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Sample records for elements mediate mitogen-activated

  1. VIP1 response elements mediate mitogen-activated protein kinase 3-induced stress gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pitzschke, Andrea; Djamei, Armin; Teige, Markus; Hirt, Heribert

    2009-10-27

    The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens transforms plant cells by delivering its T-DNA into the plant cell nucleus where it integrates into the plant genome and causes tumor formation. A key role of VirE2-interacting protein 1 (VIP1) in the nuclear import of T-DNA during Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation has been unravelled and VIP1 was shown to undergo nuclear localization upon phosphorylation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3. Here, we provide evidence that VIP1 encodes a functional bZIP transcription factor that stimulates stress-dependent gene expression by binding to VIP1 response elements (VREs), a DNA hexamer motif. VREs are overrepresented in promoters responding to activation of the MPK3 pathway such as Trxh8 and MYB44. Accordingly, plants overexpressing VIP1 accumulate high levels of Trxh8 and MYB44 transcripts, whereas stress-induced expression of these genes is impaired in mpk3 mutants. Trxh8 and MYB44 promoters are activated by VIP1 in a VRE-dependent manner. VIP1 strongly enhances expression from a synthetic promoter harboring multiple VRE copies and directly interacts with VREs in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of the MYB44 promoter confirm that VIP1 binding to VREs is enhanced under conditions of MPK3 pathway stimulation. These results provide molecular insight into the cellular mechanism of target gene regulation by the MPK3 pathway. PMID:19820165

  2. Protein Kinase Cδ Mediates Neurogenic but Not Mitogenic Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corbit, Kevin C.; Foster, David A.; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    1999-01-01

    In several neuronal cell systems, fibroblast-derived growth factor (FGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) act as neurogenic agents, whereas epidermal growth factor (EGF) acts as a mitogen. The mechanisms responsible for these different cellular fates are unclear. We report here that although FGF, NGF, and EGF all activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (extracellular signal-related kinase [ERK]) in rat hippocampal (H19-7) and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, the activation of ERK by the neurogenic agents FGF and NGF is dependent upon protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), whereas ERK activation in response to the mitogenic EGF is independent of PKCδ. Antisense PKCδ oligonucleotides or the PKCδ-specific inhibitor rottlerin inhibited FGF- and NGF-induced, but not EGF-induced, ERK activation. In contrast, EGF-induced ERK activation was inhibited by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin, which had no effect upon FGF-induced ERK activation. Rottlerin also inhibited the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK) in response to activated Raf, but had no effect upon c-Raf activity or ERK activation by activated MEK. These results indicate that PKCδ functions either downstream from or in parallel with c-Raf, but upstream of MEK. Inhibition of PKCδ also blocked neurite outgrowth induced by FGF and NGF in PC12 cells and by activated Raf in H19-7 cells, indicating a role for PKCδ in the neurogenic effects of FGF, NGF, and Raf. Interestingly, the PKCδ requirement is apparently cell type specific, since FGF-induced ERK activation was independent of PKCδ in NIH 3T3 murine fibroblasts, in which FGF is a mitogen. These data demonstrate that PKCδ contributes to growth factor specificity and response in neuronal cells and may also promote cell-type-specific differences in growth factor signaling. PMID:10330161

  3. Baicalin attenuates acute myocardial infarction of rats via mediating the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaobing; Gu, Jianmin; Fan, Yuqi; Shi, Huihua; Jiang, Mier

    2013-01-01

    Baicalin is a bioactive ingredient from the herb and has possessed various pharmacological actions. The present study was performed to evaluate the cardioprotective potential of baicalin against myocardial infarction and explore the potential mechanism. Baicalin was intraperitoneally injected into the rats by the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, respectively, once a day for 7 d and, 30 min after the last administration, the left coronary artery was ligated. Infarct size was measured to analyze the myocardial damage. Myocardial specific enzymes, including creatine kinase (CK), the MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) were determined with the colorimetric method. Evidence for myocardial apoptosis was detected by caspase-3 activity measurement and Western blot analysis. We also examined the protein levels of three major subgroups of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), namely, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 by immuoblotting. Our results indicated that baicalin significantly reduced the infarct size and myocardial enzymes (CK, CK-MB, LDH and cTnT). Administration of baicalin also suppressed the activity and protein expression of caspase-3. Moreover, the protein level of phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK) was found to be evidently augmented while the phosphorylated JNK (p-JNK) and phosphorylated p38 (p-p38) were strikingly diminished in infarcted rats with baicalin treatment. These findings suggest that the baicalin's cardioprotection associates with mediation of MAPK cascades in acute myocardial infarction of rats.

  4. Protein tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways contribute to differences in heterophil-mediated innate immune responsiveness between two lines of broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation mediates signal transduction of cellular processes, with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulating virtually all signaling events. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) super-family consists of three conserved pathways that convert receptor activation into ce...

  5. Cell cycle arrest mediated by the MEK/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pumiglia, Kevin M.; Decker, Stuart J.

    1997-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade plays a crucial role in the transduction of extracellular signals into responses governing growth and differentiation. The effects of a specific inhibitor of the MAPK kinase (MEK)/MAPK pathway (PD98059) on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced growth arrest and inhibition of cell cycle-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been examined. Treatment of NIH 3T3 cells expressing TRKA with PD98059 dramatically reversed the complete inhibition of growth of these cells caused by NGF. PD98059 also blocked the ability of NGF to inhibit the activities of CDK4 and CDK2, while partially preventing NGF induction of p21Cip1/WAF1. To independently evaluate the involvement of the MEK/MAPK pathway in growth arrest, an inducible activated form of the Raf-1 protooncogene (ΔRAF-1:ER) was expressed in these cells. Activation of ΔRAF-1:ER resulted in a prolonged increase in MAPK activity and growth arrest of these cells, with concomitant induction of p21Cip1/WAF1 and inhibition of CDK2 activity. These effects of ΔRAF-1:ER activation were all reversed by treatment of cells with PD98059. These data indicate that in addition to functioning as a positive effector of growth, stimulation of the MEK/MAPK pathway can result in an inhibition of CDK activity and cell cycle arrest. PMID:9012803

  6. Liquiritigenin Induces Tumor Cell Death through Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase- (MPAKs-) Mediated Pathway in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiahui; Liu, Yan; Meng, Qingfan; Xie, Jing; Wang, Zhenzuo

    2014-01-01

    Liquiritigenin (LQ), separated from Glycyrrhiza radix, possesses anti-inflammatory, antihyperlipidemic, and antiallergic effects. Our present study aims to investigate the antihepatocellular carcinoma effects of LQ both in cell and animal models. LQ strikingly reduced cell viability, enhanced apoptotic rate, induced lactate dehydrogenase over-release, and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and caspase 3 activity in both PLC/PRL/5 and HepG2 cells. The expression of cleaved PARP, the hall-marker of apoptosis, was enhanced by LQ. LQ treatment resulted in a reduction of the expressions of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL), and an increase of the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and P38. LQ-mediated cell viability reduction, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis related protein abnormal expressions, and JNK and P38 activation were partially abolished by N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (a ROS inhibitor) pretreatment. Moreover, LQ suppressed the activation of extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERKs) and reduced the translocation of phosphor-ERKs from cytoplasm to nucleus. This antitumor activity was further confirmed in PLC/PRL/5-xenografted mice model. All these data indicate that the antihepatocellular carcinoma effects of LQ are related to its modulation of the activations of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs). The study provides experimental evidence supporting LQ as a potential therapeutic agent for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. PMID:24738081

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway mediates DBP-maf-induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Reddy, C Damodar; Swamy, Narasimha

    2003-09-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage-activating factor (DBP-maf) is derived from serum vitamin D binding protein (DBP) by selective deglycosylation during inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DBP-maf on RAW 264.7 macrophages and the underlying intracellular signal transduction pathways. DBP-maf increased proapoptotic caspase-3, -8, and -9 activities and induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells. However, DBP, the precursor to DBP-maf did not induce apoptosis in these cells. Cell cycle analysis of DBP-maf-treated RAW 264.7 cells revealed growth arrest with accumulation of cells in sub-G(0)/G(1) phase. We also investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in the DBP-maf-induced apoptosis of RAW264.7 cells. DBP-maf increased the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK1/2, while it decreased the ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB202190, attenuated DBP-maf-induced apoptosis. PD98059, a MEK specific inhibitor, did not show a significant inhibition of apoptosis induced by DBP-maf. Taken together, these results suggest that the p38 MAPK pathway plays a crucial role in DBP-maf-mediated apoptosis of macrophages. Our studies indicate that, during inflammation DBP-maf may function positively by causing death of the macrophages when activated macrophages are no longer needed at the site of inflammation. In summary, we report for the first time that DBP-maf induces apoptosis in macrophages via p38 and JNK1/2 pathway. PMID:12938159

  8. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediates IL-8 induction by the ribotoxin deoxynivalenol in human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Zahidul; Gray, Jennifer S.; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: pestka@msu.edu

    2006-06-15

    The effects of the ribotoxic trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated IL-8 expression were investigated in cloned human monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). DON (250 to 1000 ng/ml) induced both IL-8 mRNA and IL-8 heteronuclear RNA (hnRNA), an indicator of IL-8 transcription, in the human U937 monocytic cell line in a concentration-dependent manner. Expression of IL-8 hnRNA, mRNA and protein correlated with p38 phosphorylation and was completely abrogated by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. DON at 500 ng/ml similarly induced p38-dependent IL-8 protein and mRNA expression in PBMC cultures from healthy volunteers. Significantly increased IL-6 and IL-1{beta} intracellular protein and mRNA expression was also observed in PBMC treated with DON (500 ng/ml) which were also partially p38-dependent. Flow cytometry of PBMC revealed that DON-induced p38 phosphorylation varied among individuals relative to both threshold toxin concentrations (25-100 ng/ml) and relative increases in percentages of phospho-p38{sup +} cells. DON-induced p38 activation occurred exclusively in the CD14{sup +} monocyte population. DON was devoid of agonist activity for human Toll-like receptors 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9. However, two other ribotoxins, emetine and anisomycin, induced p38 phosphorylation in PBMC similarly to DON. Taken together, these data suggest that (1) p38 activation was required for induction of IL-8 and proinflammatory gene expression in the monocyte and (2) DON induced p38 activation in human monocytes via the ribotoxic stress response.

  9. Activation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase by Clotrimazole Induces Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 3 Activation through a Novel Transcriptional Element.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takamitsu; Inami, Keita; Numata, Yoshihiro; Funakoshi, Kodai; Yoshida, Midori; Kumagai, Takeshi; Kanno, Shuichi; Matsui, Satomi; Toriyabe, Takayoshi; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi; Nagata, Kiyoshi

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3) is a basolaterally localized transporter in the liver and contributes to the transport of various metabolites such as conjugates of endogenous compounds and drugs from hepatocytes. MRP3 expression in the human liver is low under normal physiologic conditions but is induced by drug treatment. Although several studies have identified a region necessary for the basal transcription of MRP3, no region that responds to drugs has been reported. To identify the xenobiotic-responsive elements of MRP3, we constructed a luciferase reporter plasmid containing the MRP3 5'-flanking region up to -10 kb upstream from the transcription start site. Among typical nuclear receptor ligands, clotrimazole dramatically enhanced MRP3 reporter activity in HepG2 cells, whereas rifampicin had no effect. We then conducted MRP3 reporter assays with deletion or mutation constructs to identify a clotrimazole-responsive element. The element was located approximately -6.8 kb upstream from the MRP3 transcription start site. Overexpression of the pregnane X receptor did not enhance clotrimazole-mediated transcription. We found that clotrimazole was toxic to HepG2 cells and we therefore investigated whether mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation is involved in the transactivation of MRP3 by clotrimazole. p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 [4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole] suppressed MRP3 mRNA expression induced by clotrimazole, whereas c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125 (1,9-pyrazoloanthrone) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor PD98059 [2-(2-amino-3-methoxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one] did not. Phosphorylated p38 MAPK was detected in HepG2 cells treated with clotrimazole. These results suggest that activation of the p38 MAPK pathway induces the transcriptional activation of MRP3. PMID:27507784

  10. MKK3- and MKK6-regulated gene expression is mediated by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Raingeaud, J; Whitmarsh, A J; Barrett, T; Dérijard, B; Davis, R J

    1996-01-01

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction pathway is activated by proinflammatory cytokines and environmental stress. The detection of p38 MAP kinase in the nucleus of activated cells suggests that p38 MAP kinase can mediate signaling to the nucleus. To test this hypothesis, we constructed expression vectors for activated MKK3 and MKK6, two MAP kinase kinases that phosphorylate and activate p38 MAP kinase. Expression of activated MKK3 and MKK6 in cultured cells caused a selective increase in p38 MAP kinase activity. Cotransfection experiments demonstrated that p38 MAP kinase activation causes increased reporter gene expression mediated by the transcription factors ATF2 and Elk-1. These data demonstrate that the nucleus is one target of the p38 MAP kinase signal transduction pathway. PMID:8622669

  11. Role of a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in ion flux-mediated turgor regulation in fungi.

    PubMed

    Lew, Roger R; Levina, Natalia N; Shabala, Lana; Anderca, Marinela I; Shabala, Sergey N

    2006-03-01

    Fungi normally maintain a high internal hydrostatic pressure (turgor) of about 500 kPa. In response to hyperosmotic shock, there are immediate electrical changes: a transient depolarization (1 to 2 min) followed by a sustained hyperpolarization (5 to 10 min) prior to turgor recovery (10 to 60 min). Using ion-selective vibrating probes, we established that the transient depolarization is due to Ca(2+) influx and the sustained hyperpolarization is due to H(+) efflux by activation of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. Protein synthesis is not required for H(+)-ATPase activation. Net K(+) and Cl(-) uptake occurs at the same time as turgor recovery. The magnitude of the ion uptake is more than sufficient to account for the osmotic gradients required for turgor to return to its original level. Two osmotic mutants, os-1 and os-2, homologs of a two-component histidine kinase sensor and the yeast high osmotic glycerol mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, respectively, have lower turgor than the wild type and do not exhibit the sustained hyperpolarization after hyperosmotic treatment. The os-1 mutant does not exhibit all of the wild-type turgor-adaptive ion fluxes (Cl(-) uptake increases, but net K(+) flux barely changes and net H(+) efflux declines) (os-2 was not examined). Both os mutants are able to regulate turgor but at a lower level than the wild type. Our results demonstrate that a MAP kinase cascade regulates ion transport, activation of the H(+)-ATPase, and net K(+) and Cl(-) uptake during turgor regulation. Other pathways regulating turgor must also exist.

  12. Fluid shear stress activation of egr-1 transcription in cultured human endothelial and epithelial cells is mediated via the extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Schwachtgen, J L; Houston, P; Campbell, C; Sukhatme, V; Braddock, M

    1998-01-01

    The primary response transcription factor, early growth response-1 (Egr-1), is rapidly activated by a variety of extracellular stimuli. Egr-1 binds to a sequence found in the promoters of genes involved in vascular injury, such as PDGF-A and tissue factor, and trans-activates their expression in endothelial cells in response to fluid shear stress. Here we show that egr-1 mRNA is increased after 30 min of flow in human aortic endothelial cell and HeLa cell cultures. Transient transfection of HeLa cells with reporter gene constructs driven by the murine or human egr-1 5' flanking sequence revealed a five- and ninefold induction, respectively, in transcriptional activity after exposure to a shear stress of 5 dynes/cm2 for 3 h. Deletion of sequences in the murine promoter containing two AP1 sites and an inhibitory Egr-1 binding sequence, did not reduce shear stress inducibility. However, progressive deletion of five serum response elements, reduced both the basal promoter activity and its capacity to be activated by shear stress. Further examination indicated that the three upstream serum response elements are predominantly responsible for shear stress activation of the egr-1 promoter. Treatment of cells with PD98059, a specific inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase-1 inhibited shear stress activation of egr-1. We suggest that egr-1 activation by shear stress involves activation of Elk-1 but not c-jun activity. These data, which are consistent with previous findings for shear mediated signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, now implicate shear modulation of the Egr-1 transcription factor in this pathway. PMID:9616225

  13. OSU-DY7, a novel D-tyrosinol derivative, mediates cytotoxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and Burkitt lymphoma through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Li-Yuan; Ma, Yihui; Kulp, Samuel K.; Wang, Shu-Huei; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Frissora, Frank; Mani, Rajeswaran; Mo, Xiaokui; Jarjoura, David; Byrd, John C.; Chen, Ching-Shih; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Drug resistance and associated immune deregulation limit use of current therapies in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), thus warranting alternative therapy development. Herein we demonstrate that OSU-DY7, a novel D-tyrosinol derivative targeting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), mediates cytotoxicity in lymphocytic cell lines representing CLL (MEC-1), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (697 cells), Burkitt lymphoma (Raji and Ramos) and primary B cells from CLL patients in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The OSU-DY7-induced cytotoxicity is dependent on caspase activation, as evidenced by induction of caspase-3 activation and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and rescue of cytotoxicity by Z-VAD-FMK. Interestingly, OSU-DY7-induced cytotoxicity is mediated through activation of p38 MAPK, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and downstream target protein MAPKAPK2. Pretreatment of B-CLL cells with SB202190, a specific p38 MAPK inhibitor, results in decreased MAPKAPK2 protein level with concomitant rescue of the cells from OSU-DY7-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, OSU-DY7-induced cytotoxicity is associated with down regulation of p38 MAPK target BIRC5, that is rescued at protein and mRNA levels by SB202190. This study provides evidence for a role of OSU-DY7 in p38 MAPK activation and BIRC5 down regulation associated with apoptosis in B lymphocytic cells, thus warranting development of this alternative therapy for lymphoid malignancies. PMID:21470196

  14. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK)-mediated autoimmunity: lessons to learn from ANCA vasculitis and pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mavropoulos, Athanasios; Orfanidou, Timoklia; Liaskos, Christos; Smyk, Daniel S; Billinis, Charalambos; Blank, Miri; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2013-03-01

    Evidence is beginning to accumulate that p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling pathway plays an important role in the regulation of cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. The exact mechanisms and the degree by which the p38 MAPK pathway participates in the immune-mediated induction of diseases have started to emerge. This review discusses the recent advances in the molecular dissection of the p38 MAPK pathway and the findings generated by reports investigating its role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and autoimmune hepatitis. Application of newly-developed protocols based on sensitive flow cytometric detection has proven to be a useful tool in the investigation of the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK within different peripheral blood mononuclear cell populations and may help us to better understand the enigmatic role of this signaling cascade in the induction of autoimmunity as well as its role in immunosuppressive-induced remission. Special attention is paid to reported data proposing a specific role for autoantibody-induced activation of p38 MAPK-mediated immunopathology in the pathogenesis of autoimmune blistering diseases and anti-neutrophilic antibody-mediated vasculitides.

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MKK5)-mediated signalling cascade regulates expression of iron superoxide dismutase gene in Arabidopsis under salinity stress

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yu; Chen, Wei-hua; Jia, Wensuo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are involved in plant adaptive responses to biotic and abiotic stresses but the upstream signalling process that modulates their expression is not clear. Expression of two iron SODs, FSD2 and FSD3, was significantly increased in Arabidopsis in response to NaCl treatment but blocked in transgenic MKK5-RNAi plant, mkk5. Using an assay system for transient expression in protoplasts, it was found that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MKK5) was also activated in response to salt stress. Overexpression of MKK5 in wild-type plants enhanced their tolerance to salt treatments, while mkk5 mutant exhibited hypersensitivity to salt stress in germination on salt-containing media. Moreover, another kinase, MPK6, was also involved in the MKK5-mediated iron superoxide dismutase (FSD) signalling pathway in salt stress. The kinase activity of MPK6 was totally turned off in mkk5, whereas the activity of MPK3 was only partially blocked. MKK5 interacted with the MEKK1 protein that was also involved in the salt-induced FSD signalling pathway. These data suggest that salt-induced FSD2 and FSD3 expressions are influenced by MEKK1 via MKK5–MPK6-coupled signalling. This MAP kinase cascade (MEKK1, MKK5, and MPK6) mediates the salt-induced expression of iron superoxide dismutases. PMID:26136265

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors sensitize reduced glucocorticoid response mediated by TNF{alpha} in human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT)

    SciTech Connect

    Onda, Kenji . E-mail: knjond@ps.toyaku.ac.jp; Nagashima, Masahiro; Kawakubo, Yo; Inoue, Shota; Hirano, Toshihiko; Oka, Kitaro

    2006-12-08

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential drugs administered topically or systematically for the treatment of autoimmune skin diseases such as pemphigus. However, a certain proportion of patients does not respond well to GCs. Although studies on the relationship between cytokines and GC insensitivity in local tissues have attracted attention recently, little is known about the underlying mechanism(s) for GC insensitivity in epidermal keratinocytes. Here, we report that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) {alpha} reduces GC-induced transactivation of endogenous genes as well as a reporter plasmid which contains GC responsive element (GRE) in human epidermal keratinocyte cells (HaCaT). The GC insensitivity by TNF{alpha} was not accompanied by changes in mRNA expressions of GR isoforms ({alpha} or {beta}). However, we observed that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) significantly sensitized the GC-induced transactivation of anti-inflammatory genes (glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 51 gene in the presence of TNF{alpha}. Additionally, we observed that TNF{alpha} reduced prednisolone (PSL)-dependent nuclear translocation of GR, which was restored by pre-treatment of MEK-1 inhibitors. This is the first study demonstrating a role of the MEK-1/ERK cascade in TNF{alpha}-mediated GC insensitivity. Our data suggest that overexpression of TNF{alpha} leads to topical GC insensitivity by reducing GR nuclear translocation in keratinocytes, and our findings also suggest that inhibiting the MEK-1/ERK cascade may offer a therapeutic potential for increasing GC efficacy in epidermis where sufficient inflammatory suppression is required.

  17. Kainate receptor-mediated apoptosis in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells is attenuated by mitogen-activated protein and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Giardina, Sarah F; Beart, Philip M

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that neuronal apoptosis is the result of an abortive attempt to re-enter the cell cycle, and more recently the cyclin-dependent (CDKs) and the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, two superfamilies of kinases that influence and control cell cycle progression, have been implicated in neuronal apoptosis. Here, to examine whether CDK/MAPK related pathways are involved in excitotoxicity, we studied the actions of various kinase inhibitors on apoptosis induced by the ionotropic glutamate (Glu) receptor agonist, kainate (KA), in primary cultures of murine cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). KA-mediated neurotoxicity was concentration-dependent, as determined by a cell viability assay monitoring the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), and largely apoptotic in nature, as shown by morphological examination and labelling of DNA fragmentation in situ using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP digoxigenin nick-end labelling (TUNEL). KA-mediated neurotoxicity and apoptosis was completely attenuated by the mixed CDK and MAP kinase inhibitor, olomoucine, in a concentration-dependent manner (50 – 600 μM), and partially by roscovitine (1 – 100 μM), a more selective CDK inihibitor. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, SB203580 (1 – 100 μM), partially attenuated KA receptor-mediated apoptosis, as did the MAP kinase kinase inhibitors PD98509 (1 – 100 μM) and U0126 (1 – 100 μM). These findings provide new evidence for a complex network of interacting pathways involving CDK/MAPK that control apoptosis downstream of KA receptor activation in excitotoxic neuronal cell death. PMID:11934814

  18. The mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway can mediate growth inhibition and proliferation in smooth muscle cells. Dependence on the availability of downstream targets.

    PubMed Central

    Bornfeldt, K E; Campbell, J S; Koyama, H; Argast, G M; Leslie, C C; Raines, E W; Krebs, E G; Ross, R

    1997-01-01

    Activation of the classical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway leads to proliferation of many cell types. Accordingly, an inhibitor of MAPK kinase, PD 098059, inhibits PDGF-induced proliferation of human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) that do not secrete growth-inhibitory PGs such as PGE2. In striking contrast, in SMCs that express the inducible form of cyclooxygenase (COX-2), activation of MAPK serves as a negative regulator of proliferation. In these cells, PDGF-induced MAPK activation leads to cytosolic phospholipase A2 activation, PGE2 release, and subsequent activation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), which acts as a strong inhibitor of SMC proliferation. Inhibition of either MAPK kinase signaling or of COX-2 in these cells releases them from the influence of the growth-inhibitory PGs and results in the subsequent cell cycle traverse and proliferation. Thus, the MAPK pathway mediates either proliferation or growth inhibition in human arterial SMCs depending on the availability of specific downstream enzyme targets. PMID:9259587

  19. A Role for p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase-mediated Threonine 30-dependent Norepinephrine Transporter Regulation in Cocaine Sensitization and Conditioned Place Preference*

    PubMed Central

    Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; NarasimhaNaidu, Kamalakkannan; Damaj, Mohamad Imad; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Jayanthi, Lankupalle Damodara

    2015-01-01

    The noradrenergic and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) systems are implicated in cocaine-elicited behaviors. Previously, we demonstrated a role for p38 MAPK-mediated norepinephrine transporter (NET) Thr30 phosphorylation in cocaine-induced NET up-regulation (Mannangatti, P., Arapulisamy, O., Shippenberg, T. S., Ramamoorthy, S., and Jayanthi, L. D. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 20239–20250). The present study explored the functional interaction between p38 MAPK-mediated NET regulation and cocaine-induced behaviors. In vitro cocaine treatment of mouse prefrontal cortex synaptosomes resulted in enhanced NET function, surface expression, and phosphorylation. Pretreatment with PD169316, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, completely blocked cocaine-mediated NET up-regulation and phosphorylation. In mice, in vivo administration of p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 completely blocked cocaine-induced NET up-regulation and p38 MAPK activation in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. When tested for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference (CPP), mice receiving SB203580 on cocaine challenge day or on postconditioning test day exhibited significantly reduced cocaine sensitization and CPP. A transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide strategy was utilized to test the involvement of the NET-Thr30 motif. In vitro treatment of synaptosomes with TAT-NET-Thr30 (wild-type peptide) completely blocked cocaine-mediated NET up-regulation and phosphorylation. In vivo administration of TAT-NET-Thr30 peptide but not TAT-NET-T30A (mutant peptide) completely blocked cocaine-mediated NET up-regulation and phosphorylation. In the cocaine CPP paradigm, mice receiving TAT-NET-Thr30 but not TAT-NET-T30A on postconditioning test day exhibited significantly reduced cocaine CPP. Following extinction, TAT-NET-Thr30 when given prior to cocaine challenge significantly reduced reinstatement of cocaine CPP. These results demonstrate that the direct inhibition of p38

  20. A role for mitogen-activated protein kinase in mediating activation of the glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit promoter by gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, M S; Misra-Press, A; Laurance, M E; Stork, P J; Maurer, R A

    1995-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) interacts with a G protein-coupled receptor and increases the transcription of the glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit gene. We have explored the possibility that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) plays a role in mediating GnRH effects on transcription. Activation of the MAPK cascade by an expression vector for a constitutively active form of the Raf-1 kinase led to stimulation of the alpha-subunit promoter in a concentration-dependent manner. GnRH treatment was found to increase the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of MAPK and to increase MAPK activity, as determined by an immune complex kinase assay. A reporter gene assay using the MAPK-responsive, carboxy-terminal domain of the Elk1 transcription factor was also consistent with GnRH-induced activation of MAPK. Interference with the MAPK pathway by expression vectors for kinase-defective MAPKs or vectors encoding MAPK phosphatases reduced the transcription-stimulating effects of GnRH. The DNA sequences which are required for responses to GnRH include an Ets factor-binding site. An expression vector for a dominant negative form of Ets-2 was able to reduce GnRH effects on expression of the alpha-subunit gene. These findings provide evidence that GnRH treatment leads to activation of the MAPK cascade in gonadotropes and that activation of MAPK contributes to stimulation of the alpha-subunit promoter. It is likely that an Ets factor serves as a downstream transcriptional effector of MAPK in this system. PMID:7791760

  1. Toll-Like Receptor 4-Mediated Activation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Is a Determinant of Respiratory Virus Entry and Tropism▿

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, David; Singhera, Gurpreet K.; Utokaparch, Soraya; Hackett, Tillie L.; Boyd, John H.; Luo, Zongshu; Si, Xiaoning; Dorscheid, Delbert R.; McManus, Bruce M.; Hegele, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory viruses exert a heavy toll of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite this burden there are few specific treatments available for respiratory virus infections. Since many viruses utilize host cell enzymatic machinery such as protein kinases for replication, we determined whether pharmacological inhibition of kinases could, in principle, be used as a broad antiviral strategy for common human respiratory virus infections. A panel of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing recombinant respiratory viruses, including an isolate of H1N1 influenza virus (H1N1/Weiss/43), was used to represent a broad range of virus families responsible for common respiratory infections (Adenoviridae, Paramyxoviridae, Picornaviridae, and Orthomyxoviridae). Kinase inhibitors were screened in a high-throughput assay that detected virus infection in human airway epithelial cells (1HAEo-) using a fluorescent plate reader. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling was able to significantly inhibit replication by all viruses tested. Therefore, the pathways involved in virus-mediated p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK activation were investigated using bronchial epithelial cells and primary fibroblasts derived from MyD88 knockout mouse lungs. Influenza virus, which activated p38 MAPK to approximately 10-fold-greater levels than did respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in 1HAEo- cells, was internalized about 8-fold faster and more completely than RSV. We show for the first time that p38 MAPK is a determinant of virus infection that is dependent upon MyD88 expression and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligation. Imaging of virus-TLR4 interactions showed significant clustering of TLR4 at the site of virus-cell interaction, triggering phosphorylation of downstream targets of p38 MAPK, suggesting the need for a signaling receptor to activate virus internalization. PMID:20702616

  2. Epidermal Growth Factor-Mediated Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase3/1 Pathway Is Conducive to In Vitro Maturation of Sheep Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xu; Gu, Meichao; Liu, Yunhai; Qi, Xiaolong; Xing, Shuhan; Guo, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to facilitate the in vitro maturation of sheep oocytes, and enhance embryo’s capability for further development. However, such kind of molecular mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of EGF-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinases 3 and 1 (MAPK3/1) pathway on in vitro maturation of sheep oocytes. U0126, a specific inhibitor of MEK (MAPK kinase), was added into the maturation culture medium to block the EGF-mediated MAPK3/1 pathway with different doses. Then, the nuclear maturation of sheep oocytes was examined. Additionally, the effect of EGF-mediated MAPK3/1 on cytoplasmic maturation was examined though in vitro fertilization and embryonic development. The rate of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) after 6 h of culture with 10−4 mol/l of U0126 (50.4%) was significantly decreased compared with control (67.2%, p < 0.05), and the first polation body (PB1) extrusion rate after 22 h of culture in drug treatment was also significantly inhibited compared with control (28.6% vs. 48.4%, p < 0.05). However, 10−6 mol/l U0126 had slight effect on oocyte nuclear maturation. The normal distribution rate of α-tubulin in the oocytes after 22 h of in vitro maturation was significantly decreased in the 10−4 mol/l U0126 group (54%) compared with control (68%, p < 0.05). After in vitro fertilization, the cleavage rate in drug treatments (56.8% in 10−6 mol/l U0126 group and 42.6% in 10−4 mol/l U0126 group) was significantly decreased compared with control (72.3%, p < 0.01). The blastocyst rate in 10−4 mol/l U0126 group (17.6%) was also significantly decreased compared with control (29.9%, p < 0.05). Collectively, these results suggest that EGF-mediated MAPK3/1 pathway is conducive to in vitro maturation of sheep oocytes. PMID:25799554

  3. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Mediated Sonodynamic Therapy Promotes Phenotypic Switching from Dedifferentiated to Differentiated Phenotype via Reactive Oxygen Species and p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Dan, Juhua; Sun, Xin; Li, Wanlu; Zhang, Yun; Li, Xuesong; Xu, Haobo; Li, Zhitao; Tian, Zhen; Guo, Shuyuan; Yao, Jianting; Gao, Weidong; Tian, Ye

    2015-06-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) has been found to inhibit in-stent restenosis in animal models. However, the mechanism is not fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated SDT (ALA-SDT) on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), a cause of restenosis, with a focus on SDT-induced phenotypic switching. Serum-induced dedifferentiated VSMCs were cultured with ALA (1 mm, 24 h) and exposed to ultrasound (0.8 W/cm(2)) for 5 min. Results indicated that ALA-SDT inhibited the migration and proliferation of VSMCs and enhanced the expression of differentiated phenotypic markers in VSMCs. Additionally, ALA-SDT increased intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in VSMCs. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species elevation or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity abolished the expression of smooth muscle 22α (SM22α) in VSMCs induced by ALA-SDT. Taken together, these results suggest that ALA-SDT promotes transformation of the VSMC phenotype from the dedifferentiated to differentiated status via reactive oxygen species and activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

  4. Natural feed contaminant zearalenone decreases the expressions of important pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators and mitogen-activated protein kinase/NF-κB signalling molecules in pigs.

    PubMed

    Pistol, Gina Cecilia; Gras, Mihail Alexandru; Marin, Daniela Eliza; Israel-Roming, Florentina; Stancu, Mariana; Taranu, Ionelia

    2014-02-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is an oestrogenic mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species, considered to be a risk factor from both public health and agricultural perspectives. In the present in vivo study, a feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the in vivo effect of a ZEA-contaminated diet on immune response in young pigs. The effect of ZEA on pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β and interferon-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 and IL-4) cytokines and other molecules involved in inflammatory processes (matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)/tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMP), nuclear receptors: PPARγ and NF-κB1, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK): mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 7 (TAK1)/mitogen-activated protein kinase 14 (p38α)/mitogen-activated protein kinase 8 (JNK1)/ mitogen-activated protein kinase 9 (JNK2)) in the liver of piglets was investigated. The present results showed that a concentration of 316 parts per billion ZEA leads to a significant decrease in the levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines at both gene expression and protein levels, correlated with a decrease in the levels of other inflammatory mediators, MMP and TIMP. The results also showed that dietary ZEA induces a dramatic reduction in the expressions of NF-κB1 and TAK1/p38α MAPK genes in the liver of the experimentally intoxicated piglets, and has no effect on the expression of PPARγ mRNA. The present results suggest that the toxic action of ZEA begins in the upstream of the MAPK signalling pathway by the inhibition of TAK1, a MAPK/NF-κB activator. In conclusion, the present study shows that ZEA alters several important parameters of the hepatic cellular immune response. From an economic point of view, these data suggest that, in pigs, ZEA is not only a powerful oestrogenic mycotoxin but also a potential hepatotoxin when administered through the oral route. Therefore, the present results represent additional data from cellular and molecular levels

  5. Natural feed contaminant zearalenone decreases the expressions of important pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators and mitogen-activated protein kinase/NF-κB signalling molecules in pigs.

    PubMed

    Pistol, Gina Cecilia; Gras, Mihail Alexandru; Marin, Daniela Eliza; Israel-Roming, Florentina; Stancu, Mariana; Taranu, Ionelia

    2014-02-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is an oestrogenic mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species, considered to be a risk factor from both public health and agricultural perspectives. In the present in vivo study, a feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the in vivo effect of a ZEA-contaminated diet on immune response in young pigs. The effect of ZEA on pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β and interferon-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 and IL-4) cytokines and other molecules involved in inflammatory processes (matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)/tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMP), nuclear receptors: PPARγ and NF-κB1, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK): mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 7 (TAK1)/mitogen-activated protein kinase 14 (p38α)/mitogen-activated protein kinase 8 (JNK1)/ mitogen-activated protein kinase 9 (JNK2)) in the liver of piglets was investigated. The present results showed that a concentration of 316 parts per billion ZEA leads to a significant decrease in the levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines at both gene expression and protein levels, correlated with a decrease in the levels of other inflammatory mediators, MMP and TIMP. The results also showed that dietary ZEA induces a dramatic reduction in the expressions of NF-κB1 and TAK1/p38α MAPK genes in the liver of the experimentally intoxicated piglets, and has no effect on the expression of PPARγ mRNA. The present results suggest that the toxic action of ZEA begins in the upstream of the MAPK signalling pathway by the inhibition of TAK1, a MAPK/NF-κB activator. In conclusion, the present study shows that ZEA alters several important parameters of the hepatic cellular immune response. From an economic point of view, these data suggest that, in pigs, ZEA is not only a powerful oestrogenic mycotoxin but also a potential hepatotoxin when administered through the oral route. Therefore, the present results represent additional data from cellular and molecular levels

  6. Combined computational and experimental analysis reveals mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated feedback phosphorylation as a mechanism for signaling specificity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Yildirim, Necmettin; Nagiec, Michal J; Parnell, Stephen C; Errede, Beverly; Dohlman, Henrik G; Elston, Timothy C

    2012-10-01

    Different environmental stimuli often use the same set of signaling proteins to achieve very different physiological outcomes. The mating and invasive growth pathways in yeast each employ a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade that includes Ste20, Ste11, and Ste7. Whereas proper mating requires Ste7 activation of the MAP kinase Fus3, invasive growth requires activation of the alternate MAP kinase Kss1. To determine how MAP kinase specificity is achieved, we used a series of mathematical models to quantitatively characterize pheromone-stimulated kinase activation. In accordance with the computational analysis, MAP kinase feedback phosphorylation of Ste7 results in diminished activation of Kss1, but not Fus3. These findings reveal how feedback phosphorylation of a common pathway component can limit the activity of a competing MAP kinase through feedback phosphorylation of a common activator, and thereby promote signal fidelity. PMID:22875986

  7. Involvement of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 in Ras-mediated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, S; Büscher, D; Kummer, V; Buder, S; Baccarini, M

    1996-11-01

    Ubiquitously expressed SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatases interact physically with tyrosine kinase receptors or their substrates and relay positive mitogenic signals via the activation of the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Conversely, the structurally related phosphatase SHP-1 is predominantly expressed in hemopoietic cells and becomes tyrosine phosphorylated upon colony-stimulating factor 1 treatment of macrophages without associating with the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor tyrosine kinase. Mice lacking functional SHP-1 (me/me and me(v)/me(v)) develop systemic autoimmune disease with accumulation of macrophages, suggesting that SHP-1 may be a negative regulator of hemopoietic cell growth. By using macrophages expressing dominant negative Ras and the me(v)/me(v) mouse mutant, we show that SHP-1 is activated in the course of mitogenic signal transduction in a Ras-dependent manner and that its activity is necessary for the Ras-dependent activation of the MAPK pathway but not of the Raf-1 kinase. Consistent with a role for SHP-1 as an intermediate between Ras and the MEK-MAPK pathway, Ras-independent activation of the latter kinases by bacterial lipopolysaccharide occurred normally in me(v)/me(v) cells. Our results sharply accentuate the diversity of signal transduction in mammalian cells, in which the same signaling intermediates can be rearranged to form different pathways. PMID:8887625

  8. Involvement of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 in Ras-mediated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Krautwald, S; Büscher, D; Kummer, V; Buder, S; Baccarini, M

    1996-01-01

    Ubiquitously expressed SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatases interact physically with tyrosine kinase receptors or their substrates and relay positive mitogenic signals via the activation of the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Conversely, the structurally related phosphatase SHP-1 is predominantly expressed in hemopoietic cells and becomes tyrosine phosphorylated upon colony-stimulating factor 1 treatment of macrophages without associating with the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor tyrosine kinase. Mice lacking functional SHP-1 (me/me and me(v)/me(v)) develop systemic autoimmune disease with accumulation of macrophages, suggesting that SHP-1 may be a negative regulator of hemopoietic cell growth. By using macrophages expressing dominant negative Ras and the me(v)/me(v) mouse mutant, we show that SHP-1 is activated in the course of mitogenic signal transduction in a Ras-dependent manner and that its activity is necessary for the Ras-dependent activation of the MAPK pathway but not of the Raf-1 kinase. Consistent with a role for SHP-1 as an intermediate between Ras and the MEK-MAPK pathway, Ras-independent activation of the latter kinases by bacterial lipopolysaccharide occurred normally in me(v)/me(v) cells. Our results sharply accentuate the diversity of signal transduction in mammalian cells, in which the same signaling intermediates can be rearranged to form different pathways. PMID:8887625

  9. Candida albicans β-Glucan Exposure Is Controlled by the Fungal CEK1-Mediated Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway That Modulates Immune Responses Triggered through Dectin-1 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Galán-Díez, Marta; Arana, David M.; Serrano-Gómez, Diego; Kremer, Leonor; Casasnovas, José M.; Ortega, Mara; Cuesta-Domínguez, Álvaro; Corbí, Angel L.; Pla, Jesús; Fernández-Ruiz, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Innate immunity to Candida albicans depends upon the recognition of molecular patterns on the fungal cell wall. However, the masking of major components such as β-glucan seems to be a mechanism that fungi have evolved to avoid immune cell recognition through the dectin-1 receptor. Although the role of C. albicans mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways as virulence determinants has been established previously with animal models, the mechanism involved in this behavior is largely unknown. In this study we demonstrate that a disruption of the C. albicans extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-like 1 (CEK1)-mediated MAPK pathway causes enhanced cell wall β-glucan exposure, triggering immune responses more efficiently than the wild type, as measured by dectin-1-mediated specific binding and human dendritic cell (hDC)- and macrophage-mediated phagocytosis, killing, and activation of intracellular signaling pathways. At the molecular level, the disruption of CEK1 resulted in altered spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), Raf-1, and ERK1/2 activations together with IκB degradation on hDCs and increased dectin-1-dependent activator protein 1 (AP-1) activation on transfected cells. In addition, concurring with these altered pathways, we detected increased reactive oxygen species production and cytokine secretion. In conclusion, the CEK1-mediated MAPK pathway is involved in β-glucan exposure in a fungal pathogen, hence influencing dectin-1-dependent immune cell recognition, thus establishing this fungal intracellular signaling route as a promising novel therapeutic target. PMID:20100861

  10. Ras-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by G protein-coupled receptors. Convergence of Gi- and Gq-mediated pathways on calcium/calmodulin, Pyk2, and Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Della Rocca, G J; van Biesen, T; Daaka, Y; Luttrell, D K; Luttrell, L M; Lefkowitz, R J

    1997-08-01

    Many receptors that couple to heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) have been shown to mediate rapid activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases Erk1 and Erk2. In different cell types, the signaling pathways employed appear to be a function of the available repertoire of receptors, G proteins, and effectors. In HEK-293 cells, stimulation of either alpha1B- or alpha2A-adrenergic receptors (ARs) leads to rapid 5-10-fold increases in Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of Erk1/2 in response to stimulation of the alpha2A-AR is effectively attenuated by pretreatment with pertussis toxin or by coexpression of a Gbetagamma subunit complex sequestrant peptide (betaARK1ct) and dominant-negative mutants of Ras (N17-Ras), mSOS1 (SOS-Pro), and Raf (DeltaN-Raf). Erk1/2 phosphorylation in response to alpha1B-AR stimulation is also attenuated by coexpression of N17-Ras, SOS-Pro, or DeltaN-Raf, but not by coexpression of betaARK1ct or by pretreatment with pertussis toxin. The alpha1B- and alpha2A-AR signals are both blocked by phospholipase C inhibition, intracellular Ca2+ chelation, and inhibitors of protein-tyrosine kinases. Overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of c-Src or of the negative regulator of c-Src function, Csk, results in attenuation of the alpha1B-AR- and alpha2A-AR-mediated Erk1/2 signals. Chemical inhibitors of calmodulin, but not of PKC, and overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of the protein-tyrosine kinase Pyk2 also attenuate mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation after both alpha1B- and alpha2A-AR stimulation. Erk1/2 activation, then, proceeds via a common Ras-, calcium-, and tyrosine kinase-dependent pathway for both Gi- and Gq/11-coupled receptors. These results indicate that in HEK-293 cells, the Gbetagamma subunit-mediated alpha2A-AR- and the Galphaq/11-mediated alpha1B-AR-coupled Erk1/2 activation pathways converge at the level of phospholipase C. These data suggest that calcium

  11. Acrolein-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling is mediated by alkylation of thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin 1.

    PubMed

    Randall, Matthew J; Spiess, Page C; Hristova, Milena; Hondal, Robert J; van der Vliet, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking remains a major health concern worldwide, and many of the adverse effects of cigarette smoke (CS) can be attributed to its abundant electrophilic aldehydes, such as acrolein (2-propenal). Previous studies indicate that acrolein readily reacts with thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), a critical enzyme involved in regulation of thioredoxin (Trx)-mediated redox signaling, by alkylation at its selenocysteine (Sec) residue. Because alkylation of Sec within TrxR1 has significant implications for its enzymatic function, we explored the potential importance of TrxR1 alkylation in acrolein-induced activation or injury of bronchial epithelial cells. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial HBE1 cells to acrolein (1-30 μM) resulted in dose-dependent loss of TrxR thioredoxin reductase activity, which coincided with its alkylation, as determined by biotin hydrazide labeling, and was independent of initial GSH status. To test the involvement of TrxR1 in acrolein responses in HBE1 cells, we suppressed TrxR1 using siRNA silencing or augmented TrxR1 by cell supplementation with sodium selenite. Acrolein exposure of HBE1 cells induced dose-dependent activation of the MAP kinases, extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38, and activation of JNK was markedly enhanced after selenite-mediated induction of TrxR1, and was associated with increased alkylation of TrxR1. Conversely, siRNA silencing of TrxR1 significantly suppressed the ability of acrolein to activate JNK, and also appeared to attenuate acrolein-dependent activation of ERK and p38. Alteration of initial TrxR1 levels by siRNA or selenite supplementation also affected initial Trx1 redox status and acrolein-mediated alkylation of Trx1, but did not significantly affect acrolein-mediated activation of HO-1 or cytotoxicity. Collectively, our findings indicate that alkylation of TrxR1 and/or Trx1 may contribute directly to acrolein-mediated activation of MAP kinases such as JNK, and

  12. beta-hexosaminidase-induced activation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase is dependent on p21Ras and protein kinase C and mediates bovine airway smooth-muscle proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lew, D B; Dempsey, B K; Zhao, Y; Muthalif, M; Fatima, S; Malik, K U

    1999-07-01

    Late-phase and sustained activation of p44/42(MAPK) has been reported to be a critical factor in cell mitogenesis. We therefore hypothesized that p44/42(MAPK) is involved in mannosyl-rich glycoprotein-induced mitogenesis in bovine airway smooth-muscle cells (ASMC). Treatment of adherent ASMC with beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A, 50 nM), an endogenous mannosyl-rich glycoprotein, resulted in a late-onset (30-min) activation of p44/42(MAPK) that lasted for 4 h. Activation of p44/42(MAPK) induced by Hex A was inhibited by an 18-mer phosphorothioate-derivatized antisense oligonucleotide (1-5 microM) directed to human p44(MAPK); the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1) inhibitor PD98059 (5 microM); the p42(MAPK) inhibitor Tyrphostin AG-126 (0.2 microM); the farnesyl transferase inhibitors SCH-56582 (10 microM) and FPT III (10 miroM), which inhibit p21Ras activation; and Calphostin C (0.2 microM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C. These agents also inhibited Hex A-induced cell proliferation in bovine ASMC. These data suggest that Hex A activates p44/42(MAPK) in a p21Ras- and PKC-dependent manner and that this activation mediates Hex A- induced mitogenesis in bovine ASMC.

  13. Manassantin B isolated from Saururus chinensis inhibits cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostaglandin D2 generation by blocking Fyn-mediated nuclear factor-kappaB and mitogen activated protein kinase pathways in bone marrow derived-mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Hwang, Seung-Lark; Son, Jong Keun; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of manassantin B (Man B) isolated from Saururus chinensis (S. chinensis) on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) generation in mouse bone marrow derived-mast cells (BMMCs). Man B inhibited the generation of PGD2 dose-dependently by inhibiting COX-2 expression in immunoglobulin E (IgE)/Ag-stimulated BMMCs. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for the inhibition of COX-2 expression by Man B, the effects of Man B on the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB), a transcription factor essential and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) for COX-2 induction, were examined. Man B attenuated the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and its DNA-binding activity by inhibiting inhibitors of kappa Bα (IκBα) degradation and concomitantly suppressing IκB kinase (IKK) phosphorylation. In addition, Man B suppressed phosphorylation of MAPKs including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. It was also found that Man B suppressed Fyn kinase activation and consequent downstream signaling processes, including those involving Syk, Gab2, and Akt. Taken together, the present results suggest that Man B suppresses COX-2 dependent PGD2 generation by primarily inhibiting Fyn kinase in FcεRI-mediated mast cells.

  14. The MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4 Kinase Cascade Negatively Regulates Immunity Mediated by a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qing; Qu, Na; Gao, Minghui; Zhang, Zhibin; Ding, Xiaojun; Yang, Fan; Li, Yingzhong; Dong, Oliver X.; Chen, She; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2012-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade represses cell death and immune responses. In mekk1, mkk1 mkk2, and mpk4 mutants, programmed cell death and defense responses are constitutively activated, but the mechanism by which MEKK1, MKK1/MKK2, and MPK4 negatively regulate cell death and immunity was unknown. From a screen for suppressors of mkk1 mkk2, we found that mutations in suppressor of mkk1 mkk2 1 (summ1) suppress the cell death and defense responses not only in mkk1 mkk2 but also in mekk1 and mpk4. SUMM1 encodes the MAP kinase kinase kinase MEKK2. It interacts with MPK4 and is phosphorylated by MPK4 in vitro. Overexpression of SUMM1 activates cell death and defense responses that are dependent on the nucleotide binding–leucine-rich repeat protein SUMM2. Taken together, our data suggest that the MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4 kinase cascade negatively regulates MEKK2 and activation of MEKK2 triggers SUMM2-mediated immune responses. PMID:22643122

  15. Distinct docking mechanisms mediate interactions between the Msg5 phosphatase and mating or cell integrity mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Lorena; Dickinson, Robin J; Sacristán-Reviriego, Almudena; Didmon, Mark P; Marín, María José; Martín, Humberto; Keyse, Stephen M; Molina, María

    2011-12-01

    MAPK phosphatases (MKPs) are negative regulators of signaling pathways with distinct MAPK substrate specificities. For example, the yeast dual specificity phosphatase Msg5 dephosphorylates the Fus3 and Slt2 MAPKs operating in the mating and cell wall integrity pathways, respectively. Like other MAPK-interacting proteins, most MKPs bind MAPKs through specific docking domains. These include D-motifs, which contain basic residues that interact with acidic residues in the common docking (CD) domain of MAPKs. Here we show that Msg5 interacts not only with Fus3, Kss1, and Slt2 but also with the pseudokinase Slt2 paralog Mlp1. Using yeast two-hybrid and in vitro interaction assays, we have identified distinct regions within the N-terminal domain of Msg5 that differentially bind either the MAPKs Fus3 and Kss1 or Slt2 and Mlp1. Whereas a canonical D-site within Msg5 mediates interaction with the CD domains of Fus3 and Kss1, a novel motif ((102)IYT(104)) within Msg5 is involved in binding to Slt2 and Mlp1. Furthermore, mutation of this site prevents the phosphorylation of Msg5 by Slt2. This motif is conserved in Sdp1, another MKP that dephosphorylates Slt2, as well as in Msg5 orthologs from other yeast species. A region spanning amino acids 274-373 within Slt2 and Mlp1 mediates binding to this Msg5 motif in a CD domain-independent manner. In contrast, Slt2 uses its CD domain to bind to its upstream activator Mkk1. This binding flexibility may allow MAPK pathways to exploit additional regulatory controls in order to provide fine modulation of both pathway activity and specificity. PMID:22006927

  16. Artemisia asiatica Nakai Attenuates the Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in Stimulated Macrophages Through Modulation of Nuclear Factor-κB and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Tang, Yujiao; Cha, Kwang-Suk; Choi, Heeri; Lee, Chun Bok; Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Sang Bae; Kim, Jong-Shik; Kim, Jong Moon; Han, Weon Cheol; Choi, Suck-Jun; Lee, Sangmin; Choi, Eun-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to examine the anti-inflammatory effects and potential mechanism of action of Artemisia asiatica Nakai (A. asiatica Nakai) extract in activated murine macrophages. A. asiatica Nakai extract showed dose-dependent suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 activity. It also showed dose-dependent inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus and as an inhibitor of NF-κB-alpha phosphorylation. The extract's inhibitory effects were found to be mediated through NF-κB inhibition and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 in LPS-stimulated J774A.1 murine macrophages, suggesting a potential mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of A. asiatica Nakai. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the anti-inflammatory effects of A. asiatica Nakai on J774A.1 murine macrophages; these results may help develop functional foods possessing an anti-inflammatory activity.

  17. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 mediates resistance to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human hepatobiliary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Ho-Bouldoires, Thanh Huong; Clapéron, Audrey; Mergey, Martine; Wendum, Dominique; Desbois-Mouthon, Christèle; Tahraoui, Sylvana; Fartoux, Laetitia; Chettouh, Hamza; Merabtene, Fatiha; Scatton, Olivier; Gaestel, Matthias; Praz, Françoise; Housset, Chantal; Fouassier, Laura

    2015-12-01

    The development and progression of liver cancer are characterized by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS-induced oxidative stress impairs cell proliferation and ultimately leads to cell death. Although liver cancer cells are especially resistant to oxidative stress, mechanisms of such resistance remain understudied. We identified the MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2)/heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) signaling pathway mediating defenses against oxidative stress. In addition to MK2 and Hsp27 overexpression in primary liver tumors compared to adjacent nontumorous tissues, the MK2/Hsp27 pathway is activated by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in hepatobiliary cancer cells. MK2 inactivation or inhibition of MK2 or Hsp27 expression increases caspase-3 and PARP cleavage and DNA breaks and therefore cell death. Interestingly, MK2/Hsp27 inhibition decreases antioxidant defenses such as heme oxygenase 1 through downregulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2. Moreover, MK2/Hsp27 inhibition decreases both phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and expression of its ligand, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor. A new identified partner of MK2, the scaffold PDZ protein EBP50, could facilitate these effects through MK2/Hsp27 pathway regulation. These findings demonstrate that the MK2/Hsp27 pathway actively participates in resistance to oxidative stress and may contribute to liver cancer progression.

  18. Artemisia asiatica Nakai Attenuates the Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in Stimulated Macrophages Through Modulation of Nuclear Factor-κB and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Tang, Yujiao; Cha, Kwang-Suk; Choi, Heeri; Lee, Chun Bok; Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Sang Bae; Kim, Jong-Shik; Kim, Jong Moon; Han, Weon Cheol; Choi, Suck-Jun; Lee, Sangmin; Choi, Eun-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to examine the anti-inflammatory effects and potential mechanism of action of Artemisia asiatica Nakai (A. asiatica Nakai) extract in activated murine macrophages. A. asiatica Nakai extract showed dose-dependent suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 activity. It also showed dose-dependent inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus and as an inhibitor of NF-κB-alpha phosphorylation. The extract's inhibitory effects were found to be mediated through NF-κB inhibition and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 in LPS-stimulated J774A.1 murine macrophages, suggesting a potential mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of A. asiatica Nakai. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the anti-inflammatory effects of A. asiatica Nakai on J774A.1 murine macrophages; these results may help develop functional foods possessing an anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:26061361

  19. Sphingosine kinase 1 regulates tumor necrosis factor-mediated RANTES induction through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase but independently of nuclear factor κB activation.

    PubMed

    Adada, Mohamad M; Orr-Gandy, K Alexa; Snider, Ashley J; Canals, Daniel; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M; Clarke, Christopher J

    2013-09-20

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) produces the pro-survival sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate and has been implicated in inflammation, proliferation, and angiogenesis. Recent studies identified TRAF2 as a sphingosine 1-phosphate target, implicating SK1 in activation of the NF-κB pathway, but the functional consequences of this connection on gene expression are unknown. Here, we find that loss of SK1 potentiates induction of the chemokine RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted; also known as CCL5) in HeLa cells stimulated with TNF-α despite RANTES induction being highly dependent on the NF-κB pathway. Additionally, we find that SK1 is not required for TNF-induced IKK phosphorylation, IκB degradation, nuclear translocation of NF-κB subunits, and transcriptional NF-κB activity. In contrast, loss of SK1 prevented TNF-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, and inhibition of p38 MAPK, like SK1 knockdown, also potentiates RANTES induction. Finally, in addition to RANTES, loss of SK1 also potentiated the induction of multiple chemokines and cytokines in the TNF response. Taken together, these data identify a potential and novel anti-inflammatory function of SK1 in which chemokine levels are suppressed through SK1-mediated activation of p38 MAPK. Furthermore, in this system, activation of NF-κB is dissociated from SK1, suggesting that the interaction between these pathways may be more complex than currently thought.

  20. Liver X receptor agonist GW3965 dose-dependently regulates lps-mediated liver injury and modulates posttranscriptional TNF-alpha production and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in liver macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun Yong; Dahle, Maria K; Steffensen, Knut R; Reinholt, Finn P; Collins, Jon L; Thiemermann, Christoph; Aasen, Ansgar O; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Wang, Jacob E

    2009-11-01

    Modulation of the host inflammatory response to infection may be a key approach to improve the outcome of patients with sepsis and organ injury. We previously reported that pretreatment of rats with the liver X receptor (LXR) agonist GW3965 reduced the liver injury associated with endotoxemia and attenuated the production of TNF-alpha by rat Kupffer cells. Here, we examine the dose-dependent effect of GW3965 on liver injury and cytokine production in a rat model of endotoxemia and explore the mechanisms underlying TNF-alpha attenuation in Kupffer cells. Low doses of GW3965 (0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg) administered 30 min before infusion of LPS and peptidoglycan significantly attenuated the increase in plasma levels of the liver injury markers alanine aminotransferase and bilirubin (6 h) as well as the inflammatory mediators TNF-alpha (1 h) and prostaglandin E2 (6 h) associated with endotoxemia. In contrast, pretreatment with a higher dose of GW3965 (1.0 mg/kg) had no such effect. Studies in primary cultures of rat Kupffer cells demonstrated that LXR agonist treatment attenuated both the secreted and cell-associated levels of TNF-alpha, whereas TNF-alpha mRNA levels were not altered. Phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which plays a major role in production of TNF-alpha at the posttranscriptional level, was attenuated by GW3965 treatment in Kupffer cells. Experiments in murine LXR-deficient Kupffer cells demonstrated enhanced production of TNF-alpha in Kupffer cells from LXR-alpha(-/-) mice when challenged with LPS compared with LXR-beta(-/-) and wild-type Kupffer cells. Taken together, these results argue in favor of a novel mechanism for LXR-mediated attenuation of liver injury by interfering with posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-alpha in Kupffer cells. PMID:19295476

  1. A supercritical CO₂ extract from seabuckthorn leaves inhibits pro-inflammatory mediators via inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinase p38 and transcription factor nuclear factor-κB.

    PubMed

    Jayashankar, Bindhya; Mishra, K P; Kumar, M S Y; Udayasankar, K; Misra, K; Ganju, L; Singh, S B

    2012-08-01

    In the present study, we have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory properties of supercritical CO₂ extract of seabuckthorn leaves (SCE) on mouse alveolar macrophage cell line (MH-S), human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) in-vitro and in-vivo. Treatment of MH-S cells with SCE (0.5-100 μg/ml) significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production. It also inhibited the release of LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, which was further confirmed by suppression of LPS induced TNF-α in hPBMCs by ELISPOT assay. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that SCE decreased LPS-induced inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression in MH-S cells. Furthermore, SCE treatment also reduced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation in nucleus induced by LPS in MH-S cells. To elucidate the molecular mechanism for inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators by SCE (100 μg/ml), we further studied the effect of SCE on LPS-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). It was observed that the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in LPS-stimulated MH-S cells was significantly inhibited by SCE, which was further proven by suppression of LPS induced CD40 expression. The in-vivo model of AIA mice also showed a significant reduction in the inflammation of paw edema. These data collectively suggest that SCE suppressed the LPS-induced production of NO, IL-6, and TNF-α and expression of CD40, iNOS and COX-2 proteins by inhibiting NF-κB activation and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Hence, the SCE has potent anti-inflammatory activity and might be useful in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22664145

  2. Activation of RAF-1 through Ras and protein kinase Calpha mediates 1alpha,25(OH)2-vitamin D3 regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Claudia Graciela; Pardo, Veronica González; de Boland, Ana R; Boland, Ricardo

    2003-01-24

    We have previously shown that stimulation of proliferation of avian embryonic muscle cells (myoblasts) by 1alpha,25(OH)(2)-vitamin D(3) (1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)) is mediated by activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK; ERK1/2). To understand how 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) up-regulates the MAPK cascade, we have investigated whether the hormone acts upstream through stimulation of Raf-1 and the signaling mechanism by which this effect might take place. Treatment of chick myoblasts with 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) (1 nm) caused a fast increase of Raf-1 serine phosphorylation (1- and 3-fold over basal at 1 and 2 min, respectively), indicating activation of Raf-1 by the hormone. These effects were abolished by preincubation of cells with a specific Ras inhibitor peptide that involves Ras in 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) stimulation of Raf-1. 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) rapidly induced tyrosine de-phosphorylation of Ras-GTPase-activating protein, suggesting that inhibition of Ras-GTP hydrolysis is part of the mechanism by which 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) activates Ras in myoblasts. The protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors calphostin C, bisindolylmaleimide I, and Ro 318220 blocked 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)-induced Raf-1 serine phosphorylation, revealing that hormone stimulation of Raf-1 also involves PKC. In addition, transfection of muscle cells with an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide against PKCalpha mRNA suppressed serine phosphorylation by 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3). The increase in MAPK activity and tyrosine phosphorylation caused by 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) could be abolished by Ras inhibitor peptide, compound PD 98059, which prevents the activation of MEK by Raf-1, or incubation of cell lysates before 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) exposure with an anti-Raf-1 antibody. In conclusion, these results demonstrate for the first time in a 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) target cell that activation of Raf-1 via Ras and PKCalpha-dependent serine phosphorylation plays a central role in hormone stimulation of the MAPK-signaling pathway

  3. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Justin; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Lassowskat, Ines; Böttcher, Christoph; Scheel, Dierk

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554) in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins) as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression—including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding, and degradation) steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:26579181

  4. Phospholipase D and its product, phosphatidic acid, mediate agonist-dependent raf-1 translocation to the plasma membrane and the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, M A; Shome, K; Vasudevan, C; Stolz, D B; Sung, T C; Frohman, M A; Watkins, S C; Romero, G

    1999-01-01

    The primary known function of phospholipase D (PLD) is to generate phosphatidic acid (PA) via the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. However, the functional role of PA is not well understood. We report here evidence that links the activation of PLD by insulin and the subsequent generation of PA to the activation of the Raf-1-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Brefeldin A (BFA), an inhibitor of the activation of ADP-ribosylation factor proteins, inhibited insulin-dependent production of PA and MAPK phosphorylation. The addition of PA reversed the inhibition of MAPK activation by BFA. Overexpression of a catalytically inactive variant of PLD2, but not PLD1, blocked insulin-dependent activation of PLD and phosphorylation of MAPK. Real time imaging analysis showed that insulin induced Raf-1 translocation to cell membranes by a process that was inhibited by BFA. PA addition reversed the effects of BFA on Raf-1 translocation. However, PA did not activate Raf-1 in vitro or in vivo, suggesting that the primary function of PA is to enhance the recruitment of Raf-1 to the plasma membrane where other factors may activate it. Finally, we found that the recruitment of Raf-1 to the plasma membrane was transient, but Raf-1 remained bound to endocytic vesicles.

  5. Interleukin-25-induced chemokines and interleukin-6 release from eosinophils is mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and nuclear factor-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chun K; Cheung, Phyllis F Y; Ip, Wai K; Lam, Christopher W K

    2005-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-25, a novel Th2 cytokine, is capable of amplifying allergic inflammation. We investigated the modulation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways in IL-25-activated eosinophils, the principal effector cells of allergic inflammation, for the in vitro release of chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-8, and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, and inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Gene expression of chemokines and IL-6 was evaluated by RT-PCR, and concentrations of chemokines and cytokine were measured by cytokine protein array, cytometric bead array, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-kappaB, c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK activities in eosinophils were assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and Western blot. IL-25 was found to upregulate the gene expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, and IL-8, and cytokine IL-6, in eosinophils, and to significantly increase the release of the above chemokines and IL-6 from eosinophils. IL-25 could also activate the JNK, p38 MAPK, and NF-kappaB activities of eosinophils, while inhibitor of IkappaB-alpha phosphorylation (BAY11-7082), JNK (SP600125), and p38 MAPK (SB203580) could suppress the release of IL-8, MIP-1alpha, MCP-1, and IL-6. Together, the above results showed that the induction of MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, IL-8, and IL-6 in IL-25-activated eosinophils are regulated by JNK, p38 MAPK, and NF-kappaB pathways.

  6. Ghrelin protects against depleted uranium-induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells through oxidative stress-mediated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuhui; Liu, Cong; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Li, Hong; Yang, Zhangyou; Liu, Jing; Wang, Weidong; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) mainly accumulates in the bone over the long term. Osteoblast cells are responsible for the formation of bone, and they are sensitive to DU damage. However, studies investigating methods of reducing DU damage in osteoblasts are rarely reported. Ghrelin is a stomach hormone that stimulates growth hormones released from the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and it is believed to play an important physiological role in bone metabolism. This study evaluates the impact of ghrelin on DU-induced apoptosis of the osteoblast MC3T3-E1 and investigates its underlying mechanisms. The results show that ghrelin relieved the intracellular oxidative stress induced by DU, eliminated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced lipid peroxidation by increasing intracellular GSH levels; in addition, ghrelin effectively suppressed apoptosis, enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibited cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation after DU exposure. Moreover, ghrelin significantly reduced the expression of DU-induced phosphorylated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). A specific inhibitor (SB203580) or specific siRNA of p38-MAPK could significantly suppress DU-induced apoptosis and related signals, whereas ROS production was not affected. In addition, ghrelin receptor inhibition could reduce the anti-apoptosis effect of ghrelin on DU and reverse the effect of ghrelin on intracellular ROS and p38-MAPK after DU exposure. These results suggest that ghrelin can suppress DU-induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells, reduce DU-induced oxidative stress by interacting with its receptor, and inhibit downstream p38-MAPK activation, thereby suppressing the mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway.

  7. Rapamycin induces mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) expression through activation of protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Ruchi; Jiang, Zhongliang; Ahmad, Nisar; Rosati, Rita; Liu, Yusen; Beuret, Laurent; Monks, Robert; Charron, Jean; Birnbaum, Morris J; Samavati, Lobelia

    2013-11-22

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), also known as dual specificity phosphatase-1 (DUSP-1), plays a crucial role in the deactivation of MAPKs. Several drugs with immune-suppressive properties modulate MKP-1 expression as part of their mechanism of action. We investigated the effect of mTOR inhibition through rapamycin and a dual mTOR inhibitor (AZD2014) on MKP-1 expression. Low dose rapamycin led to a rapid activation of both AKT and ERK pathways with a subsequent increase in MKP-1 expression. Rapamycin treatment led to phosphorylation of CREB, transcription factor 1 (ATF1), and ATF2, three transcription factors that bind to the cyclic AMP-responsive elements on the Mkp-1 promoter. Inhibition of either the MEK/ERK or the AKT pathway attenuated rapamycin-mediated MKP-1 induction. AZD2014 did not activate AKT but activated the ERK pathway, leading to a moderate MKP-1 induction. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) derived from wild-type (WT) mice or mice deficient in AKT1 and AKT2 isoforms or BMDM from targeted deficiency in MEK1 and MEK2, we show that rapamycin treatment led to an increased MKP1 expression in BMDM from WT but failed to do so in BMDMs lacking the AKT1 isoform or MEK1 and MEK2. Importantly, rapamycin pretreatment inhibited LPS-mediated p38 activation and decreased nitric oxide and IL-6 production. Our work provides a conceptual framework for the observed immune modulatory effect of mTOR inhibition.

  8. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in Vitis vinifera

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms to control cellular functions in response to external and endogenous signals. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are universal signaling molecules in eukaryotes that mediate the intracellular transmission of extracellular signals resulting in the induction of appropriate cellular responses. MAPK cascades are composed of four protein kinase modules: MAPKKK kinases (MAPKKKKs), MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs), MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), and MAPKs. In plants, MAPKs are activated in response to abiotic stresses, wounding, and hormones, and during plant pathogen interactions and cell division. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of MAPK cascades genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with MAPK, MAPK kinases, MAPK kinase kinases and MAPK kinase kinase kinase kinase members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we revealed the existence of 14 MAPKs, 5 MAPKKs, 62 MAPKKKs, and 7 MAPKKKKs in Vitis vinifera. We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative MAPKs in different species, and ESTs corresponding to members of MAPK cascades in various tissues. This work represents the first complete inventory of MAPK cascades in V. vinifera and could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these proteins in V. vinifera. PMID:26257761

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid-mediated signal-transduction pathways involved in the induction of the early-response genes prostaglandin G/H synthase-2 and Egr-1: a critical role for the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 and for Rho proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, C O; Lanz, T; Hofmann, F; Hofer, G; Rupprecht, H D; Goppelt-Struebe, M

    1998-01-01

    During inflammatory processes of the kidney, lesions of the glomerulus lead to aggregation of thrombocytes and infiltration of macrophages, which can release bioactive mediators. One of these important signalling molecules is lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Incubation of rat mesangial cells with LPA induced mRNA and protein expression of the early-response genes pghs-2 (for prostaglandin G/H synthase-2/cyclo-oxygenase-2) and egr-1. As shown by antisense experiments, induction of egr-1 was related to the strong mitogenic effect of LPA. LPA-mediated gene expression was inhibited by pertussis toxin, indicating coupling to G-proteins of the Gi family. Specific inhibition of proteins of the small G-protein subfamily Rho with toxin B from Clostridium difficile led to changes in mesangial cell morphology without induction of apoptosis. LPA-mediated expression of pghs-2 and egr-1 was reduced to base-line levels by toxin B, indicating a role for Rho proteins in LPA-mediated gene induction. Of the two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways investigated, the MAPK kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway was involved in the induction of both pghs-2 and egr-1 mRNA expression, as shown by the inhibitory effect of PD98059. Activation of the MAPK p38, however, was only related to pghs-2 expression, whereas egr-1 expression was not affected by treatment of mesangial cells with the specific inhibitor SB203580. Taken together our data provide evidence that LPA-mediated activation of MAPK kinase and Rho proteins leads to the induction of the functionally distinct early-response genes pghs-2 and egr-1, whereas activation of MAPK p38 revealed considerable differences between the regulation of these two genes. PMID:9494074

  10. Acquisition of contextual discrimination involves the appearance of a RAS-GRF1/p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase-mediated signaling pathway that promotes long term potentiation (LTP).

    PubMed

    Jin, Shan-Xue; Arai, Junko; Tian, Xuejun; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra; Feig, Larry A

    2013-07-26

    RAS-GRF1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor with the ability to activate RAS and RAC GTPases in response to elevated calcium levels. We previously showed that beginning at 1 month of age, RAS-GRF1 mediates NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR)-induction of long term depression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus of mice. Here we show that beginning at 2 months of age, when mice first acquire the ability to discriminate between closely related contexts, RAS-GRF1 begins to contribute to the induction of long term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 hippocampus by mediating the action of calcium-permeable, AMPA-type glutamate receptors (CP-AMPARs). Surprisingly, LTP induction by CP-AMPARs through RAS-GRF1 occurs via activation of p38 MAP kinase rather than ERK MAP kinase, which has more frequently been linked to LTP. Moreover, contextual discrimination is blocked by knockdown of Ras-Grf1 expression specifically in the CA1 hippocampus, infusion of a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor into the CA1 hippocampus, or the injection of an inhibitor of CP-AMPARs. These findings implicate the CA1 hippocampus in the developmentally dependent capacity to distinguish closely related contexts through the appearance of a novel LTP-supporting signaling pathway.

  11. Identification of an essential signaling cascade for mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by angiotensin II in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Possible requirement of Gq-mediated p21ras activation coupled to a Ca2+/calmodulin-sensitive tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, S; Matsumoto, T; Motley, E D; Utsunomiya, H; Inagami, T

    1996-06-14

    In cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells, angiotensin II (Ang II) induced a rapid increase in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity through the Ang II type 1 receptor, which was insensitive to pertussis toxin but was abolished by the phospholipase C inhibitor, U73122. The Ang II-induced MAPK activation was not affected by the protein kinase C inhibitor, GF109203X, and was only partially impaired by pretreatment with a phorbol ester, whereas both treatments completely prevented MAPK activation by the phorbol ester. Intracellular Ca2+ chelation by TMB-8, but not extracellular Ca2+ chelation or inhibition of Ca2+ influx, abolished Ang II-induced MAPK activation. The calmodulin inhibitor, calmidazolium, and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, completely blocked MAPK activation by Ang II as well as by the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Ang II caused a rapid increase in the binding of GTP to p21(ras), and this was inhibited by genistein, TMB-8, and calmidazolium but not by pertussis toxin or GF109203X. These data suggest that Ang II-induced MAPK activation through the Ang II type 1 receptor could be mediated by p21(ras)activation through a currently unidentified tyrosine kinase that lies downstream of Gq-coupled Ca2+/calmodulin signals.

  12. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in yeast.

    PubMed

    Elion, Elaine A; Sahoo, Rupam

    2010-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases play central roles in transmitting extracellular and intracellular information in a wide variety of situations in eukaryotic cells. Their activities are perturbed in a large number of diseases, and their activating kinases are currently therapeutic targets in cancer. MAPKs are highly conserved among all eukaryotes. MAPKs were first cloned from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast has five MAPKs and one MAPK-like kinase. The mating MAPK Fus3 is the best characterized yeast MAPK. Members of all subfamilies of human MAPKs can functionally substitute S. cerevisiae MAPKs, providing systems to use genetic approaches to study the functions of either yeast or human MAPKs and to identify functionally relevant amino acid residues that enhance or reduce the effects of therapeutically relevant inhibitors and regulatory proteins. Here, we describe an assay to measure Fus3 activity in immune complexes prepared from S. cerevisiae extracts. The assay conditions are applicable to other MAPKs, as well. PMID:20811996

  13. Inducement of mitogen-activated protein kinases in frozen shoulders

    PubMed Central

    Kanbe, Katsuaki; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Inoue, Yasuo; Chen, Qian

    2010-01-01

    Background Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are well-known molecules that play key roles in mechanical stress signals during skeletal development. To test our hypothesis that the synovium in frozen shoulders is induced by MAP kinases, immunohistochemical analyses for detecting expression and signal transduction of MAP kinases were performed in synovial tissue obtained from the rotator interval (RI) in frozen shoulders. Methods Synovial tissues were examined from 10 frozen shoulder patients with a mean age of 55.4 years (46–62 years). Synovial tissues between the long head of the biceps tendon (LHB) and the RI in frozen shoulders were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and then examined with immunohistochemical staining. Extracellular signal-regulated (ERK), the Jun N-terminal (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), p50, CD29 (β1-integrin), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, interleukin-6 (IL-6), CD56, CD68, S-100, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were analyzed to detect expression patterns. Results H&E showed vascular proliferation with fibrin and fibrous tissue in the synovium of frozen shoulders. ERK was expressed in the epithelial cells of vascular tissue, and JNK was expressed strongly in the interstitial cells around vascular tissue; p38 MAPK was not expressed. NF-κB was expressed in vascular tissue, and IL-6 was expressed around vascular tissue. CD29 (β1-integrin) was expressed in vascular tissue and in superficial cells of synovial tissue. MMP-3 and VEGF were expressed on the surface layer of synovial tissue and vascular tissue, and CD68 was expressed on the surface layer. Nerve-related proteins, CD56 and S-100, were expressed weakly. Conclusions Mechanical stress on the LHB and RI in the shoulder may induce ERK and JNK to express NF-κB by CD29 to develop capsule contracture, producing MMP-3, IL-6, and VEGF. PMID:19214689

  14. Crosstalk and Signaling Switches in Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Dirk; Croucher, David R.; Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades control cell fate decisions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis by integrating and processing intra- and extracellular cues. However, similar MAPK kinetic profiles can be associated with opposing cellular decisions depending on cell type, signal strength, and dynamics. This implies that signaling by each individual MAPK cascade has to be considered in the context of the entire MAPK network. Here, we develop a dynamic model of feedback and crosstalk for the three major MAPK cascades; extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and also include input from protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. Focusing on the bistable activation characteristics of the JNK pathway, this model explains how pathway crosstalk harmonizes different MAPK responses resulting in pivotal cell fate decisions. We show that JNK can switch from a transient to sustained activity due to multiple positive feedback loops. Once activated, positive feedback locks JNK in a highly active state and promotes cell death. The switch is modulated by the ERK, p38, and AKT pathways. ERK activation enhances the dual specificity phosphatase (DUSP) mediated dephosphorylation of JNK and shifts the threshold of the apoptotic switch to higher inputs. Activation of p38 restores the threshold by inhibiting ERK activity via the PP1 or PP2A phosphatases. Finally, AKT activation inhibits the JNK positive feedback, thus abrogating the apoptotic switch and allowing only proliferative signaling. Our model facilitates understanding of how cancerous deregulations disturb MAPK signal processing and provides explanations for certain drug resistances. We highlight a critical role of DUSP1 and DUSP2 expression patterns in facilitating the switching of JNK activity and show how oncogene induced ERK hyperactivity prevents the normal apoptotic switch explaining the failure of certain drugs to

  15. A hemagglutinin with mitogenic activity from dark red kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lixin; Ng, T B

    2006-12-01

    A 67-kDa hemagglutinin composed of two identical subunits was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. 'Dark Red Kidney Bean'. It was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose but adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel. The hemagglutinin was highly purified after the two aforementioned chromatographic steps as revealed by a single peak in gel filtration on Superdex 75 and a single band in SDS-PAGE. The hemagglutinating activity was stable between 25 degrees C and 70 degrees C, and between pH 4 and pH 11, and in the presence of a variety of divalent metal chlorides at 500 mM concentration. The activity was reduced by 50% at 80 degrees C, and also when the pH was lowered to 3 or elevated to 12. The activity was reduced by 75% in the presence of 250 mM KCl or NaCl. A variety of sugars tested failed to inhibit the hemagglutinating activity of the hemagglutinin. Although the hemagglutinin exhibited mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes, it had no effect on the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase or mycelial growth in the fungi Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. It exerted an antiproliferative activity on leukemia L1210 cells.

  16. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Hypoxic/Ischemic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fengbao; Shi, Jian; Shi, Qianqian; Xu, Xianlin; Xia, Ying; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    Tissue hypoxia/ischemia is a pathological feature of many human disorders including stroke, myocardial infarction, hypoxic/ischemic nephropathy, as well as cancer. In the kidney, the combination of limited oxygen supply to the tissues and high oxygen demand is considered the main reason for the susceptibility of the kidney to hypoxic/ischemic injury. In recent years, increasing evidence has indicated that a reduction in renal oxygen tension/blood supply plays an important role in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, and renal tumorigenesis. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms, whereby hypoxia alters cellular behaviors, remain poorly understood. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key signal-transducing enzymes activated by a wide range of extracellular stimuli, including hypoxia/ischemia. There are four major family members of MAPKs: the extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/2), the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), p38 MAPKs, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-5 (ERK5/BMK1). Recent studies, including ours, suggest that these MAPKs are differentially involved in renal responses to hypoxic/ischemic stress. This review will discuss their changes in hypoxic/ischemic pathophysiology with acute kidney injury, chronic kidney diseases and renal carcinoma. PMID:27544204

  17. A hemagglutinin with mitogenic activity from dark red kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lixin; Ng, T B

    2006-12-01

    A 67-kDa hemagglutinin composed of two identical subunits was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. 'Dark Red Kidney Bean'. It was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose but adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel. The hemagglutinin was highly purified after the two aforementioned chromatographic steps as revealed by a single peak in gel filtration on Superdex 75 and a single band in SDS-PAGE. The hemagglutinating activity was stable between 25 degrees C and 70 degrees C, and between pH 4 and pH 11, and in the presence of a variety of divalent metal chlorides at 500 mM concentration. The activity was reduced by 50% at 80 degrees C, and also when the pH was lowered to 3 or elevated to 12. The activity was reduced by 75% in the presence of 250 mM KCl or NaCl. A variety of sugars tested failed to inhibit the hemagglutinating activity of the hemagglutinin. Although the hemagglutinin exhibited mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes, it had no effect on the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase or mycelial growth in the fungi Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. It exerted an antiproliferative activity on leukemia L1210 cells. PMID:16945595

  18. Differential regulation of transcription: repression by unactivated mitogen-activated protein kinase Kss1 requires the Dig1 and Dig2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Bardwell, L; Cook, J G; Zhu-Shimoni, J X; Voora, D; Thorner, J

    1998-12-22

    Kss1, a yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), in its unphosphorylated (unactivated) state binds directly to and represses Ste12, a transcription factor necessary for expression of genes whose promoters contain filamentous response elements (FREs) and genes whose promoters contain pheromone response elements (PREs). Herein we show that two nuclear proteins, Dig1 and Dig2, are required cofactors in Kss1-imposed repression. Dig1 and Dig2 cooperate with Kss1 to repress Ste12 action at FREs and regulate invasive growth in a naturally invasive strain. Kss1-imposed Dig-dependent repression of Ste12 also occurs at PREs. However, maintenance of repression at PREs is more dependent on Dig1 and/or Dig2 and less dependent on Kss1 than repression at FREs. In addition, derepression at PREs is more dependent on MAPK-mediated phosphorylation than is derepression at FREs. Differential utilization of two types of MAPK-mediated regulation (binding-imposed repression and phosphorylation-dependent activation), in combination with distinct Ste12-containing complexes, contributes to the mechanisms by which separate extracellular stimuli that use the same MAPK cascade can elicit two different transcriptional responses. PMID:9860980

  19. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Enslen, H; Tokumitsu, H; Stork, P J; Davis, R J; Soderling, T R

    1996-01-01

    Membrane depolarization of NG108 cells gives rapid (< 5 min) activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaM-KIV), as well as activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). To investigate whether the Ca2+-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38) might be mediated by the CaM kinase cascade, we have transfected PC12 cells, which lack CaM-KIV, with constitutively active mutants of CaM kinase kinase and/or CaM-KIV (CaM-KKc and CaM-KIVc, respectively). In the absence of depolarization, CaM-KKc transfection had no effect on Elk-dependent transcription of a luciferase reporter gene, whereas CaM-KIVc alone or in combination with CaM-KKc gave 7- to 10-fold and 60- to 80-fold stimulations, respectively, which were blocked by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase cotransfection. When epitope-tagged constructs of MAP kinases were co-transfected with CaM-KKc plus CaM-KIVc, the immunoprecipitated MAP kinases were activated 2-fold (ERK-2) and 7- to 10-fold (JNK-1 and p38). The JNK and p38 pathways were further investigated using specific c-Jun or ATF2-dependent transcriptional assays. We found that c-Jun/ATF2-dependent transcriptions were enhanced 7- to 10-fold by CaM-KIVc and 20- to 30-fold by CaM-KKc plus CaM-KIVc. In the case of the Jun-dependent transcription, this effect was not due to direct phosphorylation of c-Jun by activated CaM-KIV, since transcription was blocked by a dominant-negative JNK and by two MAP kinase phosphatases. Mutation of the phosphorylation site (Thr196) in CaM-KIV, which mediates its activation by CaM-KIV kinase, prevented activation of Elk-1, c-Jun, and ATF2 by the CaM kinase cascade. These results establish a new Ca2+-dependent mechanism for regulating MAP kinase pathways and resultant transcription. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855261

  20. Regulation of WRKY46 Transcription Factor Function by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Arsheed H.; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Pecher, Pascal; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Sinha, Alok K.; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are central signaling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defense as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defense. PMID:26870073

  1. Nedd4-induced monoubiquitination of IRS-2 enhances IGF signalling and mitogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Toshiaki; Yoshihara, Hidehito; Furuta, Haruka; Kamei, Hiroyasu; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Luan, Jing; Duan, Cunming; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Chida, Kazuhiro; Nakatsu, Yusuke; Kamata, Hideaki; Asano, Tomoichiro; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-04-16

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) induce proliferation of various cell types and play important roles in somatic growth and cancer development. Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1/2 by IGF-I receptor tyrosine kinase is essential for IGF action. Here we identify Nedd4 as an IRS-2 ubiquitin ligase. Nedd4 monoubiquitinates IRS-2, which promotes its association with Epsin1, a ubiquitin-binding protein. Nedd4 recruits IRS-2 to the membrane, probably through promoting Epsin1 binding, and enhances IGF-I receptor-induced IRS-2 tyrosine phosphorylation. In thyroid FRTL-5 cells, activation of the cyclic AMP pathway increases the association of Nedd4 with IRS-2, thereby enhancing IRS-2-mediated signalling and cell proliferation induced by IGF-I. The Nedd4 and IRS-2 association is also required for maximal activation of IGF-I signalling and cell proliferation in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Nedd4 overexpression accelerates zebrafish embryonic growth through IRS-2 in vivo. We conclude that Nedd4-induced monoubiquitination of IRS-2 enhances IGF signalling and mitogenic activity.

  2. p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors: a review on pharmacophore mapping and QSAR studies.

    PubMed

    Gangwal, Rahul P; Bhadauriya, Anuseema; Damre, Mangesh V; Dhoke, Gaurao V; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are the serine/threonine protein kinases, which play a vital role in cellular responses to external stress signals. p38 MAP kinase inhibitors have shown anti-inflammatory effects in the preclinical disease models, primarily through inhibition of the expression of inflammatory mediators. A number of structurally diverse p38 MAP kinase inhibitors have been developed as potential anti-inflammatory agents. Most of the inhibitors have failed in the clinical trials either due to poor pharmacokinetic profile or selectivity issue, which makes p38 MAP kinase a promising target for molecular modelling studies. Several quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and pharmacophore models have been developed to identify the structural requirements essential for p38 MAP kinase inhibitory activity. In this review, we provide an overview of the presently known p38 MAP kinase inhibitors and how QSAR analyses among series of compounds have led to the development of molecular models and pharmacophores, allowing the design of novel inhibitors.

  3. Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lassowskat, Ines; Böttcher, Christoph; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) target a variety of protein substrates to regulate cellular signaling processes in eukaryotes. In plants, the number of identified MAPK substrates that control plant defense responses is still limited. Here, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with an inducible system to simulate in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3, and MPK6. Metabolome analysis revealed that this artificial MPK3/6 activation (without any exposure to pathogens or other stresses) is sufficient to drive the production of major defense-related metabolites, including various camalexin, indole glucosinolate and agmatine derivatives. An accompanying (phospho)proteome analysis led to detection of hundreds of potential phosphoproteins downstream of MPK3/6 activation. Besides known MAPK substrates, many candidates on this list possess typical MAPK-targeted phosphosites and in many cases, the corresponding phosphopeptides were detected by mass spectrometry. Notably, several of these putative phosphoproteins have been reported to be associated with the biosynthesis of antimicrobial defense substances (e.g., WRKY transcription factors and proteins encoded by the genes from the “PEN” pathway required for penetration resistance to filamentous pathogens). Thus, this work provides an inventory of candidate phosphoproteins, including putative direct MAPK substrates, for future analysis of MAPK-mediated defense control. (Proteomics data are available with the identifier PXD001252 via ProteomeXchange, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org). PMID:25368622

  4. Ras-dependent and -independent pathways target the mitogen-activated protein kinase network in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Büscher, D; Hipskind, R A; Krautwald, S; Reimann, T; Baccarini, M

    1995-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are activated upon a variety of extracellular stimuli in different cells. In macrophages, colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) stimulates proliferation, while bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits cell growth and causes differentiation and activation. Both CSF-1 and LPS rapidly activate the MAPK network and induce the phosphorylation of two distinct ternary complex factors (TCFs), TCF/Elk and TCF/SAP. CSF-1, but not LPS, stimulated the formation of p21ras. GTP complexes. Expression of a dominant negative ras mutant reduced, but did not abolish, CSF-1-mediated stimulation of MEK and MAPK. In contrast, activation of the MEK kinase Raf-1 was Ras independent. Treatment with the phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C inhibitor D609 suppressed LPS-mediated, but not CSF-1-mediated, activation of Raf-1, MEK, and MAPK. Similarly, down-regulation or inhibition of protein kinase C blocked MEK and MAPK induction by LPS but not that by CSF-1. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate pretreatment led to the sustained activation of the Raf-1 kinase but not that of MEK and MAPK. Thus, activated Raf-1 alone does not support MEK/MAPK activation in macrophages. Phosphorylation of TCF/Elk but not that of TCF/SAP was blocked by all treatments that interfered with MAPK activation, implying that TCF/SAP was targeted by a MAPK-independent pathway. Therefore, CSF-1 and LPS target the MAPK network by two alternative pathways, both of which induce Raf-1 activation. The mitogenic pathway depends on Ras activity, while the differentiation signal relies on protein kinase C and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C activation. PMID:7799956

  5. Oncogenic Ras activation of Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase-independent pathways is sufficient to cause tumorigenic transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi-Far, R; White, M A; Westwick, J K; Solski, P A; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, M; Van Aelst, L; Wigler, M H; Der, C J

    1996-01-01

    Substantial evidence supports a critical role for the activation of the Raf-1/MEK/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in oncogenic Ras-mediated transformation. For example, dominant negative mutants of Raf-1, MEK, and mitogen-activated protein kinase all inhibit Ras transformation. Furthermore, the observation that plasma membrane-localized Raf-1 exhibits the same transforming potency as oncogenic Ras suggests that Raf-1 activation alone is sufficient to mediate full Ras transforming activity. However, the recent identification of other candidate Ras effectors (e.g., RalGDS and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase) suggests that activation of other downstream effector-mediated signaling pathways may also mediate Ras transforming activity. In support of this, two H-Ras effector domain mutants, H-Ras(12V, 37G) and H-Ras(12V, 40C), which are defective for Raf binding and activation, induced potent tumorigenic transformation of some strains of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. These Raf-binding defective mutants of H-Ras induced a transformed morphology that was indistinguishable from that induced by activated members of Rho family proteins. Furthermore, the transforming activities of both of these mutants were synergistically enhanced by activated Raf-1 and inhibited by the dominant negative RhoA(19N) mutant, indicating that Ras may cause transformation that occurs via coordinate activation of Raf-dependent and -independent pathways that involves Rho family proteins. Finally, cotransfection of H-Ras(12V, 37G) and H-Ras(12V, 40C) resulted in synergistic cooperation of their focus-forming activities, indicating that Ras activates at least two Raf-independent, Ras effector-mediated signaling events. PMID:8668210

  6. Biological significance of nuclear localization of mitogen-activated protein kinase Pmk1 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Villar-Tajadura, M Antonia; Soto, Teresa; Pérez, Pilar; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2012-07-27

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play a fundamental role in the response of eukaryotic cells to environmental changes. Also, much evidence shows that the stimulus-dependent nuclear targeting of this class of regulatory kinases is crucial for adequate regulation of distinct cellular events. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the cell integrity MAPK pathway, whose central element is the MAPK Pmk1, regulates multiple processes such as cell wall integrity, vacuole fusion, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. In non-stressed cells Pmk1 is constitutively localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and its localization pattern appears unaffected by its activation status or in response to stress, thus questioning the biological significance of the presence of this MAPK into the nucleus. We have addressed this issue by characterizing mutants expressing Pmk1 versions excluded from the cell nucleus and anchored to the plasma membrane in different genetic backgrounds. Although nuclear Pmk1 partially regulates cell wall integrity at a transcriptional level, membrane-tethered Pmk1 performs many of the biological functions assigned to wild type MAPK like regulation of chloride homeostasis, vacuole fusion, and cellular separation. However, we found that down-regulation of nuclear Pmk1 by MAPK phosphatases induced by the stress activated protein kinase pathway is important for the fine modulation of extranuclear Pmk1 activity. These results highlight the importance of the control of MAPK activity at subcellular level.

  7. Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C is phosphorylated and inhibited by 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Peraldi, P; Zhao, Z; Filloux, C; Fischer, E H; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C (PTP2C, also named SHPTP2, SHPTP3, or PTP1D) is a cytosolic enzyme with two Src homology 2 domains. We have investigated its regulation by phosphorylation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. In untreated cells, PTP2C was phosphorylated predominantly on serine residues. A 5-min treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced an increase in phosphorylation on threonine and, to a lesser degree, on serine. After 45 min of exposure to EGF, PTP2C phosphorylation returned to basal levels. Using an in vitro kinase assay, we found that the 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase, p44mapk, phosphorylated PTP2C on serine and threonine residues. This phosphorylation resulted in a pronounced inhibition of PTP2C enzyme activity measured with phosphorylated EGF receptors as substrate. Moreover, in intact PC12 cells, PTP2C was also inhibited following a short EGF treatment, but its activity returned to normal when the exposure to EGF was maintained for 45 min. The profile of this response to EGF can be inversely correlated to that of the stimulatory action of EGF on p44mapk. These data suggest that the EGF-induced regulation of PTP2C activity is mediated by p44mapk. These findings provide evidence for an additional role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade--namely, the regulation of a PTP. Images PMID:8197172

  8. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg{sup 2+} ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn{sup 2+}); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg{sup 2+} causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn{sup 2+} release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn{sup 2+} or Hg{sup 2+}. Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg{sup 2+}-induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg{sup 2+} that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system.

  9. Tryptase Activation of Immortalized Human Urothelial Cell Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Marentette, John O.; Hauser, Paul J.; Hurst, Robert E.; Klumpp, David J.; Rickard, Alice; McHowat, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) is multifactorial, but likely involves urothelial cell dysfunction and mast cell accumulation in the bladder wall. Activated mast cells in the bladder wall release several inflammatory mediators, including histamine and tryptase. We determined whether mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are activated in response to tryptase stimulation of urothelial cells derived from human normal and IC/PBS bladders. Tryptase stimulation of normal urothelial cells resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). A 5.5-fold increase in ERK 1/2 activity was observed in urothelial cells isolated from IC/PBS bladders. No significant change in p38 MAP kinase was observed in tryptase-stimulated normal urothelial cells but a 2.5-fold increase was observed in cells isolated from IC/PBS bladders. Inhibition of ERK 1/2 with PD98059 or inhibition of p38 MAP kinase with SB203580 did not block tryptase-stimulated iPLA2 activation. Incubation with the membrane phospholipid-derived PLA2 hydrolysis product lysoplasmenylcholine increased ERK 1/2 activity, suggesting the iPLA2 activation is upstream of ERK 1/2. Real time measurements of impedance to evaluate wound healing of cell cultures indicated increased healing rates in normal and IC/PBS urothelial cells in the presence of tryptase, with inhibition of ERK 1/2 significantly decreasing the wound healing rate of IC/PBS urothelium. We conclude that activation of ERK 1/2 in response to tryptase stimulation may facilitate wound healing or cell motility in areas of inflammation in the bladder associated with IC/PBS. PMID:23922867

  10. Evolutionary history of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in Lotus, Medicago, and Phaseolus

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P; Benson, Benjamin V; MacArthur, Kenton J; Piya, Sarbottam

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) genes encode proteins that mediate various signaling pathways associated with biotic and abiotic stress responses in eukaryotes. The MAPK genes form a 3-tier signal transduction cascade between cellular stimuli and physiological responses. Recent identification of soybean MAPKs and availability of genome sequences from other legume species allowed us to identify their MAPK genes. The main objectives of this study were to identify MAPKs in 3 legume species, Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula, and Phaseolus vulgaris, and to assess their phylogenetic relationships. We used approaches in comparative genomics for MAPK gene identification and named the newly identified genes following Arabidopsis MAPK nomenclature model. We identified 19, 18, and 15 MAPKs and 7, 4, and 9 MAPKKs in the genome of Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula, and Phaseolus vulgaris, respectively. Within clade placement of MAPKs and MAPKKs in the 3 legume species were consistent with those in soybean and Arabidopsis. Among 5 clades of MAPKs, 4 founder clades were consistent to MAPKs of other plant species and orthologs of MAPK genes in the fifth clade-"Clade E" were consistent with those in soybean. Our results also indicated that some gene duplication events might have occurred prior to eudicot-monocot divergence. Highly diversified MAPKs in soybean relative to those in 3 other legume species are attributable to the polyploidization events in soybean. The identification of the MAPK genes in the legume species is important for the legume crop improvement; and evolutionary relationships and functional divergence of these gene members provide insights into plant genome evolution. PMID:24317362

  11. Noise exposure immediately activates cochlear mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Alagramam, Kumar N; Stepanyan, Ruben; Jamesdaniel, Samson; Chen, Daniel H-C; Davis, Rickie R

    2014-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major public health issue worldwide. Uncovering the early molecular events associated with NIHL would reveal mechanisms leading to the hearing loss. Our aim is to investigate the immediate molecular responses after different levels of noise exposure and identify the common and distinct pathways that mediate NIHL. Previous work showed mice exposed to 116 decibels sound pressure level (dB SPL) broadband noise for 1 h had greater threshold shifts than the mice exposed to 110 dB SPL broadband noise, hence we used these two noise levels in this study. Groups of 4-8-week-old CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to no noise (control) or to broadband noise for 1 h, followed by transcriptome analysis of total cochlear RNA isolated immediately after noise exposure. Previously identified and novel genes were found in all data sets. Following exposure to noise at 116 dB SPL, the earliest responses included up-regulation of 243 genes and down-regulation of 61 genes, while a similar exposure at 110 dB SPL up-regulated 155 genes and down-regulated 221 genes. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling was the major pathway in both levels of noise exposure. Nevertheless, both qualitative and quantitative differences were noticed in some MAPK signaling genes, after exposure to different noise levels. Cacna1b , Cacna1g , and Pla2g6 , related to calcium signaling were down-regulated after 110 dB SPL exposure, while the fold increase in the expression of Fos was relatively lower than what was observed after 116 dB SPL exposure. These subtle variations provide insight on the factors that may contribute to the differences in NIHL despite the activation of a common pathway.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide activates activator protein-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in pancreatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Satoh, Masahiro; Suzuki, Noriaki; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2006-10-01

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, where oxidative stress is thought to play a key role. Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) may act as a second messenger to mediate the actions of growth factors and cytokines. But the role of reactive oxygen species in the activation and regulation of cell functions in PSCs remains largely unknown. We here examined the effects of H(2)O(2) on the activation of signal transduction pathways and cell functions in PSCs. PSCs were isolated from the pancreas of male Wistar rats, and used in their culture-activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype unless otherwise stated. Activation of transcription factors was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase assay. Activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases was assessed by Western blotting using anti-phosphospecific antibodies. The effects of H(2)O(2) on proliferation, alpha(1)(I)procollagen gene expression, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production were evaluated. The effect of H(2)O(2) on the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs in culture was also assessed. H(2)O(2) at non-cytotoxic concentrations (up to 100 microM) induced oxidative stress in PSCs. H(2)O(2) activated activator protein-1, but not nuclear factor kappaB. In addition, H(2)O(2) activated three classes of MAP kinases: extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAP kinase. H(2)O(2) induced alpha(1)(I)procollagen gene expression but did not induce proliferation or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. H(2)O(2) did not initiate the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs to myofibroblast-like phenotype. Specific activation of these signal transduction pathways and collagen gene expression by H(2)O(2) may play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis.

  13. Pivotal Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 in Inflammatory Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Feng; Deng, Jing; Wang, Gang; Ye, Richard D.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase (MK2) is exclusively regulated by p38 MAPK in vivo. Upon activation of p38 MAPK, MK2 binds with p38 MAPK, leading to phosphorylation of TTP, Hsp27, Akt and Cdc25 that are involved in regulation of various essential cellular functions. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about molecular mechanisms of MK2 in regulation of TNF-α production, NADPH oxidase activation, neutrophil migration, and DNA-damage-induced cell cycle arrest which are involved in the molecular pathogenesis of acute lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, and non-small-cell lung cancer. Collectively current and emerging new information indicate that developing MK2 inhibitors and blocking MK2-mediated signal pathways is a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases and lung cancer. PMID:26119506

  14. Activation of multiple mitogen-activated protein kinases by recombinant calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, N; Disa, J; Spielman, W S; Brooks, D P; Nambi, P; Aiyar, N

    2000-02-18

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide is a 37-amino-acid neuropeptide and a potent vasodilator. Although calcitonin gene-related peptide has been shown to have a number of effects in a variety of systems, the mechanisms of action and the intracellular signaling pathways, especially the regulation of mitogen-activated protien kinase (MAPK) pathway, is not known. In the present study we investigated the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the regulation of MAPKs in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells stably transfected with a recombinant porcine calcitonin gene-related peptide-1 receptor. Calcitonin gene-related peptide caused a significant dose-dependent increase in cAMP response and the effect was inhibited by calcitonin gene-related peptide(8-37), the calcitonin gene-related peptide-receptor antagonist. Calcitonin gene-related peptide also caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38 MAPK) activities, with apparently no significant change in cjun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. Forskolin, a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase also stimulated ERK and P38 activities in these cells suggesting the invovement of cAMP in this process. Calcitonin gene-related peptide-stimulated ERK and P38 MAPK activities were inhibited significantly by calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist, calcitonin gene-related peptide-(8-37) suggesting the involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide-1 receptor. Preincubation of the cells with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor, H89 [¿N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide, hydrochloride¿] inhibited calcitonin gene-related peptide-mediated activation of ERK and p38 kinases. On the other hand, preincubation of the cells with wortmannin ¿[1S-(1alpha,6balpha,9abeta,11alpha, 11bbeta)]-11-(acetyloxy)-1,6b,7,8,9a,10,11, 11b-octahydro-1-(methoxymethyl)-9a,11b-dimethyl-3H-furo[4,3, 2-de]indeno[4,5-h]-2

  15. A mitogen-activated protein kinase of the corn leaf pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus is involved in conidiation, appressorium formation, and pathogenicity: diverse roles for mitogen-activated protein kinase homologs in foliar pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lev, S; Sharon, A; Hadar, R; Ma, H; Horwitz, B A

    1999-11-01

    Fungal pathogens perceive and respond to molecules from the plant, triggering pathogenic development. Transduction of these signals may use heterotrimeric G proteins, and it is thought that protein phosphorylation cascades are also important. We have isolated a mitogen-activated protein kinase homolog from the corn pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus to test its role as a component of the transduction pathways. The new gene, CHK1, has a deduced amino acid sequence 90% identical to Pmk1 of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea and 59% identical to Fus3 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A series of chk1 deletion mutants has poorly developed aerial hyphae, autolysis, and no conidia. No pseudothecia are formed when a cross between two Deltachk1 mutants is attempted. The ability of Deltachk1 mutants to infect corn plants is reduced severely. The growth pattern of hyphae on a glass surface is strikingly altered from that of the wild type, forming coils or loops, but no appressoria. This set of phenotypes overlaps only partially with that of pmk1 mutants, the homologous gene of the rice blast fungus. In particular, sexual and asexual sporulation both require Chk1 function in Cochliobolus heterostrophus, in contrast to Pmk1, but perhaps more similar to yeast, where Fus3 transmits the mating signal. Chk1 is required for efficient colonization of leaf tissue, which can be compared with filamentous invasive growth of yeast, modulated through another closely related mitogen-activated protein kinase, Kss1. Ubiquitous signaling elements thus are used in diverse ways in different plant pathogens, perhaps the result of coevolution of the transducers and their targets. PMID:10557357

  16. Role of mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-kappa B in 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol-induced hepatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Chul; Lee, Sang-Min; Ko, Je-Won; Park, Sung-Hyeuk; Shin, In-Sik; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the potential hepatotoxicity of 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol and its hepatotoxic mechanisms in rats was investigated. The test chemical was administered orally to male rats at 0, 27.5, 55, and 110 mg/kg body weight. 1,3-Dichloro-2-propanol administration caused acute hepatotoxicity, as evidenced by an increase in serum aminotransferases, total cholesterol, and total bilirubin levels and a decrease in serum glucose concentration in a dose-dependent manner with corresponding histopathological changes in the hepatic tissues. The significant increase in malondialdehyde content and the significant decrease in glutathione content and antioxidant enzyme activities indicated that 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol-induced hepatic damage was mediated through oxidative stress, which caused a dose-dependent increase of hepatocellular apoptotic changes in the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay and immunohistochemical analysis for caspase-3. The phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases caused by 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol possibly involved in hepatocellular apoptotic changes in rat liver. Furthermore, 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol induced an inflammatory response through activation of nuclear factor-kappa B signaling that coincided with the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators or cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hepatotoxicity may be related to oxidative stress-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-kappa B-mediated inflammatory response. PMID:27051440

  17. Mitogen-activated protein kinases: a new therapeutic target in cardiac pathology.

    PubMed

    Ravingerová, Tána; Barancík, Miroslav; Strnisková, Monika

    2003-05-01

    Eukaryotic cells respond to different external stimuli by activation of mechanisms of cell signaling. One of the major systems participating in the transduction of signal from the cell membrane to nuclear and other intracellular targets is the highly conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) superfamily. The members of MAPK family are involved in the regulation of a large variety of cellular processes such as cell growth, differentiation, development, cell cycle, death and survival. Several MAPK subfamilies, each with apparently unique signaling pathway, have been identified in the mammalian myocardium. These cascades differ in their upstream activation sequence and in downstream substrate specifity. Each pathway follows the same conserved three-kinase module consisting of MAPK, MAPK kinase (MAPKK, MKK or MEK), and MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK, MEKK). The major groups of MAPKs found in cardiac tissue include the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), the stress-activated/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (SAPK/JNKs), p38-MAPK, and ERK5/big MAPK 1 (BMK1). The ERKs are strongly activated by mitogenic and growth factors and by physical stress, whereas SAPK/JNKs and p38-MAPK can be activated by various cell stresses, such as hyperosmotic shock, metabolic stress or protein synthesis inhibitors, UV radiation, heat shock, cytokines, and ischemia. Activation of MAPKs family plays a key role in the pathogenesis of various processes in the heart, e.g. myocardial hypertrophy and its transition to heart failure, in ischemic and reperfusion injury, as well in the cardioprotection conferred by ischemia- or pharmacologically-induced preconditioning. The following approaches are currently utilized to elucidate the role of MAPKs in the myocardium: (i) studies of the effects of myocardial processes on the activity of these kinases; (ii) pharmacological modulations of MAPKs activity and evaluation of their impact on the (patho)physiological processes in the heart; (iii) gene

  18. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation during platelet storage: consequences for platelet recovery and hemostatic function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Canault, Matthias; Duerschmied, Daniel; Brill, Alexander; Stefanini, Lucia; Schatzberg, Daphne; Cifuni, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Platelets undergo several modifications during storage that reduce their posttransfusion survival and functionality. One important feature of these changes, which are known as platelet storage lesion, is the shedding of the surface glycoproteins GPIb-α and GPV. We recently demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17) mediates mitochondrial injury-induced shedding of adhesion receptors and that TACE activity correlates with reduced posttransfusion survival of these cells. We now confirm that TACE mediates receptor shedding and clearance of platelets stored for 16 hours at 37°C or 22°C. We further demonstrate that both storage and mitochondrial injury lead to the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) in platelets and that TACE-mediated receptor shedding from mouse and human platelets requires p38 MAP kinase signaling. Protein kinase C, extracellular regulated-signal kinase MAPK, and caspases were not involved in TACE activation. Both inhibition of p38 MAPK and inactivation of TACE during platelet storage led to a markedly improved posttransfusion recovery and hemostatic function of platelets in mice. p38 MAPK inhibitors had only minor effects on the aggregation of fresh platelets under static or flow conditions in vitro. In summary, our data suggest that inhibition of p38 MAPK or TACE during storage may significantly improve the quality of stored platelets. PMID:19965619

  19. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation during platelet storage: consequences for platelet recovery and hemostatic function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Canault, Matthias; Duerschmied, Daniel; Brill, Alexander; Stefanini, Lucia; Schatzberg, Daphne; Cifuni, Stephen M; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Wagner, Denisa D

    2010-03-01

    Platelets undergo several modifications during storage that reduce their posttransfusion survival and functionality. One important feature of these changes, which are known as platelet storage lesion, is the shedding of the surface glycoproteins GPIb-alpha and GPV. We recently demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-alpha converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17) mediates mitochondrial injury-induced shedding of adhesion receptors and that TACE activity correlates with reduced posttransfusion survival of these cells. We now confirm that TACE mediates receptor shedding and clearance of platelets stored for 16 hours at 37 degrees C or 22 degrees C. We further demonstrate that both storage and mitochondrial injury lead to the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) in platelets and that TACE-mediated receptor shedding from mouse and human platelets requires p38 MAP kinase signaling. Protein kinase C, extracellular regulated-signal kinase MAPK, and caspases were not involved in TACE activation. Both inhibition of p38 MAPK and inactivation of TACE during platelet storage led to a markedly improved posttransfusion recovery and hemostatic function of platelets in mice. p38 MAPK inhibitors had only minor effects on the aggregation of fresh platelets under static or flow conditions in vitro. In summary, our data suggest that inhibition of p38 MAPK or TACE during storage may significantly improve the quality of stored platelets.

  20. Metabolic and cytoskeletal modulation of transferrin receptor mobility in mitogen-activated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, G M; Galbraith, R M

    1980-01-01

    The transferrin receptors which appear on mitogen-activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were found by the use of immunofluorescence techniques to display temperature-dependent patching and capping reactions upon binding of transferrin. Lateral mobility of ligand-occupied membrane sites was accompanied by both shedding and endocytosis of receptor-transferrin complexes. In the presence of sodium azide or the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B, cap formation and shedding were markedly inhibited. In contrast, endocytosis of patched receptor-ligand complexes was inhibited by azide and microtubule inhibitors, including colchicine, vinblastine and vincristine. Co-capping experiments performed to elucidate further the alterations in membrane configuration involved in these reactions failed to reveal any topographical relationship between transferrin receptors and lectin-binding sites in these cells. These studied indicate that temperature-dependent mobility of transferrin receptors upon mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes is dependent upon the integrity of the cytoskeletal system and metabolic function of the cell. PMID:6258830

  1. Mitogenic activity of new lectins from seeds of wild Artocarpus species from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Blasco, E; Ngoc, L D; Aucouturier, P; Preud'Homme, J L; Barra, A

    1996-05-01

    Proliferative response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated by new lectins purified from seeds of differents Artocarpus species from Vietnam (A. asperulus, A. heterophyllus, A. masticata, A. melinoxylus, A. parva and A. petelotii) was studied and compared to those of the lectin jacalin purified from jackfruit (A. heterophyllus) seeds collected in the island La Réunion. All lectins stimulated human PBMC to proliferate, with a variable efficiency of the mitogenic activity. Phenotypic analysis of cells recovered after 7 day-cultures showed that these lectins mostly stimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes. These results suggest that these lectins from different Artocarpus species are similar in terms of their mitogenic activity although their structural features are not identical.

  2. Activation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in Arabidopsis by chitin.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jinrong; Zhang, Shuqun; Stacey, Gary

    2004-03-01

    SUMMARY Chitin, a polysaccharide composed of beta-1-->4-linked N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, has been shown or implicated as a signal in plant defence and development. However, the key components of chitin perception and downstream signalling in non-leguminous plants are largely unknown. In recent years, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and their cascades were shown to transduce various extracellular stimuli into internal cellular responses. To investigate the possible involvement of MAPKs in chitin signalling in plants, the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was treated with crab-shell chitin and also with the purified chitin oligomers (degree of polymerization, d.p. = 2-8). Both mRNA levels and kinase activity of two MAPK genes, AtMPK6 and AtMPK3, were monitored after treatment. The mRNA of AtMPK3 was strongly up-regulated by both chitin and its larger oligomers (d.p. = 6-8), but the mRNA of AtMPK6 did not appear to be regulated by these treatments. However, the kinase activity of both MAPKs was induced by chitin and the larger oligomers (d.p. = 6-8), with AtMPK6 much more strongly induced. In addition, WRKY22, WRKY29, WRKY33 and WRKY53, which encode four WRKY transcription factors that recognize TTGAC(C/T) W-box elements in promoters of numerous plant defence-related genes, were up-regulated by these treatments. WRKY33 and WRKY53 expression was induced by the transgenic expression of the tobacco MAPKK NtMEK2 active mutant NtMEK2(DD), suggesting a potential role for these WRKY transcription factors in relaying the signal generated from the MAPK cascade to downstream genes. These data suggest that AtMPK6/AtMPK3 and WRKY transcription factors (such as WRKY33 and WRKY53) may be important components of a pathway involved in chitin signalling in Arabidopsis plants.

  3. Role of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in Middle Ear Mucosa Hyperplasia during Bacterial Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Sean D.; Pak, Kwang; Rivkin, Alexander Z.; Kayali, Ayse G.; Austen, Darrell; Aletsee, Christoph; Melhus, Åsa; Webster, Nicholas J. G.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2004-01-01

    Hyperplasia of the middle ear mucosa contributes to the sequelae of acute otitis media. Understanding the signal transduction pathways that mediate hyperplasia could lead to the development of new therapeutic interventions for this disease and its sequelae. Endotoxin derived from bacteria involved in middle ear infection can contribute to the hyperplastic response. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is known to be activated by endotoxin as well as cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that have been documented in otitis media. We assessed the activation of p38 in the middle ear mucosa of an in vivo rat bacterial otitis media model. Strong activity of p38 was observed 1 to 6 h after bacterial inoculation. Activity continued at a lower level for at least 7 days. The effects of p38 activation were assessed using an in vitro model of rat middle ear mucosal hyperplasia in which mucosal growth is stimulated by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae during acute otitis media. Hyperplastic mucosal explants treated with the p38α and p38β inhibitor SB203580 demonstrated significant inhibition of otitis media-stimulated mucosal growth. The results of this study suggest that intracellular signaling via p38 MAPK influences the hyperplastic response of the middle ear mucosa during bacterial otitis media. PMID:15271927

  4. Involvement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in soft-shelled turtle iridovirus-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youhua; Huang, Xiaohong; Cai, Jia; Ye, Fuzhou; Qin, Qiwei

    2011-06-01

    Iridoviruses are large DNA viruses that infect invertebrates and poikilothermic vertebrates, and result in significant economic losses in aquaculture production, and drastic declines in amphibian populations. Soft-shelled turtle iridovirus (STIV) is the causative agent of severe systemic diseases in farm-raised soft-shelled turtles (Trionyx sinensis). In the present study, the mechanisms of STIV-induced cell death and the roles of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway were investigated. STIV infection evoked typical apoptosis in fish cells, as demonstrated by the formation of apoptotic bodies, positive terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nicked-end labeling, and caspase-3 activation. The translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytoplasm, and caspase-9 activation suggested that a mitochondria-mediated pathway was involved in STIV-induced apoptosis. Moreover, MAPK pathways, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK signaling were activated during STIV infection. Using specific inhibitors, we found that MAPK signaling molecules, including ERK, JNK and p38 MAPK, were important for virus release, whereas, only ERK and p38 MAPK were involved in STIV-induced apoptosis by modulating caspase-3 activity. Taken together, our findings shed light on the roles of the MAPK signaling pathway in iridovirus-induced apoptosis and virus replication, which provides new insights into understanding iridovirus-host interaction.

  5. Parasite Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases as Drug Discovery Targets to Treat Human Protozoan Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Brumlik, Michael J.; Pandeswara, Srilakshmi; Ludwig, Sara M.; Murthy, Kruthi; Curiel, Tyler J.

    2011-01-01

    Protozoan pathogens are a highly diverse group of unicellular organisms, several of which are significant human pathogens. One group of protozoan pathogens includes obligate intracellular parasites such as agents of malaria, leishmaniasis, babesiosis, and toxoplasmosis. The other group includes extracellular pathogens such as agents of giardiasis and amebiasis. An unfortunate unifying theme for most human protozoan pathogens is that highly effective treatments for them are generally lacking. We will review targeting protozoan mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) as a novel drug discovery approach towards developing better therapies, focusing on Plasmodia, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma, about which the most is known. PMID:21637385

  6. Targeting the RAS pathway by mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Michael K; Rogler, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of oncogenic driver mutations with small-molecule inhibitors resulted in powerful treatment options for cancer patients in recent years. The RAS (rat sarcoma) pathway is among the most frequently mutated pathways in human cancer. Whereas targeting mutant Kirsten RAS (KRAS) remains difficult, mutant B rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (BRAF) kinase is an established drug target in cancer. Now data show that neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) and even Harvey RAS (HRAS) mutations could be predictive markers for treatment with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) inhibitors. This review discusses recent preclinical and clinical studies of MEK inhibitors in BRAF and RAS mutant cancer. PMID:26691679

  7. Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Contributes to Interferon γ Production in Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pasquinelli, Virginia; Rovetta, Ana I.; Alvarez, Ivana B.; Jurado, Javier O.; Musella, Rosa M.; Palmero, Domingo J.; Malbrán, Alejandro; Samten, Buka; Barnes, Peter F.; García, Verónica E.

    2013-01-01

    Immune control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis depends on interferon γ (IFN-γ)–producing CD4+ lymphocytes. Previous studies have shown that T cells from patients with tuberculosis produce less IFN-γ, compared with healthy donors, in response to mycobacterial antigens, although IFN-γ responses to mitogens are preserved. In this work, we found that M. tuberculosis–induced IFN-γ production by human T cells correlated with phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and p38. Moreover, the majority of IFN-γ–producing T cells expressed signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), and SLAM activation further increased ERK phosphorylation. Interestingly, patients with tuberculosis had delayed activation of ERK and p38, and this was most marked in patients with the poorest IFN-γ responses (ie, low responders). Besides, SLAM signaling failed to phosphorylate ERK in low responders. Our findings suggest that activation of p38 and ERK, in part through SLAM, mediates T-cell IFN-γ production in response to M. tuberculosis, a pathway that is defective in patients with tuberculosis. PMID:23125442

  8. Anti-inflammatory effects of a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor during human endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Branger, Judith; van den Blink, Bernt; Weijer, Sebastiaan; Madwed, Jeffrey; Bos, Carina L; Gupta, Abhya; Yong, Chan-Loi; Polmar, Stephen H; Olszyna, Dariusz P; Hack, C Erik; van Deventer, Sander J H; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; van der Poll, Tom

    2002-04-15

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) participates in intracellular signaling cascades resulting in inflammatory responses. Therefore, inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway may form the basis of a new strategy for treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, p38 MAPK activation during systemic inflammation in humans has not yet been shown, and its functional significance in vivo remains unclear. Hence, we exposed 24 healthy male subjects to an i.v. dose of LPS (4 ng/kg), preceded 3 h earlier by orally administered 600 or 50 mg BIRB 796 BS (an in vitro p38 MAPK inhibitor) or placebo. Both doses of BIRB 796 BS significantly inhibited LPS-induced p38 MAPK activation in the leukocyte fraction of the volunteers. Cytokine production (TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1R antagonist) was strongly inhibited by both low and high dose p38 MAPK inhibitor. In addition, p38 MAPK inhibition diminished leukocyte responses, including neutrophilia, release of elastase-alpha(1)-antitrypsin complexes, and up-regulation of CD11b with down-regulation of L-selectin. Finally, blocking p38 MAPK decreased C-reactive protein release. These data identify p38 MAPK as a principal mediator of the inflammatory response to LPS in humans. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory potential of an oral p38 MAPK inhibitor in humans in vivo suggests that p38 MAPK inhibitors may provide a new therapeutic option in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  9. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade controls phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ciuffreda, Ludovica; Di Sanza, Cristina; Cesta Incani, Ursula; Eramo, Adriana; Desideri, Marianna; Biagioni, Francesca; Passeri, Daniela; Falcone, Italia; Sette, Giovanni; Bergamo, Paola; Anichini, Andrea; Sabapathy, Kanaga; McCubrey, James A; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Tafuri, Agostino; Blandino, Giovanni; Orlandi, Augusto; De Maria, Ruggero; Cognetti, Francesco; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Milella, Michele

    2012-06-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K pathways are regulated by extensive crosstalk, occurring at different levels. In tumors, transactivation of the alternate pathway is a frequent "escape" mechanism, suggesting that combined inhibition of both pathways may achieve synergistic antitumor activity. Here we show that, in the M14 melanoma model, simultaneous inhibition of both MEK and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) achieves synergistic effects at suboptimal concentrations, but becomes frankly antagonistic in the presence of relatively high concentrations of MEK inhibitors. This observation led to the identification of a novel crosstalk mechanism, by which either pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of constitutive MEK signaling restores phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression, both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibits downstream signaling through AKT and mTOR, thus bypassing the need for double pathway blockade. This appears to be a general regulatory mechanism and is mediated by multiple mechanisms, such as MAPK-dependent c-Jun and miR-25 regulation. Finally, PTEN upregulation appears to be a major effector of MEK inhibitors' antitumor activity, as cancer cells in which PTEN is inactivated are consistently more resistant to the growth inhibitory and anti-angiogenic effects of MEK blockade. PMID:22215152

  10. The AngFus3 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Controls Hyphal Differentiation and Secondary Metabolism in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Priegnitz, Bert-Ewald; Brandt, Ulrike; Pahirulzaman, Khomaizon A K; Dickschat, Jeroen S; Fleißner, André

    2015-06-01

    Adaptation to a changing environment is essential for the survival and propagation of sessile organisms, such as plants or fungi. Filamentous fungi commonly respond to a worsening of their growth conditions by differentiation of asexually or sexually produced spores. The formation of these specialized cell types is, however, also triggered as part of the general life cycle by hyphal age or density. Spores typically serve for dispersal and, therefore, translocation but can also act as resting states to endure times of scarcity. Eukaryotic differentiation in response to environmental and self-derived signals is commonly mediated by three-tiered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades. Here, we report that the MAP kinase Fus3 of the black mold Aspergillus niger (AngFus3) and its upstream kinase AngSte7 control vegetative spore formation and secondary metabolism. Mutants lacking these kinases are defective in conidium induction in response to hyphal density but are fully competent in starvation-induced sporulation, indicating that conidiation in A. niger is triggered by various independent signals. In addition, the mutants exhibit an altered profile of volatile metabolites and secrete dark pigments into the growth medium, suggesting a dysregulation of the secondary metabolism. By assigning the AngFus3 MAP kinase pathway to the transduction of a potentially self-derived trigger, this work contributes to the unraveling of the intricate signaling networks controlling fungal differentiation. Moreover, our data further support earlier observations that differentiation and secondary metabolism are tightly linked in filamentous fungi.

  11. Piperine ameliorates the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis by inhibiting the activation of mitogen activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Bae, Gi-Sang; Kim, Min-Sun; Jeong, Jinsu; Lee, Hye-Youn; Park, Kyoung-Chel; Koo, Bon Soon; Kim, Byung-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Lee, Seung Ho; Hwang, Sung-Yeon; Shin, Yong Kook; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2011-07-01

    Piperine is a phenolic component of black pepper (Piper nigrum) and long pepper (Piper longum), fruits used in traditional Asian medicine. Our previous study showed that piperine inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated whether piperine reduces the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). Administration of piperine reduced histologic damage and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the pancreas and ameliorated many of the examined laboratory parameters, including the pancreatic weight (PW) to body weight (BW) ratio, as well as serum levels of amylase and lipase and trypsin activity. Furthermore, piperine pretreatment reduced the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 during cerulein-induced AP. In accordance with in vivo results, piperine reduced cell death, amylase and lipase activity, and cytokine production in isolated cerulein-treated pancreatic acinar cells. In addition, piperine inhibited the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). These findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of piperine in cerulein-induced AP is mediated by inhibiting the activation of MAPKs. Thus, piperine may have a protective effect against AP.

  12. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Plant-Interacting Fungi: Distinct Messages from Conserved Messengers[W

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Louis-Philippe; Nicole, Marie-Claude; Duplessis, Sébastien; Ellis, Brian E.

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are evolutionarily conserved proteins that function as key signal transduction components in fungi, plants, and mammals. During interaction between phytopathogenic fungi and plants, fungal MAPKs help to promote mechanical and/or enzymatic penetration of host tissues, while plant MAPKs are required for activation of plant immunity. However, new insights suggest that MAPK cascades in both organisms do not operate independently but that they mutually contribute to a highly interconnected molecular dialogue between the plant and the fungus. As a result, some pathogenesis-related processes controlled by fungal MAPKs lead to the activation of plant signaling, including the recruitment of plant MAPK cascades. Conversely, plant MAPKs promote defense mechanisms that threaten the survival of fungal cells, leading to a stress response mediated in part by fungal MAPK cascades. In this review, we make use of the genomic data available following completion of whole-genome sequencing projects to analyze the structure of MAPK protein families in 24 fungal taxa, including both plant pathogens and mycorrhizal symbionts. Based on conserved patterns of sequence diversification, we also propose the adoption of a unified fungal MAPK nomenclature derived from that established for the model species Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Finally, we summarize current knowledge of the functions of MAPK cascades in phytopathogenic fungi and highlight the central role played by MAPK signaling during the molecular dialogue between plants and invading fungal pathogens. PMID:22517321

  13. Signalling pathway leading to an activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by stimulating M3 muscarinic receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Yang, M S; Oh, C D; Kim, K T; Ha, M J; Kang, S S; Chun, J S

    1999-01-15

    The signalling pathway leading to an activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase subtypes Erk-1 and -2 upon stimulation of muscarinic receptor with carbachol in human neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2(C) cells was investigated. Carbachol activated Erk-1/-2 by stimulating M3 muscarinic receptor, as determined by specific antagonists for individual muscarinic receptors. The activation of Erk-1/-2 by carbachol was blocked by the inhibition or down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC). Among the multiple PKC isoforms expressed in SK-N-BE2(C) cells, only PKCepsilon was activated by the treatment of carbachol, and selective down-regulation of PKCepsilon was sufficient to block Erk-1/-2 activation. Carbachol treatment induced activation of the serine/threonine protein kinase Raf, and an inhibition of Raf blocked Erk-1/-2 activation. Ectopic expression of inhibitory small GTPase Ras, RasN17, blocked the carbachol-induced Raf activation without affecting the activation of PKCepsilon, while the inhibition of PKC blocked the Raf activation. Thus, these results suggest that carbachol-induced activation of PKCepsilon mediates Erk-1/-2 activation by a sequential activation of Ras, Raf and MAP kinase kinase.

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 is involved in tamoxifen resistance in MCF7 cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Gang; Pan, Yixia; Zhou, Can; Sun, Ruifang; Bai, Jingjing; Liu, Peijun; Ren, Yu; He, Jianjun

    2015-11-01

    Tamoxifen resistance is a major clinical problem for ER-positive breast cancer, but the underlying mechanism is not completely elucidated. In the present study, we reported that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase 1 (MKP-1), a member of the family of MKPs, is involved in tamoxifen resistance. We found that MKP1 expression increased in tamoxifen resistant MCF7 cells. To explore the possible role of MKP1 in tamoxifen resistance, siRNA targeting MKP1 was transfected into tamoxifen resistant MCF7 cells. To our surprise, knockdown of MKP-1 promoted cell death induced by tamoxifen. On the other hand, the MKP1 overexpressed MCF7 cell clone was established and MKP1 overexpression effectively attenuated MCF7 cell death induced by tamoxifen. In addition, we revealed that MKP1 inhibited tamoxifen‑mediated JNK activation in tamoxifen resistant MCF7 and MCF7 cells, and by this mechanism MKP1 was able to inhibit tamoxifen-induced cell death. We also showed that combined appliaction of MKP1 inhibitor triptolide and tamoxifen can effectively increase tamoxifen sensitivity in tamoxifen resistant MCF7 cells. Collectively, our results indicated that MKP-1 can attenuate tamoxifen-induced cell death through inhibiting the JNK signal pathway, which represents a novel mechanism of tamoxifen resistance in MCF7 cells.

  15. The p38/RK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway regulates interleukin-6 synthesis response to tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Beyaert, R; Cuenda, A; Vanden Berghe, W; Plaisance, S; Lee, J C; Haegeman, G; Cohen, P; Fiers, W

    1996-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a pleiotropic cytokine, the activities of which include effects on gene expression, cell growth and cell death. The biological signalling mechanisms which are responsible for these TNF effects remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the stress-responsive p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is involved in TNF-induced cytokine expression. TNF Treatment of cell activated the p38 MAP kinase pathway, as revealed by increased phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase itself, activation of the substrate protein MAPKAP kinase-2, and culminating in the phosphorylation of the heat shock protein 27 (hsp27). Pretreatment of cells with the highly specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 completely blocked this TNF-induced activation of MAPKAP kinase-2 and hsp27 phosphorylation. Under the same conditions, SB203580 also completely inhibited TNF-induced synthesis of interleukin (IL)-6 and expression of a reporter gene that was driven by a minimal promoter containing two NF-Kappa B elements. However, neither TNF-induced DNA binding of TNF-Kappa B nor TNF-induced phosphorylation of its subunits was modulated by SB203580, suggesting that NF-Kappa B is not a direct target for the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Interestingly, TNF-induced cytotoxicity was not affected by SB203580, indicating that p38 MAP kinase might be an interesting target to interfere selectively with TNF-induced gene activation. Images PMID:8617238

  16. Adult-onset hyperthyroidism impairs spatial learning: possible involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Bitiktaş, Soner; Kandemir, Başak; Tan, Burak; Kavraal, Şehrazat; Liman, Narin; Dursun, Nurcan; Dönmez-Altuntaş, Hamiyet; Aksan-Kurnaz, Işil; Suer, Cem

    2016-08-01

    Given evidence that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation is part of the nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones, we investigated the possible consequences of hyperthyroidism for the cognitive functioning of adult rats. Young adult rats were treated with L-thyroxine or saline. Twenty rats in each group were exposed to Morris water maze testing, measuring their performance in a hidden-platform spatial task. In a separate set of rats not exposed to Morris water maze testing (untrained rats), the expression and phosphorylated levels of p38-MAPK and of its two downstream effectors, Elk-1 and cAMP response element-binding protein, were evaluated using quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Rats with hyperthyroidism showed delayed acquisition of learning compared with their wild-type counterparts, as shown by increased escape latencies and distance moved on the last two trials of daily training in the water maze. The hyperthyroid rats, however, showed no difference during probe trials. Western blot analyses of the hippocampus showed that hyperthyroidism increased phosphorylated p38-MAPK levels in untrained rats. Although our study is correlative in nature and does not exclude the contribution of other molecular targets, our findings suggest that the observed impairments in acquisition during actual learning in rats with hyperthyroidism may result from the increased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK. PMID:27258653

  17. A vaccine carrier derived from Neisseria meningitidis with mitogenic activity for lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, M A; Friedman, A; Oliff, A I; Tai, J; Martinez, D; Deck, R R; Shieh, J T; Jenkins, T D; Donnelly, J J; Hawe, L A

    1992-01-01

    Protein carriers vary in their ability to increase the immunogenicity of poorly immunogenic or T-lymphocyte-independent antigens. We examined one such carrier, the outer membrane protein complex derived from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain B11, in an attempt to determine why this outer membrane protein complex was more immunogenic in young infants and in relevant animal models than two other carriers used in conjugates made with Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide, a T-cell-independent antigen. A single protein of the outer membrane protein complex, the class 2 porin protein, was purified and shown to function as a T-helper lymphocyte carrier protein. Unexpectedly, it was also found to have mitogenic activity for lymphocytes that was not due to lipopolysaccharide. This mitogenic activity appears to date to be unique to this carrier protein of the carrier proteins tested and may contribute to the ability of the H. influenzae type b conjugate vaccine made with the outer membrane protein complex to generate IgG anti-polysaccharide antibody responses in mice and infant monkeys and protective immune responses in infants less than 6 months of age. Images PMID:1533934

  18. Functional analysis of oxidative stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in plants

    PubMed Central

    Kovtun, Yelena; Chiu, Wan-Ling; Tena, Guillaume; Sheen, Jen

    2000-01-01

    Despite the recognition of H2O2 as a central signaling molecule in stress and wounding responses, pathogen defense, and regulation of cell cycle and cell death, little is known about how the H2O2 signal is perceived and transduced in plant cells. We report here that H2O2 is a potent activator of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in Arabidopsis leaf cells. Using epitope tagging and a protoplast transient expression assay, we show that H2O2 can activate a specific Arabidopsis mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase, ANP1, which initiates a phosphorylation cascade involving two stress MAPKs, AtMPK3 and AtMPK6. Constitutively active ANP1 mimics the H2O2 effect and initiates the MAPK cascade that induces specific stress-responsive genes, but it blocks the action of auxin, a plant mitogen and growth hormone. The latter observation provides a molecular link between oxidative stress and auxin signal transduction. Finally, we show that transgenic tobacco plants that express a constitutively active tobacco ANP1 orthologue, NPK1, display enhanced tolerance to multiple environmental stress conditions without activating previously described drought, cold, and abscisic acid signaling pathways. Thus, manipulation of key regulators of an oxidative stress signaling pathway, such as ANP1/NPK1, provides a strategy for engineering multiple stress tolerance that may greatly benefit agriculture. PMID:10717008

  19. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1 Is a Direct Substrate of MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE6 and Regulates Immunity1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sining; Yang, Fan; Li, Lin; Chen, Huamin; Chen, She; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) are recognized by plant pattern recognition receptors to activate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as other cytoplasmic kinases, integrate upstream immune signals and, in turn, dissect PTI signaling via different substrates to regulate defense responses. However, only a few direct substrates of these signaling kinases have been identified. Here, we show that PAMP perception enhances phosphorylation of BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1 (BES1), a transcription factor involved in brassinosteroid (BR) signaling pathway, through pathogen-induced MAPKs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). BES1 interacts with MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE6 (MPK6) and is phosphorylated by MPK6. bes1 loss-of-function mutants display compromised resistance to bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. BES1 S286A/S137A double mutation (BES1SSAA) impairs PAMP-induced phosphorylation and fails to restore bacterial resistance in bes1 mutant, indicating a positive role of BES1 phosphorylation in plant immunity. BES1 is phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase3 (GSK3)-like kinase BR-insensitive2 (BIN2), a negative regulator of BR signaling. BR perception inhibits BIN2 activity, allowing dephosphorylation of BES1 to regulate plant development. However, BES1SSAA does not affect BR-mediated plant growth, suggesting differential residue requirements for the modulation of BES1 phosphorylation in PTI and BR signaling. Our study identifies BES1 as a unique direct substrate of MPK6 in PTI signaling. This finding reveals MAPK-mediated BES1 phosphorylation as another BES1 modulation mechanism in plant cell signaling, in addition to GSK3-like kinase-mediated BES1 phosphorylation and F box protein-mediated BES1 degradation. PMID:25609555

  20. Bacterial AvrRpt2-Like Cysteine Proteases Block Activation of the Arabidopsis Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, MPK4 and MPK111[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Jiang, Xiyuan; Elmore, James Mitch; Mackey, David; Shan, Libo

    2016-01-01

    To establish infection, pathogens deliver effectors into host cells to target immune signaling components, including elements of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades. The virulence function of AvrRpt2, one of the first identified Pseudomonas syringae effectors, involves cleavage of the plant defense regulator, RPM1-INTERACTING PROTEIN4 (RIN4), and interference with plant auxin signaling. We show now that AvrRpt2 specifically suppresses the flagellin-induced phosphorylation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MPK4 and MPK11 but not MPK3 or MPK6. This inhibition requires the proteolytic activity of AvrRpt2, is associated with reduced expression of some plant defense genes, and correlates with enhanced pathogen infection in AvrRpt2-expressing transgenic plants. Diverse AvrRpt2-like homologs can be found in some phytopathogens, plant-associated and soil bacteria. Employing these putative bacterial AvrRpt2 homologs and inactive AvrRpt2 variants, we can uncouple the inhibition of MPK4/MPK11 activation from the cleavage of RIN4 and related members from the so-called nitrate-induced family as well as from auxin signaling. Thus, this selective suppression of specific mitogen-activated protein kinases is independent of the previously known AvrRpt2 targets and potentially represents a novel virulence function of AvrRpt2. PMID:27208280

  1. Roles of mitogen activated protein kinases and EGF receptor in arsenite-stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-9 production

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; Myers, Terrance Alix; Rosenberg, Martina; Chavez, Miquella; Hudson, Laurie G. . E-mail: lghudson@unm.edu

    2004-11-01

    The dermatotoxicity of arsenic is well established and epidemiological studies identify an increased incidence of keratinocytic tumors (basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma) associated with arsenic exposure. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms of arsenic-mediated skin carcinogenesis, but activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and subsequent regulation of downstream target genes may contribute to tumor promotion and progression. In this study, we investigated activation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and the stress-associated kinase p38 by arsenite in HaCat cells, a spontaneously immortalized human keratinocyte cell line. Arsenite concentrations {>=}100 {mu}M stimulate rapid activation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. However, upon extended exposure (24 h), persistent stimulation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases was detected at low micromolar concentrations of arsenite. Although ERK and p38 were activated with similar time and concentration dependence, the mechanism of activation differed for these two MAP kinases. ERK activation by arsenite was fully dependent on the catalytic activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and partially dependent on Src-family kinase activity. In contrast, p38 activation was independent of EGF receptor or Src-family kinase activity. Arsenite-stimulated MAP kinase signal transduction resulted in increased production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, an AP-1 regulated gene product. MMP-9 induction by arsenite was prevented when EGF receptor or MAP kinase signaling was inhibited. These studies indicate that EGF receptor activation is a component of arsenite-mediated signal transduction and gene expression in keratinocytes and that low micromolar concentrations of arsenite stimulate key signaling pathways upon extended exposure. Stimulation of MAP kinase cascades by arsenic and subsequent regulation of genes including c-fos, c-jun, and the matrix degrading proteases may play an important

  2. Role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in Kupffer cell secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines after burn trauma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu-Lin; Xia, Zhao-Fan; Wei, Duo; Han, Sheng; Ben, Dao-Feng; Wang, Guang-Qing

    2003-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase on Kupffer cells (KCs) secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-1beta and hepatic injury following burn trauma. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups: (1) sham burn rats given vehicle, (2) sham burn rats given the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 (10mg/kg i.v., 15min and 12h after sham burn), (3) rats given a 30% total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness burn and fluid resuscitation plus vehicle, and (4) burn rats given injury and fluid resuscitation plus SB203580. Rats from each group were killed at 24h post-burn to examine plasma aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) and KCs were isolated. The KCs secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta and p38 MAP kinase activity (by Western blot analysis) were also examined. These studies showed by more significant activation of p38 MAP kinase in KCs harvested from burn rats than from shams. Burn trauma resulted in hepatic dysfunction and promoted KCs secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. SB203580 inhibited p38 MAP kinase activity, reduced KCs secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and alleviated burn-mediated hepatic dysfunction. These data suggest p38 MAP kinase activation is one important aspect of the signaling event that may mediate the KCs secretion of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta following burn trauma.

  3. Genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase genes in Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiqin; Shi, Lanping; Liu, Yanyan; Tang, Qian; Shen, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Cai, Jinsen; Yu, Huanxin; Wang, Rongzhang; Wen, Jiayu; Lin, Youquan; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Mou, Shaoliang; He, Shuilin

    2015-01-01

    The tripartite mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades have been implicated in plant growth, development, and environment adaptation, but a comprehensive understanding of MAPK signaling at genome-wide level is limited in Capsicum annuum. Herein, genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of MAPK and MAPK kinase (MAPKK) were performed in pepper. A total of 19 pepper MAPK (CaMAPKs) genes and five MAPKK (CaMAPKKs) genes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CaMAPKs and CaMAPKKs could be classified into four groups and each group contains similar exon-intron structures. However, significant divergences were also found. Notably, five members of the pepper MAPKK family were much less conserved than those found in Arabidopsis, and 9 Arabidopsis MAPKs did not have orthologs in pepper. Additionally, 7 MAPKs in Arabidopsis had either two or three orthologs in the pepper genome, and six pepper MAPKs and one MAPKK differing in sequence were found in three pepper varieties. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the majority of MAPK and MAPKK genes were ubiquitously expressed and transcriptionally modified in pepper leaves after treatments with heat, salt, and Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation as well as exogenously applied salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, ethephon, and abscisic acid. The MAPKK-MAPK interactome was tested by yeast two-hybrid assay, the results showed that one MAPKK might interact with multiple MAPKs, one MAPK might also interact with more than one MAPKKs, constituting MAPK signaling networks which may collaborate in transmitting upstream signals into appropriate downstream cellular responses and processes. These results will facilitate future functional characterization of MAPK cascades in pepper. PMID:26442088

  4. Evidence for a role of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/mitogen-activated protein kinase in the development of testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Antonuccio, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo; Nicòtina, Piero Antonio; Bitto, Alessandra; Arena, Salvatore; Polito, Francesca; Altavilla, Domenica; Turiaco, Nunzio; Cutrupi, Antonio; Zuccarello, Biagio; Squadrito, Francesco

    2005-10-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 3/MAPK1 (also known as ERK1/ERK2) plays an important role in the signal transduction pathways. To our knowledge, however, its role in the development of testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury has not yet been investigated. Therefore, we studied the pattern of MAPK3/MAPK1 activation in a experimental model of testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury. We also investigated MAPK8 to understand whether an association exists between these two MAPKs. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 1 h of testicular ischemia followed by 24 h of reperfusion or to a sham testicular ischemia-reperfusion. Animals were randomized to receive PD98059, which is an inhibitor of MAPK3/MAPK1 (10 mg/kg i.p. administered immediately after detorsion), or its vehicle. The time course of MAPK3/MAPK1, MAPK8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF; also known as TNF alpha) expression and a histological examination in both the ischemic-reperfused testis and the contralateral one were performed. In both testes, MAPK3/MAPK1 and MAPK8 expression appeared following 10 min of reperfusion and reached their highest activation after 30 min. The MAPK levels slowly decreased, and no significant expression of either kinase was observed following 2 h of reperfusion. Expression of TNF was evident after 1 h of reperfusion and reached its maximum increase after 3 h. PD98059 blunted MAPK3/MAPK1 and MAPK8, reduced TNF expression, and improved the testicular damage caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury in both testes. These data emphasize that MAPK3/MAPK1 has a role in testicular damage and that its blockade might have a future therapeutic role for the management of patients with unilateral testicular torsion.

  5. Genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase genes in Capsicum annuum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqin; Shi, Lanping; Liu, Yanyan; Tang, Qian; Shen, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Cai, Jinsen; Yu, Huanxin; Wang, Rongzhang; Wen, Jiayu; Lin, Youquan; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Mou, Shaoliang; He, Shuilin

    2015-01-01

    The tripartite mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades have been implicated in plant growth, development, and environment adaptation, but a comprehensive understanding of MAPK signaling at genome-wide level is limited in Capsicum annuum. Herein, genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of MAPK and MAPK kinase (MAPKK) were performed in pepper. A total of 19 pepper MAPK (CaMAPKs) genes and five MAPKK (CaMAPKKs) genes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CaMAPKs and CaMAPKKs could be classified into four groups and each group contains similar exon-intron structures. However, significant divergences were also found. Notably, five members of the pepper MAPKK family were much less conserved than those found in Arabidopsis, and 9 Arabidopsis MAPKs did not have orthologs in pepper. Additionally, 7 MAPKs in Arabidopsis had either two or three orthologs in the pepper genome, and six pepper MAPKs and one MAPKK differing in sequence were found in three pepper varieties. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the majority of MAPK and MAPKK genes were ubiquitously expressed and transcriptionally modified in pepper leaves after treatments with heat, salt, and Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation as well as exogenously applied salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, ethephon, and abscisic acid. The MAPKK-MAPK interactome was tested by yeast two-hybrid assay, the results showed that one MAPKK might interact with multiple MAPKs, one MAPK might also interact with more than one MAPKKs, constituting MAPK signaling networks which may collaborate in transmitting upstream signals into appropriate downstream cellular responses and processes. These results will facilitate future functional characterization of MAPK cascades in pepper. PMID:26442088

  6. Prostaglandins from Cytosolic Phospholipase A2α/Cyclooxygenase-1 Pathway and Mitogen-activated Protein Kinases Regulate Gene Expression in Candida albicans-infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bogeon; Lee, HeeJung; Jayaraja, Sabarirajan; Suram, Saritha; Murphy, Robert C; Leslie, Christina C

    2016-03-25

    In Candida albicans-infected resident peritoneal macrophages, activation of group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2(cPLA2α) by calcium- and mitogen-activated protein kinases triggers the rapid production of prostaglandins I2 and E2 through cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and regulates gene expression by increasing cAMP. InC. albicans-infected cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages, expression ofI l10,Nr4a2, and Ptgs2 was lower, and expression ofTnfα was higher, than in wild type macrophages. Expression was reconstituted with 8-bromo-cAMP, the PKA activator 6-benzoyl-cAMP, and agonists for prostaglandin receptors IP, EP2, and EP4 in infected but not uninfected cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages. InC. albicans-infected cPLA2α(+/+)macrophages, COX-2 expression was blocked by IP, EP2, and EP4 receptor antagonists, indicating a role for both prostaglandin I2 and E2 Activation of ERKs and p38, but not JNKs, by C. albicansacted synergistically with prostaglandins to induce expression of Il10,Nr4a2, and Ptgs2. Tnfα expression required activation of ERKs and p38 but was suppressed by cAMP. Results using cAMP analogues that activate PKA or Epacs suggested that cAMP regulates gene expression through PKA. However, phosphorylation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), the cAMP-regulated transcription factor involved inIl10,Nr4a2,Ptgs2, andTnfα expression, was not mediated by cAMP/PKA because it was similar inC. albicans-infected wild type and cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages. CREB phosphorylation was blocked by p38 inhibitors and induced by the p38 activator anisomycin but not by the PKA activator 6-benzoyl-cAMP. Therefore, MAPK activation inC. albicans-infected macrophages plays a dual role by promoting the cPLA2α/prostaglandin/cAMP/PKA pathway and CREB phosphorylation that coordinately regulate immediate early gene expression.

  7. The case for inhibiting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arabacilar, Pelin; Marber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This minireview discusses the evidence that the inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPKs) maybe of therapeutic value in heart failure. Most previous experimental studies, as well as past and ongoing clinical trials, have focussed on the role of p38 MAPKs in myocardial infarction and acute coronary syndromes. There is now growing evidence that these kinases are activated within the myocardium of the failing human heart and in the heart and blood vessels of animal models of heart failure. Furthermore, from a philosophical viewpoint the chronic activation of the adaptive stress pathways that lead to the activation of p38 MAPKs in heart failure is analogous to the chronic activation of the sympathetic, renin-aldosterone-angiotensin and neprilysin systems. These have provided some of the most effective therapies for heart failure. This minireview questions whether similar and synergistic advantages would follow the inhibition of p38 MAPKs.

  8. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Is Required for Regulation during Dark-Light Transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Horim

    2015-07-01

    Plant growth and development are coordinately orchestrated by environmental cues and phytohormones. Light acts as a key environmental factor for fundamental plant growth and physiology through photosensory phytochromes and underlying molecular mechanisms. Although phytochromes are known to possess serine/threonine protein kinase activities, whether they trigger a signal transduction pathway via an intracellular protein kinase network remains unknown. In analyses of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK, also called MKK) mutants, the mkk3 mutant has shown both a hypersensitive response in plant hormone gibberellin (GA) and a less sensitive response in red light signaling. Surprisingly, light-induced MAPK activation in wild-type (WT) seedlings and constitutive MAPK phosphorylation in dark-grown mkk3 mutant seedlings have also been found, respectively. Therefore, this study suggests that MKK3 acts in negative regulation in darkness and in light-induced MAPK activation during dark-light transition. PMID:26082029

  9. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Pathway: Role in Immune Evasion by Trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Soares-Silva, Mercedes; Diniz, Flavia F; Gomes, Gabriela N; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi are the causative agents of leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively, two neglected tropical diseases that affect about 25 million people worldwide. These parasites belong to the family Trypanosomatidae, and are both obligate intracellular parasites that manipulate host signaling pathways and the innate immune system to establish infection. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are serine and threonine protein kinases that are highly conserved in eukaryotes, and are involved in signal transduction pathways that modulate physiological and pathophysiological cell responses. This mini-review highlights existing knowledge concerning the mechanisms that Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi have evolved to target the host's MAPK signaling pathways and highjack the immune response, and, in this manner, promote parasite maintenance in the host. PMID:26941717

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 negatively regulates MAPK signaling in mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Koichi; Goto, Motomitsu; Onoue, Takeshi; Tsunekawa, Taku; Shibata, Miyuki; Hagimoto, Shigeru; Ito, Yoshihiro; Banno, Ryoichi; Suga, Hidetaka; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Oiso, Yutaka; Arima, Hiroshi

    2014-05-21

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) is shown to negatively regulate MAPK signaling in various peripheral tissues as well as the central nervous system such as cortex, striatum and hippocampus. In this study, we examined whether MKP-1 regulates MAPK signaling in the mouse hypothalamus. Intraperitoneal injection of TNFα significantly increased MKP-1 mRNA expression in paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in the hypothalamus. TNFα treatment induced increases in MKP-1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, accompanied by the inactivation of MAPK signaling in mouse hypothalamic explants. Inhibition of MKP-1 by its inhibitor or siRNA increased MAPK activity in the explants. Our data indicate that MKP-1 negatively regulates MAPK signaling in the mouse hypothalamus.

  11. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in signaling plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Zhang, Shuqun

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are ubiquitous signaling modules in eukaryotes. Early research of plant MAPKs has been focused on their functions in immunity and stress responses. Recent studies reveal that they also play essential roles in plant growth and development downstream of receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs). With only a limited number of MAPK components, multiple functional pathways initiated from different receptors often share the same MAPK components or even a complete MAPK cascade. In this review, we discuss how MAPK cascades function as molecular switches in response to spatiotemporal-specific ligand-receptor interactions and the availability of downstream substrates. In addition, we discuss other possible mechanisms governing the functional specificity of plant MAPK cascades, a question central to our understanding of MAPK functions.

  12. Pyrrolopyridine inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK-2).

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Vernier, William F; Mahoney, Matthew W; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Schindler, John F; Reitz, David B; Mourey, Robert J

    2007-05-31

    A new class of potent kinase inhibitors selective for mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAP-K2 or MK-2) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been prepared and evaluated. These inhibitors have IC50 values as low as 10 nM against the target and have good selectivity profiles against a number of kinases including CDK2, ERK, JNK, and p38. These MK-2 inhibitors have been shown to suppress TNFalpha production in U397 cells and to be efficacious in an acute inflammation model. The structure-activity relationships of this series, the selectivity for MK-2 and their activity in both in vitro and in vivo models are discussed. The observed selectivity is discussed with the aid of an MK-2/inhibitor crystal structure.

  13. Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zipfel, P.F.; Siebenlist, U. ); Irving, S.G.; Kelly, K. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors describe the isolation and characterization of more than 60 novel cDNA clones that constitute part of the immediate genetic response to resting human peripheral blood T cells after mitogen activation. This primary response was highly complex, both in the absolute number of inducible genes and in the diversity of regulation. Although most of the genes expressed in activated T cells were shared with the activation response of normal human fibroblasts, a significant number were more restricted in tissue specificity and thus likely encode or effect the differentiated functions of activated T cells. The activatable genes could be further differentiated on the basis of kinetics of induction, response to cycloheximide, and sensitivity to the immunosuppressive drug cylcosporin A. It is of note that cyclosporin A inhibited the expression of more than 10 inducible genes, which suggests that this drug has a broad genetic mechanism of action.

  14. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  15. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Pathway: Role in Immune Evasion by Trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Soares-Silva, Mercedes; Diniz, Flavia F.; Gomes, Gabriela N.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi are the causative agents of leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively, two neglected tropical diseases that affect about 25 million people worldwide. These parasites belong to the family Trypanosomatidae, and are both obligate intracellular parasites that manipulate host signaling pathways and the innate immune system to establish infection. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are serine and threonine protein kinases that are highly conserved in eukaryotes, and are involved in signal transduction pathways that modulate physiological and pathophysiological cell responses. This mini-review highlights existing knowledge concerning the mechanisms that Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi have evolved to target the host’s MAPK signaling pathways and highjack the immune response, and, in this manner, promote parasite maintenance in the host. PMID:26941717

  16. Sphingosine induces phospholipase D and mitogen activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Taher, M M; Abd-Elfattah, A S; Sholley, M M

    1998-12-01

    The enzymes phospholipase D and diacylglycerol kinase generate phosphatidic acid which is considered to be a mitogen. Here we report that sphingosine produced a significant amount of phosphatidic acid in vascular smooth muscle cells from the rat aorta. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59 949 partially depressed sphingosine induced phosphatidic acid formation, suggesting that activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid produced and that additional pathways such as phospholipase D may contribute to this. Further, we have shown that phosphatidylethanol was produced by sphingosine when vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated in the presence of ethanol. Finally, as previously shown for other cell types, sphingosine stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  17. Association of mitogen-activated protein kinase with the microtubule cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Reszka, A A; Seger, R; Diltz, C D; Krebs, E G; Fischer, E H

    1995-01-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical techniques, we have determined that approximately one-third of the total mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is associated with the microtubule cytoskeleton in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. This population of enzyme can be separated from the soluble form that is found distributed throughout the cytosol and is also present in the nucleus after mitogen stimulation. The microtubule-associated enzyme pool constitutes half of all detectable MAPK activity after mitogenic stimulation. These findings extend the known in vivo associations of MAPK with microtubules to include the entire microtubule cytoskeleton of proliferating cells, and they suggest that a direct association of MAPK with microtubules may be in part responsible for the observed correlations between MAPK activities and cytoskeletal alteration. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:7568036

  18. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology.

    PubMed

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  19. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase 2 Regulates the Inflammatory Response in Sepsis▿

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Timothy T.; Rodenhouse, Paul; Cai, Qing; Sun, Lei; Shanley, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis results from a dysregulation of the regulatory mechanisms of the pro- and anti-inflammatory response to invading pathogens. The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades are key signal transduction pathways involved in the cellular production of cytokines. The dual-specific phosphatase 1 (DUSP 1), mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), has been shown to be an important negative regulator of the inflammatory response by regulating the p38 and Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) MAP kinase pathways to influence pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production. MKP-2, also a dual-specific phosphatase (DUSP 4), is a phosphatase highly homologous with MKP-1 and is known to regulate MAP kinase signaling; however, its role in regulating the inflammatory response is not known. We hypothesized a regulatory role for MKP-2 in the setting of sepsis. Mice lacking the MKP-2 gene had a survival advantage over wild-type mice when challenged with intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or a polymicrobial infection via cecal ligation and puncture. The MKP-2−/− mice also exhibited decreased serum levels of both pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) following endotoxin challenge. Isolated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from MKP-2−/− mice showed increased phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), decreased phosphorylation of JNK and p38, and increased induction of MKP-1 following LPS stimulation. The capacity for cytokine production increased in MKP-2−/− BMDMs following MKP-1 knockdown. These data support a mechanism by which MKP-2 targets ERK deactivation, thereby decreasing MKP-1 and thus removing the negative inhibition of MKP-1 on cytokine production. PMID:20351138

  20. Activity of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the esophageal epithelium of patients with Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Chwiesko, A; Baniukiewicz, A; Semeniuk, J; Kaczmarski, M; Wasielica-Berger, J; Milewski, R; Dabrowski, A

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE), a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease, is associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer. Mitogen-activated protein kinases may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this process. We aimed to evaluate mitogen-activated protein kinases activity in esophageal mucosa of patients with BE and find possible relationship between reflux type and BE. Twenty-four patients (mean age: 59 years) with gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and endoscopically suspected esophageal metaplasia (ESEM) were prospectively enrolled for testing by a multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring along with a Bilitec 2000. Endoscopic biopsies were taken from methylene blue-positive pit patterns (sites suggesting specialized intestinal metaplasia [SIM]), from 2 cm above the Z-line and from cardial parts of the stomach. The biopsies were analyzed for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 activity by Western blot. Seventeen ESEMs had histologically proven metaplasia: eight patients had SIM and nine had gastric-type epithelia (GE). Biliary reflux was more evident in SIM (P = 0.019) but not in GE (P = 0.019); non-biliary reflux was typical for GE (P = 0.005) but not for SIM (P = 0.04). Strong activations of ERK and p38 were found predominantly in SIM, but not in normal esophageal mucosa (NE) (P = 0.01 and P < 0.001 respectively). Strong signals for active JNK and p38 were detected in GE, but not in NE (P = 0.006 and P = 0.02 respectively). ERK activity was significantly higher than p38 activity in ESEM patients only with GE (P = 0.02). The strong activation of ERK, but not JNK is indicative of SIM. The presence of bile in gastroesophageal refluxate is predisposing to SIM, but not to GE in esophageal mucosa.

  1. Homology modeling studies of yeast Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKS): structural motifs as a basis for specificity.

    PubMed

    Smith, D L; Nilar, S H

    2010-06-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key components of cellular signal transduction. It is the objective of this communication to demonstrate that insight into protein-protein interactions in the Common Docking motif of yeast mitogen-activated protein kinases can be obtained based on homology models. Homology models for four yeast MAPKs, FUS3, KSS1, HOG1 and MPK1 were built based on the X-ray structures of active and inactive rat ERK2. The structural motifs required for the basis of specificity were rationalized based on these structures. PMID:19995338

  2. Identification and functional analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) genes in canola (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yun; Wang, Chen; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascades, consisting of three types of reversibly phosphorylated kinases (MAPKKK, MAPKK, and MAPK), are involved in important processes including plant immunity and hormone responses. The MAPKKKs comprise the largest family in the MAPK cascades, yet only a few of these genes have been associated with physiological functions, even in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Canola (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oilseed crops in China and worldwide. To explore MAPKKK functions in biotic and abiotic stress responses in canola, 66 MAPKKK genes were identified and 28 of them were cloned. Phylogenetic analysis of these canola MAPKKKs with homologous genes from representative species classified them into three groups (A–C), comprising four MAPKKKs, seven ZIKs, and 17 Raf genes. A further 15 interaction pairs between these MAPKKKs and the downstream BnaMKKs were identified through a yeast two-hybrid assay. The interactions were further validated through bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis. In addition, by quantitative real-time reverse transcription–PCR, it was further observed that some of these BnaMAPKKK genes were regulated by different hormone stimuli, abiotic stresses, or fungal pathogen treatments. Interestingly, two novel BnaMAPKKK genes, BnaMAPKKK18 and BnaMAPKKK19, which could elicit hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death when transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, were successfully identified. Moreover, it was found that BnaMAPKKK19 probably mediated cell death through BnaMKK9. Overall, the present work has laid the foundation for further characterization of this important MAPKKK gene family in canola. PMID:24604738

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef binds directly to Lck and mitogen-activated protein kinase, inhibiting kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Greenway, A; Azad, A; Mills, J; McPhee, D

    1996-01-01

    It is now well established that human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) Nef contributes substantially to disease pathogenesis by augmenting virus replication and markedly perturbing T-cell function. The effect of Nef on host cell activation could be explained in part by its interaction with specific cellular proteins involved in signal transduction, including at least a member of the src family kinase, Lck, and the serine/threonine kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Recombinant Nef directly interacted with purified Lck and MAPK in coprecipitation experiments and binding assays. A proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] in Nef occurring between amino acid residues 69 to 78 is highly conserved and bears strong resemblance to a defined consensus sequence identified as an SH3 binding domain present in several proteins which can interact with the SH3 domain of various signalling and cytoskeletal proteins. Binding and coprecipitation assays with short synthetic peptides corresponding to the proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] of Nef and the SH2, SH3, or SH2 and SH3 domains of Lck revealed that the interaction between these two proteins is at least in part mediated by the proline repeat sequence of Nef and the SH3 domain of Lck. In addition to direct binding to full-length Nef, MAPK was also shown to bind the same proline repeat motif. Nef protein significantly decreased the in vitro kinase activity of Lck and MAPK. Inhibition of key members of signalling cascades, including those emanating from the T-cell receptor, by the HIV-1 Nef protein undoubtedly alters the ability of the infected T cell to respond to antigens or cytokines, facilitating HIV-1 replication and contributing to HIV-1-induced disease pathogenesis. PMID:8794306

  4. Decreased expression of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 induces liver injury via activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zibiao; Ye, Shaojun; Xiong, Yan; Wu, Lianxi; Zhang, Meng; Fan, Xiaoli; Li, Ling; Fu, Zhen; Wang, Huanglei; Chen, Mingyun; Yan, Xiaomin; Huang, Wei; Ko, Dicken Shiu-Chung; Wang, Yanfeng; Ye, Qifa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of ALDH2 in the injury of liver from brain-dead donors. Using brain-dead rabbit model and hypoxia model, levels of ALDH2 and apoptosis in tissues and cell lines were determined by Western blot, flow cytometry (FCM), and transferase (TdT)-mediated biotin-16-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assays. After the expression of ALDH2 during hypoxia had been inhibited or activated, the accumulations of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and molecules involved in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway were analyzed using ELISA kit and Western blot. The low expression of phosphorylated ALDH2 in liver was time-dependent in the brain-dead rabbit model. Immunohistochemistry showed ALDH2 was primarily located in endothelial, and the rates of cell apoptosis in the donation after brain-death (DBD) rabbit groups significantly increased with time. Following the treatment of inhibitor of ALDH2, daidzein, in combination with hypoxia for 8 h, the apoptosis rate and the levels of 4-HNE, P-JNK, and cleaved caspase-3 significantly increased in contrast to that in hypoxic HUVECs; however, they all decreased after treatment with Alda-1 and hypoxia compared with that in hypoxic HUVECs (P < 0.05). Instead, the levels of P-P38, P-ERK, P-JNK, and cleaved caspase-3 decreased and the ratio of bcl-2/bax increased with ad-ALDH2 (10(6) pfu/ml) in combination with hypoxia for 8 h, which significantly alleviated in contrast to that in hypoxic HUVECs. We found low expression of ALDH2 and high rates of apoptosis in the livers of brain-dead donor rabbits. Furthermore, decreased ALDH2 led to apoptosis in HUVECs through MAPK pathway.

  5. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by oxidative and bacterial stress in an amphibian cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Carter, Lisa A; Tabor, Maija B; Bonner, James C; Bonner, Lisa A

    2002-07-01

    The decline of many amphibian species could be caused by their susceptibility to environmental pollutants that cause cellular stress and cell death. A variety of intracellular signal transduction pathways are activated by environmental stress factors, which result in cell death. Mitogen-activated protein kinases are intracellular signaling molecules that include the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK-1 and ERK-2). We used cultured (italic)Xenopus(/italic) tadpole cells (XTC-2 cells) to investigate the activation of ERK by oxidative or bacterial stress, two environmental factors that could contribute to pollution in aquatic systems. We exposed XTC-2 cell monolayers to hydrogen peroxide or bacterial lipopolysaccharide and measured ERK activation by Western blotting using antibodies raised against phosphorylated ERK-1 and ERK-2. Only ERK-2 was detected in XTC-2 cells. Both hydrogen peroxide and lipopolysaccharide caused ERK-2 phosphorylation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hydrogen peroxide caused a 20- to 30-fold increase in ERK-2 activation that peaked 30 min after treatment, and lipopolysaccharide induced a 5- to 10-fold increase in ERK-2 activation that peaked 60 min after treatment. PD98059, an inhibitor of the ERK pathway, reduced the cytotoxic response of XTC-2 cells to hydrogen peroxide or lipopolysaccharide. These data suggest that ERK-2 is an intracellular target of oxidative and bacterial stress in amphibians that mediates, at least in part, the cytotoxic response to hydrogen peroxide or lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, the (italic)Xenopus(/italic) (XTC-2) cell culture system could serve as a useful model to identify agents that might threaten amphibian populations and human health.

  6. The AngFus3 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Controls Hyphal Differentiation and Secondary Metabolism in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Priegnitz, Bert-Ewald; Brandt, Ulrike; Pahirulzaman, Khomaizon A. K.; Dickschat, Jeroen S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation to a changing environment is essential for the survival and propagation of sessile organisms, such as plants or fungi. Filamentous fungi commonly respond to a worsening of their growth conditions by differentiation of asexually or sexually produced spores. The formation of these specialized cell types is, however, also triggered as part of the general life cycle by hyphal age or density. Spores typically serve for dispersal and, therefore, translocation but can also act as resting states to endure times of scarcity. Eukaryotic differentiation in response to environmental and self-derived signals is commonly mediated by three-tiered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades. Here, we report that the MAP kinase Fus3 of the black mold Aspergillus niger (AngFus3) and its upstream kinase AngSte7 control vegetative spore formation and secondary metabolism. Mutants lacking these kinases are defective in conidium induction in response to hyphal density but are fully competent in starvation-induced sporulation, indicating that conidiation in A. niger is triggered by various independent signals. In addition, the mutants exhibit an altered profile of volatile metabolites and secrete dark pigments into the growth medium, suggesting a dysregulation of the secondary metabolism. By assigning the AngFus3 MAP kinase pathway to the transduction of a potentially self-derived trigger, this work contributes to the unraveling of the intricate signaling networks controlling fungal differentiation. Moreover, our data further support earlier observations that differentiation and secondary metabolism are tightly linked in filamentous fungi. PMID:25888553

  7. Brominated Flame Retardants, Tetrabromobisphenol A and Hexabromocyclododecane, Activate Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) in Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cato, Anita; Celada, Lindsay; Kibakaya, Esther Caroline; Simmons, Nadia; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    NK cells provide a vital surveillance against virally infected cells, tumor cells, and antibody-coated cells through the release of cytolytic mediators and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant used primarily in expanded (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams for thermal insulation in the building and construction industry. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is used both as a reactive and an additive flame retardant in a variety of materials. HBCD and TBBPA contaminate the environment and are found in human blood samples. In previous studies, we have shown that other environmental contaminants, such as the dibutyltin (DBT) and tributyltin (TBT), decrease NK lytic function by activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the NK cells. HBCD and TBBPA also interfere with NK cell(s) lytic function. The current study evaluates whether HBCD and/or TBBPA have the capacity to activate MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks). The effects of concentrations of HBCD and TBBPA that inhibited lytic function on the phosphorylation state and total levels of the MAPKs (p44/42, p38, and JNK) and the phosphorylation and total levels of the MAP2Ks (MEK1/2 and MKK3/6) were examined. Results indicate that exposure of human NK cells to 10-0.5 µM HBCD or TBBPA activate MAPKs and MAP2Ks. This HBCD and TBBPA-induced activation of MAPKs may leave them unavailable for activation by virally infected or tumor target cells and thus contributes to the observed decreases in lytic function seen in NK cells exposed to HBCD and TBBPA. PMID:25341744

  8. Differential activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in response to basic fibroblast growth factor in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J S; Wenderoth, M P; Hauschka, S D; Krebs, E G

    1995-01-01

    In the MM14 mouse myoblast cell line, fibroblast growth factor (FGF) stimulates proliferation and represses differentiation. However, the intracellular signaling pathways used by FGF to affect these cellular processes are unknown. The predominant FGF receptor present on MM14 cells, FGFR1, is a receptor tyrosine kinase capable of activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade in fibroblast and neuronal cell lines. To determine whether the FGF signal is mediated via the MAPK cascade in myoblasts, MM14 cells were stimulated with basic FGF (bFGF) and activities of the various kinases were measured. After withdrawal from serum and bFGF for 3 hr, bFGF stimulated MAPK kinase (MAPKK) activity, but MAPK and S6 peptide kinase activities were not detected. In contrast, when serum and bFGF were withdrawn for 10 hr, the activities of MAPKK, MAPK, and S6 peptide kinase were all stimulated by bFGF treatment. The inability of bFGF to stimulate MAPK after 3 hr of withdrawal may be due, in part, to the presence of a MAPK phosphatase activity that was detected in MM14 cell extracts. This dephosphorylating activity diminishes during commitment to terminal differentiation and is inhibited by sodium orthovanadate. Thus, the ability of bFGF to stimulate MAPK in MM14 cells is correlated with the loss of a MAPK phosphatase activity. These results show that although bFGF activates MAPKK in proliferating myoblasts, the mitogenic signal does not progress to the downstream kinases, providing a physiological example of an uncoupling of the MAPK cascade. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7846069

  9. Mitogen-activated protein kinase is required for the behavioural desensitization that occurs after repeated injections of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Vento, Peter J; Daniels, Derek

    2012-12-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acts on central angiotensin type 1 (AT(1)) receptors to increase water and saline intake. Prolonged exposure to Ang II in cell culture models results in a desensitization of the AT(1) receptor that is thought to involve receptor internalization, and a behavioural correlate of this desensitization has been shown in rats after repeated central injections of Ang II. Specifically, rats given repeated injections of Ang II drink less water than control animals after a subsequent test injection of Ang II. In the same conditions, however, repeated injections of Ang II have no effect on Ang II-induced saline intake. Given earlier studies indicating that separate intracellular signalling pathways mediate Ang II-induced water and saline intake, we hypothesized that the desensitization observed in rats may be incomplete, leaving the receptor able to activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (ERK1/2), which play a role in Ang II-induced saline intake without affecting water intake. In support of this hypothesis, we found no difference in MAP kinase phosphorylation after an Ang II test injection in rats given prior treatment with repeated injections of vehicle, Ang II or Sar(1),Ile(4),Ile(8)-Ang II (SII), an Ang II analogue that activates MAP kinase without G protein coupling. In addition, we found that pretreatment with the MAP kinase inhibitor U0126 completely blocked the desensitizing effect of repeated Ang II injections on water intake. Furthermore, Ang II-induced water intake was reduced to a similar extent by repeated injections of Ang II or SII. The results suggest that G protein-independent signalling is sufficient to produce behavioural desensitization of the angiotensin system and that the desensitization requires MAP kinase activation.

  10. Identification and functional analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) genes in canola (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Sun, Yun; Wang, Chen; Yang, Bo; Wu, Feifei; Hao, Xueyu; Liang, Wanwan; Niu, Fangfang; Yan, Jingli; Zhang, Hanfeng; Wang, Boya; Deyholos, Michael K; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascades, consisting of three types of reversibly phosphorylated kinases (MAPKKK, MAPKK, and MAPK), are involved in important processes including plant immunity and hormone responses. The MAPKKKs comprise the largest family in the MAPK cascades, yet only a few of these genes have been associated with physiological functions, even in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Canola (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oilseed crops in China and worldwide. To explore MAPKKK functions in biotic and abiotic stress responses in canola, 66 MAPKKK genes were identified and 28 of them were cloned. Phylogenetic analysis of these canola MAPKKKs with homologous genes from representative species classified them into three groups (A-C), comprising four MAPKKKs, seven ZIKs, and 17 Raf genes. A further 15 interaction pairs between these MAPKKKs and the downstream BnaMKKs were identified through a yeast two-hybrid assay. The interactions were further validated through bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis. In addition, by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR, it was further observed that some of these BnaMAPKKK genes were regulated by different hormone stimuli, abiotic stresses, or fungal pathogen treatments. Interestingly, two novel BnaMAPKKK genes, BnaMAPKKK18 and BnaMAPKKK19, which could elicit hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death when transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, were successfully identified. Moreover, it was found that BnaMAPKKK19 probably mediated cell death through BnaMKK9. Overall, the present work has laid the foundation for further characterization of this important MAPKKK gene family in canola. PMID:24604738

  11. Modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) activity in response to different immune stimuli in haemocytes of the common periwinkle Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, Nadya V; Gorbushin, Alexander M; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-09-01

    The modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in haemocytes of the common periwinkle (Littorina littorea) in response to immune challenges by lipopolysaccharide from Echerichia coli (LPS), mannan from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and secretory-excretory products (SEP) of trematodes Himasthla elongata (Echinostomatidae) or after the treatment with phorbol ester (PMA) has been studied by Western blotting using affinity purified rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Exposure of the cells in suspension to PMA, LPS and mannan triggered an activation of p38 and ERK2. The JNK-mediated cascade was modulated differently by the elicitors examined. PMA treatment caused a transient activation of the JNK54 isoform, LPS exposure resulted in a decrease in activity of JNK46, and mannan had no effect on JNK phosphorylation status. Incubation of periwinkle haemocytes in culture medium containing trematode SEP did not affect the activity of any MAPK. PMID:16533608

  12. A sensitive flow cytometry-based nucleotide excision repair assay unexpectedly reveals that mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling does not regulate the removal of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Raphael; Auclair, Yannick; Loignon, Martin; Affar, El Bachir; Drobetsky, Elliot A

    2008-02-29

    In response to diverse genotoxic stimuli (e.g. UV and cisplatin), the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and p38alpha/beta become rapidly phosphorylated and in turn activate multiple downstream effectors that modulate apoptosis and/or growth arrest. Furthermore, previous lines of evidence have strongly suggested that ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 participate in global-genomic nucleotide excision repair, a critical antineoplastic pathway that removes helix-distorting DNA adducts induced by a variety of mutagenic agents, including UV. To rigorously evaluate the potential role of mitogen-activated protein kinases in global-genomic nucleotide excision repair, various human cell strains (primary skin fibroblasts, primary lung fibroblasts, and HCT116 colon carcinoma cells) were treated with highly specific chemical inhibitors, which, following UV exposure, (i) abrogated the capacities of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, or p38alpha/beta to phosphorylate specific downstream effectors and (ii) characteristically modulated cellular proliferation, clonogenic survival, and/or apoptosis. A highly sensitive flow cytometry-based nucleotide excision repair assay recently optimized and validated in our laboratory was then employed to directly demonstrate that the kinetics of UV DNA photoadduct repair are highly similar in mock-treated versus mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor-treated cells. These data on primary and tumor cells treated with pharmacological inhibitors were fully corroborated by repair studies using (i) short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of ERK1/2 or JNK1/2 in human U2OS osteosarcoma cells and (ii) expression of a dominant negative p38alpha mutant in human primary lung fibroblasts. Our results provide solid evidence for the first time, in disaccord with a burgeoning perception, that mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling does not influence the efficiency of human global-genomic nucleotide excision repair.

  13. 4-Anilino-6-phenyl-quinoline inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2).

    PubMed

    Olsson, Henric; Sjö, Peter; Ersoy, Oguz; Kristoffersson, Anna; Larsson, Joakim; Nordén, Bo

    2010-08-15

    A class of inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated kinase 2 (MK2) was discovered via high-throughput screening. This compound class demonstrates activity against the enzyme with sub-microM IC(50) values, and suppresses LPS-induced TNFalpha levels in THP-1 cells. MK2 inhibition kinetic measurements indicated mixed binding approaching non-ATP competitive inhibition.

  14. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase plays a key role in regulating MAPKAPK2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Tatsuhiko . E-mail: sudo@riken.jp; Kawai, Kayoko; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2005-11-18

    One of three major families of the mitogen-activated kinases (MAPK), p38 as well as JNK, has been shown to transduce extracellular stress stimuli into cellular responses by phospho-relay cascades. Among p38 families, p38{alpha} is a widely characterized isoform and the biological phenomena are explained by its kinase activity regulating functions of its downstream substrates. However, its specific contributions to each phenomenon are yet not fully elucidated. For better understanding of the role of MAPKs, especially p38{alpha}, we utilized newly established mouse fibroblast cell lines originated from a p38{alpha} null mouse, namely, a parental cell line without p38{alpha} gene locus, knockout of p38{alpha} (KOP), Zeosin-resistant (ZKOP), revertant of p38{alpha} (RKOP), and Exip revertant (EKOP). EKOP is smaller in size but grows faster than the others. Although comparable amounts of ERK and JNK are expressed in each cell line, ERK is highly phosphorylated in EKOP even in normal culture conditions. Serum stimulation after serum starvation led to ERK phosphorylation in RKOP and ZKOP, but not in EKOP as much. On the contrary, relative phosphorylation level of JNK to total JNK in response to UV was low in RKOP. And its phosphorylation as well as total JNK is slightly lower in EKOP. RKOP is less sensitive to UV irradiation as judged by the survival rate. Stress response upon UV or sorbitol stimuli, leading to mitogen activate protein kinase activated kinase 2 (MAPKAPK2) phosphorylation, was only observed in RKOP. Further experiments reveal that MAPKAPK2 expression is largely suppressed in ZKOP and EKOP. Its expression was recovered by re-introduction of p38{alpha}. The loss of MAPKAPK2 expression accompanied by the defect of p38{alpha} is confirmed in an embryonic extract prepared from p38{alpha} null mice. These data demonstrate that p38 signal pathway is regulated not only by phosphorylation but also by modulation of the expression of its component. Together, we have

  15. Association of mitogen-activated protein kinases with microtubules in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Taxol, a microtubule-binding diterpene, mimics many effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on mouse macrophages. The LPS-mimetic effects of taxol appear to be under the same genetic control as responses to LPS itself. Thus we have postulated a role for microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) in the response of macrophages to LPS. Stimulation of macrophages by LPS quickly induces the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). MAPK are generally considered cytosolic enzymes. Herein we report that much of the LPS-activatable pool of MAPK in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages is microtubule associated. By immunofluorescence, MAPK were localized to colchicine- and nocodazole- disruptible filaments. From both mouse brain and RAW 264.7 macrophages, MAPK could be coisolated with polymerized tubulin. Fractionation of primary macrophages into cytosol-, microfilament-, microtubule-, and intermediated filament-rich extracts revealed that approximately 10% of MAPK but none of MAPK kinase (MEK1A and MEK2) was microtubule bound. Exposure of macrophages to LPS did not change the proportion of MAPK bound to microtubules, but preferentially activated the microtubule- associated pool. These findings confirm the prediction that LPS activates a kinase bound to microtubules. Together with LPS-mimetic actions of taxol and the shared genetic control of responses to LPS and taxol, these results support the hypothesis that a major LPS-signaling pathway in mouse macrophages may involve activation of one or more microtubule-associated kinases. PMID:8666946

  16. Identification, Nomenclature, and Evolutionary Relationships of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Genes in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Achal; Nepal, Madhav P.; Piya, Sarbottam; Subramanian, Senthil; Rohila, Jai S.; Reese, R. Neil; Benson, Benjamin V.

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) genes in eukaryotes regulate various developmental and physiological processes including those associated with biotic and abiotic stresses. Although MAPKs in some plant species including Arabidopsis have been identified, they are yet to be identified in soybean. Major objectives of this study were to identify GmMAPKs, assess their evolutionary relationships, and analyze their functional divergence. We identified a total of 38 MAPKs, eleven MAPKKs, and 150 MAPKKKs in soybean. Within the GmMAPK family, we also identified a new clade of six genes: four genes with TEY and two genes with TQY motifs requiring further investigation into possible legume-specific functions. The results indicated the expansion of the GmMAPK families attributable to the ancestral polyploidy events followed by chromosomal rearrangements. The GmMAPK and GmMAPKKK families were substantially larger than those in other plant species. The duplicated GmMAPK members presented complex evolutionary relationships and functional divergence when compared to their counterparts in Arabidopsis. We also highlighted existing nomenclatural issues, stressing the need for nomenclatural consistency. GmMAPK identification is vital to soybean crop improvement, and novel insights into the evolutionary relationships will enhance our understanding about plant genome evolution. PMID:24137047

  17. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway Regulates Genes during Proliferation and Differentiation in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Jeffery D.; Fulton, Debra L.; Richard, Stephane; Almazan, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) is important for oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. However, the precise cellular mechanisms by which p38 regulates OLG differentiation remain largely unknown. To determine whether p38 functions in part through transcriptional events in regulating OLG identity, we performed microarray analysis on differentiating oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) treated with a p38 inhibitor. Consistent with a role in OLG differentiation, pharmacological inhibition of p38 down-regulated the transcription of genes that are involved in myelin biogenesis, transcriptional control and cell cycle. Proliferation assays showed that OLPs treated with the p38 inhibitor retained a proliferative capacity which could be induced upon application of mitogens demonstrating that after two days of p38-inhibition OLGs remained poised to continue mitosis. Together, our results suggest that the p38 pathway regulates gene transcription which can coordinate OLG differentiation. Our microarray dataset will provide a useful resource for future studies investigating the molecular mechanisms by which p38 regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. PMID:26714323

  18. Activation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Promotes Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Miguel, Anitza San; Puertollano, Rosa

    2006-01-01

    Endocytic trafficking plays an important role in the regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). To address if cellular kinases regulate EGFR internalization, we used anisomycin, a potent activator of kinase cascades in mammalian cells, especially the stress-activated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase subtypes. Here, we report that activation of p38 MAP kinase by anisomycin is sufficient to induce internalization of EGFR. Anisomycin and EGF employ different mechanisms to promote EGFR endocytosis as anisomycin-induced internalization does not require tyrosine kinase activity or ubiquitination of the receptor. In addition, anisomycin treatment did not result in delivery and degradation of EGFR at lysosomes. Incubation with a specific inhibitor of p38, or depletion of endogenous p38 by small interfering RNAs, abolished anisomycin-induced internalization of EGFR while having no effect on transferrin endocytosis, indicating that the effect of p38 activation on EGFR endocytosis is specific. Interestingly, inhibition of p38 activation also abolished endocytosis of EGFR induced by UV radiation. Our results reveal a novel role for p38 in the regulation of EGFR endocytosis and suggest that stimulation of EGFR internalization by p38 might represent a general mechanism to prevent generation of proliferative or anti-apoptotic signals under stress conditions. PMID:16683917

  19. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-06-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets.

  20. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase 1 Protects against Nickel-induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mongan, Maureen; Tan, Zongqing; Chen, Liang; Peng, Zhimin; Dietsch, Maggie; Su, Bing; Leikauf, George; Xia, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Nickel compounds are environmental and occupational hazards that pose serious health problems and are causative factors of acute lung injury. The c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are regulated through a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) 3 kinase-MAP2 kinase cascade and have been implicated in nickel toxicity. In this study, we used genetically modified cells and mice to investigate the involvement of two upstream MAP3Ks, MAP3K1 and 2, in nickel-induced JNK activation and acute lung injury. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts, levels of JNK activation and cytotoxicity induced by nickel were similar in the Map3k2-null and wild-type cells but were much lower in the Map3k1/Map3k2 double-null cells. Conversely, the levels of JNK activation and cytotoxicity were unexpectedly much higher in the Map3k1-null cells. In adult mouse tissue, MAP3K1 was widely distributed but was abundantly expressed in the bronchiole epithelium of the lung. Accordingly, MAP3K1 ablation in mice resulted in severe nickel-induced acute lung injury and reduced survival. Based on these findings, we propose a role for MAP3K1 in reducing JNK activation and protecting the mice from nickel-induced acute lung injury. PMID:18467339

  1. Trichoderma mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling is involved in induction of plant systemic resistance.

    PubMed

    Viterbo, Ada; Harel, Michal; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Chet, Ilan; Mukherjee, Prasun K

    2005-10-01

    The role of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) TmkA in inducing systemic resistance in cucumber against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. lacrymans was investigated by using tmkA loss-of-function mutants of Trichoderma virens. In an assay where Trichoderma spores were germinated in proximity to cucumber roots, the mutants were able to colonize the plant roots as effectively as the wild-type strain but failed to induce full systemic resistance against the leaf pathogen. Interactions with the plant roots enhanced the level of tmkA transcript in T. virens and its homologue in Trichoderma asperellum. At the protein level, we could detect the activation of two forms reacting to the phospho-p44/42 MAPK antibody. Biocontrol experiments demonstrated that the tmkA mutants retain their biocontrol potential against Rhizoctonia solani in soil but are not effective against Sclerotium rolfsii in reducing disease incidence. Our results show that, unlike in many plant-pathogen interactions, Trichoderma TmkA MAPK is not involved in limited root colonization. Trichoderma, however, needs MAPK signaling in order to induce full systemic resistance in the plant.

  2. Abscisic Acid Induces Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation in Barley Aleurone Protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Knetsch, MLW.; Wang, M.; Snaar-Jagalska, B. E.; Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.

    1996-06-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) induces a rapid and transient mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in barley aleurone protoplasts. MAP kinase activity, measured as myelin basic protein phosphorylation by MAP kinase immunoprecipitates, increased after 1 min, peaked after 3 min, and decreased to basal levels after ~5 min of ABA treatment in vivo. Antibodies recognizing phosphorylated tyrosine residues precipitate with myelin basic protein kinase activity that has identical ABA activation characteristics and demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of MAP kinase occurs during activation. The half-maximal concentration of ABA required for MAP kinase activation, 3 x 10-7 M, is very similar to that required for ABA-induced rab16 gene expression. The tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor phenylarsine oxide can completely block ABA-induced MAP kinase activation and rab16 gene expression. These results lead us to conclude that ABA activates MAP kinase via a tyrosine phosphatase and that these steps are a prerequisite for ABA induction of rab16 gene expression.

  3. A conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway is required for mating in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangye; Chen, Jing; Lane, Shelley; Liu, Haoping

    2002-12-01

    Candida albicans had been thought to lack a mating process until the recent discovery of a mating type-like locus and mating between MTLa and MTL(alpha) strains. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms that regulate mating in C. albicans, we examined the function of Cph1 and its upstream mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway in mating, as they are homologues of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that overexpressing CPH1 in MTLa, but not in MTLa/alpha strains, induced the transcription of orthologues of S. cerevisiae pheromone-induced genes and also increased mating efficiency. Furthermore, cph1 and hst7 mutants were completely defective in mating, and cst20 and cek1 mutants showed reduced mating efficiency, as in S. cerevisiae. The partial mating defect in cek1 results from the presence of a functionally redundant MAP kinase, Cek2. CEK2 complemented the mating defect of a fus3 kss1 mutant of S. cerevisiae and was expressed only in MTLa or MTL(alpha), but not in MTLa/alpha cell types. Moreover, a cek1 cek2 double mutant was completely defective in mating. Our data suggest that the conserved MAP kinase pathway regulates mating in C. albicans. We also observed that C. albicans mating efficiency was greatly affected by medium composition, indicating the potential involvement of nutrient-sensing pathways in mating in addition to the MAP kinase pathway. PMID:12453219

  4. Crosstalk between mitogen-activated protein kinases and mitochondria in cardiac diseases: therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Agostini, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases cause more mortality and morbidity worldwide than any other diseases. Although many intracellular signaling pathways influence cardiac physiology and pathology, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family has garnered significant attention because of its vast implications in signaling and cross-talk with other signaling networks. The extensively studied MAPKs ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and ERK5, demonstrate unique intracellular signaling mechanisms, responding to a myriad of mitogens and stressors and influencing the signaling of cardiac development, metabolism, performance, and pathogenesis. Definitive relationships between MAPK signaling and cardiac dysfunction remain elusive, despite 30 years of extensive clinical studies and basic research of various animal/cell models, severities of stress, and types of stimuli. Still, several studies have proven the importance of MAPK cross-talk with mitochondria, powerhouses of the cell that provide over 80% of ATP for normal cardiomyocyte function and play a crucial role in cell death. Although many questions remain unanswered, there exists enough evidence to consider the possibility of targeting MAPK-mitochondria interactions in the prevention and treatment of heart disease. The goal of this review is to integrate previous studies into a discussion of MAPKs and MAPK-mitochondria signaling in cardiac diseases, such as myocardial infarction (ischemia), hypertrophy and heart failure. A comprehensive understanding of relevant molecular mechanisms, as well as challenges for studies in this area, will facilitate the development of new pharmacological agents and genetic manipulations for therapy of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24924700

  5. Heat Shock Factor 1 Is a Substrate for p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dayalan Naidu, Sharadha; Sutherland, Calum; Zhang, Ying; Risco, Ana; de la Vega, Laureano; Caunt, Christopher J.; Hastie, C. James; Lamont, Douglas J.; Torrente, Laura; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Benjamin, Ivor J.; Keyse, Stephen M.; Cuenda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) monitors the structural integrity of the proteome. Phosphorylation at S326 is a hallmark for HSF1 activation, but the identity of the kinase(s) phosphorylating this site has remained elusive. We show here that the dietary agent phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) inhibits heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), the main negative regulator of HSF1; activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); and increases S326 phosphorylation, trimerization, and nuclear translocation of HSF1, and the transcription of a luciferase reporter, as well as the endogenous prototypic HSF1 target Hsp70. In vitro, all members of the p38 MAPK family rapidly and stoichiometrically catalyze the S326 phosphorylation. The use of stable knockdown cell lines and inhibitors indicated that among the p38 MAPKs, p38γ is the principal isoform responsible for the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S326 in cells. A protease-mass spectrometry approach confirmed S326 phosphorylation and unexpectedly revealed that p38 MAPK also catalyzes the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S303/307, previously known repressive posttranslational modifications. Thus, we have identified p38 MAPKs as highly efficient catalysts for the phosphorylation of HSF1. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the magnitude and persistence of activation of p38 MAPK are important determinants of the extent and duration of the heat shock response. PMID:27354066

  6. Abscisic Acid Induces Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation in Barley Aleurone Protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Knetsch, MLW.; Wang, M.; Snaar-Jagalska, B. E.; Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.

    1996-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) induces a rapid and transient mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in barley aleurone protoplasts. MAP kinase activity, measured as myelin basic protein phosphorylation by MAP kinase immunoprecipitates, increased after 1 min, peaked after 3 min, and decreased to basal levels after ~5 min of ABA treatment in vivo. Antibodies recognizing phosphorylated tyrosine residues precipitate with myelin basic protein kinase activity that has identical ABA activation characteristics and demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of MAP kinase occurs during activation. The half-maximal concentration of ABA required for MAP kinase activation, 3 x 10-7 M, is very similar to that required for ABA-induced rab16 gene expression. The tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor phenylarsine oxide can completely block ABA-induced MAP kinase activation and rab16 gene expression. These results lead us to conclude that ABA activates MAP kinase via a tyrosine phosphatase and that these steps are a prerequisite for ABA induction of rab16 gene expression. PMID:12239411

  7. Crosstalk between mitogen-activated protein kinases and mitochondria in cardiac diseases: therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Agostini, Bryan

    2014-11-01

    Cardiovascular diseases cause more mortality and morbidity worldwide than any other diseases. Although many intracellular signaling pathways influence cardiac physiology and pathology, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family has garnered significant attention because of its vast implications in signaling and crosstalk with other signaling networks. The extensively studied MAPKs ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and ERK5, demonstrate unique intracellular signaling mechanisms, responding to a myriad of mitogens and stressors and influencing the signaling of cardiac development, metabolism, performance, and pathogenesis. Definitive relationships between MAPK signaling and cardiac dysfunction remain elusive, despite 30 years of extensive clinical studies and basic research of various animal/cell models, severities of stress, and types of stimuli. Still, several studies have proven the importance of MAPK crosstalk with mitochondria, powerhouses of the cell that provide over 80% of ATP for normal cardiomyocyte function and play a crucial role in cell death. Although many questions remain unanswered, there exists enough evidence to consider the possibility of targeting MAPK-mitochondria interactions in the prevention and treatment of heart disease. The goal of this review is to integrate previous studies into a discussion of MAPKs and MAPK-mitochondria signaling in cardiac diseases, such as myocardial infarction (ischemia), hypertrophy and heart failure. A comprehensive understanding of relevant molecular mechanisms, as well as challenges for studies in this area, will facilitate the development of new pharmacological agents and genetic manipulations for therapy of cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-01-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets. PMID:23822503

  9. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in UV-induced signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2003-01-28

    Experimental evidence supported by epidemiological findings suggests that solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is the most important environmental carcinogen leading to the development of skin cancers. Because the ozone layer blocks UVC (wavelength, 180 to 280 nm) exposure, UVA (UVA I, 340 to 400 nm; UVA II, 320 to 340 nm) and UVB (280 to 320 nm) are probably the chief carcinogenic components of sunlight with relevance for human skin cancer. Substantial contributions to the elucidation of the specific signal transduction pathways involved in UV-induced skin carcinogenesis have been made over the past few years, and most evidence suggests that the cellular signaling response is UV wavelength-dependent. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades are targets for UV and are important in the regulation of the multitude of UV-induced cellular responses. Experimental studies have used a range of UVA, UVB, UVC, and various combinations in multiple doses, and the observed effects on activation and phosphorylation of MAPKs are varied. This review focuses on the mechanistic data supporting a role for MAPKs in UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Progress in understanding the mechanisms of UV-induced signal transduction could lead to the use of these protein kinases as specific targets for the prevention and control of skin cancer.

  10. Glucose deprivation increases tau phosphorylation via P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, Elisabetta; Praticò, Domenico

    2015-12-01

    Alterations of glucose metabolism have been observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Previous studies showed that glucose deprivation increases amyloidogenesis via a BACE-1-dependent mechanism. However, no data are available on the effect that this condition may have on tau phosphorylation. In this study, we exposed neuronal cells to a glucose-free medium and investigated the effect on tau phosphorylation. Compared with controls, cells incubated in the absence of glucose had a significant increase in tau phosphorylation at epitopes Ser202/Thr205 and Ser404, which was associated with a selective activation of the P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Pharmacological inhibition of this kinase prevented the increase in tau phosphorylation, while fluorescence studies revealed its co-localization with phosphorylated tau. The activation of P38 was secondary to the action of the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, as its down-regulation prevented it. Finally, glucose deprivation induced cell apoptosis, which was associated with a significant increase in both caspase 3 and caspase 12 active forms. Taken together, our studies reveal a new mechanism whereby glucose deprivation can modulate AD pathogenesis by influencing tau phosphorylation and suggest that this pathway may be a new therapeutic target for AD.

  11. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/1 activity during meiosis resumption in mammals

    PubMed Central

    PROCHAZKA, Radek; BLAHA, Milan

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, resumption of oocyte meiosis occurs in large ovarian follicles after the preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH). The LH surge leads to the activation of a broad signaling network in mural granulosa cells equipped with LH receptors. The signals generated in the mural granulosa cells are further augmented by locally produced peptides or steroids and transferred to the cumulus cell compartment and the oocyte itself. Over the last decade, essential progress has been made in the identification of molecular events associated with the final maturation and ovulation of mammalian oocytes. All new evidence argues for a multiple roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/1 (MAPK3/1) in the gonadotropin-induced ovulation processes. However, the knowledge of gonadotropin-induced signaling pathways leading to MAPK3/1 activation in follicular cells seems limited. To date, only the LH-induced transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor/MAPK3/1 pathway has been described in granulosa/cumulus cells even though other mechanisms of MAPK3/1 activation have been detected in other types of cells. In this review, we aimed to summarize recent advances in the elucidation of gonadotropin-induced mechanisms leading to the activation of MAPK3/1 in preovulatory follicles and cultured cumulus-oocyte complexes and to point out a specific role of this kinase in the processes accompanying final maturation of the mammalian oocyte. PMID:26688146

  12. [Art-therapy in anorexia: the mediative elements?].

    PubMed

    Jarrige, Maïtè; Calestrémé, Marie; Sudres, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Art does not have any inherent curative property; it is used as a therapeutic medium. Three mediative elements, depending on their specificities, have a role to play in the intrapsychic and interpersonal transformation of the patient: the creation the art-therapist and the group of participants. This article looks at the different components of art-therapy used in the treatment of anorexia.

  13. Activation of Raf-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase in murine macrophages partially mimics lipopolysaccharide-induced signaling events

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a highly conserved component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, stimulates macrophages to release various cytokine and eicosanoid mediators of the immune response. The mechanism by which LPS stimulates these cells is poorly characterized. One of the most rapid LPS-stimulated events is the phosphorylation and activation of the p42 and p44 isoforms of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. We wished to examine the role of MAP kinase in LPS- induced signaling in murine macrophages by activating MAP kinase independently of LPS. An expression vector encoding a Raf-1:estrogen receptor (ER) chimeric protein was transfected into the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Activation of this chimeric protein (delta Raf-1:ER) by estradiol resulted in rapid and prolonged activation of MAP kinase, as expected from previous results implicating Raf-1 as an upstream activator of this signaling cascade. LPS stimulation induced accumulation of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 messenger RNA, whereas delta Raf-1:ER activation did not, perhaps accounting for the more prolonged activation of MAP kinase seen in response to delta Raf-1:ER activation. Similarly, activation of DNA binding by the transcription factor, nuclear factor (NF) kappa B, as assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, occurred in response to LPS stimulation but not in response to delta Raf-1:ER activation or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for murine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), we found that LPS and PMA stimulation and delta Raf-1:ER activation induced secretion of TNF-alpha, although the amount of TNF-alpha secreted in response to delta Raf-1:ER activation and PMA stimulation was approximately 20-fold less than that secreted in response to LPS. Correspondingly, accumulation of TNF-alpha messenger RNA was weakly induced by delta Raf-1:ER activation or PMA stimulation, whereas strong induction was noted in

  14. Activation of Raf-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase in murine macrophages partially mimics lipopolysaccharide-induced signaling events.

    PubMed

    Hambleton, J; McMahon, M; DeFranco, A L

    1995-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a highly conserved component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, stimulates macrophages to release various cytokine and eicosanoid mediators of the immune response. The mechanism by which LPS stimulates these cells is poorly characterized. One of the most rapid LPS-stimulated events is the phosphorylation and activation of the p42 and p44 isoforms of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. We wished to examine the role of MAP kinase in LPS-induced signaling in murine macrophages by activating MAP kinase independently of LPS. An expression vector encoding a Raf-1:estrogen receptor (ER) chimeric protein was transfected into the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Activation of this chimeric protein (delta Raf-1:ER) by estradiol resulted in rapid and prolonged activation of MAP kinase, as expected from previous results implicating Raf-1 as an upstream activator of this signaling cascade. LPS stimulation induced accumulation of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 messenger RNA, whereas delta Raf-1:ER activation did not, perhaps accounting for the more prolonged activation of MAP kinase seen in response to delta Raf-1:ER activation. Similarly, activation of DNA binding by the transcription factor, nuclear factor (NF) kappa B, as assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, occurred in response to LPS stimulation but not in response to delta Raf-1:ER activation or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for murine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), we found that LPS and PMA stimulation and delta Raf-1:ER activation induced secretion of TNF-alpha, although the amount of TNF-alpha secreted in response to delta Raf-1:ER activation and PMA stimulation was approximately 20-fold less than that secreted in response to LPS. Correspondingly, accumulation of TNF-alpha messenger RNA was weakly induced by delta Raf-1:ER activation or PMA stimulation, whereas strong induction was noted in

  15. The yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase Slt2 is involved in the cellular response to genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The maintenance of genomic integrity is essential for cell viability. Complex signalling pathways (DNA integrity checkpoints) mediate the response to genotoxic stresses. Identifying new functions involved in the cellular response to DNA-damage is crucial. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SLT2 gene encodes a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade whose main function is the maintenance of the cell wall integrity. However, different observations suggest that SLT2 may also have a role related to DNA metabolism. Results This work consisted in a comprehensive study to connect the Slt2 protein to genome integrity maintenance in response to genotoxic stresses. The slt2 mutant strain was hypersensitive to a variety of genotoxic treatments, including incubation with hydroxyurea (HU), methylmetanosulfonate (MMS), phleomycin or UV irradiation. Furthermore, Slt2 was activated by all these treatments, which suggests that Slt2 plays a central role in the cellular response to genotoxic stresses. Activation of Slt2 was not dependent on the DNA integrity checkpoint. For MMS and UV, Slt2 activation required progression through the cell cycle. In contrast, HU also activated Slt2 in nocodazol-arrested cells, which suggests that Slt2 may respond to dNTP pools alterations. However, neither the protein level of the distinct ribonucleotide reductase subunits nor the dNTP pools were affected in a slt2 mutant strain. An analysis of the checkpoint function revealed that Slt2 was not required for either cell cycle arrest or the activation of the Rad53 checkpoint kinase in response to DNA damage. However, slt2 mutant cells showed an elongated bud and partially impaired Swe1 degradation after replicative stress, indicating that Slt2 could contribute, in parallel with Rad53, to bud morphogenesis control after genotoxic stresses. Conclusions Slt2 is activated by several genotoxic treatments and is required to properly cope with DNA damage. Slt2 function is important

  16. Control of thrombopoietin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Rouyez, M C; Boucheron, C; Gisselbrecht, S; Dusanter-Fourt, I; Porteu, F

    1997-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the major regulator of both growth and differentiation of megakaryocytes. We previously showed that both functions can be generated by TPO in the megakaryoblastic cell line UT7, in which murine Mpl was introduced, and are independently controlled by distinct regions of the cytoplasmic domain of Mpl. Particularly, residues 71 to 94 of this domain (deleted in the mutant mpl delta3) were found to be required for megakaryocytic maturation but dispensable for proliferation. We show here that TPO-induced differentiation in UT7 cells is tightly dependent on a strong, long-lasting activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Indeed, (i) in UT7-mpl cells, TPO induced a strong activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) which was persistent until at least 4 days in TPO-containing medium; (ii) a specific MAPK kinase (MEK) inhibitor inhibited TPO-induced megakaryocytic gene expression; (iii) the Mpl mutant mpl delta3, which displayed no maturation activity, transduced only a weak and transient ERK activation in UT7 cells; and (iv) TPO-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in UT7-mpl delta3 cells was partially restored by expression of a constitutively activated mutant of MEK. The capacity of TPO to trigger a strong and prolonged MAPK signal depended on the cell in which Mpl was introduced. In BAF3-mpl cells, TPO triggered a weak and transient ERK activation, similar to that induced in UT7-mpl delta3 cells. In these cells, no difference in MAPK activation was found between normal Mpl and mpl delta3. Thus, depending on the cellular context, several distinct regions of the cytoplasmic domain of Mpl and signaling pathways may contribute to generate quantitative variations in MAPK activation. PMID:9271377

  17. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway triggers B16 melanoma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Englaro, W; Bertolotto, C; Buscà, R; Brunet, A; Pagès, G; Ortonne, J P; Ballotti, R

    1998-04-17

    In B16 melanoma cells, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are activated during cAMP-induced melanogenesis (Englaro, W., Rezzonico, R., Durand-Clément, M., Lallemand, D., Ortonne, J. P., and Ballotti, R. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 24315-24320). To establish the role of the MAP kinases in melanogenesis, we studied the effects of a specific MAP kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD 98059 on different melanogenic parameters. We showed that PD 98059 inhibits the activation of MAP kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 by cAMP, but does not impair the effects of cAMP either on the morphological differentiation, characterized by an increase in dendrite outgrowth, or on the up-regulation of tyrosinase that is the key enzyme in melanogenesis. On the contrary, PD 98059 promotes by itself cell dendricity and increases the tyrosinase amount and activity. Moreover, down-regulation of the MAP kinase pathway by PD 98059, or with dominant negative mutants of p21(ras) and MEK, triggers a stimulation of the tyrosinase promoter activity and enhances the effect of cAMP on this parameter. Conversely, activation of the MAP kinase pathway, using constitutive active mutants of p21(ras) and MEK, leads to an inhibition of basal and cAMP-induced tyrosinase gene transcription. These results demonstrate that the MAP kinase pathway activation is not required for cAMP-induced melanogenesis. Furthermore, the inhibition of this pathway induces B16 melanoma cell differentiation, while a sustained activation impairs the melanogenic effect of cAMP-elevating agents. PMID:9545341

  18. How Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Recognize and Phosphorylate Their Targets: A QM/MM Study

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Adrian Gustavo; Hummer, Gerhard; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2009-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play an essential role in the transduction of environmental stimuli to the nucleus, thereby regulating a variety of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation and programmed cell death. The components of the MAPK extracellular activated protein kinase (ERK) cascade represent attractive targets for cancer therapy as their aberrant activation is a frequent event among highly prevalent human cancers. To understand how MAPKs recognize and phosphorylate their targets is key to unravel their function. However, these events are still poorly understood due to the lack of complex structures of MAPKs with their bound targets in the active site. Here, we have modeled the interaction of ERK with a target peptide and analyzed the specificity towards Ser/Thr-Pro motifs. By using a Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) approach we propose a mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by ERK that offers new insights into MAPK function. Our results suggest that 1) the proline residue has a role both in specificity and phospho transfer efficiency; 2) the reaction occurs in one step with ERK2 Asp147 acting as the catalytic base; 3) a conserved Lys in the kinase superfamily usually mutated to check kinase activity strongly stabilizes the transition state; and 4) the reaction mechanism is similar with either one or two Mg2+ ions in the active site. Taken together, our results provide a detailed description of the molecular events involved in the phosphorylation reaction catalyzed by MAPK and contributes to the general understanding of kinase activity. PMID:19361221

  19. A role for mitogen-activated protein kinase in the spindle assembly checkpoint in XTC cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, X M; Zhai, Y; Ferrell, J E

    1997-04-21

    The spindle assembly checkpoint prevents cells whose spindles are defective or chromosomes are misaligned from initiating anaphase and leaving mitosis. Studies of Xenopus egg extracts have implicated the Erk2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) in this checkpoint. Other studies have suggested that MAP kinases might be important for normal mitotic progression. Here we have investigated whether MAP kinase function is required for mitotic progression or the spindle assembly checkpoint in vivo in Xenopus tadpole cells (XTC). We determined that Erk1 and/or Erk2 are present in the mitotic spindle during prometaphase and metaphase, consistent with the idea that MAP kinase might regulate or monitor the status of the spindle. Next, we microinjected purified recombinant XCL100, a Xenopus MAP kinase phosphatase, into XTC cells in various stages of mitosis to interfere with MAP kinase activation. We found that mitotic progression was unaffected by the phosphatase. However, XCL100 rendered the cells unable to remain arrested in mitosis after treatment with nocodazole. Cells injected with phosphatase at prometaphase or metaphase exited mitosis in the presence of nocodazole-the chromosomes decondensed and the nuclear envelope re-formed-whereas cells injected with buffer or a catalytically inactive XCL100 mutant protein remained arrested in mitosis. Coinjection of constitutively active MAP kinase kinase-1, which opposes XCL100's effects on MAP kinase, antagonized the effects of XCL100. Since the only known targets of MAP kinase kinase-1 are Erk1 and Erk2, these findings argue that MAP kinase function is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint in XTC cells.

  20. Isolation and characterization of a novel lectin with mitogenic activity from Pleurotus ferulae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng-Jian; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Niu, Bo-Nan; Liu, Bing; Li, Ying-Biao; Wang, Xue-Ming; Lu, Shi-Ling

    2014-07-01

    Lectins are the tools for the determination of sugar chain structure. Recently, lectin arrays have become a popular new technology; therefore, lectins with specific sugar-binding properties are required. The objective of the study was to isolate a novel lectin from Pleurotus ferulae mushrooms and characterize its various biological activities. A novel lectin was extracted with deionized water, precipitated from the aqueous extract using 75% saturated (NH4)2SO4, and subjected on DEAE-cellulose followed by affinity chromatography on sepharose-6B. The activity was tested using hemagglutination assays, and carbohydrate-binding specificity was determined by glycan microarray analysis. Its effects on the mitogenic activity of mouse splenocytes were determined by MTT assay. The novel lectin was adsorbed on ion-exchange chromatography DEAE-cellulose and shown as a band with the molecular mass of 17.5 kDa on a SDS-PAGE and as a single 35.0-kDa peak in gel filtration on Superdex G-75. The hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was inhibited by D-glucose, lactose, D-galactose, and galactosamine. The lectin was stable on 60°C. The hemagglutinating activity of lectin was reduced by 50% at 70°C. At 80°C, it was further reduced to 6.25% of its original activity. The hemagglutinating activity was the highest at pH 6-9. Moreover, its hemagglutinating activity was inhibited by Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions. The lectin isolated from P. ferulae in the current study possessed highly potent hemagglutinating and proliferative activities toward mouse splenocytes. PMID:25016256

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of mitogen-activated protein kinase 2 in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huan; Ma, Yan Fen; Bao, Yi; Lee, Hattie; Lisanti, Michael P; Tanowitz, Herbert B

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are major signal transduction systems by which eukaryotic cells convert environmental cues to intracellular events, such as cell proliferation and differentiation. Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan that is both a human and animal pathogen. This Apicomplexan causes significant morbidity and mortality in immune-competent and immune-compromised hosts. In humans, the most common manifestations of T. gondii infections are chorioretinitis in congenital infection and encephalitis in immune-compromised patients, such as patients with advanced AIDS. We have identified a T. gondii homolog of the MAPK family that we have called TgMAPK2. Sequence analyses demonstrated that TgMAPK2 has homology with lower eukaryotic ERK2 but has significant differences from mammalian ERK2. TgMAPK2 has an open reading frame of 2,037 bp, 678 amino acids, and its molecular weight is 73.1 kDa. It contains the typical 12 subdomains of a MAPK and has a TDY motif in the dual phosphorylation and activation subdomains. This suggests that TgMAPK2 may play an important role in stress response. Recombinant TgMAPK2 was catalytically active and was not inhibited by a human ERK2 inhibitor, FR180204. A partial TgMAPK2 lacking the ATP-binding motifs GxGxxGxV was successfully regulated by a ligand-controlled destabilization domain (ddFKBP) expression vector system in T. gondii. Since TgMAPK2 is significantly different from its mammalian counterpart, it may be useful as a drug target. This work establishes a foundation for further study for this unique kinase. PMID:22030559

  2. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Regulates Seed Dormancy in Barley.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shingo; Pourkheirandish, Mohammad; Morishige, Hiromi; Kubo, Yuta; Nakamura, Masako; Ichimura, Kazuya; Seo, Shigemi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Ando, Tsuyu; Hensel, Goetz; Sameri, Mohammad; Stein, Nils; Sato, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yano, Masahiro; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-03-21

    Seed dormancy has fundamental importance in plant survival and crop production; however, the mechanisms regulating dormancy remain unclear [1-3]. Seed dormancy levels generally decrease during domestication to ensure that crops successfully germinate in the field. However, reduction of seed dormancy can cause devastating losses in cereals like wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) due to pre-harvest sprouting, the germination of mature seed (grain) on the mother plant when rain occurs before harvest. Understanding the mechanisms of dormancy can facilitate breeding of crop varieties with the appropriate levels of seed dormancy [4-8]. Barley is a model crop [9, 10] and has two major seed dormancy quantitative trait loci (QTLs), SD1 and SD2, on chromosome 5H [11-19]. We detected a QTL designated Qsd2-AK at SD2 as the single major determinant explaining the difference in seed dormancy between the dormant cultivar "Azumamugi" (Az) and the non-dormant cultivar "Kanto Nakate Gold" (KNG). Using map-based cloning, we identified the causal gene for Qsd2-AK as Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 (MKK3). The dormant Az allele of MKK3 is recessive; the N260T substitution in this allele decreases MKK3 kinase activity and appears to be causal for Qsd2-AK. The N260T substitution occurred in the immediate ancestor allele of the dormant allele, and the established dormant allele became prevalent in barley cultivars grown in East Asia, where the rainy season and harvest season often overlap. Our findings show fine-tuning of seed dormancy during domestication and provide key information for improving pre-harvest sprouting tolerance in barley and wheat. PMID:26948880

  3. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Promotes Fibrosis and Activates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in MRC-5 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Tang, Su; Tang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening hypoxemic respiratory disorder with high incidence and mortality. ALI usually manifests as widespread inflammation and lung fibrosis with the accumulation of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic factors and collagen. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has a significant role in regulation of inflammation but little is known about its roles in lung fibrosis or ALI. This study aimed to define the role and possible regulatory mechanism of TSLP in lung fibrosis. Material/Methods We cultured human lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells and overexpressed or inhibited TSLP by the vector or small interfering RNA transfection. Then, the pro-fibrotic factors skeletal muscle actin alpha (α-SMA) and collagen I, and the 4 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) – MAPK7, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) – were detected by Western blot. Results Results showed that TSLP promoted the production of α-SMA and collagen I (P<0.001), suggesting that it can accelerate MRC-5 cell fibrosis. It also activated the expression of MAPK7, p-p38, p-ERK1, and p-JNK1, but the total MAPK7, p-38, ERK1, and JNK1 protein levels were mostly unchanged, indicating the activated MAPK pathways that might contribute to the promotion of cell fibrosis. Conclusions This study shows the pro-fibrotic role of TSLP in MRC-5 cells, suggesting TSLP is a potential therapeutic target for treating lung fibrosis in ALI. It possibly functions via activating MAPKs. These findings add to our understanding of the mechanism of fibrosis. PMID:27385084

  4. Bone morphogenetic protein 2-induced human dental pulp cell differentiation involves p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated canonical WNT pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Ye, Ling; Hui, Tian-Qian; Yang, Dong-Mei; Huang, Ding-Ming; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Mao, Jeremy J; Wang, Cheng-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Both bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and the wingless-type MMTV integration site (WNT)/β-catenin signalling pathway play important roles in odontoblast differentiation and dentinogenesis. Cross-talk between BMP2 and WNT/β-catenin in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation has been identified. However, the roles and mechanisms of the canonical WNT pathway in the regulation of BMP2 in dental pulp injury and repair remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that BMP2 promotes the differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) by activating WNT/β-catenin signalling, which is further mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in vitro. BMP2 stimulation upregulated the expression of β-catenin in HDPCs, which was abolished by SB203580 but not by Noggin or LDN193189. Furthermore, BMP2 enhanced cell differentiation, which was not fully inhibited by Noggin or LDN193189. Instead, SB203580 partially blocked BMP2-induced β-catenin expression and cell differentiation. Taken together, these data suggest a possible mechanism by which the elevation of β-catenin resulting from BMP2 stimulation is mediated by the p38 MAPK pathway, which sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of BMP2-mediated pulp reparative dentin formation. PMID:26047580

  5. Ozone induces a proinflammatory response in primary human bronchial epithelial cells through mitogen-activated protein kinase activation without nuclear factor-κB activation.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Shaun D; Duncan, Kelly E; Swanton, Samantha M; Dailey, Lisa A; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Devlin, Robert B

    2014-09-01

    Ground-level ozone (O3) is a ubiquitous environmental air pollutant that is a potent inducer of airway inflammation and has been linked with respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Some studies using transformed or immortalized cells have attributed O3-mediated expression of inflammatory cytokines with activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway. In this study, we sought to characterize the O3-mediated activation of cellular signaling pathways using primary human bronchial epithelial cells obtained from a panel of donors. We demonstrate that the O3-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines requires the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor/MEK/ERK and MKK4/p38 mitogen-activated signaling pathways but does not appear to involve activation of canonical NF-κB signaling. In addition to providing a novel mechanistic model for the O3-mediated induction of proinflammatory cytokines, these findings highlight the importance of using primary cells over cell lines in mechanistic studies.

  6. Pyroglutamic acid stimulates DNA synthesis in rat primary hepatocytes through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shinjiro; Okita, Yoichi; de Toledo, Andreia; Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Eiichi; Morinaga, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    We purified pyroglutamic acid from human placental extract and identified it as a potent stimulator of rat primary hepatocyte DNA synthesis. Pyroglutamic acid dose-dependently stimulated DNA synthesis, and this effect was inhibited by PD98059, a dual specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MAP2K1) inhibitor. Therefore, pyroglutamic acid stimulated DNA synthesis in rat primary hepatocytes via MAPK signaling.

  7. Simian virus 40 small t antigen cooperates with mitogen-activated kinases to stimulate AP-1 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Alberts, A S; Sontag, E; Guan, K; Mumby, M C; Feramisco, J R

    1994-01-01

    The simian virus 40 small tumor antigen (small t) specifically interacts with protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) in vivo and alters its catalytic activity in vitro. Among the substrates for PP2A in vitro are the activated forms of MEK and ERK kinases. Dephosphorylation of the activating phosphorylation sites on MEK and ERKs by PP2A in vitro results in a decrease in their respective kinase activities. Recently, it has been shown that overexpression of small t in CV-1 cells results in an inhibition of PP2A activity toward MEK and ERK2 and a constitutive upregulation of MEK and ERK2 activity. Previously, we have observed that overexpression of either ERK1, MEK1, or a constitutively active truncated form of c-Raf-1 (BXB) is insufficient to activate AP-1 in REF52 fibroblasts. We therefore examined whether overexpression of small t either alone or in conjunction with ERK1, MEK1, or BXB could activate AP-1. We found that coexpression of small t and either ERK1, MEK1, or BXB resulted in an increase in AP-1 activity, whereas expression of either small t or any of the kinases alone did not have any effect. Similarly, coexpression of small t and ERK1 activated serum response element-regulated promoters. Coexpression of kinase-deficient mutants of ERK1 and ERK2 inhibited the activation of AP-1 caused by expression of small t and either MEK1 or BXB. Coexpression of an interfering MEK, which inhibited AP-1 activation by small t and BXB, did not inhibit the activation of AP-1 caused by small t and ERK1. In contrast to REF52 cells, we observed that overexpression of either small or ERK1 alone in CV-1 cells was sufficient to stimulate AP-1 activity and that this stimulation was not enhanced by expression of small t and ERK1 together. These results show that the effects of small t on immediate-early gene expression depend on the cell type examined and suggest that the mitogen-activated protein kinase activation pathway is distinctly regulated in different cell types. Images PMID

  8. Structural characterization and antitumor and mitogenic activity of a lectin from the gill of bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis).

    PubMed

    Yao, Dongrui; Pan, Saikun; Zhou, Mingqian

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the gross structure, secondary structure, and antitumor and mitogenic activity of GANL, a lectin from the gill of bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis). We used infrared spectroscopy, β-elimination, and circular dichroism spectroscopy to determine the structure of GANL. We measured antiproliferation activity against six human tumor cell lines and mitogenic activity against murine splenocytes using the MTT assay. Based on infrared spectroscopy and β-elimination, we conclude that GANL is a glycoprotein. The protein and carbohydrate moieties are joined by O-glycosidic linkage. A circular dichroism spectroscopic analysis revealed that the secondary structure of GANL consists of α-helices (34.8 %), β-sheets (12.1 %), β-turns (24.5 %), and unordered structures (33.0 %). GANL exerted potent antitumor activity against the HeLa cell line (IC(50) = 11.86 μg/mL) and a mitogenic effect on murine splenocytes in the MTT assay. GANL, a lectin that is isolated from the gills of bighead carp, is a glycoprotein with potent antitumor and mitogenic activity. PMID:22714932

  9. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and the regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways: a revolving neurochemical axis for therapeutic intervention?

    PubMed

    Haddad, John J

    2005-11-01

    Excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS) is mediated by the release of glutamate from presynaptic terminals onto postsynaptic channels gated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA (AMPA and KA) receptors. Extracellular signals control diverse neuronal functions and are responsible for mediating activity-dependent changes in synaptic strength and neuronal survival. Influx of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](e)) through the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) is required for neuronal activity to change the strength of many synapses. At the molecular level, the NMDAR interacts with signaling modules, which, like the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) superfamily, transduce excitatory signals across neurons. Recent burgeoning evidence points to the fact that MAPKs play a crucial role in regulating the neurochemistry of NMDARs, their physiologic and biochemical/biophysical properties, and their potential role in pathophysiology. It is the purpose of this review to discuss: (i) the MAPKs and their role in a plethora of cellular functions; (ii) the role of MAPKs in regulating the biochemistry and physiology of NMDA receptors; (iii) the kinetics of MAPK-NMDA interactions and their biologic and neurochemical properties; (iv) how cellular signaling pathways, related cofactors and intracellular conditions affect NMDA-MAPK interactions and (v) the role of NMDA-MAPK pathways in pathophysiology and the evolution of disease conditions. Given the versatility of the NMDA-MAPK interactions, the NMDA-MAPK axis will likely form a neurochemical target for therapeutic interventions.

  10. Phosphorylation by p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Promotes Estrogen Receptor α Turnover and Functional Activity via the SCFSkp2 Proteasomal Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Shweta; Xiao, Zhen; Meng, Zhaojing

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptor estrogen receptor α (ERα) mediates the actions of estrogens in target cells and is a master regulator of the gene expression and proliferative programs of breast cancer cells. The presence of ERα in breast cancer cells is crucial for the effectiveness of endocrine therapies, and its loss is a hallmark of endocrine-insensitive breast tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of the cellular levels of ERα are not fully understood. Our findings reveal a unique cellular pathway involving the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK)-mediated phosphorylation of ERα at Ser-294 that specifies its turnover by the SCFSkp2 proteasome complex. Consistently, we observed an inverse relationship between ERα and Skp2 or active p38MAPK in breast cancer cell lines and human tumors. ERα regulation by Skp2 was cell cycle stage dependent and critical for promoting the mitogenic effects of estradiol via ERα. Interestingly, by the knockdown of Skp2 or the inhibition of p38MAPK, we restored functional ERα protein levels and the control of gene expression and proliferation by estrogen and antiestrogen in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. Our findings highlight a novel pathway with therapeutic potential for restoring ERα and the responsiveness to endocrine therapy in some endocrine-insensitive ERα-negative breast cancers. PMID:22431515

  11. Ringo/cyclin-dependent kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways regulate the activity of the cell fate determinant Musashi to promote cell cycle re-entry in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Karthik; MacNicol, Melanie C; Wang, Yiying; Cragle, Chad E; Tackett, Alan J; Hardy, Linda L; MacNicol, Angus M

    2012-03-23

    Cell cycle re-entry during vertebrate oocyte maturation is mediated through translational activation of select target mRNAs, culminating in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and cyclin B/cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) signaling. The temporal order of targeted mRNA translation is crucial for cell cycle progression and is determined by the timing of activation of distinct mRNA-binding proteins. We have previously shown in oocytes from Xenopus laevis that the mRNA-binding protein Musashi targets translational activation of early class mRNAs including the mRNA encoding the Mos proto-oncogene. However, the molecular mechanism by which Musashi function is activated is unknown. We report here that activation of Musashi1 is mediated by Ringo/CDK signaling, revealing a novel role for early Ringo/CDK function. Interestingly, Musashi1 activation is subsequently sustained through mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, the downstream effector of Mos mRNA translation, thus establishing a positive feedback loop to amplify Musashi function. The identified regulatory sites are present in mammalian Musashi proteins, and our data suggest that phosphorylation may represent an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to control Musashi-dependent target mRNA translation.

  12. Insulin stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase by a Ras-independent pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Carel, K; Kummer, J L; Schubert, C; Leitner, W; Heidenreich, K A; Draznin, B

    1996-11-29

    To characterize tissue-specific differences in insulin signaling, we compared the mechanisms of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation by insulin in the mitogenically active 3T3-L1 fibroblasts with the metabolically active 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In both cell lines, insulin significantly increased p21(ras).GTP loading (1.5-2-fold) and MAP kinase activity (5-8-fold). Inhibition of Ras farnesylation with lovastatin blocked activation of p21(ras) and Raf-1 kinase in both 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In 3T3-L1 fibroblasts, this was accompanied by an inhibition of the stimulatory effect of insulin on MAP kinase. In contrast, in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, despite an inhibition of activation of p21(ras) and Raf-1 by lovastatin, insulin continued to stimulate MAP kinase activity. Fractionation of the cell lysates on the FPLC Mono-Q column revealed that lovastatin inhibited insulin stimulation of ERK2 (and, to a lesser extent, ERK1) in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and had no effect on the insulin-stimulated ERK2 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These results demonstrate an important distinction between the mechanism of insulin signaling in the metabolically and mitogenically active cells. Insulin activates MAP kinase by the Ras-dependent pathway in the 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and by the Ras-independent pathway in the 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  13. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in T-2 toxin-induced cell cycle alteration and apoptosis in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Mona; Bhaskar, A S B; Lakshmana Rao, P V

    2015-01-01

    T-2 toxin is the most toxic trichothecene and a frequent contaminant in many agriculture products. Dietary ingestion represents the most common route of T-2 toxin exposure in humans. T-2 toxin exposure leads to many pathological conditions like nervous disorders, cardiovascular alterations, immune depression and dermal inflammation. However, the neuronal toxicity of T-2 toxin in vitro remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of T-2 toxin-induced apoptosis in human neuroblastoma cells (IMR-32). T-2 toxin was cytotoxic at a low concentration of 10 ng/ml. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of T-2 toxin was found to be 40 ng/ml as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, crystal violet dye exclusion test and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage. T-2 toxin increased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation as early as 15 min and peaked at 60 min as analyzed by flow cytometry. Annexin V + propidium iodide staining showed time-dependent increase in percent apoptotic cells. DNA gel electrophoresis showed oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation typical of apoptotic cells. Additionally, casapse-3 activation and PARP cleavage indicated involvement of mitochondrial mediated caspase-dependent pathway of apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed time-dependent increase in sub-G1 population of cells and significant up-regulation of CDK2, CDK6, cyclin A and p21 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. Exposure to T-2 toxin induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). Analysis of human phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) antibody array revealed time-dependent increase in phosphorylation. Upstream of ERK pathway Grb2, Ras and Raf and downstream transcription factors c-fos and c-jun were significantly up-regulated. Z-VAD-FMK and MAPK inhibitors (PD 98059, SB 203580 and ZM 336372) exposure prior to T-2

  14. Phosphorylation of sodium channel Na(v)1.8 by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase increases current density in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, Andy; Choi, Jin-Sung; Tyrrell, Lynda; Black, Joel A; Rush, Anthony M; Waxman, Stephen G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D

    2008-03-19

    The sensory neuron-specific sodium channel Na(v)1.8 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase are potential therapeutic targets within nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in inflammatory, and possibly neuropathic, pain. Na(v)1.8 channels within nociceptive DRG neurons contribute most of the inward current underlying the depolarizing phase of action potentials. Nerve injury and inflammation of peripheral tissues cause p38 activation in DRG neurons, a process that may contribute to nociceptive neuron hyperexcitability, which is associated with pain. However, how substrates of activated p38 contribute to DRG neuron hyperexcitability is currently not well understood. We report here, for the first time, that Na(v)1.8 and p38 are colocalized in DRG neurons, that Na(v)1.8 within DRG neurons is a substrate for p38, and that direct phosphorylation of the Na(v)1.8 channel by p38 regulates its function in these neurons. We show that direct phosphorylation of Na(v)1.8 at two p38 phospho-acceptor serine residues on the L1 loop (S551 and S556) causes an increase in Na(v)1.8 current density that is not accompanied by changes in gating properties of the channel. Our study suggests a mechanism by which activated p38 contributes to inflammatory, and possibly neuropathic, pain through a p38-mediated increase of Na(v)1.8 current density. PMID:18354022

  15. Reactive oxygen species and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activate Bax to induce mitochondrial cytochrome c release and apoptosis in response to malonate.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lazaro, M; Galindo, M F; Melero-Fernandez de Mera, R M; Fernandez-Gómez, F J; Concannon, C G; Segura, M F; Comella, J X; Prehn, J H M; Jordan, J

    2007-03-01

    Malonate, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex II, is a widely used toxin to study neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease and ischemic stroke. We have shown previously that malonate increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, leading to oxidative stress, cytochrome c release, and apoptotic cell death. Expression of a green fluorescent protein-Bax fusion protein in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells demonstrated a Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria after 12 to 24 h of malonate treatment that coincided with mitochondrial potential collapse and chromatin condensation. Inhibition of Bax translocation using furosemide, as well as Bax gene deletion, afforded significant protection against malonate-induced apoptosis. Further experiments revealed that malonate induced a prominent increase in the level of activated p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and that treatment with the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SKF86002 potently blocked malonate-induced Bax translocation and apoptosis. Treatment with vitamin E diminished ROS production, reduced the activation status of p38 MAP kinase, inhibited Bax translocation, and protected against malonate-induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that malonate-induced ROS production and subsequent p38 MAP kinase activation mediates the activation of the pro-apoptotic Bax protein to induce mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and neuronal apoptosis.

  16. Coordinate regulation of IkappaB kinases by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 and NF-kappaB-inducing kinase.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, S; DiDonato, J A; Lin, A

    1998-12-01

    IkappaB kinases (IKKalpha and IKKbeta) are key components of the IKK complex that mediates activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB in response to extracellular stimuli such as inflammatory cytokines, viral and bacterial infection, and UV irradiation. Although NF-kappaB-inducing kinase (NIK) interacts with and activates the IKKs, the upstream kinases for the IKKs still remain obscure. We identified mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1) as an immediate upstream kinase of the IKK complex. MEKK1 is activated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 and can potentiate the stimulatory effect of TNF-alpha on IKK and NF-kappaB activation. The dominant negative mutant of MEKK1, on the other hand, partially blocks activation of IKK by TNF-alpha. MEKK1 interacts with and stimulates the activities of both IKKalpha and IKKbeta in transfected HeLa and COS-1 cells and directly phosphorylates the IKKs in vitro. Furthermore, MEKK1 appears to act in parallel to NIK, leading to synergistic activation of the IKK complex. The formation of the MEKK1-IKK complex versus the NIK-IKK complex may provide a molecular basis for regulation of the IKK complex by various extracellular signals.

  17. Isorhamnetin inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in breast cancer via Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    HU, SHAN; HUANG, LIMING; MENG, LIWEI; SUN, HE; ZHANG, WEI; XU, YINGCHUN

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of female cancer-associated mortality. Although treatment options, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery have led to a decline in the mortality rates associated with breast cancer, drug resistance remains one of the predominant causes for poor prognosis and high recurrence rates. The present study investigated the potential effects of the natural product, isorhamnetin on breast cancer, and examined the effects of isorhamnetin on the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/MAPK kinase (MEK) signaling cascades, which are two important signaling pathways for endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer. The results of the present study indicate that isorhamnetin inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell apoptosis. In addition, isorhamnetin was observed to inhibit the Akt/mTOR and the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation cascades. The inhibition of these two signaling pathways was attenuated by the two Akt and MEK1 inhibitors, but not by the nuclear factor-κB inhibitor. Furthermore, epidermal growth factor inhibited the effects of isorhamnetin via activation of the Akt and MEK signaling pathways. These results indicate that isorhamnetin exhibits antitumor effects in breast cancer, which are mediated by the Akt and MEK signaling pathways. PMID:26502751

  18. Isoflurane attenuates mouse microglial engulfment induced by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ possibly by inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jung-Hee; Wang, Zhi; Fan, Dan; Han, Sung-Hee; Do, Sang-Hwan; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2016-09-28

    Microglial engulfment is a basic function to clean up dead and injured cells and invaders, such as bacteria. This study was designed to assess the effects of isoflurane on the microglial engulfment induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and the involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in these effects. C8-B4 microglial cells were exposed to 1, 2, and 3% isoflurane at 2 h after the initiation of LPS (100 ng/ml) and IFN-γ (1 ng/ml) stimulation. Fluorescent immunostaining was performed to assess the percentage of cells with engulfment of fluorescent microspheres after stimulation for 24 h. P38 and phosphorylated p38 were determined by Western blotting. Isoflurane concentration dependently decreased microglial engulfment stimulated by LPS and IFN-γ. LPS and IFN-γ increased the phosphorylated p38 in microglial cells. This upregulation was decreased by isoflurane. SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, abolished the LPS-induced and IFN-γ-induced increase of engulfment activity, whereas anisomycin, a p38 MAPK activator, partly reversed the isoflurane-decreased microglial engulfment activity. These results suggest that isoflurane reduces LPS-induced and IFN-γ-induced microglial engulfment and that these effects may be mediated by inhibiting p38 MAPK. PMID:27513199

  19. Actions of Rho family small G proteins and p21-activated protein kinases on mitogen-activated protein kinase family members.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Xu, S; Hutchison, M R; Marcus, S; Cobb, M H

    1996-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are a family of serine/threonine kinases that are regulated by distinct extracellular stimuli. The currently known members include extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 (ERK1), ERK2, the c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), and p38 MAP kinases. We find that overexpression of the Ste20-related enzymes p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and PAK2 in 293 cells is sufficient to activate JNK/SAPK and to a lesser extent p38 MAP kinase but not ERK2. Rat MAP/ERK kinase kinase 1 can stimulate the activity of each of these MAP kinases. Although neither activated Rac nor the PAKs stimulate ERK2 activity, overexpression of either dominant negative Rac2 or the N-terminal regulatory domain of PAK1 inhibits Ras-mediated activation of ERK2, suggesting a permissive role for Rac in the control of the ERK pathway. Furthermore, constitutively active Rac2, Cdc42hs, and RhoA synergize with an activated form of Raf to increase ERK2 activity. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized connection between Rho family small G proteins and the ERK pathway. PMID:8668187

  20. Abrogation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and Akt Signaling by Vandetanib Synergistically Potentiates Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor-Induced Apoptosis in Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jane, Esther P.; Premkumar, Daniel R.; Addo-Yobo, Steven O.

    2009-01-01

    Vandetanib is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Our initial studies demonstrated that this agent blocks vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor phosphorylation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated signaling in glioma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Despite these effects, we observed that vandetanib had little effect on apoptosis induction at clinically achievable concentrations. Because histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) have been suggested to regulate signaling protein transcription and downstream interactions via modulation of protein chaperone function through the 90-kDa heat shock protein, we investigated whether combining vandetanib with an HDACI could synergistically potentiate signaling pathway inhibition and apoptosis induction in a panel of malignant human glioma cell lines. Proliferation assays, apoptosis induction studies, and Western immunoblot analysis were conducted in cells treated with vandetanib and HDACIs as single agents or in combination. Vandetanib and suberoylanalide hydroxamic acid reduced proliferation in all cell lines when used as single agents, and the combination produced marked potentiation of growth inhibition as assessed by combinatorial methods. These effects were paralleled by potentiation of Akt signaling inhibition and apoptosis induction. Our results indicate that inhibition of histone deacetylation enhances the antiproliferative effect of vandetanib in malignant human glioma cell lines by enhancing inhibition of MAPK, Akt, and other downstream effectors that may have application in combinatorial therapeutics for these tumors. PMID:19622715

  1. Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) interrupts signal transduction between the Kss1 MAPK and the Tec1 transcription factor to maintain pathway specificity.

    PubMed

    Shock, Teresa R; Thompson, James; Yates, John R; Madhani, Hiten D

    2009-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mating, filamentous growth (FG), and high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways share components and yet mediate distinct responses to different extracellular signals. Cross talk is suppressed between the mating and FG pathways because mating signaling induces the destruction of the FG transcription factor Tec1. We show here that HOG pathway activation results in phosphorylation of the FG MAPK, Kss1, and the MAPKK, Ste7. However, FG transcription is not activated because HOG signaling prevents the activation of Tec1. In contrast to the mating pathway, we find that the mechanism involves the inhibition of DNA binding by Tec1 rather than its destruction. We also find that nuclear accumulation of Tec1 is not affected by HOG signaling. Inhibition by Hog1 is apparently indirect since it does not require any of the consensus S/TP MAPK phosphorylation sites on Tec1, its DNA-binding partner Ste12, or the associated regulators Dig1 or Dig2. It also does not require the consensus MAPK sites of the Ste11 activator Ste50, in contrast to a recent proposal for a role for negative feedback in specificity. Our results demonstrate that HOG signaling interrupts the FG pathway signal transduction between the phosphorylation of Kss1 and the activation of DNA binding by Tec1. PMID:19218425

  2. Exosomes derived from SW480 colorectal cancer cells promote cell migration in HepG2 hepatocellular cancer cells via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Mitsuru; Watanabe, Narumi; Watanabe, Miki; Sakamoto, Maki; Sato, Akika; Fujisaki, Mizuki; Kubota, Shiori; Monzen, Satoru; Maruyama, Atsushi; Nanashima, Naoki; Kashiwakura, Ikuo; Nakamura, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are membrane-derived extracellular vesicles that have recently been recognized as important mediators of intercellular communication. In the present study, we investigated the effects of exosomes derived from SW480 colorectal cancer cells in recipient HepG2 hepatocellular cancer cells. We demonstrated that SW480-derived exosomes were taken up by the recipient HepG2 cells via dynamin-dependent endocytosis and were localized to the HepG2 lysosomes. In addition, SW480-derived exosomes induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 following their uptake into HepG2 cells. Of note, these changes occurred during the early phase after exosome treatment. Furthermore, SW480-derived exosomes promoted the migration of recipient HepG2 cells in a wound-healing assay, which was suppressed by pretreatment with U0126, an upstream inhibitor of ERK1/2. These results indicated that SW480-derived exosomes activated a classical mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in recipient HepG2 cells via dynamin-dependent endocytosis and subsequently enhanced cell migration by ERK1/2 activation. Our results provide new insights into the regulation of cellular functions by exosomes.

  3. Protein-bound polysaccharide-K induces apoptosis via mitochondria and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways in HL-60 promyelomonocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hirahara, Noriyuki; Edamatsu, Takeo; Fujieda, Ayako; Fujioka, Masaki; Wada, Tsutomu; Tajima, Yoshitsugu

    2013-07-01

    Protein-bound polysaccharide-K (PSK) is extracted from Coriolus versicolor (CM101). PSK is a biological response modifier (BRM), and its mechanism of action is partly mediated by modulating host immune systems; however, recent studies showed antiproliferative activity of PSK. Therefore, we examined the mechanism underlying the antiproliferative activity of PSK using seven different human malignant cell lines (WiDr, HT29, SW480, KATOIII, AGS, HL-60 and U937), and PSK was found to inhibit the proliferation of HL-60 cells most profoundly. Therefore, HL-60 cells were used to elucidate the mechanism of the antiproliferative activity. Western blotting was performed to detect phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). A p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, was used to examine the roles in PSK-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition. Flow cytometry was performed for mitochondrial membrane potential detection. PSK activated caspase-3 and induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Co-treatment with SB203580 blocked PSK-induced apoptosis, caspase-3 activation and growth inhibition. PSK induced apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. The depolarization of mitochondria induced by PSK was reversed by co-treatment with SB203580. The present study revealed that PSK induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells via a mitochondrial and p38 MAPK-dependent pathway. PMID:23604455

  4. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation Is Required for Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation by Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in HaCaT Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ockenga, Wymke; Kühne, Sina; Bocksberger, Simone; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2014-01-01

    Non-neuronal acetylcholine plays a substantial role in the human skin by influencing adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. These processes are regulated by the Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) kinase cascade. Here we show that in HaCaT keratinocytes all five muscarinic receptor subtypes are expressed, but M1 and M3 are the subtypes involved in mitogenic signaling. Stimulation with the cholinergic agonist carbachol leads to activation of the MAP kinase extracellular signal regulated kinase, together with the protein kinase Akt. The activation is fully dependent on the transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which even appears to be the sole pathway for the muscarinic receptors to facilitate MAP kinase activation in HaCaT cells. The transactivation pathway involves a triple-membrane-passing process, based on activation of matrix metalloproteases, and extracellular ligand release; whereas phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Src family kinases or protein kinase C do not appear to be involved in MAP kinase activation. Furthermore, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and endocytosis of the EGF receptor after cholinergic transactivation are different from that induced by a direct stimulation with EGF, suggesting that ligands other than EGF itself mediate the cholinergic transactivation. PMID:25421240

  5. Stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and p38 target Cdc25B for degradation.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sanae; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Kizu, Ryoichi; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Poon, Randy Y C; Yamashita, Katsumi

    2009-08-15

    Cdc25 dual specificity phosphatases positively regulate the cell cycle by activating cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin complexes. Of the three mammalian Cdc25 isoforms, Cdc25A is phosphorylated by genotoxic stress-activated Chk1 or Chk2, which triggers its SCFbeta-TrCP-mediated degradation. However, the roles of Cdc25B and Cdc25C in cell stress checkpoints remain inconclusive. We herein report that c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) induces the degradation of Cdc25B. Nongenotoxic stress induced by anisomycin caused rapid degradation of Cdc25B as well as Cdc25A. Cdc25B degradation was dependent mainly on JNK and partially on p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38). Accordingly, cotransfection with JNK1, JNK2, or p38 destabilized Cdc25B. In vitro kinase assays and site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the critical JNK and p38 phosphorylation site in Cdc25B was Ser101. Cdc25B with Ser101 mutated to alanine was refractory to anisomycin-induced degradation, and cells expressing such mutant Cdc25B proteins were able to override the anisomycin-induced G2 arrest. These results highlight the importance of a novel JNK/p38-Cdc25B axis for a nongenotoxic stress-induced cell cycle checkpoint.

  6. Regulation of Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2 Expression by Adrenoceptors and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein-Potential Crosstalk Between Sterol and Glycerophospholipid Mediators.

    PubMed

    Chew, Wee-Siong; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) is an 85-kDa enzyme that releases docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from glycerophospholipids. DHA can be metabolized to resolvins and neuroprotectins that have anti-inflammatory properties and effects on neural plasticity. Recent studies show an important role of prefrontal cortical iPLA2 in hippocampo-prefrontal cortical LTP and antidepressant-like effect of the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NRI) antidepressant, maprotiline. In this study, we elucidated the cellular mechanisms through which stimulation of adrenergic receptors could lead to increased iPLA2 expression. Treatment of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with maprotiline, another tricyclic antidepressant with noradrenaline reuptake inhibiting properties, nortriptyline, and the adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine, resulted in increased iPLA2β mRNA expression. This increase was blocked by inhibitors to alpha-1 adrenergic receptor, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP). Maprotiline and phenylephrine induced binding of SREBP-2 to sterol regulatory element (SRE) region on the iPLA2 promoter, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Together, results indicate that stimulation of adrenoreceptors causes increased iPLA2 expression via MAP kinase/ERK 1/2 and SREBP, and suggest a possible mechanism for effect of CNS noradrenaline on neural plasticity and crosstalk between sterol and glycerophospholipid mediators, that may play a role in physiological or pathophysiological processes in the brain and other organs.

  7. Rho2 Palmitoylation Is Required for Plasma Membrane Localization and Proper Signaling to the Fission Yeast Cell Integrity Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Martín-García, Rebeca; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Soto, Teresa; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    The fission yeast small GTPase Rho2 regulates morphogenesis and is an upstream activator of the cell integrity pathway, whose key element, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Pmk1, becomes activated by multiple environmental stimuli and controls several cellular functions. Here we demonstrate that farnesylated Rho2 becomes palmitoylated in vivo at cysteine-196 within its carboxyl end and that this modification allows its specific targeting to the plasma membrane. Unlike that of other palmitoylated and prenylated GTPases, the Rho2 control of morphogenesis and Pmk1 activity is strictly dependent upon plasma membrane localization and is not found in other cellular membranes. Indeed, artificial plasma membrane targeting bypassed the Rho2 need for palmitoylation in order to signal. Detailed functional analysis of Rho2 chimeras fused to the carboxyl end from the essential GTPase Rho1 showed that GTPase palmitoylation is partially dependent on the prenylation context and confirmed that Rho2 signaling is independent of Rho GTP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) function. We further demonstrate that Rho2 is an in vivo substrate for DHHC family acyltransferase Erf2 palmitoyltransferase. Remarkably, Rho3, another Erf2 target, negatively regulates Pmk1 activity in a Rho2-independent fashion, thus revealing the existence of cross talk whereby both GTPases antagonistically modulate the activity of this MAPK cascade. PMID:24820419

  8. Fisetin Ameliorated Photodamage by Suppressing the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase/Matrix Metalloproteinase Pathway and Nuclear Factor-κB Pathways.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Chan, Shih-Yun; Chu, Yin; Wen, Kuo-Ching

    2015-05-13

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is one of the most important extrinsic factors contributing to skin photodamage. After UV irradiation, a series of signal transductions in the skin will be activated, leading to inflammatory response and photoaged skin. In this study, fisetin, a flavonol that exists in fruits and vegetables, was investigated for its photoprotective effects. The results revealed that 5-25 μM fisetin inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-3, MMP-9 expression induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation in human skin fibroblasts. In addition, fisetin suppressed UVB-induced collagen degradation. With regard to its effect on upper-stream signal transduction, we found that fisetin reduced the expression of ultraviolet (UV)-induced ERK, JNK, and p38 phosphorylation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) pathway. Furthermore, fisetin reduced inhibitor κB (IκB) degradation and increased the amount of p65, which is a major subunit of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), in cytoplasm. It also suppressed NF-κB translocated to the nucleus and inhibited cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) Ser-133 phosphorylation level in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/CREB (PI3K/AKT/CREB) pathway. Finally, fisetin inhibited UV-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and nitric oxide (NO) generation. The mentioned effects and mechanisms suggest that fisetin can be used in the development of photoprotective agents.

  9. Hesperetin exerts apoptotic effect on A431 skin carcinoma cells by regulating mitogen activated protein kinases and cyclins.

    PubMed

    Smina, T P; Mohan, A; Ayyappa, K A; Sethuraman, S; Krishnan, U M

    2015-10-30

    Dietary agents and phytochemicals have been utilised for the management of cancer for many years. Hesperetin, a dietary flavonoid found abundantly in citrus fruits, was evaluated for its cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic activities in A431 human skin carcinoma cells. Effect of hesperetin in regulating MAPK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase) signalling pathway and levels of various cyclins and other downstream apoptotic proteins were investigated. Its critical role in regulating other apoptotic proteins especially p21, Bcl-2 and Bax were also assessed. Hesperetin stimulated alterations in MAPK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase) signalling pathway by modulating the expression levels of ERK (Extracellular signal Regulated Kinase), JNK (c-Jun NH2-terminal Kinase) and p38; thereby induced apoptosis in A431 cells. Hesperetin regulated the levels of cyclin A2, B1, D1, D3 and E1. It also modulated the levels of various proteins involved in apoptotic pathway especially p21, Bcl-2 and Bax. The study revealed the efficiency of hesperetin against human skin carcinoma cells and proposed its mechanism of action; there by opens up new avenues for the use of this dietary flavonoid against skin malignancies.

  10. Chemerin Stimulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Carotid Neointimal Hyperplasia by Activating Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Luo, Yu; Wu, Lin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Huadong; Li, Jianghua; Liao, Bihong; Dong, Shaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular neointimal hyperplasia and remodeling arising from local inflammation are characteristic pathogeneses of proliferative cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and post angioplasty restenosis. The molecular mechanisms behind these pathological processes have not been fully determined. The adipokine chemerin is associated with obesity, metabolism, and control of inflammation. Recently, chemerin has gained increased attention as it was found to play a critical role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemerin on the regulation of vascular smooth muscle cells and carotid neointimal formation after angioplasty. We found that circulating chemerin levels increased after carotid balloon injury, and that knockdown of chemerin significantly inhibited the proliferative aspects of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vitro as well as prohibited carotid neointimal hyperplasia and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vivo after angioplasty. Additionally, inhibition of chemerin down-regulated the expression of several proteins, including phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, nuclear factor-kappa B p65, and proliferation cell nuclear antigen. The novel finding of this study is that chemerin stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation and carotid intimal hyperplasia through activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, which may lead to vascular inflammation and remodeling, and is relevant to proliferative cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27792753

  11. Parallel regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3) and MKK6 in Gq-signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, J; Tsujimoto, G; Kaziro, Y; Itoh, H

    2001-06-29

    Heterotrimeric G protein G(q) stimulates the activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in mammalian cells. To investigate the signaling mechanism whereby alpha and betagamma subunits of G(q) activate p38 MAPK, we introduced kinase-deficient mutants of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3), MKK4, and MKK6 into human embryonal kidney 293 cells. The activation of p38 MAPK by Galpha(q) and Gbetagamma was blocked by kinase-deficient MKK3 and MKK6 but not by kinase-deficient MKK4. In addition, Galpha(q) and Gbetagamma stimulated MKK3 and MKK6 activities. The MKK3 and MKK6 activations by Galpha(q), but not by Gbetagamma, were dependent on phospholipase C and c-Src. Galpha(q) stimulated MKK3 in a Rac- and Cdc42-dependent manner and MKK6 in a Rho-dependent manner. On the other hand, Gbetagamma activated MKK3 in a Rac- and Cdc42-dependent manner and MKK6 in a Rho-, Rac-, and Cdc42-dependent manner. Gbetagamma-induced MKK3 and MKK6 activations were dependent on a tyrosine kinase other than c-Src. These results suggest that Galpha(q) and Gbetagamma stimulate the activity of p38 MAPK by regulating MKK3 and MKK6 through parallel signaling pathways.

  12. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase gene family from banana suggest involvement of specific members in different stages of fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Asif, Mehar Hasan; Lakhwani, Deepika; Pathak, Sumya; Bhambhani, Sweta; Bag, Sumit K; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important components of the tripartite mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade and play an important role in plant growth and development. Although members of the MAPK gene family have been identified in model plants, little information is available regarding this gene family in fruit crops. In this study, we carried out a computational analysis using the Musa Genome database to identify members of the MAPK gene family in banana, an economically important crop and the most popular fruit worldwide. Our analysis identified 25 members of the MAP kinase (MAPK or MPK) gene family. Phylogenetic analyses of MPKs in Arabidopsis, Oryza, and Populus have classified these MPKs into four subgroups. The presence of conserved domains in the deduced amino acid sequences, phylogeny, and genomic organization strongly support their identity as members of the MPK gene family. Expression analysis during ethylene-induced banana fruit ripening suggests the involvement of several MPKs in the ethylene signal transduction pathway that are necessary for banana fruit ripening. Analysis of the cis-regulatory elements in the promoter regions and the involvement of the identified MPKs in various cellular processes, as analyzed using Pathway Studio, suggest a role for the banana MPK gene family in diverse functions related to growth, development, and the stress response. This report is the first concerning the identification of members of a gene family and the elucidation of their role in various processes using the Musa Genome database. PMID:24275941

  13. Decreased hepatic phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase contributes to attenuation of thioacetamide-induced hepatic necrosis in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Makoto; Arakawa, Shingo; Teranishi, Munehiro; Kai, Kiyonori

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that thioacetamide (TA)-induced hepatocellular necrosis was attenuated in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD mice) compared with mice fed a normal rodent diet (ND mice). In this study, we investigated whether p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) was involved in this attenuation. Western blot analysis revealed that hepatic phosphorylated p38 MAPK protein decreased at 8 and 24 hours (hr) after TA dosing in the HFD mice, while it decreased only at 24 hr in the ND mice in comparison to the time- and diet-matched, vehicle-treated mice. p38 MAPK regulates various biological functions including inflammation, therefore, hepatic metabolomics analysis focusing on pro-inflammatory lipid mediators was performed. At 24 hr after TA dosing, only one pro-inflammatory mediator, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), was higher in the HFD mice. On the other hand, in addition to 12-HETE, 15-HETE and 12-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (HEPE) were higher and omega-3/omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids ratios were lower in the ND mice at 24 hr. These results of metabolomics indicated that less pro-inflammatory state was seen in HFD mice than in ND mice at 24 hr. Finally, to confirm whether the observed decrease in phosphorylated p38 MAPK could attenuate TA-induced hepatocellular necrosis, we showed that SB203580 hydrochloride, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, partially attenuated TA-induced hepatic necrosis in ND mice. Collectively, these results suggest that a prompt decrease in phosphorylation of p38 MAPK after TA administration is one of the factors that attenuate TA-induced hepatic necrosis in HFD mice. PMID:26961609

  14. Cancer Cell-derived Exosomes Induce Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase-dependent Monocyte Survival by Transport of Functional Receptor Tyrosine Kinases.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao; Ding, Yanping; Liu, Gang; Yang, Xiao; Zhao, Ruifang; Zhang, Yinlong; Zhao, Xiao; Anderson, Gregory J; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-04-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) play pivotal roles in cancer initiation and progression. Monocytes, the precursors of TAMs, normally undergo spontaneous apoptosis within 2 days, but can subsist in the inflammatory tumor microenvironment for continuous survival and generation of sufficient TAMs. The mechanisms underlying tumor-driving monocyte survival remain obscure. Here we report that cancer cell-derived exosomes were crucial mediators for monocyte survival in the inflammatory niche. Analysis of the survival-promoting molecules in monocytes revealed that cancer cell-derived exosomes activated Ras and extracellular signal-regulated kinases in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, resulting in the prevention of caspase cleavage. Phosphorylated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), such as phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2), were abundantly expressed in cancer cell-derived exosomes. Knock-out of EGFR or/and HER-2, or alternatively, inhibitors against their phosphorylation significantly disturbed the exosome-mediated activation of the MAPK pathway, inhibition of caspase cleavage, and increase in survival rate in monocytes. Moreover, the deprived survival-stimulating activity of exosomes due to null expression of EGFR and HER-2 could be restored by activation of another RTK, insulin receptor. Overall, our study uncovered a mechanism of tumor-associated monocyte survival and demonstrated that cancer cell-derived exosomes can stimulate the MAPK pathway in monocytes through transport of functional RTKs, leading to inactivation of apoptosis-related caspases. This work provides insights into the long sought question on monocyte survival prior to formation of plentiful TAMs in the tumor microenvironment.

  15. Suppression of UVB-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor kappa B by green tea polyphenol in SKH-1 hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Afaq, Farrukh; Ahmad, Nihal; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2003-12-18

    Studies from our laboratory have shown that epigallocatechin-3-gallate, the major polyphenol present in green tea, inhibits ultraviolet (UV)B-exposure-mediated phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 176: 110-117, 2001) and activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) (Oncogene 22: 1035-1044, 2003) pathways in normal human epidermal keratinocytes. This study was designed to investigate the relevance of these findings to the in vivo situations in SKH-1 hairless mouse model, which is regarded to have relevance to human situations. SKH-1 hairless mice were topically treated with GTP (5 mg/0.2 ml acetone/mouse) and were exposed to UVB 30 min later (180 mJ/cm2). These treatments were repeated every alternate day for 2 weeks, for a total of seven treatments. The animals were killed 24 h after the last UVB exposure. Topical application of GTP resulted in significant decrease in UVB-induced bifold-skin thickness, skin edema and infiltration of leukocytes. Employing Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical studies, we found that GTP resulted in inhibition of UVB-induced: (i) phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), (ii) c-Jun N-terminal kinases, and (iii) p38 protein expression. Since NF-kappaB plays a major role in inflammation and cell proliferation, we assessed the effect of GTP on UVB-mediated modulations in the NF-kappaB pathway. Our data demonstrated that GTP inhibited UVB-induced: (i) activation of NF-kappaB, (ii) activation of IKKalpha, and (iii) phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha. Our data suggest that GTP protects against the adverse effects of UV radiation via modulations in MAPK and NF-kappaB signaling pathways, and provides molecular basis for the photochemopreventive effect of GTP in an in vivo animal model system.

  16. Epiderstatin, a new inhibitor of the mitogenic activity induced by epidermal growth factor. I. Taxonomy, fermentation, isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Osada, H; Sonoda, T; Kusakabe, H; Isono, K

    1989-11-01

    Inhibitors of mitogenic activity induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) were screened from culture broths of soil microorganisms. A strain of actinomycetes has been found to produce a new glutarimide antibiotic named epiderstatin which inhibits the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into quiescent animal cells stimulated by EGF. Taxonomic studies have revealed that the producing strain belongs to a subspecies of Streptomyces pulveraceus, thus the name, Streptomyces pulveraceus subsp. epiderstagenes was given to this strain. The molecular formula (C15H20N2O4) and UV profile (lambda max 295 nm) of the antibiotic are distinct from other known antibiotics. It inhibited the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into quiescent cells stronger than into growing cells. PMID:2584144

  17. p38γ and p38δ Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs), New Stars in the MAPK Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Escós, Alejandra; Risco, Ana; Alsina-Beauchamp, Dayanira; Cuenda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinases p38γ and p38δ belong to the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family. p38MAPK signaling controls many cellular processes and is one of the most conserved mechanisms in eukaryotes for the cellular response to environmental stress and inflammation. Although p38γ and p38δ are widely expressed, it is likely that they perform specific functions in different tissues. Their involvement in human pathologies such as inflammation-related diseases or cancer is starting to be uncovered. In this article we give a general overview and highlight recent advances made in defining the functions of p38γ and p38δ, focusing in innate immunity and inflammation. We consider the potential of the pharmacological targeting of MAPK pathways to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:27148533

  18. A role for p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in early post-embryonic development of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Ressurreição, Margarida; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M; Walker, Anthony J

    2011-11-01

    The importance of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) to Schistosoma mansoni miracidium to mother-sporocyst development was investigated. Western blotting revealed that phosphorylation (activation) of p38 MAPK was low in larvae after 4h development in vitro but increased markedly during transformation, with ∼2.7- and ∼3.7-fold increases after 19h and 28h culture, respectively. Immunohistochemistry of larvae undergoing transformation revealed activated p38 MAPK associated with regions including the tegument, neural mass and germinal cells. Inhibition of larval p38 MAPK with SB203580 reduced significantly the rate of development of miracidia to mother sporocysts, whereas activation of p38 MAPK with anisomycin had the opposite effect. These results provide insight into p38 MAPK signalling in schistosomes and support a role for p38 MAPK in the early post-embryonic development of S. mansoni. PMID:21787807

  19. Context Specificity of Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling: The Story as Told by Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Andrusiak, Matthew G; Jin, Yishi

    2016-04-01

    Stress-associated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades trigger specific cellular responses and are involved in multiple disease states. At the root of MAP kinase signaling complexity is the differential use of common components on a context-specific basis. The roundwormCaenorhabditis eleganswas developed as a system to study genes required for development and nervous system function. The powerful genetics ofC. elegansin combination with molecular and cellular dissections has led to a greater understanding of how p38 and JNK signaling affects many biological processes under normal and stress conditions. This review focuses on the studies revealing context specificity of different stress-activated MAPK components inC. elegans.

  20. Context Specificity of Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling: The Story as Told by Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Andrusiak, Matthew G; Jin, Yishi

    2016-04-01

    Stress-associated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades trigger specific cellular responses and are involved in multiple disease states. At the root of MAP kinase signaling complexity is the differential use of common components on a context-specific basis. The roundwormCaenorhabditis eleganswas developed as a system to study genes required for development and nervous system function. The powerful genetics ofC. elegansin combination with molecular and cellular dissections has led to a greater understanding of how p38 and JNK signaling affects many biological processes under normal and stress conditions. This review focuses on the studies revealing context specificity of different stress-activated MAPK components inC. elegans. PMID:26907690

  1. p38γ and p38δ Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs), New Stars in the MAPK Galaxy

    PubMed Central

    Escós, Alejandra; Risco, Ana; Alsina-Beauchamp, Dayanira; Cuenda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinases p38γ and p38δ belong to the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family. p38MAPK signaling controls many cellular processes and is one of the most conserved mechanisms in eukaryotes for the cellular response to environmental stress and inflammation. Although p38γ and p38δ are widely expressed, it is likely that they perform specific functions in different tissues. Their involvement in human pathologies such as inflammation-related diseases or cancer is starting to be uncovered. In this article we give a general overview and highlight recent advances made in defining the functions of p38γ and p38δ, focusing in innate immunity and inflammation. We consider the potential of the pharmacological targeting of MAPK pathways to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:27148533

  2. Conformation-selective ATP-competitive inhibitors control regulatory interactions and noncatalytic functions of mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Hari, Sanjay B; Merritt, Ethan A; Maly, Dustin J

    2014-05-22

    Most potent protein kinase inhibitors act by competing with ATP to block the phosphotransferase activity of their targets. However, emerging evidence demonstrates that ATP-competitive inhibitors can affect kinase interactions and functions in ways beyond blocking catalytic activity. Here, we show that stabilizing alternative ATP-binding site conformations of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38α and Erk2 with ATP-competitive inhibitors differentially, and in some cases divergently, modulates the abilities of these kinases to interact with upstream activators and deactivating phosphatases. Conformation-selective ligands are also able to modulate Erk2's ability to allosterically activate the MAPK phosphatase DUSP6, highlighting how ATP-competitive ligands can control noncatalytic kinase functions. Overall, these studies underscore the relationship between the ATP-binding and regulatory sites of MAPKs and provide insight into how ATP-competitive ligands can be designed to confer graded control over protein kinase function.

  3. Genome-wide identification and analysis of expression profiles of maize mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangpei; Lv, Wei; Zhang, Dan; Jiang, Shanshan; Zhang, Shizhong; Li, Dequan

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are highly conserved signal transduction model in animals, yeast and plants. Plant MAPK cascades have been implicated in development and stress responses. Although MAPKKKs have been investigated in several plant species including Arabidopsis and rice, no systematic analysis has been conducted in maize. In this study, we performed a bioinformatics analysis of the entire maize genome and identified 74 MAPKKK genes. Phylogenetic analyses of MAPKKKs from maize, rice and Arabidopsis have classified them into three subgroups, which included Raf, ZIK and MEKK. Evolutionary relationships within subfamilies were also supported by exon-intron organizations and the conserved protein motifs. Further expression analysis of the MAPKKKs in microarray databases revealed that MAPKKKs were involved in important signaling pathways in maize different organs and developmental stages. Our genomics analysis of maize MAPKKK genes provides important information for evolutionary and functional characterization of this family in maize.

  4. 2,2',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl upregulates cyclooxygenase-2 in HL-60 cells via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Bezdecny, Steven A.; Karmaus, Peer; Roth, Robert A.; Ganey, Patricia E. . E-mail: ganey@msu.edu

    2007-06-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous, persistent environmental contaminants that affect a number of cellular systems, including neutrophils. Among the effects caused by the noncoplanar PCB 2,2',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (2244-TCB) in granulocytic HL-60 cells are increases in superoxide anion production, activation of phospholipase A{sub 2} with subsequent release of arachidonic acid (AA) and upregulation of the inflammatory gene cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The objective of this study was to determine the signal transduction pathways involved in the upregulation of COX-2 by 2244-TCB. Treatment of HL-60 cells with 2244-TCB led to increased expression of COX-2 mRNA. This increase was prevented by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D in cells pretreated with 2244-TCB for 10 min. The increase in COX-2 mRNA was associated with release of {sup 3}H-AA, phosphorylation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, increased levels of nuclear NF-{kappa}B and increased superoxide anion production. Bromoenol lactone, an inhibitor of the calcium-independent phospholipase A{sub 2}, reduced {sup 3}H-AA release but had no effect on COX-2 mRNA, protein or activity. Pretreatment with SB-202190 or SB-203580, inhibitors of the p38 MAP kinase pathway, prevented the 2244-TCB-mediated induction of COX-2 and phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. These inhibitors did not alter {sup 3}H-AA release. Treatment with PD 98059 or U 0126, inhibitors of the MAP/ERK (MEK) pathway, prevented the 2244-TCB-mediated activation of ERK but had no effect on COX-2 induction or p38 phosphorylation. 2244-TCB treatment did not affect c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. 2244-TCB exposure increased the amount of nuclear NF-{kappa}B. This increase was prevented by pretreatment with p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, but not by pretreatment with MEK inhibitors. Pretreatment with inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B prevented the 2244-TCB-mediated

  5. Octacalcium phosphate crystals directly stimulate expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase through p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases in articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ea, Hang-Korng; Uzan, Benjamin; Rey, Christian; Lioté, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    Basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals, including hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and carbonate-apatite, have been associated with severe osteoarthritis and several degenerative arthropathies. Most studies have considered the chondrocyte to be a bystander in the pathogenesis of calcium crystal deposition disease, assuming that synovial cell cytokines were the only triggers of chondrocyte activation. In the present study we identified direct activation of articular chondrocytes by OCP crystals, which are the BCP crystals with the greatest potential for inducing inflammation. OCP crystals induced nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mRNA expression by isolated articular chondrocytes and cartilage fragments, in a dose-dependent manner and with variations over time. OCP crystals also induced IL-1β mRNA expression. Using pharmacological and cytokine inhibitors, we observed that OCP crystals induced NO production and inducible NOS mRNA activation were regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels; were independent from IL-1β gene activation; and involved p38 and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, as further confirmed by OCP crystal-induced p38 and JNK MAPK phosphorylation. Taken together, our data suggest that the transcriptional inducible NOS response to OCP crystals involved both the p38 and the JNK MAPK pathways, probably under the control of activator protein-1. NO, a major mediator of cartilage degradation, can be directly produced by BCP crystals in chondrocytes. Together with synovial activation, this direct mechanism may be important in the pathogenesis of destructive arthropathies triggered by microcrystals. PMID:16207333

  6. Phosphorylation within the transactivation domain of adenovirus E1A protein by mitogen-activated protein kinase regulates expression of early region 4.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, S G; Marcellus, R C; Whalen, A; Ahn, N G; Ricciardi, R P; Branton, P E

    1997-01-01

    A critical role of the 289-residue (289R) E1A protein of human adenovirus type 5 during productive infection is to transactivate expression of all early viral transcription. Sequences within and proximal to conserved region 3 (CR3) promote expression of these viral genes through interactions with a variety of transcription factors requiring the zinc binding motif in CR3 and in some cases a region at the carboxy-terminal end of CR3, including residues 183 to 188. It is known that 3',5' cyclic AMP (cAMP) reduces the level of phosphorylation of the 289R E1A protein through the activation of protein phosphatase 2A by the E4orf4 protein. This study was designed to identify the E1A phosphorylation sites affected by E4orf4 expression and to determine their importance in regulation of E1A activity. We report here that two previously unidentified sites at Ser-185 and Ser-188 are the targets for decreased phosphorylation in response to cAMP. At least one of these sites, presumably Ser-185, is phosphorylated in vitro by purified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and both are hyperphosphorylated in cells which express a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase. Analysis of E1A-mediated transactivation activity indicated that elevated phosphorylation at these sites increased expression of the E4 promoter but not that of E3. We have recently shown that one or more E4 products induce cell death due to p53-independent apoptosis, and thus it seems likely that one role of the E4orf4 protein is to limit production of toxic E4 products by limiting expression of the E4 promoter. PMID:9094626

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinases play an essential role in oxidative burst-independent expression of pathogenesis-related genes in parsley.

    PubMed

    Kroj, Thomas; Rudd, Jason J; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Gäbler, Yvonne; Lee, Justin; Scheel, Dierk

    2003-01-24

    Plants are continuously exposed to attack by potential phytopathogens. Disease prevention requires pathogen recognition and the induction of a multifaceted defense response. We are studying the non-host disease resistance response of parsley to the oomycete, Phytophthora sojae using a cell culture-based system. Receptor-mediated recognition of P. sojae may be achieved through a thirteen amino acid peptide sequence (Pep-13) present within an abundant cell wall transglutaminase. Following recognition of this elicitor molecule, parsley cells mount a defense response, which includes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transcriptional activation of genes encoding pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins or enzymes involved in the synthesis of antimicrobial phytoalexins. Treatment of parsley cells with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium (DPI), blocked both Pep-13-induced phytoalexin production and the accumulation of transcripts encoding enzymes involved in their synthesis. In contrast, DPI treatment had no effect upon Pep-13-induced PR gene expression, suggesting the existence of an oxidative burst-independent mechanism for the transcriptional activation of PR genes. The use of specific antibodies enabled the identification of three parsley mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that are activated within the signal transduction pathway(s) triggered following recognition of Pep-13. Other environmental challenges failed to activate these kinases in parsley cells, suggesting that their activation plays a key role in defense signal transduction. Moreover, by making use of a protoplast co-transfection system overexpressing wild-type and loss-of-function MAPK mutants, we show an essential role for post-translational phosphorylation and activation of MAPKs for oxidative burst-independent PR promoter activation.

  8. Cry1Ac toxin induces macrophage activation via ERK1/2, JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martínez, Marilu; Rubio-Infante, Néstor; García-Hernández, Ana Lilia; Nava-Acosta, Raúl; Ilhuicatzi-Alvarado, Damaris; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia

    2016-09-01

    The Cry1Ac toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis is used commercially as a bio-insecticide and is expressed in transgenic plants that are used for human and animal consumption. Although it was originally considered innocuous for mammals, the Cry1Ac toxin is not inert and has the ability to induce mucosal and systemic immunogenicity. Herein, we examined whether the Cry1Ac toxin promotes macrophage activation and explored the signalling pathways that may mediate this effect. Treatment of primary and RAW264.7 macrophages with the Cry1Ac toxin resulted in upregulation of the costimulatory molecules CD80, CD86 and ICOS-L and enhanced production of nitric oxide, the chemokine MCP-1 and the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. Remarkably, the Cry1Ac toxin induced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) ERK1/2, JNK and p38 and promoted nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p50 and p65. p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs were involved in this effect, as indicated by the Cry1Ac-induced upregulation of CD80 and IL-6 and TNF-α abrogation by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Furthermore, treatment the MEK1/2 kinase inhibitor PD98059 blocked increases in MCP-1 secretion and augmented Cry1Ac-induced ICOS-L upregulation. These data demonstrate the capacity of the Cry1Ac toxin to induce macrophage activation via the MAPK and NF-κB pathways. PMID:27394658

  9. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase by celecoxib oppositely regulates survivin and gamma-H2AX in human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, P.-W.; Chang, C.-C.; Liu, H.-F.; Tsai, C.-M.; Chiu, Ted H.; Chao, J.-I . E-mail: chaoji@mail.tcu.edu.tw

    2007-07-01

    Cancer cells express survivin that facilitates tumorigenesis. Celecoxib has been shown to reduce human colorectal cancers. However, the role and regulation of survivin by celecoxib in colorectal carcinoma cells remain unclear. Treatment with 40-80 {mu}M celecoxib for 24 h induced cytotoxicity and proliferation inhibition via a concentration-dependent manner in RKO colorectal carcinoma cells. Celecoxib blocked the survivin protein expression and increased the phosphorylation of H2AX at serine-193 ({gamma}-H2AX). The survivin gene knockdown by transfection with a survivin siRNA revealed that the loss of survivin correlated with the expression of {gamma}-H2AX. Meanwhile, celecoxib increased caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. Celecoxib activated the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The phosphorylated proteins of p38 MAP kinase and {gamma}-H2AX were observed in the apoptotic cells. SB203580, a specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, protected the survivin protein expression and decreased the levels of {gamma}-H2AX and apoptosis in the celecoxib-exposed cells. The blockade of survivin expression increased the celecoxib-induced cytotoxicity; conversely, overexpression of survivin by transfection with a survivin-expressing vector raised the cancer cell proliferation and resisted the celecoxib-induced cell death. Our results provide for the first time that p38 MAP kinase participates in the down-regulation of survivin and subsequently induces the activation of {gamma}-H2AX for mediating apoptosis following treatment with celecoxib in human colorectal cancer cells.

  10. The cooked meat carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine activates the extracellular signal regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Creton, Stuart K; Zhu, Huijun; Gooderham, Nigel J

    2007-12-01

    During the cooking of meat, mutagenic and carcinogenic heterocyclic amines are formed, the most abundant of which, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4-5-b]pyridine (PhIP), induces tumors of the prostate, colon, and mammary gland in rats. Humans consuming cooked meat are exposed to PhIP on a daily basis, yet few studies have assessed the effects of PhIP at dietary relevant concentrations. In addition to its genotoxic properties, recent studies have shown that PhIP can activate estrogen receptor-mediated signaling pathways at doses that are similar to those that may be present in the body following consumption of a cooked meat meal. In the present study, we examined whether such doses of PhIP can affect estrogen receptor-independent signal transduction via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) pathway to influence proliferation and migration in the human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A and the prostate cancer cell line PC-3. At doses shown to have a proliferative effect on MCF10A cells (10(-11)-10(-7) mol/L), PhIP induced a rapid, transient increase in phosphorylation of both MAPK/ERK kinase 1/2 and ERKs. Inhibition of this pathway significantly reduced the PhIP-induced proliferation of MCF10A cells and the migration of PC-3 cells. The data presented here show that levels of PhIP that approximate to human dietary exposure stimulate cellular signaling pathways and result in increased growth and migration, processes linked to the promotion and progression of neoplastic disease. These findings provide strong evidence that PhIP acts as a tumor initiator and promoter and that dietary exposure to this compound could contribute to carcinogenesis in humans.

  11. Roles for the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, DUSP1, in feedback control of inflammatory gene expression and repression by dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Shah, Suharsh; King, Elizabeth M; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Newton, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Glucocorticoids act on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) to repress inflammatory gene expression. This is central to their anti-inflammatory effectiveness and rational improvements in therapeutic index depend on understanding the mechanism. Human pulmonary epithelial A549 cells were used to study the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase, dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), in the dexamethasone repression of 11 inflammatory genes induced, in a MAPK-dependent manner, by interleukin-1β (IL1B). Adenoviral over-expression of DUSP1 inactivated MAPK pathways and reduced expression of all 11 inflammatory genes. IL1B rapidly induced DUSP1 expression and RNA silencing revealed a transient role in feedback inhibition of MAPKs and inflammatory gene expression. With dexamethasone, which induced DUSP1 expression, plus IL1B (co-treatment), DUSP1 expression was further enhanced. At 1 h, this was responsible for the dexamethasone inhibition of IL1B-induced MAPK activation and CXCL1 and CXCL2 mRNA expression, with a similar trend for CSF2. Whereas, CCL20 mRNA was not repressed by dexamethasone at 1 h, repression of CCL2, CXCL3, IL6, and IL8 was unaffected, and PTGS2 repression was partially affected by DUSP1 knockdown. At later times, dexamethasone repression of MAPKs was unaffected by DUSP1 silencing. Likewise, 6 h post-IL1B, dexamethasone repression of all 11 mRNAs was essentially unaffected by DUSP1 knockdown. Qualitatively similar data were obtained for CSF2, CXCL1, IL6, and IL8 release. Thus, despite general roles in feedback inhibition, DUSP1 plays a transient, often partial, role in the dexamethasone-dependent repression of certain inflammatory genes. Therefore this also illustrates key roles for DUSP1-independent effectors in mediating glucocorticoid-dependent repression. PMID:24692548

  12. Signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinase and Rac/Rho does not duplicate the effects of activated Ras on skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramocki, M B; Johnson, S E; White, M A; Ashendel, C L; Konieczny, S F; Taparowsky, E J

    1997-07-01

    The ability of basic helix-loop-helix muscle regulatory factors (MRFs), such as MyoD, to convert nonmuscle cells to a myogenic lineage is regulated by numerous growth factor and oncoprotein signaling pathways. Previous studies have shown that H-Ras 12V inhibits differentiation to a skeletal muscle lineage by disrupting MRF function via a mechanism that is independent of the dimerization, DNA binding, and inherent transcriptional activation properties of the proteins. To investigate the intracellular signaling pathway(s) that mediates the inhibition of MRF-induced myogenesis by oncogenic Ras, we tested two transformation-defective H-Ras 12V effector domain variants for their ability to alter terminal differentiation. H-Ras 12V,35S retains the ability to activate the Raf/MEK/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade, whereas H-Ras 12V,40C is unable to interact directly with Raf-1 yet still influences other signaling intermediates, including Rac and Rho. Expression of each H-Ras 12V variant in C3H10T1/2 cells abrogates MyoD-induced activation of the complete myogenic program, suggesting that MAP kinase-dependent and -independent Ras signaling pathways individually block myogenesis in this model system. However, additional studies with constitutively activated Rac1 and RhoA proteins revealed no negative effects on MyoD-induced myogenesis. Similarly, treatment of Ras-inhibited myoblasts with the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 revealed that elevated MAP kinase activity is not a significant contributor to the H-Ras 12V effect. These data suggest that an additional Ras pathway, distinct from the well-characterized MAP kinase and Rac/Rho pathways known to be important for the transforming function of activated Ras, is primarily responsible for the inhibition of myogenesis by H-Ras 12V.

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1) stabilizes MyoD through direct phosphorylation at tyrosine 156 during myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jo, Chulman; Cho, Sun-Jung; Jo, Sangmee Ahn

    2011-05-27

    Previously, we reported that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1) activated in the mid-stage of skeletal muscle differentiation promotes myogenic differentiation. To elucidate the molecular mechanism, we investigated an activity of MEK1 for MyoD. Activated MEK1 associates with MyoD in the nucleus of differentiating myoblasts. In vitro kinase assay using active MEK1, a (32)P-labeled protein band corresponding to GST-MyoD was observed but not to mutant GST-MyoD-Y156F. Tyrosine phosphorylation of endogenous MyoD was detected with a specific anti-pMyoD-Y156 antibody; however, this response was blocked by PD184352, a MEK-specific inhibitor. These results indicate that activated MEK1 phosphorylates the MyoD-Y156 residue directly. Interestingly, the protein level of mutant MyoD-Y156F decreased compared with that of wild type but was recovered in the presence of lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor. The protein level of MyoD-Y156E, which mimics phosphorylation at Tyr-156, was above that of wild type, indicating that the phosphorylation protects MyoD from the ubiquitin proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, the low protein level of MyoD-Y156F was recovered over that of wild type by an additional mutation at Leu-164, a critical binding residue of MAFbx/AT-1, a Skp, Cullin, F-box (SCF) E3-ubiquitin ligase. The amount of MyoD co-precipitated with MAFbx/AT-1 also was reduced in the presence of active MEK1. Thus, these results suggested that the phosphorylation probably interrupts the binding of MAFbx/AT-1 to MyoD and thereby increases its stability. Collectively, our results suggest that MEK1 activated in differentiating myoblasts stimulates muscle differentiation by phosphorylating MyoD-Y156, which results in MyoD stabilization.

  14. Two guard cell mitogen-activated protein kinases, MPK9 and MPK12, function in methyl jasmonate-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Khokon, Md A R; Salam, M A; Jammes, F; Ye, W; Hossain, M A; Uraji, M; Nakamura, Y; Mori, I C; Kwak, J M; Murata, Y

    2015-09-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and abscisic acid (ABA) signalling cascades share several signalling components in guard cells. We previously showed that two guard cell-preferential mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), MPK9 and MPK12, positively regulate ABA signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we examined whether these two MAP kinases function in MeJA signalling using genetic mutants for MPK9 and MPK12 combined with a pharmacological approach. MeJA induced stomatal closure in mpk9-1 and mpk12-1 single mutants as well as wild-type plants, but not in mpk9-1 mpk12-1 double mutants. Consistently, the MAPKK inhibitor PD98059 inhibited the MeJA-induced stomatal closure in wild-type plants. MeJA elicited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cytosolic alkalisation in guard cells of the mpk9-1, mpk12-1 and mpk9-1 mpk12-1 mutants, as well in wild-type plants. Furthermore, MeJA triggered elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt ) in the mpk9-1 mpk12-1 double mutant as well as wild-type plants. Activation of S-type anion channels by MeJA was impaired in mpk9-1 mpk12-1. Together, these results indicate that MPK9 and MPK12 function upstream of S-type anion channel activation and downstream of ROS production, cytosolic alkalisation and [Ca(2+)]cyt elevation in guard cell MeJA signalling, suggesting that MPK9 and MPK12 are key regulators mediating both ABA and MeJA signalling in guard cells.

  15. Arabidopsis Raf-Like Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Gene Raf43 Is Required for Tolerance to Multiple Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Nasar; Li, Dayong; Tian, Limei; Huang, Lei; Hong, Yongbo; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yafen; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Huijuan; Song, Fengming

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are critical signaling modules that mediate the transduction of extracellular stimuli into intracellular response. A relatively large number of MAPKKKs have been identified in a variety of plant genomes but only a few of them have been studied for their biological function. In the present study, we identified an Arabidopsis Raf-like MAPKKK gene Raf43 and studied its function in biotic and abiotic stress response using a T-DNA insertion mutant raf43-1 and two Raf43-overexpressing lines Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13. Expression of Raf43 was induced by multiple abiotic and biotic stresses including treatments with drought, mannitol and oxidative stress or defense signaling molecule salicylic acid and infection with necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Seed germination and seedling root growth of raf43-1 were significantly inhibited on MS medium containing mannitol, NaCl, H2O2 or methyl viologen (MV) while seed germination and seedling root growth of the Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13 lines was similar to wild type Col-0 under the above stress conditions. Soil-grown raf43-1 plants exhibited reduced tolerance to MV, drought and salt stress. Abscisic acid inhibited significantly seed germination and seedling root growth of the raf43-1 line but had no effect on the two Raf43-overexpressing lines. Expression of stress-responsive RD17 and DREB2A genes was significantly down-regulated in raf43-1 plants. However, the raf43-1 and Raf43-overexpressing plants showed similar disease phenotype to the wild type plants after infection with B. cinerea or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Our results demonstrate that Raf43, encoding for a Raf-like MAPKKK, is required for tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. PMID:26222830

  16. Reactive oxygen species and mitogen-activated protein kinase induce apoptotic death of SH-SY5Y cells in response to fipronil.

    PubMed

    Ki, Yeo-Woon; Lee, Jeong Eun; Park, Jae Hyeon; Shin, In Chul; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2012-05-20

    There are multiple lines of evidence showing that environmental toxicants including pesticides may contribute to neuronal cell death. Fipronil (FPN) is a phenylpyrazole insecticide that acts on insect GABA receptors. Although the action of FPN is restricted to insect neuronal or muscular transmitter systems, a few studies have assessed the effects of this neurotoxicant on neuronal cell death distinct from an insect. To determine the mechanisms underlying FPN-induced neuronal cell death, we evaluated the ability of this chemical to induce oxidative stress and studied the involvement of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in FPN-induced apoptosis stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y (SH-SY5Y) cells. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to FPN led to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic cell death via activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Interestingly, the antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) attenuated apoptotic cell death and ROS production induced by FPN. These results indicated that oxidative stress plays a central role in FPN-induced cytotoxicity. Mitochondrial complex I activity was also inhibited by FPN treatment. These finding indicate that FPN triggers intrinsic apoptosis via the mitochondrial signaling pathway that is initiated by the generation of ROS. Furthermore, FPN treatment induced phosphorylation of MAPK members. Activation of these protein kinases by FPN was involved in the onset of apoptosis as inhibitors specific to these kinases protect against FPN-induced cell death as well as ROS generation. Our data indicate that FPN-induced apoptosis is mediated primarily by the generation of ROS and activation of MAPK members followed by activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  17. Apoptosis during spontaneous and prostaglandin F(2alpha)-induced luteal regression in the buffalo cow (Bubalus bubalis): involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vijay K; Sudhagar, Ranga R; Medhamurthy, R

    2002-09-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate whether the corpus luteum (CL) of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) cow undergoes luteal regression by the process of apoptosis and to examine the involvement of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases during prostaglandin (PG) F(2alpha)-induced luteolysis. Sections of CL from late in the estrous cycle, i.e., during spontaneous luteolysis, stained for 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole revealed increased numbers of condensed nuclei, indicating cell death by apoptosis, which was confirmed further by the occurrence of pronounced oligonucleosome formation. For morphological and biochemical characterization during PGF(2alpha)-induced apoptosis, CL were collected at 0, 4, 12, and 18 h after injection of 750 micro g of Tiaprost, a synthetic analogue of PGF(2alpha), to midestrous buffalo cows. Serum progesterone concentrations fell within 4 h and decreased (P < 0.05) maximally by 18 h. Concomitant decreases (P < 0.05) in the levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory mRNA and protein were observed in CL during 12-18 h, with the more profound effect on mRNA levels. Quantitative analysis of the genomic DNA showed a >5-fold increase (P < 0.05) in the low molecular weight DNA fragments by 18 h postinjection. Immunoblot analysis of CL tissue lysates showed increased (P < 0.05) levels of phospho-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1 (4- to 14-fold during 4-18 h) and phospho-p38 (2- to 4-fold at 18 h). Immunohistochemical evaluation of CL sections revealed an increased nuclear localization of phospho-JNK after treatment. These findings demonstrate that the CL of the buffalo cow undergoes cell death by the process of apoptosis both during spontaneous and PGF(2alpha)-induced luteolysis and that MAP kinases are involved during PGF(2alpha)-mediated apoptosis in the CL.

  18. The type 3 effector NopL of Sinorhizobium sp. strain NGR234 is a mitogen-activated protein kinase substrate.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ying-Ying; Xiang, Qi-Wang; Wagner, Christian; Zhang, Di; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Pathogenic bacteria utilize type 3 secretion systems to inject type 3 effectors (T3Es) into host cells, thereby subverting host defense reactions. Similarly, T3Es of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing rhizobia can affect nodule formation on roots of legumes. Previous work showed that NopL (nodulation outer protein L) of Sinorhizobium(Ensifer) sp. strain NGR234 is multiply phosphorylated in eukaryotic cells and that this T3E suppresses responses mediated by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling in yeast (mating pheromone signaling) and plant cells (expression of pathogenesis-related defense proteins). Here, we show that NopL is a MAP kinase substrate. Microscopic observations of fluorescent fusion proteins and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis in onion cells indicated that NopL is targeted to the nucleus and forms a complex with SIPK (salicylic acid-induced protein kinase), a MAP kinase of tobacco. In vitro experiments demonstrated that NopL is phosphorylatyed by SIPK. At least nine distinct spots were observed after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, indicating that NopL can be hyperphosphorylated by MAP kinases. Senescence symptoms in nodules of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Tendergreen) were analyzed to determine the symbiotic effector activity of different NopL variants with serine to alanine substitutions at identified and predicted phosphorylation sites (serine-proline motif). NopL variants with six or eight serine to alanine substitutions were partially active, whereas NopL forms with 10 or 12 substituted serine residues were inactive. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence that NopL interacts with MAP kinases and reveals the importance of serine-proline motifs for effector activity during symbiosis. PMID:26931172

  19. Arabidopsis Raf-Like Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Gene Raf43 Is Required for Tolerance to Multiple Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Virk, Nasar; Li, Dayong; Tian, Limei; Huang, Lei; Hong, Yongbo; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yafen; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Huijuan; Song, Fengming

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are critical signaling modules that mediate the transduction of extracellular stimuli into intracellular response. A relatively large number of MAPKKKs have been identified in a variety of plant genomes but only a few of them have been studied for their biological function. In the present study, we identified an Arabidopsis Raf-like MAPKKK gene Raf43 and studied its function in biotic and abiotic stress response using a T-DNA insertion mutant raf43-1 and two Raf43-overexpressing lines Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13. Expression of Raf43 was induced by multiple abiotic and biotic stresses including treatments with drought, mannitol and oxidative stress or defense signaling molecule salicylic acid and infection with necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Seed germination and seedling root growth of raf43-1 were significantly inhibited on MS medium containing mannitol, NaCl, H2O2 or methyl viologen (MV) while seed germination and seedling root growth of the Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13 lines was similar to wild type Col-0 under the above stress conditions. Soil-grown raf43-1 plants exhibited reduced tolerance to MV, drought and salt stress. Abscisic acid inhibited significantly seed germination and seedling root growth of the raf43-1 line but had no effect on the two Raf43-overexpressing lines. Expression of stress-responsive RD17 and DREB2A genes was significantly down-regulated in raf43-1 plants. However, the raf43-1 and Raf43-overexpressing plants showed similar disease phenotype to the wild type plants after infection with B. cinerea or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Our results demonstrate that Raf43, encoding for a Raf-like MAPKKK, is required for tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. PMID:26222830

  20. The mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade is activated by B-Raf in response to nerve growth factor through interaction with p21ras.

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, R K; Moodie, S A; Wolfman, A; Landreth, G E

    1994-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) activates the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade through a p21ras-dependent signal transduction pathway in PC12 cells. The linkage between p21ras and MEK1 was investigated to identify those elements which participate in the regulation of MEK1 activity. We have screened for MEK activators using a coupled assay in which the MAP kinase cascade has been reconstituted in vitro. We report that we have detected a single NGF-stimulated MEK-activating activity which has been identified as B-Raf. PC12 cells express both B-Raf and c-Raf1; however, the MEK-activating activity was found only in fractions containing B-Raf. c-Raf1-containing fractions did not exhibit a MEK-activating activity. Gel filtration analysis revealed that the B-Raf eluted with an apparent M(r) of 250,000 to 300,000, indicating that it is present within a stable complex with other unidentified proteins. Immunoprecipitation with B-Raf-specific antisera quantitatively precipitated all MEK activator activity from these fractions. We also demonstrate that B-Raf, as well as c-Raf1, directly interacted with activated p21ras immobilized on silica beads. NGF treatment of the cells had no effect on the ability of B-Raf or c-Raf1 to bind to activated p21ras. These data indicate that this interaction was not dependent upon the activation state of these enzymes; however, MEK kinase activity was found to be associated with p21ras following incubation with NGF-treated samples at levels higher than those obtained from unstimulated cells. These data provide direct evidence that NGF-stimulated B-Raf is responsible for the activation of the MAP kinase cascade in PC12 cells, whereas c-Raf1 activity was not found to function within this pathway. Images PMID:7935411

  1. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolution, and Co-expression Network Analysis of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinases in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kewei; Liu, Fuyan; Zou, Jinwei; Xing, Guangwei; Deng, Pingchuan; Song, Weining; Tong, Wei; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are the conserved and universal signal transduction modules in all eukaryotes, which play the vital roles in plant growth, development, and in response to multiple stresses. In this study, we used bioinformatics methods to identify 86 MAPKKK protein encoded by 73 MAPKKK genes in Brachypodium. Phylogenetic analysis of MAPKKK family from Arabidopsis, rice, and Brachypodium has classified them into three subfamilies, of which 28 belonged to MEKK, 52 to Raf, and 6 to ZIK subfamily, respectively. Conserved protein motif, exon-intron organization, and splicing intron phase in kinase domains supported the evolutionary relationships inferred from the phylogenetic analysis. And gene duplication analysis suggested the chromosomal segment duplication happened before the divergence of the rice and Brachypodium, while all of three tandem duplicated gene pairs happened after their divergence. We further demonstrated that the MAPKKKs have evolved under strong purifying selection, implying the conservation of them. The splicing transcripts expression analysis showed that the splicesome translating longest protein tended to be adopted. Furthermore, the expression analysis of BdMAPKKKs in different organs and development stages as well as heat, virus and drought stresses revealed that the MAPKKK genes were involved in various signaling pathways. And the circadian analysis suggested there were 41 MAPKKK genes in Brachypodium showing cycled expression in at least one condition, of which seven MAPKKK genes expressed in all conditions and the promoter analysis indicated these genes possessed many cis-acting regulatory elements involved in circadian and light response. Finally, the co-expression network of MAPK, MAPKK, and MAPKKK in Brachypodium was constructed using 144 microarray and RNA-seq datasets, and ten potential MAPK cascades pathway were predicted. To conclude, our study provided the important information for evolutionary and

  2. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolution, and Co-expression Network Analysis of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinases in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kewei; Liu, Fuyan; Zou, Jinwei; Xing, Guangwei; Deng, Pingchuan; Song, Weining; Tong, Wei; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are the conserved and universal signal transduction modules in all eukaryotes, which play the vital roles in plant growth, development, and in response to multiple stresses. In this study, we used bioinformatics methods to identify 86 MAPKKK protein encoded by 73 MAPKKK genes in Brachypodium. Phylogenetic analysis of MAPKKK family from Arabidopsis, rice, and Brachypodium has classified them into three subfamilies, of which 28 belonged to MEKK, 52 to Raf, and 6 to ZIK subfamily, respectively. Conserved protein motif, exon-intron organization, and splicing intron phase in kinase domains supported the evolutionary relationships inferred from the phylogenetic analysis. And gene duplication analysis suggested the chromosomal segment duplication happened before the divergence of the rice and Brachypodium, while all of three tandem duplicated gene pairs happened after their divergence. We further demonstrated that the MAPKKKs have evolved under strong purifying selection, implying the conservation of them. The splicing transcripts expression analysis showed that the splicesome translating longest protein tended to be adopted. Furthermore, the expression analysis of BdMAPKKKs in different organs and development stages as well as heat, virus and drought stresses revealed that the MAPKKK genes were involved in various signaling pathways. And the circadian analysis suggested there were 41 MAPKKK genes in Brachypodium showing cycled expression in at least one condition, of which seven MAPKKK genes expressed in all conditions and the promoter analysis indicated these genes possessed many cis-acting regulatory elements involved in circadian and light response. Finally, the co-expression network of MAPK, MAPKK, and MAPKKK in Brachypodium was constructed using 144 microarray and RNA-seq datasets, and ten potential MAPK cascades pathway were predicted. To conclude, our study provided the important information for evolutionary and

  3. Expression analysis of genes encoding mitogen-activated protein kinases in maize provides a key link between abiotic stress signaling and plant reproduction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Chen, Hao; Wang, Juan; Sun, Hong Wei; Yang, Shu Ke; Sang, Ya Lin; Lu, Xing Bo; Xu, Xiao Hui

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play important roles in stress responses and development in plants. Maize (Zea mays), an important cereal crop, is a model plant species for molecular studies. In the last decade, several MAPKs have been identified in maize; however, their functions have not been studied extensively. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of maize MAPK genes could provide valuable information for understanding their functions. In this study, 20 non-redundant maize MAPK genes (ZmMPKs) were identified via a genome-wide survey. Phylogenetic analysis of MAPKs from maize, rice (Oryza sativa), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), poplar (Populus trichocarpa), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) classified them into four major classes. ZmMPKs in the same class had similar domains, motifs, and genomic structures. Gene duplication investigations suggested that segmental duplications made a large contribution to the expansion of ZmMPKs. A number of cis-acting elements related to plant development and response to stress and hormones were identified in the promoter regions of ZmMPKs. Furthermore, transcript profile analysis in eight tissues and organs at various developmental stages demonstrated that most ZmMPKs were preferentially expressed in reproductive tissues and organs. The transcript abundance of most ZmMPKs changed significantly under salt, drought, cold, or abscisic acid (ABA) treatments, implying that they might participate in abiotic stress and ABA signaling. These expression analyses indicated that ZmMPKs might serve as linkers between abiotic stress signaling and plant reproduction. Our data will deepen our understanding of the complexity of the maize MAPK gene family and provide new clues to investigate their functions.

  4. OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM). E S Roberts1, R Jaskot2, J Richards2, and K L Dreher2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC a...

  5. Postextinction Infusion of a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Inhibitor into the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Impairs Memory of the Extinction of Conditioned Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugues, Sandrine; Deschaux, Olivier; Garcia, Rene

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether postextinction training infusion of PD098059, a selective inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation, into the medial prefrontal cortex, would impair retention of extinction learning in rats. We found that immediate, but not late (2 or 4 h), postextinction infusion of PD098059 provoked a full return of…

  6. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referred to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.

  7. Phenotypic and transcriptional plasticity directed by a yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase network.

    PubMed

    Breitkreutz, Ashton; Boucher, Lorrie; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Sultan, Mujahid; Jurisica, Igor; Tyers, Mike

    2003-11-01

    The yeast pheromone/filamentous growth MAPK pathway mediates both mating and invasive-growth responses. The interface between this MAPK module and the transcriptional machinery consists of a network of two MAPKs, Fus3 and Kss1; two regulators, Rst1 and Rst2 (a.k.a. Dig1 and Dig2); and two transcription factors, Ste12 and Tec1. Of 16 possible combinations of gene deletions in FUS3, KSS1, RST1, and RST2 in the sigma1278 background, 10 display constitutive invasive growth. Rst1 was the primary negative regulator of invasive growth, while other components either attenuated or enhanced invasive growth, depending on the genetic context. Despite activation of the invasive response by lesions at the same level in the MAPK pathway, transcriptional profiles of different invasive mutant combinations did not exhibit a unified program of gene expression. The distal MAPK regulatory network is thus capable of generating phenotypically similar invasive-growth states (an attractor) from different molecular architectures (trajectories) that can functionally compensate for one another. This systems-level robustness may also account for the observed diversity of signals that trigger invasive growth. PMID:14668360

  8. Ras-GTP dimers activate the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li-Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referred to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors. PMID:26080442

  9. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    DOE PAGES

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referredmore » to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.« less

  10. Role of mitogen activated protein kinases in skin tumorigenicity of Patulin

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Neha; Ansari, Kausar M.; Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhari, Bhushan P.; Dwivedi, Premendra D.; Das, Mukul

    2011-12-15

    WHO has highlighted the need to evaluate dermal toxicity of mycotoxins including Patulin (PAT), detected in several fruits. In this study the skin carcinogenic potential of topically applied PAT was investigated. Single topical application of PAT (400 nmol) showed enhanced cell proliferation ({approx} 2 fold), along with increased generation of ROS and activation of ERK, p38 and JNK MAPKs, in mouse skin. PAT exposure also showed activation of downstream target proteins, c-fos, c-Jun and NF-{kappa}B transcription factors. Further, single topical application of PAT (400 nmol) followed by twice weekly application of TPA resulted in tumor formation after 14 weeks, indicating the tumor initiating activity of PAT. However no tumors were observed when PAT was used either as a complete carcinogen (80 nmol) or as a tumor promoter (20 nmol and 40 nmol) for 25 weeks. Histopathological findings of tumors found in PAT/TPA treated mice showed that these tumors were of squamous cell carcinoma type and similar to those found in the positive control group (DMBA/TPA) along with significant increase of lipid peroxidation and decrease in free sulfydryls, catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase activities. The results suggest the possible role of free radicals in PAT mediated dermal tumorigenicity involving MAPKs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single topical application of Patulin showed enhanced cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Patulin activate MAPKs, c-fos, c-Jun and NF-{kappa}B transcription factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Patulin showed skin tumor initiating potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We could not detect skin tumor promoting potential of Patulin at the tested dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer However prolonged exposure of Patulin at a higher dose may promote tumor.

  11. EhMAPK, the mitogen-activated protein kinase from Entamoeba histolytica is associated with cell survival.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anupama Sardar; Ray, Doel; Dutta, Suman; Raha, Sanghamitra

    2010-10-08

    Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) are a class of serine/threonine kinases that regulate a number of different cellular activities including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival and even death. The pathogen Entamoeba histolytica possess a single homologue of a typical MAPK gene (EhMAPK) whose identification was previously reported by us but its functional implications remained unexplored. EhMAPK, the only mitogen-activated protein kinase from the parasitic protist Entamoeba histolytica with Threonine-X-Tyrosine (TXY) phosphorylation motif was cloned, expressed in E. coli and functionally characterized under different stress conditions. The expression profile of EhMAPK at the protein and mRNA level remained similar among untreated, heat shocked and hydrogen peroxide-treated samples in all cases of dose and time. But a significant difference was obtained in the phosphorylation status of the protein in response to different stresses. Heat shock at 43°C or 0.5 mM H(2)O(2) treatment enhanced the phosphorylation status of EhMAPK and augmented the kinase activity of the protein whereas 2.0 mM H(2)O(2) treatment induced dephosphorylation of EhMAPK and loss of kinase activity. 2.0 mM H(2)O(2) treatment reduced parasite viability significantly but heat shock and 0.5 mM H(2)O(2) treatment failed to adversely affect E. histolytica viability. Therefore, a distinct possibility that activation of EhMAPK is associated with stress survival in E. histolytica is seen. Our study also gives a glimpse of the regulatory mechanism of the protein under in vivo conditions. Since the parasite genome lacks any typical homologue of mammalian MEK, the dual specificity kinases which are the upstream activators of MAPK, indications of the existence of some alternate regulatory mechanisms of the EhMAPK activity is perceived. These may include the autophosphorylation activity of the protein itself in combination with some upstream phosphatases which are not yet identified.

  12. Isolation of a Glucosamine Binding Leguminous Lectin with Mitogenic Activity towards Splenocytes and Anti-Proliferative Activity towards Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yau Sang; Wong, Jack Ho; Fang, Evandro Fei; Pan, Wenliang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2012-01-01

    A dimeric 64-kDa glucosamine-specific lectin was purified from seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. “brown kidney bean.” The simple 2-step purification protocol involved affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel and gel filtration by FPLC on Superdex 75. The lectin was absorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and desorbed using 1M NaCl in the starting buffer. Gel filtration on Superdex 75 yielded a major absorbance peak that gave a single 32-kDa band in SDS-PAGE. Hemagglutinating activity was completely preserved when the ambient temperature was in the range of 20°C–60°C. However, drastic reduction of the activity occurred at temperatures above 65°C. Full hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was observed at an ambient pH of 3 to 12. About 50% activity remained at pH 0–2, and only residual activity was observed at pH 13–14. Hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was inhibited by glucosamine. The brown kidney bean lectin elicited maximum mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes at 2.5 µM. The mitogenic activity was nearly completely eliminated in the presence of 250 mM glucosamine. The lectin also increased mRNA expression of the cytokines IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ. The lectin exhibited antiproliferative activity toward human breast cancer (MCF7) cells, hepatoma (HepG2) cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (CNE1 and CNE2) cells with IC50 of 5.12 µM, 32.85 µM, 3.12 µM and 40.12 µM respectively after treatment for 24 hours. Flow cytometry with Annexin V and propidum iodide staining indicated apoptosis of MCF7 cells. Hoechst 33342 staining also indicated formation of apoptotic bodies in MCF7 cells after exposure to brown kidney bean lectin. Western blotting revealed that the lectin-induced apoptosis involved ER stress and unfolded protein response. PMID:22720002

  13. Isolation of a glucosamine binding leguminous lectin with mitogenic activity towards splenocytes and anti-proliferative activity towards tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Wong, Jack Ho; Fang, Evandro Fei; Pan, Wenliang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2012-01-01

    A dimeric 64-kDa glucosamine-specific lectin was purified from seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. "brown kidney bean." The simple 2-step purification protocol involved affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel and gel filtration by FPLC on Superdex 75. The lectin was absorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and desorbed using 1M NaCl in the starting buffer. Gel filtration on Superdex 75 yielded a major absorbance peak that gave a single 32-kDa band in SDS-PAGE. Hemagglutinating activity was completely preserved when the ambient temperature was in the range of 20 °C-60 °C. However, drastic reduction of the activity occurred at temperatures above 65 °C. Full hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was observed at an ambient pH of 3 to 12. About 50% activity remained at pH 0-2, and only residual activity was observed at pH 13-14. Hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was inhibited by glucosamine. The brown kidney bean lectin elicited maximum mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes at 2.5 µM. The mitogenic activity was nearly completely eliminated in the presence of 250 mM glucosamine. The lectin also increased mRNA expression of the cytokines IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ. The lectin exhibited antiproliferative activity toward human breast cancer (MCF7) cells, hepatoma (HepG2) cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (CNE1 and CNE2) cells with IC(50) of 5.12 µM, 32.85 µM, 3.12 µM and 40.12 µM respectively after treatment for 24 hours. Flow cytometry with Annexin V and propidum iodide staining indicated apoptosis of MCF7 cells. Hoechst 33342 staining also indicated formation of apoptotic bodies in MCF7 cells after exposure to brown kidney bean lectin. Western blotting revealed that the lectin-induced apoptosis involved ER stress and unfolded protein response. PMID:22720002

  14. Functional cyclic AMP response element in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) promoter modulates epidermal growth factor receptor pathway- or androgen withdrawal-mediated BCRP/ABCG2 transcription in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Natarajan, Karthika; Safren, Lowell; Hamburger, Anne W; Hussain, Arif; Ross, Douglas D

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorylated cyclic-AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (p-CREB) is a downstream effector of a variety of important signaling pathways. We investigated whether the human BCRP promoter contains a functional cAMP response element (CRE). 8Br-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased the activity of a BCRP promoter reporter construct and BCRP mRNA in human carcinoma cells. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway activation also led to an increase in p-CREB and in BCRP promoter reporter activity via two major downstream EGFR signaling pathways: the phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT, ERK and CREB, while simultaneously enhancing BCRP mRNA and functional protein expression. EGF-stimulated CREB phosphorylation and BCRP induction were diminished by inhibition of EGFR, PI3K/AKT or RAS/MAPK signaling. CREB silencing using RNA interference reduced basal levels of BCRP mRNA and diminished the induction of BCRP by EGF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that a putative CRE site on the BCRP promoter bound p-CREB by a point mutation of the CRE site abolished EGF-induced stimulation of BCRP promoter reporter activity. Furthermore, the CREB co-activator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC2), is involved in CREB-mediated BCRP transcription: androgen depletion of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells increased both CREB phosphorylation and CRTC2 nuclear translocation, and enhanced BCRP expression. Silencing CREB or CRTC2 reduced basal BCRP expression and BCRP induction under androgen-depletion conditions. This novel CRE site plays a central role in mediating BCRP gene expression in several human cancer cell lines following activation of multiple cancer-relevant signaling pathways. PMID:25615818

  15. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Increases Arginase Activity and Contributes to Endothelial Dysfunction in Corpora Cavernosa from Angiotensin-II Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Toque, Haroldo A.; Romero, Maritza J.; Tostes, Rita C.; Shatanawi, Alia; Chandra, Surabhi; Carneiro, Zidonia N.; Inscho, Edward W.; Webb, R. Clinton; Caldwell, Ruth B.; Caldwell, R. William

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Angiotensin II (AngII) activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and elevates arginase activity in endothelial cells. Upregulation of arginase activity has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction by reducing NO bioavailability. However, signaling pathways activated by AngII in the penis are largely unknown. Aim We hypothesized that activation of p38 MAPK increases arginase activity and thus impairs penile vascular function in AngII-treated mice. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice were implanted with osmotic minipumps containing saline or AngII (42 μg/kg/h) for 14 days and co-treated with p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB 203580 (5 μg/kg/day), beginning 2 days before minipump implantation. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured. Corpus cavernosum (CC) tissue was used for vascular functional studies and protein expression levels of p38 MAPK, arginase and constitutive NOS, and arginase activity. Main Outcome Measures Arginase expression and activity; expression of phospho-p38 MAPK, -eNOS and nNOS proteins; endothelium-dependent and nitrergic nerve-mediated relaxations were determined in CC from control and AngII-infused mice. Results AngII increased SBP (22%) and increased CC arginase activity and expression (~2-fold), and phosphorylated P38 MAPK levels (30%) over control. Treatment with SB 203580 prevented these effects. Endothelium-dependent NO-mediated relaxation to acetylcholine was significantly reduced by AngII and this effect was prevented by SB 203580 (P<0.01). AngII (2-week) did not alter nitrergic function. However, SB 203580 significantly increased nitrergic relaxation in both control and AngII tissue at lower frequencies. Maximum contractile responses for phenylephrine and electrical field stimulation were increased by AngII (56% and 171%, respectively), and attenuated by SB 203580 treated. AngII treatment also decreased eNOS phosphorylation at Ser-1177 compared to control. Treatment with SB 203580 prevented all these changes. Conclusion p38

  16. Activation of the Ras/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway by Kinase-Defective Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors Results in Cell Survival but Not Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Francesca; Kato, Akiko; Gonez, L. Jorge; Hibbs, Margaret L.; Pouliot, Normand; Levitzki, Alexander; Burgess, Antony W.

    1998-01-01

    Signalling by the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) has been studied intensively, but for most cell types the analysis is complicated by the fact that EGFR not only homodimerizes but can also form heterodimers with other EGFR family members. Heterodimerization is a particular problem in the study of EGFR mutants, where the true phenotype of the mutants is confounded by the contribution of the heterodimer partner to signal transduction. We have made use of the murine hemopoietic cell line BaF/3, which does not express EGFR family members, to express wild-type (WT) EGFR, three kinase-defective EGFR mutants (V741G, Y740F, and K721R), or a C-terminally truncated EGFR (CT957) and have measured their responses to EGF. We found that under the appropriate conditions EGF can stimulate cell proliferation of BaF/3 cells expressing WT or CT957 EGFRs but not that of cells expressing the kinase-defective mutants. However, EGF promotes the survival of BaF/3 cells expressing either of the kinase-defective receptors (V741G and Y740F), indicating that these receptors can still transmit a survival signal. Analysis of the early signalling events by the WT, V741G, and Y740F mutant EGF receptors indicated that EGF stimulates comparable levels of Shc phosphorylation, Shc–GRB-2 association, and activation of Ras, B-Raf, and Erk-1. Blocking the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway with the specific inhibitor PD98059 abrogates completely the EGF-dependent survival of cells expressing the kinase-defective EGFR mutants but has no effect on the EGF-dependent proliferation mediated by WT and CT957 EGFRs. Similarly, the Src family kinase inhibitor PP1 abrogates EGF-dependent survival without affecting proliferation. However blocking phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase or JAK-2 kinase with specific inhibitors does arrest growth factor-dependent cell proliferation. Thus, EGFR-mediated mitogenic signalling in BaF/3 cells requires an intact EGFR tyrosine kinase activity

  17. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in the signal-transduction pathways of the soya bean oxidative burst.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A T; Kim, J; Low, P S

    2001-01-01

    The oxidative burst constitutes one of the most rapid defence responses characterized in the Plant Kingdom. We have observed that four distinct elicitors of the soya bean oxidative burst activate kinases of masses approximately 44 kDa and approximately 47 kDa. Evidence that these kinases regulate production of reactive oxygen species include: (i) their rapid activation by oxidative burst elicitors, (ii) their tight temporal correlation between activation/deactivation of the kinases and activation/deactivation of the oxidative burst, (iii) the identical pharmacological profile of kinase activation and oxidant production for 13 commonly used inhibitors, and (iv) the autologous activation of both kinases and oxidant production by calyculin A and cantharidin, two phosphatase inhibitors. Immunological and biochemical studies reveal that the activated 44 kDa and 47 kDa kinases are mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family members. The kinases prefer myelin basic protein as a substrate, and they phosphorylate primarily on threonine residues. The kinases are themselves phosphorylated on tyrosine residues, and this phosphorylation is required for activity. Finally, both kinases are recognized by an antibody against activated MAP kinase immediately after (but not before) cell stimulation by elicitors. Based on these and other observations, a preliminary sequence of signalling steps linking elicitor stimulation, kinase activation and Ca(2+) entry, to initiation of oxidant production, is proposed. PMID:11311144

  18. Competition between members of the tribbles pseudokinase protein family shapes their interactions with mitogen activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hongtao; Shuaib, Aban; Leon, David Davila De; Angyal, Adrienn; Salazar, Maria; Velasco, Guillermo; Holcombe, Mike; Dower, Steven K; Kiss-Toth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal regulation of intracellular signalling networks is key to normal cellular physiology; dysregulation of which leads to disease. The family of three mammalian tribbles proteins has emerged as an important controller of signalling via regulating the activity of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), the PI3-kinase induced signalling network and E3 ubiquitin ligases. However, the importance of potential redundancy in the action of tribbles and how the differences in affinities for the various binding partners may influence signalling control is currently unclear. We report that tribbles proteins can bind to an overlapping set of MAPK-kinases (MAPKK) in live cells and dictate the localisation of the complexes. Binding studies in transfected cells reveal common regulatory mechanisms and suggest that tribbles and MAPKs may interact with MAPKKs in a competitive manner. Computational modelling of the impact of tribbles on MAPK activation suggests a high sensitivity of this system to changes in tribbles levels, highlighting that these proteins are ideally placed to control the dynamics and balance of activation of concurrent signalling pathways. PMID:27600771

  19. Riboflavin-Induced Disease Resistance Requires the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases 3 and 6 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Shengjun; Xu, Huilian

    2016-01-01

    As a resistance elicitor, riboflavin (vitamin B2) protects plants against a wide range of pathogens. At molecular biological levels, it is important to elucidate the signaling pathways underlying the disease resistance induced by riboflavin. Here, riboflavin was tested to induce resistance against virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000) in Arabidopsis. Results showed that riboflavin induced disease resistance based on MAPK-dependent priming for the expression of PR1 gene. Riboflavin induced transient expression of PR1 gene. However, following Pst DC3000 inoculation, riboflavin potentiated stronger PR1 gene transcription. Further was suggested that the transcript levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases, MPK3 and MPK6, were primed under riboflavin. Upon infection by Pst DC3000, these two enzymes were more strongly activated. The elevated activation of both MPK3 and MPK6 was responsible for enhanced defense gene expression and resistance after riboflavin treatment. Moreover, riboflavin significantly reduced the transcript levels of MPK3 and MPK6 by application of AsA and BAPTA, an H2O2 scavenger and a calcium (Ca2+) scavenger, respectively. In conclusion, MPK3 and MPK6 were responsible for riboflavin-induced resistance, and played an important role in H2O2- and Ca2+-related signaling pathways, and this study could provide a new insight into the mechanistic study of riboflavin-induced defense responses. PMID:27054585

  20. Competition between members of the tribbles pseudokinase protein family shapes their interactions with mitogen activated protein kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hongtao; Shuaib, Aban; Leon, David Davila De; Angyal, Adrienn; Salazar, Maria; Velasco, Guillermo; Holcombe, Mike; Dower, Steven K.; Kiss-Toth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal regulation of intracellular signalling networks is key to normal cellular physiology; dysregulation of which leads to disease. The family of three mammalian tribbles proteins has emerged as an important controller of signalling via regulating the activity of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), the PI3-kinase induced signalling network and E3 ubiquitin ligases. However, the importance of potential redundancy in the action of tribbles and how the differences in affinities for the various binding partners may influence signalling control is currently unclear. We report that tribbles proteins can bind to an overlapping set of MAPK-kinases (MAPKK) in live cells and dictate the localisation of the complexes. Binding studies in transfected cells reveal common regulatory mechanisms and suggest that tribbles and MAPKs may interact with MAPKKs in a competitive manner. Computational modelling of the impact of tribbles on MAPK activation suggests a high sensitivity of this system to changes in tribbles levels, highlighting that these proteins are ideally placed to control the dynamics and balance of activation of concurrent signalling pathways. PMID:27600771

  1. The Role of Endosomal Escape and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Adenoviral Activation of the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Xu, Zhili; Tian, Jie; Palmer, Donna J.; Ng, Philip; Byrnes, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdV) activate multiple signaling pathways associated with innate immune responses, including mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). In this study, we investigated how systemically-injected AdVs activate two MAPK pathways (p38 and ERK) and the contribution of these kinases to AdV-induced cytokine and chemokine responses in mice. Mice were injected intravenously either with a helper-dependent Ad2 vector that does not express viral genes or transgenes, or with the Ad2 mutant ts1, which is defective in endosomal escape. We found that AdV induced rapid phosphorylation of p38 and ERK as well as a significant cytokine response, but ts1 failed to activate p38 or ERK and induced only a limited cytokine response. These results demonstrate that endosomal escape of virions is a critical step in the induction of these innate pathways and responses. We then examined the roles of p38 and ERK pathways in the innate cytokine response by administering specific kinase inhibitors to mice prior to AdV. The cytokine and chemokine response to AdV was only modestly suppressed by a p38 inhibitor, while an ERK inhibitor has mixed effects, lowering some cytokines and elevating others. Thus, even though p38 and ERK are rapidly activated after i.v. injection of AdV, cytokine and chemokine responses are mostly independent of these kinases. PMID:22046344

  2. Differential activation by cytokines of mitogen-activated protein kinases in bovine temporomandibular-joint disc cells.

    PubMed

    Landesberg, R; Takeuchi, E; Puzas, J E

    1999-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders affect a significant proportion of the population. While their aetiology is not well defined, recent histological studies suggest that the majority are similar to the osteoarthritis seen in other joints. Inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha appear to be important in the cascade of events leading to joint destruction in osteoarthritis. Here, cells from the disc of bovine temporomandibular joint were used to examine the response to various cytokines in vitro. Disc cells were stimulated with interleukin-1alpha, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta, platelet-derived growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Their effects were monitored by assessing the phosphorylation of selected signal-transduction intermediates using western blot. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (Erk 1, Erk 2) were rapidly phosphorylated by exposure to basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha, while interleukin-1alpha showed a weak response. Transforming growth factor-beta failed to activate these kinases. Examination of the effect of these cytokines on p38 (an intermediate in the stress-activated protein-kinase pathway) showed an increase in phosphorylated p38 when stimulated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1alpha. The amounts of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 did not significantly increase when the cells were exposed to any of the cytokines. PMID:10075149

  3. SMALL GRAIN 1, which encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4, influences grain size in rice.

    PubMed

    Duan, Penggen; Rao, Yuchun; Zeng, Dali; Yang, Yaolong; Xu, Ran; Zhang, Baolan; Dong, Guojun; Qian, Qian; Li, Yunhai

    2014-02-01

    Although grain size is one of the most important components of grain yield, little information is known about the mechanisms that determine final grain size in crops. Here we characterize rice small grain1 (smg1) mutants, which exhibit small and light grains, dense and erect panicles and comparatively slightly shorter plants. The short grain and panicle phenotypes of smg1 mutants are caused by a defect in cell proliferation. The smg1 mutations were identified, using a map-based cloning approach, in mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (OsMKK4). Relatively higher expression of OsMKK4/SMG1 was detected in younger organs than in older ones, consistent with its role in cell proliferation. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-OsMKK4/SMG1 fusion proteins appear to be distributed ubiquitously in plant cells. Further results revealed that OsMKK4 influenced brassinosteroid (BR) responses and the expression of BR-related genes. Thus, our findings have identified OsMKK4 as a factor for grain size, and suggest a possible link between the MAPK pathways and BRs in grain growth.

  4. Characterization of a mitogen-activated protein kinase gene from cucumber required for trichoderma-conferred plant resistance.

    PubMed

    Shoresh, Michal; Gal-On, Amit; Leibman, Diana; Chet, Ilan

    2006-11-01

    The fungal biocontrol agent Trichoderma asperellum has been recently shown to induce systemic resistance in plants through a mechanism that employs jasmonic acid and ethylene signal transduction pathways. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) proteins have been implicated in the signal transduction of a wide variety of plant stress responses. Here we report the identification and characterization of a Trichoderma-induced MAPK (TIPK) gene function in cucumber (Cucumis sativus). Similar to its homologs, wound-induced protein kinase, MPK3, and MPK3a, TIPK is also induced by wounding. Normally, preinoculation of roots with Trichoderma activates plant defense mechanisms, which result in resistance to the leaf pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv lachrymans. We used a unique attenuated virus vector, Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV-AGII), to overexpress TIPK protein and antisense (AS) RNA. Plants overexpressing TIPK were more resistant to pathogenic bacterial attack than control plants, even in the absence of Trichoderma preinoculation. On the other hand, plants expressing TIPK-AS revealed increased sensitivity to pathogen attack. Moreover, Trichoderma preinoculation could not protect these AS plants against subsequent pathogen attack. We therefore demonstrate that Trichoderma exerts its protective effect on plants through activation of the TIPK gene, a MAPK that is involved in signal transduction pathways of defense responses.

  5. Cdc42p-Interacting Protein Bem4p Regulates the Filamentous-Growth Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pitoniak, Andrew; Chavel, Colin A.; Chow, Jacky; Smith, Jeremy; Camara, Diawoye; Karunanithi, Sheelarani; Li, Boyang; Wolfe, Kennith H.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous Rho (Ras homology) GTPase Cdc42p can function in different settings to regulate cell polarity and cellular signaling. How Cdc42p and other proteins are directed to function in a particular context remains unclear. We show that the Cdc42p-interacting protein Bem4p regulates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that controls filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Bem4p controlled the filamentous-growth pathway but not other MAPK pathways (mating or high-osmolarity glycerol response [HOG]) that also require Cdc42p and other shared components. Bem4p associated with the plasma membrane (PM) protein, Sho1p, to regulate MAPK activity and cell polarization under nutrient-limiting conditions that favor filamentous growth. Bem4p also interacted with the major activator of Cdc42p, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Cdc24p, which we show also regulates the filamentous-growth pathway. Bem4p interacted with the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of Cdc24p, which functions in an autoinhibitory capacity, and was required, along with other pathway regulators, to maintain Cdc24p at polarized sites during filamentous growth. Bem4p also interacted with the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) Ste11p. Thus, Bem4p is a new regulator of the filamentous-growth MAPK pathway and binds to general proteins, like Cdc42p and Ste11p, to promote a pathway-specific response. PMID:25384973

  6. Gene-Environment Interactions Target Mitogen-activated Protein 3 Kinase 1 (MAP3K1) Signaling in Eyelid Morphogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Mongan, Maureen; Meng, Qinghang; Wang, Jingjing; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Puga, Alvaro; Xia, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions determine the biological outcomes through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Mouse embryonic eyelid closure is a well defined model to study the genetic control of developmental programs. Using this model, we investigated how exposure to dioxin-like environmental pollutants modifies the genetic risk of developmental abnormalities. Our studies reveal that mitogen-activated protein 3 kinase 1 (MAP3K1) signaling is a focal point of gene-environment cross-talk. Dioxin exposure, acting through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), blocked eyelid closure in genetic mutants in which MAP3K1 signaling was attenuated but did not disturb this developmental program in either wild type or mutant mice with attenuated epidermal growth factor receptor or WNT signaling. Exposure also markedly inhibited c-Jun phosphorylation in Map3k1+/− embryonic eyelid epithelium, suggesting that dioxin-induced AHR pathways can synergize with gene mutations to inhibit MAP3K1 signaling. Our studies uncover a novel mechanism through which the dioxin-AHR axis interacts with the MAP3K1 signaling pathways during fetal development and provide strong empirical evidence that specific gene alterations can increase the risk of developmental abnormalities driven by environmental pollutant exposure. PMID:26109068

  7. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in the Heart: Angels Versus Demons in a Heart-Breaking Tale

    PubMed Central

    ROSE, BETH A.; FORCE, THOMAS; WANG, YIBIN

    2013-01-01

    Among the myriad of intra-cellular signaling networks that govern the cardiac development and pathogenesis, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are prominent players that have been the focus of extensive investigations in the past decades. The four best characterized MAPK subfamilies, ERK1/2, JNK, p38, and ERK5, are the targets of pharmacological and genetic manipulations to uncover their roles in cardiac development, function, and diseases. However, information reported in the literature from these efforts has not yet resulted in a clear view about the roles of specific MAPK pathways in heart. Rather, controversies from contradictive results have led to a perception that MAPKs are ambiguous characters in heart with both protective and detrimental effects. The primary object of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current progress, in an effort to highlight the areas where consensus is established verses the ones where controversy remains. MAPKs in cardiac development, cardiac hypertrophy, ischemia/reperfusion injury, and pathological remodeling are the main focuses of this review as these represent the most critical issues for evaluating MAPKs as viable targets of therapeutic development. The studies presented in this review will help to reveal the major challenges in the field and the limitations of current approaches and point to a critical need in future studies to gain better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of MAPK function and regulation in the heart. PMID:20959622

  8. Prp19 facilitates invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase/Twist1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ji-Min; Yu, Qian; Xue, Ru-Yi; Fang, Ying; Zhang, Yi-An; Chen, Yan-Jie; Liu, Tao-Tao; Dong, Ling; Shen, Xi-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Pre-mRNA processing factor 19 (Prp19) is involved in many cellular events including pre-mRNA processing and DNA damage response. However, the pathological role of Prp19 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still elusive. Here, we reported that Prp19 was increased in most HCC tissues and HCC cell lines, and its overexpression in HCC tissues was positively correlated with vascular invasion, tumor capsule breakthrough and poor prognosis. Prp19 potentiated migratory and invasive abilities of HCC cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore Prp19 facilitated Twist1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Mechanistic insights revealed that Prp19 directly binded with TGF-β-activated kinase1 (TAK1) and promoted the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), preventing Twist1 from degradation. Finally Prp19/p38 MAPK/Twist1 axis was attested in nude mice xenografts and HCC patient specimens. This work implies that the gain of Prp19 is a critical event during the progression of HCC, making it a promising target for malignancies with aberrant Prp19 expression. PMID:26959880

  9. Chitosan Controls Postharvest Decay on Cherry Tomato Fruit Possibly via the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danfeng; Wang, Hongtao; Hu, Yi; Liu, Yongsheng

    2015-08-26

    The inhibitive effects of chitosan on gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea on cherry tomato fruit were evaluated. Decay incidence was tested on tomato stored at 22 °C. Hydrogen peroxide accumulation, malondialdehyde (MDA) production, peroxidase (POD) activity, and several related gene expressions (including MPK3, MPK6, PR1a1, and PR5) were determined. Results showed that 0.2% of chitosan solution significantly inhibited the tomato gray mold 3 days after inoculation. Hydrogen peroxide accumulated in the fruit epidermal peel along with chitosan treatment, while MDA production was not increased. POD activity was remarkably enhanced by the application of chitosan. The relative expressions of MPK3, MPK6, and PR1a1 were significantly induced in 10 min after chitosan treatment, while PR5 was induced in 20 min. These findings suggested that the effects of chitosan on inhibiting gray mold in cherry tomato fruit were probably associated with the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. PMID:26223862

  10. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family in Cassava.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Lianzhe; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Xupo; Zeng, Changying; Wei, Yunxie; Zhao, Hongliang; Peng, Ming; Hu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play central roles in plant developmental processes, hormone signaling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. However, no data are currently available about the MAPK family in cassava, an important tropical crop. Herein, 21 MeMAPK genes were identified from cassava. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MeMAPKs could be classified into four subfamilies. Gene structure analysis demonstrated that the number of introns in MeMAPK genes ranged from 1 to 10, suggesting large variation among cassava MAPK genes. Conserved motif analysis indicated that all MeMAPKs had typical protein kinase domains. Transcriptomic analysis suggested that MeMAPK genes showed differential expression patterns in distinct tissues and in response to drought stress between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression analyses revealed that crucial pathways controlled by MeMAPK networks may be involved in the differential response to drought stress in different accessions of cassava. Expression of nine selected MAPK genes showed that these genes could comprehensively respond to osmotic, salt, cold, oxidative stressors, and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. These findings yield new insights into the transcriptional control of MAPK gene expression, provide an improved understanding of abiotic stress responses and signaling transduction in cassava, and lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of cassava cultivars.

  11. Cloning of the mitogen-activated S6 kinase from rat liver reveals an enzyme of the second messenger subfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Kozma, S.C.; Ferrari, S. Bassand, P.; Siegmann, M.; Thomas, G. ); Totty, N. )

    1990-10-01

    Recently the authors reported the purification of a mitogen-activated S6 kinase from Swiss mouse 3T3 fibroblasts and rat liver. The rat liver protein was cleaved with cyanogen bromide or trypsin and 17 of the resulting peptides were sequenced. DNA primers were generated from 3 peptides that had homology to sequences of the conserved catalytic domain of protein kinases. These primers were used in the polymerase chain reaction to obtain a 0.4-kilobase DNA fragment. This fragment was either radioactively labeled and hybridized to Northern blots of poly(A){sup {sup plus}} mRNA or used to screen a rat liver cDNA library. Northern blot analysis revealed four transcripts of 2.5, 3.2, 4.0, and 6.0 kilobases, and five S6 kinase clones were obtained by screening the library. Only two of the clones, which were identical, encoded a full-length protein. This protein had a molecular weight of 56,160, which correlated closely to that of the dephosphorylated kinase determined by SDS/PAGE. The catalytic domain of the kinase resembles that of other serine/threonine kinases belonging to the second messenger subfamily of protein kinases.

  12. The inducible G protein-coupled receptor edg-1 signals via the G(i)/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J; Evans, M; Hla, T

    1996-05-10

    The edg-1 gene encodes an inducible G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) homologue that is induced during the in vitro differentiation of human endothelial cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the G protein-coupling and -signaling properties of the edg-1 polypeptide. The third cytosolic loop (i3) of edg-1 associates with G(i) alpha and G(o) alpha polypeptides in a guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate)-sensitive manner. Immunoprecipitation of the edg-1 polypeptide in transfected cells results in the co-precipitation of G(i) alpha 1 and G(i) alpha 3 polypeptides. These data strongly suggest that edg-1 is capable of coupling to the Gi pathway. Overexpression of the edg-1 GPR in human embryonic kidney 293 cells results in the sustained activation of the MAP kinase activity that is blocked by pertussis toxin treatment. Moreover, NIH3T3 cells permanently transfected with edg-1 exhibit enhanced MAP kinase and phospholipase A2 activities. These data suggest that the G(i)/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway is a major signaling pathway regulated by the orphan receptor edg-1. PMID:8626678

  13. Fibroblast growth factor, but not activin, is a potent activator of mitogen-activated protein kinase in Xenopus explants.

    PubMed Central

    Graves, L M; Northrop, J L; Potts, B C; Krebs, E G; Kimelman, D

    1994-01-01

    Isolated explants from the animal hemisphere of Xenopus embryos were incubated with Xenopus basic fibroblast growth factor (XbFGF) or human activin A. XbFGF incubation resulted in the rapid activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and ribosomal S6 protein kinase (pp90rsk) in a dose-dependent manner with the highest levels of activation occurring at 50 ng/ml. Maximal activation occurred within 6-10 min after the addition of growth factor, and the activity of both kinases declined to unstimulated levels after 30 min. Activin was unable to activate either MAPK or pp90rsk in the Xenopus explants to a substantial level, although it induced dorsal mesoderm better than XbFGF under the same experimental conditions. The regulatory protein Xwnt-8 did not activate MAPK, nor did it enhance the activation of MAPK by XbFGF. XbFGF was able to activate MAPK through at least the midgastrula stage, suggesting that this family of growth factors may have a role in gastrula-stage events. Images PMID:7510404

  14. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Lianzhe; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Xupo; Zeng, Changying; Wei, Yunxie; Zhao, Hongliang; Peng, Ming; Hu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play central roles in plant developmental processes, hormone signaling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. However, no data are currently available about the MAPK family in cassava, an important tropical crop. Herein, 21 MeMAPK genes were identified from cassava. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MeMAPKs could be classified into four subfamilies. Gene structure analysis demonstrated that the number of introns in MeMAPK genes ranged from 1 to 10, suggesting large variation among cassava MAPK genes. Conserved motif analysis indicated that all MeMAPKs had typical protein kinase domains. Transcriptomic analysis suggested that MeMAPK genes showed differential expression patterns in distinct tissues and in response to drought stress between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression analyses revealed that crucial pathways controlled by MeMAPK networks may be involved in the differential response to drought stress in different accessions of cassava. Expression of nine selected MAPK genes showed that these genes could comprehensively respond to osmotic, salt, cold, oxidative stressors, and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. These findings yield new insights into the transcriptional control of MAPK gene expression, provide an improved understanding of abiotic stress responses and signaling transduction in cassava, and lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of cassava cultivars.

  15. In silico analysis reveals 75 members of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase gene family in rice.

    PubMed

    Rao, Kudupudi Prabhakara; Richa, Tambi; Kumar, Kundan; Raghuram, Badmi; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2010-06-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinases (MAPKKKs) are important components of MAPK cascades, which are universal signal transduction modules and play important role in plant growth and development. In the sequenced Arabidopsis genome 80 MAPKKKs were identified and currently being analysed for its role in different stress. In rice, economically important monocot cereal crop only five MAPKKKs were identified so far. In this study using computational analysis of sequenced rice genome we have identified 75 MAPKKKs. EST hits and full-length cDNA sequences (from KOME or Genbank database) of 75 MAPKKKs supported their existence. Phylogenetic analyses of MAPKKKs from rice and Arabidopsis have classified them into three subgroups, which include Raf, ZIK and MEKK. Conserved motifs in the deduced amino acid sequences of rice MAPKKKs strongly supported their identity as members of Raf, ZIK and MEKK subfamilies. Further expression analysis of the MAPKKKs in MPSS database revealed that their transcripts were differentially regulated in various stress and tissue-specific libraries.

  16. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Lianzhe; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Xupo; Zeng, Changying; Wei, Yunxie; Zhao, Hongliang; Peng, Ming; Hu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play central roles in plant developmental processes, hormone signaling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. However, no data are currently available about the MAPK family in cassava, an important tropical crop. Herein, 21 MeMAPK genes were identified from cassava. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MeMAPKs could be classified into four subfamilies. Gene structure analysis demonstrated that the number of introns in MeMAPK genes ranged from 1 to 10, suggesting large variation among cassava MAPK genes. Conserved motif analysis indicated that all MeMAPKs had typical protein kinase domains. Transcriptomic analysis suggested that MeMAPK genes showed differential expression patterns in distinct tissues and in response to drought stress between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression analyses revealed that crucial pathways controlled by MeMAPK networks may be involved in the differential response to drought stress in different accessions of cassava. Expression of nine selected MAPK genes showed that these genes could comprehensively respond to osmotic, salt, cold, oxidative stressors, and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. These findings yield new insights into the transcriptional control of MAPK gene expression, provide an improved understanding of abiotic stress responses and signaling transduction in cassava, and lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of cassava cultivars. PMID:27625666

  17. Smooth-muscle mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase: purification and characterization, and the phosphorylation of caldesmon.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, T J; Mak, A S

    1993-01-01

    A single 42 kDa isoform of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is expressed in both embryonic and adult chicken gizzard. The gizzard MAP kinase, which cross-reacts with anti-p44mpk antibody, has been purified from adult chicken gizzard and partially characterized. The purification protocol employs phenyl-Sepharose, polylysine-agarose, hydroxyapatite, Mono-Q and phenyl-Superose column chromatography. The purified enzyme phosphorylates myelin basic protein and gizzard high-molecular-mass (h-)caldesmon. Sea-star p44mpk and gizzard MAP kinase phosphorylate h-caldesmon at identical sites at the C-terminal domain, as revealed by tryptic-peptide mapping of the phosphorylated protein. Phosphorylation of h-caldesmon by gizzard MAP kinase abolishes its interaction with polymerized tubulin. The specific activity of the purified gizzard kinase toward myelin basic protein is similar to that of brain tau kinase, but is only a fraction of that of activated sea-star p44mpk. This suggests that, although a large amount of MAP kinase is present in the gizzard, only a small percentage of the enzyme is activated normally. Autophosphorylation of the gizzard kinase, at least in part on tyrosine residues, activates its kinase activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8280072

  18. Osmoregulation and fungicide resistance: the Neurospora crassa os-2 gene encodes a HOG1 mitogen-activated protein kinase homologue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Lamm, Randy; Pillonel, Christian; Lam, Stephen; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2002-02-01

    Neurospora crassa osmosensitive (os) mutants are sensitive to high osmolarity and therefore are unable to grow on medium containing 4% NaCl. We found that os-2 and os-5 mutants were resistant to the phenylpyrrole fungicides fludioxonil and fenpiclonil. To understand the relationship between osmoregulation and fungicide resistance, we cloned the os-2 gene by using sib selection. os-2 encodes a putative mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase homologous to HOG1 and can complement the osmosensitive phenotype of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae hog1 mutant. We sequenced three os-2 alleles and found that all of them were null with either frameshift or nonsense point mutations. An os-2 gene replacement mutant also was generated and was sensitive to high osmolarity and resistant to phenylpyrrole fungicides. Conversely, os-2 mutants transformed with the wild-type os-2 gene could grow on media containing 4% NaCl and were sensitive to phenylpyrrole fungicides. Fludioxonil stimulated intracellular glycerol accumulation in wild-type strains but not in os-2 mutants. Fludioxonil also caused wild-type conidia and hyphal cells to swell and burst. These results suggest that the hyperosmotic stress response pathway of N. crassa is the target of phenylpyrrole fungicides and that fungicidal effects may result from a hyperactive os-2 MAP kinase pathway.

  19. Riboflavin-Induced Disease Resistance Requires the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases 3 and 6 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shengjun; Xu, Huilian

    2016-01-01

    As a resistance elicitor, riboflavin (vitamin B2) protects plants against a wide range of pathogens. At molecular biological levels, it is important to elucidate the signaling pathways underlying the disease resistance induced by riboflavin. Here, riboflavin was tested to induce resistance against virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000) in Arabidopsis. Results showed that riboflavin induced disease resistance based on MAPK-dependent priming for the expression of PR1 gene. Riboflavin induced transient expression of PR1 gene. However, following Pst DC3000 inoculation, riboflavin potentiated stronger PR1 gene transcription. Further was suggested that the transcript levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases, MPK3 and MPK6, were primed under riboflavin. Upon infection by Pst DC3000, these two enzymes were more strongly activated. The elevated activation of both MPK3 and MPK6 was responsible for enhanced defense gene expression and resistance after riboflavin treatment. Moreover, riboflavin significantly reduced the transcript levels of MPK3 and MPK6 by application of AsA and BAPTA, an H2O2 scavenger and a calcium (Ca2+) scavenger, respectively. In conclusion, MPK3 and MPK6 were responsible for riboflavin-induced resistance, and played an important role in H2O2- and Ca2+-related signaling pathways, and this study could provide a new insight into the mechanistic study of riboflavin-induced defense responses. PMID:27054585

  20. The Cotton Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Functions in Drought Tolerance by Regulating Stomatal Responses and Root Growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Lu, Wenjing; He, Xiaowen; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Yuli; Guo, Xulei; Guo, Xingqi

    2016-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play critical roles in signal transduction processes in eukaryotes. The MAPK kinases (MAPKKs) that link MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs) and MAPKs are key components of MAPK cascades. However, the intricate regulatory mechanisms that control MAPKKs under drought stress conditions are not fully understood, especially in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Here, we isolated and characterized the cotton group B MAPKK gene GhMKK3 Overexpressing GhMKK3 in Nicotiana benthamiana enhanced tolerance to drought, and the results of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assays suggest that GhMKK3 plays an important role in responses to abiotic stresses by regulating stomatal responses and root hair growth. Further evidence demonstrated that overexpressing GhMKK3 promoted root growth and ABA-induced stomatal closure. In contrast, silencing GhMKK3 in cotton using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) resulted in the opposite phenotypes. More importantly, we identified an ABA- and drought-induced MAPK cascade that is composed of GhMKK3, GhMPK7 and GhPIP1 that compensates for deficiency in the MAPK cascade pathway in cotton under drought stress conditions. Together, these findings significantly improve our understanding of the mechanism by which GhMKK3 positively regulates drought stress responses. PMID:27335349

  1. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family in Cassava.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Lianzhe; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Xupo; Zeng, Changying; Wei, Yunxie; Zhao, Hongliang; Peng, Ming; Hu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play central roles in plant developmental processes, hormone signaling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. However, no data are currently available about the MAPK family in cassava, an important tropical crop. Herein, 21 MeMAPK genes were identified from cassava. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MeMAPKs could be classified into four subfamilies. Gene structure analysis demonstrated that the number of introns in MeMAPK genes ranged from 1 to 10, suggesting large variation among cassava MAPK genes. Conserved motif analysis indicated that all MeMAPKs had typical protein kinase domains. Transcriptomic analysis suggested that MeMAPK genes showed differential expression patterns in distinct tissues and in response to drought stress between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression analyses revealed that crucial pathways controlled by MeMAPK networks may be involved in the differential response to drought stress in different accessions of cassava. Expression of nine selected MAPK genes showed that these genes could comprehensively respond to osmotic, salt, cold, oxidative stressors, and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. These findings yield new insights into the transcriptional control of MAPK gene expression, provide an improved understanding of abiotic stress responses and signaling transduction in cassava, and lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of cassava cultivars. PMID:27625666

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase p38b interaction with delta class glutathione transferases from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wongtrakul, Jeerang; Sukittikul, Suchada; Saisawang, Chonticha; Ketterman, Albert J

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a family of multifunctional enzymes involved in xenobiotic biotransformation, drug metabolism, and protection against oxidative damage. The p38b mitogen-activated protein kinase is involved in cellular stress response. This study screened interactions between Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Delta class glutathione transferases (DmGSTs) and the D. melanogaster p38b MAPK. Therefore, 12 DmGSTs and p38b kinase were obtained as recombinant proteins. The study showed that DmGSTD8 and DmGSTD11b significantly increased p38b activity toward ATF2 and jun, which are transcription factor substrates. DmGSTD3 and DmGSTD5 moderately increased p38b activity for jun. In addition, GST activity in the presence of p38b was also measured. It was found that p38b affected substrate specificity toward CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and DCNB (1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene) of several GST isoforms, i.e., DmGSTD2, DmGSTD5, DmGSTD8, and DmGSTD11b. The interaction of a GST and p38b can affect the substrate specificity of either enzyme, which suggests induced conformational changes affecting catalysis. Similar interactions do not occur for all the Delta enzymes and p38b, which suggests that these interactions could be specific. PMID:23438069

  3. Salt Stress in Arabidopsis: Lipid Transfer Protein AZI1 and Its Control by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase MPK3

    PubMed Central

    Pitzschke, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    A plant’s capability to cope with environmental challenges largely relies on signal transmission through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. In Arabidopsis thaliana, MPK3 is particularly strongly associated with numerous abiotic and biotic stress responses. Identification of MPK3 substrates is a milestone towards improving stress resistance in plants. Here, we characterize AZI1, a lipid transfer protein (LTP)-related hybrid proline-rich protein (HyPRP), as a novel target of MPK3. AZI1 is phosphorylated by MPK3 in vitro. As documented by co-immunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments, AZI1 interacts with MPK3 to form protein complexes in planta. Furthermore, null mutants of azi1 are hypersensitive to salt stress, while AZI1-overexpressing lines are markedly more tolerant. AZI1 overexpression in the mpk3 genetic background partially alleviates the salt-hypersensitive phenotype of this mutant, but functional MPK3 appears to be required for the full extent of AZI1-conferred robustness. Notably, this robustness does not come at the expense of normal development. Immunoblot and RT–PCR data point to a role of MPK3 as positive regulator of AZI1 abundance. PMID:24214892

  4. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase interacts with vinculin at focal adhesions during fatty acid-stimulated cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    George, Margaret D.; Wine, Robert N.; Lackford, Brad; Kissling, Grace E.; Akiyama, Steven K.; Olden, Kenneth; Roberts, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Arachidonic acid stimulates cell adhesion by activating α2β1 integrins in a process that depends on protein kinases, including p38 mitogen activated protein kinase. Here, we describe the interaction of cytoskeletal components with key signaling molecules that contribute to spreading of, and morphological changes in, arachidonic acid-treated MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma cells. Arachidonic acid-treated cells showed increased attachment and spreading on collagen type IV as measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. Fatty acid-treated cells displayed short cortical actin filaments associated with an increased number of β1 integrin-containing pseudopodia whereas untreated cells displayed elongated stress fibers and fewer clusters of β1 integrins. Confocal microscopy of arachidonic acid-treated cells showed that vinculin and phospho-p38 both appeared enriched in pseudopodia and at the tips of actin filaments, and fluorescence ratio imaging indicated the increase was specific for the phospho-(active) form of p38. Immunoprecipitates of phospho-p38 from extracts of arachidonic acid-treated cells contained vinculin, and GST-vinculin fusion proteins carrying the central region of vinculin bound phospho-p38, whereas fusion proteins expressing the terminal portions of vinculin did not. These data suggest that phospho-p38 associates with particular domains on critical focal adhesion proteins that are involved in tumor cell adhesion and spreading and that this association can be regulated by factors in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24219282

  5. On the participation of hippocampal p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in extinction and reacquisition of inhibitory avoidance memory.

    PubMed

    Rossato, J I; Bevilaqua, L R M; Lima, R H; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I; Cammarota, M

    2006-11-17

    Inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning relies on the formation of an association between stepping down from a platform present in a certain context (conditioned stimulus; CS) with an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US; i.e. a footshock). A single CS-US pairing establishes a robust long-term memory expressed as an increase in step-down latency at testing. However, repeated retrieval of the avoidance response in the absence of the US induces extinction of IA memory. That is, recurring presentation of the CS alone results in a new learning indicating that the CS no longer predicts the US. Although the signaling pathways involved in the consolidation of IA and other fear-motivated memories have been profusely studied, little is known about the molecular requirements of fear memory extinction. Here we report that, as happens with its consolidation, extinction of IA long-term memory requires activity of the p38 subfamily of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus. Moreover, we found that inhibition of hippocampal p38MAPK blocked memory reacquisition after extinction without affecting either the increase in IA memory retention induced by a second training session or animal's locomotor/exploratory activity and anxiety state.

  6. Interplay between mitogen-activated protein kinase and nitric oxide in brassinosteroid-induced pesticide metabolism in Solanum lycopersicum.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yan-Ling; Zhou, Yue; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Jie; Yu, Yunlong; Yu, Jing-Quan; Xia, Xiao-Jian

    2016-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) play important roles in brassinosteroid (BR)-induced stress tolerance, however, their functions in BR-induced pesticides metabolism remain unclear. Here, we showed that MPK activity and transcripts of SlMPK1 and SlMPK2 were induced by chlorothalonil (CHT), a widely used fungicide, in tomato leaves. However, cosilencing of SlMPK1/2 compromised the 24-epibrassinolide (EBR)-induced upregulation of detoxification genes and CHT metabolism in tomato leaves. In addition, cosilencing of SlMPK1/2 inhibited the accumulation of S-nitrosothiol (SNO), the reservoir of nitric oxide (NO) in plants, whereas tungstate, the inhibitor of nitrate reductase (NR), blocked EBR-induced SNO accumulation and MPK activity. Inhibiting the accumulation of NO by cPTIO, the specific scavenger and tungstate abolished the EBR-induced upregulation of detoxification genes, glutathione accumulation and CHT metabolism. The results showed that MPK and NR-dependent NO were involved in BR-induced CHT metabolism. Notably, there was a positive crosstalk between the MPK and NO production. PMID:27236431

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 activates apoptosis during testicular ischemia-reperfusion injury in a nuclear factor-kappaB-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Antonuccio, Pietro; Polito, Francesca; Bitto, Alessandra; Squadrito, Francesco; Di Stefano, Vincenzo; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Fazzari, Carmine; Maisano, Daniele; Romeo, Carmelo; Altavilla, Domenica

    2009-02-14

    Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB), mitogen-activated protein kinase3/MAPK1 and MAPK8 are involved in testicular ischemia reperfusion injury (testicular-I/R). NF-kappaB knock-out mice (KO) subjected to testicular-I/R have a reduced testicular damage, blunted MAPK8 activation and enhanced MAPK3/MAPK1 activity. To better understand the role of MAPK3/MAPK1 up-regulation during testicular-I/R, we investigated the effects of PD98059, an inhibitor of MAPK3/MAPK1, in KO mice during testicular-I/R. KO and wild-type (WT) animals underwent 1 h testicular ischemia followed by 24 h reperfusion or a sham testicular-I/R. Animals received either PD98059 (5 mg/kg/ip) or its vehicle. MAPK3/MAPK1, BAX, caspase-3 and -9 and TNF-alpha expression were assessed along with histological examination and an immunostaining for protein of apoptosis. Testicular-I/R caused a greater increase in MAPK3/MAPK1 in KO than in WT animals in both testes. KO mice had a lower expression of the apoptotic proteins and TNF-alpha as well as reduced histological damage compared to WT. Immunostaining confirmed the lower expression of BAX in the Leydig cells of KO mice. Administration of PD98059, abrogated MAPK3/MAPK1 expression and slightly reduced TNF-alpha but did not improve or reverse the histological damage in KO. PD98059 significantly reduced the histological damage in WT mice and markedly reduced the apoptotic proteins in KO and WT mice. These results suggest that testicular-I/R triggers also a pathway of organ damage involving MAPK3/MAPK1, TNF-alpha, BAX, caspase-3 and -9 that activates an apoptotic machinery in an NF-kappaB independent manner. These findings should contribute to better understand testicular torsion-induced damage.

  8. Synergistic effects of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibition with a corticosteroid in alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J; Harbron, C; Lea, S; Booth, G; Cadden, P; Wreggett, K A; Singh, D

    2011-09-01

    Corticosteroids partially suppress cytokine production by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) alveolar macrophages. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors are a novel class of anti-inflammatory drug. We have studied the effects of combined treatment with a corticosteroid and a p38 MAPK inhibitor on cytokine production by COPD alveolar macrophages, with the aim of investigating dose-sparing and efficacy-enhancing effects. Alveolar macrophages from 10 patients with COPD, six smokers, and six nonsmokers were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) after preincubation with five concentrations of dexamethasone alone, five concentrations of the p38 MAPK inhibitor 1-(5-tert-butyl-2-p-tolyl-2H-pyrazol-3-yl)-3(4-(2-morpholin-4-yl-ethoxy)naphthalen-1-yl)urea (BIRB-796) alone, and all combinations of these concentrations. After 24 h, the supernatants were analyzed for interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein 3, macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES). The effect of dexamethasone on p38 MAPK activation was analyzed by Western blotting. Dexamethasone and BIRB-796 both reduced LPS-induced cytokine production in a dose-dependent manner in all subject groups, with no differences between groups. Increasing the concentration of BIRB-796 in combination with dexamethasone produced progressively greater inhibition of cytokine production than dexamethasone alone. There were significant efficacy-enhancing benefits and synergistic dose-sparing effects (p < 0.05) for the combination treatment for IL-8, IL-6, TNFα, GM-CSF, IL-1ra, IL-10, MDC, and RANTES in one or more subject groups. Dexamethasone had no effect on LPS-induced p38 MAPK activation. We conclude that p38 MAPK activation in alveolar macrophages is corticosteroid-insensitive. Combining a p38

  9. The SrkA Kinase Is Part of the SakA Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Interactome and Regulates Stress Responses and Development in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes-Arroyo, Rafael; Lara-Rojas, Fernando; Bayram, Özgür; Valerius, Oliver; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and many other eukaryotes use specialized mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) of the Hog1/p38 family to transduce environmental stress signals. In Aspergillus nidulans, the MAPK SakA and the transcription factor AtfA are components of a central multiple stress-signaling pathway that also regulates development. Here we characterize SrkA, a putative MAPK-activated protein kinase, as a novel component of this pathway. ΔsrkA and ΔsakA mutants share a derepressed sexual development phenotype. However, ΔsrkA mutants are not sensitive to oxidative stress, and in fact, srkA inactivation partially suppresses the sensitivity of ΔsakA mutant conidia to H2O2, tert-butyl-hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), and menadione. In the absence of stress, SrkA shows physical interaction with nonphosphorylated SakA in the cytosol. We show that H2O2 induces a drastic change in mitochondrial morphology consistent with a fission process and the relocalization of SrkA to nuclei and mitochondria, depending on the presence of SakA. SakA-SrkA nuclear interaction is also observed during normal asexual development in dormant spores. Using SakA and SrkA S-tag pulldown and purification studies coupled to mass spectrometry, we found that SakA interacts with SrkA, the stress MAPK MpkC, the PPT1-type phosphatase AN6892, and other proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, mRNA stability and protein synthesis, mitochondrial function, and other stress-related responses. We propose that oxidative stress induces DNA damage and mitochondrial fission and that SakA and SrkA mediate cell cycle arrest and regulate mitochondrial function during stress. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SakA and SrkA regulate the remodelling of cell physiology during oxidative stress and development. PMID:25820520

  10. Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and NF-κB Pathways by a Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus K15 Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Melanie M.; Glenn, Mark; Rainbow, Lucille; Kieser, Arnd; Henke-Gendo, Cornelia; Schulz, Thomas F.

    2003-01-01

    The K15 gene of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (also known as human herpesvirus 8) consists of eight alternatively spliced exons and has been predicted to encode membrane proteins with a variable number of transmembrane regions and a common C-terminal cytoplasmic domain with putative binding sites for SH2 and SH3 domains, as well as for tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors. These features are reminiscent of the latent membrane proteins LMP-1 and LMP2A of Epstein-Barr virus and, more distantly, of the STP, Tip, and Tio proteins of the related γ2-herpesviruses herpesvirus saimiri and herpesvirus ateles. These viral membrane proteins can activate a number of intracellular signaling pathways. We have therefore examined the abilities of different K15-encoded proteins to initiate intracellular signaling. We found that a 45-kDa K15 protein derived from all eight K15 exons and containing 12 predicted transmembrane domains in addition to the cytoplasmic domain activated the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB pathways, as well as (more weakly) the c-Jun N-terminal kinase/SAPK pathway. Activation of the MAPK and NF-κB pathways required phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 481 within a putative SH2-binding site (YEEVL). This motif was phosphorylated by the tyrosine kinases Src, Lck, Yes, Hck, and Fyn. The region containing the YEEVL motif interacted with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF-2), and a dominant negative TRAF-2 mutant inhibited the K15-mediated activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway, suggesting the involvement of TRAF-2 in the initiation of these signaling routes. In contrast, several smaller K15 protein isoforms activated these pathways only weakly. All of the K15 isoforms tested were, however, localized in lipid rafts, suggesting that incorporation into lipid rafts is not sufficient to initiate signaling. Additional regions of K15, located presumably in exons 2 to 5, may therefore contribute to the

  11. Sensitization of apoptotically-resistant breast carcinoma cells to TNF and TRAIL by inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Christopher B; Parker, Amanda P; Patten, Daniel; Elliott, Steven; Tang, Yan; Frigo, Daniel E; Dugan, Christine M; Coakley, Erin L; Butler, Nancy N; Clayton, John L; Alam, Jawed; Curiel, Tyler J; Beckman, Barbara S; Jaffe, Bernard M; Burow, Matthew E

    2004-06-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is a critical component in the regulation of cell survival and proliferation decisions. In breast carcinoma cells, activation of the p38-MAPK member of this family occurs in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines and cellular stress. The involvement of p38-MAPK in the activation of the transcription factor, NF-kappaB, suggests a potential role and mechanism for regulation of cell survival and drug resistance. Generation of the resistant MCF-7 variant (MCF-7TN-R) was achieved by prolonged exposure of MCF-7N cells to increasing concentrations of TNF. Differences in MAPK activation and function in the MCF-7 cell variants were determined. The role of the p38-MAPK pathway in regulation of resistance was determined using pharmacological (SB 203580) or molecular [Dominant Inhibitory (DI)-p38] inhibition. The effect of p38 inhibition on NF-kappaB transcriptional activation was analyzed. As compared to the sensitive MCF-7N parent cell line, the MCF-7TN-R cell line displayed significant resistance to TNF- and TRAIL-induced cell death. Analysis of the expression and phosphorylation of members of the MAPK family revealed an increased basal activation of p38 in the MCF-7TN-R variant. The p38-mediated phosphorylation and transcriptional activity were suppressed by pharmacologic inhibition with SB 230580. Treatment of MCF-7TN-R cells with SB partially restored sensitivity to TNF-induced cell death. In addition, use of a DI-p38 construct with or without the addition to TNF induced cell death, thus restoring TNF-sensitivity to these cells. The ability of p38 inhibition to restore apoptotic sensitivity was correlated with suppression of the TNF-induced cell survival pathway, NF-kappaB. The increased activation of p38-MAPK in MCF-7TN-R cells demonstrates that this signaling pathway through activation of NF-kappaB is an important route for control of resistance to cell death in breast carcinoma. Molecular and pharmacological

  12. Porins from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Activate the Transcription Factors Activating Protein 1 and NF-κB through the Raf-1-Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, Massimiliano; Vitiello, Mariateresa; Sanzari, Emma; D’Isanto, Marina; Tortora, Annalisa; Longanella, Anna; Galdiero, Stefania

    2002-01-01

    In this study we examined the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium porins to activate activating protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, and we identified the AP-1-induced protein subunits. Our results demonstrate that these enzymes may participate in cell signaling pathways leading to AP-1 and NF-κB activation following porin stimulation of cells. Raf-1 was phosphorylated in response to the treatment of U937 cells with porins; moreover, the porin-mediated increase in Raf-1 phosphorylation is accompanied by the phosphorylation of MAPK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2), p38, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. We used three different inhibitors of phosphorylation pathways: 2′-amino-3′-methoxyflavone (PD-098059), a selective inhibitor of MEK1 activator and the MAPK cascade; 4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole (SB203580), a specific inhibitor of the p38 pathway; and 7β-acetoxy-1α,6β,9α-trihydroxy-8,13-epoxy-labd-14-en-11-one (forskolin), an inhibitor at the level of Raf-1 kinase. PD-098059 pretreatment of cells decreases AP-1 and NF-κB activation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by porins, and SB203580 pretreatment of cells decreases mainly AP-1 and NF-κB activation by porins; in contrast, forskolin pretreatment of cells does not affect AP-1 and NF-κB activation following either porin or LPS stimulation. Our data suggest that the p38 signaling pathway mainly regulates AP-1 and NF-κB activation in cells treated with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium porins. Antibody electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that JunD and c-Fos binding is found in cells treated with porins, in cells treated with LPS, and in unstimulated cells. However, by 30 to 60 min of stimulation, a different complex including c-Jun appears in cells treated with porins or LPS, while the Fra-2 subunit is present only after porin stimulation

  13. Modeling anhydrobiosis: activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK by dehydration in both human cells and nematodes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zebo; Banton, Matthew C; Tunnacliffe, Alan

    2010-12-01

    Anhydrobiosis ("life without water") is the state of suspended animation that certain organisms, including some nematodes, tardigrades, and bdelloid rotifers, enter during desiccation. Extreme water loss imposes considerable stress on biomolecules, cells, and tissues, and must require specific sensing and response mechanisms for survival. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood, in part owing to the lack of amenable model systems. We have, therefore, begun to develop mammalian cell lines as tools for investigating the eukaryotic response to desiccation, and have an additional long-term goal of generating a desiccation-tolerant mammalian cell. Here, we investigate the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in controlling gene expression in response to evaporative water loss. We report that the ERK MAPK pathway inhibitor U0126 can almost completely block induction of desiccation early response genes in a human cell line, suggesting a role for the ERK signal transduction pathway in the stress response. Accordingly, ERK is activated by phosphorylation during desiccation of human cells. Importantly, nematodes also activate ERK on drying, showing that the mammalian cell model behaves similarly to invertebrates experiencing similar stress conditions. We further reveal that, in response to desiccation, human cells can rapidly initiate complex stress signaling networks involving all three MAPK pathways, with transient activation of ERK and sustained activation of JNK and p38. These results are consistent with a role for MAPK pathways in anhydrobiotic adaptation and suggest that non-anhydrobiotes are able to sense and, at least to some extent, respond appropriately to evaporative water loss.

  14. Activation of transcription factor AP-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in aniline-induced splenic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M. Firoze . E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu; Kannan, Subburaj; Wang Jianling

    2006-01-15

    Signaling mechanisms in aniline-induced fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen are not known. Previous studies have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron accumulation and oxidative stress in the spleen, which may cause activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors and regulate the transcription of genes involved in fibrosis and/or tumorigenesis. To test this, male SD rats were treated with 0.5 mmol/kg/day aniline via drinking water for 30 days, and activation of transcription factor AP-1 was determined in the splenocyte nuclear extracts (NEs). AP-1 DNA-binding activity in the NEs of freshly isolated splenocytes from aniline-treated rats increased in comparison to the controls, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). AP-1 binding was also determined in the NEs of cultured splenocytes (2 h and 24 h), which showed even a greater increase in binding activity at 2 h. The specificity of AP-1 binding for relevant DNA motifs was confirmed by competition EMSA and by supershift EMSA using antibodies specific to c-Jun and c-Fos. To further explore the signaling mechanisms in the AP-1 activation, phosphorylation patterns of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were pursued. Aniline exposure induced increases in the phosphorylation of the three classes of MAPKs: extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK 1/2), and p38 MAPKs. Furthermore, TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression showed a 3-fold increase in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. These observations suggest a strong association among MAPK phosphorylation, AP-1 activation, and enhanced TGF-{beta}1 gene expression. The observed sequence of events subsequent to aniline exposure could regulate genes that lead to fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  15. Phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by one-trial and multi-trial classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Crow, T; Xue-Bian, J J; Siddiqi, V; Kang, Y; Neary, J T

    1998-05-01

    The pathway supporting the conditioned stimulus (CS) is one site of plasticity that has been studied extensively in conditioned Hermissenda. Several signal transduction pathways have been implicated in classical conditioning of this preparation, although the major emphasis has been on protein kinase C. Here we provide evidence for the activation and phosphorylation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway by one-trial and multi-trial conditioning. A one-trial in vitro conditioning procedure consisting of light (CS) paired with the application of 5-HT results in the increased incorporation of 32PO4 into proteins detected with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Two of the phosphoproteins have molecular weights of 44 and 42 kDa, consistent with extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK1 and ERK2). Phosphorylation of the 44 and 42 kDa proteins by one-trial conditioning was inhibited by pretreatment with PD098059, A MEK1 (ERK-Activating kinase) inhibitor. Assays of ERK activity with brain myelin basic protein as a substrate revealed greater ERK activity for the group that received one-trial conditioning compared with an unpaired control group. Western blot analysis of phosphorylated ERK using antibodies recognizing the dually phosphorylated forms of ERK1 and ERK2 showed an increase in phosphorylation after one-trial conditioning compared with unpaired controls. The increased phosphorylation of ERK after one-trial conditioning was blocked by pretreatment with PD098059. Hermissenda that received 10 or 15 conditioning trials showed significant behavioral suppression compared with pseudo-random controls. After conditioning and behavioral testing, the conditioned animals showed significantly greater phosphorylation of ERK compared with the pseudo-random controls. These results show that the ERK-MAPK signaling pathway is activated in Pavlovian conditioning of Hermissenda.

  16. Contributions of reactive oxygen species and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in arsenite-stimulated hemeoxygenase-1 production

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G. . E-mail: lhudson@salud.unm.edu

    2007-01-15

    Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an oxidative stress responsive gene upregulated by various physiological and exogenous stimuli. HO-1 has cytoprotective activities and arsenite is a potent inducer of HO-1 in many cell types and tissues, including epidermal keratinocytes. We investigated the potential contributions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation to arsenite-dependent regulation of HO-1 in HaCaT cells, an immortalized human keratinocyte line. Both epidermal growth factor (EGF) and arsenite stimulated ROS production was detected by dihydroethidium (DHE) staining and fluorescence microscopy. Arsenite induced HO-1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, while HO-1 expression in response to EGF was modest and evident at extended time points (48-72 h). Inhibition of EGF receptor, MEK I/II or Src decreased arsenite-stimulated HO-1 expression by 20-30%. In contrast, addition of a superoxide scavenger or inhibition of p38 activity decreased the arsenite-dependent response by 80-90% suggesting that ROS and p38 are required for HO-1 induction. However, ROS generation alone was insufficient for the observed arsenite-dependent response as use of a xanthine/xanthine oxidase system to generate ROS did not produce an equivalent upregulation of HO-1. Cooperation between ERK signaling and ROS generation was demonstrated by synergistic induction of HO-1 in cells co-treated with EGF and xanthine/xanthine oxidase resulting in a response nearly equivalent to that observed with arsenite. These findings suggest that the ERK/MAPK activation is necessary but not sufficient for optimal arsenite-stimulated HO-1 induction. The robust and persistent upregulation of HO-1 may have a role in cellular adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure.

  17. Effects of pentylenetetrazole kindling on mitogen-activated protein kinases levels in neocortex and hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Ben, Juliana; de Oliveira, Paulo Alexandre; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Peres, Tanara Vieira; Matheus, Filipe Carvalho; Hoeller, Alexandre Ademar; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Walz, Roger; Prediger, Rui Daniel

    2014-12-01

    The epileptogenesis process involves cell signaling events associated with neuroplasticity. The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) integrate signals originating from a variety of extracellular stimuli and may regulate cell differentiation, survival, cell death and synaptic plasticity. Here we compared the total and phosphorylated MAPKs (ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38(MAPK)) levels in the neocortex and hippocampus of adult Swiss male mice quantified by western blotting analysis 48 h after the last injection of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), according to the kindling protocol (35 mg/kg, i.p., on alternated days, with a total of eight injections). The total levels of the investigated MAPKs and the phospho-p38(MAPK) in the neocortex and hippocampus were not affected by the PTZ injections. The MAPKs phosphorylation levels remain unaltered in PTZ-treated animals without convulsive seizures. The phospho-JNK2 phosphorylation, but not the phospho-JNK1, was increased in the hippocampus of PTZ-treated animals showing 1-3 days with convulsive seizures, whereas no significant changes were observed in those animals with more than 3 days with convulsive seizures. The phospho-ERK1/2 phosphorylation decreased in the neocortex and increased in the hippocampus of animals with 1-4 days with convulsive seizures and became unaltered in mice that showed convulsive seizures for more than 4 days. These findings indicate that resistance to PTZ kindling is associated with unaltered ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38(MAPK) phosphorylation levels in the neocortex and hippocampus. Moreover, when the PTZ kindling-induced epileptogenesis manifests behaviorally, the activation of the different MAPKs sub-families shows a variable and non-linear pattern in the neocortex and hippocampus.

  18. Upregulation of early growth response factor-1 by bile acids requires mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Katryn; Kim, Nam Deuk; Moon, Jeon-OK; Copple, Bryan L.

    2010-02-15

    Cholestasis results when excretion of bile acids from the liver is interrupted. Liver injury occurs during cholestasis, and recent studies showed that inflammation is required for injury. Our previous studies demonstrated that early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1) is required for development of inflammation in liver during cholestasis, and that bile acids upregulate Egr-1 in hepatocytes. What remains unclear is the mechanism by which bile acids upregulate Egr-1. Bile acids modulate gene expression in hepatocytes by activating the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and through activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Accordingly, the hypothesis was tested that bile acids upregulate Egr-1 in hepatocytes by FXR and/or MAPK-dependent mechanisms. Deoxycholic acid (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) stimulated upregulation of Egr-1 to the same extent in hepatocytes isolated from wild-type mice and FXR knockout mice. Similarly, upregulation of Egr-1 in the livers of bile duct-ligated (BDL) wild-type and FXR knockout mice was not different. Upregulation of Egr-1 in hepatocytes by DCA and CDCA was prevented by the MEK inhibitors U0126 and SL-327. Furthermore, pretreatment of mice with U0126 prevented upregulation of Egr-1 in the liver after BDL. Results from these studies demonstrate that activation of MAPK signaling is required for upregulation of Egr-1 by bile acids in hepatocytes and for upregulation of Egr-1 in the liver during cholestasis. These studies suggest that inhibition of MAPK signaling may be a novel therapy to prevent upregulation of Egr-1 in liver during cholestasis.

  19. Overexpression of human insulin receptor substrate 1 induces cellular transformation with activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, T; Sasaki, Y; Wands, J R

    1996-01-01

    The receptor insulin substrate 1 protein (IRS-1) is a specific substrate for insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. Expression and tyrosyl phosphorylation of IRS-1 play an important role during normal hepatocyte growth, and the gene is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. We determined if IRS-1 overexpression directly contributes to cellular transformation. The human IRS-1 gene was subcloned into a mammalian expression vector driven by the cytomegalovirus early promoter. NIH 3T3 cells transiently transfected with this vector subsequently developed transformed foci. Several stably transfected cell lines were established, and they grew efficiently under low-serum conditions and formed colonies when plated in soft agar. Cell lines overexpressing IRS-1 displayed increased tyrosyl phosphorylation of IRS-1 and association with Grb2 but not with the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase. Since Grb2 is a component of the son-of-sevenless-Ras pathway and upstream in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, enzymatic activities of the major components of this cascade, such as MAPK kinase and MAPK were evaluated and found to be substantially increased in three independent cell lines with IRS-1 protein overexpression. Such cells, when injected into nude mice, were highly tumorigenic, and there may be a correlation between the degree of MAPK activation and tumor growth rate. This report describes the generation of a transformed phenotype by overexpression of a molecule without a catalytic domain far upstream in the signal transduction cascade and suggests that prolonged activation of MAPKs by this mechanism may be one of the molecular events related to hepatocellular transformation. PMID:8622697

  20. Role of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 in corticosteroid insensitivity of chronic oxidant lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Pinart, Mariona; Hussain, Farhana; Shirali, Sima; Li, Feng; Zhu, Jie; Clark, Andrew R.; Ammit, Alaina J.; Chung, Kian Fan

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and in the induction of corticosteroid (CS) insensitivity. Chronic ozone exposure leads to a model of COPD with lung inflammation and emphysema. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) may underlie CS insensitivity in COPD. We determined the role played by MKP-1 by studying the effect of corticosteroids in wild-type C57/BL6J and MKP-1−/− mice after chronic ozone exposure. Mice were exposed to ozone (3 ppm, 3 h) 12 times over 6 weeks. Dexamethasone (0.1 or 2 mg/kg; intraperitoneally) was administered before each exposure. Mice were studied 24 h after final exposure. In ozone-exposed C57/BL6J mice, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) was not inhibited by both doses of dexamethasone, but in MKP-1−/− mice, there was a small inhibition by high dose dexamethasone (2 mg/kg). There was an increase in mean linear intercept after chronic ozone exposure in both strains which was CS-insensitive. There was lesser inflammation after low dose of dexamethasone in MKP-1−/− mice compared to C57/Bl6J mice. Epithelial and collagen areas were modulated in ozone-exposed MKP-1−/− mice treated with dexamethasone compared to C57/Bl6J mice. MKP-1 regulated the expression of MMP-12, IL-13 and KC induced by ozone but did not alter dexamethasone׳s effects. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness, lung inflammation and emphySEMa after chronic exposure are CS-insensitive, and the contribution of MKP-1 to CS sensitivity in this model was negligible. PMID:25310910

  1. Role of Phosphatidylinositol Phosphate Signaling in the Regulation of the Filamentous-Growth Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Hema

    2015-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of the phospholipid phosphatidylinositol (PI) is a key event in the determination of organelle identity and an underlying regulatory feature in many biological processes. Here, we investigated the role of PI signaling in the regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that controls filamentous growth in yeast. Lipid kinases that generate phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] at the Golgi (Pik1p) or PI(4,5)P2 at the plasma membrane (PM) (Mss4p and Stt4p) were required for filamentous-growth MAPK pathway signaling. Introduction of a conditional allele of PIK1 (pik1-83) into the filamentous (Σ1278b) background reduced MAPK activity and caused defects in invasive growth and biofilm/mat formation. MAPK regulatory proteins that function at the PM, including Msb2p, Sho1p, and Cdc42p, were mislocalized in the pik1-83 mutant, which may account for the signaling defects of the PI(4)P kinase mutants. Other PI kinases (Fab1p and Vps34p), and combinations of PIP (synaptojanin-type) phosphatases, also influenced the filamentous-growth MAPK pathway. Loss of these proteins caused defects in cell polarity, which may underlie the MAPK signaling defect seen in these mutants. In line with this possibility, disruption of the actin cytoskeleton by latrunculin A (LatA) dampened the filamentous-growth pathway. Various PIP signaling mutants were also defective for axial budding in haploid cells, cell wall construction, or proper regulation of the high-osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway. Altogether, the study extends the roles of PI signaling to a differentiation MAPK pathway and other cellular processes. PMID:25724886

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinases with distinct requirements for Ste5 scaffolding influence signaling specificity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Flatauer, Laura J; Zadeh, Sheena F; Bardwell, Lee

    2005-03-01

    Scaffold proteins are believed to enhance specificity in cell signaling when different pathways share common components. The prototype scaffold Ste5 binds to multiple components of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating pheromone response pathway, thereby conducting the mating signal to the Fus3 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Some of the kinases that Ste5 binds to, however, are also shared with other pathways. Thus, it has been presumed that Ste5 prevents its bound kinases from transgressing into other pathways and protects them from intrusions from those pathways. Here we found that Fus3MAPK required Ste5 scaffolding to receive legitimate signals from the mating pathway as well as misdirected signals leaking from other pathways. Furthermore, increasing the cellular concentration of active Ste5 enhanced the channeling of inappropriate stimuli to Fus3. This aberrant signal crossover resulted in the erroneous induction of cell cycle arrest and mating. In contrast to Fus3, the Kss1 MAPK did not require Ste5 scaffolding to receive either authentic or leaking signals. Furthermore, the Ste11 kinase, once activated via Ste5, was able to signal to Kss1 independently of Ste5 scaffolding. These results argue that Ste5 does not act as a barrier that actively prevents signal crossover to Fus3 and that Ste5 may not effectively sequester its activated kinases away from other pathways. Rather, we suggest that specificity in this network is promoted by the selective activation of Ste5 and the distinct requirements of the MAPKs for Ste5 scaffolding. PMID:15713635

  3. Toward a comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of the evolutionary history of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the plant kingdom.

    PubMed

    Janitza, Philipp; Ullrich, Kristian Karsten; Quint, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is a three-tier signaling cascade that transmits cellular information from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm where it triggers downstream responses. The MAPKs represent the last step in this cascade and are activated when both tyrosine and threonine residues in a conserved TxY motif are phosphorylated by MAPK kinases, which in turn are themselves activated by phosphorylation by MAPK kinase kinases. To understand the molecular evolution of MAPKs in the plant kingdom, we systematically conducted a Hidden-Markov-Model based screen to identify MAPKs in 13 completely sequenced plant genomes. In this analysis, we included green algae, bryophytes, lycophytes, and several mono- and eudicotyledonous species covering >800 million years of evolution. The phylogenetic relationships of the 204 identified MAPKs based on Bayesian inference facilitated the retraction of the sequence of emergence of the four major clades that are characterized by the presence of a TDY or TEY-A/TEY-B/TEY-C type kinase activation loop. We present evidence that after the split of TDY- and TEY-type MAPKs, initially the TEY-C clade emerged. This was followed by the TEY-B clade in early land plants until the TEY-A clade finally emerged in flowering plants. In addition to these well characterized clades, we identified another highly conserved clade of 45 MAPK-likes, members of which were previously described as Mak-homologous kinases. In agreement with their essential functions, molecular population genetic analysis of MAPK genes in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions reveal that purifying selection drove the evolution of the MAPK family, implying strong functional constraints on MAPK genes. Closely related MAPKs most likely subfunctionalized, a process in which differential transcriptional regulation of duplicates may be involved. PMID:23230446

  4. Early activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase is associated with interferon-alpha-induced depression and fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Felger, Jennifer C.; Alagbe, Oyetunde; Pace, Thaddeus W. W.; Woolwine, Bobbi J.; Hu, Fang; Raison, Charles L.; Miller, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    Cytokine-induced stimulation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been shown to influence behaviorally-relevant pathophysiologic pathways including monoamine neurotransmission and neuroendocrine function and thus may contribute to behavioral changes that occur during chronic administration of the innate immune cytokine, interferon (IFN)-alpha. Accordingly, in the current study, phosphorylation (activation) of intracellular p38 MAPK in peripheral blood lymphocytes was analyzed by flow cytometry every 2 hours for 12 hours following the initial injection of IFN-alpha in eleven patients with chronic hepatitis C. Hourly assessments of plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone, cortisol and interleukin-6 were also obtained. Symptoms of depression and fatigue were measured at baseline and after 4 and 12 weeks of IFN-alpha treatment. Acute administration of IFN-alpha significantly increased the percentage of lymphocytes staining positive for intracellular phosphorylated p38 (p-p38). IFN-alpha-induced increases in p-p38 were significantly greater in patients that developed clinically significant depressive symptoms [Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score ≥15] during the first 12 weeks of IFN-alpha treatment. Increases in the percentage of p-p38-positive lymphocytes following the first IFN-alpha injection also highly correlated with depression severity at weeks 4 (r=0.85, p=0.001) and 12 (r=0.70, p=0.018). Similar relationships were observed for fatigue. Examination of relationships between p-p38 induction and factors previously reported to predict IFN-alpha-induced depressive symptoms revealed strong associations of p-p38 with baseline MADRS (r=0.82, p=0.002) and cortisol responses to the initial injection of IFN-alpha (r=0.91, p=0.000). Taken together, these findings indicate that sensitivity of p38 MAPK signaling pathways to immune stimulation is associated with depressive symptoms during chronic IFN-alpha treatment. PMID

  5. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) regulates the expression of progelatinase B (MMP-9) in breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K B; Krueger, J S; Kondapaka, S B; Diglio, C A

    1999-07-19

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play a major role in the mitogenic signal transduction pathway and are essential components of both growth and differentiation. Constitutive activation of the MAPK cascade is associated with the carcinogenesis and metastasis of human breast and renal cell carcinomas. The gelatinases B (MMP-9) and A (MMP-2) are 2 members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) family which are expressed in human cancers and thought to play a critical role in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. In a previous study, we have shown that EGF and amphiregulin upregulate MMP-9 in metastatic SKBR-3 cells but have no effect on MMP-2 secretion. We now investigated specific step(s) in EGF-induced signalling associated with regulation of cell proliferation and MMP-9 induction. EGF-induced signalling in SKBR-3 cells was blocked by relatively specific inhibitors either on ras (FPT inhibitor-1) or P13 kinase (Wortmannin) or by reduction in EGF-induced tyrosine kinase activity (RG 13022). Blocking these signalling pathways significantly inhibited of EGF-induced cell proliferation but only partially reduced in EGF-induced MMP-9 secretion. In contrast, when SKBR-3 cells were exposed to MEK inhibitor (PD 98059) or MAPK inhibitors (Apigenin or MAPK antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides), EGF-induced cell proliferation, MMP-9 induction and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane were significantly reduced. Our results suggest that interfering with MAPK activity may provide a novel means of controlling growth and invasiveness of tumors in which the signalling cascade is activated.

  6. The p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase is a key regulator of myelination and remyelination in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Chung, S-H; Biswas, S; Selvaraj, V; Liu, X-B; Sohn, J; Jiang, P; Chen, C; Chmilewsky, F; Marzban, H; Horiuchi, M; Pleasure, D E; Deng, W

    2015-05-07

    The p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is one of the serine/threonine kinases regulating a variety of biological processes, including cell-type specification, differentiation and migration. Previous in vitro studies using pharmacological inhibitors suggested that p38 MAPK is essential for oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation and myelination. To investigate the specific roles of p38α MAPK in OL development and myelination in vivo, we generated p38α conditional knockout (CKO) mice under the PLP and nerve/glial antigen 2 (NG2) gene promoters, as these genes are specifically expressed in OL progenitor cells (OPCs). Our data revealed that myelin synthesis was completely inhibited in OLs differentiated from primary OPC cultures derived from the NG2 Cre-p38α CKO mouse brains. Although an in vivo myelination defect was not obvious after gross examination of these mice, electron microscopic analysis showed that the ultrastructure of myelin bundles was severely impaired. Moreover, the onset of myelination in the corpus callosum was delayed in the knockout mice compared with p38α fl/fl control mice. A delay in OL differentiation in the central nervous system was observed with concomitant downregulation in the expression of OPC- and OL-specific genes such as Olig1 and Zfp488 during early postnatal development. OPC proliferation was not affected during this time. These data indicate that p38α is a positive regulator of OL differentiation and myelination. Unexpectedly, we observed an opposite effect of p38α on remyelination in the cuprizone-induced demyelination model. The p38α CKO mice exhibited better remyelination capability compared with p38α fl/fl mice following demyelination. The opposing roles of p38α in myelination and remyelination could be due to a strong anti-inflammatory effect of p38α or a dual reciprocal regulatory action of p38α on myelin formation during development and on remyelination after demyelination.

  7. Positive feedback regulation of maize NADPH oxidase by mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in abscisic acid signalling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fan; Ding, Haidong; Wang, Jinxiang; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Aying; Zhang, Yun; Tan, Mingpu; Dong, Wen; Jiang, Mingyi

    2009-01-01

    In maize (Zea mays), abscisic acid (ABA)-induced H2O2 production activates a 46 kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase (p46MAPK), and the activation of p46MAPK also regulates the production of H2O2. However, the mechanism for the regulation of H2O2 production by MAPK in ABA signalling remains to be elucidated. In this study, four reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing NADPH oxidase (rboh) genes (ZmrbohA–D) were isolated and characterized in maize leaves. ABA treatment induced a biphasic response (phase I and phase II) in the expression of ZmrbohA–D and the activity of NADPH oxidase. Phase II induced by ABA was blocked by pretreatments with two MAPK kinase (MPKKK) inhibitors and two H2O2 scavengers, but phase I was not affected by these inhibitors or scavengers. Treatment with H2O2 alone also only induced phase II, and the induction was arrested by the MAPKK inhibitors. Furthermore, the ABA-activated p46MAPK was partially purified. Using primers corresponding to the sequences of internal tryptic peptides, the p46MAPK gene was cloned. Analysis of the tryptic peptides and the p46MAPK sequence indicate it is the known ZmMPK5. Treatments with ABA and H2O2 led to a significant increase in the activity of ZmMPK5, although ABA treatment only induced a slight increase in the expression of ZmMPK5. The data indicate that H2O2-activated ZmMPK5 is involved in the activation of phase II in ABA signalling, but not in phase I. The results suggest that there is a positive feedback loop involving NADPH oxidase, H2O2, and ZmMPK5 in ABA signalling. PMID:19592501

  8. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase p38α Regulates Tubular Damage in Murine Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Ralf; Daniel, Christoph; Hugo, Christian; Amann, Kerstin; Mielenz, Dirk; Endlich, Karlhans; Braun, Tobias; van der Veen, Betty; Heeringa, Peter; Schett, Georg; Zwerina, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is thought to play a central role in acute and chronic inflammatory responses. Whether p38MAPK plays a pathogenic role in crescentic GN (GN) and which of its four isoforms is preferentially involved in kidney inflammation is not definitely known. We thus examined expression and activation of p38MAPK isoforms during anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis. Therefore, p38α conditional knockout mice (MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ) were used to examine the role of p38α in anti-GBM induced nephritis. Both wild type and MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ mice developed acute renal failure over time. Histological examinations revealed a reduced monocyte influx and less tubular damage in MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ mice, whereas glomerular crescent formation and renal fibrosis was similar. Likewise, the levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, IL-1 and IL-10 were similar, but IL-8 was even up-regulated in MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ mice. In contrast, we could detect strong down-regulation of chemotactic cytokines such as CCL-2, -5 and -7, in the kidneys of MxCre-p38αΔ/Δ mice. In conclusion, p38α is the primary p38MAPK isoform expressed in anti-GBM nephritis and selectively affects inflammatory cell influx and tubular damage. Full protection from nephritis is however not achieved as renal failure and structural damage still occurs. PMID:23441175

  9. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-3 is a tumor promoter target in initiated cells that express oncogenic Ras.

    PubMed

    Warmka, Janel K; Mauro, Laura J; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V

    2004-08-01

    We have capitalized on the unique properties of the skin tumor promoter palytoxin, which does not activate protein kinase C, to investigate alternative mechanisms by which major signaling molecules can be modulated during carcinogenesis. We report here that palytoxin activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) through a novel mechanism that involves inactivation of an ERK phosphatase in keratinocytes derived from initiated mouse skin (308 cells). Use of U0126 revealed that palytoxin requires the ERK kinase MEK to stimulate ERK activity, although palytoxin did not activate MEK. We found that 308 keratinocytes highly express mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-3 (MKP-3), which selectively inactivates ERK. Palytoxin induced the loss of MKP-3 in a manner that corresponded to increased ERK phosphorylation. Complementary studies showed that sustained expression of exogenous MKP-3 inhibited palytoxin-stimulated ERK activation. As is characteristic of initiated keratinocytes, 308 cells express activated H-Ras. To investigate whether expression of oncogenic Ras is key to palytoxin-stimulated ERK activation, we determined how palytoxin affected ERK and MKP-3 in MCF10A human breast epithelial cells and in H-ras MCF10A cells, which stably express activated H-Ras. Palytoxin did not affect ERK activity in MCF10A cells, which had no detectable MKP-3. Like 308 cells, H-ras MCF10A cells highly express MKP-3. Strikingly, palytoxin stimulated ERK activity and induced a corresponding loss of MKP-3 in H-ras MCF10A cells. These studies indicate that in initiated cells palytoxin unleashes ERK activity by down-regulating MKP-3, an ERK inhibitor, and further suggest that MKP-3 may be a vulnerable target in cells that express oncogenic Ras.

  10. OsMAPK6, a mitogen-activated protein kinase, influences rice grain size and biomass production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuying; Hua, Lei; Dong, Sujun; Chen, Hongqi; Zhu, Xudong; Jiang, Jun'e; Zhang, Fang; Li, Yunhai; Fang, Xiaohua; Chen, Fan

    2015-11-01

    Grain size is an important agronomic trait in determining grain yield. However, the molecular mechanisms that determine the final grain size are not well understood. Here, we report the functional analysis of a rice (Oryza sativa L.) mutant, dwarf and small grain1 (dsg1), which displays pleiotropic phenotypes, including small grains, dwarfism and erect leaves. Cytological observations revealed that the small grain and dwarfism of dsg1 were mainly caused by the inhibition of cell proliferation. Map-based cloning revealed that DSG1 encoded a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), OsMAPK6. OsMAPK6 was mainly located in the nucleus and cytoplasm, and was ubiquitously distributed in various organs, predominately in spikelets and spikelet hulls, consistent with its role in grain size and biomass production. As a functional kinase, OsMAPK6 interacts strongly with OsMKK4, indicating that OsMKK4 is likely to be the upstream MAPK kinase of OsMAPK6 in rice. In addition, hormone sensitivity tests indicated that the dsg1 mutant was less sensitive to brassinosteroids (BRs). The endogenous BR levels were reduced in dsg1, and the expression of several BR signaling pathway genes and feedback-inhibited genes was altered in the dsg1 mutant, with or without exogenous BRs, indicating that OsMAPK6 may contribute to influence BR homeostasis and signaling. Thus, OsMAPK6, a MAPK, plays a pivotal role in grain size in rice, via cell proliferation, and BR signaling and homeostasis. PMID:26366992

  11. Stimulation of Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells by Dentin Matrix Protein 1 Activates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Sangeetha; Ramachandran, Amsaveni; Eapen, Asha; George, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontitis can ultimately result in tooth loss. Many natural and synthetic materials have been tried to achieve periodontal regeneration, but the results remain variable and unpredictable. We hypothesized that exogenous treatment with dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) activates specific genes and results in phenotypic and functional changes in human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs). Methods hPDLSCs were isolated from extracted teeth and cultured in the presence or absence of DMP1. Quantitative polymerase chain reactions were performed to analyze the expression of several genes involved in periodontal regeneration. hPDLSCs were also processed for immunocytochemical and Western blot analysis using phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) and ERK antibodies. Alkaline phosphatase and von Kossa staining were performed to characterize the differentiation of hPDLSCs into osteoblasts. Field emission scanning electron microscopic analysis of the treated and control cell cultures were also performed. Results Treatment with DMP1 resulted in the upregulation of genes, such as matrix metalloproteinase-2, alkaline phosphatase, and transforming growth factor β1. Activation of ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and translocation of pERK from the cytoplasm to the nucleus was observed. Overall, DMP1-treated cells showed increased expression of alkaline phosphatase, increased matrix, and mineralized nodule formation when compared with untreated controls. Conclusion DMP1 can orchestrate a coordinated expression of genes and phenotypic changes in hPDLSCs by activation of the ERK signaling pathway, which may provide a valuable strategy for tissue engineering approaches in periodontal regeneration. PMID:22612367

  12. The catalytic domain of endogenous urokinase-type plasminogen activator is required for the mitogenic activity of platelet-derived and basic fibroblast growth factors in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Padró, Teresa; Mesters, Rolf M; Dankbar, Berno; Hintelmann, Heike; Bieker, Ralf; Kiehl, Michael; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Kienast, Joachim

    2002-05-01

    Emerging data suggest that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (UPA), beyond its role in pericellular proteolysis, may also act as a mitogen. We investigated the function of endogenous UPA in mediating the mitogenic effects of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Growth-arrested SMC constitutively expressed UPA, but UPA expression and secretion increased several times upon stimulation with either PDGF or bFGF. Inhibition of endogenous UPA with a polyclonal antibody significantly reduced DNA synthesis and proliferation of PDGF or bFGF stimulated SMC, this effect already being evident when the cells entered S-phase. The proliferative activity of endogenous UPA was dependent on a functional catalytic domain as demonstrated by inhibition experiments with a specific monoclonal antibody (394OA) and p-aminobenzamidine, respectively. In contrast, neither plasmin generation nor binding of UPA to its receptor (CD87) were required for UPA-mediated mitogenic effects. The results demonstrate that endogenous UPA is not only overexpressed in SMC upon stimulation with PDGF/bFGF, but also mediates the mitogenic activity of the growth factors in a catalytic-domain-dependent manner. Specific inhibition of this UPA domain may represent an attractive target for pharmacological interventions in atherogenesis and restenosis after angioplasty. PMID:11956327

  13. Lack of in vitro effect of aglepristone on IFN-γ and IL-4 production by resting and mitogen-activated T cells of luteal bitches

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aglepristone (RU534) is an antiprogestin used for pregnancy termination, parturition induction and conservative pyometra treatment in bitches. Its molecular structure is similar to mifepristone, an antiprogestin used in human medicine. Mifepristone has been shown to suppress proliferation and cytokine production by T cells, whereas the effect of aglepristone on T cell function remains elusive. The purpose of this project was to investigate the in vitro influence of RU534 on IFN-γ and IL-4 synthesis by peripheral blood T cells isolated from healthy bitches (N = 16) in luteal phase. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were incubated with three different dosages of aglepristone, or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), with or without mitogen. The production of cytokines by resting or mitogen-activated T cells was determined by intercellular staining and flow cytometry analysis or ELISA assay, respectively. Results Our results showed no statistically significant differences in the percentage of IFN-γ and IL-4-synthesizing CD4+ or CD8+ resting T cells between untreated and aglepristone-treated cells at 24 and 48 hours post treatment. Moreover, mitogen-activated PBMCs treated with RU534 displayed similar concentration of IFN-γ and IL-4 in culture supernatants to those observed in mitogen-activated DMSO-treated PBMCs. Presented results indicate that administration of aglepristone for 48 hours has no influence on IFN-γ and IL-4 synthesis by resting and mitogen-activated T cells isolated from diestral bitches. Conclusions We conclude that antiprogestins may differentially affect T cell function depending on the animal species in which they are applied. PMID:24284004

  14. 3pK, a new mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase located in the small cell lung cancer tumor suppressor gene region.

    PubMed Central

    Sithanandam, G; Latif, F; Duh, F M; Bernal, R; Smola, U; Li, H; Kuzmin, I; Wixler, V; Geil, L; Shrestha, S

    1996-01-01

    NotI linking clones, localized to the human chromosome 3p21.3 region and homozygously deleted in small cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H740 and NCI-H1450, were used to search for a putative tumor suppressor gene(s). One of these clones, NL1G210, detected a 2.5-kb mRNA in all examined human tissues, expression being especially high in the heart and skeletal muscle. Two overlapping cDNA clones containing the entire open reading frame were isolated from a human heart cDNA library and fully characterized. Computer analysis and a search of the GenBank database to reveal high sequence identity of the product of this gene to serine-threonine kinases, especially to mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2, a recently described substrate of mitogen-activated kinases. Sequence identitiy was 72% at the nucleotide level and 75% at the amino acid level, strongly suggesting that this protein is a serine-threonine kinase. Here we demonstrate that the new gene, referred to as 3pK (for chromosome 3p kinase), in fact encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated protein serine-threonine kinase with a novel substrate specificity. PMID:8622688

  15. Epidermal growth factor stimulates the disruption of gap junctional communication and connexin43 phosphorylation independent of 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-sensitive protein kinase C: the possible involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kanemitsu, M Y; Lau, A F

    1993-08-01

    We previously reported that epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced the disruption of gap junctional communication (gjc) and serine phosphorylation of connexin43 (Cx43) in T51B rat liver epithelial cells. However, the cascade of events linking EGF receptor activation to these particular responses have not been fully characterized. Furthermore, the serine kinase(s) acting directly on Cx43 remain unidentified. In the current study, we demonstrate that downmodulation of 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-sensitive protein kinase C (PKC) activity does not affect EGF's ability to reduce junctional permeability or phosphorylate Cx43 in T51B cells. EGF in the presence or absence of chronic TPA treatment stimulated marked increases in Cx43 phosphorylation on numerous sites as determined by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping. Computer-assisted sequence analysis of Cx43 identified several protein kinase phosphorylation consensus sites including two sites for mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. EGF stimulated activation of MAP kinase in a time- and dose-dependent manner where the kinetics of kinase activity corroborated its possible involvement in mediating EGF's effects. Moreover, purified MAP kinase directly phosphorylated Cx43 on serine residues in vitro. Two-dimensional tryptic and chymotryptic phosphopeptide mapping demonstrated that the in vitro phosphopeptides represented a specific subset of the in vivo phosphopeptides produced in response to EGF after chronic TPA treatment. Therefore, EGF-induced disruption of gjc and phosphorylation of Cx43 may be mediated in part by MAP kinase in vivo.

  16. Beta interferon and oncostatin M activate Raf-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase through a JAK1-dependent pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Stancato, L F; Sakatsume, M; David, M; Dent, P; Dong, F; Petricoin, E F; Krolewski, J J; Silvennoinen, O; Saharinen, P; Pierce, J; Marshall, C J; Sturgill, T; Finbloom, D S; Larner, A C

    1997-01-01

    Activation of early response genes by interferons (IFNs) and other cytokines requires tyrosine phosphorylation of a family of transcription factors termed signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats). The Janus family of tyrosine kinases (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2) is required for cytokine-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and dimerization of the Stat proteins. In order for IFNs to stimulate maximal expression of Stat1alpha-regulated genes, phosphorylation of a serine residue in the carboxy terminus by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is also required. In HeLa cells, both IFN-beta and oncostatin M (OSM) stimulated MAPK and Raf-1 enzyme activity, in addition to Stat1 and Stat3 tyrosine phosphorylation. OSM stimulation of Raf-1 correlated with GTP loading of Ras, whereas IFN-beta activation of Raf-1 was Ras independent. IFN-beta- and OSM-induced Raf-1 activity could be coimmunoprecipitated with either Jak1 or Tyk2. Furthermore, HeLa cells lacking Jak1 displayed no activation of STAT1alpha, STAT3, and Raf-1 by IFN-beta or OSM and also demonstrated no increase in the relative level of GTP-bound p21ras in response to OSM. The requirement for Jak1 for IFN-beta- and OSM-induced activation of Raf-1 was also seen in Jak1-deficient U4A fibrosarcoma cells. Interestingly, basal MAPK, but not Raf-1, activity was constitutively enhanced in Jak1-deficient HeLa cells. Transient expression of Jak1 in both Jak-deficient HeLa cells and U4A cells reconstituted the ability of IFN-beta and OSM to activate Raf-1 and decreased the basal activity of MAPK, while expression of a kinase-inactive form of the protein showed no effect. Moreover, U4A cells selected for stable expression of Jak1, or COS cells transiently expressing Jak1 or Tyk2 but not Jak3, exhibited enhanced Raf-1 activity. Therefore, it appears that Jak1 is required for Raf-1 activation by both IFN-beta and OSM. These results provide evidence for a link between the Jaks and the Raf/MAPK signaling pathways

  17. Brucella abortus induces TNF-α-dependent astroglial MMP-9 secretion through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Central nervous system (CNS) invasion by bacteria of the genus Brucella results in an inflammatory disorder called neurobrucellosis. We have recently demonstrated that B. abortus infects microglia and astrocytes, eliciting the production of a variety of pro-inflammatory cytokines which contribute to CNS damage. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) have been implicated in inflammatory tissue destruction in a range of pathological situations in the CNS. Increased MMP secretion is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines in a variety of CNS diseases characterized by tissue-destructive pathology. Methods In this study, the molecular mechanisms that regulate MMP secretion from Brucella-infected astrocytes in vitro were investigated. MMP-9 was evaluated in culture supernatants by ELISA, zymography and gelatinolytic activity. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways was evaluated by Western blot and using specific inhibitors. The role of TNF-α was evaluated by ELISA and by assays with neutralizing antibodies. Results B. abortus infection induced the secretion of MMP-9 from murine astrocytes in a dose-dependent fashion. The phenomenon was independent of bacterial viability and was recapitulated by L-Omp19, a B. abortus lipoprotein model, but not its LPS. B. abortus and L-Omp19 readily activated p38 and Erk1/2 MAPK, thus enlisting these pathways among the kinase pathways that the bacteria may address as they invade astrocytes. Inhibition of p38 or Erk1/2 significantly diminished MMP-9 secretion, and totally abrogated production of this MMP when both MAPK pathways were inhibited simultaneously. A concomitant abrogation of B. abortus- and L-Omp19-induced TNF-α production was observed when p38 and Erk1/2 pathways were inhibited, indicating that TNF-α could be implicated in MMP-9 secretion. MMP-9 secretion induced by B. abortus or L-Omp19 was completely abrogated when experiments were conducted in the presence of a TNF-α neutralizing

  18. Changes in mitogen-activated protein kinase in cerebellar granule neurons by polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Chunyang; Besas, Jonathan

    2010-05-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as additive flame retardants and have been detected in human blood, adipose tissue, and breast milk. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that the effects of PBDEs are similar to the known human developmental neurotoxicants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on a molar basis. Previously, we reported that PBDE mixtures and congeners, perturbed calcium homeostasis which is critical for the development and function of the nervous system. In the present study, we tested whether environmentally relevant PBDE/PCB mixtures and congeners affected mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which are down-stream events of calcium signaling in cerebellar granule neuronal cultures. In this study, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK)1/2, a widely studied MAPK cascade and known to be involved in learning and memory, levels were quantitated using western blot technique with phospho-specific antibodies. Glutamate (a positive control) increased pERK1/2 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner reaching maximum activation at 5-30 min of exposure and at doses >= 10 muM. Both Aroclor 1254 (a commercial penta PCB mixture) and DE-71 (a commercial penta PBDE mixture) elevated phospho-ERK1/2, producing maximum stimulation at 30 min and at concentrations >= 3 mug/ml; Aroclor 1254 was more efficacious than DE-71. DE-79 (an octabrominated diphenyl ether mixture) also elevated phospho-ERK1/2, but to a lesser extent than that of DE-71. PBDE congeners 47, 77, 99, and 153 also increased phospo-ERK1/2 in a concentration-dependent manner. The data indicated that PBDE congeners are more potent than the commercial mixtures. PCB 47 also increased phospho-ERK1/2 like its structural analog PBDE 47, but to a lesser extent, suggesting that these chemicals affect similar pathways. Cytotoxicity, measured as %LDH release, data showed that higher concentrations (> 30 muM) and longer exposures (> 30 min) are

  19. Detection of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase in the developing spinal cord of the mouse embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Teraishi, Toshiya; Miura, Kenji

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} We detected physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs in developing spinal cord. {yields} We detected physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs by an improved method. {yields} p-ERK1/2 and p-JNK1/2 were detected in the marginal layer and the dorsal horn. {yields} p-ERK1/2 and p-JNK1/2 might play critical roles in the developing spinal cord. {yields} Constructing phosphoprotein atlases will be possible if expanding this work. -- Abstract: Global understanding of the proteome is a major research topic. The comprehensive visualization of the distribution of proteins in vivo or the construction of in situ protein atlases may be a valuable strategy for proteomic researchers. Information about the distribution of various proteins under physiological and pathological conditions should be extremely valuable for the basic and clinical sciences. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade plays an essential role in intracellular signaling in organisms. This cascade also regulates biological processes involving development, differentiation, and proliferation. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are integral reactions in regulating the activity of MAPKs. Changes in the phosphorylation state of MAPKs are rapid and reversible; therefore, the localizations of physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs in vivo are difficult to accurately detect. Furthermore, phosphorylated MAPKs are likely to change phosphorylated states through commonly used experimental manipulations. In the present study, as a step toward the construction of in situ phosphoprotein atlases, we attempted to detect physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs in vivo in developing spinal cords of mice. We previously reported an improved immunohistochemical method for detecting unstable phosphorylated MAPKs. The distribution patterns of phosphorylated MAPKs in the spinal cords of embryonic mice from embryonic day 13 (E13) to E17 were observed with an improved immunohistochemical method. Phosphorylated

  20. Cadmium-induced apoptosis and necrosis in human osteoblasts: role of caspases and mitogen-activated protein kinases pathways.

    PubMed

    Brama, M; Politi, L; Santini, P; Migliaccio, S; Scandurra, R

    2012-02-01

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental pollutant which induces severe toxic alterations, including osteomalacia and osteoporosis, likely by estrogen receptor-dependent mechanisms. Indeed, cadmium has been described to act as an endocrine disruptor and its toxicity is exerted both in vivo and in vitro through induction of apoptosis and/or necrosis by not fully clarified intracellular mechanism(s) of action. Aim of the present study was to further investigate the molecular mechanism by which cadmium might alter homeostasis of estrogen target cells, such as osteoblast homeostasis, inducing cell apoptosis and/or necrosis. Human osteoblastic cells (hFOB 1.19) in culture were used as an in vitro model to characterize the intracellular mechanisms induced by this heavy metal. Cells were incubated in the presence/ absence of 10-50 μM cadmium chloride at different times and DNA fragmentation and activation of procaspases- 8 and -3 were induced upon CdCl(2) treatment triggering apoptotic and necrotic pathways. Addition of caspase-8 and -3 inhibitors (Z-IETD-FMK and Z-DQMD-FMK) partially blocked these effects. No activation of procaspase-9 was observed. To determine the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in these events, we investigated c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation which were activated by 10 μM CdCl(2). Chemical inhibitors of JNK, p38, and ERK1/2, SP600125, SB202190, and PD98059, significantly reduced the phosphorylation of the kinases and blunted apoptosis. In contrast, caspase inhibitors did not reduce the cadmium-induced MAPK phosphorylation, suggesting an independent activation of these pathways. In conclusion, at least 2 pathways appear activated by cadmium in osteoblasts: a direct induction of caspase-8 followed by activation of caspase-3 and an indirect induction by phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNK MAPK triggering activation of caspase-8 and -3.

  1. Increased expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase is related to the acute renal lesions induced by gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Volpini, R A; Balbi, A P C; Costa, R S; Coimbra, T M

    2006-06-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) may be involved in the pathogenesis of acute renal failure. This study investigated the expression of p-p38 MAPK and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) in the renal cortex of rats treated with gentamicin. Twenty rats were injected with gentamicin, 40 mg/kg, i.m., twice a day for 9 days, 20 with gentamicin + pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, an NF-kappaB inhibitor), 14 with 0.15 M NaCl, i.m., twice a day for 9 days, and 14 with 0.15 M NaCl , i.m., twice a day for 9 days and PDTC, 50 mg kg(-1) day(-1), i.p., twice a day for 15 days. The animals were killed 5 and 30 days after the last of the injections and the kidneys were removed for histological, immunohistochemical and Western blot analysis and for nitrate determination. The results of the immunohistochemical study were evaluated by counting the p-p38 MAPK-positive cells per area of renal cortex measuring 0.05 mm2. Creatinine was measured by the Jaffé method in blood samples collected 5 and 30 days after the end of the treatments. Gentamicin-treated rats presented a transitory increase in plasma creatinine levels. In addition, animals killed 5 days after the end of gentamicin treatment presented acute tubular necrosis and increased nitrate levels in the renal cortex. Increased expression of p-p38 MAPK and NF-kappaB was also observed in the kidneys from these animals. The animals killed 30 days after gentamicin treatment showed residual areas of interstitial fibrosis in the renal cortex, although the expression of p-p38 MAPK in their kidneys did not differ from control. Treatment with PDTC reduced the functional and structural changes induced by gentamicin as well as the expression of p-p38 MAPK and NF-kappaB. The increased expression of p-p38 MAPK and NF-kappaB observed in these rats suggests that these signaling molecules may be involved in the pathogenesis of tubulointerstitial nephritis induced by gentamicin.

  2. Transposable Elements in TDP-43-Mediated Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hammell, Molly; Dubnau, Josh

    2012-01-01

    Elevated expression of specific transposable elements (TEs) has been observed in several neurodegenerative disorders. TEs also can be active during normal neurogenesis. By mining a series of deep sequencing datasets of protein-RNA interactions and of gene expression profiles, we uncovered extensive binding of TE transcripts to TDP-43, an RNA-binding protein central to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we find that association between TDP-43 and many of its TE targets is reduced in FTLD patients. Third, we discovered that a large fraction of the TEs to which TDP-43 binds become de-repressed in mouse TDP-43 disease models. We propose the hypothesis that TE mis-regulation contributes to TDP-43 related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22957047

  3. The investigation of Mitogen-Activated Protein kinase Phosphatase-1 as a potential pharmacological target in non-small cell lung carcinomas, assisted by non-invasive molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Invasiveness and metastasis are the most common characteristics of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and causes of tumour-related morbidity and mortality. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signalling pathways have been shown to play critical roles in tumorigenesis. However, the precise pathological role(s) of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in different cancers has been controversial such that the up-regulation of MKP-1 in different cancers does not always correlate to a better prognosis. In this study, we showed that the induction of MKP-1 lead to a significant retardation of proliferation and metastasis in NSCLC cells. We also established that rosiglitazone (a PPARγ agonist) elevated MKP-1 expression level in NSCLC cells and inhibited tumour metastasis. Methods Both wildtype and dominant negative forms of MKP-1 were constitutively expressed in NSCLC cell line H441GL. The migration and invasion abilities of these cells were examined in vitro. MKP-1 modulating agents such as rosiglitazone and triptolide were used to demonstrate MKP-1's role in tumorigenesis. Bioluminescent imaging was utilized to study tumorigenesis of MKP-1 over-expressing H441GL cells and anti-metastatic effect of rosiglitazone. Results Over-expression of MKP-1 reduced NSCLC cell proliferation rate as well as cell invasive and migratory abilities, evident by the reduced expression levels of MMP-2 and CXCR4. Mice inoculated with MKP-1 over-expressing H441 cells did not develop NSCLC while their control wildtype H441 inoculated littermates developed NSCLC and bone metastasis. Pharmacologically, rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonist appeared to induce MKP-1 expression while reduce MMP-2 and CXCR4 expression. H441GL-inoculated mice receiving daily oral rosiglitazone treatment demonstrated a significant inhibition of bone metastasis when compared to mice receiving sham treatment. We found that rosiglitazone treatment

  4. Induction of apoptosis in human mitogen-activated peripheral blood T-lymphocytes by the ether phospholipid ET-18-OCH3: Involvement of the Fas receptor/ligand system

    PubMed Central

    Cabaner, Christelle; Gajate, Consuelo; Macho, Antonio; Muñoz, Eduardo; Modolell, Manuel; Mollinedo, Faustino

    1999-01-01

    Activated T-cells constitute a target for treatment of autoimmune diseases. We have found that the antitumour ether phospholipid 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET-18-OCH3; edelfosine) induced dose- and time-dependent apoptosis in human mitogen-activated peripheral blood T-lymphocytes, but not in resting T-cells. T-lymphocytes were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin and interleukin-2 or with concanavalin A. Apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation through cell cycle and TUNEL analyses, as well as through visualization of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in agarose gels.The ET-18-OCH3-mediated apoptotic response in activated T-lymphocytes was less intense than in human leukaemic T cell lines, such as Jurkat cells and Peer cells; namely about 25% apoptosis in activated T-cells versus about 46–61% apoptosis in T leukaemic cells after 24 h treatment with 10 μM ET-18-OCH3.The ET-18-OCH3 thioether analogue BM 41.440 (ilmofosine) showed a similar apoptotic capacity to that found with ET-18-OCH3 in activated T-cells, whereas the phospholipid analogue hexadecylphosphocholine (miltefosine) failed to promote this response.The uptake of [3H]-ET-18-OCH3 was much larger in activated T-cells than in resting lymphocytes.Using a cytofluorimetric approach we have found that ET-18-OCH3 induced disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species in activated T-cells, but not in resting lymphocytes.ET-18-OCH3 induced an increase in Fas (APO-1/CD95) ligand mRNA expression in activated T-cells, and incubation with a blocking anti-Fas (APO-1/CD95) antibody partially inhibited the ET-18-OCH3-induced apoptosis of activated T-lymphocytes.These results demonstrate that mitogen-activated T-cells, unlike resting lymphocytes, are able to take up significant amounts of ET-18-OCH3, and are susceptible to undergo apoptosis by the ether lipid via, in part, the Fas (APO-1/CD95) receptor/ligand system. This ET-18-OCH3

  5. Antinociceptive effects of analgesic-antitumor peptide (AGAP), a neurotoxin from the scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch, on formalin-induced inflammatory pain through a mitogen-activated protein kinases-dependent mechanism in mice.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qinghong; Ruan, Jiaping; Cai, Xueting; Lu, Wuguang; Ye, Juan; Yang, Jie; Yang, Yang; Sun, Xiaoyan; Cao, Junli; Cao, Peng

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-nociceptive effect and the underlying mechanism of the analgesic-antitumor peptide (AGAP), a neurotoxin from the scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch. AGAP in doses of 0.2, 1 and 5 µg was injected intraplantarly (i.pl.) before formalin injection 10 min at the same site. The suppression by intraplantar injection of AGAP on formalin-induced spontaneous nociceptive behaviors was investigated. The results show that AGAP could dose-dependently inhibit formalin-induced two-phase spontaneous flinching response. To investigate the mechanism of action of treatment with AGAP in inflammatory pain, the expressions of peripheral and spinal phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (phospho-MAPKs) including p-p38, p-ERK and p-JNK were examined. We found that formalin increased the expressions of peripheral and spinal MAPKs, which were prevented by pre-intraplantar injection of AGAP in inflammation pain model in mice. AGAP could also decrease the expression of spinal Fos induced by formalin. Furthermore, combinations the lower doses of the inhibitors of MAPKs (U0126, SP600125, or SB203580 0.1 µg) with the lower dose of AGAP (0.2 µg), the results suggested that AGAP could potentiate the effects of the inhibitors of MAPKs on the inflammatory pain. The present results indicate that pre-intraplantar injection of AGAP prevents the inflammatory pain induced by formalin through a MAPKs-mediated mechanism in mice. PMID:24244296

  6. Luteolin prevents solar radiation-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 activation in human fibroblasts: a role for p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and interleukin-20 released from keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wölfle, Ute; Heinemann, Anja; Esser, Philipp R; Haarhaus, Birgit; Martin, Stefan F; Schempp, Christoph M

    2012-10-01

    Human skin is continuously exposed to solar radiation, which can result in photoaging, a process involving both dermal and, to a lesser extent, epidermal structures. Previously, we have shown that the flavonoid luteolin protects the epidermis from ultraviolet (UV)-induced damage by a combination of UV-absorbing, antioxidant, and antiinflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to determine direct and indirect effects of luteolin on dermal fibroblasts as major targets of photoaging. Stimulation of fibroblasts with UVA light or the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-20 (IL-20) is associated with wrinkled skin, increased IL-6 secretion, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1) expression, and hyaluronidase activity. All of these targets were inhibited by luteolin via interference with the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Next, we assessed the role of conditioned supernatants from keratinocytes irradiated with solar-simulated radiation (SSR) on nonirradiated dermal fibroblasts. In keratinocytes, luteolin inhibited SSR-induced production of IL-20, also via interference with the p38 MAPK pathway. Similarly, keratinocyte supernatant-induced IL-6 and MMP-1 expression in fibroblasts was reduced by pretreatment of keratinocytes with luteolin. Finally, these results were confirmed ex vivo on skin explants treated with luteolin before UV irradiation. Our results suggest that SSR-mediated production of soluble factors in keratinocytes is modulated by luteolin and may attenuate photoaging in dermal fibroblasts. PMID:23004935

  7. CYP2E1 Sensitizes the Liver to LPS- and TNF α-Induced Toxicity via Elevated Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress and Activation of ASK-1 and JNK Mitogen-Activated Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Cederbaum, Arthur I.; Yang, Lili; Wang, Xiaodong; Wu, Defeng

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which alcohol causes cell injury are not clear. A major mechanism is the role of lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in alcohol toxicity. Many pathways have been suggested to play a role in how alcohol induces oxidative stress. Considerable attention has been given to alcohol elevated production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and TNFα and to alcohol induction of CYP2E1. These two pathways are not exclusive of each other; however, interactions between them, have not been extensively evaluated. Increased oxidative stress from induction of CYP2E1 sensitizes hepatocytes to LPS and TNFα toxicity and oxidants, activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and p38 and JNK MAP kinases, and mitochondrial dysfunction are downstream mediators of this CYP2E1-LPS/TNFα-potentiated hepatotoxicity. This paper will summarize studies showing potentiated interactions between these two risk factors in promoting liver injury and the mechanisms involved including activation of the mitogen-activated kinase kinase kinase ASK-1. Decreasing either cytosolic or mitochondrial thioredoxin in HepG2 cells expressing CYP2E1 causes loss of cell viability and elevated oxidative stress via an ASK-1/JNK-dependent mechanism. We hypothesize that similar interactions occur as a result of ethanol induction of CYP2E1 and TNFα. PMID:22028977

  8. A novel p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitor suppresses respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus replication by inhibiting virus-induced p38 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Soo; Heo, Jinyuk; Yi, Chae-Min; Ban, Junsu; Lee, Noh-Jin; Lee, Na-Rae; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Nam-Jung; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2016-08-26

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A virus are leading causes of acute lower respiratory infectious disease. Respiratory diseases caused by RSV and influenza A virus result in serious economic burden and life-threatening disease for immunocompromised people. With the revelation that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in host cells is crucial for infection and replication of RSV and influenza A virus, inhibition of p38 MAPK activity has been suggested as a potential antiviral therapeutic strategy. However, the low selectivity and high toxicity of the p38 MAPK inhibitors necessitate the development of better inhibitors. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel p38 MAPK inhibitor, NJK14047, with high kinase selectivity. In this work, it was demonstrated that NJK14047 inhibits RSV- and influenza A-mediated p38 MAPK activation in epithelial cells. Subsequently, NJK14047 treatment resulted in decreased viral replication and viral mRNA synthesis. In addition, secretion of interleukin-6 from infected cells was greatly diminished by NJK14047, suggesting that it can ameliorate immunopathological responses to RSV and influenza A. Collectively, the results suggest that NJK14047 has therapeutic potential to treat respiratory viral infection through the suppression of p38 MAPK activation, which is suggested to be an essential step for respiratory virus infection. PMID:27346133

  9. BET bromodomain inhibition releases the Mediator complex from select cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Roe, Jae-Seok; Mok, Beverly A.; Hohmann, Anja F.; Shi, Junwei; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein BRD4 can physically interact with the Mediator complex, but the relevance of this association to the therapeutic effects of BET inhibitors in cancer is unclear. Here, we show that BET inhibition causes a rapid release of Mediator from a subset of cis-regulatory elements in the genome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. These sites of Mediator eviction were highly correlated with transcriptional suppression of neighboring genes, which are enriched for targets of the transcription factor MYB and for functions related to leukemogenesis. An shRNA screen of Mediator in AML cells identified the MED12, MED13, MED23, and MED24 subunits as performing a similar regulatory function to BRD4 in this context, including a shared role in sustaining a block in myeloid maturation. These findings suggest that the interaction between BRD4 and Mediator has functional importance for gene-specific transcriptional activation and for AML maintenance. PMID:27068464

  10. p38β Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Modulates Its Own Basal Activity by Autophosphorylation of the Activating Residue Thr180 and the Inhibitory Residues Thr241 and Ser261

    PubMed Central

    Beenstock, Jonah; Melamed, Dganit; Mooshayef, Navit; Mordechay, Dafna; Garfinkel, Benjamin P.; Ahn, Natalie G.; Admon, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Many enzymes are self-regulated and can either inhibit or enhance their own catalytic activity. Enzymes that do both are extremely rare. Many protein kinases autoactivate by autophosphorylating specific sites at their activation loop and are inactivated by phosphatases. Although mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are usually activated by dual phosphorylation catalyzed by MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), the MAPK p38β is exceptional and is capable of self-activation by cis autophosphorylation of its activation loop residue T180. We discovered that p38β also autophosphorylates in trans two previously unknown sites residing within a MAPK-specific structural element known as the MAPK insert: T241 and S261. Whereas phosphorylation of T180 evokes catalytic activity, phosphorylation of S261 reduces the activity of T180-phosphorylated p38β, and phosphorylation of T241 reduces its autophosphorylation in trans. Both phosphorylations do not affect the activity of dually phosphorylated p38β. T241 of p38β is found phosphorylated in vivo in bone and muscle tissues. In myogenic cell lines, phosphorylation of p38β residue T241 is correlated with differentiation to myotubes. T241 and S261 are also autophosphorylated in intrinsically active variants of p38α, but in this protein, they probably play a different role. We conclude that p38β is an unusual enzyme that automodulates its basal, MAPKK-independent activity by several autophosphorylation events, which enhance and suppress its catalytic activity. PMID:26976637

  11. Inhibitory effect of panduratin A on UV-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae-Seok; Kwon, Yi-Young; Han, Young-Sun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2008-10-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet (UV) induces photoaging associated with up-regulated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activities and decreased collagen synthesis. We previously reported that panduratin A, a chalcone compound isolated from KAEMPFERIA PANDURATA Roxb ., decreased MMP-1 expression in UV-irradiated human skin fibroblasts. Here, we have investigated the effect of panduratin A on UV-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling modules such as extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK), Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. Treatment with panduratin A in the range of 0.001 - 0.1 microM significantly inhibited UV-induced ERK, JNK and p38 activation. Moreover, inhibition of ERK, JNK and p38 by panduratin A resulted in decreased c-Fos expression and c-Jun phosphorylation induced by UV, which led to inhibition of activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA binding activity. Panduratin A showed stronger activity than epigallocatechin 3- O-gallate (EGCG) known as a natural anti-aging agent. The results suggest that panduratin A can down-regulate UV-induced MMP-1 expression by inhibiting the MAPKs pathways and AP-1 activation. AP-1:activator protein-1 EGCG:epigallocatechin 3- O-gallate ERK:extracellular-regulated protein kinase JNK:c-Jun N-terminal kinase MAPK:mitogen-activated protein kinase MMP:matrix metalloproteinase UV:ultraviolet.

  12. Structural characterization and immunomodulatory activity of Grifola frondosa polysaccharide via toll-like receptor 4-mitogen-activated protein kinases-nuclear factor κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaolei; Meng, Meng; Han, Lirong; Cheng, Dai; Cao, Xiaohong; Wang, Chunling

    2016-06-15

    We isolated a neutral polysaccharide from the fruiting body of a mushroom Grifola frondosa (GFP-A). The aim of this study was to characterize a neutral α-d-polysaccharide derived from G. frondosa and evaluate its immunomodulatory effect on toll-like receptor 4, mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor κB pathways of protein expression in macrophages. The structural features of GFP-A were characterized by physicochemical and instrumental analyses. Its molecular weight was found to be 8.48 × 10(2) kDa. The main chain of GFP-A consisted of (1 → 4)-linked and (1 → 6)-linked α-d-glucopyranosyl, and (1 → 3,6)-linked α-d-mannopyranosyl residues, which branched at C-3. The branches consisted of (1 → 6)-linked α-d-galactopyranosyl and t-l-rhamnopyranosyl residues. An in vitro immunomodulatory assay for pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β, interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, etc.) using the macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, revealed that GFP-A exhibited significant immunomodulatory activity by stimulating the toll-like receptor 4, mitogen-activated protein kinases to nuclear factor κB/pathway. PMID:27220562

  13. Signals from the AT2 (angiotensin type 2) receptor of angiotensin II inhibit p21ras and activate MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) to induce morphological neuronal differentiation in NG108-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Gendron, L; Laflamme, L; Rivard, N; Asselin, C; Payet, M D; Gallo-Payet, N

    1999-09-01

    In a previous study, we had shown that activation of the AT2 (angiotensin type 2) receptor of angiotensin II (Ang II) induced morphological differentiation of the neuronal cell line NG108-15. In the present study, we investigated the nature of the possible intracellular mediators involved in the AT2 effect. We found that stimulation of AT2 receptors in NG108-15 cells resulted in time-dependent modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of cytoplasmic proteins. Stimulation of NG108-15 cells with Ang II induced a decrease in GTP-bound p21ras but a sustained increase in the activity of p42mapk and p44mapk as well as neurite outgrowth. Similarly, neurite elongation, increased polymerized tubulin levels, and increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity were also observed in a stably transfected NG108-15 cell line expressing the dominant-negative mutant of p21ras, RasN17. These results support the observation that inhibition of p21ras did not impair the effect of Ang II on its ability to stimulate MAPK activity. While 10 microM of the MEK inhibitor, PD98059, only moderately affected elongation, 50 microM PD98059 completely blocked the Ang II- and the RasN17-mediated induction of neurite outgrowth. These results demonstrate that some of the events associated with the AT2 receptor-induced neuronal morphological differentiation of NG108-15 cells not only include inhibition of p21ras but an increase in MAPK activity as well, which is essential for neurite outgrowth.

  14. Phosphodiesterase MoPdeH targets MoMck1 of the conserved mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling pathway to regulate cell wall integrity in rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ziyi; Tang, Wei; Wang, Jingzhen; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Lina; Gao, Chuyun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-06-01

    In the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the high-affinity cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) phosphodiesterase MoPdeH is important not only for cAMP signalling and pathogenicity, but also for cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance through an unknown mechanism. By utilizing affinity purification, we found that MoPdeH interacts with MoMck1, one of the components of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade that regulates CWI. Overexpression of MoMCK1 suppressed defects in autolysis and pathogenicity of the ΔMopdeH mutant, although partially, suggesting that MoPdeH plays a critical role in CWI maintenance mediated by the MAP kinase pathway. We found that MoMck1 and two other MAP kinase cascade components, MoMkk1 and MoMps1, modulate intracellular cAMP levels by regulating the expression of MoPDEH through a feedback loop. In addition, disruption of MoMKK1 resulted in less aerial hyphal formation, defective asexual development and attenuated pathogenicity. Moreover, MoMkk1 plays a role in the response to osmotic stress via regulation of MoOsm1 phosphorylation levels, whereas endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress enhances MoMps1 phosphorylation and loss of the MAP kinase cascade component affects the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that MoPdeH functions upstream of the MoMck1-MoMkk1-MoMps1 MAP kinase pathway to regulate CWI, and that MoPdeH also mediates crosstalk between the cAMP signalling pathway, the osmotic sensing high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway and the dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced UPR pathway in M. oryzae.

  15. Phosphodiesterase MoPdeH targets MoMck1 of the conserved mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling pathway to regulate cell wall integrity in rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ziyi; Tang, Wei; Wang, Jingzhen; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Lina; Gao, Chuyun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-06-01

    In the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the high-affinity cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) phosphodiesterase MoPdeH is important not only for cAMP signalling and pathogenicity, but also for cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance through an unknown mechanism. By utilizing affinity purification, we found that MoPdeH interacts with MoMck1, one of the components of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade that regulates CWI. Overexpression of MoMCK1 suppressed defects in autolysis and pathogenicity of the ΔMopdeH mutant, although partially, suggesting that MoPdeH plays a critical role in CWI maintenance mediated by the MAP kinase pathway. We found that MoMck1 and two other MAP kinase cascade components, MoMkk1 and MoMps1, modulate intracellular cAMP levels by regulating the expression of MoPDEH through a feedback loop. In addition, disruption of MoMKK1 resulted in less aerial hyphal formation, defective asexual development and attenuated pathogenicity. Moreover, MoMkk1 plays a role in the response to osmotic stress via regulation of MoOsm1 phosphorylation levels, whereas endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress enhances MoMps1 phosphorylation and loss of the MAP kinase cascade component affects the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that MoPdeH functions upstream of the MoMck1-MoMkk1-MoMps1 MAP kinase pathway to regulate CWI, and that MoPdeH also mediates crosstalk between the cAMP signalling pathway, the osmotic sensing high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway and the dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced UPR pathway in M. oryzae. PMID:27193947

  16. Selective loss of PMA-stimulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1 in HaCaT keratinocytes is correlated with the inability to induce mitogen-activated protein family kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Sudbeck, B D; Baumann, P; Ryan, G J; Breitkopf, K; Nischt, R; Krieg, T; Mauch, C

    1999-01-01

    Many cell types, including fibroblasts and primary keratinocytes, increase matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) production in response to agonists such as growth factors and phorbol esters. However, the spontaneously transformed human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT, although it increases MMP-1 production in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF), does not respond similarly to stimulation with PMA. This phenomenon occurs even though HaCaT cells remain proliferatively responsive to both agonists, suggesting a HaCaT-specific defect in a PMA-mediated signal transduction pathway. Using an inside-out approach to elucidate the source of this defect, we found that EGF, but not PMA, stimulated MMP-1 promoter activity in transiently transfected HaCaT keratinocytes. In addition, an assessment of fibroblast and HaCaT c-fos and c-jun gene expression after exposure to EGF and PMA showed that although both agonists increased the expression of c-fos and c-jun mRNA in fibroblasts, only EGF did so in HaCaT keratinocytes. Finally, we looked at the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) family kinases after stimulation with EGF or PMA and found that both agonists increased the phosphorylation and activation of fibroblast extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, but only EGF activated the same kinase activities in HaCaT cells. Further, the EGF-mediated increase in MMP-1 gene expression was inhibited by the MAP kinase/ERK kinase (MEK)-specific inhibitor PD98059 and the p38 kinase-specific inhibitor SB203580. Our evidence indicates that although HaCaT MAP kinases are functional, they are not properly regulated in response to the activation of protein kinase C, and that the defect that bars HaCaT MMP-1 expression in response to stimulation with PMA lies before MAP kinase activation. PMID:10085241

  17. Visualizing and Quantitating the Spatiotemporal Regulation of Ras/ERK Signaling by Dual-Specificity Mitogen-Activated Protein Phosphatases (MKPs).

    PubMed

    Caunt, Christopher J; Kidger, Andrew M; Keyse, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal regulation of the Ras/ERK pathway is critical in determining the physiological and pathophysiological outcome of signaling. Dual-specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatases (DUSPs or MKPs) are key regulators of pathway activity and may also localize ERK to distinct subcellular locations. Here we present methods largely based on the use of high content microscopy to both visualize and quantitate the subcellular distribution of activated (p-ERK) and total ERK in populations of mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from mice lacking DUSP5, a nuclear ERK-specific MKP. Such methods in combination with rescue experiments using adenoviral vectors encoding wild-type and mutant forms of DUSP5 have allowed us to visualize specific defects in ERK regulation in these cells thus confirming the role of this phosphatase as both a nuclear regulator of ERK activity and localization. PMID:27514808

  18. Involvement of YODA and mitogen activated protein kinase 6 in Arabidopsis post-embryogenic root development through auxin up-regulation and cell division plane orientation

    PubMed Central

    Smékalová, Veronika; Luptovčiak, Ivan; Komis, George; Šamajová, Olga; Ovečka, Miroslav; Doskočilová, Anna; Takáč, Tomáš; Vadovič, Pavol; Novák, Ondřej; Pechan, Tibor; Ziemann, Anja; Košútová, Petra; Šamaj, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    Summary The role of YODA MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASE KINASE 4 (MAPKKK4) upstream of MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE 6 (MPK6) was studied during post-embryonic root development of Arabidopsis thaliana. Loss- and gain-of-function mutants of YODA (yda1 and ΔNyda1) were characterized in terms of root patterning, endogenous auxin content and global proteomes.We surveyed morphological and cellular phenotypes of yda1 and ΔNyda1 mutants suggesting possible involvement of auxin. Endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels were up-regulated in both mutants. Proteomic analysis revealed up-regulation of auxin biosynthetic enzymes tryptophan synthase and nitrilases in these mutants. The expression, abundance and phosphorylation of MPK3, MPK6 and MICROTUBULE ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 65–1 (MAP65-1) were characterized by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot analyses and interactions between MAP65-1, microtubules and MPK6 were resolved by quantitative co-localization studies and co-immunoprecipitations.yda1 and ΔNyda1 mutants showed disoriented cell divisions in primary and lateral roots, abortive cytokinesis, and differential subcellular localization of MPK6 and MAP65-1. They also showed deregulated expression of TANGLED1 (TAN1), PHRAGMOPLAST ORIENTING KINESIN 1 (POK1), and GAMMA TUBULIN COMPLEX PROTEIN 4 (GCP4).The findings that MPK6 localized to preprophase bands (PPBs) and phragmoplasts while the mpk6-4 mutant transformed with MPK6AEF (alanine (A)–glutamic acid (E)–phenylanine (F)) showed a root phenotype similar to that of yda1 demonstrated that MPK6 is an important player downstream of YODA. These data indicate that YODA and MPK6 are involved in post-embryonic root development through an auxin-dependent mechanism regulating cell division and mitotic microtubule (PPB and phragmoplast) organization. PMID:24923680

  19. Novel Antiplatelet Activity of Minocycline Involves Inhibition of MLK3-p38 Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Axis

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joseph W.; Singh, Meera V.; Singh, Vir B.; Jones, Letitia D.; Davidson, Gregory A.; Ture, Sara; Morrell, Craig N.; Schifitto, Giovanni; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play an essential role in hemostasis and wound healing by facilitating thrombus formation at sites of injury. Platelets also mediate inflammation and contain several pro-inflammatory molecules including cytokines and chemokines that mediate leukocyte recruitment and activation. Not surprisingly, platelet dysfunction is known to contribute to several inflammatory disorders. Antiplatelet therapies, such as aspirin, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) antagonists, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa) inhibitors, and anticoagulants such as warfarin, dampen platelet activity at the risk of unwarranted bleeding. Thus, the development of drugs that reduce platelet-mediated inflammation without interfering with thrombus formation is of importance to combat platelet-associated disorders. We have shown here for the first time that the tetracycline antibiotic, minocycline, administered to HIV-infected individuals reduces plasma levels of soluble CD40L and platelet factor 4 levels, host molecules predominately released by platelets. Minocycline reduced the activation of isolated platelets in the presence of the potent platelet activator, thrombin, as measured by ELISA and flow cytometry. Platelet degranulation was reduced upon exposure to minocycline as shown by mepacrine retention and flow cytometry. However, minocycline had no effect on spreading, aggregation, GPIIb/IIIa activation, or in vivo thrombus formation. Lastly, immunoblot analysis suggests that the antiplatelet activity of minocycline is likely mediated by inhibition of mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3)-p38 MAPK signaling axis and loss of p38 activity. Our findings provide a better understanding of platelet biology and a novel repurposing of an established antibiotic, minocycline, to specifically reduce platelet granule release without affecting thrombosis, which may yield insights in generating novel, specific antiplatelet therapies. PMID:27270236

  20. Inhibitory effect of caffeic acid on ADP-induced thrombus formation and platelet activation involves mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yu; Li, Quan; Liu, Yu-Ying; Sun, Kai; Fan, Jing-Yu; Wang, Chuan-She; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA), one of the active constituents of Radix Salvia miltiorrhizae, exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, few studies have assessed the ability of CA to inhibit platelet mediated thrombus generation in vivo. In this study, we investigated the antithrombotic effect of CA in mouse cerebral arterioles and venules using intravital microscopy. The antiplatelet activity of CA in ADP stimulated mouse platelets in vitro was also examined in attempt to explore the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that CA (1.25–5 mg/kg) significantly inhibited thrombus formation in vivo. In vitro, CA (25–100 μM) inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation, P-selectin expression, ATP release, Ca2+ mobilization, and integrin αIIbβ3 activation. Additionally, CA attenuated p38, ERK, and JNK activation, and enhanced cAMP levels. Taken together, these data provide evidence for the inhibition of CA on platelet-mediated thrombosis in vivo, which is, at least partly, mediated by interference in phosphorylation of ERK, p38, and JNK leading to elevation of cAMP and down-regulation of P-selectin expression and αIIbβ3 activation. These results suggest that CA may have potential for the treatment of aberrant platelet activation-related diseases. PMID:26345207

  1. Fc gamma R-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in leukocytes: a common signal transduction event necessary for expression of TNF-alpha and early activation genes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Cross-linking the receptors for the Fc domain of IgG (Fc gamma R) on leukocytes induces activation of protein tyrosine kinases. The intermediary molecules that transduce to the nucleus the signals leading to induction of the diverse biological responses mediated by these receptors are not clearly identified. We have investigated whether mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in transmembrane signaling via the three Fc gamma R present on monocytic, polymorphonuclear, and natural killer (NK) cells. Our results indicate that occupancy of Fc gamma RI and Fc gamma RII on the monocytic cell line THP-I and on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) induces, transiently and with fast kinetics, MAPK phosphorylation, as indicated by decreased electrophoretic mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and increased amounts of the proteins in antiphosphotyrosine antibody immunoprecipitates. This, associated with increased enzymatic activity, also occurs upon stimulation of the transmembrane isoform of CD16 (Fc gamma RIIIA) in NK cells and in a T cell line expressing transfected Fc gamma RIIIA alpha ligand-binding chain in association with zeta, but not upon stimulation of the glycosil-phosphatidylinositol-anchored Fc gamma RIIIB on PMN. Using the specific MAP kinase kinase inhibitor-PD 098059, we show that activation of MAPK is necessary for the Fc gamma R-dependent induction of c-fos and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA expression in monocytes and NK cells. These results underscore the role of MAPK as signal- transducing molecules controlling the expression of different genes relevant to leukocyte biology upon Fc gamma R stimulation. PMID:9064320

  2. Suppression of Mitochondrial Biogenesis through Toll-Like Receptor 4–Dependent Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling in Endotoxin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joshua A.; Stallons, L. Jay; Collier, Justin B.; Chavin, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Although disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis and biogenesis (MB) is a widely accepted pathophysiologic feature of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI), the molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are unknown. In this study, we examined the signaling pathways responsible for the suppression of MB in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced AKI. Downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a master regulator of MB, was noted at the mRNA level at 3 hours and protein level at 18 hours in the renal cortex, and was associated with loss of renal function after LPS treatment. LPS-mediated suppression of PGC-1α led to reduced expression of downstream regulators of MB and electron transport chain proteins along with a reduction in renal cortical mitochondrial DNA content. Mechanistically, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) knockout mice were protected from renal injury and disruption of MB after LPS exposure. Immunoblot analysis revealed activation of tumor progression locus 2/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (TPL-2/MEK/ERK) signaling in the renal cortex by LPS. Pharmacologic inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling attenuated renal dysfunction and loss of PGC-1α, and was associated with a reduction in proinflammatory cytokine (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], interleukin-1β) expression at 3 hours after LPS exposure. Neutralization of TNF-α also blocked PGC-1α suppression, but not renal dysfunction, after LPS-induced AKI. Finally, systemic administration of recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α alone was sufficient to produce AKI and disrupt mitochondrial homeostasis. These findings indicate an important role for the TLR4/MEK/ERK pathway in both LPS-induced renal dysfunction and suppression of MB. TLR4/MEK/ERK/TNF-α signaling may represent a novel therapeutic target to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and AKI produced by sepsis. PMID:25503387

  3. Lithium protection of phencyclidine-induced neurotoxicity in developing brain: the role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan; Wang, Cheng Z; Liu, Jie; Anastasio, Noelle C; Johnson, Kenneth M

    2008-09-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) and other N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been shown to be neurotoxic to developing brains and to result in schizophrenia-like behaviors later in development. Prevention of both effects by antischizophrenic drugs suggests the validity of PCP neurodevelopmental toxicity as a heuristic model of schizophrenia. Lithium is used for the treatment of bipolar and schizoaffective disorders and has recently been shown to have neuroprotective properties. The present study used organotypic corticostriatal slices taken from postnatal day 2 rat pups to investigate the protective effect of lithium and the role of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K)/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/ERK) pathways in PCP-induced cell death. Lithium pretreatment dose-dependently reduced PCP-induced caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in layers II to IV of the cortex. PCP elicited time-dependent inhibition of the MEK/ERK and PI-3K/Akt pathways, as indicated by dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. The proapoptotic factor glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta was also dephosphorylated at serine 9 and thus activated. Lithium prevented PCP-induced inhibition of the two pathways and activation of GSK-3beta. Furthermore, blocking either PI-3K/Akt or MEK/ERK pathway abolished the protective effect of lithium, whereas inhibiting GSK-3beta activity mimicked the protective effect of lithium. However, no cross-talk between the two pathways was found. Finally, specific GSK-3beta inhibition did not prevent PCP-induced dephosphorylation of Akt and ERK. These data strongly suggest that the protective effect of lithium against PCP-induced neuroapoptosis is mediated through independent stimulation of the PI-3K/Akt and ERK pathways and suppression of GSK-3beta activity.

  4. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein induces transcription factor AP-1 by activation of extracellular signal-regulated and c-Jun N-terminal mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Su, F; Doria, M; Schneider, R J

    1996-01-01

    The HBx protein of hepatitis B virus is a dual-specificity activator of transcription, stimulating signal transduction pathways in the cytoplasm and transcription factors in the nucleus, when expressed in cell lines in culture. In the cytoplasm, HBx was shown to stimulate the Ras-Raf-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) cascade, which is essential for activation of transcription factor AP-1. Here we show that HBx protein stimulates two independently regulated members of the MAP kinase family when expressed transiently in cells. HBx protein stimulates the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). HBx activation of ERKs and JNKs leads to induction and activation of AP-1 DNA binding activity involving transient de novo synthesis of c-Fos protein and prolonged synthesis of c-Jun, mediated by N-terminal phosphorylation of c-Jun carried out by HBx-activated JNK. New c-Jun synthesis was blocked by coexpression with a dominant-negative MAP kinase kinase (MEK kinase, MEKK-1), confirming that HBx stimulates the prolonged synthesis of c-Jun by activating JNK signalling pathways. Activation of the c-fos gene was blocked by coexpression with a Raf-C4 catalytic mutant, confirming that HBx induces c-Fos by acting on Ras-Raf linked pathways. HBx activation of ERK and JNK pathways resulted in prolonged accumulation of AP-1-c-Jun dimer complexes. HBx activation of JNK and sustained activation of c-jun, should they occur in the context of hepatitis B virus infection, might play a role in viral transformation and pathogenesis. PMID:8764004

  5. Distinct regulatory elements mediate similar expression patterns in the excretory cell of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongying; Fang, Li; Chen, Nansheng; Johnsen, Robert C; Stein, Lincoln; Baillie, David L

    2005-11-18

    Identification of cis-regulatory elements and their binding proteins constitutes an important part of understanding gene function and regulation. It is well accepted that co-expressed genes tend to share transcriptional elements. However, recent findings indicate that co-expression data show poor correlation with co-regulation data even in unicellular yeast. This motivates us to experimentally explore whether it is possible that co-expressed genes are subject to differential regulatory control using the excretory cell of Caenorhabditis elegans as an example. Excretory cell is a functional equivalent of human kidney. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression in the cell is largely unknown. We isolated a 10-bp excretory cell-specific cis-element, Ex-1, from a pgp-12 promoter. The significance of the element has been demonstrated by its capacity of converting an intestine-specific promoter into an excretory cell-specific one. We also isolated a cDNA encoding an Ex-1 binding transcription factor, DCP-66, using a yeast one-hybrid screen. Role of the factor in regulation of pgp-12 expression has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Search for occurrence of Ex-1 reveals that only a small portion of excretory cell-specific promoters contain Ex-1. Two other distinct cis-elements isolated from two different promoters can also dictate the excretory cell-specific expression but are independent of regulation by DCP-66. The results indicate that distinct regulatory elements are able to mediate the similar expression patterns.

  6. Src Family Kinases and p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Regulate Pluripotent Cell Differentiation in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Boon Siang Nicholas; Kwek, Joly; Wong, Chong Kum Edwin; Saner, Nicholas J.; Yap, Charlotte; Felquer, Fernando; Morris, Michael B.; Gardner, David K.; Rathjen, Peter D.; Rathjen, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Multiple pluripotent cell populations, which together comprise the pluripotent cell lineage, have been identified. The mechanisms that control the progression between these populations are still poorly understood. The formation of early primitive ectoderm-like (EPL) cells from mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells provides a model to understand how one such transition is regulated. EPL cells form from mES cells in response to l-proline uptake through the transporter Slc38a2. Using inhibitors of cell signaling we have shown that Src family kinases, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 and GSK3β are required for the transition between mES and EPL cells. ERK1/2, c-Src and GSK3β are likely to be enforcing a receptive, primed state in mES cells, while Src family kinases and p38 MAPK are involved in the establishment of EPL cells. Inhibition of these pathways prevented the acquisition of most, but not all, features of EPL cells, suggesting that other pathways are required. L-proline activation of differentiation is mediated through metabolism and changes to intracellular metabolite levels, specifically reactive oxygen species. The implication of multiple signaling pathways in the process suggests a model in which the context of Src family kinase activation determines the outcomes of pluripotent cell differentiation. PMID:27723793

  7. The regulation of oncogenic Ras/ERK signalling by dual-specificity mitogen activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs).

    PubMed

    Kidger, Andrew M; Keyse, Stephen M

    2016-02-01

    Dual-specificity MAP kinase (MAPK) phosphatases (MKPs or DUSPs) are well-established negative regulators of MAPK signalling in mammalian cells and tissues. By virtue of their differential subcellular localisation and ability to specifically recognise, dephosphorylate and inactivate different MAPK isoforms, they are key spatiotemporal regulators of pathway activity. Furthermore, as they are transcriptionally regulated as downstream targets of MAPK signalling they can either act as classical negative feedback regulators or mediate cross talk between distinct MAPK pathways. Because MAPKs and particularly Ras/ERK signalling are implicated in cancer initiation and development, the observation that MKPs are abnormally regulated in human tumours has been interpreted as evidence that these enzymes can either suppress or promote carcinogenesis. However, definitive evidence of such roles has been lacking. Here we review recent work based on the use of mouse models, biochemical studies and clinical data that demonstrate key roles for MKPs in modulating the oncogenic potential of Ras/ERK signalling and also indicate that these enzymes may play a role in the response of tumours to certain anticancer drugs. Overall, this work reinforces the importance of negative regulatory mechanisms in modulating the activity of oncogenic MAPK signalling and indicates that MKPs may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer. PMID:26791049

  8. L1 cell adhesion molecule induces melanoma cell motility by activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Yi, Young-Su; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Cho, Jae Youl

    2014-06-01

    L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is highly expressed in various types of cancer cells and has been implicated in the control of cell proliferation and motility. Recently, L1CAM was reported to induce the motility of melanoma cells, but the mechanism of this induction remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which L1CAM induces the motility of melanoma cells. Unlike other types of cancer cells, B16F10 melanoma cells highly expressed L1CAM at both the RNA and protein levels, and the expression of L1CAM induced AP-1 activity. In accordance to AP-1 activation, MAPK signaling pathways were activated by L1CAM. Inhibition of L1CAM expression by L1CAM-specific siRNA suppressed the activation of MAPKs such as ERK and p38. However, no significant change was observed in JNK activation. As expected, upstream MAP2K, MKK3/6, MAP3K, and TAK1 were also deactivated by the inhibition of L1CAM expression. L1CAM induced the motility of B16F10 cells. Inhibition of L1CAM expression suppressed migration and invasion of B16F10 cells, but no suppressive effect was observed on their proliferation and anti-apoptotic resistance. Treatment of B16F10 cells with U0126, an ERK inhibitor, or SB203580, a p38 inhibitor, suppressed the migration and invasion abilities of B16F10 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that L1CAM induces the motility of B16F10 melanoma cells via the activation of MAPK pathways. This finding provides a more detailed molecular mechanism of L1CAM-mediated induction of melanoma cell motility. PMID:24974583

  9. Altering genomic integrity: heavy metal exposure promotes trans-posable element-mediated damage

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Maria E.; Servant, Geraldine; Ade, Catherine; Roy-Enge, Astrid M.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity is critical for cellular homeostasis and survival. The active transposable elements (TEs) composed primarily of three mobile element lineages LINE-1, Alu, and SVA comprise approximately 30% of the mass of the human genome. For the past two decades, studies have shown that TEs significantly contribute to genetic instability and that TE-caused damages are associated with genetic diseases and cancer. Different environmental exposures, including several heavy metals, influence how TEs interact with its host genome increasing their negative impact. This mini-review provides some basic knowledge on TEs, their contribution to disease and an overview of the current knowledge on how heavy metals influence TE-mediated damage. PMID:25774044

  10. The Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase SHP-2 Participates in a Multimeric Signaling Complex and Regulates T Cell Receptor (TCR) coupling to the Ras/Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Pathway in Jurkat T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Frearson, Julie A.; Alexander, Denis R.

    1998-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domain–containing phosphotyrosine phosphatases (SHPs) are increasingly being shown to play critical roles in protein tyrosine kinase–mediated signaling pathways. The role of SHP-1 as a negative regulator of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling has been established. To further explore the function of the other member of this family, SHP-2, in TCR-mediated events, a catalytically inactive mutant SHP-2 was expressed under an inducible promoter in Jurkat T cells. Expression of the mutant phosphatase significantly inhibited TCR-induced activation of the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)-2 member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, but had no effect on TCR-ζ chain tyrosine phosphorylation or TCR-elicited Ca2+ transients. Inactive SHP-2 was targeted to membranes resulting in the selective increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of three membrane-associated candidate SHP-2 substrates of 110 kD, 55-60 kD, and 36 kD, respectively. Analysis of immunoprecipitates containing inactive SHP-2 also indicated that the 110-kD and 36-kD Grb-2–associated proteins were putative substrates for SHP-2. TCR-stimulation of Jurkat T cells expressing wild-type SHP-2 resulted in the formation of a multimeric cytosolic complex composed of SHP-2, Grb-2, phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3′-kinase, and p110. A significant proportion of this complex was shown to be membrane associated, presumably as a result of translocation from the cytosol. Catalytically inactive SHP-2, rather than the wild-type PTPase, was preferentially localized in complex with Grb-2 and the p85 subunit of PI 3′-kinase, suggesting that the dephosphorylating actions of SHP-2 may regulate the association of these signaling molecules to the p110 complex. Our results show that SHP-2 plays a critical role in linking the TCR to the Ras/MAPK pathway in Jurkat T cells, and also provide some insight into the molecular interactions of SHP-2 that form the basis of this signal transduction process

  11. Molecular Basis of the Interaction of the Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-receptor Type 4 (PTPN4) with the Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase p38γ.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Pierre; Caillet-Saguy, Célia; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Bibi-Zainab, Edoo; Sawyer, Kristi; Raynal, Bertrand; Haouz, Ahmed; Delepierre, Muriel; Lafon, Monique; Cordier, Florence; Wolff, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    The human protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) prevents cell death induction in neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cell lines in a PDZ·PDZ binding motifs-dependent manner, but the cellular partners of PTPN4 involved in cell protection are unknown. Here, we described the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38γ as a cellular partner of PTPN4. The main contribution to the p38γ·PTPN4 complex formation is the tight interaction between the C terminus of p38γ and the PDZ domain of PTPN4. We solved the crystal structure of the PDZ domain of PTPN4 bound to the p38γ C terminus. We identified the molecular basis of recognition of the C-terminal sequence of p38γ that displays the highest affinity among all endogenous partners of PTPN4. We showed that the p38γ C terminus is also an efficient inducer of cell death after its intracellular delivery. In addition to recruiting the kinase, the binding of the C-terminal sequence of p38γ to PTPN4 abolishes the catalytic autoinhibition of PTPN4 and thus activates the phosphatase, which can efficiently dephosphorylate the activation loop of p38γ. We presume that the p38γ·PTPN4 interaction promotes cellular signaling, preventing cell death induction.

  12. The mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase BcOs4 is required for vegetative differentiation and pathogenicity in Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qianqian; Yan, Leiyan; Gu, Qin; Ma, Zhonghua

    2012-10-01

    The high-osmolarity glycerol signal pathway plays an important role in the response of fungi to various environmental stresses. In this study, we characterized a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase gene BcOS4 in Botrytis cinerea, which is homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSK2/SSK22. The BcOS4 deletion mutant was significantly impaired in vegetative growth and conidial formation. The mutant exhibited increased sensitivity to the osmotic, oxidative stresses and to the fungicides iprodione and fludioxonil. Western blot analysis showed that BcSak1, a putative downstream component of BcOs4, was not phosphorylated in the mutant. In addition, the BcOS4 mutant was unable to infect leaves of rapeseed and cucumber, and grape fruits, although it can cause disease on apple fruits. All the defects were restored by genetic complementation of the BcOS4 deletion mutant with the wild-type BcOS4 gene. The data of this study indicate that BcOS4 is involved in vegetative differentiation, virulence, adaption to hyperosmotic and oxidative stresses, and to fungicides in B. cinerea.

  13. ZmMKK4, a novel group C mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase in maize (Zea mays), confers salt and cold tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangpei; Pan, Jiaowen; Zhang, Maoying; Xing, Xin; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Yang; Li, Dapeng; Li, Dequan

    2011-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are signalling modules that transduce extracellular signalling to a range of cellular responses. Plant MAPK cascades have been implicated in development and stress response. In this study, we isolated a novel group C MAPKK gene, ZmMKK4, from maize. Northern blotting analysis revealed that the ZmMKK4 transcript expression was up-regulated by cold, high salt and exogenous H(2)O(2,) but down-regulated by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expression of ZmMKK4 in Arabidopsis conferred tolerance to cold and salt stresses by increased germination rate, lateral root numbers, plant survival rate, chlorophyll, proline and soluble sugar contents, and antioxidant enzyme [peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT)] activities compared with control plants. Furthermore, ZmMKK4 enhanced a 37 kDa kinase activity after cold and salt stresses. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the transcript levels of stress-responsive transcription factors and functional genes were higher in ZmMKK4-over-expressing plants than in control plants. In addition, ZmMKK4 protein is localized in the nucleus. Taken together, these results indicate that ZmMKK4 is a positive regulator of salt and cold tolerance in plants.

  14. Inhibition of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Enhances the Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein in Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Tie, Guodong; Yan, Jinglian; Messina, Julia A; Raffai, Robert L; Messina, Louis M

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is an important risk factor in the development of atherosclerosis. oxLDL has been shown to decrease endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) number by inducing apoptosis. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was shown to be activated by oxLDL and participated in the regulation of EPC number and function. However, the role of p38 remains unknown. Here, we show that oxLDL-induced p38 phosphorylation in EPCs is time and dose dependent. Treatment with antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine restored oxLDL-induced p38 phosphorylation to basal levels. LOX-1-blocking antibody also significantly decreased oxLDL-induced p38 phosphorylation. Interestingly, TUNEL staining showed that pretreatment with the p38 inhibitor SB203580 further increased oxLDL-induced apoptosis in EPCs. In accordance with these findings, pretreatment with SB203580 further attenuated Akt phosphorylation in EPCs challenged with oxLDL, indicating an interaction between Akt and p38 MAPK pathways. In agreement, inhibition of p38 MAPK further attenuated Akt phosphorylation and increased apoptosis in EPCs isolated from hypercholesterolemic ApoE-/- mice. In conclusion, p38 MAPK serves as an anti-apoptotic pathway by supporting Akt activity when EPCs are challenged with oxLDL. PMID:27031525

  15. Inhibition of coagulation, fibrinolysis, and endothelial cell activation by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor during human endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Branger, Judith; van den Blink, Bernt; Weijer, Sebastiaan; Gupta, Abhya; van Deventer, Sander J H; Hack, C Erik; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-06-01

    P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is an important component of intracellular signaling cascades that initiate various inflammatory cellular responses. To determine the role of p38 MAPK in the procoagulant response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 24 healthy subjects were exposed to an intravenous dose of LPS (4 ng/kg), preceded 3 hours earlier by orally administered 600 or 50 mg BIRB 796 BS (a specific p38 MAPK inhibitor), or placebo. The 600-mg dose of BIRB 796 BS strongly inhibited LPS-induced coagulation activation, as measured by plasma concentrations of the prothrombin fragment F1 + 2. BIRB 796 BS also dose dependently attenuated the activation and subsequent inhibition of the fibrinolytic system (plasma tissue-type plasminogen activator, plasmin-alpha2-antiplasmin complexes, and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1) and endothelial cell activation (plasma soluble E-selectin and von Willebrand factor). Activation of p38 MAPK plays an important role in the procoagulant and endothelial cell response after in vivo exposure to LPS.

  16. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase VdPbs2 of Verticillium dahliae Regulates Microsclerotia Formation, Stress Response, and Plant Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Longyan; Wang, Yonglin; Yu, Jun; Xiong, Dianguang; Zhao, Hengjun; Tian, Chengming

    2016-01-01

    Verticillium dahliae, a ubiquitous phytopathogenic fungus, forms resting structures, known as microsclerotia that play crucial roles in Verticillium wilt diseases. VdHog1, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), controls microsclerotia formation, virulence, and stress response in V. dahliae. In this study, we present detailed evidence that the conserved upstream component of VdHog1, VdPbs2, is a key regulator of microsclerotia formation, oxidative stress and fungicide response and plant virulence in V. dahliae. We identified VdPbs2, homologous to the yeast MAPK kinase Pbs2. Similar to the VdHog1 deletion mutant, VdPbs2 deletion strains exhibited delayed melanin synthesis and reduced formation of microsclerotia. When exposed to stresses, VdPbs2 mutants were more sensitive than the wild type to osmotic agents and peroxide, but more resistant to inhibitors of cell wall synthesis and some fungicides. Finally, VdPbs2 deletion mutants exhibited reduced virulence on smoke tree and tobacco seedlings. When taken together, we implicate that VdPbs2 and VdHog1 function in a cascade that regulates microsclerotia formation and virulence, but not all VdHog1 dependent functions are VdPbs2 regulated. This study thus provides novel insights into the signal transduction mechanisms that regulate microsclerotia formation and pathogenesis in this fungus. PMID:27729908

  17. A stress-activated, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-ATF/CREB pathway regulates posttranscriptional, sequence-dependent decay of target RNAs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Wagnon, Jacy L; Protacio, Reine M; Glazko, Galina V; Beggs, Marjorie; Raj, Vinay; Davidson, Mari K; Wahls, Wayne P

    2013-08-01

    Broadly conserved, mitogen-activated/stress-activated protein kinases (MAPK/SAPK) of the p38 family regulate multiple cellular processes. They transduce signals via dimeric, basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors of the ATF/CREB family (such as Atf2, Fos, and Jun) to regulate the transcription of target genes. We report additional mechanisms for gene regulation by such pathways exerted through RNA stability controls. The Spc1 (Sty1/Phh1) kinase-regulated Atf1-Pcr1 (Mts1-Mts2) heterodimer of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe controls the stress-induced, posttranscriptional stability and decay of sets of target RNAs. Whole transcriptome RNA sequencing data revealed that decay is associated nonrandomly with transcripts that contain an M26 sequence motif. Moreover, the ablation of an M26 sequence motif in a target mRNA is sufficient to block its stress-induced loss. Conversely, engineered M26 motifs can render a stable mRNA into one that is targeted for decay. This stress-activated RNA decay (SARD) provides a mechanism for reducing the expression of target genes without shutting off transcription itself. Thus, a single p38-ATF/CREB signal transduction pathway can coordinately induce (promote transcription and RNA stability) and repress (promote RNA decay) transcript levels for distinct sets of genes, as is required for developmental decisions in response to stress and other stimuli. PMID:23732911

  18. A Stress-Activated, p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase–ATF/CREB Pathway Regulates Posttranscriptional, Sequence-Dependent Decay of Target RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Wagnon, Jacy L.; Protacio, Reine M.; Glazko, Galina V.; Beggs, Marjorie; Raj, Vinay

    2013-01-01

    Broadly conserved, mitogen-activated/stress-activated protein kinases (MAPK/SAPK) of the p38 family regulate multiple cellular processes. They transduce signals via dimeric, basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors of the ATF/CREB family (such as Atf2, Fos, and Jun) to regulate the transcription of target genes. We report additional mechanisms for gene regulation by such pathways exerted through RNA stability controls. The Spc1 (Sty1/Phh1) kinase-regulated Atf1-Pcr1 (Mts1-Mts2) heterodimer of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe controls the stress-induced, posttranscriptional stability and decay of sets of target RNAs. Whole transcriptome RNA sequencing data revealed that decay is associated nonrandomly with transcripts that contain an M26 sequence motif. Moreover, the ablation of an M26 sequence motif in a target mRNA is sufficient to block its stress-induced loss. Conversely, engineered M26 motifs can render a stable mRNA into one that is targeted for decay. This stress-activated RNA decay (SARD) provides a mechanism for reducing the expression of target genes without shutting off transcription itself. Thus, a single p38-ATF/CREB signal transduction pathway can coordinately induce (promote transcription and RNA stability) and repress (promote RNA decay) transcript levels for distinct sets of genes, as is required for developmental decisions in response to stress and other stimuli. PMID:23732911

  19. Effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the bovine oviduct in vitro: Alteration by heat stress

    PubMed Central

    WIJAYAGUNAWARDANE, Missaka P. B.; HAMBRUCH, Nina; HAEGER, Jan-Dirk; PFARRER, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to be involved in control of the oviductal microenvironment. To elucidate the potential mechanisms responsible for the detrimental effect of heat stress and to identify the relation with the endocrine status, the effects of EGF on the level of phosphorylated mitogen-activated-protein kinase (MAPK) and proliferation of bovine oviductal epithelial cells (OECs) exposed to different cyclic ovarian steroidal environments (luteal phase (LP), follicular phase (FP) and postovulatory phase (PO)) and temperatures (mild heat stress (40 C) and severe heat stress (43 C)) were investigated. Western blot was performed to evaluate phosphorylated MAPK, while proliferation was analyzed by MTT assay. Stimulation of OECs with EGF alone or with EGF in the PO and FP environments significantly increased the amount of phosphorylated MAPK, with MAPK 44 phosphorylation being highest during exposure to PO conditions. These effects were not observed in the LP. Heat treatment completely blocked effects of EGF on phosphorylated MAPK. Additionally, severe heat stress led to a significantly lower basal level of phosphorylated MAPK. PD98059 (MAPK inhibitor) completely abolished EGF-stimulated MAPK phosphorylation and OECs proliferation. Overall the results indicate that EGF has the potential to increase the amount of phosphorylated MAPK in OECs and therefore could be involved in regulation of the bovine oviductal microenvironment. However, these regulatory mechanisms may be compromised in the presence of heat stress (high ambient temperature), leading to low fertility rates and impaired embryo survival. PMID:26050642

  20. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF{kappa}B in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong | Alexis, Neil E. |; Chen Xian |; Bromberg, Philip A. |; Peden, David B. ||

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NF{kappa}B were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NF{kappa}B activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NF{kappa}B activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NF{kappa}B.

  1. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in the early and peak phases of autoimmune neuritis in rat sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changjong; Ahn, Meejung; Kim, Heechul; Lee, Yongduk; Koh, Chang Sung; Matsumoto, Yoh; Shin, Taekyun

    2005-04-01

    To examine the involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in autoimmune disorders of the peripheral nerve system, we analyzed the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK protein in the sciatic nerves of Lewis rats with experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN). Western blot analysis showed that phosphorylated p38 (p-p38) MAPK protein was significantly increased in the sciatic nerves of rats in the early and peak phases of EAN, and declined gradually thereafter. Immunohistochemistry showed that p-p38 MAPK levels were increased in the infiltrating inflammatory cells, including T cells and macrophages, as well as in blood vessels and some Schwann cells in EAN-affected sciatic nerves, as compared to the sciatic nerves of controls. Some inflammatory cells and a few Schwann cells were also positive for TUNEL reaction at the peak and recovery phases of EAN. In conclusion, we postulate that the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK is involved in the elimination of infiltrating inflammatory cells during the course of EAN and may possibly modulate recovery in autoimmune disorders of the peripheral nervous system.

  2. Genome-Wide Identification of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family across Fungal Lineage Shows Presence of Novel and Diverse Activation Loop Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Tapan Kumar; Mohanta, Nibedita; Parida, Pratap; Panda, Sujogya Kumar; Ponpandian, Lakshmi Narayanan; Bae, Hanhong

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is characterized by the presence of the T-E-Y, T-D-Y, and T-G-Y motifs in its activation loop region and plays a significant role in regulating diverse cellular responses in eukaryotic organisms. Availability of large-scale genome data in the fungal kingdom encouraged us to identify and analyse the fungal MAPK gene family consisting of 173 fungal species. The analysis of the MAPK gene family resulted in the discovery of several novel activation loop motifs (T-T-Y, T-I-Y, T-N-Y, T-H-Y, T-S-Y, K-G-Y, T-Q-Y, S-E-Y and S-D-Y) in fungal MAPKs. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that fungal MAPKs are non-polymorphic, had evolved from their common ancestors around 1500 million years ago, and are distantly related to plant MAPKs. We are the first to report the presence of nine novel activation loop motifs in fungal MAPKs. The specificity of the activation loop motif plays a significant role in controlling different growth and stress related pathways in fungi. Hence, the presences of these nine novel activation loop motifs in fungi are of special interest. PMID:26918378

  3. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade MKK7-MPK6 Plays Important Roles in Plant Development and Regulates Shoot Branching by Phosphorylating PIN1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Weiyan; Li, Baohua; Li, Shujia; Liang, Yan; Wu, Xiaowei; Ma, Mei; Wang, Jiyao; Gao, Jin; Cai, Yueyue; Zhang, Yuanya; Wang, Yingchun; Li, Jiayang; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidences exhibit that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/MPK) signaling pathways are connected with many aspects of plant development. The complexity of MAPK cascades raises challenges not only to identify the MAPK module in planta but also to define the specific role of an individual module. So far, our knowledge of MAPK signaling has been largely restricted to a small subset of MAPK cascades. Our previous study has characterized an Arabidopsis bushy and dwarf1 (bud1) mutant, in which the MAP Kinase Kinase 7 (MKK7) was constitutively activated, resulting in multiple phenotypic alterations. In this study, we found that MPK3 and MPK6 are the substrates for phosphorylation by MKK7 in planta. Genetic analysis showed that MKK7-MPK6 cascade is specifically responsible for the regulation of shoot branching, hypocotyl gravitropism, filament elongation, and lateral root formation, while MKK7-MPK3 cascade is mainly involved in leaf morphology. We further demonstrated that the MKK7-MPK6 cascade controls shoot branching by phosphorylating Ser 337 on PIN1, which affects the basal localization of PIN1 in xylem parenchyma cells and polar auxin transport in the primary stem. Our results not only specify the functions of the MKK7-MPK6 cascade but also reveal a novel mechanism for PIN1 phosphorylation, establishing a molecular link between the MAPK cascade and auxin-regulated plant development. PMID:27618482

  4. Binding Affinity Prediction for Ligands and Receptors Forming Tautomers and Ionization Species: Inhibition of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 (MK2)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of ionization and tautomerism of ligands and receptors is one of the unresolved issues in structure-based prediction of binding affinities. Our solution utilizes the thermodynamic master equation, expressing the experimentally observed association constant as the sum of products, each valid for a specific ligand–receptor species pair, consisting of the association microconstant and the fractions of the involved ligand and receptor species. The microconstants are characterized by structure-based simulations, which are run for individual species pairs. Here we incorporated the multispecies approach into the QM/MM linear response method and used it for structural correlation of published inhibition data on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase (MK2) by 66 benzothiophene and pyrrolopyridine analogues, forming up to five tautomers and seven ionization species under experimental conditions. Extensive cross-validation showed that the resulting models were stable and predictive. Inclusion of all tautomers and ionization ligand species was essential: the explained variance increased to 90% from 66% for the single-species model. PMID:22280316

  5. The Arabidopsis mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 is associated with γ-tubulin on microtubules, phosphorylates EB1c and maintains spindle orientation under nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Kohoutová, Lucie; Kourová, Hana; Nagy, Szilvia K; Volc, Jindřich; Halada, Petr; Mészáros, Tamás; Meskiene, Irute; Bögre, László; Binarová, Pavla

    2015-09-01

    Stress-activated plant mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways play roles in growth adaptation to the environment by modulating cell division through cytoskeletal regulation, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. We performed protein interaction and phosphorylation experiments with cytoskeletal proteins, mass spectrometric identification of MPK6 complexes and immunofluorescence analyses of the microtubular cytoskeleton of mitotic cells using wild-type, mpk6-2 mutant and plants overexpressing the MAP kinase-inactivating phosphatase, AP2C3. We showed that MPK6 interacted with γ-tubulin and co-sedimented with plant microtubules polymerized in vitro. It was the active form of MAP kinase that was enriched with microtubules and followed similar dynamics to γ-tubulin, moving from poles to midzone during the anaphase-to-telophase transition. We found a novel substrate for MPK6, the microtubule plus end protein, EB1c. The mpk6-2 mutant was sensitive to 3-nitro-l-tyrosine (NO2 -Tyr) treatment with respect to mitotic abnormalities, and root cells overexpressing AP2C3 showed defects in chromosome segregation and spindle orientation. Our data suggest that the active form of MAP kinase interacts with γ-tubulin on specific subsets of mitotic microtubules during late mitosis. MPK6 phosphorylates EB1c, but not EB1a, and has a role in maintaining regular planes of cell division under stress conditions.

  6. Direct Phosphorylation and Activation of a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase by a Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rice[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kabin; Chen, Jianping; Wang, Qin; Yang, Yinong

    2014-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a pivotal point of convergence for many signaling pathways in eukaryotes. In the classical MAPK cascade, a signal is transmitted via sequential phosphorylation and activation of MAPK kinase kinase, MAPK kinase (MKK), and MAPK. The activation of MAPK is dependent on dual phosphorylation of a TXY motif by an MKK, which is considered the sole kinase to phosphorylate and activate MAPK. Here, we report a novel regulatory mechanism of MAPK phosphorylation and activation besides the canonical MAPK cascade. A rice (Oryza sativa) calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK), CPK18, was identified as an upstream kinase of MAPK (MPK5) in vitro and in vivo. Curiously, CPK18 was shown to phosphorylate and activate MPK5 without affecting the phosphorylation of its TXY motif. Instead, CPK18 was found to predominantly phosphorylate two Thr residues (Thr-14 and Thr-32) that are widely conserved in MAPKs from land plants. Further analyses reveal that the newly identified CPK18-MPK5 pathway represses defense gene expression and negatively regulates rice blast resistance. Our results suggest that land plants have evolved an MKK-independent phosphorylation pathway that directly connects calcium signaling to the MAPK machinery. PMID:25035404

  7. Constitutively Active Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Versions Reveal Functions of Arabidopsis MPK4 in Pathogen Defense Signaling[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Berriri, Souha; Garcia, Ana Victoria; dit Frey, Nicolas Frei; Rozhon, Wilfried; Pateyron, Stéphanie; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Montillet, Jean-Luc; Leung, Jeffrey; Hirt, Heribert; Colcombet, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are involved in important processes, including stress signaling and development. In a functional yeast screen, we identified mutations that render Arabidopsis thaliana MAPKs constitutively active (CA). Importantly, CA-MAPKs maintain their specificity toward known activators and substrates. As a proof-of-concept, Arabidopsis MAPK4 (MPK4) function in plant immunity was investigated. In agreement with the phenotype of mpk4 mutants, CA-MPK4 plants were compromised in pathogen-induced salicylic acid accumulation and disease resistance. MPK4 activity was found to negatively regulate pathogen-associated molecular pattern-induced reactive oxygen species production but had no impact on callose deposition, indicating that CA-MPK4 allows discriminating between processes regulated by MPK4 activity from processes indirectly affected by mpk4 mutation. Finally, MPK4 activity was also found to compromise effector-triggered immunity conditioned by the Toll Interleukin-1 Receptor–nucleotide binding (NB)–Leu-rich repeat (LRR) receptors RPS4 and RPP4 but not by the coiled coil–NB-LRR receptors RPM1 and RPS2. Overall, these data reveal important insights on how MPK4 regulates plant defenses and establishes that CA-MAPKs offer a powerful tool to analyze the function of plant MAPK pathways. PMID:23115249

  8. The F-box protein Fbp1 functions in the invasive growth and cell wall integrity mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Rojas, Cristina; Hera, Concepcion

    2016-01-01

    F-box proteins determine substrate specificity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Previous work has demonstrated that the F-box protein Fbp1, a component of the SCF(Fbp1) E3 ligase complex, is essential for invasive growth and virulence of the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Here, we show that, in addition to invasive growth, Fbp1 also contributes to vegetative hyphal fusion and fungal adhesion to tomato roots. All of these functions have been shown previously to require the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Fmk1. We found that Fbp1 is required for full phosphorylation of Fmk1, indicating that Fbp1 regulates virulence and invasive growth via the Fmk1 pathway. Moreover, the Δfbp1 mutant is hypersensitive to sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and calcofluor white (CFW) and shows reduced phosphorylation levels of the cell wall integrity MAPK Mpk1 after SDS treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that Fbp1 contributes to both the invasive growth and cell wall integrity MAPK pathways of F. oxysporum.

  9. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NFkappaB in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weidong; Alexis, Neil E; Chen, Xian; Bromberg, Philip A; Peden, David B

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NFkappaB were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NFkappaB activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NFkappaB activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NFkappaB activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NFkappaB activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NFkappaB.

  10. The food contaminant deoxynivalenol activates the mitogen activated protein kinases in the intestine: interest of ex vivo models as an alternative to in vivo experiments.

    PubMed

    Lucioli, Joelma; Pinton, Philippe; Callu, Patrick; Laffitte, Joëlle; Grosjean, François; Kolf-Clauw, Martine; Oswald, Isabelle P; Bracarense, Ana Paula F R L

    2013-05-01

    Trichothecenes induce changes in the intestinal barrier function through decreased expression of cell junction proteins and apoptosis of enterocytes. The mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) play an important role in the signaling pathways of cell turnover and differentiation. Using ex vivo and in vivo approaches, the purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of low doses of DON to induce histological changes in the intestine and to activate the MAPK ERK 1/2, p38 and JNK. Twelve weaning piglets received during four weeks a control diet or a DON-contaminated diet (2.3 mg DON/kg feed). Six weaning piglets were used to prepare jejunal explants (ex vivo model). Explants were exposed during 4 h to vehicle, 5 or 10 μM DON. Intestinal changes were graded using a histological score. Pigs fed a DON-diet and explants exposed to DON showed a significant decrease in the jejunal score. In both models, the toxin significantly enhanced phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 and p38, whereas the increased phosphorylation of JNK was non significant. Taken together these results indicate that in vivo or ex vivo exposure of intestinal tissue to DON lead to similar intestinal lesions and activation of MAPK. These effects could impair the homeostasis of intestinal tissue in the aspects of barrier function and immune protection. The similarity of the in vivo and ex vivo results provides also strong evidence that the jejunal explant model is a good alternative for toxicological studies in intestinal tissue.

  11. Effects of doxepin on brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, mitogen-activated protein kinase 14, and AKT1 genes expression in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Eidelkhani, Nastaran; Radahmadi, Maryam; Kazemi, Mohammad; Rafiee, Laleh; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Reisi, Parham

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that doxepin in addition to enhancement of noradrenaline and serotonin levels may have neuroprotective effects. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of doxepin on gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), mitogen-activated protein kinase 14 (MAPK14), and serine-threonine protein kinase AKT1 in rat hippocampus. Materials and Methods: Male rats were divided randomly into three groups: Control, doxepin 1 mg/kg, and doxepin 5 mg/kg. Rats received an i.p injection of doxepin for 21 days. Then the hippocampi were dissected for the measurement of the expression of BDNF, TNF-α, MAPK14, and AKT1 genes. Results: Our results showed no significant effects of doxepin on gene expression of BDNF, TNF-α, MAPK14, and AKT1 genes in the hippocampus. Conclusions: These results did not show significant effects of doxepin on the genes that affect the neuronal survival in intact animals. However, more studies need to be done, especially in models associated with neuronal damage. PMID:26601091

  12. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor LY2228820 enhances bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity and inhibits osteoclastogenesis in multiple myeloma; therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Ishitsuka, Kenji; Hideshima, Teru; Neri, Paola; Vallet, Sonia; Shiraishi, Norihiko; Okawa, Yutaka; Shen, Zhenxin; Raje, Noopur; Kiziltepe, Tanyel; Ocio, Enrique M; Chauhan, Dharminder; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Munshi, Nikhil; Campbell, Robert M; Dios, Alfonso De; Shih, Chuan; Starling, James J; Tamura, Kazuo; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2008-05-01

    The interaction between multiple myeloma (MM) cells and the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment induces proliferation and survival of MM cells, as well as osteoclastogenesis. This study investigated the therapeutic potential of novel p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) inhibitor LY2228820 (LY) in MM. Although cytotoxicity against MM cell lines was modest, LY significantly enhanced the toxicity of bortezomib by down-regulating bortezomib-induced heat shock protein 27 phosphorylation. LY inhibited interleukin-6 secretion from long term cultured-BM stromal cells and BM mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) derived from MM patients in remission. LY also inhibited macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha secretion from patient MM cells and BMMNCs as well as normal CD14 positive osteoclast precursor cells. Moreover, LY significantly inhibited in vitro osteoclastogenesis from CD14 positive cells induced by macrophage-colony stimulating factor and soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand. Finally, LY also inhibited in vivo osteoclatogenesis in a severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model of human MM. These results suggest that LY represents a promising novel targeted approach to improve MM patient outcome both by enhancing the effect of bortezomib and by reducing osteoskeletal events.

  13. Protein synthesis inhibitors reveal differential regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and stress-activated protein kinase pathways that converge on Elk-1.

    PubMed Central

    Zinck, R; Cahill, M A; Kracht, M; Sachsenmaier, C; Hipskind, R A; Nordheim, A

    1995-01-01

    Inhibitors of protein synthesis, such as anisomycin and cycloheximide, lead to superinduction of immediate-early genes. We demonstrate that these two drugs activate intracellular signaling pathways involving both the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) cascades. The activation of either pathway correlates with phosphorylation of the c-fos regulatory transcription factor Elk-1. In HeLa cells, anisomycin stabilizes c-fos mRNA when protein synthesis is inhibited to only 50%. Under these conditions, anisomycin, in contrast to cycloheximide, rapidly induces kinase activation and efficient Elk-1 phosphorylation. However, full inhibition of translation by either drug leads to prolonged activation of SAPK activity, while MAPK induction is transient. This correlates with prolonged Elk-1 phosphorylation and c-fos transcription. Elk-1 induction and c-fos activation are also observed in KB cells, in which anisomycin strongly induces SAPKs but not MAPKs. Purified p54 SAPK alpha efficiently phosphorylates the Elk-1 C-terminal domain in vitro and comigrates with anisomycin-activated kinases in in-gel kinase assays. Thus, Elk-1 provides a potential convergence point for the MAPK and SAPK signaling pathways. The activation of signal cascades and control of transcription factor function therefore represent prominent processes in immediate-early gene superinduction. PMID:7651411

  14. Signaling of chloroquine-induced stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the Hog1 and Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Shivani; Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Singh, Vikash; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2014-09-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) has been under clinical use for several decades, and yet little is known about CQ sensing and signaling mechanisms or about their impact on various biological pathways. We employed the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to study the pathways targeted by CQ. Our screening with yeast mutants revealed that it targets histone proteins and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we also describe the novel role of mitogen-activated protein kinases Hog1 and Slt2, which aid in survival in the presence of CQ. Cells deficient in Hog1 or Slt2 are found to be CQ hypersensitive, and both proteins were phosphorylated in response to CQ exposure. CQ-activated Hog1p is translocated to the nucleus and facilitates the expression of GPD1 (glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), which is required for the synthesis of glycerol (one of the major osmolytes). Moreover, cells treated with CQ exhibited an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and the effects were rescued by addition of reduced glutathione to the medium. The deletion of SOD1, the superoxide dismutase in yeast, resulted in hypersensitivity to CQ. We have also observed P38 as well as P42/44 phosphorylation in HEK293T human cells upon exposure to CQ, indicating that the kinds of responses generated in yeast and human cells are similar. In summary, our findings define the multiple biological pathways targeted by CQ that might be useful for understanding the toxicity modulated by this pharmacologically important molecule.

  15. Key signalling nodes in mammary gland development and cancer. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling in experimental models of breast cancer progression and in mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Jacqueline; Bergin, Orla; Bianchi, Alessandro; McNally, Sara; Martin, Finian

    2009-01-01

    Seven classes of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) intracellular signalling cascades exist, four of which are implicated in breast disease and function in mammary epithelial cells. These are the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 pathway, the ERK5 pathway, the p38 pathway and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. In some forms of human breast cancer and in many experimental models of breast cancer progression, signalling through the ERK1/2 pathway, in particular, has been implicated as being important. We review the influence of ERK1/2 activity on the organised three-dimensional association of mammary epithelial cells, and in models of breast cancer cell invasion. We assess the importance of epidermal growth factor receptor family signalling through ERK1/2 in models of breast cancer progression and the influence of ERK1/2 on its substrate, the oestrogen receptor, in this context. In parallel, we consider the importance of these MAPK-centred signalling cascades during the cycle of mammary gland development. Although less extensively studied, we highlight the instances of signalling through the p38, JNK and ERK5 pathways involved in breast cancer progression and mammary gland development.

  16. Distinct roles for extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in the regulation of Mcl-1 synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, K M; Duronio, V

    2001-01-01

    Alterations in the expression of various Bcl-2 family members may act as one means by which a cell's survival may be regulated. The mechanism by which cytokines regulate expression of Bcl-2 family members was examined in the haemopoietic cell line TF-1. Cytokine-induced Mcl-1 protein expression was shown to be controlled through a pathway dependent upon phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). The cytokine-induced increase in mRNA transcription was not dependent upon PI 3-kinase, thus dissociating the immediate-early transcription factors responsible for Mcl-1 transcription from the PI 3-kinase signalling pathway. In contrast, Mcl-1 mRNA levels were dependent upon MEK [mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinase] activation, suggesting a role for the Ras/MEK/MAPK pathway in Mcl-1 transcription. Activation of PI 3-kinase was shown to be necessary to stimulate Mcl-1 protein translation. This was not due to any effect on prolonging the half-life of the protein. Finally, the lipid second messenger ceramide was shown to cause a reduction in Mcl-1 protein translation, probably via its ability to inhibit protein kinase B activation, providing further clues regarding the death-inducing effect of this lipid. PMID:11368774

  17. PTH stimulated growth and decreased Col-X deposition are phosphotidylinositol-3,4,5 triphosphate kinase and mitogen activating protein kinase dependent in avian sterna.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Erik Kern; Coon, David J; Kern, Matthew F; Svoboda, Kathy K H

    2010-02-01

    Type X collagen (Col-X) deposition is a marker of terminal differentiation during chondrogenesis, in addition to appositional growth and apoptosis. The parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone related peptide (PTH/PTHrP) receptor, or PPR, is a G-Protein coupled receptor (GPCR), which activates several downstream pathways, moderating chondrocyte differentiation, including suppression of Col-X deposition. An Avian sterna model was used to analyze the PPR GPCR downstream kinase role in growth rate and extracellular matrix (ECM) including Col-II, IX, and X. Phosphatidylinositol kinase (PI3K), mitogen activating protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase A (PKA) were inhibited with specific established inhibitors LY294002, PD98059, and H89, respectively to test the hypothesis that they could reverse/inhibit the PTH/PTHrP pathway. Excised E14 chick sterna were PTH treated with or without an inhibitor and compared to controls. Sternal length was measured every 24 hr. Cultured sterna were immuno-stained using specific antibodies for Col-II, IX, or X and examined via confocal microscopy. Increased growth in PTH-treated sterna was MAPK, PI3K, and PKA dose dependent, suggesting growth was regulated through multiple pathways. Col-X deposition was rescued in PTH-treated sterna in the presence of PI3K or MAPK inhibitors, but not with the PKA inhibitor. All three inhibitors moderately disrupted Col-II and Col-IX deposition. These results suggest that PTH can activate multiple pathways during chondrocyte differentiation.

  18. Phosphoproteomic analysis of protein kinase C signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent phosphorylation of eisosome core components.

    PubMed

    Mascaraque, Victoria; Hernáez, María Luisa; Jiménez-Sánchez, María; Hansen, Rasmus; Gil, Concha; Martín, Humberto; Cid, Víctor J; Molina, María

    2013-03-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been thoroughly studied as a paradigm of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It consists of a classic MAPK module comprising the Bck1 MAPK kinase kinase, two redundant MAPK kinases (Mkk1 and Mkk2), and the Slt2 MAPK. This module is activated under a variety of stimuli related to cell wall homeostasis by Pkc1, the only member of the protein kinase C family in budding yeast. Quantitative phosphoproteomics based on stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture is a powerful tool for globally studying protein phosphorylation. Here we report an analysis of the yeast phosphoproteome upon overexpression of a PKC1 hyperactive allele that specifically activates CWI MAPK signaling in the absence of external stimuli. We found 82 phosphopeptides originating from 43 proteins that showed enhanced phosphorylation in these conditions. The MAPK S/T-P target motif was significantly overrepresented in these phosphopeptides. Hyperphosphorylated proteins provide putative novel targets of the Pkc1-cell wall integrity pathway involved in diverse functions such as the control of gene expression, protein synthesis, cytoskeleton maintenance, DNA repair, and metabolism. Remarkably, five components of the plasma-membrane-associated protein complex known as eisosomes were found among the up-regulated proteins. We show here that Pkc1-induced phosphorylation of the eisosome core components Pil1 and Lsp1 was not exerted directly by Pkc1, but involved signaling through the Slt2 MAPK module.

  19. Manipulation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Signaling in the Arabidopsis Stomatal Lineage Reveals Motifs That Contribute to Protein Localization and Signaling Specificity[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lampard, Gregory R.; Wengier, Diego L.; Bergmann, Dominique C.

    2014-01-01

    When multiple mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) components are recruited recurrently to transduce signals of different origins, and often opposing outcomes, mechanisms to enforce signaling specificity are of utmost importance. These mechanisms are largely uncharacterized in plant MAPK signaling networks. The Arabidopsis thaliana stomatal lineage was previously used to show that when rendered constitutively active, four MAPK kinases (MKKs), MKK4/5/7/9, are capable of perturbing stomatal development and that these kinases comprise two pairs, MKK4/5 and MKK7/9, with both overlapping and divergent functions. We characterized the contributions of specific structural domains of these four “stomatal” MKKs to MAPK signaling output and specificity both in vitro and in vivo within the three discrete cell types of the stomatal lineage. These results verify the influence of functional docking (D) domains of MKKs on MAPK signal output and identify novel regulatory functions for previously uncharacterized structures within the N termini of MKK4/5. Beyond this, we present a novel function of the D-domains of MKK7/9 in regulating the subcellular localization of these kinases. These results provide tools to broadly assess the extent to which these and additional motifs within MKKs function to regulate MAPK signal output throughout the plant. PMID:25172143

  20. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade MKK7-MPK6 Plays Important Roles in Plant Development and Regulates Shoot Branching by Phosphorylating PIN1 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan; Wu, Xiaowei; Cai, Yueyue; Zhang, Yuanya; Wang, Yingchun; Li, Jiayang; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidences exhibit that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/MPK) signaling pathways are connected with many aspects of plant development. The complexity of MAPK cascades raises challenges not only to identify the MAPK module in planta but also to define the specific role of an individual module. So far, our knowledge of MAPK signaling has been largely restricted to a small subset of MAPK cascades. Our previous study has characterized an Arabidopsis bushy and dwarf1 (bud1) mutant, in which the MAP Kinase Kinase 7 (MKK7) was constitutively activated, resulting in multiple phenotypic alterations. In this study, we found that MPK3 and MPK6 are the substrates for phosphorylation by MKK7 in planta. Genetic analysis showed that MKK7-MPK6 cascade is specifically responsible for the regulation of shoot branching, hypocotyl gravitropism, filament elongation, and lateral root formation, while MKK7-MPK3 cascade is mainly involved in leaf morphology. We further demonstrated that the MKK7-MPK6 cascade controls shoot branching by phosphorylating Ser 337 on PIN1, which affects the basal localization of PIN1 in xylem parenchyma cells and polar auxin transport in the primary stem. Our results not only specify the functions of the MKK7-MPK6 cascade but also reveal a novel mechanism for PIN1 phosphorylation, establishing a molecular link between the MAPK cascade and auxin-regulated plant development. PMID:27618482

  1. Heat stress activates the yeast high-osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and protein tyrosine phosphatases are essential under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Astrid; Arkind, Christopher; Mattison, Christopher P; Burkholder, Anne; Knoche, Kathryn; Ota, Irene

    2002-04-01

    The yeast high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been characterized as being activated solely by osmotic stress. In this work, we show that the Hog1 MAPK is also activated by heat stress and that Sho1, previously identified as a membrane-bound osmosensor, is required for heat stress activation of Hog1. The two-component signaling protein, Sln1, the second osmosensor in the HOG pathway, was not involved in heat stress activation of Hog1, suggesting that the Sho1 and Sln1 sensors discriminate between stresses. The possible function of Hog1 activation during heat stress was examined, and it was found that the hog1 delta strain does not recover as rapidly from heat stress as well as the wild type. It was also found that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) Ptp2 and Ptp3, which inactivate Hog1, have two functions during heat stress. First, they are essential for survival at elevated temperatures, preventing lethality due to Hog1 hyperactivation. Second, they block inappropriate cross talk between the HOG and the cell wall integrity MAPK pathways, suggesting that PTPs are important for maintaining specificity in MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:12455951

  2. Heat Stress Activates the Yeast High-Osmolarity Glycerol Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway, and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Are Essential under Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Astrid; Arkind, Christopher; Mattison, Christopher P.; Burkholder, Anne; Knoche, Kathryn; Ota, Irene

    2002-01-01

    The yeast high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been characterized as being activated solely by osmotic stress. In this work, we show that the Hog1 MAPK is also activated by heat stress and that Sho1, previously identified as a membrane-bound osmosensor, is required for heat stress activation of Hog1. The two-component signaling protein, Sln1, the second osmosensor in the HOG pathway, was not involved in heat stress activation of Hog1, suggesting that the Sho1 and Sln1 sensors discriminate between stresses. The possible function of Hog1 activation during heat stress was examined, and it was found that the hog1Δ strain does not recover as rapidly from heat stress as well as the wild type. It was also found that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) Ptp2 and Ptp3, which inactivate Hog1, have two functions during heat stress. First, they are essential for survival at elevated temperatures, preventing lethality due to Hog1 hyperactivation. Second, they block inappropriate cross talk between the HOG and the cell wall integrity MAPK pathways, suggesting that PTPs are important for maintaining specificity in MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:12455951

  3. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade MKK7-MPK6 Plays Important Roles in Plant Development and Regulates Shoot Branching by Phosphorylating PIN1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Weiyan; Li, Baohua; Li, Shujia; Liang, Yan; Wu, Xiaowei; Ma, Mei; Wang, Jiyao; Gao, Jin; Cai, Yueyue; Zhang, Yuanya; Wang, Yingchun; Li, Jiayang; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidences exhibit that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/MPK) signaling pathways are connected with many aspects of plant development. The complexity of MAPK cascades raises challenges not only to identify the MAPK module in planta but also to define the specific role of an individual module. So far, our knowledge of MAPK signaling has been largely restricted to a small subset of MAPK cascades. Our previous study has characterized an Arabidopsis bushy and dwarf1 (bud1) mutant, in which the MAP Kinase Kinase 7 (MKK7) was constitutively activated, resulting in multiple phenotypic alterations. In this study, we found that MPK3 and MPK6 are the substrates for phosphorylation by MKK7 in planta. Genetic analysis showed that MKK7-MPK6 cascade is specifically responsible for the regulation of shoot branching, hypocotyl gravitropism, filament elongation, and lateral root formation, while MKK7-MPK3 cascade is mainly involved in leaf morphology. We further demonstrated that the MKK7-MPK6 cascade controls shoot branching by phosphorylating Ser 337 on PIN1, which affects the basal localization of PIN1 in xylem parenchyma cells and polar auxin transport in the primary stem. Our results not only specify the functions of the MKK7-MPK6 cascade but also reveal a novel mechanism for PIN1 phosphorylation, establishing a molecular link between the MAPK cascade and auxin-regulated plant development.

  4. The FRK1 mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) from Solanum chacoense is involved in embryo sac and pollen development.

    PubMed

    Lafleur, Edith; Kapfer, Christelle; Joly, Valentin; Liu, Yang; Tebbji, Faiza; Daigle, Caroline; Gray-Mitsumune, Madoka; Cappadocia, Mario; Nantel, André; Matton, Daniel P

    2015-04-01

    The fertilization-related kinase 1 (ScFRK1), a nuclear-localized mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) from the wild potato species Solanum chacoense, belongs to a small group of pMEKKs that do not possess an extended N- or C-terminal regulatory domain. Initially selected based on its highly specific expression profile following fertilization, in situ expression analyses revealed that the ScFRK1 gene is also expressed early on during female gametophyte development in the integument and megaspore mother cell and, later, in the synergid and egg cells of the embryo sac. ScFRK1 mRNAs are also detected in pollen mother cells. Transgenic plants with lower or barely detectable levels of ScFRK1 mRNAs lead to the production of small fruits with severely reduced seed set, resulting from a concomitant decline in the number of normal embryo sacs produced. Megagametogenesis and microgametogenesis were affected, as megaspores did not progress beyond the functional megaspore (FG1) stage and the microspore collapsed around the first pollen mitosis. As for other mutants that affect embryo sac development, pollen tube guidance was severely affected in the ScFRK1 transgenic lines. Gametophyte to sporophyte communication was also affected, as observed from a marked change in the transcriptomic profiles of the sporophytic tissues of the ovule. The ScFRK1 MAPKKK is thus involved in a signalling cascade that regulates both male and female gamete development. PMID:25576576

  5. MicroRNA biogenesis factor DRB1 is a phosphorylation target of mitogen activated protein kinase MPK3 in both rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Raghuram, Badmi; Sheikh, Arsheed H; Rustagi, Yashika; Sinha, Alok K

    2015-02-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis requires AtDRB1 (double-stranded RNA binding protein)/HYL1 (Hyponastic Leaves1) protein for processing and maturation of miRNA precursors. The AtDRB1/HYL1 protein associates with AtDCL1 (Dicer-Like1) and accurately processes primary-miRNAs (pri-mRNAs) first to precursor-miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) and finally to mature miRNAs. The dephosphorylation of AtDRB1/HYL1 protein is very important for the precise processing of miRNA precursors. The monocot model crop plant Oryza sativa encodes four orthologues of AtDRB1/HYL1 protein, the only one encoded by Arabidopsis thaliana. The present study focuses on the functionality of the O. sativa DRBs as the orthologues of AtDRB1/HYL1 by using RNA binding assays and in planta protein-protein interaction analysis. Further, mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3 is established as the kinase phosphorylating DRB1 protein in both the model plants, O. sativa and Arabidopsis. MicroRNA microarray analysis in atmpk3 and atmpk6 mutants indicate the importance of AtMPK3 in maintaining the level of miRNAs in the plant.

  6. The use of a spaceflight-compatible device to perform WBC surface marker staining and whole-blood mitogenic activation for cytokine detection by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Sams, C. F.

    1999-01-01

    Significant changes have recently been described regarding circulating peripheral immune cells immediately following spaceflight. Existing methods for immunophenotype staining of peripheral blood in terrestrial labs do not meet the constraints for flight on the Space Shuttle. We have recently described the development and use of the Whole Blood Staining Device (WBSD), a simple device for staining flow cytometry specimens during spaceflight. When preparing samples with the WBSD, all liquids are safely contained as the cells are moved through staining, lysis and fixation steps. Here we briefly review the use of the WBSD, and then describe another versatile adaptation, a modification to perform intracellular staining of cytokines for detection by flow cytometry. Alterations in cytokine production have been reported both in ground-based simulated microgravity culture and in astronaut samples returning from spaceflight. Data regarding microgravity effects on cytokine production for specific subpopulations of cells is lacking. Flow cytometric cytokine analysis offers the unique ability to perform simultaneous surface marker analysis and positively identity cytokine producing subsets of cells. The utilization of the WBSD provides the ability to perform rapid and routine mitogenic activation during spaceflight coupled with the ability to perform simultaneous surface marker analysis. The only external requirements for this procedure are an in-flight 37-degree incubator and the capacity for 4-degree storage.

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase activity is required for the G2/M transition of the cell cycle in mammalian fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jocelyn H.; Munar, Erlynda; Jameson, Damon R.; Andreassen, Paul R.; Margolis, Robert L.; Seger, Rony; Krebs, Edwin G.

    1999-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is required for mitogenesis in somatic mammalian cells and is activated by a wide variety of oncogenic stimuli. Specific roles for this signaling module in growth were dissected by inhibiting MAPK kinase 1 (MAPKK1) activity in highly synchronized NIH 3T3 cells. In addition to the known role of this kinase in cell-cycle entry from G0, the level of MAPKK activity was observed to affect the kinetics of progression through both the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle in NIH 3T3 cells. Ectopic expression of dominant-negative forms of MAPKK1, which was previously shown to inhibit G0/G1 progression, was found to also delay progression of cells through G2. In addition, treatment of cells with the specific MAPKK inhibitor PD 98059 during a synchronous S phase arrested the cells in the following G2 phase. These data demonstrate a novel role for the MAPK cascade in progression from G2 into mitosis in NIH 3T3 cells. PMID:10500177

  8. Phosphorylation of the human leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor by mitogen-activated protein kinase and the regulation of LIF receptor function by heterologous receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Schiemann, W P; Graves, L M; Baumann, H; Morella, K K; Gearing, D P; Nielsen, M D; Krebs, E G; Nathanson, N M

    1995-01-01

    We used a bacterially expressed fusion protein containing the entire cytoplasmic domain of the human leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor to study its phosphorylation in response to LIF stimulation. The dose- and time-dependent relationships for phosphorylation of this construct in extracts of LIF-stimulated 3T3-L1 cells were superimposable with those for the stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Indeed, phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of the low-affinity LIF receptor alpha-subunit (LIFR) in Mono Q-fractionated, LIF-stimulated 3T3-L1 extracts occurred only in those fractions containing activated MAPK; Ser-1044 served as the major phosphorylation site in the human LIFR for MAPK both in agonist-stimulated 3T3-L1 lysates and by recombinant extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 in vitro. Expression in rat H-35 hepatoma cells of LIFR or chimeric granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR)-LIFR mutants lacking Ser-1044 failed to affect cytokine-stimulated expression of a reporter gene under the control of the beta-fibrinogen gene promoter but eliminated the insulin-induced attenuation of cytokine-stimulated gene expression. Thus, our results identify the human LIFR as a substrate for MAPK and suggest a mechanism of heterologous receptor regulation of LIFR signaling occurring at Ser-1044. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7777512

  9. Altered mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction in human skin fibroblasts during in vitro aging: differential expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Bose, Chhanda; Bhuvaneswaran, Chidambaram; Udupa, Kodetthoor B

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the correlation of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in fibroblasts after serial passage in vitro. We used early-passage ( approximately 20 mean population division, MPD) and late-passage ( approximately 60 MPD) human skin fibroblasts to study the LDLr expression and MAPK at basal and after interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) stimulation. We found a reduced LDLr expression in late-passage fibroblasts in comparison with early-passage fibroblasts, and late-passage fibroblasts showed a delayed induction of MAPK after IL-1beta stimulation, confirmed by the delay in translocation of MAPK from cytoplasmic to nuclear fraction. Using two specific inhibitors of MAPK, we could show a reduced LDLr expression in early-passage fibroblasts, indicating a direct relationship between MAPK signaling and LDLr expression. We conclude that one of the reasons for reduced LDLr gene expression in late passage fibroblast is related to MAPK signaling.

  10. PTK1, a mitogen-activated-protein kinase gene, is required for conidiation, appressorium formation, and pathogenicity of Pyrenophora teres on barley.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Roldán, M C; Maier, F J; Schäfer, W

    2001-02-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a group of protein kinases that execute a wide variety of roles in cellular signal transduction pathways such as osmoregulation, cell wall biosynthesis, growth, and differentiation. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with degenerate primers based on conserved regions of known MAPKs was used to clone the MAPK gene PTK1 from the leaf pathogen Pyrenophora teres (anamorph Drechslera teres), the causal agent of net blotch of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). The predicted amino acid sequence shows high homology with MAPKs from other phytopathogenic fungi. The gene is present in the genome as a single copy. PTK1 is expressed during in vitro growth on complete medium, under conidiation-inducing conditions and during infection of barley leaves, as shown by reverse transcription-PCR studies. In order to assess the role of PTK1 in the life cycle of P. teres, targeted gene disruption was conducted. Mutants carrying an interrupted copy of the gene were deficient in conidiation, did not form appressoria on glass surfaces or on barley leaves, lost their ability to infect barley leaves, and could not colonize host tissues following artificial wounding.

  11. Mitogen-activated protein kinase 4-like carrying an MEY motif instead of a TXY motif is involved in ozone tolerance and regulation of stomatal closure in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Yoda, Hiroshi; Osaki, Kohei; Amano, Yuta; Aono, Mitsuko; Seo, Shigemi; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs/MPKs) are important factors in the regulation of signal transduction in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Previously, we characterized a MAPK from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum MPK4 (NtMPK4). Here, we found a highly homologous gene, NtMPK4-like (NtMPK4L), in tobacco as well as other species in Solanaceae and Gramineae. Deduced amino acid sequences of their translation products carried MEY motifs instead of conserved TXY motifs of the MAPK family. We isolated the full length NtMPK4L gene and examined the physiological functions of NtMPK4L. We revealed that NtMPK4L was activated by wounding, like NtMPK4. However, a constitutively active salicylic acid-induced protein kinase kinase (SIPKK(EE)), which phosphorylates NtMPK4, did not phosphorylate NtMPK4L. Moreover, a tyrosine residue in the MEY motif was not involved in NtMPK4L activation. We also found that NtMPK4L-silenced plants showed rapid transpiration caused by remarkably open stomata. In addition, NtMPK4L-silenced plants completely lost the ability to close stomata upon ozone treatment and were highly sensitive to ozone, suggesting that this atypical MAPK plays a role in ozone tolerance through stomatal regulation. PMID:27126796

  12. A maize mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, ZmMKK1, positively regulated the salt and drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guohua; Wang, Guodong; Wang, Li; Liu, Yang; Pan, Jiaowen; Li, Dequan

    2014-07-15

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are highly conserved signal transduction modules in animals, plants and yeast. MAPK cascades are complicated networks and play vital roles in signal transduction pathways involved in biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, a maize MAPKK gene, ZmMKK1, was characterized. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that ZmMKK1 transcripts were induced by diverse stresses and ABA signal molecule in maize root. Further study showed that the ZmMKK1-overexpressing Arabidopsis enhanced the tolerance to salt and drought stresses. However, seed germination, post-germination growth and stomatal aperture analysis demonstrated that ZmMKK1 overexpression was sensitive to ABA in transgenic Arabidopsis. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that the overexpression of ZmMKK1 in Arabidopsis enhanced the expression of ROS scavenging enzyme- and ABA-related genes, such as POD, CAT, RAB18 and RD29A under salt and drought conditions. In addition, heterologous overexpression of ZmMKK1 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) improved the tolerance to salt and drought stresses. These results suggested that ZmMKK1 might act as an ABA- and ROS-dependent protein kinase in positive modulation of salt and drought tolerance. Most importantly, ZmMKK1 interacted with ZmMEKK1 as evidenced by yeast two-hybrid assay, redeeming a deficiency of MAPK interaction partners in maize. PMID:24974327

  13. Stearoyl lysophosphatidylcholine enhances the phagocytic ability of macrophages through the AMP-activated protein kinase/p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Quan, Hui; Hur, Young-Hoe; Xin, Chun; Kim, Joung-Min; Choi, Jeong-Il; Kim, Man-Young; Bae, Hong-Beom

    2016-10-01

    A previous study showed that stearoyl lysophosphatidylcholine (sLPC) suppressed extracellular high mobility group box 1 translocation in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation. In the present study, we investigated whether sLPC-induced AMPK activation could enhance macrophages phagocytosis of bacteria. We found that sLPC increased phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a downstream target of AMPK, in a time- and dose-dependent manner in macrophages. Furthermore, sLPC increased the uptake of FITC-conjugated Escherichia coli by macrophages in a dose-dependent manner, and treatment with an AMPK inhibitor (compound C) or siRNA to AMPKα1 reversed this uptake. sLPC increased the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but inhibition of AMPK activity with compound C or siRNA to AMPKα1 prevented the sLPC-induced increase in p38 MAPK phosphorylation. SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, decreased sLPC-induced phagocytosis. In vivo, systemic administration of sLPC to mice led to increased AMPK and p38 MAPK activity in the lung and to increased phagocytosis of fluorescent E. coli in bronchoalveolar lavage cells. These results suggest that sLPC increases macrophages phagocytosis through activation of the AMPK/p38 MAPK pathway. Therefore, sLPC is a candidate pharmacological agent for the treatment of bacterial infections in clinically relevant conditions. PMID:27517519

  14. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases 3 and 6 Are Required for Full Priming of Stress Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Gerold J.M.; Jaskiewicz, Michal; Liu, Yidong; Underwood, William R.; He, Sheng Yang; Zhang, Shuqun; Conrath, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    In plants and animals, induced resistance (IR) to biotic and abiotic stress is associated with priming of cells for faster and stronger activation of defense responses. It has been hypothesized that cell priming involves accumulation of latent signaling components that are not used until challenge exposure to stress. However, the identity of such signaling components has remained elusive. Here, we show that during development of chemically induced resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana, priming is associated with accumulation of mRNA and inactive proteins of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MPKs), MPK3 and MPK6. Upon challenge exposure to biotic or abiotic stress, these two enzymes were more strongly activated in primed plants than in nonprimed plants. This elevated activation was linked to enhanced defense gene expression and development of IR. Strong elicitation of stress-induced MPK3 and MPK6 activity is also seen in the constitutive priming mutant edr1, while activity was attenuated in the priming-deficient npr1 mutant. Moreover, priming of defense gene expression and IR were lost or reduced in mpk3 or mpk6 mutants. Our findings argue that prestress deposition of the signaling components MPK3 and MPK6 is a critical step in priming plants for full induction of defense responses during IR. PMID:19318610

  15. Dose-dependent impairment of inhibitory avoidance retention in rats by immediate post-training infusion of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor into cortical structures.

    PubMed

    Walz, R; Roesler, R; Quevedo, J; Rockenbach, I C; Amaral, O B; Vianna, M R; Lenz, G; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I

    1999-11-15

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase abundantly expressed in postmitotic neurons of the developed nervous system. MAPK is activated in and required for both the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampal slices and the acquisition of fear conditioning training in rats. The present work was performed in order to test the effect of the specific inhibitor of MAPK kinase (MAPKK), PD 098059, on retention of a step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA). Adult male Wistar rats were bilaterally injected (0.5 microl/side) with PD 098059 (at 0.5, 5, or 50 microM) or vehicle into the entorhinal cortex or into the parietal cortex immediately after IA training using a 0.4 mA footshock. Retention testing was carried out 24 h after training. PD 098059 impaired retention when injected into the entorhinal cortex at the dose of 50 microM, but not at the doses of 5 or 0.5 microM. When infused into the parietal cortex, PD 098059 was amnestic at the doses of 5 and 50 microM. The drug had no effect when infused at the highest dose in either structure 6 h after training. Our results suggest that the MAPKK inhibitor impairs IA retention memory in a dose-dependent manner when injected immediately after training into entorhinal cortex or parietal cortex. The effective dose is variable according to the neocortical structure studied.

  16. Non-mutagenic Suppression of Enterocyte Ferroportin 1 by Chemical Ribosomal Inactivation via p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-mediated Regulation: EVIDENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEMOCHROMATOSIS.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Kyu; Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Moon, Yuseok

    2016-09-16

    Iron transfer across the basolateral membrane of an enterocyte into the circulation is the rate-limiting step in iron absorption and is regulated by various pathophysiological factors. Ferroportin (FPN), the only known mammalian iron exporter, transports iron from the basolateral surface of enterocytes, macrophages, and hepatocytes into the blood. Patients with genetic mutations in FPN or repeated blood transfusion develop hemochromatosis. In this study, non-mutagenic ribosomal inactivation was assessed as an etiological factor of FPN-associated hemochromatosis in enterocytes. Non-mutagenic chemical ribosomal inactivation disrupted iron homeostasis by regulating expression of the iron exporter FPN-1, leading to intracellular accumulation in enterocytes. Mechanistically, a xenobiotic insult stimulated the intracellular sentinel p38 MAPK signaling pathway, which was positively involved in FPN-1 suppression by ribosomal dysfunction. Moreover, ribosomal inactivation-induced iron accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans as a simplified in vivo model for gut nutrition uptake was dependent on SEK-1, a p38 kinase activator, leading to suppression of FPN-1.1 expression and iron accumulation. In terms of gene regulation, ribosomal stress-activated p38 signaling down-regulated NRF2 and NF-κB, both of which were positive transcriptional regulators of FPN-1 transcription. This study provides molecular evidence for the modulation of iron bioavailability by ribosomal dysfunction as a potent etiological factor of non-mutagenic environmental hemochromatosis in the gut-to-blood axis.

  17. A Network of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Links G Protein-Coupled Receptors to the c-jun Promoter: a Role for c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase, p38s, and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Marinissen, Maria Julia; Chiariello, Mario; Pallante, Michael; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    1999-01-01

    The expression of the c-jun proto-oncogene is rapidly induced in response to mitogens acting on a large variety of cell surface receptors. The resulting functional activity of c-Jun proteins appears to be critical for cell proliferation. Recently, we have shown that a large family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), represented by the m1 muscarinic receptor, can initiate intracellular signaling cascades that result in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNK) and that the activation of JNK but not of MAPK correlated with a remarkable increase in the expression of c-jun mRNA. Subsequently, however, we obtained evidence that GPCRs can potently stimulate the activity of the c-jun promoter through MEF2 transcription factors, which do not act downstream from JNK. In view of these observations, we set out to investigate further the nature of the signaling pathway linking GPCRs to the c-jun promoter. Utilizing NIH 3T3 cells, we found that GPCRs can activate the c-jun promoter in a JNK-independent manner. Additionally, we demonstrated that these GPCRs can elevate the activity of novel members of the MAPK family, including ERK5, p38α, p38γ, and p38δ, and that the activation of certain kinases acting downstream from MEK5 (ERK5) and MKK6 (p38α and p38γ) is necessary to fully activate the c-jun promoter. Moreover, in addition to JNK, ERK5, p38α, and p38γ were found to stimulate the c-jun promoter by acting on distinct responsive elements. Taken together, these results suggest that the pathway linking GPCRs to the c-jun promoter involves the integration of numerous signals transduced by a highly complex network of MAPK, rather than resulting from the stimulation of a single linear protein kinase cascade. Furthermore, our findings suggest that each signaling pathway affects one or more regulatory elements on the c-jun promoter and that the transcriptional response most likely results from the temporal integration

  18. Anti-hepatitis B virus effect of matrine-type alkaloid and involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Xin; Shen, Hong-Hui; Niu, Ming; Guo, Yu-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Qiong; Han, Yan-Zhong; Zhang, Ya-Ming; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Bai, Bing-Ke; Zhou, Wen-Jun; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2016-04-01

    The matrine-type alkaloid, oxymatrine inhibits hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication but very little is known about these effects in other matrine-type alkaloids, including sophoridine and sophocarpine. Therefore, we compared the in vitro anti-HBV effects of matrine, oxymatrine, sophocarpine, and sophoridine by treating an HBV-transfected cell line (HepG2.2.15) with 0.4-1.6mM of the compounds for 24 or 72h. The levels of the HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and e antigen (HBeAg) in the culture medium, as well as the intracellular and extracellular HBV DNA levels, were determined. Metabolomic analysis and detection of the mRNA level of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) 6, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1, NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 10 (NLRP10), and caspase-1 were conducted in sophoridine-treated HepG2.2.15 cells. HepG2.2.15 cell exposure to 0.4-1.6mM sophocarpine or sophoridine for 24h reduced the HBsAg level of the medium more effectively than exposure to matrine and oxymatrine did, and reduced the HBeAg levels more effectively than these compounds did at 1.6mM. Sophoridine (0.4-1.6mM) reduced the cell medium HBV DNA levels more than the same concentrations of matrine, oxymatrine, or sophocarpine did. After 72h, 0.4 and 0.8mM sophoridine reduced HBsAg and intracellular HBV DNA levels more potently than matrine, oxymatrine, or sophocarpine did. Furthermore, sophoridine (0.8mM) potently reduced the cell medium HBeAg levels while the metabolomic analyses revealed that HepG2.2.15 cells exposed to 0.8mM sophoridine for 72h exhibited reduced cycloleucine and phytosphingosine levels. In addition, the mRNA expression analyses revealed that HepG2.2.15 cells exposed to 0.8mM sophoridine showed reduced levels of p38 MAPK, TRAF6, ERK1, NLRP10, and caspase-1. Sophoridine produced more potent anti-HBV effects than matrine, oxymatrine, and sophocarpine did. These effects may be related

  19. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation of Splicing Factor 45 (SPF45) Regulates SPF45 Alternative Splicing Site Utilization, Proliferation, and Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ayoubi, Adnan M.; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Yuying; Bai, Tao

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of alternative mRNA splicing factors by extracellular cues and signal transduction cascades is poorly understood. Using an engineered extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) that can utilize ATP analogs, we have identified the alternative mRNA splicing factor 45 (SPF45), which is overexpressed in cancer, as a novel coimmunoprecipitating ERK2 substrate. ERK2 phosphorylated SPF45 on Thr71 and Ser222 in vitro and in cells in response to H-RasV12, B-RAF-V600E, and activated MEK1. Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and p38α also phosphorylated SPF45 in vitro and associated with SPF45 in cells. SPF45 was differentially phosphorylated in cells by all three mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in response to phorbol myristate acid (PMA), H2O2, UV, and anisomycin stimulation. ERK and p38 activation decreased SPF45-dependent exon 6 exclusion from fas mRNA in a minigene assay in cells. Stable overexpression of SPF45 in SKOV-3 cells dramatically inhibited cell proliferation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner through inhibition of ErbB2 expression. SPF45 overexpression also induced EDA inclusion into fibronectin transcripts and fibronectin expression in a phosphorylation-dependent and -independent manner, respectively, specifically affecting cellular adhesion to a fibronectin matrix. These data identify SPF45 as the first splicing factor regulated by multiple MAP kinase pathways and show effects of both SPF45 overexpression and phosphorylation. PMID:22615491

  20. Docosahexaenoic acid attenuates mycotoxin-induced immunoglobulin a nephropathy, interleukin-6 transcription, and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qunshan; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Bennink, Maurice; Pestka, James J

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the dose-dependent effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on deoxynivalenol (DON)-induced IgA nephropathy in mice and their relation to proinflammatory gene expression and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Consumption of a modified AIN-93G diet containing 1, 5, and 30 g/kg DHA resulted in dose-dependent increases of DHA in liver phospholipids with concomitant decreases in arachidonic acid compared with control diets. DHA dose dependently inhibited increases in serum IgA and IgA immune complexes (IC) as well as IgA deposition in the kidney in DON-fed mice; the 30 g/kg DHA diet had the earliest detectable effects and maximal efficacy. Both splenic interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA), an indicator of IL-6 transcription, were significantly reduced in DON-fed mice that consumed 5 and 30 g/kg DHA; a similar reduction was observed for cyclooxygenase (COX-2) mRNA. In a subsequent study, acute DON exposure (25 mg/kg body weight) induced splenic IL-6 mRNA and hnRNA as well as COX-2 mRNA in mice fed the control diet, whereas induction of both RNA species was significantly inhibited in mice fed 30 g/kg DHA. These latter inhibitory effects corresponded to a reduction in DON-induced phosphorylation of p38, extracellular-signal related kinase 1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 MAPKs in the spleen. Taken together, the results indicate that DHA dose-dependently inhibited DON-induced IgA dysregulation and nephropathy, and that impairment of MAPK activation and expression of COX-2 and IL-6 are potential critical upstream mechanisms.

  1. Excessive L-cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yun; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Sun, Kaiji; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    High intake of dietary cysteine is extremely toxic to animals and the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that excessive L-cysteine induces cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells. Jejunal enterocytes were cultured in the presence of 0-10 mmol/L L-cysteine. Cell viability, morphologic alterations, mRNA levels for genes involved in ER stress, protein abundances for glucose-regulated protein 78, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2α), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK1/2) were determined. The results showed that L-cysteine (5-10 mmol/L) reduced cell viability (P < 0.05) and led to vacuole-like cell death in intestinal porcine epithelial cells. These adverse effects of L-cysteine were not affected by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. The protein abundances for CHOP, phosphorylated (p)-eIF2α, p-JNK1/2, p-p38 MAPK, and the spliced form of XBP-1 mRNA were enhanced (P < 0.05), whereas those for p-ERK1/2 were reduced (P < 0.05). Collectively, excessive L-cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death via the activation of ER stress and MAPK signaling in small intestinal epithelial cells. These signaling pathways may be potential targets for developing effective strategies to prevent the toxicity of dietary cysteine.

  2. Luteolin is a bioflavonoid that attenuates adipocyte-derived inflammatory responses via suppression of nuclear factor-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinases pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nepali, Sarmila; Son, Ji-Seon; Poudel, Barun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Young-Mi; Kim, Dae-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inflammation of adipocytes has been a therapeutic target for treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders which cause insulin resistance and hence lead to type II diabetes. Luteolin is a bioflavonoid with many beneficial properties such as antioxidant, antiproliferative, and anti-cancer. Objectives: To elucidate the potential anti-inflammatory response and the underlying mechanism of luteolin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Materials and Methods: We stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes with the mixture of tumor necrosis factor-α, lipopolysaccharide, and interferon-γ (TLI) in the presence or absence of luteolin. We performed Griess’ method for nitric oxide (NO) production and measure mRNA and protein expressions by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. Results: Luteolin opposed the stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and NO production by simultaneous treatment of adipocytes with TLI. Furthermore, it reduced the pro-inflammatory genes such as cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-6, resistin, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Furthermore, luteolin improved the insulin sensitivity by enhancing the expression of insulin receptor substrates (IRS1/2) and glucose transporter-4 via phosphatidylinositol-3K signaling pathway. This inhibition was associated with suppression of Iκ-B-α degradation and subsequent inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 translocation to the nucleus. In addition, luteolin blocked the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, c-Jun N-terminal Kinases and also p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Conclusions: These results illustrate that luteolin attenuates inflammatory responses in the adipocytes through suppression of NF-κB and MAPKs activation, and also improves insulin sensitivity in 3T3-L1 cells, suggesting that luteolin may represent a therapeutic agent to prevent obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:26246742

  3. Albumin stimulates p44/p42 extracellular-signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase in opossum kidney proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R; Brunskill, N J

    2000-03-01

    The presence of protein in the urine of patients with renal disease is an adverse prognostic feature. It has therefore been suggested that proteinuria per se may be responsible for the development of renal tubulo-interstitial scarring and fibrosis, and disturbances in tubular cell growth and proliferation. We have used the opossum kidney proximal tubular cell line to investigate the effects of albumin on cell growth. The effect of albumin on cell proliferation was investigated by cell counting and measurement of [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. We studied the effect of recombinant human albumin on the activity of p44/p42 extracellular-signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase ) using an in vitro kinase assay, and immunoblotting with antibodies against active extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK). The effects of the ERK inhibitor PD98059 were also examined. Recombinant human albumin was found to stimulate proliferation of opossum kidney cells in a dose-dependent manner, with maximal stimulation at a concentration of 1 mg/ml. In addition, recombinant human albumin activated ERK in a time-dependent (maximal after 5 min) and dose-dependent (maximal at 1 mg/ml) fashion. These effects on cell proliferation and ERK activity were inhibited by PD98059, and were not reproduced by ovalbumin or mannitol. The data therefore indicate that albumin is able to stimulate growth and proliferation of proximal tubular cells that is dependent on the ERK family of MAP kinases. The potential importance of this pathway in the development of renal disease is discussed. PMID:10677388

  4. The food contaminant deoxynivalenol activates the mitogen activated protein kinases in the intestine: interest of ex vivo models as an alternative to in vivo experiments.

    PubMed

    Lucioli, Joelma; Pinton, Philippe; Callu, Patrick; Laffitte, Joëlle; Grosjean, François; Kolf-Clauw, Martine; Oswald, Isabelle P; Bracarense, Ana Paula F R L

    2013-05-01

    Trichothecenes induce changes in the intestinal barrier function through decreased expression of cell junction proteins and apoptosis of enterocytes. The mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) play an important role in the signaling pathways of cell turnover and differentiation. Using ex vivo and in vivo approaches, the purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of low doses of DON to induce histological changes in the intestine and to activate the MAPK ERK 1/2, p38 and JNK. Twelve weaning piglets received during four weeks a control diet or a DON-contaminated diet (2.3 mg DON/kg feed). Six weaning piglets were used to prepare jejunal explants (ex vivo model). Explants were exposed during 4 h to vehicle, 5 or 10 μM DON. Intestinal changes were graded using a histological score. Pigs fed a DON-diet and explants exposed to DON showed a significant decrease in the jejunal score. In both models, the toxin significantly enhanced phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 and p38, whereas the increased phosphorylation of JNK was non significant. Taken together these results indicate that in vivo or ex vivo exposure of intestinal tissue to DON lead to similar intestinal lesions and activation of MAPK. These effects could impair the homeostasis of intestinal tissue in the aspects of barrier function and immune protection. The similarity of the in vivo and ex vivo results provides also strong evidence that the jejunal explant model is a good alternative for toxicological studies in intestinal tissue. PMID:23403092

  5. Contributions of mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor kappa B to N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Keiji; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Ishida, Eiwa; Kishi, Munehiro; Yonehara, Shin; Konishi, Noboru

    2002-11-01

    The synthetic retinoid N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-HPR) has been shown to induce apoptosis in various types of tumors, including prostate cancer. We sought to examine the key mechanisms affecting the resistance to 4-HPR-induced apoptosis in three human prostate cancer cell lines, PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP. Concentrations of more than 40 microM 4-HPR produced apoptosis to almost the same extent in all cell lines; however, only the LNCaP line remained highly sensitive to concentrations less than 10 microM. These differing sensitivities at low concentrations correlated well with the level of constitutive activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) in the individual cell lines. We found that NFkappaB activation inhibited c-jun NH(2)-terminal kinase and caspase 3 activation induced by 4-HPR and that NFkappaB inhibition by the I kappa B alpha phosphorylation inhibitor compound Bay 117082 resulted in increasing sensitization of both PC-3 and DU145 lines to apoptosis induced by 4-HPR at low concentrations. Furthermore, we found that inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) enhanced the suppression of NFkappaB by 4-HPR and also resulted in sensitization to apoptosis in the DU145 cell line, in which ERK is activated constitutively. It thus appears that mitogen-activated protein kinase associated with the activity of NFkappaB plays an important role in the degree of resistance to 4-HPR-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells.

  6. Chlamydiaphage φCPG1 Capsid Protein Vp1 Inhibits Chlamydia trachomatis Growth via the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanli; Guo, Rui; Zhou, Quan; Sun, Changgui; Zhang, Xinmei; Liu, Yuanjun; Liu, Quanzhong

    2016-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of curable bacterial sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Although the pathogen is well established, the pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear. Given the current challenges of antibiotic resistance and blocked processes of vaccine development, the use of a specific chlamydiaphage may be a new treatment solution. φCPG1 is a lytic phage specific for Chlamydia caviae, and shows over 90% nucleotide sequence identity with other chlamydiaphages. Vp1 is the major capsid protein of φCPG1. Purified Vp1 was previously confirmed to inhibit Chlamydia trachomatis growth. We here report the first attempt at exploring the relationship between Vp1-treated C. trachomatis and the protein and gene levels of the mitogen-activated/extracellular regulated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway by Western blotting and real-time PCR, respectively. Moreover, we evaluated the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-1 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after Vp1 treatment. After 48 h of incubation, the p-ERK level of the Vp1-treated group decreased compared with that of the Chlamydia infection group. Accordingly, ERK1 and ERK2 mRNA expression levels of the Vp1-treated group also decreased compared with the Chlamydia infection group. IL-8 and IL-1 levels were also decreased after Vp1 treatment compared with the untreated group. Our results demonstrate that the inhibition effect of the chlamydiaphage φCPG1 capsid protein Vp1 on C. trachomatis is associated with the MAPK pathway, and inhibits production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-1. The bacteriophages may provide insight into a new signaling transduction mechanism to influence their hosts, in addition to bacteriolysis. PMID:27089359

  7. LY2228820 dimesylate, a selective inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, reduces angiogenic endothelial cord formation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tate, Courtney M; Blosser, Wayne; Wyss, Lisa; Evans, Glenn; Xue, Qi; Pan, Yong; Stancato, Louis

    2013-03-01

    LY2228820 dimesylate is a highly selective small molecule inhibitor of p38α and p38β mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that is currently under clinical investigation for human malignancies. p38 MAPK is implicated in a wide range of biological processes, in particular those that support tumorigenesis. One such process, angiogenesis, is required for tumor growth and metastasis, and many new cancer therapies are therefore directed against the tumor vasculature. Using an in vitro co-culture endothelial cord formation assay, a surrogate of angiogenesis, we investigated the role of p38 MAPK in growth factor- and tumor-driven angiogenesis using LY2228820 dimesylate treatment and by shRNA gene knockdown. p38 MAPK was activated in endothelial cells upon growth factor stimulation, with inhibition by LY2228820 dimesylate treatment causing a significant decrease in VEGF-, bFGF-, EGF-, and IL-6-induced endothelial cord formation and an even more dramatic decrease in tumor-driven cord formation. In addition to involvement in downstream cytokine signaling, p38 MAPK was important for VEGF, bFGF, EGF, IL-6, and other proangiogenic cytokine secretion in stromal and tumor cells. LY2228820 dimesylate results were substantiated using p38α MAPK-specific shRNA and shRNA against the downstream p38 MAPK effectors MAPKAPK-2 and HSP27. Using in vivo models of functional neoangiogenesis, LY2228820 dimesylate treatment reduced hemoglobin content in a plug assay and decreased VEGF-A-stimulated vascularization in a mouse ear model. Thus, p38α MAPK is implicated in tumor angiogenesis through direct tumoral effects and through reduction of proangiogenic cytokine secretion via the microenvironment.

  8. Association of Common Genetic Variants in Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting-Ting; Qiao, Hong; Tong, Hui-Xin; Zhuang, Tian-Wei; Wang, Tong-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Background: A study has identified several novel susceptibility variants of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP4K4) gene for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) within the German population. Among the variants, five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of MAP4K4 (rs1003376, rs11674694, rs2236935, rs2236936, and rs6543087) showed significant association with T2DM or diabetes-related quantitative traits. We aimed to evaluate whether common SNPs in the MAP4K4 gene were associated with T2DM in the Chinese population. Methods: Five candidate SNPs were genotyped in 996 patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and in 976 control subjects, using the SNPscan™ method. All subjects were recruited from the Second Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University from October 2010 to September 2013. We evaluated the T2DM risk conferred by individual SNPs and haplotypes using logistic analysis, and the association between the five SNPs and metabolic traits in the subgroups. Results: Of the five variants, SNP rs2236935T/C was significantly associated with T2DM in this study population (odds ratio = 1.293; 95% confidence interval: 1.034–1.619, P = 0.025). In addition, among the controls, rs1003376 was significantly associated with an increased body mass index (P = 0.045) and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (P = 0.037). Conclusions: MAP4K4 gene is associated with T2DM in a Chinese Han population, and MAP4K4 gene variants may contribute to the risk toward the development of T2DM. PMID:27174326

  9. Chlamydiaphage φCPG1 Capsid Protein Vp1 Inhibits Chlamydia trachomatis Growth via the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanli; Guo, Rui; Zhou, Quan; Sun, Changgui; Zhang, Xinmei; Liu, Yuanjun; Liu, Quanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of curable bacterial sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Although the pathogen is well established, the pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear. Given the current challenges of antibiotic resistance and blocked processes of vaccine development, the use of a specific chlamydiaphage may be a new treatment solution. φCPG1 is a lytic phage specific for Chlamydia caviae, and shows over 90% nucleotide sequence identity with other chlamydiaphages. Vp1 is the major capsid protein of φCPG1. Purified Vp1 was previously confirmed to inhibit Chlamydia trachomatis growth. We here report the first attempt at exploring the relationship between Vp1-treated C. trachomatis and the protein and gene levels of the mitogen-activated/extracellular regulated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway by Western blotting and real-time PCR, respectively. Moreover, we evaluated the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-1 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after Vp1 treatment. After 48 h of incubation, the p-ERK level of the Vp1-treated group decreased compared with that of the Chlamydia infection group. Accordingly, ERK1 and ERK2 mRNA expression levels of the Vp1-treated group also decreased compared with the Chlamydia infection group. IL-8 and IL-1 levels were also decreased after Vp1 treatment compared with the untreated group. Our results demonstrate that the inhibition effect of the chlamydiaphage φCPG1 capsid protein Vp1 on C. trachomatis is associated with the MAPK pathway, and inhibits production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-1. The bacteriophages may provide insight into a new signaling transduction mechanism to influence their hosts, in addition to bacteriolysis. PMID:27089359

  10. Colletotrichum higginsianum Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase ChMK1: Role in Growth, Cell Wall Integrity, Colony Melanization, and Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Xiong, Ying; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Nancong; Yang, Guogen; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. To facilitate the efficient control of anthracnose disease, it will be important to understand the mechanism by which the cruciferous crops and C. higginsianum interact. A key step in understanding this interaction is characterizing the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway of C. higginsianum. MAPK plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. In this study, a Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK gene, ChMK1, from C. higginsianum was analyzed. The results showed that the Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK ChMK1 plays a significant role in cell wall integrity. Targeted deletion of ChMK1 resulted in a hypersensitivity to cell wall inhibitors, reduced conidiation and albinistic colonies. Further, the deletion mutant was also unable to form melanized appressorium, a specialized infection structure that is necessary for successful infection. Therefore, the deletion mutant loses pathogenicity on A. thaliana leaves, demonstrating that ChMK1 plays an essential role in the early infection step. In addition, the ChMK1 deletion mutant showed an attenuated growth rate that is different from that of its homolog in Colletotrichum lagenarium, indicating the diverse roles that Fus3/Kss1-related MAPKs plays in phytopathogenic fungi. Furthermore, the expression level of three melanin synthesis associated genes were clearly decreased in the albinistic ChMK1 mutant compared to that of the wild type strain, suggesting that ChMK1 is also required for colony melanization in C. higginsianum. PMID:27536296

  11. Diphenylarsinic Acid Induced Activation of Cultured Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes: Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Upregulation of Transcription Factors, and Release of Brain-Active Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Mami; Kojima, Mikiya; Asai, Ryota; Kanehira, Tomoko; Sakaguchi, Fumika; Takahata, Kazuaki; Arakaki, Rina; Aoyama, Yohei; Yoshida, Hikari; Yoshida, Kenji; Yukawa, Kazunori; Tashiro, Tomoko; Hirano, Seishiro

    2016-03-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was detected as the primary compound responsible for the arsenic poisoning that occurred in Kamisu, Ibaraki, Japan, where people using water from a well that was contaminated with a high level of arsenic developed neurological (mostly cerebellar) symptoms and dysregulation of regional cerebral blood flow. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism of DPAA-induced cerebellar symptoms, we focused on astrocytes, which have a brain-protective function. Incubation with 10 µM DPAA for 96 h promoted cell proliferation, increased the expression of antioxidative stress proteins (heme oxygenase-1 and heat shock protein 70), and induced the release of cytokines (MCP-1, adrenomedullin, FGF2, CXCL1, and IL-6). Furthermore, DPAA overpoweringly increased the phosphorylation of three major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and SAPK/JNK), which indicated MAPK activation, and subsequently induced expression and/or phosphorylation of transcription factors (Nrf2, CREB, c-Jun, and c-Fos) in cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes. Structure-activity relationship analyses of DPAA and other related pentavalent organic arsenicals revealed that DPAA at 10 µM activated astrocytes most effective among organic arsenicals tested at the same dose. These results suggest that in a cerebellum exposed to DPAA, abnormal activation of the MAPK-transcription factor pathway and irregular secretion of these neuroactive, glioactive, and/or vasoactive cytokines in astrocytes can be the direct/indirect cause of functional abnormalities in surrounding neurons, glial cells, and vascular cells: This in turn might lead to the onset of cerebellar symptoms and disruption of cerebral blood flow. PMID:26645585

  12. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 6 and Ethylene and Auxin Signaling Pathways Are Involved in Arabidopsis Root-System Architecture Alterations by Trichoderma atroviride.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Cornejo, Hexon Angel; López-Bucio, Jesús Salvador; Méndez-Bravo, Alejandro; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Ramos-Vega, Maricela; Guevara-García, Ángel Arturo; López-Bucio, José

    2015-06-01

    Trichoderma atroviride is a symbiotic fungus that interacts with roots and stimulates plant growth and defense. Here, we show that Arabidopsis seedlings cocultivated with T. atroviride have an altered root architecture and greater biomass compared with axenically grown seedlings. These effects correlate with increased activity of mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 (MPK6). The primary roots of mpk6 mutants showed an enhanced growth inhibition by T. atroviride when compared with wild-type (WT) plants, while T. atroviride increases MPK6 activity in WT roots. It was also found that T. atroviride produces ethylene (ET), which increases with l-methionine supply to the fungal growth medium. Analysis of growth and development of WT seedlings and etr1, ein2, and ein3 ET-related Arabidopsis mutants indicates a role for ET in root responses to the fungus, since etr1 and ein2 mutants show defective root-hair induction and enhanced primary-root growth inhibition when cocultivated with T. atroviride. Increased MPK6 activity was evidenced in roots of ctr1 mutants, which correlated with repression of primary root growth, thus connecting MPK6 signaling with an ET response pathway. Auxin-inducible gene expression analysis using the DR5:uidA reporter construct further revealed that ET affects auxin signaling through the central regulator CTR1 and that fungal-derived compounds, such as indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetaldehyde, induce MPK6 activity. Our results suggest that T. atroviride likely alters root-system architecture modulating MPK6 activity and ET and auxin action.

  13. Melanin biosynthesis in the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus depends on two mitogen-activated protein kinases, Chk1 and Mps1, and the transcription factor Cmr1.

    PubMed

    Eliahu, Noa; Igbaria, Aeid; Rose, Mark S; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Lev, Sophie

    2007-03-01

    The maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus requires two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), Chk1 and Mps1, to produce normal pigmentation. Young colonies of mps1 and chk1 deletion mutants have a white and autolytic appearance, which was partially rescued by a hyperosmotic environment. We isolated the transcription factor Cmr1, an ortholog of Colletotrichum lagenarium Cmr1 and Magnaporthe grisea Pig1, which regulates melanin biosynthesis in C. heterostrophus. Deletion of CMR1 in C. heterostrophus resulted in mutants that lacked dark pigmentation and acquired an orange-pink color. In cmr1 deletion strains the expression of putative scytalone dehydratase (SCD1) and hydroxynaphthalene reductase (BRN1 and BRN2) genes involved in melanin biosynthesis was undetectable, whereas expression of PKS18, encoding a polyketide synthase, was only moderately reduced. In chk1 and mps1 mutants expression of PKS18, SCD1, BRN1, BRN2, and the transcription factor CMR1 itself was very low in young colonies, slightly up-regulated in aging colonies, and significantly induced in hyperosmotic conditions, compared to invariably high expression in the wild type. These findings indicate that two MAPKs, Chk1 and Mps1, affect Cmr1 at the transcriptional level and this influence is partially overridden in stress conditions including aging culture and hyperosmotic environment. Surprisingly, we found that the CMR1 gene was transcribed in both sense and antisense directions, apparently producing mRNA as well as a long noncoding RNA transcript. Expression of the antisense CMR1 was also Chk1 and Mps1 dependent. Analysis of chromosomal location of the melanin biosynthesis genes in C. heterostrophus resulted in identification of a small gene cluster comprising BRN1, CMR1, and PKS18. Since expression of all three genes depends on Chk1 and Mps1 MAPKs, we suggest their possible epigenetic regulation. PMID:17237364

  14. Genome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Gene Family in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Qu, Cunmin; Tang, Zhanglin; Li, Jiana; Chai, Yourong; Liang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are fundamental signal transduction modules in plants, controlling cell division, development, hormone signaling, and biotic and abiotic stress responses. Although MAPKs have been investigated in several plant species, a comprehensive analysis of the MAPK gene family has hitherto not been performed in Brassica rapa. In this study, we identified 32 MAPKs in the B. rapa genome by conducting BLASTP and syntenic block analyses, and screening for the essential signature motif (TDY or TEY) of plant MAPK proteins. Of the 32 BraMAPK genes retrieved from the Brassica Database, 13 exhibited exon splicing errors, excessive splicing of the 5' sequence, excessive retention of the 5' sequence, and sequencing errors of the 3' end. Phylogenetic trees of the 32 corrected MAPKs from B. rapa and of MAPKs from other plants generated by the neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods suggested that BraMAPKs could be divided into four groups (groups A, B, C, and D). Gene number expansion was observed for BraMAPK genes in groups A and D, which may have been caused by the tandem duplication and genome triplication of the ancestral genome of the Brassica progenitor. Except for five members of the BraMAPK10 subfamily, the identified BraMAPKs were expressed in most of the tissues examined, including callus, root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that at least six and five BraMAPKs were induced or repressed by various abiotic stresses and hormone treatments, respectively, suggesting their potential roles in the abiotic stress response and various hormone signal transduction pathways in B. rapa. This study provides valuable insight into the putative physiological and biochemical functions of MAPK genes in B. rapa. PMID:26173020

  15. Thrombin produces phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 by a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-independent mechanism in the human astrocytoma cell line 1321N1.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, M; Bayón, Y; Sánchez Crespo, M; Nieto, M L

    1997-01-01

    The release of [3H]arachidonic acid was studied in the 1321N1 astrocytoma cell line upon stimulation with thrombin. The effect of thrombin was antagonized by hirudin only when both compounds were added simultaneously, which suggests activation of thrombin receptor. Evidence that the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) takes part in thrombin-induced arachidonate release was provided by the finding that thrombin induced retardation of the mobility of cPLA2 in SDS/polyacrylamide gels, which is a feature of the activation of cPLA2 by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Thrombin induced activation of two members of the MAP kinase family whose consensus primary sequence appears in cPLA2, namely p42-MAP kinase and c-Jun kinase. However, the activation of c-Jun kinase preceded the phosphorylation of cPLA2 more clearly than the activation of p42-MAK kinase did. Both cPLA2 and c-Jun kinase activation were not affected by PD-98059, a specific inhibitor of MAP kinase kinases, which indeed completely blocked p42-MAP kinase shift. Heat shock, a well-known activator of c-Jun kinase, also phosphorylated cPLA2 but not p42-MAP kinase. These data indicate the existence in astrocytoma cells of a signalling pathway triggered by thrombin receptor stimulation that activates a kinase cascade acting on the Pro-Leu-Ser-Pro consensus primary sequence, activates cPLA2, and associates the release of arachidonate with nuclear signalling pathways. PMID:9359863

  16. The role of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling components and the Ste12 transcription factor in germination and pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Schamber, Astrid; Leroch, Michaela; Diwo, Janine; Mendgen, Kurt; Hahn, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    In all fungi studied so far, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades serve as central signalling complexes that are involved in various aspects of growth, stress response and infection. In this work, putative components of the yeast Fus3/Kss1-type MAP kinase cascade and the putative downstream transcription factor Ste12 were analysed in the grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion mutants of the MAP triple kinase Ste11, the MAP kinase kinase Ste7 and the MAP kinase adaptor protein Ste50 all resulted in phenotypes similar to that of the previously described BMP1 MAP kinase mutant, namely defects in germination, delayed vegetative growth, reduced size of conidia, lack of sclerotia formation and loss of pathogenicity. Mutants lacking Ste12 showed normal germination, but delayed infection as a result of low penetration efficiency. Two differently spliced ste12 transcripts were detected, and both were able to complement the ste12 mutant, except for a defect in sclerotium formation, which was only corrected by the full-sized transcript. Overexpression of the smaller ste12 transcript resulted in delayed germination and strongly reduced infection. Bc-Gas2, a homologue of Magnaporthe grisea Gas2 that is required for appressorial function, was found to be non-essential for growth and infection, but its expression was under the control of both Bmp1 and Ste12. In summary, the role and regulatory connections of the Fus3/Kss1-type MAP kinase cascade in B. cinerea revealed both common and unique properties compared with those of other plant pathogenic fungi, and provide evidence for a regulatory link between the BMP1 MAP kinase cascade and Ste12. PMID:20078780

  17. Identification of Novel Coxiella burnetii Icm/Dot Effectors and Genetic Analysis of Their Involvement in Modulating a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lifshitz, Ziv; Burstein, David; Schwartz, Kierstyn; Shuman, Howard A.; Pupko, Tal

    2014-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is a human intracellular pathogen that utilizes the Icm/Dot type IVB secretion system to translocate effector proteins into host cells. To identify novel C. burnetii effectors, we applied a machine-learning approach to predict C. burnetii effectors, and examination of 20 such proteins resulted in the identification of 13 novel effectors. To determine whether these effectors, as well as several previously identified effectors, modulate conserved eukaryotic pathways, they were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The effects on yeast growth were examined under regular growth conditions and in the presence of caffeine, a known modulator of the yeast cell wall integrity (CWI) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. In the presence of caffeine, expression of the effectors CBU0885 and CBU1676 caused an enhanced inhibition of yeast growth, and the growth inhibition of CBU0388 was suppressed. Furthermore, analysis of synthetic lethality effects and examination of the activity of the CWI MAP kinase transcription factor Rlm1 indicated that CBU0388 enhances the activation of this MAP kinase pathway in yeast, while CBU0885 and CBU1676 abolish this activation. Additionally, coexpression of CBU1676 and CBU0388 resulted in mutual suppression of their inhibition of yeast growth. These results strongly indicate that these three effectors modulate the CWI MAP kinase pathway in yeast. Moreover, both CBU1676 and CBU0885 were found to contain a conserved haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) domain, which was found to be required for their activity. Collectively, our results demonstrate that MAP kinase pathways are most likely targeted by C. burnetii Icm/Dot effectors. PMID:24958706

  18. Genome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Gene Family in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kun; Guo, Wenjin; Lu, Junxing; Yu, Hao; Qu, Cunmin; Tang, Zhanglin; Li, Jiana; Chai, Yourong; Liang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are fundamental signal transduction modules in plants, controlling cell division, development, hormone signaling, and biotic and abiotic stress responses. Although MAPKs have been investigated in several plant species, a comprehensive analysis of the MAPK gene family has hitherto not been performed in Brassica rapa. In this study, we identified 32 MAPKs in the B. rapa genome by conducting BLASTP and syntenic block analyses, and screening for the essential signature motif (TDY or TEY) of plant MAPK proteins. Of the 32 BraMAPK genes retrieved from the Brassica Database, 13 exhibited exon splicing errors, excessive splicing of the 5' sequence, excessive retention of the 5' sequence, and sequencing errors of the 3' end. Phylogenetic trees of the 32 corrected MAPKs from B. rapa and of MAPKs from other plants generated by the neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods suggested that BraMAPKs could be divided into four groups (groups A, B, C, and D). Gene number expansion was observed for BraMAPK genes in groups A and D, which may have been caused by the tandem duplication and genome triplication of the ancestral genome of the Brassica progenitor. Except for five members of the BraMAPK10 subfamily, the identified BraMAPKs were expressed in most of the tissues examined, including callus, root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that at least six and five BraMAPKs were induced or repressed by various abiotic stresses and hormone treatments, respectively, suggesting their potential roles in the abiotic stress response and various hormone signal transduction pathways in B. rapa. This study provides valuable insight into the putative physiological and biochemical functions of MAPK genes in B. rapa.

  19. The dual specificity phosphatases M3/6 and MKP-3 are highly selective for inactivation of distinct mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Muda, M; Theodosiou, A; Rodrigues, N; Boschert, U; Camps, M; Gillieron, C; Davies, K; Ashworth, A; Arkinstall, S

    1996-11-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family includes extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK) and p38/RK/CSBP (p38) as structurally and functionally distinct enzyme classes. Here we describe two new dual specificity phosphatases of the CL100/MKP-1 family that are selective for inactivating ERK or JNK/SAPK and p38 MAP kinases when expressed in COS-7 cells. M3/6 is the first phosphatase of this family to display highly specific inactivation of JNK/SAPK and p38 MAP kinases. Although stress-induced activation of p54 SAPKbeta, p46 SAPKgamma (JNK1) or p38 MAP kinases is abolished upon co-transfection with increasing amounts of M3/6 plasmid, epidermal growth factor-stimulated ERK1 is remarkably insensitive even to the highest levels of M3/6 expression obtained. In contrast to M3/6, the dual specificity phosphatase MKP-3 is selective for inactivation of ERK family MAP kinases. Low level expression of MKP-3 blocks totally epidermal growth factor-stimulated ERK1, whereas stress-induced activation of p54 SAPKbeta and p38 MAP kinases is inhibited only partially under identical conditions. Selective regulation by M3/6 and MKP-3 was also observed upon chronic MAP kinase activation by constitutive p21(ras) GTPases. Hence, although M3/6 expression effectively blocked p54 SAPKbeta activation by p21(rac) (G12V), ERK1 activated by p21(ras) (G12V) was insensitive to this phosphatase. ERK1 activation by oncogenic p21(ras) was, however, blocked totally by co-expression of MKP-3. This is the first report demonstrating reciprocally selective inhibition of different MAP kinases by two distinct dual specificity phosphatases.

  20. Role of hippocampus mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 mRNA expression and DNA methylation in the depression of the rats with chronic unpredicted stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Li, Yan; Wang, Guo-Dong; Wang, Xin-Kai; Dong, Jiao; Ning, Qiu-Fen

    2015-05-01

    Stressful life events especially the chronic unpredictable stress are the obvious precipitating factors of depression. The biological information transduction in cells plays an important role in the molecular biology mechanism of depression. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) regulates the cell physiological activity and involves in the adjustment of neural plasticity, function, and survival. This experiment tried to explore the possible effects of MKP-1 in hippocampus on depression of rats by determining the expression of MKP-1 mRNA and DNA methylation in MKP-1 gene promoter. The animal model was established by chronic unpredictable stress, and evaluated by open-field test and weight changes. All the rats were divided into the sham stimulation, the physiological saline, and the fluoxetine (1.25, 2.50, and 5.00 mg/kg) groups randomly. The expression of MKP-1 mRNA in the hippocampus was measured by RT-PCR and the methylation of MKP-1 promoter DNA was detected by COBRA. The chronic unpredicted stress (1) increased the animal movement scores in open-field test, and fluoxetine could prevent this increasement; (2) increased the body weight, and fluoxetine could not prevent this increasement; and (3) increased MKP-1 mRNA expression in the hippocampus, and fluoxetine could prevent it. However, fluoxetine did not influence the DNA methylation of MKP-1 gene promoter in the hippocampus during the chronic unpredicted stress. MKP-1 in the hippocampus might be involved in the etiology of depression, and DNA methylation of MKP-1 gene promoter in the hippocampus did not related with the depression. PMID:25410305

  1. Regulation of p53, nuclear factor {kappa}B and cyclooxygenase-2 expression by bromelain through targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Neetu; Bhui, Kulpreet; Roy, Preeti; Srivastava, Smita; George, Jasmine; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2008-01-01

    Bromelain is a pharmacologically active compound, present in stems and immature fruits of pineapples (Ananas cosmosus), which has been shown to have anti-edematous, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-metastatic properties. In the present study, antitumorigenic activity of bromelain was recorded in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted 2-stage mouse skin model. Results showed that bromelain application delayed the onset of tumorigenesis and reduced the cumulative number of tumors, tumor volume and the average number of tumors/mouse. To establish a cause and effect relationship, we targeted the proteins involved in the cell death pathway. Bromelain treatment resulted in upregulation of p53 and Bax and subsequent activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 with concomitant decrease in antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in mouse skin. Since persistent induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is frequently implicated in tumorigenesis and is regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), we also investigated the effect of bromelain on Cox-2 and NF-{kappa}B expression. Results showed that bromelain application significantly inhibited Cox-2 and inactivated NF-{kappa}B by blocking phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. In addition, bromelain treatment attenuated DMBA-TPA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Taken together, we conclude that bromelain induces apoptosis-related proteins along with inhibition of NF-{kappa}B-driven Cox-2 expression by blocking the MAPK and Akt/protein kinase B signaling in DMBA-TPA-induced mouse skin tumors, which may account for its anti-tumorigenic effects.

  2. Phosphorylation pattern of the p90rsk and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) molecule: comparison of in vitro and in vivo matured porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Schuon, C; Ebeling, S; Meinecke, B

    2007-08-01

    The overall objective was to elucidate the phosphorylation pattern and activity of the kinase p90rsk, a substrate of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), during in vitro and in vivo maturation of pig oocytes. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were collected from slaughtered pigs and matured in vitro (0, 22, 26, 30, 34, 46 h) with and without the MEK inhibitor U0126. For in vivo maturation, gilts were stimulated with equine chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) (600-800 IU). Maturation was induced 72 h later with hCG (500 IU). Oocytes were obtained surgically (0, 22, 30 h). The samples were submitted to electrophoresis and protein blotting analysis. Enhanced chemiluminescence was used for visualization. In vitro matured oocytes were further submitted to a commercially available radioactive kinase assay to determine kinase activity. It was shown that oocytes, as well as cumulus cells, already possess a partially phosphorylated p90rsk at the time of removal from follicles, with a further phosphorylation of the molecule occurring between 22-24 h after the initiation of culture, and in vivo maturation. The phosphorylation of p90rsk coincides with the phosphorylation of MAPK and can be prevented by U0126, indicating a MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of p90rsk. Phosphorylation of the in vivo matured oocytes occurred shown as a band of less than 200 kDa. This is presumably a molecule complex, with MAPK not being a component. Therefore, the p90rsk molecule in vivo exists as a dimer. Determination of kinase activity demonstrated decreasing enzyme activities. This led to the conclusion that the assay is not specific for p90rsk, instead measuring p70S6 kinase activities.

  3. Low concentrations of trichosanthin induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest via c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duo; Chen, Bin; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Lin; Li, Qing; Liu, Fei; Chou, Kuang-Yen; Tao, Lei; Lu, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Trichosanthin (TCS) is a type I ribosome--inactivating protein, which inhibits cell viability in human epithelial type 2 (HEp-2) and AMC-HN-8 human laryngeal epidermoid carcinoma cells. Although TCS is a potential chemotherapeutic agent, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. In the present study, HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cells were treated with different concentrations of TCS combined with or without cisplatin. After 5 days of successive treatment, different experimental groups were detected using a cell counting kit-8 and the collected supernatants were analyzed using a lactate dehydrogenase kit. Flow cytometric assays were performed to detect apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cells, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the levels of p27, p21WAF and western blot analysis was performed to detect changes in c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK)/phosphorylated (phospho)-JNK, p38/phospho-p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/phospho-ERK, caspase-3 and caspase-9 in the HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cancer cells. TCS significantly inhibited the cell viability of the HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cells, independently of necrosis. TCS induced apoptosis and increased the percentage of HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle. In addition, the JNK/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway was activated by TCS in the HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cells. Low concentrations of TCS also induced apoptosis and S-phase cell cycle arrest in the HEp-2 and AMC-HN-8 cells. The antitumor effects of TCS may be associated with JNK/MAPK activation.

  4. Colletotrichum higginsianum Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase ChMK1: Role in Growth, Cell Wall Integrity, Colony Melanization, and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Xiong, Ying; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Nancong; Yang, Guogen; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. To facilitate the efficient control of anthracnose disease, it will be important to understand the mechanism by which the cruciferous crops and C. higginsianum interact. A key step in understanding this interaction is characterizing the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway of C. higginsianum. MAPK plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. In this study, a Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK gene, ChMK1, from C. higginsianum was analyzed. The results showed that the Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK ChMK1 plays a significant role in cell wall integrity. Targeted deletion of ChMK1 resulted in a hypersensitivity to cell wall inhibitors, reduced conidiation and albinistic colonies. Further, the deletion mutant was also unable to form melanized appressorium, a specialized infection structure that is necessary for successful infection. Therefore, the deletion mutant loses pathogenicity on A. thaliana leaves, demonstrating that ChMK1 plays an essential role in the early infection step. In addition, the ChMK1 deletion mutant showed an attenuated growth rate that is different from that of its homolog in Colletotrichum lagenarium, indicating the diverse roles that Fus3/Kss1-related MAPKs plays in phytopathogenic fungi. Furthermore, the expression level of three melanin synthesis associated genes were clearly decreased in the albinistic ChMK1 mutant compared to that of the wild type strain, suggesting that ChMK1 is also required for colony melanization in C. higginsianum. PMID:27536296

  5. Interaction of Omega, Sigma, and Theta glutathione transferases with p38b mitogen-activated protein kinase from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wongtrakul, J; Janphen, K; Saisawang, C; Ketterman, A J

    2014-05-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a diverse family of phase II detoxification enzymes found in almost all organisms. Besides playing a major role in the detoxification of xenobiotic and toxic compounds, GSTs are also involved in the regulation of mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction by interaction with proteins in the pathway. An in vitro study was performed for Theta, Omega, Sigma GSTs and their interaction with MAP kinase p38b protein from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae). The study included the effects of all five Omega class GSTs (DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, DmGSTO2b, DmGSTO3, DmGSTO4), all five Theta class GSTs (DmGSTT1, DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3a, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTT4), and one Sigma class glutathione transferase on the activity of Drosophila p38b, including the reciprocal effect of this kinase protein on glutathione transferase activity. It was found that DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTO1, and DmGSTO3 activated p38b significantly. Substrate specificities of GSTs were also altered after co-incubation with p38b. Although p38b activated DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, and DmGSTT2, it inhibited DmGSTT3b and DmGSTO3 activity toward xenobiotic and physiological substrates tested. These results suggest a novel link between Omega and Theta GSTs with the p38b MAP kinase pathway.

  6. Involvement of PPS3 phosphorylated by elicitor-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinases in the regulation of plant cell death.

    PubMed

    Katou, Shinpei; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Rowland, Owen; Jones, Jonathan D G; Mori, Hitoshi; Doke, Noriyuki

    2005-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play pivotal roles in plant innate immunity. Overexpression of StMEK1(DD), a constitutively active MAPK kinase that activates salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) and wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK), provokes hypersensitive response-like cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana. Here we purified a 51-kD MAPK, which was activated in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers treated with hyphal wall elicitor of a plant pathogen, and isolated the cDNA designated StMPK1. The deduced amino acid sequence of the StMPK1 showed strong similarity to stress-responsive MAPKs, such as tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) SIPK and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtMPK6. To investigate the downstream signaling of StMPK1, we identified several proteins phosphorylated by StMPK1 (PPSs) using an in vitro expression cloning method. To dissect the biological function of PPSs in the plant defense, we employed virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in N. benthamiana. VIGS of NbPPS3 significantly delayed cell death induced by the transient expression of StMEK1(DD) and treatment with hyphal wall elicitor. Furthermore, the mobility shift of NbPPS3 on SDS-polyacrylamide gel was induced by transient expression of StMEK1(DD). The mobility shift of NbPPS3 induced by StMEK1(DD) was not compromised by VIGS of WIPK or SIPK alone, but drastically reduced by the silencing of both WIPK and SIPK. This work strongly supports the idea that PPS3 is a physiological substrate of StMPK1 and is involved in cell death activated by a MAPK cascade. PMID:16306147

  7. The genome-wide identification of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MKK) genes in Yesso scallop Patinopecten yessoensis and their expression responses to bacteria challenges.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiajun; Wang, Ruijia; Li, Ruojiao; Kong, Yifan; Wang, Jing; Ning, Xianhui; Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Shi; Hu, Xiaoli; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MKK) are the essential components of the evolutionarily conserved MAPK signaling cascade, which regulates a variety of cellular activities and innate immune responses. Although MKK genes have been extensively studied in various vertebrate and invertebrate species, they have not been systematically characterized in bivalves. In this study, we identified and characterized five MKK genes (PyMKK1/2, PyMKK4, PyMKK5, PyMKK3/6 and PyMKK7) in the Yesso scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis). Phylogenetic and protein structural analyses were conducted to determine their identities and evolutionary relationships. To gain insights into the possible roles of MKK genes during scallop innate immune responses, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to investigate their expression profiles during different developmental stages in samples taken from healthy adult tissues and hemocytes after Micrococcus luteus and Vibrio anguillarum bacterial infections. The Yesso scallop MKKs (PyMKKs) were found to have highly conserved structural features compared to the MKK genes from other invertebrate species. Using qRT-PCR analysis, three distinct expression patterns were detected among the PyMKKs over the course of ten different developmental stages. In adult scallops, the majority of the PyMKKs were highly expressed in mantle, gill, muscle and hemocytes. The differential expression patterns of the five PyMKKs after M. luteus (Gram-positive) and V. anguillarum (Gram-negative) bacterial infections suggested their possible involvement in the innate immune response and provide the foundation and resource for the further study on innate immune response of MAPK signal pathway in mollusk. PMID:26067168

  8. Thermodynamic characterization of pyrazole and azaindole derivatives binding to p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase using Biacore T100 technology and van't Hoff analysis.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Giuseppe A; Giannetti, Anthony M; Arora, Nidhi; Myszka, David G

    2008-12-15

    Biacore T100 technology was used in conjunction with a van't Hoff analysis to characterize the thermodynamic binding parameters of 85 small-molecule inhibitors of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding to p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The compounds were selected from a large panel of azaindole and pyrazole derivatives for which IC(50) data exist. We showed a strong relationship between the K(D) and IC(50) of a compound, but only a modest relationship between k(off) and IC(50) was detected and an apparent relationship between a compound's k(on) and its IC(50) could not be discerned. Similarly, a correlation between a compound's IC(50) and its thermodynamic parameters DeltaH degrees and DeltaS degrees could not be established. The lack of a predominant kinetic or thermodynamic signature associated with the inhibitory potential of these compounds demonstrates that there exists, even within a single well-defined system, a library of kinetic routes or, alternatively, a library of initial and final enthalpic and entropic states from which to effect inhibition. As a complement to these studies, selected double mutant thermodynamic cycles were performed to probe the energetic coupling, if any, between common sites of fluorination in both the azaindole and pyrazole classes and two different substituents. Although both cycles indicated negligible coupling free energies, both revealed significant coupling enthalpies, an observation made in other similarly dissected systems. The possible significance and caveats associated with these findings along with the advantages of using Biacore technology to derive thermodynamic parameters in drug discovery efforts are discussed.

  9. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, DNA methyltransferase, and transforming growth factor-β promotes differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Nao; Iwao, Takahiro; Kabeya, Tomoki; Horikawa, Takashi; Niwa, Takuro; Kondo, Yuki; Nakamura, Katsunori; Matsunaga, Tamihide

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that small-molecule compounds were effective in generating pharmacokinetically functional enterocytes from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. In this study, to determine whether the compounds promote the differentiation of human iPS cells into enterocytes, we investigated the effects of a combination of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), DNA methyltransferase (DNMT), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β inhibitors on intestinal differentiation. Human iPS cells cultured on feeder cells were differentiated into endodermal cells by activin A. These endodermal-like cells were then differentiated into intestinal stem cells by fibroblast growth factor 2. Finally, the cells were differentiated into enterocyte cells by epidermal growth factor and small-molecule compounds. After differentiation, mRNA expression levels and drug-metabolizing enzyme activities were measured. The mRNA expression levels of the enterocyte marker sucrase-isomaltase and the major drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 were increased by a combination of MEK, DNMT, and TGF-β inhibitors. The mRNA expression of CYP3A4 was markedly induced by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Metabolic activities of CYP1A1/2, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A4/5, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and sulfotransferase were also observed in the differentiated cells. In conclusion, MEK, DNMT, and TGF-β inhibitors can be used to promote the differentiation of human iPS cells into pharmacokinetically functional enterocytes.

  10. Enhanced Mitogenic Activity of Recombinant Human Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor VEGF121 Expressed in E. coli Origami B (DE3) with Molecular Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Ondřej; Zárubová, Jana; Mikulová, Barbora; Filová, Elena; Bártová, Jiřina; Bačáková, Lucie; Brynda, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    We describe the production of a highly-active mutant VEGF variant, α2-PI1-8-VEGF121, which contains a substrate sequence for factor XIIIa at the aminoterminus designed for incorporation into a fibrin gel. The α2-PI1-8-VEGF121 gene was synthesized, cloned into a pET-32a(+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli Origami B (DE3) host cells. To increase the protein folding and the solubility, the resulting thioredoxin-α2-PI1-8-VEGF121 fusion protein was co-expressed with recombinant molecular chaperones GroES/EL encoded by independent plasmid pGro7. The fusion protein was purified from the soluble fraction of cytoplasmic proteins using affinity chromatography. After cleavage of the thioredoxin fusion part with thrombin, the target protein was purified by a second round of affinity chromatography. The yield of purified α2-PI1-8-VEGF121 was 1.4 mg per liter of the cell culture. The α2-PI1-8-VEGF121 expressed in this work increased the proliferation of endothelial cells 3.9–8.7 times in comparison with commercially-available recombinant VEGF121. This very high mitogenic activity may be caused by co-expression of the growth factor with molecular chaperones not previously used in VEGF production. At the same time, α2-PI1-8-VEGF121 did not elicit considerable inflammatory activation of human endothelial HUVEC cells and human monocyte-like THP-1 cells. PMID:27716773

  11. Downregulation of the Ras–Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway by the EphB2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Is Required for Ephrin-Induced Neurite Retraction

    PubMed Central

    Elowe, Sabine; Holland, Sacha J.; Kulkarni, Sarang; Pawson, Tony

    2001-01-01

    Activation of the EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase by clustered ephrin-B1 induces growth cone collapse and neurite retraction in differentiated NG108 neuronal cells. We have investigated the cytoplasmic signaling events associated with EphB2-induced cytoskeletal reorganization in these neuronal cells. We find that unlike other receptor tyrosine kinases, EphB2 induces a pronounced downregulation of GTP-bound Ras and consequently of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. A similar inhibition of the Ras-MAPK pathway was observed on stimulation of endogenous EphB2 in COS-1 cells. Inactivation of Ras, induced by ephrin B1 stimulation of NG108 neuronal cells, requires EphB2 tyrosine kinase activity and is blocked by a truncated form of p120-Ras GTPase-activating protein (p120-RasGAP), suggesting that EphB2 signals through the SH2 domain protein p120-RasGAP to inhibit the Ras-MAPK pathway. Suppression of Ras activity appears functionally important, since expression of a constitutively active variant of Ras impaired the ability of EphB2 to induce neurite retraction. In addition, EphB2 attenuated the elevation in ERK activation induced by attachment of NG108 cells to fibronectin, indicating that the EphB2 receptor can modulate integrin signaling to the Ras GTPase. These results suggest that a primary function of EphB2, a member of the most populous family of receptor tyrosine kinases, is to inactivate the Ras-MAPK pathway in a fashion that contributes to cytoskeletal reorganization and adhesion responses in neuronal growth cones. PMID:11585923

  12. Evidence for protein kinase C-dependent and -independent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in T cells: potential role of additional diacylglycerol binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Puente, L G; Stone, J C; Ostergaard, H L

    2000-12-15

    Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) is a critical signal transduction event for CTL activation, but the signaling mechanisms responsible are not fully characterized. Protein kinase C (PKC) is thought to contribute to MAPK activation following TCR stimulation. We have found that dependence on PKC varies with the method used to stimulate the T cells. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in CTL stimulated with soluble cross-linked anti-CD3 is completely inhibited by the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM). In contrast, only the later time points in the course of ERK activation are sensitive to BIM when CTL are stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3, a condition that stimulates CTL degranulation. Surprisingly, MAPK activation in response to immobilized anti-CD3 is strongly inhibited at all time points by the diacylglycerol (DAG)-binding domain inhibitor calphostin C implicating the contribution of a DAG-dependent but PKC-independent pathway in the activation of ERK in CTL clones. Chronic exposure to phorbol ester down-regulates the expression of DAG-responsive PKC isoforms; however, this treatment of CTL clones does not inhibit anti-CD3-induced activation of MAPK. Phorbol ester-treated cells have reduced expression of several isoforms of PKC but still express the recently described DAG-binding Ras guanylnucleotide-releasing protein. These results indicate that the late phase of MAPK activation in CTL clones in response to immobilized anti-CD3 stimulation requires PKC while the early phase requires a DAG-dependent, BIM-resistant component.

  13. Interaction of Omega, Sigma, and Theta Glutathione Transferases with p38b Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase from the Fruit Fly, Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wongtrakul, J.; Janphen, K.; Saisawang, C.; Ketterman, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a diverse family of phase II detoxification enzymes found in almost all organisms. Besides playing a major role in the detoxification of xenobiotic and toxic compounds, GSTs are also involved in the regulation of mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction by interaction with proteins in the pathway. An in vitro study was performed for Theta, Omega, Sigma GSTs and their interaction with MAP kinase p38b protein from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae). The study included the effects of all five Omega class GSTs (DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, DmGSTO2b, DmGSTO3, DmGSTO4), all five Theta class GSTs (DmGSTT1, DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3a, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTT4), and one Sigma class glutathione transferase on the activity of Drosophila p38b, including the reciprocal effect of this kinase protein on glutathione transferase activity. It was found that DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTO1, and DmGSTO3 activated p38b significantly. Substrate specificities of GSTs were also altered after co-incubation with p38b. Although p38b activated DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, and DmGSTT2, it inhibited DmGSTT3b and DmGSTO3 activity toward xenobiotic and physiological substrates tested. These results suggest a novel link between Omega and Theta GSTs with the p38b MAP kinase pathway. PMID:25373207

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 regulates cytoskeletal organization and chemotaxis via catalytic and microtubule-specific interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Reszka, A A; Bulinski, J C; Krebs, E G; Fischer, E H

    1997-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) 1 and 2 are mitogen-activated protein kinases that act as key components in a signaling cascade linking growth factor receptors to the cytoskeleton and the nucleus. ERK2 mutants have been used to alter cytoskeletal regulation in Chinese hamster ovary cells without affecting cell growth or feedback signaling. Mutation of the unique loop L6 (residues 91-95), which is in a portion of the molecule that is cryptic upon the binding of ERK2 to the microtubules (MTs), generated significant morphological alterations. Most notable phenotypes were observed after expression of a combined mutant incorporating changes to both L6 and the TEY phosphorylation lip, including a 70% increase in cell spreading. Actin stress fibers in these cells, which normally formed a single broad parallel array, were arranged in three or more orientations or in fan-like arrays. MTs, which ordinarily extend longitudinally from the centrosome, spread radially, covering a larger surface area. Single, but not the double, mutations of the Thr and Tyr residues of the TEY phosphorylation lip caused a ca. 25% increase in cell spreading, accompanied by a threefold increase in chemotactic cell migration. Mutation of Lys-52 triggered a 48% increase in cell spreading but no alteration to chemotaxis. These findings suggest that wild-type ERK2 inhibits the organization of the cytoskeleton, the spreading of the cell, and chemotactic migration. This involves control of the orientation of actin and MTs and the positioning of focal adhesions via regulatory interactions that may occur on the MTs. Images PMID:9243503

  15. From pure compounds to complex exposure: Effects of dietary cadmium and lignans on estrogen, epidermal growth factor receptor, and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Hurmerinta, Teija; Nurmi, Tarja; Berglund, Marika; Rüegg, Joelle; Poutanen, Matti; Halldin, Krister; Mäkelä, Sari; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina

    2016-06-24

    Exposure to environmental endocrine active compounds correlates with altered susceptibility to disease in human populations. Chemical risk assessment is single compound based, although exposure often takes place as heterogeneous mixtures of man-made and natural substances within complex matrices like diet. Here we studied whether the effects of cadmium and enterolactone on endocrine endpoints in dietary exposure can be predicted based on pure compound effects. Ovariectomized estrogen reporter ERE-luciferase (ERE-luc) mice were maintained on diets that intrinsically contain increasing concentrations of cadmium and enterolactone precursors for three and 21 days. The activation of the ERE-luc, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-ERK1/2, and classical estrogen responses were measured. Interactions between the diets and endogenous hormone were evaluated by challenging the animals with 17β-estradiol. Compared to animals on basal purified diet, mice consuming experimental diets were exposed to significantly higher levels of cadmium and enterolactone, yet the exposure remained comparable to typical human dietary intake. Surprisingly, we could not detect effects on endpoints regulated by pure enterolactone, such as ERE-luc activation. However, cadmium accumulation in the liver was accompanied with activation of EGFR and MAPK-ERK1/2 in line with our earlier CdCl2 studies. Further, attenuation of 17β-estradiol-induced ERE-luc response in liver by experimental diets was observed. Our findings indicate that the exposure context can have substantial effects on the activity of endocrine active compounds in vivo. Thus, whenever possible, a context that mimics human exposure should be tested along with pure compounds. PMID:27108949

  16. Functional characterization of the MKC1 gene of Candida albicans, which encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase homolog related to cell integrity.

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-García, F; Sánchez, M; Pla, J; Nombela, C

    1995-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases represent a group of serine/threonine protein kinases playing a central role in signal transduction processes in eukaryotic cells. Using a strategy based on the complementation of the thermosensitive autolytic phenotype of slt2 null mutants, we have isolated a Candida albicans homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAP kinase gene SLT2 (MPK1), which is involved in the recently outlined PKC1-controlled signalling pathway. The isolated gene, named MKC1 (MAP kinase from C. albicans), coded for a putative protein, Mkc1p, of 58,320 Da that displayed all the characteristic domains of MAP kinases and was 55% identical to S. cerevisiae Slt2p (Mpk1p). The MKC1 gene was deleted in a diploid Candida strain, and heterozygous and homozygous strains, in both Ura+ and Ura- backgrounds, were obtained to facilitate the analysis of the function of the gene. Deletion of the two alleles of the MKC1 gene gave rise to viable cells that grew at 28 and 37 degrees C but, nevertheless, displayed a variety of phenotypic traits under more stringent conditions. These included a low growth yield and a loss of viability in cultures grown at 42 degrees C, a high sensitivity to thermal shocks at 55 degrees C, an enhanced susceptibility to caffeine that was osmotically remediable, and the formation of a weak cell wall with a very low resistance to complex lytic enzyme preparations. The analysis of the functions downstream of the MKC1 gene should contribute to understanding of the connection of growth and morphogenesis in pathogenic fungi. PMID:7891715

  17. Ethanol Impairs Intestinal Barrier Function in Humans through Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Signaling: A Combined In Vivo and In Vitro Approach

    PubMed Central

    Elamin, Elhaseen; Masclee, Ad; Troost, Freddy; Pieters, Harm-Jan; Keszthelyi, Daniel; Aleksa, Katarina; Dekker, Jan; Jonkers, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Background Ethanol-induced gut barrier disruption is associated with several gastrointestinal and liver disorders. Aim Since human data on effects of moderate ethanol consumption on intestinal barrier integrity and involved mechanisms are limited, the objectives of this study were to investigate effects of a single moderate ethanol dose on small and large intestinal permeability and to explore the role of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway as a primary signaling mechanism. Methods Intestinal permeability was assessed in 12 healthy volunteers after intraduodenal administration of either placebo or 20 g ethanol in a randomised cross-over trial. Localization of the tight junction (TJ) and gene expression, phosphorylation of the MAPK isoforms p38, ERK and JNK as indicative of activation were analyzed in duodenal biopsies. The role of MAPK was further examined in vitro using Caco-2 monolayers. Results Ethanol increased small and large intestinal permeability, paralleled by redistribution of ZO-1 and occludin, down-regulation of ZO-1 and up-regulation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) mRNA expression, and increased MAPK isoforms phosphorylation. In Caco-2 monolayers, ethanol increased permeability, induced redistribution of the junctional proteins and F-actin, and MAPK and MLCK activation, as indicated by phosphorylation of MAPK isoforms and myosin light chain (MLC), respectively, which could be reversed by pretreatment with either MAPK inhibitors or the anti-oxidant L-cysteine. Conclusions Administration of moderate ethanol dosage can increase both small and colon permeability. Furthermore, the data indicate a pivotal role for MAPK and its crosstalk with MLCK in ethanol-induced intestinal barrier disruption. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00928733 PMID:25226407

  18. Genome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Gene Family in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kun; Guo, Wenjin; Lu, Junxing; Yu, Hao; Qu, Cunmin; Tang, Zhanglin; Li, Jiana; Chai, Yourong; Liang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are fundamental signal transduction modules in plants, controlling cell division, development, hormone signaling, and biotic and abiotic stress responses. Although MAPKs have been investigated in several plant species, a comprehensive analysis of the MAPK gene family has hitherto not been performed in Brassica rapa. In this study, we identified 32 MAPKs in the B. rapa genome by conducting BLASTP and syntenic block analyses, and screening for the essential signature motif (TDY or TEY) of plant MAPK proteins. Of the 32 BraMAPK genes retrieved from the Brassica Database, 13 exhibited exon splicing errors, excessive splicing of the 5' sequence, excessive retention of the 5' sequence, and sequencing errors of the 3' end. Phylogenetic trees of the 32 corrected MAPKs from B. rapa and of MAPKs from other plants generated by the neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods suggested that BraMAPKs could be divided into four groups (groups A, B, C, and D). Gene number expansion was observed for BraMAPK genes in groups A and D, which may have been caused by the tandem duplication and genome triplication of the ancestral genome of the Brassica progenitor. Except for five members of the BraMAPK10 subfamily, the identified BraMAPKs were expressed in most of the tissues examined, including callus, root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that at least six and five BraMAPKs were induced or repressed by various abiotic stresses and hormone treatments, respectively, suggesting their potential roles in the abiotic stress response and various hormone signal transduction pathways in B. rapa. This study provides valuable insight into the putative physiological and biochemical functions of MAPK genes in B. rapa. PMID:26173020

  19. LY2228820 dimesylate, a selective inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, reduces angiogenic endothelial cord formation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tate, Courtney M; Blosser, Wayne; Wyss, Lisa; Evans, Glenn; Xue, Qi; Pan, Yong; Stancato, Louis

    2013-03-01

    LY2228820 dimesylate is a highly selective small molecule inhibitor of p38α and p38β mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that is currently under clinical investigation for human malignancies. p38 MAPK is implicated in a wide range of biological processes, in particular those that support tumorigenesis. One such process, angiogenesis, is required for tumor growth and metastasis, and many new cancer therapies are therefore directed against the tumor vasculature. Using an in vitro co-culture endothelial cord formation assay, a surrogate of angiogenesis, we investigated the role of p38 MAPK in growth factor- and tumor-driven angiogenesis using LY2228820 dimesylate treatment and by shRNA gene knockdown. p38 MAPK was activated in endothelial cells upon growth factor stimulation, with inhibition by LY2228820 dimesylate treatment causing a significant decrease in VEGF-, bFGF-, EGF-, and IL-6-induced endothelial cord formation and an even more dramatic decrease in tumor-driven cord formation. In addition to involvement in downstream cytokine signaling, p38 MAPK was important for VEGF, bFGF, EGF, IL-6, and other proangiogenic cytokine secretion in stromal and tumor cells. LY2228820 dimesylate results were substantiated using p38α MAPK-specific shRNA and shRNA against the downstream p38 MAPK effectors MAPKAPK-2 and HSP27. Using in vivo models of functional neoangiogenesis, LY2228820 dimesylate treatment reduced hemoglobin content in a plug assay and decreased VEGF-A-stimulated vascularization in a mouse ear model. Thus, p38α MAPK is implicated in tumor angiogenesis through direct tumoral effects and through reduction of proangiogenic cytokine secretion via the microenvironment. PMID:23335506

  20. Time-dependent impairment of inhibitory avoidance retention in rats by posttraining infusion of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor into cortical and limbic structures.

    PubMed

    Walz, R; Roesler, R; Quevedo, J; Sant'Anna, M K; Madruga, M; Rodrigues, C; Gottfried, C; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I

    2000-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is abundantly expressed in postmitotic neurons of the developed nervous system. MAPK is activated and required for induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 area of the hippocampus, which is blocked by the specific inhibitor of the MAPK kinase, PD 098059. Recently it was demonstrated that MAPK is activated in the hippocampus after training and is necessary for contextual fear conditioning learning. The present work tests the role of the MAPK cascade in step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA) retention. PD 098059 (50 microM) was bilaterally injected (0.5 microl/side) into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus or entorhinal cortex at 0, 90, 180, or 360 min, or into the amygdala or parietal cortex at 0, 180, or 360 min after IA training in rats using a 0.4-mA foot shock. Retention testing was carried out 24 h after training. PD 098059 impaired retention when injected into the dorsal hippocampus at 180 min, but not 0, 90, and 360 min after training. When infused into the entorhinal cortex, PD 098059 was amnestic at 0 and 180 min, but not at 90 and 360 min after training. The MAPKK inhibitor also impairs IA retention when infused into the parietal cortex immediately after training, but not at 180 or 360 min. Infusions performed into amygdala were amnestic at 180 min, but not at 0 and 360 min after training. Our results suggest a time-dependent involvement of the MAPK cascade in the posttraining memory processing of IA; the time dependency is different in the hippocampus, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, or parietal cortex of rats.

  1. The role of mitogen-activated protein kinases and sterol receptor coactivator-1 in TGF-β-regulated expression of genes implicated in macrophage cholesterol uptake

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Rebecca C.; Foka, Pelagia; Davies, Thomas S.; Gallagher, Hayley; Michael, Daryn R.; Ashlin, Tim G.; Ramji, Dipak P.

    2016-01-01

    The anti-atherogenic cytokine TGF-β inhibits macrophage foam cell formation by suppressing the expression of key genes implicated in the uptake of modified lipoproteins. We have previously shown a critical role for p38 MAPK and JNK in the TGF-β-mediated regulation of apolipoprotein E expression in human monocytes. However, the roles of these two MAPK pathways in the control of expression of key genes involved in the uptake of modified lipoproteins in human macrophages is poorly understood and formed the focus of this study. TGF-β activated both p38 MAPK and JNK, and knockdown of p38 MAPK or c-Jun, a key downstream target of JNK action, demonstrated their requirement in the TGF-β-inhibited expression of several key genes implicated in macrophage lipoprotein uptake. The potential role of c-Jun and specific co-activators in the action of TGF-β was investigated further by studies on the lipoprotein lipase gene. c-Jun did not directly interact with the minimal promoter region containing the TGF-β response elements and a combination of transient transfection and knock down assays revealed an important role for SRC-1. These studies provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the TGF-β-mediated inhibition of macrophage gene expression associated with the control of cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:27687241

  2. Identification of the REST regulon reveals extensive transposable element-mediated binding site duplication

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rory; Gamblin, Richard J.; Ooi, Lezanne; Bruce, Alexander W.; Donaldson, Ian J.; Westhead, David R.; Wood, Ian C.; Jackson, Richard M.; Buckley, Noel J.

    2006-01-01

    The genome-wide mapping of gene-regulatory motifs remains a major goal that will facilitate the modelling of gene-regulatory networks and their evolution. The repressor element 1 is a long, conserved transcription factor-binding site which recruits the transcriptional repressor REST to numerous neuron-specific target genes. REST plays important roles in multiple biological processes and disease states. To map RE1 sites and target genes, we created a position specific scoring matrix representing the RE1 and used it to search the human and mouse genomes. We identified 1301 and 997 RE1s inhuman and mouse genomes, respectively, of which >40% are novel. By employing an ontological analysis we show that REST target genes are significantly enriched in a number of functional classes. Taking the novel REST target gene CACNA1A as an experimental model, we show that it can be regulated by multiple RE1s of different binding affinities, which are only partially conserved between human and mouse. A novel BLAST methodology indicated that many RE1s belong to closely related families. Most of these sequences are associated with transposable elements, leading us to propose that transposon-mediated duplication and insertion of RE1s has led to the acquisition of novel target genes by REST during evolution. PMID:16899447

  3. Sphingosine kinase 1 inhibition improves lipopolysaccharide/D-galactosamine-induced acute liver failure by inhibiting mitogen-activated protein kinases pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tao; Tian, Weiliang; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Risheng; Huang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1)/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) signaling plays a key role in inflammatory responses. Lei et al. showed that SphK1 inhibition presented a hepatoprotective effect on acute liver damage via decreasing hepatic high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) cytoplasmic translocation. Objective We aim to determine whether SphK1 or S1PRs inhibition improves lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/D-galactosamine (GalN)-induced acute liver failure by inhibiting the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway. Methods A mouse model of acute liver failure was induced by LPS/GalN. Male C57BL/6J mice (6–8 weeks) were randomly distributed into five groups: control group, LPS/GalN group, SphK1 inhibition group (LPS/GalN+SKI-5c), S1PR1 inhibition group (LPS/GalN+W146), and S1PR3 inhibition group (LPS/GalN+CAY10444). Results We confirmed the findings of Lei et al. that hepatic SphK1 expression was upregulated; serum transaminase activity (AST, ALT), as well as serum TNF-α and IL-6, were decreased by SphK1 inhibition. We further showed that the expression of S1PR1 and S1PR3 was augmented in response to LPS/GalN. SphK1 inhibition improves hepatic hemorrhage, and the activities of hepatic caspase-3 and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Furthermore, the activation of the MAPKs family (JNK, ERK and p38) was suppressed by SphK1 inhibition. However, S1PR1 or S1PR3 inhibition did not protect the mouse against liver damage, though S1PR1 or S1PR3 inhibition reduced serum TNF-α and IL-6, and partially attenuated the phosphorylation of the MAPKs signaling. Conclusions SphK1 inhibition improves LPS/GalN-induced liver injury by inhibiting activation of MAPKs signaling. PMID:27733910

  4. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling Components in the Fungal Development, Stress Response and Virulence of the Fungal Cereal Pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Yueqiang; Zhong, Shaobin

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been demonstrated to be involved in fungal development, sexual reproduction, pathogenicity and/or virulence in many filamentous plant pathogenic fungi, but genes for MAPKs in the fungal cereal pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana have not been characterized. In this study, orthologues of three MAPK genes (CsSLT2, CsHOG1 and CsFUS3) and one MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) gene (CsSTE11) were identified in the whole genome sequence of the B. sorokiniana isolate ND90Pr, and knockout mutants were generated for each of them. The ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 mutants were defective in conidiation and formation of appressoria-like structures, showed hypersensitivity to oxidative stress and lost pathogenicity on non-wounded leaves of barley cv. Bowman. When inoculated on wounded leaves of Bowman, the ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 mutants were reduced in virulence compared to the wild type. No morphological changes were observed in the ∆Cshog1 mutants in comparison with the wild type; however, they were slightly reduced in growth under oxidative stress and were hypersensitive to hyperosmotic stress. The ∆Cshog1 mutants formed normal appressoria-like structures but were reduced in virulence when inoculated on Bowman leaves. The ∆Csslt2 mutants produced more vegetative hyphae, had lighter pigmentation, were more sensitive to cell wall degrading enzymes, and were reduced in virulence on Bowman leaves, although they formed normal appressoria like the wild type. Root infection assays indicated that the ∆Cshog1 and ∆Csslt2 mutants were able to infect barley roots while the ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 failed to cause any symptoms. However, no significant difference in virulence was observed for ∆Cshog1 mutants while ∆Csslt2 mutants showed significantly reduced virulence on barley roots in comparison with the wild type. Our results indicated that all of these MAPK and MAPKKK genes are involved in the regulation of fungal development under

  5. Differential Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, ERK 1/2, p38(MAPK) and JNK p54/p46 During Postnatal Development of Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Paula; Lopes, Mark William; Rieger, Débora K; Barbosa, Sabrina Giovana Rocha; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Xikota, João Carlos; Walz, Roger; Leal, Rodrigo B

    2016-05-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a group of serine-threonine kinases, including p38(MAPK), ERK 1/2 and JNK p54/p46, activated by phosphorylation in response to extracellular stimuli. The early postnatal period is characterized by significant changes in brain structure as well as intracellular signaling. In the hippocampus MAPKs have been involved in the modulation of development and neural plasticity. However, the temporal profile of MAPK activation throughout the early postnatal development is incomplete. An understanding of this profile is important since slight changes in the activity of these enzymes, in response to environmental stress in specific developmental windows, might alter the course of development. The present study was undertaken to investigate the hippocampal differential activation of MAPK during postnatal period. MAPK activation and total content were evaluated by Western blotting of hippocampal tissue obtained from male Wistar rats at postnatal days (P) 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, 30 and 60. The total content and phosphorylation of each MAPK was expressed as mean ± SEM and then calculates as a percentile compared to P1 (set at 100 %). The results showed: (1) phosphorylation peaks of p38(MAPK) at PN4 (p = 0.036) and PN10 to PN60; (2) phosphorylation of ERK1 and ERK2 were increased with age (ERK1 p = 0.0000005 and ERK2 p = 0.003); (3) phosphorylation profile of JNK p54/p46 was not changed during the period analyzed (JNKp56 p = 0.716 and JNKp46 p = 0.192). Therefore, the activity profile of ERK 1/2 and p38(MAPK) during postnatal development of rat hippocampus are differentially regulated. Our results demonstrate that ERK 1/2 and p38(MAPK) are dynamically regulated during postnatal neurodevelopment, suggesting temporal correlation of MAPK activity with critical periods when programmed cell death and synaptogenesis are occurring. This suggests an important role for these MAPKs in postnatal development of rat hippocampus.

  6. Ineffective Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Hog1p in Response to High Osmotic Stress in the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Zavala, Nancy; Rodríguez-González, Miriam; Navarro-Olmos, Rocío; Ongay-Larios, Laura; Kawasaki, Laura; Torres-Quiroz, Francisco; Coria, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    When treated with a hyperosmotic stimulus, Kluyveromyces lactis cells respond by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) K. lactis Hog1 (KlHog1) protein via two conserved branches, SLN1 and SHO1. Mutants affected in only one branch can cope with external hyperosmolarity by activating KlHog1p by phosphorylation, except for single ΔKlste11 and ΔKlste50 mutants, which showed high sensitivity to osmotic stress, even though the other branch (SLN1) was intact. Inactivation of both branches by deletion of KlSHO1 and KlSSK2 also produced sensitivity to high salt. Interestingly, we have observed that in ΔKlste11 and ΔKlsho1 ΔKlssk2 mutants, which exhibit sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress, and contrary to what would be expected, KlHog1p becomes phosphorylated. Additionally, in mutants lacking both MAPK kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) present in K. lactis (KlSte11p and KlSsk2p), the hyperosmotic stress induced the phosphorylation and nuclear internalization of KlHog1p, but it failed to induce the transcriptional expression of KlSTL1 and the cell was unable to grow in high-osmolarity medium. KlHog1p phosphorylation via the canonical HOG pathway or in mutants where the SHO1 and SLN1 branches have been inactivated requires not only the presence of KlPbs2p but also its kinase activity. This indicates that when the SHO1 and SLN1 branches are inactivated, high-osmotic-stress conditions activate an independent input that yields active KlPbs2p, which, in turn, renders KlHog1p phosphorylation ineffective. Finally, we found that KlSte11p can alleviate the sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress displayed by a ΔKlsho1 ΔKlssk2 mutant when it is anchored to the plasma membrane by adding the KlSho1p transmembrane segments, indicating that this chimeric protein can substitute for KlSho1p and KlSsk2p. PMID:26150414

  7. Ineffective Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Hog1p in Response to High Osmotic Stress in the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Zavala, Nancy; Rodríguez-González, Miriam; Navarro-Olmos, Rocío; Ongay-Larios, Laura; Kawasaki, Laura; Torres-Quiroz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    When treated with a hyperosmotic stimulus, Kluyveromyces lactis cells respond by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) K. lactis Hog1 (KlHog1) protein via two conserved branches, SLN1 and SHO1. Mutants affected in only one branch can cope with external hyperosmolarity by activating KlHog1p by phosphorylation, except for single ΔKlste11 and ΔKlste50 mutants, which showed high sensitivity to osmotic stress, even though the other branch (SLN1) was intact. Inactivation of both branches by deletion of KlSHO1 and KlSSK2 also produced sensitivity to high salt. Interestingly, we have observed that in ΔKlste11 and ΔKlsho1 ΔKlssk2 mutants, which exhibit sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress, and contrary to what would be expected, KlHog1p becomes phosphorylated. Additionally, in mutants lacking both MAPK kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) present in K. lactis (KlSte11p and KlSsk2p), the hyperosmotic stress induced the phosphorylation and nuclear internalization of KlHog1p, but it failed to induce the transcriptional expression of KlSTL1 and the cell was unable to grow in high-osmolarity medium. KlHog1p phosphorylation via the canonical HOG pathway or in mutants where the SHO1 and SLN1 branches have been inactivated requires not only the presence of KlPbs2p but also its kinase activity. This indicates that when the SHO1 and SLN1 branches are inactivated, high-osmotic-stress conditions activate an independent input that yields active KlPbs2p, which, in turn, renders KlHog1p phosphorylation ineffective. Finally, we found that KlSte11p can alleviate the sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress displayed by a ΔKlsho1 ΔKlssk2 mutant when it is anchored to the plasma membrane by adding the KlSho1p transmembrane segments, indicating that this chimeric protein can substitute for KlSho1p and KlSsk2p. PMID:26150414

  8. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase) are differentially regulated during cardiac volume and pressure overload hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Sopontammarak, Somkiat; Aliharoob, Assad; Ocampo, Catherina; Arcilla, Rene A; Gupta, Mahesh P; Gupta, Madhu

    2005-01-01

    Chronic pressure overload (PO) and volume overload (VO) result in morphologically and functionally distinct forms of myocardial hypertrophy. However, the molecular mechanism initiating these two types of hypertrophy is not yet understood. Data obtained from different cell types have indicated that the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) comprising c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and p38 play an important role in transmitting signals of stress stimuli to elicit the cellular response. We tested the hypothesis that early induction of MAPKs differs in two types of overload on the heart and associates with distinct expression of hypertrophic marker genes, namely ANF, alpha-myosin heavy chain (alpha-MHC), and beta-MHC. In rats, VO was induced by aortocaval shunt and PO by constriction of the abdominal aorta. The PO animals were further divided into two groups depending on the severity of the constriction, mild (MPO) and severe pressure overload (SPO), having 35 and 85% aortic constriction, respectively. Early changes in MAPK activity (2-120 min and 1 to 2 d) were analyzed by the in vitro kinase assay using kinase-specific antibodies for p38, JNK, and ERK2. The change in expression of hypertrophy marker genes was examined by Northern blot analysis. In VO hypertrophy, the activity of p38 was markedly increased (10-fold), without changing the activity of ERK and JNK. However, during PO hypertrophy, the activity of JNK was significantly increased (two- to sixfold) and depended on the severity of the load. The activity of p38 was not changed in MPO hypertrophy, whereas it was slightly elevated (50%) in hearts with SPO. Similarly, ERK activity was not changed in hearts with MPO, but a transient rise in activity was observed in hearts with SPO. The expression of ANF and beta-MHC genes was elevated in both PO and VO hypertrophy; however, this change was much greater in hearts subjected to PO than VO hypertrophy. Alpha

  9. Whey protein concentrate enhances intestinal integrity and influences transforming growth factor-β1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways in piglets after lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kan; Jiao, Lefei; Cao, Shuting; Song, Zehe; Hu, Caihong; Han, Xinyan

    2016-03-28

    attenuates the LPS-induced intestinal injury by improving mucosal barrier function, alleviating intestinal inflammation and influencing TGF-β1 canonical Smad and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways.

  10. N-Farnesyloxy-norcantharimide inhibits progression of human leukemic Jurkat T cells through regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and interleukin-2 production

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Che; Wu, Jin-Yi; Liao, Hui-Fen; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the anticancer effects of N-farnesyloxy-norcantharimide (NOC15), a newly synthesized norcantharidin (NCTD) analogue, on human leukemic Jurkat T cells and the signaling pathway underlying its effects. We found that the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of NOC15 on Jurkat T cells is 1.4 μmol/l, which is 11.14-fold (=15.6÷1.4) smaller than the 15.6 μmol/l of NCTD on Jurkat T cells, whereas the IC50 of NOC15 on human normal lymphoblast (HNL) is 207.9 μmol/l, which is 8.17-fold (=1698.0÷207.8) smaller than the 1698.0 μmol/l of NCTD on HNL cells. These results indicated that NOC15 exerts a higher anticancer effect on Jurkat T cells and has higher toxicity toward HNL cells than NCTD. Thus, NOC15 is 1.36-fold (=11.14÷8.17) beneficial as an anticancer agent toward Jurkat T cells compared with NCTD. Moreover, NOC15 can increase the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase and reduce the cell viability of Jurkat T cells, stimulate p38 and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathway, and inhibit calcineurin expression and interleukin-2 (IL-2) production. However, NOC15 exerted no effects on the Jun-N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) signaling pathway, the production of IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α. We conclude that the anticancer activity of the newly synthesized NOC15 is 1.36-fold beneficial than NCTD as an anticancer agent and that NOC15 can increase the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase through the stimulation of p38 and ERK1/2 of the MAPK signaling pathway and the inhibition of calcineurin expression and IL-2 production. The NOC15 may have the potential of being developed into an anticancer agent in the future. PMID:26288134

  11. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Nam Ho; Jung, Young Do

    2012-03-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-κB signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-κB and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-κB signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells

  12. Prostaglandin F2alpha stimulates the Raf/MEK1/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade in bovine luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, D B; Westfall, S D; Fong, H W; Roberson, M S; Davis, J S

    1998-09-01

    Upon binding to its G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors, the actions of PGF2alpha on the corpus luteum are initiated by the phospholipase C/diacylglycerol-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)/Ca2+-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. However, little is known about the downstream intracellular signaling events that can lead to transcriptional activation in response to PGF2alpha. The present study was conducted to examine the involvement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade in the corpus luteum. Three isoforms of the Raf family of oncoprotein kinases (A-Raf, B-Raf, and Raf-1 or c-Raf) were detected in bovine luteal cells. Raf-1 and B-Raf, but not A-Raf, were activated by PGF2alpha (1 microM) and the pharmacological PKC activator phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, 20 nM). Kinetic analysis revealed that PGF2alpha rapidly and transiently activated Raf-1. In vitro protein kinase assays demonstrated that activation of Raf-1 and B-Raf resulted in the phosphorylation and activation of MAPK kinase (MEK1), which subsequently phosphorylated p42mapk. As determined by hyperphosphorylation, tyrosine phosphorylation, and enzymatic activity, p42mapk and p44mapk were rapidly and transiently activated by both PGF2alpha (1 microM) and PMA (20 nM). Additionally, both PGF2alpha (1 microM) and PMA (20 nM) stimulated phosphorylation of Raf-1, MEK1, and p42mapk in 32P-labeled cells. Our data demonstrate that PGF2alpha activates the Raf/MEK1/p42/44mapk signaling cascade in bovine luteal cells and that the actions of PGF2alpha are mimicked by the PKC activator PMA. Activation of the Raf/MEK1/MAPK signaling cascade by PGF2alpha in luteal cells provides a mechanism to transduce signals initiated by PGF2alpha receptors on the cell surface into the nucleus. Activation of the Raf/MEK1/MAPK signaling cascade may be associated with transcriptional activation of luteal genes possessing activator protein-1-binding sites.

  13. Perivascular adipose tissue-derived leptin promotes vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic switching via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in metabolic syndrome rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Wang, Ya-Ping; Zhang, Li-Na; Tian, Gang

    2014-04-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT)-derived leptin is a detrimental adipocytokine and plays a critical role in the development of cardiovascular diseases in metabolic syndrome (MetS). During vascular remodeling, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) undergo phenotypic switching into a synthetic phenotype characterized by decreased expression of differentiation markers (smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, α-smooth muscle actin, and calponin) and increased proliferation. We aimed to determine whether PVAT-derived leptin influences VSMC phenotypic switching and to explore the underlying mechanisms in MetS rats. In vivo, 32 Wistar rats were divided into two groups that received either a normal diet (control rat) or a high-fat diet (MetS rats). After 16 weeks, rat aortas were stained using hematoxylin-eosin and imaged. VSMC differentiation markers and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), PVAT-derived leptin, aortic leptin receptor (ObR), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) expression were detected. In vitro, aortic VSMCs were incubated with MetS rat PVAT conditioned medium (PVAT-CM) to mimic in vivo conditions and were pretreated with a p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB 203580) or leptin antagonist. Differentiation marker expression, including PCNA and p38 MAPK, was detected. MetS rats exhibited pronounced insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obesity, and an associated increase in PVAT weight. VSMCs underwent phenotypic switching in MetS rat aorta and contributed to vascular remodeling. PVAT-derived leptin expression was higher in MetS rats than in control rats (P < 0.01). ObRa expression and p38 MAPK phosphorylation were upregulated in MetS rat aorta. In vitro, VSMCs incubated with MetS rat PVAT-CM underwent phenotypic switching, associated with increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation. This VSMC phenotypic switching was inhibited by pretreatment with SB 203580 or a leptin antagonist. These results suggest that in MetS rats, PVAT

  14. Comparison of alkylacylglycerol vs. diacylglycerol as activators of mitogen-activated protein kinase and cytosolic phospholipase A2 in human neutrophil priming.

    PubMed

    Nixon, A B; Seeds, M C; Bass, D A; Smitherman, P K; O'Flaherty, J T; Daniel, L W; Wykle, R L

    1997-08-16

    In human neutrophils, the choline-containing phosphoglycerides contain almost equal amounts of alkylacyl- and diacyl-linked subclasses. In contrast to phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis which yields diacylglycerol, hydrolysis of choline-containing phosphoglycerides by phospholipase D coupled with phosphohydrolase yields both alkylacyl- and diacylglycerol. While diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C, alkylacylglycerol does not, and its role is unclear. Yet previous studies have shown that exogenous alkylacyl- and diacylglycerols can prime for the release of radiolabeled arachidonic acid (AA) in intact neutrophils stimulated by formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. We have now examined the effects of both diacylglycerol (1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol; OAG) and alkylacylglycerol (1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetylglycerol; EAG) on the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and the 85-kDa cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) in human neutrophils. We observed that while OAG could effectively activate p42 and p44 MAP kinases along with cPLA2 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, EAG could not. A novel p40 MAP kinase isoform is also present and activated in response to OAG treatment; the behavior of this MAP kinase isoform is discussed. The activation of cPLA2 and MAP kinase by 20 microM OAG could be inhibited by pretreatment with 1 microM GF-109203X, a selective inhibitor of protein kinase C. Although only OAG activated cPLA2, both OAG and EAG primed for the release of AA mass as determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The priming of AA release by OAG may be explained by the phosphorylation of cPLA2 through the activation of protein kinase C linked to MAP kinase. However, priming by EAG appears to involve a separate mechanism that is dependent on a different PLA2. Our results support a role for phospholipase D-derived products modulating the activation of cPLA2, further supporting the idea of cross-talk among various phospholipases.

  15. Artocarpol A stimulation of superoxide anion generation in neutrophils involved the activation of PLC, PKC and p38 mitogen-activated PK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Ruey-Hseng; Tsao, Lo-Ti; Lin, Chun-Nan; Wang, Jih-Pyang

    2005-06-01

    1 Artocarpol A (ART), a natural phenolic compound isolated from Artocarpus rigida, stimulated a slow onset and long-lasting superoxide anion generation in rat neutrophils, whereas only slightly activated the NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system. 2 Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin (1 microg ml(-1)), 50 microM 2'-amino-3'-methoxyflavone (PD 98059), or 1 microM 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio)butadiene (U0126) had no effect on ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation. ART (30 microM) did not induce extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. 3 4-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-1H-imidazole (SB 203580) markedly attenuated the ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation (IC50 value of 4.3+/-0.3 microM). Moreover, ART induced p38 mitogen-activated PK (MAPK) phosphorylation and activation. 4 The superoxide anion generation in response to ART was also substantially inhibited in a Ca2+-free medium, and by pretreatment with 1 microM 1-[6-((17beta-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl)amino)hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U-73122) and 100 microM 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB). ART (30 microM) stimulated the [Ca2+]i elevation in the presence or absence of external Ca2+, and also increased the D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation. 5 2-[1-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-maleimide (GF 109203X) greatly inhibited the ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation (IC50 value of 7.8+/-1.0 nM). ART increased the recruitment of PKC-alpha, -betaI, and -betaII to the plasma membrane of neutrophils, and stimulated Ca2+-dependent PKC activation in the cytosol preparation. 6 ART induced the phosphorylation of p47phox, which was attenuated by GF 109203X. Moreover, ART evoked the membrane association of p47(phox), which was inhibited by GF 109203X and SB 203580. 7 These results indicate that the ART stimulation of superoxide anion generation involved the activation of p38 MAPK, PLC/Ca2

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Muchir, Antoine; Wu, Wei; Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi; Worman, Howard J.

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  17. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling Components in the Fungal Development, Stress Response and Virulence of the Fungal Cereal Pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yueqiang; Zhong, Shaobin

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been demonstrated to be involved in fungal development, sexual reproduction, pathogenicity and/or virulence in many filamentous plant pathogenic fungi, but genes for MAPKs in the fungal cereal pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana have not been characterized. In this study, orthologues of three MAPK genes (CsSLT2, CsHOG1 and CsFUS3) and one MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) gene (CsSTE11) were identified in the whole genome sequence of the B. sorokiniana isolate ND90Pr, and knockout mutants were generated for each of them. The ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 mutants were defective in conidiation and formation of appressoria-like structures, showed hypersensitivity to oxidative stress and lost pathogenicity on non-wounded leaves of barley cv. Bowman. When inoculated on wounded leaves of Bowman, the ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 mutants were reduced in virulence compared to the wild type. No morphological changes were observed in the ∆Cshog1 mutants in comparison with the wild type; however, they were slightly reduced in growth under oxidative stress and were hypersensitive to hyperosmotic stress. The ∆Cshog1 mutants formed normal appressoria-like structures but were reduced in virulence when inoculated on Bowman leaves. The ∆Csslt2 mutants produced more vegetative hyphae, had lighter pigmentation, were more sensitive to cell wall degrading enzymes, and were reduced in virulence on Bowman leaves, although they formed normal appressoria like the wild type. Root infection assays indicated that the ∆Cshog1 and ∆Csslt2 mutants were able to infect barley roots while the ∆Csfus3 and ∆Csste11 failed to cause any symptoms. However, no significant difference in virulence was observed for ∆Cshog1 mutants while ∆Csslt2 mutants showed significantly reduced virulence on barley roots in comparison with the wild type. Our results indicated that all of these MAPK and MAPKKK genes are involved in the regulation of fungal development under

  18. Frequency Modulated Translocational Oscillations of Nrf2 Mediate the Antioxidant Response Element Cytoprotective Transcriptional Response

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mingzhan; Momiji, Hiroshi; Rabbani, Naila; Barker, Guy; Bretschneider, Till; Shmygol, Anatoly; Rand, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Stress responsive signaling coordinated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) provides an adaptive response for protection of cells against toxic insults, oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction. Nrf2 regulates a battery of protective genes by binding to regulatory antioxidant response elements (AREs). The aim of this study was to examine how Nrf2 signals cell stress status and regulates transcription to maintain homeostasis. Results: In live cell microscopy we observed that Nrf2 undergoes autonomous translocational frequency-modulated oscillations between cytoplasm and nucleus. Oscillations occurred in quiescence and when cells were stimulated at physiological levels of activators, they decrease in period and amplitude and then evoke a cytoprotective transcriptional response. We propose a mechanism whereby oscillations are produced by negative feedback involving successive de-phosphorylation and phosphorylation steps. Nrf2 was inactivated in the nucleus and reactivated on return to the cytoplasm. Increased frequency of Nrf2 on return to the cytoplasm with increased reactivation or refresh-rate under stress conditions activated the transcriptional response mediating cytoprotective effects. The serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PGAM5, member of the Nrf2 interactome, was a key regulatory component. Innovation: We found that Nrf2 is activated in cells without change in total cellular Nrf2 protein concentration. Regulation of ARE-linked protective gene transcription occurs rather through translocational oscillations of Nrf2. We discovered cytoplasmic refresh rate of Nrf2 is important in maintaining and regulating the transcriptional response and links stress challenge to increased cytoplasmic surveillance. We found silencing and inhibition of PGAM5 provides potent activation of Nrf2. Conclusion: Frequency modulated translocational oscillations of Nrf2 mediate the ARE-linked cytoprotective transcriptional response. Antioxid. Redox

  19. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  20. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

    PubMed

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  1. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

    PubMed

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  2. Interleukin-10 Expression in Macrophages during Phagocytosis of Apoptotic Cells Is Mediated by the TALE homeoproteins Pbx-1 and Prep-1

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Elaine Y.; Liu, Jianguo; Homma, Yoichiro; Zhang, Yunhua; Brendolan, Andrea; Saggese, Matilde; Han, Jihong; Silverstein, Roy; Selleri, Licia; Ma, Xiaojing

    2007-01-01

    Production of IL-10, a major immunoregulatory cytokine, by phagocytes during clearance of apoptotic cells is critical to ensuring cellular homeostasis and suppression of autoimmunity. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms in this fundamental process. We report that IL-10 production stimulated by apoptotic cells is regulated at the level of transcription in a manner dependent on the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, partially on the scavenger receptor CD36, and requires cell-cell contact but not phagocytosis. Using a reporter assay, we mapped the Apoptotic Cell Response Element (ACRE) in the human IL-10 promoter, and provide biochemical and physiological evidence that ACRE mediates the transcriptional activation of IL-10 by pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor-1b and another Hox cofactor Pbx-regulating protein 1 in response to apoptotic cells. PMID:18093541

  3. The role of mRNA turnover in the regulation of tristetraprolin expression: evidence for an extracellular signal-regulated kinase-specific, AU-rich element-dependent, autoregulatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Seth A; Connolly, John E; Rigby, William F C

    2004-06-15

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a regulator of TNF-alpha mRNA stability and is the only trans-acting factor shown to be capable of regulating AU-rich element-dependent mRNA turnover at the level of the intact animal. Using the THP-1 myelomonocytic cell line, we demonstrated for the first time that TTP is encoded by an mRNA with a short half-life under resting conditions. Using pharmacologic inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, we show that the induction of TTP by LPS activation is mediated through changes in transcription, mRNA stability, and translation. A coordinate increase in both TTP and TNF-alpha mRNA stability occurs within 15 min of LPS treatment, but is transduced through different mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. This regulation of TTP and TNF-alpha mRNA stability is associated with the finding that TTP binds these mRNA under both resting and LPS-activated conditions in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that TTP can regulate reporter gene expression in a TTP 3' untranslated region-dependent manner and identify three distinct AU-rich elements necessary to mediate this effect. Thus, TTP regulates its own expression in a manner identical to that seen with the TNF-alpha 3' untranslated region, indicating that this autoregulation is mediated at the level of mRNA stability. In this manner, TTP is able to limit the production of its own proteins as well as that of TNF-alpha and thus limit the response of the cell to LPS. PMID:15187101

  4. Composite IS1 elements encoding hydroxamate-mediated iron uptake in FIme plasmids from epidemic Salmonella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, B; Nicoletti, M; Visca, P; Casalino, M; Valenti, P; Maimone, F

    1985-01-01

    Eleven FIme plasmids representative of those identified in epidemic strains of Salmonella wien and Salmonella typhimurium isolated in North Africa, Europe, and the Middle East have been examined for the presence of determinants of toxigenicity, adherence, and iron-sequestering mechanisms. Chemical and genetic data indicated that all plasmids code for a hydroxamate-mediated iron assimilation system. Detailed analysis of derivative plasmids and cloned fragments of FIme plasmid pZM61 demonstrated that the general genetic and structural organization of the DNA region containing the genes for hydroxamate biosynthesis and cloacin DF13 receptor was virtually identical to that described for the aerobactin-mediated iron uptake system of pColV-K30. This DNA region is part of a composite element that is 16.7 kilobases long and carries its IS1 modules as inverted repeats. A very similar element is present in either orientation in all nine FIme plasmids analyzed. Images PMID:2984176

  5. Homocysteine-NMDA receptor mediated activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase leads to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Paul, Surojit

    2009-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for stroke and neurological abnormalities. However the underlying cellular mechanisms by which elevated homocysteine can promote neuronal death is not clear. In the present study we have examined the role of NMDA receptor mediated activation of the extracellular-signal regulated mitogen activated protein (ERK MAP) kinase pathway in homocysteine-dependent neurotoxicity. The study demonstrates that in neurons L-homocysteine-induced cell death is mediated through activation of NMDA receptors. The study also shows that homocysteine-dependent NMDA receptor stimulation and resultant Ca2+ influx leads to rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERK MAP kinase. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation attenuates homocysteine mediated neuronal cell death thereby demonstrating that activation of ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway is an intermediate step that couples homocysteine mediated NMDA receptor stimulation to neuronal death. The findings also show that cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB), a pro-survival transcription factor and a downstream target of ERK, is only transiently activated following homocysteine exposure. The sustained activation of ERK but a transient activation of CREB together suggest that exposure to homocysteine initiates a feedback loop that shuts off CREB signaling without affecting ERK phosphorylation and thereby facilitates homocysteine mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:19508427

  6. Molecular cloning of the duck mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) gene and the development of a quantitative real-time PCR assay to detect its expression.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shoulin; Han, Xiangan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Tian, Mingxing; Wang, Xiaolan; Hou, Wanwan; Yue, Jiaping; Wang, Guijun; Yu, Shengqing

    2014-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) acts as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals, and is involved in a wide variety of biological processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation, transcription regulation, and development. Mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 plays an important role in inducing cell death in bacterial infections. In this study, the duck MAPK1 gene was cloned for the first time from the Cherry Valley duck. Sequence analysis showed that duck MAPK1 cDNA is 1,557 bp long, with an open reading frame of 1,107 bp. It encodes 368 amino acids, with 85.4, 84.5, and 97.3% homology with the human, mouse, and chicken MAPK1 gene, respectively. Furthermore, a SYBR Green quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed to detect duck MAPK1 expression. Following Riemerella anatipestifer infection by virule