characteristics, controlling and capturing the full beam current can only be achieved improving the source parameters.

  12. Coupling of individual quantum emitters to channel plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez-Ureña, Esteban; Gonzalez-Ballestero, Carlos; Geiselmann, Michael; Marty, Renaud; Radko, Ilya P.; Holmgaard, Tobias; Alaverdyan, Yury; Moreno, Esteban; García-Vidal, Francisco J.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Quidant, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Efficient light-matter interaction lies at the heart of many emerging technologies that seek on-chip integration of solid-state photonic systems. Plasmonic waveguides, which guide the radiation in the form of strongly confined surface plasmon-polariton modes, represent a promising solution to manipulate single photons in coplanar architectures with unprecedented small footprints. Here we demonstrate coupling of the emission from a single quantum emitter to the channel plasmon polaritons supported by a V-groove plasmonic waveguide. Extensive theoretical simulations enable us to determine the position and orientation of the quantum emitter for optimum coupling. Concomitantly with these predictions, we demonstrate experimentally that 42% of a single nitrogen-vacancy centre emission efficiently couples into the supported modes of the V-groove. This work paves the way towards practical realization of efficient and long distance transfer of energy for integrated solid-state quantum systems. PMID:26249363

  13. The image-charge correction for curved field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Ramachandran, Rajasree

    2017-07-01

    The image-charge potential plays a key role in field emission by lowering the potential barrier, thereby leading to an increase in current density by orders of magnitude. The classical image-charge potential is however strictly applicable to planar emitters rather than the curved protrusions characteristic of field emission sites. Using recent results [Jensen et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 35, 02C101 (2017)] for a hyperboloid emitting surface, we show that for a charge close to the emitter surface, the image charge magnitude and location are well approximated by replacing the surface locally by a sphere having the same radius of curvature. Corrections to the image-charge potential under this approximation are calculated and found to be significant for field emission when the radius of curvature is in the nanometer regime. In such cases, there is reduced electron emission and the effect is more pronounced at lower external field strengths.

  14. First observation of the exchange of transverse and longitudinal emittances

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.P.; Koeth, T.; Sun, Y.-E; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    An experimental program to demonstrate a novel phase space manipulation in which the horizontal and longitudinal emittances of a particle beam are exchanged has been completed at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector. A new beamline, consisting of a TM{sub 110} deflecting mode cavity flanked by two horizontally dispersive doglegs has been installed. We report on the first direct observation of transverse and longitudinal emittance exchange: {l_brace}{var_epsilon}{sub x}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub y}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub z}{sup n}{r_brace} = {l_brace} 2.9 {+-} 0.1, 2.4 {+-} 0.1, 13.1 {+-} 1.3{r_brace} {yields} {l_brace}11.3 {+-} 1.1, 2.9 {+-} 0.5, 3.1 {+-} 0.3{r_brace} mm-mrad.

  15. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Yorita, T. Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Shimada, K.; Yasuda, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamura, H.; Kamakura, K.

    2016-02-15

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  16. Micromachined mold-type double-gated metal field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongjae; Kang, Seokho; Chun, Kukjin

    1997-12-01

    Electron field emitters with double gates were fabricated using micromachining technology and the effect of the electric potential of the focusing gate (or second gate) was experimentally evaluated. The molybdenum field emission tip was made by filling a cusplike mold formed when a conformal film was deposited on the hole-trench that had been patterned on stacked metals and dielectric layers. The hole-trench was patterned by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. Each field emitter has a 0960-1317/7/4/009/img1 diameter extraction gate (or first gate) and a 0960-1317/7/4/009/img2 diameter focusing gate (or second gate). To make a path for the emitted electrons, silicon bulk was etched anisotropically in KOH and EDP (ethylene-diamine pyrocatechol) solution successively. The I - V characteristics and anode current change due to the focusing gate potential were measured.

  17. Estimation of emittances and surface temperatures from AVHRR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Holben, Brent N.

    1991-01-01

    An approach to the estimation of surface temperatures and emissivities using AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) data acquired near noon is presented. Thermal data in channels 3, 4, and 5 were used to estimate the reflective component in 3. For three water bodies in Oregon the average emittances found for channels 3 and 4 were 0.979 and 0.991, respectively. Also studied were agricultural sites and forests, comprising both primary (PF) and secondary (SF) types. For the agricultural sites, the average emittances were 0.919 and 0.943 for channels 3 and 4. For the PF and SF the results were 0.976 and 0.983 for channel 3 and 0.988 and 0.995 for channel 4.

  18. High efficiency rare-earth emitter for thermophotovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sakr, E. S.; Zhou, Z.; Bermel, P.

    2014-09-15

    In this work, we propose a rare-earth-based ceramic thermal emitter design that can boost thermophotovoltaic (TPV) efficiencies significantly without cold-side filters at a temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C). The proposed emitter enhances a naturally occurring rare earth transition using quality-factor matching, with a quarter-wave stack as a highly reflective back mirror, while suppressing parasitic losses via exponential chirping of a multilayer reflector transmitting only at short wavelengths. This allows the emissivity to approach the blackbody limit for wavelengths overlapping with the absorption peak of the rare-earth material, while effectively reducing the losses associated with undesirable long-wavelength emission. We obtain TPV efficiencies of 34% using this layered design, which only requires modest index contrast, making it particularly amenable to fabrication via a wide variety of techniques, including sputtering, spin-coating, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

  19. Emittance Measurements of the SSRL Gun Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Michael; Clendenin, James; Fisher, Alan; Miller, Roger; Palmer, Dennis; Park, Sam; Schmerge, John; Weaver, Jim; Wiedemann, Helmut; Winick, Herman; Yeremian, Dian; Meyerhofer, David; Reis, David; /Rochester U.

    2011-09-01

    A photocathode RF gun test stand is under construction in the injector vault of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC. The goal of this facility is to produce an electron beam with a normalized emittance of 1-3[mm-mr], a longitudinal bunch duration of the order of 10[ps] FWHM and approximately 1[nC] of charge per bunch. The beam will be generated from a laser driven copper photocathode RF gun developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL and UCLA. The 3-5[MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section. The emittance of the electron beam will be measured through the use of quadrupole scans with phosphor screens and also a wire scanner. The details of the experimental setup will be discussed, and first measurements will be presented and compared with results from PARMELA simulations.

  20. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2016-03-01

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based in combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth from CSR can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  1. Extended emitter target tracking using GM-PHD filter.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Youqing; Zhou, Shilin; Gao, Gui; Zou, Huanxin; Lei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    If equipped with several radar emitters, a target will produce more than one measurement per time step and is denoted as an extended target. However, due to the requirement of all possible measurement set partitions, the exact probability hypothesis density filter for extended target tracking is computationally intractable. To reduce the computational burden, a fast partitioning algorithm based on hierarchy clustering is proposed in this paper. It combines the two most similar cells to obtain new partitions step by step. The pseudo-likelihoods in the Gaussian-mixture probability hypothesis density filter can then be computed iteratively. Furthermore, considering the additional measurement information from the emitter target, the signal feature is also used in partitioning the measurement set to improve the tracking performance. The simulation results show that the proposed method can perform better with lower computational complexity in scenarios with different clutter densities.

  2. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Mark; Alexander, James; Billing, Michael; Calvey, Joseph; Conolly, Christopher; Crittenden, James; Dobbins, John; Dugan, Gerald; Eggert, Nicholas; Fontes, Ernest; Forster, Michael; Gallagher, Richard; Gray, Steven; Greenwald, Shlomo; Hartill, Donald; Hopkins, Walter; Kreinick, David; Kreis, Benjamin; Leong, Zhidong; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; /more authors..

    2012-07-06

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud's effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results.

  3. Nanodiamond composite as a material for cold electron emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, A. V.; Gordeev, S. K.; Korchagina, S. B.; Sominski, G. G.; Uvarov, A. A.

    2008-03-01

    Characteristics of field-induced electron emission were investigated for one of newly designed all-carbon materials - nanodiamond composite (NDC). The composite is comprised by 4‥6 nm diamond grains covered with 0.2‥1 nm-thick graphite-like shells that merge at grain junctions and determine such properties as mechanical strength and high electric conductivity. Large number of uniformly distributed sp3-sp2 interfaces allowed to expect enhanced electron emission in electric field. Combination of these features makes NDC a promising material for cold electron emitters in various applications. Experimental testing confirmed high efficiency of electron emission from NDC. In comparison with previousely tested forms of nanocarbon, NDC emitters demonstrated better stabily and tolerance to performance conditions. Unusual activation scenarios and thermal dependencies of emission characteristics observed in experiments with NDC can add new background for explanation of facilitated electron emission from nanocarbons with relatively 'smooth' surface morphology.

  4. Modal Coupling of Single Photon Emitters Within Nanofiber Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale generation of individual photons in confined geometries is an exciting research field aiming at exploiting localized electromagnetic fields for light manipulation. One of the outstanding challenges of photonic systems combining emitters with nanostructured media is the selective channelling of photons emitted by embedded sources into specific optical modes and their transport at distant locations in integrated systems. Here, we show that soft-matter nanofibers, electrospun with embedded emitters, combine subwavelength field localization and large broadband near-field coupling with low propagation losses. By momentum spectroscopy, we quantify the modal coupling efficiency identifying the regime of single-mode coupling. These nanofibers do not rely on resonant interactions, making them ideal for room-temperature operation, and offer a scalable platform for future quantum information technology. PMID:27203403

  5. Measurement of ultra low transverse emittance at REGAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachmann, M.; Flöttmann, K.

    2016-09-01

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump-probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required which can be identified with a small beam emittance. A standard magnet scan is used for the emittance measurement which is in case of a low charged bunch most sensitive to the beam size determination (RMS or 2nd central moment of a distribution). Therefore the diagnostic and a routine to calculate proper central moments of an arbitrary distribution will be introduced and discussed.

  6. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Shimada, K.; Yasuda, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamura, H.; Kamakura, K.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  7. Advancements in cancer therapy with alpha-emitters: a review.

    PubMed

    Imam, S K

    2001-09-01

    This synopsis attempts to shed light on the progresses made in the field of cancer therapy using alpha-particles. The rationale of selection of radionuclides focusing on comparison of alpha- and beta-emitters, the hurdles and their solutions, and recent developments are addressed. The efforts made in the field of alpha-radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies are emphasized. A good deal of progress has been achieved in the past decade, and preclinical studies with a variety of radioimmunoconjugates with astatine and bismuth radioisotopes (At-211, Bi-212, and Bi-213) have generated encouraging results, providing an impetus for future clinical trials. The onset of early clinical trials with alpha-emitters will hopefully enable the cancer researchers to come up with extremely effective and highly specific "smart bombs" to target cancer cells.

  8. Multipolar radiation of quantum emitters with nanowire optical antennas

    PubMed Central

    Curto, Alberto G.; Taminiau, Tim H.; Volpe, Giorgio; Kreuzer, Mark P.; Quidant, Romain; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2013-01-01

    Multipolar transitions other than electric dipoles are generally too weak to be observed at optical frequencies in single quantum emitters. For example, fluorescent molecules and quantum dots have dimensions much smaller than the wavelength of light and therefore emit predominantly as electric dipoles. Here we demonstrate controlled emission of a quantum dot into multipolar radiation through selective coupling to a linear nanowire antenna. The antenna resonance tailors the interaction of the quantum dot with light, effectively creating a hybrid nanoscale source beyond the simple Hertz dipole. Our findings establish a basis for the controlled driving of fundamental modes in nanoantennas and metamaterials, for the understanding of the coupling of quantum emitters to nanophotonic devices such as waveguides and nanolasers, and for the development of innovative quantum nano-optics components with properties not found in nature. PMID:23612291

  9. Photosensitivity of p-type black Si field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mingels, S. Porshyn, V.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G.; Prommesberger, C.; Langer, C.; Schreiner, R.

    2016-04-28

    We have investigated the properties of black Si field emitter arrays under strong electric fields and laser illumination. A low onset field of 1.8 MV/m for an emission current of 1 nA was obtained. A pronounced saturation region of the dark and photo-enhanced current was observed, which provided a short-term stability of 0.1% at 0.4 μA and 0.7% at 1.0 μA, respectively. As maximum value for the photosensitivity, an on-off current switching ratio of 43 reaching about 13 μA was achieved at a laser power of 15 mW. Electron spectra in the dark and under laser illumination are presented, showing a current and light-sensitive voltage drop across the emitters as well as hints for hot electron emission.

  10. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J. P.; Billing, M. G.; Calvey, J.; Crittenden, J. A.; Dugan, G.; Eggert, N.; Forster, M.; Greenwald, S.; Hartill, D. L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Kreinick, D. L.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Livezey, J. A.; Meller, R.; Peck, S.; Peterson, D. P.; Rice, D.; Rider, N.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Schwartz, R.; Shanks, J. P.; Sikora, J.; Harkay, K. C.; Antoniou, F.; Calatroni, S.; Gasior, M.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pfingstner, J.; Rumolo, G.; Schmickler, H.; Taborelli, M.; Holtzapple, R.; Jones, J.; Wolski, A.; Tan, C.Y.; Zwaska, R. M; Flanagan, J. W.; Kanazawa, K.I.; Sakai, H.; Shibata, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Byrd, J.; Corlett, J.; De Santis, S.; Furman, M.; Kraft, R.; Munson, D. V.; Penn, G.; Plate, D.; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.; Schachter, L.

    2010-05-23

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud's effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results.

  11. Selective protected state preparation of coupled dissipative quantum emitters

    PubMed Central

    Plankensteiner, D.; Ostermann, L.; Ritsch, H.; Genes, C.

    2015-01-01

    Inherent binary or collective interactions in ensembles of quantum emitters induce a spread in the energy and lifetime of their eigenstates. While this typically causes fast decay and dephasing, in many cases certain special entangled collective states with minimal decay can be found, which possess ideal properties for spectroscopy, precision measurements or information storage. We show that for a specific choice of laser frequency, power and geometry or a suitable configuration of control fields one can efficiently prepare these states. We demonstrate this by studying preparation schemes for strongly subradiant entangled states of a chain of dipole-dipole coupled emitters. The prepared state fidelity and its entanglement depth is further improved via spatial excitation phase engineering or tailored magnetic fields. PMID:26549501

  12. Refractory absorber/emitter using monolayer of ceramic microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, P. N.; do Rosário, J. J.; Leib, E. W.; Petrov, A. Y.; Störmer, M.; Weller, H.; Vossmeyer, T.; Schneider, G. A.; Eich, M.

    2016-04-01

    We present a self-assembled refractory absorber/emitter without the necessity to structure the metallic surface itself, still retaining the feature of tailored optical properties for visible light emission and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. We have demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that monolayers of zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) microparticles on a tungsten layer can be used as large area, efficient and thermally stable selective absorbers/emitters. The band edge of the absorption is based on critically coupled microsphere resonances. It can be tuned from visible to near-infrared range by varying the diameter of the microparticles. We demonstrated the optical functionality of the structure after annealing up to temperatures of 1000°C under vacuum conditions. In particular it opens up the route towards high efficiency TPV systems with emission matched to the photovoltaic cell.

  13. Short-lived positron emitter labeled radiotracers - present status

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    The preparation of labelled compounds is important for the application of positron emission transaxial tomography (PETT) in biomedical sciences. This paper describes problems and progress in the synthesis of short-lived positron emitter (/sup 11/C, /sup 18/F, /sup 13/N) labelled tracers for PETT. Synthesis of labelled sugars, amino acids, and neurotransmitter receptors (pimozide and spiroperidol tagged with /sup 11/C) is discussed in particular. (DLC)

  14. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  15. Emittance compensation studies of photoinjector beams with angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven

    2003-05-19

    Beam dynamics studies on the FNPL photo injector that seek to optimize the transport of intense electron beams with large values of canonical angular momentum have been performed. These studies investigate the effect of solenoid emittance compensation on beams that evolve under the combined influence of intense space charge forces and large angular momentum. We present details of experimental measurements and supporting simulations of beam envelope evolution.

  16. Correlated blinking of fluorescent emitters mediated by single plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, D.; Lhuillier, E.; Ithurria, S.; Gulinatti, A.; Rech, I.; Carminati, R.; De Wilde, Y.; Krachmalnicoff, V.

    2017-03-01

    We observe time-correlated emission between a single CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dot exhibiting single-photon statistics and a fluorescent nanobead located micrometers apart. This is accomplished by coupling both emitters to a silver nanowire. Single plasmons are created on the latter from the quantum dot, and transfer energy to excite in turn the fluorescent nanobead. We demonstrate that the molecules inside the bead show the same blinking behavior as the quantum dot.

  17. Aerosol emitters disrupt codling moth, Cydia pomonella, competitively.

    PubMed

    McGhee, Peter S; Gut, Larry J; Miller, James R

    2014-12-01

    Isomate(®) CM MIST aerosol emitters (Pacific BioControl Corp, Vancouver, WA) containing 36 g of codlemone, (E,E)-8,10-dodecadien-1-ol, were deployed at various densities in a commercial apple orchard to generate dosage-response profiles in order to elucidate the behavioral mechanism of disruption. Moth captures decreased asymptotically as Isomate(®) CM MIST densities increased. Data fitting to Miller-Gut and Miller-de Lame plots yielded straight lines, with positive and negative slopes respectively. Catch of male moths decreased from 28 trap(-1) in the control to 0.9 trap(-1) at the highest emitter density. Disruption of >90% was realized at emitter densities greater than 5 units ha(-1) . The resulting set of profiles explicitly matched the predictions for competitive rather than non-competitive disruption. Thus, these devices probably disrupt by inducing false-plume following rather than by camouflaging traps and females. The use of 5 MIST units ha(-1) would be necessary to achieve the same level of codling moth control provided by a standard pheromone treatment with passive reservoir dispensers. The need for only a few aerosol emitters, 2.5-5 units ha(-1) , mitigates the cost of labor required to hand-apply hundreds of passive reservoir dispensers; however, a potential weakness in using this technology is that the low deployment density may leave areas of little or no pheromone coverage, where mate finding may occur. This technology is likely to benefit substantially from treatment of large contiguous blocks of crop. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. T-Shaped Emitter Metal Structures for HBTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, King Man; Samoska, Lorene; Velebir, James; Muller, Richard; Echternach, Pierre; Siegel, Peter; Smith, Peter; Martin, Suzanne; Malik, Roger; Rodwell, Mark; Urteaga, Miguel; Paidi, Vamsi; Griffith, Zack

    2006-01-01

    Metal emitter structures in a class of developmental InP-based high-speed heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) have been redesigned to have T-shaped cross sections. T-cross-section metal features have been widely used in Schottky diodes and high-electron-mobility transistors, but not in HBTs. As explained, the purpose served by the present T cross-sectional shapes is to increase fabrication yields beyond those achievable with the prior cross-sectional shapes.

  19. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  20. Voltage controlled optics of a monolayer semiconductor quantum emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Goodfellow, Kenneth; Kinnischtzke, Laura; Vamivakas, Nick; University of Rochester Team

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional atomically thin materials are being actively investigated for next generation optoelectronic devices. Particularly exciting are transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) since these materials exhibit a band gap, and support valley specific exciton mediated optical transitions. In this work we report the observation of single photon emission in the TMDC tungsten diselenide. We present magneto-optical spectroscopy results and demonstrate voltage controlled photoluminescence of these localized quantum emitters.

  1. Combined selective emitter and filter for high performance incandescent lighting

    DOE PAGES

    Leroy, Arny; Bhatia, Bikram; Wilke, Kyle; ...

    2017-09-01

    The efficiency of incandescent light bulbs (ILBs) is inherently low due to the dominant emission at infrared wavelengths, diminishing its popularity today. ILBs with cold-side filters that transmit visible light but reflect infrared radiation back to the filament can surpass the efficiency of state-of-the- art light-emitting diodes (LEDs). However, practical challenges such as imperfect geometrical alignment (view factor) between the filament and cold-side filters can limit the maximum achievable efficiency and make the use of cold-side filters ineffective. Here in this work, we show that by combining a cold-side optical filter with a selective emitter, the effect of the imperfectmore » view factor between the filament and filter on the system efficiency can be minimized. We experimentally and theoretically demonstrate energy savings of up to 67% compared to a bare tungsten emitter at 2000 K, representing a 34% improvement over a bare tungsten filament with a filter. Our work suggests that this approach can be competitive with LEDs in both luminous efficiency and color rendering index (CRI) when using selective emitters and filters already demonstrated in the literature, thus paving the way for next-generation high-efficiency ILBs.« less

  2. Data compression for complex ambiguity function for emitter location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourhomayoun, Mohammed; Fowler, Mark L.

    2010-08-01

    The Complex Ambiguity Function (CAF) used in emitter location measurement is a 2-dimensional complex-valued function of time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) and frequency-difference-of-arrival (FDOA). In classical TDOA/FDOA systems, pairs of sensors share data (using compression) to compute the CAF, which is then used to estimate the TDOA/FDOA for each pair; the sets of TDOA/FDOA measurements are then transmitted to a common site where they are fused into an emitter location. However, in some recently published methods for improved emitter location methods, it has been proposed that after each pair of sensors computes the CAF it is the entire CAFs that should be shared rather than the extracted TDOA/FDOA estimates. This leads to a need for methods to compress the CAFs. Because a CAF is a 2-D functions it can be thought of as a form of image - albeit, a complex-valued image. We apply and appropriately modify the Embedded Zerotree Wavelet (EZW) to compress the Ambiguity Function. Several techniques are analyzed to exploit the correlation between the imaginary part and real part of Ambiguity Function and comparisons are made between the approaches. The impact of such compression on the overall location accuracy is assessed via simulations.

  3. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT)-Based Electron Field Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Bocharov, Grigory S.; Eletskii, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules.

  4. Cooperative Lamb shift in a quantum emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Osip; Meir, Ziv; Shahmoon, Ephraim; Oron, Dan; Ozeri, Roee

    2014-05-01

    Whenever several quantum light emitters are brought in proximity with one another, their interaction with common electromagnetic fields couples them, giving rise to cooperative shifts in their resonance frequency. Such collective line shifts are central to modern atomic physics, being closely related to superradiance on one hand and the Lamb shift on the other. Although collective shifts have been theoretically predicted more than fifty years ago, the effect has not been observed yet in a controllable system of a few isolated emitters. Here, we report a direct spectroscopic observation of the cooperative shift of an optical electric dipole transition in a system of up to eight Sr ions suspended in a Paul trap. We study collective resonance shift in the previously unexplored regime of far-field coupling, and provide the first observation of cooperative effects in an array of quantum emitters. These results pave the way towards experimental exploration of cooperative emission phenomena in mesoscopic systems. Z. Meir and O. Schwartz contributed equally to this work.

  5. Optical Signatures of Quantum Emitters in Suspended Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Exarhos, Annemarie L; Hopper, David A; Grote, Richard R; Alkauskas, Audrius; Bassett, Lee C

    2017-03-28

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is rapidly emerging as an attractive material for solid-state quantum engineering. Analogously to three-dimensional wide-band-gap semiconductors such as diamond, h-BN hosts isolated defects exhibiting visible fluorescence at room temperature, and the ability to position such quantum emitters within a two-dimensional material promises breakthrough advances in quantum sensing, photonics, and other quantum technologies. Critical to such applications is an understanding of the physics underlying h-BN's quantum emission. We report the creation and characterization of visible single-photon sources in suspended, single-crystal, h-BN films. With substrate interactions eliminated, we study the spectral, temporal, and spatial characteristics of the defects' optical emission. Theoretical analysis of the defects' spectra reveals similarities in vibronic coupling to h-BN phonon modes despite widely varying fluorescence wavelengths, and a statistical analysis of the polarized emission from many emitters throughout the same single-crystal flake uncovers a weak correlation between the optical dipole orientations of some defects and h-BN's primitive crystallographic axes, despite a clear misalignment for other dipoles. These measurements constrain possible defect models and, moreover, suggest that several classes of emitters can exist simultaneously throughout free-standing h-BN, whether they be different defects, different charge states of the same defect, or the result of strong local perturbations.

  6. Fowler Nordheim theory of carbon nanotube based field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parveen, Shama; Kumar, Avshish; Husain, Samina; Husain, Mushahid

    2017-01-01

    Field emission (FE) phenomena are generally explained in the frame-work of Fowler Nordheim (FN) theory which was given for flat metal surfaces. In this work, an effort has been made to present the field emission mechanism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which have tip type geometry at nanoscale. High aspect ratio of CNTs leads to large field enhancement factor and lower operating voltages because the electric field strength in the vicinity of the nanotubes tip can be enhanced by thousand times. The work function of nanostructure by using FN plot has been calculated with reverse engineering. With the help of modified FN equation, an important formula for effective emitting area (active area for emission of electrons) has been derived and employed to calculate the active emitting area for CNT field emitters. Therefore, it is of great interest to present a state of art study on the complete solution of FN equation for CNTs based field emitter displays. This manuscript will also provide a better understanding of calculation of different FE parameters of CNTs field emitters using FN equation.

  7. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT)-Based Electron Field Emitters.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Grigory S; Eletskii, Alexander V

    2013-07-17

    Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules.

  8. Emittance compensation with dynamically optimized photoelectron beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Cook, A. M.; England, R. J.; Dunning, M.; Anderson, S. G.; Ferrario, Massimo

    2006-02-01

    Much of the theory and experimentation concerning creation of a high-brightness electron beam from a photocathode, and then applying emittance compensation techniques, assumes that one must strive for a uniform density electron beam, having a cylindrical shape. On the other hand, this shape has large nonlinearities in the space-charge field profiles near the beam's longitudinal extrema. These nonlinearities are known to produce both transverse and longitudinal emittance growth. On the other hand, it has recently been shown by Luiten that by illuminating the cathode with an ultra-short laser pulse of appropriate transverse profile, a uniform density, ellipsoidally shaped bunch is dynamically formed, which then has linear space-charge fields in all dimensions inside of the bunch. We study here this process, and its marriage to the standard emittance compensation scenario that is implemented in most recent photoinjectors. It is seen that the two processes are compatible, with simulations indicating a very high brightness beam can be obtained. The robustness of this scheme to systematic errors is examined. Prospects for experimental tests of this scheme are discussed.

  9. Emittance Growth in Intense Non-Circular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, O. A.

    1997-05-01

    The electrostatic energy of intense beams in linear uniform focusing channels is minimized when the initial beam configuration is both uniform and round.(In the case of quadrupole focusing, this means round on the average.) Deviations from either uniformity or roundness produce free energy and emittance growth. Over the past 25 years, the consequences of beam nonuniformity have been thoroughly investigated for the case of round beams. Recently, there has been interest in more complex beam configurations such as those that occur in Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) combiners or splitters. We discuss free energy and emittance growth for a variety of cases: (a) square beams, (b) hexagonal beams, (c) beams bounded by a quadrant or sextant of a circle, (d) rectangular beams, (e) elliptical beams, (f) pairs of beamlets, and (g) arrays of many beamlets. Cases (a) and (b) are approximations for large arrays of beamlets as proposed for HIF combiners or for negative-ion sources. Beam splitting, suggested for a particular HIF final focus scheme, leads to (c). The large emittance growth in cases (d)-(f), calculated by a new method,(O.A. Anderson, Proceedings of EPAC 96 conference.) illustrates the importance of maintaining symmetry. Practical examples are given for several cases.

  10. Emittance growth for the thermalization of space-charged nonuniformities

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Barnard, John J.; Lee, Edward P.

    2001-03-01

    Beams injected into a linear focusing channel typically have some degree of space-charge nonuniformity. In general, injected particle distributions with systematic charge nonuniformities are not equilibria of the focusing channel and launch a broad spectrum of collective modes. These modes can phase-mix and have nonlinear wave-wave interactions which, at high space-charge intensities, results in a relaxation to a more thermal-like distribution characterized by a uniform density profile. This thermalization can transfer self-field energy from the initial space-charge nonuniformity to the local particle temperature, thereby increasing beam phase space area (emittance growth). In this paper, we employ a simple kinetic model of a continuous focusing channel and build on previous work that applied system energy and charge conservation to quantify emittance growth associated with the collective thermalization of an initial azimuthally symmetric, rms matched beam with a radial density profile that is hollowed or peaked. This emittance growth is shown to be surprisingly modest even for high beam intensities with significant radial structure in the initial density profile.

  11. Combined selective emitter and filter for high performance incandescent lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Arny; Bhatia, Bikram; Wilke, Kyle; Ilic, Ognjen; Soljačić, Marin; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2017-08-01

    The efficiency of incandescent light bulbs (ILBs) is inherently low due to the dominant emission at infrared wavelengths, diminishing its popularity today. ILBs with cold-side filters that transmit visible light but reflect infrared radiation back to the filament can surpass the efficiency of state-of-the-art light-emitting diodes (LEDs). However, practical challenges such as imperfect geometrical alignment (view factor) between the filament and cold-side filters can limit the maximum achievable efficiency and make the use of cold-side filters ineffective. In this work, we show that by combining a cold-side optical filter with a selective emitter, the effect of the imperfect view factor between the filament and filter on the system efficiency can be minimized. We experimentally and theoretically demonstrate energy savings of up to 67% compared to a bare tungsten emitter at 2000 K, representing a 34% improvement over a bare tungsten filament with a filter. Our work suggests that this approach can be competitive with LEDs in both luminous efficiency and color rendering index (CRI) when using selective emitters and filters already demonstrated in the literature, thus paving the way for next-generation high-efficiency ILBs.

  12. Science and applications of low-emittance electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    van Bibber, K

    2000-08-20

    The capability of making very low-emittance electron beams of temporally short, high charge bunches has opened up exciting new possibilities in basic and applied science. Two notable applications are high energy electron-positron linear colliders for particle physics, and fourth-generation light sources consisting of linac-driven Free-Electron Lasers (FEL), both of which represent significant programmatic potential for the Laboratory in the future. The technologies contributing to low-emittance electron beams and their applications, namely precision fabrication, ultra-short pulse lasers, and RF photocathode injectors, are all areas of Lab expertise, and the work carried out under this LDRD project further expanded our core-competency in advanced concept accelerators. Furthermore, high energy accelerators have become a cornerstone of the SBSS program, as illustrated by the recent development of proton radiography as a prime technology candidate for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF), which enhanced the significance of this project all the more. This was a one-year project to both advance the technology of, and participate in the science enabled by very low-emittance electron beams. The work centered around the two themes above, namely electron-positron linear colliders, and the new fourth-generation light sources. This work built upon previous LDRD investments, and was intended to emphasize accelerator physics experiments.

  13. Biologic data, models, and dosimetric methods for internal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The absorbed radiation dose from internal emitters has been and will remain a pivotal factor in assessing risk and therapeutic utility in selecting radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment. Although direct measurements of absorbed dose and dose distributions in vivo have been and will continue to be made in limited situations, the measurement of the biodistribution and clearance of radiopharmaceuticals in human subjects and the use of this data is likely to remain the primary means to approach the calculation and estimation of absorbed dose from internal emitters over the next decade. Since several approximations are used in these schema to calculate dose, attention must be given to inspecting and improving the application of this dosimetric method as better techniques are developed to assay body activity and as more experience is gained in applying these schema to calculating absorbed dose. Discussion of the need for considering small scale dosimetry to calculate absorbed dose at the cellular level will be presented in this paper. Other topics include dose estimates for internal emitters, biologic data mathematical models and dosimetric methods employed. 44 refs.

  14. Crystal Monochromator based Emittance Measurements at the PETRA Undulator Beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, U.; Schulte-Schrepping, H.

    2004-05-01

    The synchrotron radiation beamline at the PETRA storage ring at DESY with two end stations uses a 4 m-long undulator delivering hard X-ray photons up to 300 keV at a storage ring energy of 12 GeV. The spatial photon intensity distribution at the first undulator harmonic (21.23 keV) was used to determine the horizontal emittance of the storage ring. The set-up installed at 107.7 m from the source point consists of a vacuum chamber with a cryogenically cooled silicon crystal in Laue geometry. The monochromatized radiation is converted to visible light by a fluorescent screen on the back of an aluminum plate and observed by a digital camera. Gaussian fits to horizontal lines through the centre of mass of the images provide the standard deviations of the measured intensity distributions in the horizontal plane. The corresponding emittance values were derived by modeling the whole setup with the SPECTRA code using the emittance as a free parameter and by using machine physics formulas neglecting photon source size effects.

  15. Erbium doped ceramic nanofiber synthesis for thermophotovoltaic selective emitter applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifon, George Sebastian

    This thesis explored the development of isothermal selective emitters for harvesting thermal energy to be used in conjunction with photovoltaic cells. The selective emitters were Erbium doped Titania nanofibers and Erbium and Yttrium doped Titania nanofibers that may be used with a Gallium Antimonide photovoltaic cell. The ultimate aim of this research was to develop Erbium doped Yttrium Titanate nanofibers. This research is of importance in recovering heat from a number of resources including power plant boilers. The thermal energy lost in the boilers can be as high as 20% of the input fuel energy and a recovery of this energy would boost the thermal performance of the power plants. It has been observed that the temperatures of the flue gas reaching the heat recovery region may be higher than 1600K and the radiation and convective losses in the burner occurs at even higher temperatures. Thermophotovoltaics (TPV) offer a solution in terms of converting the thermal energy to electricity without any moving parts. The efficiencies of conventional TPVs are very small (10-20%) and thus not a solution as the primary electric generator. However, in the field of the harvesting of waste energy, TPVs have tremendous potential. In order to improve efficiencies, Erbia (which can absorb thermal energy and convert it to electromagnetic radiation with a narrow wavelength spectrum with mean wavelength of 1500nm) can be used as a selective emitter with GaSb PV cells (which have its maximum efficiency in the same wavelength range) as the collector. In order to further improve its performance, the Erbia was proposed to be supported by Titania, which is transparent to IR in this range. However, past research has shown that the Erbia doped Titania nanofibers essentially have Erbium in the form of pyrochlore Erbium Titanate. Thus the research focused on a way to synthesize ErxY2-xTi 2O7 pyrochlore structure to act as the selective emitter. The self-supporting composite was designed to

  16. Field Emitter Arrays for Plasma and Microwave Source Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kevin L.

    1998-11-01

    Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are attractive cathode candidates for many applications, e.g., electron microguns(C. Constancias, D. Herve, R. Accomo, and E. Molva, J. Vac. Sci. Tech. B13, 611, 1995.), miniaturized TWTs(H. Imura, S. Tsuida, M. Takahasi, A. Okamoto, H. Makishima, and S. Miyano, Tech. Dig. of the IEEE-IEDM (Dec. 7-11, Washington, DC) p721.), radiation sources, instrumentation , sensors, mass spectrometers, and electric propulsion (Hall thrusters (C. M. Marrese and Alec D. Gallimore, Tech. Dig. of Int'l. Conf. on Plasma Science, (Raleigh, NC, June 4-5, 1998), 1D05.)) due to their instant ON/OFF capability, high brightness and current density, large transconductance to capacitance ratio, low voltage operation, and so on. Two applications are significant: in the most widely pursued, FEAs may enable significant reductions in physical dimensions, weight, and power consumption of flat panel displays (FPDs)(A. Ghis, R. Meyer, P. Rambaud, F. Levy, and T. Leroux, IEEE-Trans. Elect. Dev. 36, 2320 (1991)), whereas the most challenging application, advanced RF tubes(M. A. Kodis, K. L. Jensen, E. G. Zaidman, B. Goplen, D. N. Smithe, IEEE-Trans. on Plas. Sci. 24, 970 (1996).), may benefit from the current densities and high pulse repetition frequencies field emitters are capable of. FEAs (a coplanar gate less than one micron from a microfabricated conical emitter for field enhancement), provide high current density for low gate voltages, are relatively temperature insensitive, and are capable of emission modulation at 10 GHz. High currents due to quantum mechanical tunneling are made possible by narrowing the field emission barrier to nanometer widths. Greater performance and robustness may be enabled through rugged low work function coatings. We shall describe the process of field emission by quantum mechanical tunneling, provide an overview of the applications and their demands on field emitters, and present a model of FEAs used to characterize their performance

  17. Properties Of Lyman Alpha Emitters At Z~1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Amy

    Ly-alpha emission-line searches have been widely used to find high-redshift galaxies. For the z>6 galaxies, this line is the only spectroscopic signature that can be used to confirm the redshift of a galaxy selected on the basis of its color properties. Even in the era of JWST and extremely large ground-based facilities, it is likely that Ly-alpha will continue to be an important tracer of the faintest sources at high redshifts. However, Ly-alpha is a difficult line to interpret. Because the line is resonantly scattered by neutral hydrogen, determining its escape path and therefore its dust destruction is an extremely complex problem, both theoretically and observationally. Thus, while we have empirical measurements that a significant fraction of UV-continuum selected samples have Ly- alpha lines with rest-frame equivalent widths greater than 20 Angstrom, our understanding of what determines this fraction is still weak. In particular, we would like to know whether the presence of Ly-alpha emission is related to other properties of the galaxy, such as its extinction, age, metallicity, or morphology. GALEX grism spectra have revolutionized the field by making it possible to find low- redshift Ly-alpha emission line galaxies where the properties can be studied in exquisite detail. From these data, we have found that z~0.3 Ly-alpha emitters are heavily drawn from small, low metallicity galaxies with intense ongoing star formation. We have also found that the Ly-alpha luminosity function evolves rapidly over z=0-1, with the characteristic luminosity being much higher at z=1 than at z=0. However, the latter result is based on a very small number of galaxies at z~1 where we only probe the high luminosity tip of the luminosity function because of the continuum limits used in the GALEX pipeline extraction. We propose to obtain a large sample of Ly-alpha emitters in the sweet spot at z=0.7-1.3 where the intrinsic galaxy structure can be separated from the effects of the

  18. Effects of Ambient High Temperature Exposure on Alumina-Titania High Emittance Surfaces for Solar Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Smith, Daniela C.; Wheeler, Donald R.; MacLachlam, Brian J.

    1998-01-01

    Solar dynamic (SD) space power systems require durable, high emittance surfaces on a number of critical components, such as heat receiver interior surfaces and parasitic load radiator (PLR) elements. To enhance surface characteristics, an alumina-titania coating has been applied to 500 heat receiver thermal energy containment canisters and the PLR of NASA Lewis Research Center's (LeRC) 2 kW SD ground test demonstrator (GTD). The alumina-titania coating was chosen because it had been found to maintain its high emittance under vacuum (less than or equal to 10(exp -6) torr) at high temperatures (1457 F (827 C)) for an extended period (approximately 2,700 hours). However, preflight verification of SD systems components, such as the PLR require operation at ambient pressure and high temperatures. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to evaluate the durability of the alumina-titania coating at high temperature in air. Fifteen of sixteen alumina-titania coated Incoloy samples were exposed to high temperatures (600 F (316 C) to l500 F (816 C)) for various durations (2 to 32 hours). Samples, were characterized prior to and after heat treatment for reflectance, solar absorptance, room temperature emittance and emittance at 1,200 F (649 C). Samples were also examined to detect physical defects and to determine surface chemistry using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy operated with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) system, and x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Visual examination of the heat-treated samples showed a whitening of samples exposed to temperatures of 1,000 F (538 C) and above. Correspondingly, the optical properties of these samples had degraded. A sample exposed to 1,500 F (816 C) for 24 hours had whitened and the thermal emittance at 1,200 F (649 C) had decreased from the non-heat treated value of 0.94 to 0.62. The coating on this sample had become embrittled with spalling off the substrate noticeable at several locations. Based

  19. Effects of ambient high temperature exposure on alumina-titania high emittance surfaces for solar dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Groh, Kim K. de; Wheeler, Donald R.; Smith, Daniela C.; MacLachlan, Brian J.

    1999-01-22

    Solar dynamic (SD) space power systems require durable, high emittance surfaces on a number of critical components, such as heat receiver interior surfaces and parasitic load radiator (PLR) elements. To enhance surface characteristics, an alumina-titania coating has been applied to 500 heat receiver thermal energy containment canisters and the PLR of NASA Lewis Research Center's (LeRC) 2 kW SD ground test demonstrator (GTD). The alumina-titania coating was chosen because it had been found to maintain its high emittance under vacuum ({<=}10{sup -6} torr) at high temperatures (1457 deg. F (827 deg. C)) for an extended period ({approx_equal}2,700 hours). However, preflight verification of SD systems components, such as the PLR, require operation at ambient pressure and high temperatures. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to evaluate the durability of the alumina-titania coating at high temperature in air. Fifteen of sixteen alumina-titania coated Incoloy samples were exposed to high temperatures (600 deg. F (316 deg. C) to 1500 deg. F (816 deg. C)) for various durations (2 to 32 hours). Samples were characterized prior to, and after, heat treatment for reflectance, solar absorptance, room temperature emittance and emittance at 1200 deg. F (649 deg. C). Samples were also examined to detect physical defects and to determine surface chemistry using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, operated with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) system, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Visual examination of the heat-treated samples showed a whitening of samples exposed to temperatures of 1000 deg. F (538 deg. C) and above. Correspondingly, the optical properties of these samples had degraded. A sample exposed to 1500 deg. F (816 deg. C) for 24 hours had whitened and the thermal emittance at 1200 deg. F (649 deg. C) had decreased from the non-heat treated value of 0.94 to 0.62. The coating on this sample had become embrittled, with spalling off

  20. Heavily doped transparent-emitter regions in junction solar cells, diodes, and transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibib, M. A.; Lindholm, F. A.; Therez, F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical treatment of transparent-emitter devices, particularly solar cells, that is more complete than previously available treatments. The proposed approach includes the effects of bandgap narrowing, Fermi-Dirac statistics, built-in field due to impurity profile, and a finite surface recombination velocity at the emitter surface. It is demonstrated that the transparent-emitter model can predict experimental values of Voc observed on n(plus)-p thin diffused junction silicon solar cells made on low-resistivity (0.1 ohm-cm) substrates. A test is included for the self-consistent validity of the transparent-emitter model. This test compares the calculated transit time of minority carriers across the emitter with the Auger-impact minority-carrier lifetime within the emitter region.

  1. Radial arrays of nano-electrospray ionization emitters and methods of forming electrosprays

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ryan T [West Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2010-10-19

    Electrospray ionization emitter arrays, as well as methods for forming electrosprays, are described. The arrays are characterized by a radial configuration of three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters without an extractor electrode. The methods are characterized by distributing fluid flow of the liquid sample among three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters, forming an electrospray at outlets of the emitters without utilizing an extractor electrode, and directing the electrosprays into an entrance to a mass spectrometry device. Each of the nano-electrospray ionization emitters can have a discrete channel for fluid flow. The nano-electrospray ionization emitters are circularly arranged such that each is shielded substantially equally from an electrospray-inducing electric field.

  2. Polysilicon-contacted P/sup +/ emitters for silicon solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Christel, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    A polysilicon-contact technology was investigated as a method of reducing the minority carrier recombination that occurs in boron-doped p/sup +/ emitter structures in silicon. Two different polysilicon processes using low-pressure chemical-vapor deposition were used. Undoped polysilicon that was later doped by furnace predeposition was compared with in situ-doped polysilicon followed by diffusion. PNP transistors were used as the test structure. The emitter saturation current densities measured on devices with and without polysilicon were compared. The effect of a chemically grown oxide beneath the polysilicon was also investigated. Devices with polysilicon-contacted emitters performed marginally better than those with simple metal contacts. A barrier oxide between the polysilicon and single-crystal emitter was found to offer additional improvement. The magnitude of the emitter saturation current densities observed was not as low as that seen in n-type emitter structures. 10 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Ion Motion Induced Emittance Growth of Matched Electron Beams in Plasma Wakefields

    DOE PAGES

    An, Weiming; Lu, Wei; Huang, Chengkun; ...

    2017-06-14

    Plasma-based acceleration is being considered as the basis for building a future linear collider. Nonlinear plasma wakefields have ideal properties for accelerating and focusing electron beams. Preservation of the emittance of nano-Coulomb beams with nanometer scale matched spot sizes in these wakefields remains a critical issue due to ion motion caused by their large space charge forces. We use fully resolved quasistatic particle-in-cell simulations of electron beams in hydrogen and lithium plasmas, including when the accelerated beam has different emittances in the two transverse planes. The projected emittance initially grows and rapidly saturates with a maximum emittance growth of lessmore » than 80% in hydrogen and 20% in lithium. The use of overfocused beams is found to dramatically reduce the emittance growth. In conclusion, the underlying physics that leads to the lower than expected emittance growth is elucidated.« less

  4. Analytical performance characteristics of nanoelectrospray emitters as a function of conductive coating.

    PubMed

    Smith, Douglas R; Moy, Marie A; Dolan, Anthony R; Wood, Troy D

    2006-04-01

    As miniaturization of electrospray continues to become more prevalent in the mass spectrometry arsenal, numerous types of conductive coatings have been developed with miniaturized electrospray emitters. Different conductive coatings have different properties that may lead to differences in analytical performance. This paper investigates and compares the analytical properties of a series of applied conductive coatings for low-flow electrospray ionization developed in this laboratory vs. commercially-available types. Evaporated graphite is thoroughly compared with commercially available polyaniline (PANI) coated emitters and metal coated emitters. Each set of emitters was investigated to determine various performance characteristics, including susceptibility to electrical discharge in both positive and negative ionization modes, as well as emitter reproducibility and generation of a standard curve to determine each emitter coating's limit of detection and limit of quantitation. Furthermore, evaporated graphite and polyaniline coated fused silica capillaries were investigated to determine which coating is more stable over long-term analyses and during electrical discharge.

  5. Heavily doped transparent-emitter regions in junction solar cells, diodes, and transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibib, M. A.; Lindholm, F. A.; Therez, F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical treatment of transparent-emitter devices, particularly solar cells, that is more complete than previously available treatments. The proposed approach includes the effects of bandgap narrowing, Fermi-Dirac statistics, built-in field due to impurity profile, and a finite surface recombination velocity at the emitter surface. It is demonstrated that the transparent-emitter model can predict experimental values of Voc observed on n(plus)-p thin diffused junction silicon solar cells made on low-resistivity (0.1 ohm-cm) substrates. A test is included for the self-consistent validity of the transparent-emitter model. This test compares the calculated transit time of minority carriers across the emitter with the Auger-impact minority-carrier lifetime within the emitter region.

  6. The Infrared Emittance Of Semi-Transparent Materials Measured At Cold Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, S. J.

    1984-03-01

    The infrared emittance of semi-transparent glazing materials used in passive solar building construction was measured over the temperature range -5.6°C to +15°C at 2 - 5.6 μm wavelength. A table of measured apparent emittance values is presented. Absolute values of emittance are not provided due to the conclusion that no adequate model describing three-dimensional emittance in terms of thickness, rectilinear transmittance, and broadband detector sensitivity has yet been formulated. A rough rule-of-thumb for thermographers appears to be that a high emittance value can be assumed for most thick sheets of these materials but the emittance of thin films drops rapidly below a certain critical thickness.

  7. Measurement of total hemispherical emittance of transparent materials at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Schleiger, E R

    1967-05-01

    A transient calorimetric method of measuring the total hemispherical emittance of transparent materials in the temperature range 75 degrees K to 312 degrees K is described. Measured emittance values with an estimated accuracy of +/-5% are presented forvarious thicknesses of NaCl and fused quartz. The emittance of NaCl decreased from 0.67 at 75 degrees K to 0.34 at 312 degrees K. The emittance of quartz was approximately constant at 0.73 over the same temperature range. Increasing the thickness of NaCl resulted in slight increases in emittance; no thickness effect was observed in the quartz. Total normal emissivity values calculated for NaCl from optical constants were not appreciably different from the measured total hemispherical emittances.

  8. Silanization of inner surfaces of nanoelectrospray ionization emitters for reduced analyte adsorption.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Seok; Wood, Troy D

    2008-04-01

    During the course of nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) of substance P, an unusual type of signal reduction was observed with flow rates <10 nL/min. This reduction in signal appears to be induced by the adsorption of positively charged analytes onto negatively charged free silanol groups on the inner surface of emitters; analytes with higher pI values (such as substance P) exhibit greater tendency for adsorption. Support for this hypothesis is demonstrated by the decrease in signal reduction in the presence of concentrated salts or for emitters whose internal silanols have been covalently silanized. Emitters treated with hexamethyldisilazane or 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane showed higher analyte signals for substance P than untreated emitters, suggesting a reduction of analyte adsorption onto the inner walls of silanized emitters. The efficacy of reduced peptide adsorption was demonstrated for emitters silanized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane using a simple peptide mixture as well as a more complex peptide mixture (a tryptic digest of horse hemoglobin).

  9. Ion Motion Induced Emittance Growth of Matched Electron Beams in Plasma Wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Weiming; Lu, Wei; Huang, Chengkun; Xu, Xinlu; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Mori, Warren B.

    2017-06-01

    Plasma-based acceleration is being considered as the basis for building a future linear collider. Nonlinear plasma wakefields have ideal properties for accelerating and focusing electron beams. Preservation of the emittance of nano-Coulomb beams with nanometer scale matched spot sizes in these wakefields remains a critical issue due to ion motion caused by their large space charge forces. We use fully resolved quasistatic particle-in-cell simulations of electron beams in hydrogen and lithium plasmas, including when the accelerated beam has different emittances in the two transverse planes. The projected emittance initially grows and rapidly saturates with a maximum emittance growth of less than 80% in hydrogen and 20% in lithium. The use of overfocused beams is found to dramatically reduce the emittance growth. The underlying physics that leads to the lower than expected emittance growth is elucidated.

  10. Intrinsic emittance reduction of copper cathodes by laser wavelength tuning in an rf photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divall, Marta Csatari; Prat, Eduard; Bettoni, Simona; Vicario, Carlo; Trisorio, Alexandre; Schietinger, Thomas; Hauri, Christoph P.

    2015-03-01

    With the improvement of acceleration techniques, the intrinsic emittance of the cathode has a strong impact on the final brightness of a free electron laser. The systematic studies presented in this paper demonstrate for the first time in a radiofrequency photocathode gun a reduction of the intrinsic emittance when tuning the laser photon energies close to the effective work function of copper. The intrinsic emittance was determined by measuring the core slice emittance as a function of the laser beam size at laser wavelengths between 260 and 275 nm. The results are consistent with the measured effective work function of the cathode. Slice emittance values normalized to the laser beam size reached values down to 500 nm /mm , close to that expected from theory. A 20% reduction of the intrinsic emittance was observed over the spectral range of the laser.

  11. Ultra-high Temperature Emittance Measurements for Space and Missile Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan; Crandall, David

    2009-01-01

    Advanced modeling and design efforts for many aerospace components require high temperature emittance data. Applications requiring emittance data include propulsion systems, radiators, aeroshells, heatshields/thermal protection systems, and leading edge surfaces. The objective of this work is to provide emittance data at ultra-high temperatures. MSFC has a new instrument for the measurement of emittance at ultra-high temperatures, the Ultra-High Temperature Emissometer System (Ultra-HITEMS). AZ Technology Inc. developed the instrument, designed to provide emittance measurements over the temperature range 700-3500K. The Ultra-HITEMS instrument measures the emittance of samples, heated by lasers, in vacuum, using a blackbody source and a Fourier Transform Spectrometer. Detectors in a Nicolet 6700 FT-IR spectrometer measure emittance over the spectral range of 0.4-25 microns. Emitted energy from the specimen and output from a Mikron M390S blackbody source at the same temperature with matched collection geometry are measured. Integrating emittance over the spectral range yields the total emittance. The ratio provides a direct measure of total hemispherical emittance. Samples are heated using lasers. Optical pyrometry provides temperature data. Optical filters prevent interference from the heating lasers. Data for Inconel 718 show excellent agreement with results from literature and ASTM 835. Measurements taken from levitated spherical specimens provide total hemispherical emittance data; measurements taken from flat specimens mounted in the chamber provide near-normal emittance data. Data from selected characterization studies will be presented. The Ultra-HITEMS technique could advance space and missile technologies by advancing the knowledge base and the technology readiness level for ultra-high temperature materials.

  12. Emittance Measurements for a Thin Liquid Sheet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englehart, Amy N.; McConley, Marc W.; Chubb, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    The Liquid Sheet Radiator (LSR) is an external flow radiator that uses a triangular-shaped flowing liquid sheet as the radiating surface. It has potentially much lower mass than solid wall radiators such as pumped loop and heat pipe radiators, along with being nearly immune to micrometeoroid penetration. The LSR has an added advantage of simplicity. Surface tension causes a thin (100-300 microns) liquid sheet to coalesce to a point, causing the sheet flow to have a triangular shape. Such a triangular sheet is desirable since it allows for simple collection of the flow at a single point. A major problem for all external flow radiators is the requirement that the working fluid be of very low (approx. 10(sup -8) torr) vapor pressure to keep evaporative losses low. As a result, working fluids are limited to certain oils (such as used in diffusion pumps) for low temperatures (300-400 K) and liquid metals for higher temperatures. Previous research on the LSR has been directed at understanding the fluid mechanics of thin sheet flows and assessing the stability of such flows, especially with regard to the formation of holes in the sheet. Taylor studied extensively the stability of thin liquid sheets both theoretically and experimentally. He showed that thin sheets in a vacuum are stable. The latest research has been directed at determining the emittance of thin sheet flows. The emittance was calculated from spectral transmittance data for the Dow Corning 705 silicone oil. By experimentally setting up a sheet flow, the emittance was also determined as a function of measurable quantities, most importantly, the temperature drop between the top of the sheet and the temperature at the coalescence point of the sheet. Temperature fluctuations upstream of the liquid sheet were a potential problem in the analysis and were investigated.

  13. HETDEX: The Physical Properties of [O II] Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, C.; Blanc, G.; Gebhardt, K.; Jogee, S.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Beginning in Fall 2012, the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) will map out 300 square degrees of sky via a blind integral-field spectroscopic survey. While the main goal of the project is to measure the power spectrum of 800,000 Lyα emitters between 1.9 < z < 3.5, the survey will also identify 1,000,000 [O II] emitting galaxies with z < 0.5. Together, these data will provide an unprecedented view of the emission-line universe and allow us to not only examine the history star formation, but to study the properties of star-forming galaxies as a function of environment. To prepare for HETDEX, a 3 year pilot survey was undertaken with a proto-type integral-field spectrograph (VIRUS-P) on the McDonald 2.7-m telescope. This program, which tested the HETDEX instrumentation, data reduction, target properties, observing procedures, and ancillary data requirements, produced R=800 spectra between 350 nm and 580 nm for 169 square arcmin of sky in the COSMOS, GOODS-N, MUNICS-S2, and XMM-LSS fields. The survey found 397 emission-line objects, including 104 Lyα emitters between 1.9 < z < 3.8 and 284 [O II] galaxies with z < 0.56. We present the properties of the [O II] emitters found in this survey, and detail their line strengths, internal extinction, and emission-line luminosity function. We use these data to show that over the past 5 Gyr, star-formation in the universe has decreased linearly, in both in an absolute and relative sense. We compare the star formation rates measured via [O II] fluxes to those determined via the rest-frame ultraviolet, explore the extinction corrections for our sample, and discuss the implications of our work for the main HETDEX survey.

  14. Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Bronkowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have shown that with suitable choices of critical dimensions, planar arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes (see figure) can serve as high-current-density field emitter (cold-cathode) electron sources. Whereas some hot-cathode electron sources must be operated at supply potentials of thousands of volts, these cold-cathode sources generate comparable current densities when operated at tens of volts. Consequently, arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes might prove useful as cold-cathode sources in miniature, lightweight electron-beam devices (e.g., nanoklystrons) soon to be developed. Prior to the experiments, all reported efforts to develop carbon-nanotube-based field-emission sources had yielded low current densities from a few hundred microamperes to a few hundred milliamperes per square centimeter. An electrostatic screening effect, in which taller nanotubes screen the shorter ones from participating in field emission, was conjectured to be what restricts the emission of electrons to such low levels. It was further conjectured that the screening effect could be reduced and thus emission levels increased by increasing the spacing between nanotubes to at least by a factor of one to two times the height of the nanotubes. While this change might increase the emission from individual nanotubes, it would decrease the number of nanotubes per unit area and thereby reduce the total possible emission current. Therefore, to maximize the area-averaged current density, it would be necessary to find an optimum combination of nanotube spacing and nanotube height. The present concept of using an array of bundles of nanotubes arises partly from the concept of optimizing the spacing and height of field emitters. It also arises partly from the idea that single nanotubes may have short lifetimes as field emitters, whereas bundles of nanotubes could afford redundancy so that the loss of a single nanotube would not significantly reduce the overall field emission.

  15. Minimum emittance in electron storage rings with uniform or nonuniform dipoles.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-x.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2009-06-01

    A simple treatment of minimum emittance theory in storage rings is presented, favoring vector and matrix forms for a more concise picture. Both conventional uniform dipoles and nonuniform dipoles with bending radius variation are treated. Simple formulas are given for computing the minimum emittance, optimal lattice parameters, as well as effects of nonoptimal parameters. For nonuniform dipoles, analytical results are obtained for a three-piece sandwich dipole model. Minimization of the effective emittance for light sources is given in detail. Usefulness of gradient and/or nonuniform dipoles for reducing the effective emittance is addressed.

  16. Silicon solar cells made by a self-aligned, selective-emitter, plasma-etchback process

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, D.S.; Schubert, W.K.; Gee, J.M.

    1999-02-16

    A potentially low-cost process for forming and passivating a selective emitter. The process uses a plasma etch of the heavily doped emitter to improve its performance. The grids of the solar cell are used to mask the plasma etch so that only the emitter in the region between the grids is etched, while the region beneath the grids remains heavily doped for low contact resistance. This process is potentially low-cost because it requires no alignment. After the emitter etch, a silicon nitride layer is deposited by plasma-enhanced, chemical vapor deposition, and the solar cell is annealed in a forming gas. 5 figs.

  17. Silicon solar cells made by a self-aligned, selective-emitter, plasma-etchback process

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, Douglas S.; Schubert, William K.; Gee, James M.

    1999-01-01

    A potentially low-cost process for forming and passivating a selective emitter. The process uses a plasma etch of the heavily doped emitter to improve its performance. The grids of the solar cell are used to mask the plasma etch so that only the emitter in the region between the grids is etched, while the region beneath the grids remains heavily doped for low contact resistance. This process is potentially low-cost because it requires no alignment. After the emitter etch, a silicon nitride layer is deposited by plasma-enhanced, chemical vapor deposition, and the solar cell is annealed in a forming gas.

  18. Ultraviolet-nanoimprinted packaged metasurface thermal emitters for infrared CO2 sensing

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Hideki T; Kasaya, Takeshi; Oosato, Hirotaka; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Choi, Bongseok; Iwanaga, Masanobu; Sakoda, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    Packaged dual-band metasurface thermal emitters integrated with a resistive membrane heater were manufactured by ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprint lithography followed by monolayer lift-off based on a soluble UV resist, which is mass-producible and cost-effective. The emitters were applied to infrared CO2 sensing. In this planar Au/Al2O3/Au metasurface emitter, orthogonal rectangular Au patches are arrayed alternately and exhibit nearly perfect blackbody emission at 4.26 and 3.95 μm necessary for CO2 monitoring at the electric power reduced by 31%. The results demonstrate that metasurface infrared thermal emitters are almost ready for commercialization. PMID:27877806

  19. Measurements of Intra-Beam Scattering at Low Emittance in the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.; Corlett, J.; Nishimura, H.; Robin, D.; De Santis, S.; Steier, C.; Wolski, A.; Wu, Y.; Bane, K.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, T.; /SLAC

    2006-03-13

    The beam emittance at the interaction point of linear colliders is expected to be strongly influenced by the emittance of the beams extracted from the damping rings. Intra-beam scattering (IBS) potentially limits the minimum emittance of low-energy storage rings, and this effect strongly influences the choice of energy of damping rings [1]. Theoretical analysis suggests that the NLC damping rings will experience modest emittance growth at 1.98 GeV, however there is little experimental data of IBS effects for very low-emittance machines in the energy regime of interest. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a third-generation synchrotron light source operating with high-intensity, low-emittance beams at energies of approximately 1-2 GeV, and with emittance coupling capability of 1% or less. We present measurements of the beam growth in three dimensions as a function of current, for normalized natural horizontal emittance of approximately 1-10 mm-mrad at energies of 0.7-1.5 GeV, values comparable to the parameters in an NLC damping ring. Using a dedicated diagnostic beamline with an x-ray scintillator imaging system, measurements of the transverse beamsize are made, and bunch length measurements are made using an optical streak camera. Emittance growth as a function of bunch current is determined, and compared with preliminary calculation estimates.

  20. A compilation of microdosimetry for uniformly distributed Auger emitters used in medicine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing

    2008-12-01

    To provide a compilation of microdosimetric characteristics for 12 Auger emitters commonly used in medicine. Monte Carlo electron track structure simulations are performed for 12 Auger emitters. They are (55)Fe, (67)Ga, (99m)Tc, (111)In, (113m)In, (115m)In, (123)I, (125)I, (193m)Pt, (195m)Pt, (201)Tl, and (203)Pb. Proximity functions of 12 Auger emitters are calculated from the simulated track structures and compared with that of gamma rays from (60)Co. Some of those Auger emitters are highly radiotoxic compared to hard gamma rays from (60)Co. The more electrons per decay and the lower electron energies, the more effective an Auger emitter could be. The high radiotoxicity of Auger emitters is due to correlations of low-energy electrons released from decay processes. If these correlations were disregarded, Auger emitters would not differ significantly from other low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation sources. Even in the case of uniform distribution, some of those Auger emitters are highly radiotoxic compared to hard gamma rays. For Auger emitters to bond to radiosensitive sites in cell nucleus, much higher radiation effectiveness could be expected.

  1. Effect of dipole orientation on Purcell factor for the quantum emitter near silicon nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalogina, Anastasia S.; Javadzade, Javid; Zuev, Dmitry A.; Savelev, Roman S.; Vorobyov, Vadim V.; Makarov, Sergey V.; Belov, Pavel A.; Akimov, Alexey V.; Shadrivov, Ilya V.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the optical properties of quantum emitters is the cornerstone of many phenomena in nanophotonics. Spontaneous emission from quantum emitters can be modified when they are placed in resonators, for example, near plasmonic or dielectric nanoantennas. We numerically study the Purcell factor of the emitter inside a nanodiamond placed near the resonant silicon nanoparticle. We show that in this system the 11-fold enhancement can be achieved for a specific orientation of the dipole moment of the emitter. The obtained results are of particular importance for nanophotonic applications which aim to control optical properties of quantum light sources.

  2. Biofilm structure and its influence on clogging in drip irrigation emitters distributing reclaimed wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dazhuang; Bai, Zhihui; Mike, Rowan; Gu, Likun; Ren, Shumei; Yang, Peiling

    2009-01-01

    Using reclaimed wastewater for crop irrigation is a practical alternative to discharge wastewater treatment plant effluents into surface waters. However, biofouling has been identified as a major contributor to emitter clogging in drip irrigation systems distributing reclaimed wastewater. Little is known about the biofilm structure and its influence on clogging in the drip emitter flow path. This study was first to investigate the microbial characteristics of mature biofilms present in the emitters and the effect of flow path structures on the biofilm microbial communities. The analysis of biofilm matrix structure using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that particles in the matrix of the biofilm coupled extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) and formed sediment in the emitter flow path. Analysis of biofilm mass including protein, polysaccharide, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) showed that emitter flow path style influenced biofilm community structure and diversity. The correlations of biofilm biomass and discharge reduction after 360 h irrigation were computed and suggest that PFLAs provide the best correlation coefficient. Comparatively, the emitter with the unsymmetrical dentate structure and shorter flow path (Emitter C) had the best anti-clogging capability. By optimizing the dentate structure, the internal flow pattern within the flow path could be enhanced as an important method to control the biofilm within emitter flow path. This study established electron microscope techniques and biochemical microbial analysis methods that may provide a framework for future emitter biofilm studies.

  3. Emittance studies of the Spallation Neutron Source external-antenna H- ion source.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Stockli, M P; Welton, R F; Pennisi, T R; Murray, S N; Santana, M; Long, C D

    2010-02-01

    A new Allison-type emittance scanner has been built to characterize the ion sources and low energy beam transport systems at Spallation Neutron Source. In this work, the emittance characteristics of the H(-) beam produced with the external-antenna rf-driven ion source and transported through the two-lens electrostatic low energy beam transport are studied. The beam emittance dependence on beam intensity, extraction parameters, and the evolution of the emittance and twiss parameters over beam pulse duration are presented.

  4. Development of chemically vapor deposited rhenium emitters of (0001) preferred crystal orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L.; Hudson, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Rhenium thermionic emitters were prepared by the pyrolysis of rhenium chlorides formed by the chlorination of rhenium pellets. The impurity contents, microstructures, degrees of (0001) preferred crystal orientation, and vacuum electron work functions of these emitters were determined as a function of deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature, rhenium pellet temperature and chlorine flow rate. A correlation between vacuum electron work function and degree of (0001) preferred crystal orientation was established. Conditions for depositing porosity-free rhenium emitters of high vacuum electron work functions were defined. Finally, three cylindrical rhenium emitters were prepared under the optimum deposition conditions.

  5. Experimental Studies on Coherent Synchrotron Radiation at an Emittance Exchange Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, J.C.T.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Ruan, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Santucci, J.; /Fermilab

    2012-04-01

    One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to experimentally investigate the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange (EEX) principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line could limit the performance of the emittance exchanger at short bunch lengths. In this paper, we present experimental and simulation studies of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the emittance exchange line at the A0 photoinjector. We report on time-resolved CSR studies using a skew-quadrupole technique. We also demonstrate the advantages of running the EEX with an energy chirped beam.

  6. Tunable graphene micro-emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gongtao; Wei, Xianlong; Gao, Song; Chen, Qing; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-01-01

    Microfabricated electron emitters have been studied for half a century for their promising applications in vacuum electronics. However, tunable microfabricated electron emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission still proves challenging. Here, we report the scaling down of thermionic emitters to the microscale using microfabrication technologies and a Joule-heated microscale graphene film as the filament. The emission current of the graphene micro-emitters exhibits a tunability of up to six orders by a modest gate voltage. A turn-on/off time of less than 1 μs is demonstrated for the graphene micro-emitters, indicating a switching speed about five orders of magnitude faster than their bulky counterparts. Importantly, emission performances of graphene micro-emitters are controllable and reproducible through engineering graphene dimensions by microfabrication technologies, which enables us to fabricate graphene micro-emitter arrays with uniform emission performances. Graphene micro-emitters offer an opportunity of realizing large-scale addressable micro-emitter arrays for vacuum electronics applications. PMID:27160693

  7. Strategies for minimizing emittance growth in high charge CW FEL injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the best strategies for designing low emittance, high charge CW FEL injectors. This issue has become more and more critical as today`s interest in FELs is toward UV wavelength high average power operation. The challenge of obtaining the smallest possible emittance is discussed from both the practical point of view and the beam physics point of view. Various mechanisms responsible for beam emittance growth are addressed in detail. Finally, the design of a high charge injector test stand at CEBAF is chosen to help illustrate the design strategies and emittance growth mechanisms discussed in this paper.

  8. Study of porous silicon, silicon carbide and DLC coated field emitters for pressure sensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleps, Irina; Angelescu, Anca; Samfirescu, Narcis; Gil, Adriana; Correia, Antonio

    2001-06-01

    This paper is a revue of our experimental data regarding field emitter array fabrication, various field emission materials and application in pressure sensors domain. Silicon emitter's arrays of different sizes and geometrical shapes were realised using micromachining technologies. Some important aspects as control in etch rate, emitter profile, selectivity and surface morphology were investigated. The emitter surface was modified or was covered by different materials in order to improve the emission properties. The most usual materials investigated for FED applications were: Si, diamond-like carbon layers, silicon carbide, and porous silicon. The main application which is present in our attention is the field emission pressure sensor.

  9. Method of manufacturing a hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2017-02-07

    A method of manufacturing an all back contact solar cell which has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. A second emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The method further includes forming contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  10. Structural Attributes and Photodynamics of Visible Spectrum Quantum Emitters in Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Chejanovsky, Nathan; Rezai, Mohammad; Paolucci, Federico; Kim, Youngwook; Rendler, Torsten; Rouabeh, Wafa; Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Herlinger, Patrick; Denisenko, Andrej; Yang, Sen; Gerhardt, Ilja; Finkler, Amit; Smet, Jurgen H; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2016-11-09

    Newly discovered van der Waals materials like MoS2, WSe2, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), and recently C2N have sparked intensive research to unveil the quantum behavior associated with their 2D structure. Of great interest are 2D materials that host single quantum emitters. h-BN, with a band gap of 5.95 eV, has been shown to host single quantum emitters which are stable at room temperature in the UV and visible spectral range. In this paper we investigate correlations between h-BN structural features and emitter location from bulk down to the monolayer at room temperature. We demonstrate that chemical etching and ion irradiation can generate emitters in h-BN. We analyze the emitters' spectral features and show that they are dominated by the interaction of their electronic transition with a single Raman active mode of h-BN. Photodynamics analysis reveals diverse rates between the electronic states of the emitter. The emitters show excellent photo stability even under ambient conditions and in monolayers. Comparing the excitation polarization between different emitters unveils a connection between defect orientation and the h-BN hexagonal structure. The sharp spectral features, color diversity, room-temperature stability, long-lived metastable states, ease of fabrication, proximity of the emitters to the environment, outstanding chemical stability, and biocompatibility of h-BN provide a completely new class of systems that can be used for sensing and quantum photonics applications.

  11. Solar absorptance and thermal emittance of some common spacecraft thermal-control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Solar absorptance and thermal emittance of spacecraft materials are critical parameters in determining spacecraft temperature control. Because thickness, surface preparation, coatings formulation, manufacturing techniques, etc. affect these parameters, it is usually necessary to measure the absorptance and emittance of materials before they are used. Absorptance and emittance data for many common types of thermal control coatings, are together with some sample spectral data curves of absorptance. In some cases for which ultraviolet and particle radiation data are available, the degraded absorptance and emittance values are also listed.

  12. Ultraviolet-nanoimprinted packaged metasurface thermal emitters for infrared CO2 sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Hideki T.; Kasaya, Takeshi; Oosato, Hirotaka; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Choi, Bongseok; Iwanaga, Masanobu; Sakoda, Kazuaki

    2015-06-01

    Packaged dual-band metasurface thermal emitters integrated with a resistive membrane heater were manufactured by ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprint lithography followed by monolayer lift-off based on a soluble UV resist, which is mass-producible and cost-effective. The emitters were applied to infrared CO2 sensing. In this planar Au/Al2O3/Au metasurface emitter, orthogonal rectangular Au patches are arrayed alternately and exhibit nearly perfect blackbody emission at 4.26 and 3.95 μm necessary for CO2 monitoring at the electric power reduced by 31%. The results demonstrate that metasurface infrared thermal emitters are almost ready for commercialization.

  13. Copper conducting electrode with nickel as a seed layer for selective emitter crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ur Rehman, Atteq; Shin, Eun Gu; Lee, Soo Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this research, we investigated selective emitter formation with a single-step photolithography process having a metallization scheme composed of nickel/copper metal stacks. The nickel seed layers were deposited by applying the electroless deposition process while copper was formed by light induced electro-plating arrangements as the main conducting electrode. The electroless deposition of nickel, along with a sintering process, was employed to create a diffusion barrier between copper and silicon. The nickel metal stack below the copper-conducting electrode also helped in lowering the sheet resistance and improving the contact adhesion. The nickel used as a seed layer was successfully demonstrated in the fabrication of a homogeneous 60 Ω/□ emitter and selective emitter cells. Lower series resistances of 0.165 Ω and 0.253 Ω were achieved for the selective emitter and the homogeneous emitter cells, respectively. The best cell efficiency of 18.37% for the selective emitter solar cell was achieved, with average cell efficiencies of 18.17% and 17.3% for the selective emitter and the homogeneous emitter cells, respectively. An approximate efficiency increase of about 0.8% was recorded for the selective emitter solar cells.

  14. The Effect of Temperature on the Radiative Performance of Ho-Yag Thin Film Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.

    1995-01-01

    We present the emitter efficiency results for the thin film 25 percent Ho YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet, Y3Al5O12) selective emitter from 1000 to 1700 K with a platinum substrate. Spectral emittance and emissive power measurements were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.2 microns) and used to calculate the radiative efficiency. The radiative efficiency and power density of rare earth doped selective emitters are strongly dependent on temperature and experimental results indicate an optimum temperature (1650 K for Ho YAG) for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications.

  15. Elementary framework for cold field emission from quantum-confined, non-planar emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, A. A. Akinwande, A. I.

    2015-05-07

    For suitably small field emitters, the effects of quantum confinement at the emitter tip may have a significant impact on the emitter performance and total emitted current density (ECD). Since the geometry of a quantum system uniquely determines the magnitude and distribution of its energy levels, a framework for deriving ECD equations from cold field electron emitters of arbitrary geometry and dimensionality is developed. In the interest of obtaining semi-analytical ECD equations, the framework is recast in terms of plane wave solutions to the Schrödinger equation via the use of the Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. To demonstrate the framework's consistency with our previous work and its capabilities in treating emitters with non-planar geometries, ECD equations were derived for the normally unconfined cylindrical nanowire (CNW) and normally confined (NC) CNW emitter geometries. As a function of the emitter radius, the NC CNW emitter ECD profile displayed a strong dependence on the Fermi energy and had an average ECD that exceeded the Fowler-Nordheim equation for typical values of the Fermi energy due to closely spaced, singly degenerate energy levels (excluding electron spin), comparatively large electron supply values, and the lack of a transverse, zero-point energy. Such characteristics suggest that emitters with non-planar geometries may be ideal for emission from both an electron supply and electrostatics perspective.

  16. Field emission characteristics of a small number of carbon fiber emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wilkin W.; Shiffler, Donald A.; Harris, John R.; Jensen, Kevin L.; Golby, Ken; LaCour, Matthew; Knowles, Tim

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports an experiment that studies the emission characteristics of small number of field emitters. The experiment consists of nine carbon fibers in a square configuration. Experimental results show that the emission characteristics depend strongly on the separation between each emitter, providing evidence of the electric field screening effects. Our results indicate that as the separation between the emitters decreases, the emission current for a given voltage also decreases. The authors compare the experimental results to four carbon fiber emitters in a linear and square configurations as well as to two carbon fiber emitters in a paired array. Voltage-current traces show that the turn-on voltage is always larger for the nine carbon fiber emitters as compared to the two and four emitters in linear configurations, and approximately identical to the four emitters in a square configuration. The observations and analysis reported here, based on Fowler-Nordheim field emission theory, suggest the electric field screening effect depends critically on the number of emitters, the separation between them, and their overall geometric configuration.

  17. Applications using high-Tc superconducting terahertz emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakade, Kurama; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Saiwai, Yoshihiko; Minami, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Klemm, Richard A.; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    Using recently-developed THz emitters constructed from single crystals of the high-Tc superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ, we performed three prototype tests of the devices to demonstrate their unique characteristic properties for various practical applications. The first is a compact and simple transmission type of THz imaging system using a Stirling cryocooler. The second is a high-resolution Michelson interferometer used as a phase-sensitive reflection-type imaging system. The third is a system with precise temperature control to measure the liquid absorption coefficient. The detailed characteristics of these systems are discussed.

  18. Oxidation and Emittance Studies of Coated Mo-Re

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    1997-01-01

    A commercially available Fe-Cr-Si coating (R512E) and a silicide coating were evaluated regarding their ability to protect Mo-Re from oxidation. The R512E coating provided very good oxidation protection at 1260 C in atmospheric air. Oxidation tests were also performed at Mach 4 in the HYMETS facility at NASA Langley Research Center where again the R512E provided good oxidation protection but for much shorter times. Emittance measurements as a function of wavelength were also obtained for the R512E coating on Mo-Re after exposure to the Mach 4 environment at 1150 C and 1230 C.

  19. An integrated microcombustor and photonic crystal emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Walker R.; Stelmakh, Veronika; Allmon, William R.; Waits, Christopher M.; Soljacic, Marin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Celanovic, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion is appealing for portable millimeter- scale generators because of its simplicity, but it relies on a high temperatures. The performance and reliability of the high-temperature components, a microcombustor and a photonic crystal emitter, has proven challenging because they are subjected to 1000-1200°C and stresses arising from thermal expansion mismatches. In this paper, we adopt the industrial process of diffusion brazing to fabricate an integrated microcombustor and photonic crystal by bonding stacked metal layers. Diffusion brazing is simpler and faster than previous approaches of silicon MEMS and welded metal, and the end result is more robust.

  20. Feasibility of a ring FEL at low emittance storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, I.

    2015-09-01

    A scheme for generating coherent radiation at latest generation low emittance storage rings such as PETRA III at DESY (Balewski et al., 2004 [1]) is proposed. The scheme is based on focusing and subsequent defocusing of the electron beam in the longitudinal phase space at the undulator location. The expected performance characteristics are estimated for radiation in the wavelength range of 500-1500 eV. It is shown that the average brightness is increased by several orders of magnitude compared to spontaneous undulator radiation, which can open new perspectives for photon-hungry soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques.

  1. a New Strongly Deformed Proton-Emitter 117La

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soramel, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; Bonetti, R.; Poli, G. L.; Malerba, F.; Bianchi, E.; Stroe, L.; Müller, L.; Andrighetto, A.; Guo, J. Y.; Li, Z. C.; Maglione, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Signorini, C.; Liu, Z. H.; Ruan, M.; Ivascu, M.; Broude, C.; Ferreira, L. S.

    2001-11-01

    The decay by proton emission of the 117La nucleus has been studied via the 310 MeV 58Ni + 64Zn reaction. The nucleus has two levels that decay to the ground state of 116Ba with Ep = 783(6) keV (T1/2 = 20(5) ms) and Ep = 933(10) keV (T1/2 = 10(5) ms). Calculations done for a deformed proton emitter reproduce the experimental results confirming that 117La is well deformed (β2 ~ 0.3).

  2. Effects of surface diffusion on high temperature selective emitters

    DOE PAGES

    Peykov, Daniel; Yeng, Yi Xiang; Celanovic, Ivan; ...

    2015-01-01

    Using morphological and optical simulations of 1D tantalum photonic crystals at 1200K, surface diffusion was determined to gradually reduce the efficiency of selective emitters. This was attributed to shifting resonance peaks and declining emissivity caused by changes to the cavity dimensions and the aperture width. Decreasing the structure’s curvature through larger periods and smaller cavity widths, as well as generating smoother transitions in curvature through the introduction of rounded cavities, was found to alleviate this degradation. An optimized structure, that shows both high efficiency selective emissivity and resistance to surface diffusion, was presented.

  3. Applications using high-Tc superconducting terahertz emitters

    PubMed Central

    Nakade, Kurama; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Saiwai, Yoshihiko; Minami, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Klemm, Richard A.; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Using recently-developed THz emitters constructed from single crystals of the high-Tc superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ, we performed three prototype tests of the devices to demonstrate their unique characteristic properties for various practical applications. The first is a compact and simple transmission type of THz imaging system using a Stirling cryocooler. The second is a high-resolution Michelson interferometer used as a phase-sensitive reflection-type imaging system. The third is a system with precise temperature control to measure the liquid absorption coefficient. The detailed characteristics of these systems are discussed. PMID:26983905

  4. Spectral properties of single photons from quantum emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Philipp; Tentrup, Tristan; Bienert, Marc; Morigi, Giovanna; Eschner, Jürgen

    2017-08-01

    Quantum networks require flying qubits that transfer information between the nodes. This may be implemented by means of single atoms (the nodes) that emit and absorb single photons (the flying qubits) and requires full control of photon absorption and emission by the individual emitters. In this paper, we theoretically characterize the wave packet of a photon emitted by a single atom undergoing a spontaneous Raman transition in a three-level scheme. We investigate several excitation schemes that are experimentally relevant and discuss control parameters that allow one to tailor the spectrum of the emitted photon wave packet.

  5. Electroluminescence from Si/SiGe quantum cascade emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, D. J.; Lynch, S. A.; Bates, R.; Ikonic, Z.; Kelsall, R. W.; Harrison, P.; Norris, D. J.; Liew, S. L.; Cullis, A. G.; Murzyn, P.; Pidgeon, C.; Arnone, D. D.; Robbins, D. J.

    2003-03-01

    Intersubband electroluminescence results are presented from Si/SiGe quantum cascade emitters at 3.2 THz and at temperatures up to 150 K. The effect of adding doping into the active quantum wells was studied in addition to reduced barrier widths from previous measurements. While the current through the sample is increased by the addition of doping, the emitted power is reduced through additional free carrier absorption and Coulombic scattering. Free electron laser measurements confirm the intersubband transitions in the quantum wells of the cascade devices and produce non-radiative lifetimes of ∼20 ps between 4 and 150 K.

  6. BEAM EMITTANCE DIAGNOSTIC FOR THE DARHT SECOND AXIS INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, R. R.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Rose, E. A.; Custer, D. M.; Ridlon, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    Low beam emittance is key to achieving the required spot size at the output focus of the DARHT Second Axis. The nominal electron beam parameters at the output of the injector are 2 kA, 4.6 MeV, 2-microsecond pulse width and an rms radius less than 1 cm. Emittance is measured by bringing the beam to a focus in which the emittance is a dominant influence in determining the spot size. The spot size is measured from Cerenkov or optical transition radiation (OTR) generated from a target intercepted by the beam. The current density in the focused DARHT beam would melt this target in less than 1/2 microsec. To prevent this we have designed a DC magnetic transport system that defocuses the beam on the emittance target to prevent overheating, and uses a 125-ns half period pulsed solenoid to selectively focus the beam for short times during the beam pulse. During the development of the fast-focusing portion of this diagnostic it has been determined that the focusing pulse must rapidly sweep through the focus at the target to an over-focused condition to avoid target damage due to overheating. The fast focus produces {approx}1 kilogauss field over an effective length of {approx}50 cm to bring the beam to a focus on the target. The fast focus field is generated with a 12-turn coil located inside the beam-transport vacuum chamber with the entire fast coil structure within the bore of a D.C. magnet. The pulsed coil diameter of {approx}15 cm is dictated by the return current path at the nominal vacuum wall. Since the drive system is to use 40 kV to 50 kV technology and much of the inductance is in the drive and feed circuit, the coil design has three 120 degree segments. The coil, driver and feed system design, as well as beam envelope calculations and target heating calculations are presented below. Operation of the OTR imaging system will be discussed in separate publication (Ref. 1).

  7. Dosimetry of Auger emitters: Physical and phenomenological approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.S.R.; Howell, R.W.; Rao, D.V.; Mylavarapu, V.B.; Kassis, A.I.; Adelstein, S.J.; Wright, H.A.; Hamm, R.N.; Turner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Recent radiobiological studies have demonstrated that Auger cascades can cause severe biological damage contrary to expectations based on conventional dosimetry. Several determinants govern these effects, including the nature of the Auger electron spectrum; localized energy deposition; cellular geometry; chemical form of the carrier; cellular localization, concentration, and subcellular distribution of the radionuclide. Conventional dosimetry is inadequate in that these considerations are ignored. Our results provide the basis for biophysical approaches toward subcellular dosimetry of Auger emitters in vitro and in vivo. 12 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Improving the Sensitivity of Mass Spectrometry by Using a New Sheath Flow Electrospray Emitter Array at Subambient Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Kelly, Ryan T.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi

    2014-01-01

    Arrays of chemically etched emitters with individualized sheath gas capillaries were developed to enhance electrospray ionization (ESI) efficiency at subambient pressures. By incorporating the new emitter array in a subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) source, both ionization efficiency and ion transmission efficiency were significantly increased, providing enhanced sensitivity in mass spectrometric analyses. The SPIN source eliminates the major ion losses of conventional ESI-mass spectrometry (MS) interfaces by placing the emitter in the first reduced pressure region of the instrument. The new ESI emitter array design developed in this study allows individualized sheath gas around each emitter in the array making it possible to generate an array of uniform and stable electrosprays in the subambient pressure (10 to 30 Torr) environment for the first time. The utility of the new emitter arrays was demonstrated by coupling the emitter array/SPIN source with a time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The instrument sensitivity was compared under different ESI source and interface configurations including a standard atmospheric pressure single ESI emitter/heated capillary, single emitter/SPIN and multi-emitter/SPIN configurations using an equimolar solution of 9 peptides. The highest instrument sensitivity was observed using the multi-emitter/SPIN configuration in which the sensitivity increased with the number of emitters in the array. Over an order of magnitude MS sensitivity improvement was achieved using multi-emitter/SPIN as compared to using the standard atmospheric pressure single ESI emitter/heated capillary interface. PMID:24676894

  9. MIRD Pamphlet No. 22 (Unabridged): Radiobiology and Dosimetry of alpha-Particle Emitters for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sgouros, George; Roeske, John C.; McDevitt, Michael S.; Palm, Stig; Allen, Barry J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Brill, Bertrand A.; Song, Hong; Howell, R. W.; Akabani, Gamal

    2010-02-28

    The potential of alpha-particle emitters to treat cancer has been recognized since the early 1900s. Advances in the targeted delivery of radionuclides, in radionuclide conjugation chemistry, and in the increased availability of alpha-emitters appropriate for clinical use have recently led to patient trials of alpha-particle-emitter labeled radiopharmaceuticals. Although alpha-emitters have been studied for many decades, their current use in humans for targeted therapy is an important milestone. The objective of this work is to review those aspects of the field that are pertinent to targeted alpha-particle-emitter therapy and to provide guidance and recommendations for human alpha-particle-emitter dosimetry.

  10. MIRD Pamphlet No. 22 (abridged): radiobiology and dosimetry of alpha-particle emitters for targeted radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, George; Roeske, John C; McDevitt, Michael R; Palm, Stig; Allen, Barry J; Fisher, Darrell R; Brill, A Bertrand; Song, Hong; Howell, Roger W; Akabani, Gamal; Bolch, Wesley E; Brill, A Bertrand; Fisher, Darrell R; Howell, Roger W; Meredith, Ruby F; Sgouros, George; Wessels, Barry W; Zanzonico, Pat B

    2010-02-01

    The potential of alpha-particle emitters to treat cancer has been recognized since the early 1900s. Advances in the targeted delivery of radionuclides and radionuclide conjugation chemistry, and the increased availability of alpha-emitters appropriate for clinical use, have recently led to patient trials of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with alpha-particle emitters. Although alpha-emitters have been studied for many decades, their current use in humans for targeted therapy is an important milestone. The objective of this work is to review those aspects of the field that are pertinent to targeted alpha-particle emitter therapy and to provide guidance and recommendations for human alpha-particle emitter dosimetry.

  11. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlehahn, A.; Krüger, L.; Gschrey, M.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-01-01

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g(2)(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g(2)(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  12. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Schlehahn, A.; Krüger, L.; Gschrey, M.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T. Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-01-15

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g{sup (2)}(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g{sup (2)}(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  13. Boron implanted emitter for n-type silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Peng; Han, Pei-De; Fan, Yu-Jie; Xing, Yu-Peng

    2015-03-01

    The effects of ion doses on the properties of boron implanted Si for n-type solar cell application were investigated with doses ranging from 5× 1014 cm- 2 to 2× 1015 cm- 2 and a subsequent two-step annealing process in a tube furnace. With the help of the TCAD process simulation tool, knowledge on diffusion kinetics of dopants and damage evolution was obtained by fitting SIMS measured boron profiles. Due to insufficient elimination of the residual damage, the implanted emitter was found to have a higher saturation current density (J0e) and a poorer crystallographic quality. Consistent with this observation, Voc, Jsc, and the efficiency of the all-implanted p+-n-n+ solar cells followed a decreasing trend with an increase of the implantation dose. The obtained maximum efficiency was 19.59% at a low dose of 5× 1014 cm- 2. The main efficiency loss under high doses came not only from increased recombination of carriers in the space charge region revealed by double-diode parameters of dark I-V curves, but also from the degraded minority carrier diffusion length in the emitter and base evidenced by IQE data. These experimental results indicated that clusters and dislocation loops had appeared at high implantation doses, which acted as effective recombination centers for photogenerated carriers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61275040, 60976046, and 61021003) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB934200).

  14. Emitter Choice for Epitaxial CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-11-21

    High-quality epitaxial CdTe layers with low defect density and high carrier concentration have been demonstrated by several research groups. Nevertheless, one primary challenge for high-performance epitaxial CdTe solar cells is how to choose a suitable emitter partner for the junction formation. The numerical simulations show that a type I heterojunction with small conduction band offset (0.1 eV = ..delta..Ec = 0.3 eV) is necessary to maintain a good cell efficiency even with large interface recombination. Otherwise, a small 'cliff' can assist interface recombination causing smaller Voc, and a large 'spike' (..delta..Ec = 0.4 eV) can impede the photo current and lead to a reduction of JSC and FF. Among the three possible emitters, CdS, CdMgTe, and MgZnO, CdMgTe (with ~30% Mg) and MgZnO (with ~ 20% Mg) are likely to be a better choice since their type-I junction can tolerate a larger density of interface defects.

  15. Scalable emitter array development for infrared scene projector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparkman, Kevin; LaVeigne, Joe; McHugh, Steve; Kulick, Jason; Lannon, John; Goodwin, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Several new technologies have been developed over recent years that make a fundamental change in the scene projection for infrared hardware in the loop test. Namely many of the innovations are in Read In Integrated Circuit (RIIC) architecture, which can lead to an operational and cost effective solution for producing large emitter arrays based on the assembly of smaller sub-arrays. Array sizes of 2048x2048 and larger are required to meet the high fidelity test needs of today's modern infrared sensors. The Test Resource Management Center (TRMC) Test and Evaluation/Science and Technology (T and E/S and T) Program through the U.S. Army Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentations (PEO STRI) has contracted with SBIR and its partners to investigate integrating new technologies in order to achieve array sizes much larger than are available today. SBIR and its partners have undertaken several proof-of-concept experiments that provide the groundwork for producing a tiled emitter array. Herein we will report on the results of these experiments, including the demonstration of edge connections formed between different ICs with a gap of less than 10µm.

  16. Strong coupling between surface plasmon polaritons and emitters: a review.

    PubMed

    Törmä, P; Barnes, W L

    2015-01-01

    In this review we look at the concepts and state-of-the-art concerning the strong coupling of surface plasmon-polariton modes to states associated with quantum emitters such as excitons in J-aggregates, dye molecules and quantum dots. We explore the phenomenon of strong coupling with reference to a number of examples involving electromagnetic fields and matter. We then provide a concise description of the relevant background physics of surface plasmon polaritons. An extensive overview of the historical background and a detailed discussion of more recent relevant experimental advances concerning strong coupling between surface plasmon polaritons and quantum emitters is then presented. Three conceptual frameworks are then discussed and compared in depth: classical, semi-classical and fully quantum mechanical; these theoretical frameworks will have relevance to strong coupling beyond that involving surface plasmon polaritons. We conclude our review with a perspective on the future of this rapidly emerging field, one we are sure will grow to encompass more intriguing physics and will develop in scope to be of relevance to other areas of science.

  17. Extension of the general thermal field equation for nanosized emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Kyritsakis, A. Xanthakis, J. P.

    2016-01-28

    During the previous decade, Jensen et al. developed a general analytical model that successfully describes electron emission from metals both in the field and thermionic regimes, as well as in the transition region. In that development, the standard image corrected triangular potential barrier was used. This barrier model is valid only for planar surfaces and therefore cannot be used in general for modern nanometric emitters. In a recent publication, the authors showed that the standard Fowler-Nordheim theory can be generalized for highly curved emitters if a quadratic term is included to the potential model. In this paper, we extend this generalization for high temperatures and include both the thermal and intermediate regimes. This is achieved by applying the general method developed by Jensen to the quadratic barrier model of our previous publication. We obtain results that are in good agreement with fully numerical calculations for radii R > 4 nm, while our calculated current density differs by a factor up to 27 from the one predicted by the Jensen's standard General-Thermal-Field (GTF) equation. Our extended GTF equation has application to modern sharp electron sources, beam simulation models, and vacuum breakdown theory.

  18. Gallium arsenide deep-level optical emitter for fibre optics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Janet L; McManis, Joseph E; Osadchy, Thomas; Grober, Louise; Woodall, Jerry M; Kindlmann, Peter J

    2003-06-01

    Fibre-optic components fabricated on the same substrate as integrated circuits are important for future high-speed communications. One industry response has been the costly push to develop indium phosphide (InP) electronics. However, for fabrication simplicity, reliability and cost, gallium arsenide (GaAs) remains the established technology for integrated optoelectronics. Unfortunately, the GaAs bandgap wavelength (0.85 microm) is far too short for fibre optics at 1.3-1.5 microm. This has led to work on materials that have a large lattice mismatch on GaAs. Here we demonstrate the first light-emitting diode (LED) that emits at 1.5 microm fibre-optic wavelengths in GaAs using optical transitions from arsenic antisite (As(Ga)) deep levels. This is an enabling technology for fibre-optic components that are lattice-matched to GaAs integrated circuits. We present experimental results showing significant internal optical power (24 mW) and speed (in terahertz) from GaAs optical emitters using deep-level transitions. Finally, we present theory showing the ultimate limit to the efficiency-bandwidth product of semiconductor deep-level optical emitters.

  19. On the Nature of Lyman-α Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junxian; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Brown, Michael; Heckman, Timothy; Norman, Colin

    2003-05-01

    More than half of the approximately 360 Lyman-α emitters found by the LALA survey show rest equivalent widths (EWs) larger than 200 Å, which is the maximum EW expected for normal stellar population. The high EWs can be reproduced by stellar populations with high proportions of young, massive stars, or by type 2 AGNs, which are supposed to be detectable in X-ray by deep Chandra images. An 180 ks Chandra ACIS exposure was obtained to study the X-ray properties of these emitters. However, none of the 49 sources imaged was significantly detected (over 2σ level) in X-ray. These sources cannot be detected in the stacked X-ray image either, which has an effective Chandra exposure time of 6.5 million seconds. The 3σ upper limit of the average X-ray flux is 7.9 × 10-17 erg.cm-2.s-1 in the 0.5 - 10.0 keV band, which is much fainter than the type 2 quasars discovered by Chandra so far. Optical spectra also show no AGN signatures.

  20. A Complete Census of Hα Emitters in NGC 6397

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallanca, Cristina; Beccari, Giacomo; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Pasquini, Luca; Lanzoni, Barbara; Mucciarelli, Alessio

    2017-08-01

    We used a data set of archival Hubble Space Telescope images obtained through the F555W, F814W, and F656N filters to perform a complete search for objects showing {{H}}α emission in the globular cluster NGC 6397. As a photometric diagnostic, we used the {(V-{{H}}α )}0 color excess in the {(V-{{H}}α )}0-{(V-I)}0 color-color diagram. In the analyzed field of view, we identified 53 {{H}}α emitters. In particular, we confirmed the optical counterpart to 20 X-ray sources (7 cataclysmic variables, 2 millisecond pulsars and 11 active binaries) and identified 33 previously unknown sources, thus significantly enlarging the population of known active binaries in this cluster. We report the main characteristics for each class of objects. Photometric estimates of the equivalent width of the {{H}}α emission line were derived from the {(V-{{H}}α )}0-excess and, for the first time, compared to the spectroscopic measurements obtained from the analysis of MUSE spectra. The very good agreement between the spectroscopic and photometric measures fully confirmed the reliability of the proposed approach to measure the {{H}}α emission. The search demonstrated the efficiency of this novel approach to pinpoint and measure {{H}}α -emitters, thus offering a powerful tool to conduct a complete census of objects with formations and evolutions that can be strongly affected by dynamical interactions in star clusters.