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Sample records for elements mediate protection

  1. Cell-mediated Protection in Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Paul G.; Keating, Rachael; Hulse-Post, Diane J.

    2006-01-01

    Current vaccine strategies against influenza focus on generating robust antibody responses. Because of the high degree of antigenic drift among circulating influenza strains over the course of a year, vaccine strains must be reformulated specifically for each influenza season. The time delay from isolating the pandemic strain to large-scale vaccine production would be detrimental in a pandemic situation. A vaccine approach based on cell-mediated immunity that avoids some of these drawbacks is discussed here. Specifically, cell-mediated responses typically focus on peptides from internal influenza proteins, which are far less susceptible to antigenic variation. We review the literature on the role of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell–mediated immunity in influenza infection and the available data on the role of these responses in protection from highly pathogenic influenza infection. We discuss the advantages of developing a vaccine based on cell-mediated immune responses toward highly pathogenic influenza virus and potential problems arising from immune pressure. PMID:16494717

  2. [Art-therapy in anorexia: the mediative elements?].

    PubMed

    Jarrige, Maïtè; Calestrémé, Marie; Sudres, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Art does not have any inherent curative property; it is used as a therapeutic medium. Three mediative elements, depending on their specificities, have a role to play in the intrapsychic and interpersonal transformation of the patient: the creation the art-therapist and the group of participants. This article looks at the different components of art-therapy used in the treatment of anorexia.

  3. Clusterin: a protective mediator for ischemic cardiomyocytes?

    PubMed

    Krijnen, P A J; Cillessen, S A G M; Manoe, R; Muller, A; Visser, C A; Meijer, C J L M; Musters, R J P; Hack, C E; Aarden, L A; Niessen, H W M

    2005-11-01

    We examined the relationship between clusterin and activated complement in human heart infarction and evaluated the effect of this protein on ischemic rat neonatal cardiomyoblasts (H9c2) and isolated adult ventricular rat cardiomyocytes as in vitro models of acute myocardial infarction. Clusterin protects cells by inhibiting complement and colocalizes with complement on jeopardized human cardiomyocytes after infarction. The distribution of clusterin and complement factor C3d was evaluated in the infarcted human heart. We also analyzed the protein expression of clusterin in ischemic H9c2 cells. The binding of endogenous and purified human clusterin on H9c2 cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the effect of clusterin on the viability of ischemically challenged H9c2 cells and isolated adult ventricular rat cardiomyocytes was analyzed. In human myocardial infarcts, clusterin was found on scattered, morphologically viable cardiomyocytes within the infarcted area that were negative for complement. In H9c2 cells, clusterin was rapidly expressed after ischemia. Its expression was reduced after reperfusion. Clusterin bound to single annexin V-positive or annexin V and propidium iodide-positive H9c2 cells. Clusterin inhibited ischemia-induced death in H9c2 cells as well as in isolated adult ventricular rat cardiomyocytes in the absence of complement. We conclude that ischemia induces the upregulation of clusterin in ischemically challenged, but viable, cardiomyocytes. Our data suggest that clusterin protects cardiomyocytes against ischemic cell death via a complement-independent pathway.

  4. Finite Element Method Applied to Fuse Protection Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sen; Song, Zhiquan; Zhang, Ming; Xu, Liuwei; Li, Jinchao; Fu, Peng; Wang, Min; Dong, Lin

    2014-03-01

    In a poloidal field (PF) converter module, fuse protection is of great importance to ensure the safety of the thyristors. The fuse is pre-selected in a traditional way and then verified by finite element analysis. A 3D physical model is built by ANSYS software to solve the thermal-electric coupled problem of transient process in case of external fault. The result shows that this method is feasible.

  5. Nitric oxide protects endothelium from cadmium mediated leakiness.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Shunmugam; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Priya, M Krishna; Swaminathan, Akila; Siamwala, Jamila H; Sinha, Swaraj; Veeriah, Vimal; Sonar, Punam; Jadhav, Vivek; Jaffar Ali, B M; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium targets the vascular endothelium causing endothelial dysfunction and leakiness of endothelial barrier. Nitric oxide plays a major role in mediating endothelial functions including angiogenesis, migration and permeability. The present study investigates the nitric oxide effects on cadmium induced endothelial leakiness. Results of ex vivo and in vitro permeability assays showed that even a sub-lethal dose of cadmium chloride (1 µM) was sufficient to induce leakiness of endothelial cells. Cadmium drastically altered the actin polymerisation pattern and membrane tension of these cells compared to controls. Addition of nitric oxide donor Spermine NONOate (SP) significantly blunted cadmium-mediated effects and recover endothelial cells integrity. Cadmium-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements and membrane leakiness are associated with the low nitric oxide availability and high reactive oxygen species generation. In brief, we show the protective role of nitric oxide against cadmium-mediated endothelial leakiness.

  6. A possible mechanism in DHEA-mediated protection against osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Jun; Tang, Lu-Ping; Xiong, Yan; Chen, Wei-Ping; Zhou, Xin-Die; Ding, Qian-Hai; Wu, Li-Dong

    2014-11-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its ester form, DHEA-S, are the most abundant steroids in human plasma. Our previous studies showed that DHEA protects against osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this paper was to explore the possible mechanisms that underlie DHEA-mediated protection against OA. We tested the expression of β-catenin, it was increased significantly in OA. Rabbit cartilage was treated with various concentrations of DHEA in both IL-1β-induced rabbit chondrocytes and in rabbit cartilage from the anterior cruciate ligament transaction-induced OA model. We found DHEA decreased the expression of β-catenin. Then we further activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by β-catenin transfection and inactivated it by the inhibitor Dickkopf1 in chondrocytes to reveal its role in the pathogenesis of OA. It turns out the protective effect of DHEA was significantly decreased when Wnt/β-catenin signaling was activated, while inactivating Wnt/β-catenin signaling enhanced the effects of DHEA. Therefore, we hypothesize that DHEA probably exerted its chondroprotective effect by regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in DHEA-mediated protection against OA. PMID:25065588

  7. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Liam K. R.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to an in vitro translation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosome in vitro. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection. PMID:27006457

  8. Maraviroc-Mediated Lung Protection following Trauma-Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu-Chao; Zheng, Chih-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) pathway exerts anti-inflammatory effects in response to injury. Maraviroc has been shown to have potent anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether PPARγ plays an important role in maraviroc-mediated lung protection following trauma-hemorrhage. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent trauma-hemorrhage (mean blood pressure maintained at approximately 35–40 mmHg for 90 minutes), followed by fluid resuscitation. During resuscitation, a single dose of maraviroc (3 mg/kg, intravenously) with and without a PPARγ inhibitor GW9662 (1 mg/kg, intravenously), GW9662, or vehicle was administered. Lung water content, tissue histology, and other various parameters were measured (n = 8 rats/group) 24 hours after resuscitation. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's testing were used for statistical analysis. Results. Trauma-hemorrhage significantly increased lung water content, myeloperoxidase activity, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β levels. These parameters significantly improved in the maraviroc-treated rats subjected to trauma-hemorrhage. Maraviroc treatment also decreased lung tissue damage as compared to the vehicle-treated trauma-hemorrhaged rats. Coadministration of GW9662 with maraviroc abolished the maraviroc-induced beneficial effects on these parameters and lung injury. Conclusion. These results suggest that PPARγ might play a key role in maraviroc-mediated lung protection following trauma-hemorrhage. PMID:27556035

  9. 30 CFR 75.601-3 - Short circuit protection; dual element fuses; current ratings; maximum values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Short circuit protection; dual element fuses... Trailing Cables § 75.601-3 Short circuit protection; dual element fuses; current ratings; maximum values. Dual element fuses having adequate current-interrupting capacity shall meet the requirements for...

  10. 30 CFR 75.601-3 - Short circuit protection; dual element fuses; current ratings; maximum values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Short circuit protection; dual element fuses... Trailing Cables § 75.601-3 Short circuit protection; dual element fuses; current ratings; maximum values. Dual element fuses having adequate current-interrupting capacity shall meet the requirements for...

  11. Child custody mediation in cases of domestic violence: empirical evidence of a failure to protect.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nancy E; Saccuzzo, Dennis P; Koen, Wendy J

    2005-08-01

    Mediation of child custody disputes is mandated in several states. Investigators have averred that victims of domestic violence (DV) are greatly disadvantaged in mediation. The present study empirically evaluated outcomes and found that mediators failed to recognize and report DV in 56.9% of the DV cases. The court's screening form failed to indicate DV in at least 14.7% of the violent cases. Mediation resulted in poor outcomes for DV victims in terms of protections, such as supervised visitation and protected child exchanges. Mediator capacity to focus on the child's best interest was called into question. Child custody mediation should not be mandated in cases of DV.

  12. Frequency Modulated Translocational Oscillations of Nrf2 Mediate the Antioxidant Response Element Cytoprotective Transcriptional Response

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mingzhan; Momiji, Hiroshi; Rabbani, Naila; Barker, Guy; Bretschneider, Till; Shmygol, Anatoly; Rand, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Stress responsive signaling coordinated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) provides an adaptive response for protection of cells against toxic insults, oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction. Nrf2 regulates a battery of protective genes by binding to regulatory antioxidant response elements (AREs). The aim of this study was to examine how Nrf2 signals cell stress status and regulates transcription to maintain homeostasis. Results: In live cell microscopy we observed that Nrf2 undergoes autonomous translocational frequency-modulated oscillations between cytoplasm and nucleus. Oscillations occurred in quiescence and when cells were stimulated at physiological levels of activators, they decrease in period and amplitude and then evoke a cytoprotective transcriptional response. We propose a mechanism whereby oscillations are produced by negative feedback involving successive de-phosphorylation and phosphorylation steps. Nrf2 was inactivated in the nucleus and reactivated on return to the cytoplasm. Increased frequency of Nrf2 on return to the cytoplasm with increased reactivation or refresh-rate under stress conditions activated the transcriptional response mediating cytoprotective effects. The serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PGAM5, member of the Nrf2 interactome, was a key regulatory component. Innovation: We found that Nrf2 is activated in cells without change in total cellular Nrf2 protein concentration. Regulation of ARE-linked protective gene transcription occurs rather through translocational oscillations of Nrf2. We discovered cytoplasmic refresh rate of Nrf2 is important in maintaining and regulating the transcriptional response and links stress challenge to increased cytoplasmic surveillance. We found silencing and inhibition of PGAM5 provides potent activation of Nrf2. Conclusion: Frequency modulated translocational oscillations of Nrf2 mediate the ARE-linked cytoprotective transcriptional response. Antioxid. Redox

  13. Quiescent fibroblasts are protected from proteasome inhibition–mediated toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Legesse-Miller, Aster; Raitman, Irene; Haley, Erin M.; Liao, Albert; Sun, Lova L.; Wang, David J.; Krishnan, Nithya; Lemons, Johanna M. S.; Suh, Eric J.; Johnson, Elizabeth L.; Lund, Benjamin A.; Coller, Hilary A.

    2012-01-01

    Proteasome inhibition is used as a treatment strategy for multiple types of cancers. Although proteasome inhibition can induce apoptotic cell death in actively proliferating cells, it is less effective in quiescent cells. In this study, we used primary human fibroblasts as a model system to explore the link between the proliferative state of a cell and proteasome inhibition–mediated cell death. We found that proliferating and quiescent fibroblasts have strikingly different responses to MG132, a proteasome inhibitor; proliferating cells rapidly apoptosed, whereas quiescent cells maintained viability. Moreover, MG132 treatment of proliferating fibroblasts led to increased superoxide anion levels, juxtanuclear accumulation of ubiquitin- and p62/SQSTM1-positive protein aggregates, and apoptotic cell death, whereas MG132-treated quiescent cells displayed fewer juxtanuclear protein aggregates, less apoptosis, and higher levels of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. In both cell states, reducing reactive oxygen species with N-acetylcysteine lessened protein aggregation and decreased apoptosis, suggesting that protein aggregation promotes apoptosis. In contrast, increasing cellular superoxide levels with 2-methoxyestradiol treatment or inhibition of autophagy/lysosomal pathways with bafilomycin A1 sensitized serum-starved quiescent cells to MG132-induced apoptosis. Thus, antioxidant defenses and the autophagy/lysosomal pathway protect serum-starved quiescent fibroblasts from proteasome inhibition–induced cytotoxicity. PMID:22875985

  14. Environmental mediation: A method for protecting environmental sciences and scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Vigerstad, T.J.; Berdt Romilly, G. de; MacKeigan, P.

    1995-12-31

    The primary role for scientific analysis of environmental and human risks has been to support decisions that have arisen out of a regulatory decision-making model called ``Command and Control`` or ``Decide and Defend``. A project or a policy is proposed and permission for its implementation is sought. Permission-gaining sometimes requires a number of technical documents: Environmental Impact Statements, Public Health Risk Evaluations, policy analysis documents. Usually, little of this analysis is used to make any real decisions. This is a fact that has lead to enormous frustration and an atmosphere of distrust of government, industry and consulting scientists. There have been a number of responses by governmental and industrial managers, some scientists, and even the legal system, to mitigate the frustration and distrust. One response has been to develop methods of packaging information using language which is considered more ``understandable`` to the public: Ecosystem Health, Social Risk Assessment, Economic Risk Management, Enviro-hazard Communication, Risk Focus Analysis, etc. A second is to develop more sophisticated persuasion techniques-a potential misuse of Risk Communication. A third is proposing to change the practice of science itself: e.g., ``post-normal science`` and ``popular epidemiology``. A fourth has been to challenge the definition of ``expert`` in legal proceedings. All of these approaches do not appear to address the underlying issue: lack of trust and credibility. To address this issue requires an understanding of the nature of environmental disputes and the development of an atmosphere of trust and credibility. The authors propose Environmental Mediation as a response to the dilemma faced by professional environmental scientists, engineers, and managers that protects the professionals and their disciplines.

  15. Adiponectin-Mediated Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction Protects Against Iron-Induced Liver Injury via a PPARα-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Heng; Yu, Chun-Hsien; Jen, Chih-Yu; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Chou, Ying; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Juan, Shu-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Protective effects of adiponectin (APN; an adipocytokine) were shown against various oxidative challenges; however, its therapeutic implications and the mechanisms underlying hepatic iron overload remain unclear. Herein, we show that the deleterious effects of iron dextran on liver function and iron deposition were significantly reversed by adiponectin gene therapy, which was accompanied by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 induction. Furthermore, AMPK-mediated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) activation by APN was ascribable to HO-1 induction. Additionally, we revealed direct transcriptional regulation of HO-1 by the binding of PPARα to a PPAR-responsive element (PPRE) by various experimental assessments. Interestingly, overexpression of HO-1 in hepatocytes mimicked the protective effect of APN in attenuating iron-mediated injury, whereas it was abolished by SnPP and small interfering HO-1. Furthermore, bilirubin, the end-product of the HO-1 reaction, but not CO, protected hepatocytes from iron dextran-mediated caspase activation. Herein, we demonstrate a novel functional PPRE in the promoter regions of HO-1, and APN-mediated HO-1 induction elicited an antiapoptotic effect and a decrease in iron deposition in hepatocytes subjected to iron challenge. PMID:20709802

  16. DEMONSTRATION OF THE ANALYTIC ELEMENT METHOD FOR WELLHEAD PROTECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new computer program has been developed to determine time-of-travel capture zones in relatively simple geohydrological settings. The WhAEM package contains an analytic element model that uses superposition of (many) closed form analytical solutions to generate a ground-water fl...

  17. Braving the Elements: Protecting Schools against Weather-Related Disasters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breighner, Mary

    1997-01-01

    Discusses common weather-related hazards (floods, windstorms, and winter storms) and provides some steps administrators can take to protect their schools. Suggests administrators periodically assess their school's commitment to loss control, housekeeping, suitable building construction and reinforcement, sprinkler systems, water supply,…

  18. Transposable Elements in TDP-43-Mediated Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hammell, Molly; Dubnau, Josh

    2012-01-01

    Elevated expression of specific transposable elements (TEs) has been observed in several neurodegenerative disorders. TEs also can be active during normal neurogenesis. By mining a series of deep sequencing datasets of protein-RNA interactions and of gene expression profiles, we uncovered extensive binding of TE transcripts to TDP-43, an RNA-binding protein central to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we find that association between TDP-43 and many of its TE targets is reduced in FTLD patients. Third, we discovered that a large fraction of the TEs to which TDP-43 binds become de-repressed in mouse TDP-43 disease models. We propose the hypothesis that TE mis-regulation contributes to TDP-43 related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22957047

  19. A negatively acting DNA sequence element mediates phytochrome-directed repression of phyA gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, W B; Deng, X W; Quail, P H

    1991-01-01

    Phytochrome represses transcription of its own phyA genes within 5 min of light-triggered conversion to its active Pfr form. We have utilized microprojectile mediated gene transfer into etiolated rice seedlings to delineate sequence elements in the oat phyA3 promoter responsible for this regulation. Linker-scan mutagenesis of this promoter has identified two positive elements which together are necessary for maximal transcription in the absence of Pfr. These elements are designated PE1, centered at position -357 bp, and PE3, centered at position -96 bp. Sequence mutagenesis immediately downstream of PE3 results in maximal transcription in the presence of high Pfr levels, indicating that Pfr represses phyA3 transcription through a negatively acting sequence element. This element, designated RE1, with the sequence CATGGGCGCGG, encompasses a motif that is highly conserved in all monocot phyA promoters thus far characterized. DNase I protection analysis indicates that oat nuclear extracts contain multiple factors that bind to an array of sequence motifs, including PE1 and part of PE3, within 400 bp upstream of the oat phyA3 transcription start site. This DNA-binding pattern is not altered by Pfr. Weak binding to part of the RE1 motif is evident but also with no difference between high and low Pfr levels. We conclude that the signal transduction chain that mediates Pfr-directed repression of phyA3 transcription terminates with a negatively acting transcription factor that binds to the sequence element RE1. Images PMID:1915276

  20. BET bromodomain inhibition releases the Mediator complex from select cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Roe, Jae-Seok; Mok, Beverly A.; Hohmann, Anja F.; Shi, Junwei; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein BRD4 can physically interact with the Mediator complex, but the relevance of this association to the therapeutic effects of BET inhibitors in cancer is unclear. Here, we show that BET inhibition causes a rapid release of Mediator from a subset of cis-regulatory elements in the genome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. These sites of Mediator eviction were highly correlated with transcriptional suppression of neighboring genes, which are enriched for targets of the transcription factor MYB and for functions related to leukemogenesis. An shRNA screen of Mediator in AML cells identified the MED12, MED13, MED23, and MED24 subunits as performing a similar regulatory function to BRD4 in this context, including a shared role in sustaining a block in myeloid maturation. These findings suggest that the interaction between BRD4 and Mediator has functional importance for gene-specific transcriptional activation and for AML maintenance. PMID:27068464

  1. Antibody-mediated Xenograft Injury: Mechanisms and Protective Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Richard N.

    2009-01-01

    The use of porcine organs for clinical transplantation is a promising potential solution to the shortage of human organs. Preformed anti-pig antibody is the primary cause of hyperacute rejection, while elicited antibody can contribute to subsequent “delayed” xenograft rejection. This article will review recent progress to overcome antibody mediated xenograft rejection, through modification of the host immunity and use of genetically engineered pig organs. PMID:19376229

  2. Protective effect of Pterostilbene against free radical mediated oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pterostilbene, a methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, is gradually gaining more importance as a therapeutic drug owing to its higher lipophilicity, bioavailability and biological activity than Resveratrol. This study was undertaken to characterize its ability to scavenge free radicals such as superoxide, hydroxyl and hydrogen peroxide and to protect bio-molecules within a cell against oxidative insult. Methods Anti-oxidant activity of Pterostilbene was evaluated extensively by employing several in vitro radical scavenging/inhibiting assays and pulse radiolysis study. In addition, its ability to protect rat liver mitochondria against tertiary-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) and hydroxyl radical generated oxidative damage was determined by measuring the damage markers such as protein carbonyls, protein sulphydryls, lipid hydroperoxides, lipid peroxides and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Pterostilbene was also evaluated for its ability to inhibit •OH radical induced single strand breaks in pBR322 DNA. Result Pterostilbene exhibited strong anti-oxidant activity against various free radicals such as DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl, superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in a concentration dependent manner. Pterostilbene conferred protection to proteins, lipids and DNA in isolated mitochondrial fractions against TBHP and hydroxyl radical induced oxidative damage. It also protected pBR322 DNA against oxidative assault. Conclusions Thus, present study provides an evidence for the strong anti-oxidant property of Pterostilbene, methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, thereby potentiating its role as an anti-oxidant. PMID:24070177

  3. Calpain inhibition mediates autophagy-dependent protection against polyglutamine toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Menzies, F M; Garcia-Arencibia, M; Imarisio, S; O'Sullivan, N C; Ricketts, T; Kent, B A; Rao, M V; Lam, W; Green-Thompson, Z W; Nixon, R A; Saksida, L M; Bussey, T J; O'Kane, C J; Rubinsztein, D C

    2015-01-01

    Over recent years, accumulated evidence suggests that autophagy induction is protective in animal models of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Intense research in the field has elucidated different pathways through which autophagy can be upregulated and it is important to establish how modulation of these pathways impacts upon disease progression in vivo and therefore which, if any, may have further therapeutic relevance. In addition, it is important to understand how alterations in these target pathways may affect normal physiology when constitutively modulated over a long time period, as would be required for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Here we evaluate the potential protective effect of downregulation of calpains. We demonstrate, in Drosophila, that calpain knockdown protects against the aggregation and toxicity of proteins, like mutant huntingtin, in an autophagy-dependent fashion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, overexpression of the calpain inhibitor, calpastatin, increases autophagosome levels and is protective in a mouse model of Huntington's disease, improving motor signs and delaying the onset of tremors. Importantly, long-term inhibition of calpains did not result in any overt deleterious phenotypes in mice. Thus, calpain inhibition, or activation of autophagy pathways downstream of calpains, may be suitable therapeutic targets for diseases like Huntington's disease. PMID:25257175

  4. The Role of Lipid Competition for Endosymbiont-Mediated Protection against Parasitoid Wasps in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Schüpfer, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insects commonly harbor facultative bacterial endosymbionts, such as Wolbachia and Spiroplasma species, that are vertically transmitted from mothers to their offspring. These endosymbiontic bacteria increase their propagation by manipulating host reproduction or by protecting their hosts against natural enemies. While an increasing number of studies have reported endosymbiont-mediated protection, little is known about the mechanisms underlying this protection. Here, we analyze the mechanisms underlying protection from parasitoid wasps in Drosophila melanogaster mediated by its facultative endosymbiont Spiroplasma poulsonii. Our results indicate that S. poulsonii exerts protection against two distantly related wasp species, Leptopilina boulardi and Asobara tabida. S. poulsonii-mediated protection against parasitoid wasps takes place at the pupal stage and is not associated with an increased cellular immune response. In this work, we provide three important observations that support the notion that S. poulsonii bacteria and wasp larvae compete for host lipids and that this competition underlies symbiont-mediated protection. First, lipid quantification shows that both S. poulsonii and parasitoid wasps deplete D. melanogaster hemolymph lipids. Second, the depletion of hemolymphatic lipids using the Lpp RNA interference (Lpp RNAi) construct reduces wasp success in larvae that are not infected with S. poulsonii and blocks S. poulsonii growth. Third, we show that the growth of S. poulsonii bacteria is not affected by the presence of the wasps, indicating that when S. poulsonii is present, larval wasps will develop in a lipid-depleted environment. We propose that competition for host lipids may be relevant to endosymbiont-mediated protection in other systems and could explain the broad spectrum of protection provided. PMID:27406568

  5. Tissue-Protective Effects of NKG2A in Immune-Mediated Clearance of Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    DeBerge, Matthew P.; Ruby, Jessica A.; Liu, Jun; Schneider, Mark J.; Wang, Yan; Hahn, Young S.; Enelow, Richard I.

    2014-01-01

    Virus infection triggers a CD8+ T cell response that aids in virus clearance, but also expresses effector functions that may result in tissue injury. CD8+ T cells express a variety of activating and inhibiting ligands, though regulation of the expression of inhibitory receptors is not well understood. The ligand for the inhibitory receptor, NKG2A, is the non-classical MHC-I molecule Qa1b, which may also serve as a putative restricting element for the T cell receptors of purported regulatory CD8+ T cells. We have previously shown that Qa1b-null mice suffer considerably enhanced immunopathologic lung injury in the context of CD8+ T cell-mediated clearance of influenza infection, as well as evidence in a non-viral system that failure to ligate NKG2A on CD8+ effector T cells may represent an important component of this process. In this report, we examine the requirements for induction of NKG2A expression, and show that NKG2A expression by CD8+ T cells occurs as a result of migration from the MLN to the inflammatory lung environment, irrespective of peripheral antigen recognition. Further, we confirmed that NKG2A is a mediator in limiting immunopathology in virus infection using mice with a targeted deletion of NKG2A, and infecting the mutants with two different viruses, influenza and adenovirus. In neither infection is virus clearance altered. In influenza infection, the enhanced lung injury was associated with increased chemoattractant production, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, and significantly enhanced alveolar hemorrhage. The primary mechanism of enhanced injury was the loss of negative regulation of CD8+ T cell effector function. A similar effect was observed in the livers of mutant mice infected intravenously with adenovirus. These results demonstrate the immunoregulatory role of CD8+ NKG2A expression in virus infection, which negatively regulates T cell effector functions and contributes to protection of tissue integrity during virus clearance

  6. Infection-Mediated Priming of Phagocytes Protects against Lethal Secondary Aspergillus fumigatus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Savers, Amélie; Rasid, Orhan; Parlato, Marianna; Brock, Matthias; Jouvion, Gregory; Ryffel, Bernhard; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Eberl, Gerard; Ibrahim-Granet, Oumaïma

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytes restrict the germination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia and prevent the establishment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in immunecompetent mice. Here we report that immunecompetent mice recovering from a primary A. fumigatus challenge are protected against a secondary lethal challenge. Using RAGγc knock-out mice we show that this protection is independent of T, B and NK cells. In protected mice, lung phagocytes are recruited more rapidly and are more efficient in conidial phagocytosis and killing. Protection was also associated with an enhanced expression of CXCR2 and Dectin-1 on bone marrow phagocytes. We also show that protective lung cytokine and chemokine responses are induced more rapidly and with enhanced dynamics in protected mice. Our findings support the hypothesis that following a first encounter with a non-lethal dose of A. fumigatus conidia, the innate immune system is primed and can mediate protection against a secondary lethal infection. PMID:27078879

  7. Enhanced stability of tristetraprolin mRNA protects mice against immune-mediated inflammatory pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Patial, Sonika; Curtis, Alan D.; Lai, Wi S.; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Hill, Georgette D.; Flake, Gordon P.; Mannie, Mark D.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2016-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an inducible, tandem zinc-finger mRNA binding protein that binds to adenylate-uridylate–rich elements (AREs) in the 3′-untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of specific mRNAs, such as that encoding TNF, and increases their rates of deadenylation and turnover. Stabilization of Tnf mRNA and other cytokine transcripts in TTP-deficient mice results in the development of a profound, chronic inflammatory syndrome characterized by polyarticular arthritis, dermatitis, myeloid hyperplasia, and autoimmunity. To address the hypothesis that increasing endogenous levels of TTP in an intact animal might be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, we generated a mouse model (TTPΔARE) in which a 136-base instability motif in the 3′UTR of TTP mRNA was deleted in the endogenous genetic locus. These mice appeared normal, but cultured fibroblasts and macrophages derived from them exhibited increased stability of the otherwise highly labile TTP mRNA. This resulted in increased TTP protein expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages and increased levels of TTP protein in mouse tissues. TTPΔARE mice were protected from collagen antibody-induced arthritis, exhibited significantly reduced inflammation in imiquimod-induced dermatitis, and were resistant to induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, presumably by dampening the excessive production of proinflammatory mediators in all cases. These data suggest that increased systemic levels of TTP, secondary to increased stability of its mRNA throughout the body, can be protective against inflammatory disease in certain models and might be viewed as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases. PMID:26831084

  8. Protective Effects of Gastrodin Against Autophagy-Mediated Astrocyte Death.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-shang; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Nan; Han, Jing; Guo, Hong-liang; Zhao, Ming-gao; Liu, Shui-bing

    2016-03-01

    Gastrodin is an active ingredient derived from the rhizome of Gastrodia elata. This compound is usually used to treat convulsive illness, dizziness, vertigo, and headache. This study aimed to investigate the effect of gastrodin on the autophagy of glial cells exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPS, 1 µg/mL). Autophagy is a form of programmed cell death, although it also promotes cell survival. In cultured astrocytes, LPS exposure induced excessive autophagy and apoptosis, which were significantly prevented by the pretreatment cells with gastrodin (10 μM). The protective effects of gastrodin via autophagy inhibition were verified by the decreased levels of LC3-II, P62, and Beclin-1, which are classical markers for autophagy. Furthermore, gastrodin protected astrocytes from apoptosis through Bcl-2 and Bax signaling pathway. The treatment of astrocytes with rapamycin (500 nM), wortmannin (100 nM), and LY294002 (10 μM), which are inhibitors of mTOR and PI3K, respectively, eliminated the known effects of gastrodin on the inhibited Beclin-1 expression. Furthermore, gastrodin blocked the down-regulation of glutamine synthetase induced by LPS exposure in astrocytes. Our results suggest that gastrodin can be used as a preventive agent for the excessive autophagy induced by LPS. PMID:26643508

  9. IVIG-mediated protection against necrotizing pneumonia caused by MRSA.

    PubMed

    Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Badiou, Cedric; Le, Hoan N; Pinheiro, Marcos Gabriel; Duong, Au H; Wang, Xing; Dip, Etyene Castro; Aguiar-Alves, Fábio; Basuino, Li; Marbach, Helene; Mai, Thuy T; Sarda, Marie N; Kajikawa, Osamu; Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Tkaczyk, Christine; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Sellman, Bret R; Chambers, Henry F; Lina, Gerard

    2016-09-21

    New therapeutic approaches are urgently needed to improve survival outcomes for patients with necrotizing pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus One such approach is adjunctive treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), but clinical practice guidelines offer conflicting recommendations. In a preclinical rabbit model, prophylaxis with IVIG conferred protection against necrotizing pneumonia caused by five different epidemic strains of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) as well as a widespread strain of hospital-associated MRSA. Treatment with IVIG, either alone or in combination with vancomycin or linezolid, improved survival outcomes in this rabbit model. Two specific IVIG antibodies that neutralized the toxic effects of α-hemolysin (Hla) and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) conferred protection against necrotizing pneumonia in the rabbit model. This mechanism of action of IVIG was uncovered by analyzing loss-of-function mutant bacterial strains containing deletions in 17 genes encoding staphylococcal exotoxins, which revealed only Hla and PVL as having an impact on necrotizing pneumonia. These results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of IVIG in the treatment of severe pneumonia induced by S. aureus. PMID:27655850

  10. Fibronectin mediates enhanced wear protection of lubricin during shear.

    PubMed

    Andresen Eguiluz, Roberto C; Cook, Sierra G; Brown, Cory N; Wu, Fei; Pacifici, Noah J; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Gourdon, Delphine

    2015-09-14

    Fibronectin (FN) is a glycoprotein found in the superficial zone of cartilage; however, its role in the lubrication and the wear protection of articular joints is unknown. In this work, we have investigated the molecular interactions between FN and various components of the synovial fluid such as lubricin (LUB), hyaluronan (HA), and serum albumin (SA), which are all believed to contribute to joint lubrication. Using a Surface Forces Apparatus, we have measured the normal (adhesion/repulsion) and lateral (friction) forces across layers of individual synovial fluid components physisorbed onto FN-coated mica substrates. Our chief findings are (i) FN strongly tethers LUB and HA to mica, as indicated by high and reversible long-range repulsive normal interactions between surfaces, and (ii) FN and LUB synergistically enhance wear protection of surfaces during shear, as suggested by the structural robustness of FN+LUB layers under pressures up to about 4 MPa. These findings provide new insights into the role of FN in the lubricating properties of synovial fluid components sheared between ideal substrates and represent a significant step forward in our understanding of cartilage damage involved in diseases such as osteoarthritis.

  11. IL-17A-mediated protection against Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Amol; Cao, Zhiyi; Sampson, James F; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2015-01-15

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a very painful and vision-impairing infection of the cornea that is difficult to treat. Although past studies have indicated a critical role of neutrophils and macrophages in AK, the relative contribution of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-17A, that is essential for migration, activation, and function of these cells into the cornea is poorly defined. Moreover, the role of the adaptive immune response, particularly the contribution of CD4(+) T cell subsets, Th17 and regulatory T cells , in AK is yet to be understood. In this report, using a mouse corneal intrastromal injection-induced AK model, we show that Acanthamoeba infection induces a strong CD4(+) T effector and regulatory T cell response in the cornea and local draining lymph nodes. We also demonstrate that corneal Acanthamoeba infection induces IL-17A expression and that IL-17A is critical for host protection against severe AK pathology. Accordingly, IL-17A neutralization in Acanthamoeba-infected wild-type mice or Acanthamoeba infection of mice lacking IL-17A resulted in a significantly increased corneal AK pathology, increased migration of inflammatory cells at the site of inflammation, and a significant increase in the effector CD4(+) T cell response in draining lymph nodes. Thus, in sharp contrast with other corneal infections such as herpes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis where IL-17A exacerbates corneal pathology and inflammation, the findings presented in this article suggest that IL-17A production after Acanthamoeba infection plays an important role in host protection against invading parasites.

  12. Amygdala FAAH and anandamide: mediating protection and recovery from stress

    PubMed Central

    Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Hill, Matthew N.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Holmes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A long-standing literature linking endocannabinoids (ECBs) to stress, fear, and anxiety has led to growing interest in developing novel anxiolytics targeting the ECB system. Following rapid on-demand biosynthesis and degradation upon neuronal activation, the ECB N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA) is actively degraded by the serine hydrolase enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Exposure to stress rapidly mobilizes FAAH to deplete the signaling pool of AEA and increase neuronal excitability in a key anxiety-mediating region – the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Gene deletion or pharmacological inhibition of FAAH prevents stress-induced reductions in AEA and associated increases in BLA dendritic hypertrophy and anxiety-like behavior. Additionally, inhibition of FAAH facilitates long-term fear extinction and rescues deficient fear extinction in rodent models by enhancing AEA–CB1 (cannabinoid type 1) receptor signaling and synaptic plasticity in the BLA. These preclinical findings propose restoring deficient BLA AEA levels by pharmacologically inhibiting FAAH as a mechanism to therapeutically mitigate the effects of traumatic stress. PMID:24325918

  13. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  14. Novel antimalarial antibodies highlight the importance of the antibody Fc region in mediating protection.

    PubMed

    Pleass, Richard J; Ogun, Solabomi A; McGuinness, David H; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Holder, Anthony A; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-12-15

    Parasite drug resistance and difficulties in developing effective vaccines have precipitated the search for alternative therapies for malaria. The success of passive immunization suggests that immunoglobulin (Ig)-based therapies are effective. To further explore the mechanism(s) by which antibody mediates its protective effect, we generated human chimeric IgG1 and IgA1 and a single-chain diabody specific for the C-terminal 19-kDa region of Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP119), a major target of protective immune responses. These novel human reagents triggered in vitro phagocytosis of merozoites but, unlike their parental mouse IgG2b, failed to protect against parasite challenge in vivo. Therefore, the Fc region appears critical for mediating protection in vivo, at least for this MSP119 epitope. Such antibodies may serve as prototype therapeutic agents, and as useful tools in the development of in vitro neutralization assays with Plasmodium parasites.

  15. UVR8 mediated plant protective responses under low UV-B radiation leading to photosynthetic acclimation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suruchi; Agrawal, S B; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2014-08-01

    The UV-B photoreceptor UVR8 regulates the expression of several genes leading to acclimation responses in plants. Direct role of UVR8 in maintaining the photosynthesis is not defined but it is known to increase the expression of some chloroplastic proteins like SIG5 and ELIP. It provides indirect protection to photosynthesis by regulating the synthesis of secondary metabolites and photomorphogenesis. Signaling cascades controlled by UVR8 mediate many protective responses thus promotes plant acclimation against stress and secures its survival.

  16. Mediation in Child Protection Cases: An Alternative to the Adversary System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Sally E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses two concerns regarding adverse effects of increased litigation in child protection cases: (1) fallout from the adversarial process on agencies' work with families; and (2) dissonance between the approaches of social workers and lawyers to decision-making about families. Recommends mediation to prevent less serious cases from going to…

  17. Conscientiousness, Protective Behavioral Strategies, and Alcohol Use: Testing for Mediated Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Matthew P.; Karakashian, Michael A.; Fleming, Kristie M.; Fowler, Roneferiti M.; Hatchett, E. Suzanne; Cimini, M. Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if use of protective behavioral strategies mediated the relationship between conscientiousness and alcohol use and alcohol-related problems. Participants were 186 college students at a state university campus in the Northeastern United States participating in a study examining the effectiveness of a brief…

  18. Protection from radiation injury by elemental diet: does added glutamine change the effect?

    PubMed

    McArdle, A H

    1994-01-01

    The feeding of a protein hydrolysate based 'elemental' diet supplemented with added glutamine did not provide superior protection to the small intestine of dogs subjected to therapeutic pelvic irradiation. Comparison of diets with and without the added glutamine showed significant protection of the intestine from radiation injury. Both histological examination and electron microscopy showed lack of tissue injury with both diets. The activity of the free radical generating enzymes, scavengers, and antioxidants were similar in the intestinal mucosa of dogs fed either diet. After radiation, however, the activity of xanthine oxidase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase were significantly (p < 0.002) higher in the intestine of dogs fed elemental diet without the added glutamine. If the activities of these enzymes are important in the protection of the intestine from radiation injury, then the addition of extra glutamine may provide no benefit.

  19. Distinct regulatory elements mediate similar expression patterns in the excretory cell of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongying; Fang, Li; Chen, Nansheng; Johnsen, Robert C; Stein, Lincoln; Baillie, David L

    2005-11-18

    Identification of cis-regulatory elements and their binding proteins constitutes an important part of understanding gene function and regulation. It is well accepted that co-expressed genes tend to share transcriptional elements. However, recent findings indicate that co-expression data show poor correlation with co-regulation data even in unicellular yeast. This motivates us to experimentally explore whether it is possible that co-expressed genes are subject to differential regulatory control using the excretory cell of Caenorhabditis elegans as an example. Excretory cell is a functional equivalent of human kidney. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression in the cell is largely unknown. We isolated a 10-bp excretory cell-specific cis-element, Ex-1, from a pgp-12 promoter. The significance of the element has been demonstrated by its capacity of converting an intestine-specific promoter into an excretory cell-specific one. We also isolated a cDNA encoding an Ex-1 binding transcription factor, DCP-66, using a yeast one-hybrid screen. Role of the factor in regulation of pgp-12 expression has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Search for occurrence of Ex-1 reveals that only a small portion of excretory cell-specific promoters contain Ex-1. Two other distinct cis-elements isolated from two different promoters can also dictate the excretory cell-specific expression but are independent of regulation by DCP-66. The results indicate that distinct regulatory elements are able to mediate the similar expression patterns.

  20. Molecular basis of antibody-mediated neutralization and protection against flavivirus.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lianpan; Wang, Qihui; Qi, Jianxun; Shi, Yi; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2016-10-01

    Antibody-mediated humoral immunity plays a pivotal role in flavivirus control. Neutralizing antibodies targeting viral envelope (E) protein, provide protection against flaviviruses in vivo but can also promote virus infection by antibody-dependent enhancement when antibodies are weakly neutralizing or in subneutralizing concentrations. The molecular basis for antibody-mediated virus neutralization can be revealed by structural studies of monoclonal antibodies complexed with the E protein or virion. In addition, the flavivirus non-structural protein NS1 can also induce host antibody production, and some of these antibodies can provide protection against virus challenge. In this review, we summarize the known structures of flavivirus neutralizing or protective antibodies bound to their epitopes and describe the underlying molecular mechanisms. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):783-791, 2016.

  1. Molecular basis of antibody-mediated neutralization and protection against flavivirus.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lianpan; Wang, Qihui; Qi, Jianxun; Shi, Yi; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2016-10-01

    Antibody-mediated humoral immunity plays a pivotal role in flavivirus control. Neutralizing antibodies targeting viral envelope (E) protein, provide protection against flaviviruses in vivo but can also promote virus infection by antibody-dependent enhancement when antibodies are weakly neutralizing or in subneutralizing concentrations. The molecular basis for antibody-mediated virus neutralization can be revealed by structural studies of monoclonal antibodies complexed with the E protein or virion. In addition, the flavivirus non-structural protein NS1 can also induce host antibody production, and some of these antibodies can provide protection against virus challenge. In this review, we summarize the known structures of flavivirus neutralizing or protective antibodies bound to their epitopes and describe the underlying molecular mechanisms. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):783-791, 2016. PMID:27604155

  2. Toll-like receptor 2-mediated alternative activation of microglia is protective after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Stirling, David P; Cummins, Karen; Mishra, Manoj; Teo, Wulin; Yong, V Wee; Stys, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Improving neurological outcome after spinal cord injury is a major clinical challenge because axons, once severed, do not regenerate but 'dieback' from the lesion site. Although microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the brain and spinal cord respond rapidly to spinal cord injury, their role in subsequent injury or repair remains unclear. To assess the role of microglia in spinal cord white matter injury we used time-lapse two-photon and spectral confocal imaging of green fluorescent protein-labelled microglia, yellow fluorescent protein-labelled axons, and Nile Red-labelled myelin of living murine spinal cord and revealed dynamic changes in white matter elements after laser-induced spinal cord injury in real time. Importantly, our model of acute axonal injury closely mimics the axonopathy described in well-characterized clinically relevant models of spinal cord injury including contusive-, compressive- and transection-based models. Time-lapse recordings revealed that microglia were associated with some acute pathophysiological changes in axons and myelin acutely after laser-induced spinal cord injury. These pathophysiological changes included myelin and axonal spheroid formation, spectral shifts in Nile Red emission spectra in axonal endbulbs detected with spectral microscopy, and 'bystander' degeneration of axons that survived the initial injury, but then succumbed to secondary degeneration. Surprisingly, modulation of microglial-mediated release of neurotoxic molecules failed to protect axons and myelin. In contrast, sterile stimulation of microglia with the specific toll-like receptor 2 agonist Pam2CSK4 robustly increased the microglial response to ablation, reduced secondary degeneration of central myelinated fibres, and induced an alternative (mixed M1:M2) microglial activation profile. Conversely, Tlr2 knock out: Thy1 yellow fluorescent protein double transgenic mice experienced greater axonal dieback than littermate controls. Thus, promoting an alternative

  3. [MODIFICATION OF THE PROTON BEAM PHYSICAL PARAMETERS AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS BY ELEMENTS OF SPACECRAFT RADIATION PROTECTION].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A A; Molokanov, A G; Shurshakov, V A; Bulynina, T M; Liakhova, K N; Severiukhin, Yu S; Abrosimova, A N; Ushakov, I B

    2015-01-01

    The experiment was performed with outbred ICR (CD-1). female mice (SPF). The animals were irradiated by 171 MeV protons at a dose of 20 cGy. The spacecraft radiation protection elements used in the experiment were a construction of wet hygiene wipes called a "protective blind", and a glass plate imitating an ISS window. Physical obstacles on the path of 171 MeV protons increase their linear energy transfer leading to the absorbed dose elevation and strengthening of the radiobiological effect. In the experiment, two types of obstacles together raised the absorbed dose from 20 to 23.2 cGy. Chemically different materials (glass and water in the wipes) were found to exert unequal modifying effects on physical and biological parameters of the proton-irradiated mice. There was a distinct dose-dependent reduction of bone marrow cellularity within the dose range from 20 cGy to 23.2 cGy in 24 hours after exposure. No modifying effect of the radiation protection elements on spontaneous motor activity was discovered when compared with entrance protons. The group of animals protected by the glass plate exhibited normal orientative-trying reactions and weakened grip with the forelimbs. Rationalization of physical methods of spacecrew protection should be based as on knowledge in physical dosimetry (ionizing chambers, thermoluminescent, track detectors etc.), so the radiobiological criteria established in experiments with animals. PMID:26738306

  4. Rapid evolution of microbe-mediated protection against pathogens in a worm host.

    PubMed

    King, Kayla C; Brockhurst, Michael A; Vasieva, Olga; Paterson, Steve; Betts, Alex; Ford, Suzanne A; Frost, Crystal L; Horsburgh, Malcolm J; Haldenby, Sam; Hurst, Gregory Dd

    2016-08-01

    Microbes can defend their host against virulent infections, but direct evidence for the adaptive origin of microbe-mediated protection is lacking. Using experimental evolution of a novel, tripartite interaction, we demonstrate that mildly pathogenic bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis) living in worms (Caenorhabditis elegans) rapidly evolved to defend their animal hosts against infection by a more virulent pathogen (Staphylococcus aureus), crossing the parasitism-mutualism continuum. Host protection evolved in all six, independently selected populations in response to within-host bacterial interactions and without direct selection for host health. Microbe-mediated protection was also effective against a broad spectrum of pathogenic S. aureus isolates. Genomic analysis implied that the mechanistic basis for E. faecalis-mediated protection was through increased production of antimicrobial superoxide, which was confirmed by biochemical assays. Our results indicate that microbes living within a host may make the evolutionary transition to mutualism in response to pathogen attack, and that microbiome evolution warrants consideration as a driver of infection outcome.

  5. Rapid evolution of microbe-mediated protection against pathogens in a worm host

    PubMed Central

    King, Kayla C; Brockhurst, Michael A; Vasieva, Olga; Paterson, Steve; Betts, Alex; Ford, Suzanne A; Frost, Crystal L; Horsburgh, Malcolm J; Haldenby, Sam; Hurst, Gregory DD

    2016-01-01

    Microbes can defend their host against virulent infections, but direct evidence for the adaptive origin of microbe-mediated protection is lacking. Using experimental evolution of a novel, tripartite interaction, we demonstrate that mildly pathogenic bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis) living in worms (Caenorhabditis elegans) rapidly evolved to defend their animal hosts against infection by a more virulent pathogen (Staphylococcus aureus), crossing the parasitism–mutualism continuum. Host protection evolved in all six, independently selected populations in response to within-host bacterial interactions and without direct selection for host health. Microbe-mediated protection was also effective against a broad spectrum of pathogenic S. aureus isolates. Genomic analysis implied that the mechanistic basis for E. faecalis-mediated protection was through increased production of antimicrobial superoxide, which was confirmed by biochemical assays. Our results indicate that microbes living within a host may make the evolutionary transition to mutualism in response to pathogen attack, and that microbiome evolution warrants consideration as a driver of infection outcome. PMID:26978164

  6. Altering genomic integrity: heavy metal exposure promotes trans-posable element-mediated damage

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Maria E.; Servant, Geraldine; Ade, Catherine; Roy-Enge, Astrid M.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity is critical for cellular homeostasis and survival. The active transposable elements (TEs) composed primarily of three mobile element lineages LINE-1, Alu, and SVA comprise approximately 30% of the mass of the human genome. For the past two decades, studies have shown that TEs significantly contribute to genetic instability and that TE-caused damages are associated with genetic diseases and cancer. Different environmental exposures, including several heavy metals, influence how TEs interact with its host genome increasing their negative impact. This mini-review provides some basic knowledge on TEs, their contribution to disease and an overview of the current knowledge on how heavy metals influence TE-mediated damage. PMID:25774044

  7. Sulforaphane protects Microcystin-LR-induced toxicity through activation of the Nrf2-mediated defensive response

    SciTech Connect

    Gan Nanqin; Mi Lixin; Sun Xiaoyun; Dai Guofei; Chung Funglung; Song Lirong

    2010-09-01

    Microcystins (MCs), a cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxins, are mainly produced by the bloom-forming cyanobacerium Microcystis, which has become an environmental hazard worldwide. Long term consumption of MC-contaminated water may induce liver damage, liver cancer, and even human death. Therefore, in addition to removal of MCs in drinking water, novel strategies that prevent health damages are urgently needed. Sulforaphane (SFN), a natural-occurring isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, has been reported to reduce and eliminate toxicities from xenobiotics and carcinogens. The purpose of the present study was to provide mechanistic insights into the SFN-induced antioxidative defense system against MC-LR-induced cytotoxicity. We performed cell viability assays, including MTS assay, colony formation assay and apoptotic cell sorting, to study MC-LR-induced cellular damage and the protective effects by SFN. The results showed that SFN protected MC-LR-induced damages at a nontoxic and physiological relevant dose in HepG2, BRL-3A and NIH 3 T3 cells. The protection was Nrf2-mediated as evident by transactivation of Nrf2 and activation of its downstream genes, including NQO1 and HO-1, and elevated intracellular GSH level. Results of our studies indicate that pretreatment of cells with 10 {mu}M SFN for 12 h significantly protected cells from MC-LR-induced damage. SFN-induced protective response was mediated through Nrf2 pathway.

  8. Complement plays a minimal role in Sm-p80-mediated protection against Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Souvik; Zhang, Weidong; Ahmad, Gul; Alam, Mayeen U; Winn, Richard; Torben, Workineh; Le, Loc; Tillery, Kory A; Siddiqui, Afzal A

    2014-01-01

    Sm-p80, the large subunit of Schistosoma masoni calpain, is a leading antigen candidate for a schistosome vaccine. Prophylactic and antifecundity efficacy of Sm-p80 has been tested using a variety of vaccine approaches. However, the mechanism of Sm-p80-mediated killing is still unknown. In this study, potential role of complement in Sm-p80-mediated protection was studied using both in vitro (cobra venom factor inhibition) and in vivo using mice deficient in C3 (C3 -/-; B6.129S4-C3tm1Crr/J). In the absence of C3, Sm-p80-based vaccine was able to provide significant reduction in adult worm burden following challenge with schistosome cercariae in mice suggesting the effector functions of complement may be limited in this vaccine-induced protection.

  9. Modification of radiobiological effects of 171 MeV protons by elements of physical protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulinina, Taisia; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Ivanov, Alexander; Molokanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation includes protons of various energies. Physical protection is effective in the case of low energy protons (50-100 MeV) and becomes insufficient for radiation with a high part of high-energy protons. In the experiment performed on outbred mice, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the radiobiological effect of 171 MeV protons and protons modified by elements of physical protection of the spacecraft, on a complex of indicators of the functional condition of the system hematopoiesis and the central nervous system in 24 hours after irradiation at 20 cGy dose. The spacecraft radiation protection elements used in the experiment were a construction of wet hygiene wipes called a «protective curtain», and a glass plate imitating an ISS window. Mass thickness of the " protective curtain" in terms of water equivalent was ̴ 6,2 g/cm2. Physical shielding along the path of 171 MeV protons increases their linear energy transfer leading to the absorbed dose elevation and strengthening of the radiobiological effect. In the experiment, the two types of shielding together raised the absorbed dose from 20 to 23.2 cGy. Chemically different materials (glass and water in the wipes) were found to exert unequal modifying effects on physical and biological parameters of the proton-irradiated mice. There was a distinct dose-dependent reduction of bone marrow cellularity within the dose range from 20 cGy to 23.2 cGy in 24 hours after exposure. No modifying effect of the radiation protection elements on spontaneous motor activity was discovered when compared with entrance protons. The group of animals protected by the glass plate exhibited normal orientative-trying reactions and weakened grip with the forelimbs. The effects observed in the experiment indicate the necessity to carry out comprehensive radiobiological researches (physical, biological and mathematical) in assessing the effects of physical protection, that are actual for ensuring radiation safety of crews in

  10. Function of a Foxp3 cis-element in protecting regulatory T cell identity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xudong; Liang, Yuqiong; LeBlanc, Mathias; Benner, Chris; Zheng, Ye

    2014-08-14

    The homeostasis of multicellular organisms requires terminally differentiated cells to preserve their lineage specificity. However, it is unclear whether mechanisms exist to actively protect cell identity in response to environmental cues that confer functional plasticity. Regulatory T (Treg) cells, specified by the transcription factor Foxp3, are indispensable for immune system homeostasis. Here, we report that conserved noncoding sequence 2 (CNS2), a CpG-rich Foxp3 intronic cis-element specifically demethylated in mature Tregs, helps maintain immune homeostasis and limit autoimmune disease development by protecting Treg identity in response to signals that shape mature Treg functions and drive their initial differentiation. In activated Tregs, CNS2 helps protect Foxp3 expression from destabilizing cytokine conditions by sensing TCR/NFAT activation, which facilitates the interaction between CNS2 and Foxp3 promoter. Thus, epigenetically marked cis-elements can protect cell identity by sensing key environmental cues central to both cell identity formation and functional plasticity without interfering with initial cell differentiation. PMID:25126782

  11. Cutaneous infection with Leishmania major mediates heterologous protection against visceral infection with Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Audrey; Doria, Nicole A.; Mendez, Jonatan; Sacks, David L.; Peters, Nathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) is a fatal disease of the internal organs caused by the eukaryotic parasite Leishmania. Control of VL would best be achieved through vaccination. However, this has proven to be difficult partly because the correlates of protective immunity are not fully understood. In contrast, protective immunity against non-fatal cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) is well defined and mediated by rapidly recruited, IFN-γ-producing, Ly6C+CD4+ T cells at the dermal challenge site. Protection against CL is best achieved by prior infection or live vaccination with Leishmania major, termed leishmanization. A long-standing question is whether prior CL or leishmanization can protect against VL. Employing an intra-dermal challenge model in mice, we report that cutaneous infection with Leishmania major provides heterologous protection against visceral infection with Leishmania infantum. Protection was associated with a robust CD4+ T cell response at the dermal challenge site and in the viscera. In-vivo labeling of circulating cells revealed that increased frequencies of IFN-γ+CD4+ T cells at sites of infection is due to recruitment or retention of cells in the tissue, rather than increased numbers of cells trapped in the vasculature. Shortly after challenge IFN-γ producing cells were highly enriched for Ly6C+T-bet+ cells in the viscera. Surprisingly, this heterologous immunity was superior to homologous immunity mediated by prior infection with Leishmania infantum. Our observations demonstrate a common mechanism of protection against different clinical forms of leishmaniasis. The efficacy of leishmanization against VL may warrant the introduction of the practice in VL endemic areas or during outbreaks of disease. PMID:26371247

  12. Flexible Foam Protection Materials for Constellation Space Suit Element Portable Life Support Subsystem Packaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Henry H.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.; Thomas, Gretchen A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the effort in evaluating and selecting a light weight impact protection material for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) conceptual packaging study. A light weight material capable of holding and protecting the components inside the PLSS is required to demonstrate the viability of the flexible PLSS packaging concept. The material needs to distribute, dissipate, and absorb the impact energy of the PLSS falling on the lunar surface. It must also be very robust and function in the extreme lunar thermal vacuum environment for up to one hundred Extravehicular Activity (EVA) missions. This paper documents the performance requirements for selecting a foam protection material, and the methodologies for evaluating commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) foam protection materials. It also presents the materials properties test results and impact drop test results of the various foam materials evaluated in the study. The findings from this study suggest that a foam based flexible protection system is a viable solution for PLSS packaging. However, additional works are needed to optimize COTS foam properties or to develop a composite foam system that will meet all the performance requirements for the CSSE PLSS flexible packaging.

  13. Apical Organelle Secretion by Toxoplasma Controls Innate and Adaptive Immunity and Mediates Long-Term Protection.

    PubMed

    Sloves, Pierre-Julien; Mouveaux, Thomas; Ait-Yahia, Saliha; Vorng, Han; Everaere, Laetitia; Sangare, Lamba Omar; Tsicopoulos, Anne; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2015-11-01

    Apicomplexan parasites have unique apical rhoptry and microneme secretory organelles that are crucial for host infection, although their role in protection against Toxoplasma gondii infection is not thoroughly understood. Here, we report a novel function of the endolysosomal T. gondii sortilin-like receptor (TgSORTLR), which mediates trafficking to functional apical organelles and their subsequent secretion of virulence factors that are critical to the induction of sterile immunity against parasite reinfection. We further demonstrate that the T. gondii armadillo repeats-only protein (TgARO) mutant, which is deficient only in apical secretion of rhoptries, is also critical in mounting protective immunity. The lack of TgSORTLR and TgARO proteins completely inhibited T-helper 1-dependent adaptive immunity and compromised the function of natural killer T-cell-mediated innate immunity. Our findings reveal an essential role for apical secretion in promoting sterile protection against T. gondii and provide strong evidence for rhoptry-regulated discharge of antigens as a key effector for inducing protective immunity.

  14. Prominent role of exopeptidase DPP III in estrogen-mediated protection against hyperoxia in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sobočanec, Sandra; Filić, Vedrana; Matovina, Mihaela; Majhen, Dragomira; Šafranko, Željka Mačak; Hadžija, Marijana Popović; Krsnik, Željka; Kurilj, Andrea Gudan; Šarić, Ana; Abramić, Marija; Balog, Tihomir

    2016-01-01

    A number of age-related diseases have a low incidence in females, which is attributed to a protective effect of sex hormones. For instance, the female sex hormone estrogen (E2) has a well established cytoprotective effect against oxidative stress, which strongly contributes to ageing. However, the mechanism by which E2 exerts its protective activity remains elusive. In this study we address the question whether the E2-induced protective effect against hyperoxia is mediated by the Nrf-2/Keap-1 signaling pathway. In particular, we investigate the E2-induced expression and cellular distribution of DPP III monozinc exopeptidase, a member of the Nrf-2/Keap-1 pathway, upon hyperoxia treatment. We find that DPP III accumulates in the nucleus in response to hyperoxia. Further, we show that combined induction of hyperoxia and E2 administration have an additive effect on the nuclear accumulation of DPP III. The level of nuclear accumulation of DPP III is comparable to nuclear accumulation of Nrf-2 in healthy female mice exposed to hyperoxia. In ovariectomized females exposed to hyperoxia, supplementation of E2 induced upregulation of DPP III, Ho-1, Sirt-1 and downregulation of Ppar-γ. While other cytoprotective mechanisms cannot be excluded, these findings demonstrate a prominent role of DPP III, along with Sirt-1, in the E2-mediated protection against hyperoxia. PMID:26774752

  15. Identification of the heart as the critical site of adenosine mediated embryo protection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Our understanding of the mechanisms that protect the developing embryo from intrauterine stress is limited. Recently, adenosine has been demonstrated to play a critical role in protecting the embryo against hypoxia via adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs), which are expressed in the heart, nervous system, and other sites during development. However, the sites of A1AR action that mediate embryo protection are not known. To determine if the heart is a key site of adenosine-mediated embryo protection, A1ARs were selectively deleted in the embryonic heart using a Cre-LoxP system in which the alpha-myosin heavy chain promoter drives Cre-recombinase expression and excision of the A1AR gene from cardiomyocytes. Results With increasing exposure of maternal hypoxia (10% O2) from 48-96 hours beginning at embryonic day (E) 8.5, embryo viability decreased in the cardiac-A1AR deleted embryos. 48 hours of hypoxia reduced embryonic viability by 49% in embryos exposed from E10.5-12.5 but no effect on viability was observed in younger embryos exposed to hypoxia from E8.5-10.5. After 72 hours of hypoxia, 57.8% of the cardiac-A1AR deleted embryos were either dead or re-absorbed compared to 13.7% of control littermates and after 96 hours 81.6% of cardiac-A1AR deleted embryos were dead or re-absorbed. After 72 hours of hypoxia, cardiac size was reduced significantly more in the cardiac-A1AR deleted hearts compared to controls. Gene expression analysis revealed clusters of genes that are regulated by both hypoxia and A1AR expression. Conclusions These data identify the embryonic heart as the critical site where adenosine acts to protect the embryo against hypoxia. As such these studies identify a previously unrecognized mechanism of embryo protection. PMID:20509906

  16. Experiments and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of a Wire-Rope Rockfall Protective Fence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Phuc Van; Maegawa, Koji; Fukada, Saiji

    2013-09-01

    The imperative need to protect structures in mountainous areas against rockfall has led to the development of various protection methods. This study introduces a new type of rockfall protection fence made of posts, wire ropes, wire netting and energy absorbers. The performance of this rock fence was verified in both experiments and dynamic finite element analysis. In collision tests, a reinforced-concrete block rolled down a natural slope and struck the rock fence at the end of the slope. A specialized system of measuring instruments was employed to accurately measure the acceleration of the block without cable connection. In particular, the performance of two energy absorbers, which contribute also to preventing wire ropes from breaking, was investigated to determine the best energy absorber. In numerical simulation, a commercial finite element code having explicit dynamic capabilities was employed to create models of the two full-scale tests. To facilitate simulation, certain simplifying assumptions for mechanical data of each individual component of the rock fence and geometrical data of the model were adopted. Good agreement between numerical simulation and experimental data validated the numerical simulation. Furthermore, the results of numerical simulation helped highlight limitations of the testing method. The results of numerical simulation thus provide a deeper understanding of the structural behavior of individual components of the rock fence during rockfall impact. More importantly, numerical simulations can be used not only as supplements to or substitutes for full-scale tests but also in parametric study and design.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms Responsible for Neuron-Derived Conditioned Medium (NCM)-Mediated Protection of Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chen-Hsuan; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Liao, Li-Ya; Lin, Ting-An; Hsueh, Chi-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The protective value of neuron-derived conditioned medium (NCM) in cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia were investigated in the study. NCM was first collected from the neuronal culture growing under the in vitro ischemic condition (glucose-, oxygen- and serum-deprivation or GOSD) for 2, 4 or 6 h. Through the focal cerebral ischemia (bilateral CCAO/unilateral MCAO) animal model, we discovered that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain infarction was significantly reduced by NCM, given directly into the cistern magna at the end of 90 min of CCAO/MCAO. Immunoblocking and chemical blocking strategies were applied in the in vitro ischemic studies to show that NCM supplement could protect microglia, astrocytes and neurons from GOSD-induced cell death, in a growth factor (TGFβ1, NT-3 and GDNF) and p-ERK dependent manner. Brain injection with TGFβ1, NT3, GDNF and ERK agonist (DADS) alone or in combination, therefore also significantly decreased the infarct volume of ischemic brain. Moreover, NCM could inhibit ROS but stimulate IL-1β release from GOSD-treated microglia and limit the infiltration of IL-β-positive microglia into the core area of ischemic brain, revealing the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of NCM. In overall, NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia has been demonstrated for the first time in S.D. rats, due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and potentially anti-glutamate activities (NCM-induced IL-1β can inhibit the glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity) and restriction upon the infiltration of inflammatory microglia into the core area of ischemic brain. The therapeutic potentials of NCM, TGFβ1, GDNF, NT-3 and DADS in the control of cerebral ischemia in human therefore have been suggested and require further investigation. PMID:26745377

  18. Molecular Mechanisms Responsible for Neuron-Derived Conditioned Medium (NCM)-Mediated Protection of Ischemic Brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chen-Hsuan; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Liao, Li-Ya; Lin, Ting-An; Hsueh, Chi-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The protective value of neuron-derived conditioned medium (NCM) in cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia were investigated in the study. NCM was first collected from the neuronal culture growing under the in vitro ischemic condition (glucose-, oxygen- and serum-deprivation or GOSD) for 2, 4 or 6 h. Through the focal cerebral ischemia (bilateral CCAO/unilateral MCAO) animal model, we discovered that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain infarction was significantly reduced by NCM, given directly into the cistern magna at the end of 90 min of CCAO/MCAO. Immunoblocking and chemical blocking strategies were applied in the in vitro ischemic studies to show that NCM supplement could protect microglia, astrocytes and neurons from GOSD-induced cell death, in a growth factor (TGFβ1, NT-3 and GDNF) and p-ERK dependent manner. Brain injection with TGFβ1, NT3, GDNF and ERK agonist (DADS) alone or in combination, therefore also significantly decreased the infarct volume of ischemic brain. Moreover, NCM could inhibit ROS but stimulate IL-1β release from GOSD-treated microglia and limit the infiltration of IL-β-positive microglia into the core area of ischemic brain, revealing the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of NCM. In overall, NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia has been demonstrated for the first time in S.D. rats, due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and potentially anti-glutamate activities (NCM-induced IL-1β can inhibit the glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity) and restriction upon the infiltration of inflammatory microglia into the core area of ischemic brain. The therapeutic potentials of NCM, TGFβ1, GDNF, NT-3 and DADS in the control of cerebral ischemia in human therefore have been suggested and require further investigation. PMID:26745377

  19. Maintaining energy homeostasis is an essential component of Wld(S)-mediated axon protection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hua; Hyrc, Krzysztof L; Goldberg, Mark P

    2013-11-01

    Wld(S) mutation protects axons from degeneration in diverse experimental models of neurological disorders, suggesting that the mutation might act on a key step shared by different axon degeneration pathways. Here we test the hypothesis that Wld(S) protects axons by preventing energy deficiency commonly encountered in many diseases. We subjected compartmentally cultured, mouse cortical axons to energy deprivation with 6mM azide and zero glucose. In wild-type (WT) culture, the treatment, which reduced axon ATP level ([ATP]axon) by 65%, caused immediate axon depolarization followed by gradual free calcium accumulation and subsequent irreversible axon damage. The calcium accumulation resulted from calcium influx partially via L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (L-VGCC). Blocking L-VGCC with nimodipine reduced calcium accumulation and protected axons. Without altering baseline [ATP]axon, the presence of Wld(S) mutation significantly reduced the axon ATP loss and depolarization, restrained the subsequent calcium accumulation, and protected axons against energy deprivation. Wld(S) neurons possessed higher than normal nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT) activity. The intrinsic Wld(S) NMNAT activity was required for the Wld(S)-mediated energy preservation and axon protection during but not prior to energy deprivation. NMNAT catalyzes the reversible reaction that produces nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) from nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN). Interestingly, preventing the production of NAD from NMN with FK866 increased [ATP]axon and protected axons from energy deprivation. These results indicate that the Wld(S) mutation depends on its intrinsic Wld(S) NMNAT activity and the subsequent increase in axon ATP but not NAD to protect axons, implicating a novel role of Wld(S) NMNAT in axon bioenergetics and protection.

  20. Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 2 mediates dimethyl fumarate’s protective effect in EAE

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Assmann, Julian C.; Krenz, Antje; Rahman, Mahbubur; Grimm, Myriam; Karsten, Christian M.; Köhl, Jörg; Offermanns, Stefan; Wettschureck, Nina; Schwaninger, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Taken orally, the drug dimethyl fumarate (DMF) has been shown to improve functional outcomes for patients with MS; however, it is unclear how DMF mediates a protective effect. DMF and, more so, its active metabolite, monomethyl fumarate, are known agonists of the hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 2 (HCA2), a G protein–coupled membrane receptor. Here, we evaluated the contribution of HCA2 in mediating the protective effect afforded by DMF in EAE, a mouse model of MS. DMF treatment reduced neurological deficit, immune cell infiltration, and demyelination of the spinal cords in wild-type mice, but not in Hca2–/– mice, indicating that HCA2 is required for the therapeutic effect of DMF. In particular, DMF decreased the number of infiltrating neutrophils in a HCA2-dependent manner, likely by interfering with neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells and chemotaxis. Together, our data indicate that HCA2 mediates the therapeutic effects of DMF in EAE. Furthermore, identification of HCA2 as a molecular target may help to optimize MS therapy. PMID:24691444

  1. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Ablative Thermal Response and Thermostructural Design of Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    A finite element ablation and thermal response program is presented for simulation of three-dimensional transient thermostructural analysis. The three-dimensional governing differential equations and finite element formulation are summarized. A novel probabilistic design methodology for thermal protection systems is presented. The design methodology is an eight step process beginning with a parameter sensitivity study and is followed by a deterministic analysis whereby an optimum design can determined. The design process concludes with a Monte Carlo simulation where the probabilities of exceeding design specifications are estimated. The design methodology is demonstrated by applying the methodology to the carbon phenolic compression pads of the Crew Exploration Vehicle. The maximum allowed values of bondline temperature and tensile stress are used as the design specifications in this study.

  2. Boundary element analysis of packed silencers with protective cloth and embedded thin surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. W.; Cheng, C. Y. R.; Tao, Z.

    2003-03-01

    Bulk-reacting porous materials are often used as absorptive lining in packed silencers to reduce broadband noise. Modelling the entire silencer domain with a bulk-reacting material will inevitably involve two different acoustic media, air and the bulk-reacting material. A so-called direct mixed-body boundary element method (BEM) has recently been developed to model the two-medium problem in a single-domain fashion. The present paper is an extension of the direct mixed-body BEM to include protective cloth and embedded rigid surfaces. Protective cloth, an absorptive material itself with a higher flow resistivity than the primary lining material, is usually sandwiched between a perforated metal surface and the lining to protect the lining material from any abrasive effect of the grazing flow. Two different approaches are taken to model the protective cloth. One is to approximate sound pressure as a linear function across the cloth thickness and then use the bulk-reacting material properties of the cloth to obtain the transfer impedance. The other is to measure the transfer impedance of the cloth directly by an experimental set-up similar to the two-cavity method. As for an embedded thin surface, it is a rigid thin surface sandwiched between two bulk-reacting linings. Numerical modelling of an embedded thin surface is similar to the modelling of a rigid thin surface in air. Several test cases are given and the BEM results for transmission loss (TL) are verified by experimental TL measurements.

  3. HIF-1α Mediates Isoflurane-Induced Vascular Protection in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Eric; Johnson, Andrew W; Nelson, James W; Harries, Michael D; Gidday, Jeffrey M; Han, Byung Hee; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) depends critically on delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) – a process driven primarily by vascular events including cerebral vasospasm, microvessel thrombosis, and microvascular dysfunction. This study sought to determine the impact of postconditioning – the phenomenon whereby endogenous protection against severe injury is enhanced by subsequent exposure to a mild stressor – on SAH-induced DCI. Methods Adult male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to sham, SAH, or SAH plus isoflurane postconditioning. Neurological outcome was assessed daily via sensorimotor scoring. Contributors to DCI including cerebral vasospasm, microvessel thrombosis, and microvascular dysfunction were measured 3 days later. Isoflurane-induced changes in hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1α)-dependent genes were assessed via quantitative polymerase chain reaction. HIF-1α was inhibited pharmacologically via 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) or genetically via endothelial cell HIF-1α-null mice (EC-HIF-1α-null). All experiments were performed in a randomized and blinded fashion. Results Isoflurane postconditioning initiated at clinically relevant time points after SAH significantly reduced cerebral vasospasm, microvessel thrombosis, microvascular dysfunction, and neurological deficits in wild-type (WT) mice. Isoflurane modulated HIF-1α-dependent genes – changes that were abolished in 2ME2-treated WT mice and EC-HIF-1α-null mice. Isoflurane-induced DCI protection was attenuated in 2ME2-treated WT mice and EC-HIF-1α-null mice. Interpretation Isoflurane postconditioning provides strong HIF-1α-mediated macro- and microvascular protection in SAH, leading to improved neurological outcome. These results implicate cerebral vessels as a key target for the brain protection afforded by isoflurane postconditioning, and HIF-1α as a critical mediator of this vascular protection. They also identify isoflurane postconditioning as a promising novel

  4. IL-11 Is Required for A1 Adenosine Receptor–Mediated Protection against Ischemic AKI

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Yun; Kim, Mihwa; Ham, Ahrom; Brown, Kevin M.; Greene, Robert W.; D’Agati, Vivette D.

    2013-01-01

    A1 adenosine receptor activation ameliorates ischemic AKI through the induction of renal proximal tubular sphingosine kinase-1. However, systemic adverse effects may limit A1 adenosine receptor–based therapy for ischemic AKI, indicating a need to identify alternative therapeutic targets within this pathway. Here, we evaluated the function of renal proximal tubular IL-11, a clinically approved hematopoietic cytokine, in A1 adenosine receptor–mediated induction of sphingosine kinase-1 and renal protection. Treatment of human proximal tubule epithelial (HK-2) cells with a selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist, chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), induced the expression of IL-11 mRNA and protein in an extracellular signal–regulated kinase–dependent manner, and administration of CCPA in mice induced renal synthesis of IL-11. Pretreatment with CCPA protected against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in wild-type mice, but not in IL-11 receptor–deficient mice. Administration of an IL-11–neutralizing antibody abolished the renal protection provided by CCPA. Similarly, CCPA did not induce renal IL-11 expression or protect against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice lacking the renal proximal tubular A1 adenosine receptor. Finally, treatment with CCPA induced sphingosine kinase-1 in HK-2 cells and wild-type mice, but not in IL-11 receptor–deficient or renal proximal tubule A1 adenosine receptor–deficient mice. Taken together, these results suggest that induction of renal proximal tubule IL-11 is a critical intermediary in A1 adenosine receptor–mediated renal protection that warrants investigation as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic AKI. PMID:23813214

  5. Protective effects of phyllanthus emblica leaf extract on sodium arsenite-mediated adverse effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Sadia; Ahsan, Nazmul; Kato, Masashi; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Rashid, Abdur; Akhand, Anwarul Azim

    2015-02-01

    Groundwater contamination of arsenic is the major cause of a serious health hazard in Bangladesh. No specific treatment is yet available to manage the large number of individuals exposed to arsenic. In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of Phyllanthus emblica (Indian gooseberry or Amla) leaf extract (PLE) on arsenic-mediated toxicity in experimental mice. Male Swiss albino mice were divided into three different groups (n=6/group). 'Control' mice received arsenic free water together with normal feed. Mice in the remaining two groups designated 'SA' and 'SA+PLE' were exposed to sodium arsenite (SA, 10 µg/g body weight/day) through drinking water in addition to receiving normal feed and PLE-supplemented feed, respectively. The weight gain of SA-exposed mice was decreased compared with the controls; however, this decrease in body weight gain was prevented when the feed was supplemented with PLE. A secondary effect of arsenic was enlargement of the liver, kidney and spleen of SA-group mice. Deposition of arsenic in those organs was demonstrated by ICP-MS. When PLE was supplemented in the feed the enlargement of the organs was minimized; however, the deposition of arsenic was not significantly reduced. These results indicated that PLE may not block arsenic deposition in tissue directly but rather may play a protective role to reduce arsenic-induced toxicity. Therefore, co-administration of PLE in arsenic-exposed animals might have a future therapeutic application for protecting against arsenic-mediated toxicity.

  6. Troxerutin protects the mouse liver against oxidative stress-mediated injury induced by D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-feng; Fan, Shao-hua; Zheng, Yuan-lin; Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin

    2009-09-01

    Troxerutin, a trihydroxyethylated derivative of rutin, has been well-demonstrated to exert hepatoprotective properties. In the present study, we attempted to explore whether the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms were involved in troxerutin-mediated protection from D-gal-induced liver injury. The effects of troxerutin on liver lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymatic activities, and the expression of inflammatory mediator were investigated in D-gal-treated mice. The results showed that troxerutin largely attenuated the D-gal-induced TBARS content increase and also markedly renewed the activities of Cu, Zn-SOD, CAT, and GPx in the livers of D-gal-treated mice. Furthermore, troxerutin inhibited the upregulation of the expression of NF-kappaB p65, iNOS, and COX-2 induced by D-gal. D-Gal-induced tissue architecture changes and serum ALT and AST increases were effectively suppressed by troxerutin. In conclusion, these results suggested that troxerutin could protect the mouse liver from D-gal-induced injury by attenuating lipid peroxidation, renewing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and suppressing inflammatory response. This study provided novel insights into the mechanisms of troxerutin in the protection of the liver.

  7. Protection against henipaviruses in swine requires both, cell-mediated and humoral immune response.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Brad S; Hardham, John M; Smith, Greg; Weingartl, Eva T; Dominowski, Paul J; Foss, Dennis L; Mwangi, Duncan; Broder, Christopher C; Roth, James A; Weingartl, Hana M

    2016-09-14

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are members of the genus Henipavirus, within the family Paramyxoviridae. Nipah virus has caused outbreaks of human disease in Bangladesh, Malaysia, Singapore, India and Philippines, in addition to a large outbreak in swine in Malaysia in 1998/1999. Recently, NiV was suspected to be a causative agent of an outbreak in horses in 2014 in the Philippines, while HeV has caused multiple human and equine outbreaks in Australia since 1994. A swine vaccine able to prevent shedding of infectious virus is of veterinary and human health importance, and correlates of protection against henipavirus infection in swine need to be better understood. In the present study, three groups of animals were employed. Pigs vaccinated with adjuvanted recombinant soluble HeV G protein (sGHEV) and challenged with HeV, developed antibody levels considered to be protective prior to the challenge (titers of 320). However, activation of the cell-mediated immune response was not detected, and the animals were only partially protected against challenge with 5×10(5) PFU of HeV per animal. In the second group, cross-neutralizing antibody levels against NiV in the sGHEV vaccinated animals did not reach protective levels, and with no activation of cellular immune memory, these animals were not protected against NiV. Only pigs orally infected with 5×10(4) PFU of NiV per animal were protected against nasal challenge with 5×10(5) PFU of NiV per animal. This group of pigs developed protective antibody levels, as well as cell-mediated immune memory. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells restimulated with UV-inactivated NiV upregulated IFN-gamma, IL-10 and the CD25 activation marker on CD4(+)CD8(+) T memory helper cells and to lesser extent on CD4(-)CD8(+) T cells. In conclusion, both humoral and cellular immune responses were required for protection of swine against henipaviruses. PMID:27544586

  8. Heat shock protein-mediated protection against Cisplatin-induced hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tiffany G; Roy, Soumen; Brandon, Carlene S; Kramarenko, Inga K; Francis, Shimon P; Taleb, Mona; Marshall, Keely M; Schwendener, Reto; Lee, Fu-Shing; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2015-02-01

    Cisplatin is a highly successful and widely used chemotherapy for the treatment of various solid malignancies in both adult and pediatric patients. Side effects of cisplatin treatment include nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity results from damage to and death of cells in the inner ear, including sensory hair cells. We showed previously that heat shock inhibits cisplatin-induced hair cell death in whole-organ cultures of utricles from adult mice. Since heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is the most upregulated HSP in response to heat shock, we investigated the role of HSP70 as a potential protectant against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Our data using utricles from HSP70 (-/-) mice indicate that HSP70 is necessary for the protective effect of heat shock against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. In addition, constitutive expression of inducible HSP70 offered modest protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. We also examined a second heat-inducible protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, also called HSP32). HO-1 is an enzyme responsible for the catabolism of free heme. We previously showed that induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) inhibits aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. Here, we show that HO-1 also offers significant protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. HO-1 induction occurred primarily in resident macrophages, with no detectable expression in hair cells or supporting cells. Depletion of macrophages from utricles abolished the protective effect of HO-1 induction. Together, our data indicate that HSP induction protects against cisplatin-induced hair cell death, and they suggest that resident macrophages mediate the protective effect of HO-1 induction.

  9. Heat shock protein-mediated protection against Cisplatin-induced hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tiffany G; Roy, Soumen; Brandon, Carlene S; Kramarenko, Inga K; Francis, Shimon P; Taleb, Mona; Marshall, Keely M; Schwendener, Reto; Lee, Fu-Shing; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2015-02-01

    Cisplatin is a highly successful and widely used chemotherapy for the treatment of various solid malignancies in both adult and pediatric patients. Side effects of cisplatin treatment include nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity results from damage to and death of cells in the inner ear, including sensory hair cells. We showed previously that heat shock inhibits cisplatin-induced hair cell death in whole-organ cultures of utricles from adult mice. Since heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is the most upregulated HSP in response to heat shock, we investigated the role of HSP70 as a potential protectant against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Our data using utricles from HSP70 (-/-) mice indicate that HSP70 is necessary for the protective effect of heat shock against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. In addition, constitutive expression of inducible HSP70 offered modest protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. We also examined a second heat-inducible protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, also called HSP32). HO-1 is an enzyme responsible for the catabolism of free heme. We previously showed that induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) inhibits aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. Here, we show that HO-1 also offers significant protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. HO-1 induction occurred primarily in resident macrophages, with no detectable expression in hair cells or supporting cells. Depletion of macrophages from utricles abolished the protective effect of HO-1 induction. Together, our data indicate that HSP induction protects against cisplatin-induced hair cell death, and they suggest that resident macrophages mediate the protective effect of HO-1 induction. PMID:25261194

  10. Identification of the REST regulon reveals extensive transposable element-mediated binding site duplication

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rory; Gamblin, Richard J.; Ooi, Lezanne; Bruce, Alexander W.; Donaldson, Ian J.; Westhead, David R.; Wood, Ian C.; Jackson, Richard M.; Buckley, Noel J.

    2006-01-01

    The genome-wide mapping of gene-regulatory motifs remains a major goal that will facilitate the modelling of gene-regulatory networks and their evolution. The repressor element 1 is a long, conserved transcription factor-binding site which recruits the transcriptional repressor REST to numerous neuron-specific target genes. REST plays important roles in multiple biological processes and disease states. To map RE1 sites and target genes, we created a position specific scoring matrix representing the RE1 and used it to search the human and mouse genomes. We identified 1301 and 997 RE1s inhuman and mouse genomes, respectively, of which >40% are novel. By employing an ontological analysis we show that REST target genes are significantly enriched in a number of functional classes. Taking the novel REST target gene CACNA1A as an experimental model, we show that it can be regulated by multiple RE1s of different binding affinities, which are only partially conserved between human and mouse. A novel BLAST methodology indicated that many RE1s belong to closely related families. Most of these sequences are associated with transposable elements, leading us to propose that transposon-mediated duplication and insertion of RE1s has led to the acquisition of novel target genes by REST during evolution. PMID:16899447

  11. The protective effect of salicylic acid on lysozyme against riboflavin-mediated photooxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Wang, Hongbao; Cheng, Lingli; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Mei; Wang, Shi-Long

    2011-06-01

    As a metabolite of aspirin in vivo, salicylic acid was proved to protect lysozyme from riboflavin-mediated photooxidation in this study. The antioxidative properties of salicylic acid were further studied by using time-resolved laser flash photolysis of 355 nm. It can quench the triplet state of riboflavin via electron transfer from salicylic acid to the triplet state of riboflavin with a reaction constant of 2.25×10(9) M(-1) s(-1). Mechanism of antioxidant activities of salicylic acid on lysozyme oxidation was discussed. Salicylic acid can serve as a potential antioxidant to quench the triplet state of riboflavin and reduce oxidative pressure.

  12. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) in leishmaniasis. I. TNF alpha mediates host protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Liew, F Y; Parkinson, C; Millott, S; Severn, A; Carrier, M

    1990-01-01

    Genetically resistant CBA mice developed significantly larger lesions to Leishmania major infection when they were injected with rabbit anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-specific antibodies compared to control mice injected with normal rabbit immunoglobulin. BALB/c mice recovered from a previous infection following prophylactic sublethal irradiation also developed exacerbated lesions when treated with the anti-TNF antibody. Injection of TNF into the lesion of infected CBA mice significantly reduced the lesion development. Furthermore, TNF activates macrophages to kill Leishmania in vitro. These data demonstrate that TNF plays an important role in mediating host-protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:2335376

  13. The protective effect of salicylic acid on lysozyme against riboflavin-mediated photooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kun; Wang, Hongbao; Cheng, Lingli; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Mei; Wang, Shi-Long

    2011-06-01

    As a metabolite of aspirin in vivo, salicylic acid was proved to protect lysozyme from riboflavin-mediated photooxidation in this study. The antioxidative properties of salicylic acid were further studied by using time-resolved laser flash photolysis of 355 nm. It can quench the triplet state of riboflavin via electron transfer from salicylic acid to the triplet state of riboflavin with a reaction constant of 2.25 × 10 9 M -1 s -1. Mechanism of antioxidant activities of salicylic acid on lysozyme oxidation was discussed. Salicylic acid can serve as a potential antioxidant to quench the triplet state of riboflavin and reduce oxidative pressure.

  14. Importance of (antibody-dependent) complement-mediated serum killing in protection against Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Geurtsen, Jeroen; Fae, Kellen C; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie P J M

    2014-10-01

    Pertussis is a highly contagious respiratory disease that is caused by Bordetella pertussis. Despite being vaccine preventable, pertussis rates have been rising steadily over the last decades, even in areas with high vaccine uptake. Recently, experiments with infant baboons indicated that although vaccination with acellular pertussis vaccines prevented disease, no apparent effect was observed on infection and transmission. One explanation may be that current acellular pertussis vaccines do not induce high levels of opsonophagocytic and/or bactericidal activity, implying that engineering of vaccines that promote bacterial killing may improve efficacy. Here, we discuss the importance of complement-mediated killing in vaccine-induced protection against B. pertussis. We first examine how B. pertussis may have evolved different complement evasion strategies. Second, we explore the benefits of opsonophagocytic and/or bactericidal killing in vaccine-induced protection and discuss whether or not inclusion of new opsonophagocytic or bactericidal target antigens in pertussis vaccines may benefit efficacy.

  15. Tie-mediated signal from apoptotic cells protects stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yalan; Su, Tin Tin; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    Many types of normal and cancer stem cells are resistant to killing by genotoxins, but the mechanism for this resistance is poorly understood. Here we show that adult stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster germline and midgut are resistant to ionizing radiation (IR) or chemically induced apoptosis and dissect the mechanism for this protection. We find that upon IR the receptor tyrosine kinase Tie/Tie-2 is activated, leading to the upregulation of microRNA bantam that represses FOXO-mediated transcription of pro-apoptotic Smac/DIABLO orthologue, Hid in germline stem cells. Knockdown of the IR-induced putative Tie ligand, Pvf1, a functional homologue of human Angiopoietin, in differentiating daughter cells renders germline stem cells sensitive to IR, suggesting that the dying daughters send a survival signal to protect their stem cells for future repopulation of the tissue. If conserved in cancer stem cells, this mechanism may provide therapeutic options for the eradication of cancer. PMID:25959206

  16. Relative importance of complement-mediated bactericidal and opsonic activity for protection against meningococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Granoff, Dan M

    2009-06-24

    Killing of Neisseria meningitidis can result from complement-mediated serum bactericidal activity (SBA) or opsonophagocytosis (OPA), or a combination of the two mechanisms. While SBA titers > or =1:4 confer protection, recent evidence suggests that this threshold titer may not be required. For example, the incidence of meningococcal disease declines between ages 1 and 4 years without evidence of acquisition of SBA titers > or =1:4. Meningococcal polysaccharide vaccination also elicited OPA and lowered the risk of disease in patients with late complement component deficiencies whose sera did not support SBA. Sera from healthy adults immunized with an outer membrane vesicle vaccine showed OPA killing of N. meningitidis with C6-depleted complement, and whole blood from complement-sufficient non-immunized adults with SBA titers <1:4 also frequently had killing activity. Collectively the data indicate that SBA titers <1:4 and/or vaccine-induced OPA can confer protection against meningococcal disease.

  17. Glutamate receptor-mediated oligodendrocyte toxicity in periventricular leukomalacia: a protective role for topiramate.

    PubMed

    Follett, Pamela L; Deng, Wenbin; Dai, Weimin; Talos, Delia M; Massillon, Leon J; Rosenberg, Paul A; Volpe, Joseph J; Jensen, Frances E

    2004-05-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia is a form of hypoxic-ischemic cerebral white matter injury seen most commonly in premature infants and is the major antecedent of cerebral palsy. Glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity is a predominant mechanism of hypoxic-ischemic injury to developing cerebral white matter. We have demonstrated previously the protective effect of AMPA-kainate-type glutamate receptor blockade in a rodent model of periventricular leukomalacia. The present study explores the therapeutic potential of glutamate receptor blockade for hypoxic-ischemic white matter injury. We demonstrate that AMPA receptors are expressed on developing human oligodendrocytes that populate fetal white matter at 23-32 weeks gestation, the period of highest risk for periventricular leukomalacia. We show that the clinically available anticonvulsant topiramate, when administered post-insult in vivo, is protective against selective hypoxic-ischemic white matter injury and decreases the subsequent neuromotor deficits. We further demonstrate that topiramate attenuates AMPA-kainate receptor-mediated cell death and calcium influx, as well as kainate-evoked currents in developing oligodendrocytes, similar to the AMPA-kainate receptor antagonist 6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo-(f)quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX). Notably, protective doses of NBQX and topiramate do not affect normal maturation and proliferation of oligodendrocytes either in vivo or in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that AMPA-kainate receptor blockade may have potential for translation as a therapeutic strategy for periventricular leukomalacia and that the mechanism of protective efficacy of topiramate is caused at least in part by attenuation of excitotoxic injury to premyelinating oligodendrocytes in developing white matter.

  18. The protective effect of a helmet in three bicycle accidents--A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Fahlstedt, Madelen; Halldin, Peter; Kleiven, Svein

    2016-06-01

    There is some controversy regarding the effectiveness of helmets in preventing head injuries among cyclists. Epidemiological, experimental and computer simulation studies have suggested that helmets do indeed have a protective effect, whereas other studies based on epidemiological data have argued that there is no evidence that the helmet protects the brain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of a helmet in single bicycle accident reconstructions using detailed finite element simulations. Strain in the brain tissue, which is associated with brain injuries, was reduced by up to 43% for the accident cases studied when a helmet was included. This resulted in a reduction of the risk of concussion of up to 54%. The stress to the skull bone went from fracture level of 80 MPa down to 13-16 MPa when a helmet was included and the skull fracture risk was reduced by up to 98% based on linear acceleration. Even with a 10% increased riding velocity for the helmeted impacts, to take into account possible increased risk taking, the risk of concussion was still reduced by up to 46% when compared with the unhelmeted impacts with original velocity. The results of this study show that the brain injury risk and risk of skull fracture could have been reduced in these three cases if a helmet had been worn. PMID:26974030

  19. TRF2-Mediated Control of Telomere DNA Topology as a Mechanism for Chromosome-End Protection.

    PubMed

    Benarroch-Popivker, Delphine; Pisano, Sabrina; Mendez-Bermudez, Aaron; Lototska, Liudmyla; Kaur, Parminder; Bauwens, Serge; Djerbi, Nadir; Latrick, Chrysa M; Fraisier, Vincent; Pei, Bei; Gay, Alexandre; Jaune, Emilie; Foucher, Kevin; Cherfils-Vicini, Julien; Aeby, Eric; Miron, Simona; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ye, Jing; Le Du, Marie-Hélène; Wang, Hong; Gilson, Eric; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe

    2016-01-21

    The shelterin proteins protect telomeres against activation of the DNA damage checkpoints and recombinational repair. We show here that a dimer of the shelterin subunit TRF2 wraps ∼ 90 bp of DNA through several lysine and arginine residues localized around its homodimerization domain. The expression of a wrapping-deficient TRF2 mutant, named Top-less, alters telomeric DNA topology, decreases the number of terminal loops (t-loops), and triggers the ATM checkpoint, while still protecting telomeres against non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In Top-less cells, the protection against NHEJ is alleviated if the expression of the TRF2-interacting protein RAP1 is reduced. We conclude that a distinctive topological state of telomeric DNA, controlled by the TRF2-dependent DNA wrapping and linked to t-loop formation, inhibits both ATM activation and NHEJ. The presence of RAP1 at telomeres appears as a backup mechanism to prevent NHEJ when topology-mediated telomere protection is impaired.

  20. Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection in Drosophila larvae and adults following oral infection.

    PubMed

    Stevanovic, Aleksej L; Arnold, Pieter A; Johnson, Karyn N

    2015-12-01

    Understanding viral dynamics in arthropods is of great importance when designing models to describe how viral spread can influence arthropod populations. The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia spp., which is present in up to 40% of all insect species, has the ability to alter viral dynamics in both Drosophila spp. and mosquitoes, a feature that in mosquitoes may be utilized to limit spread of important arboviruses. To understand the potential effect of Wolbachia on viral dynamics in nature, it is important to consider the impact of natural routes of virus infection on Wolbachia antiviral effects. Using adult Drosophila strains, we show here that Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that have previously been shown to confer antiviral protection following systemic viral infection also confer protection against virus-induced mortality following oral exposure to Drosophila C virus in adults. Interestingly, a different pattern was observed when the same fly lines were challenged with the virus when still larvae. Analysis of the four Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that were protective in adults indicated that only the w1118-wMelPop association conferred protection in larvae following oral delivery of the virus. Analysis of Wolbachia density using quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that a high Wolbachia density was congruent with antiviral protection in both adults and larvae. This study indicates that Wolbachia-mediated protection may vary between larval and adult stages of a given Wolbachia-host combination and that the variations in susceptibility by life stage correspond with Wolbachia density. The differences in the outcome of virus infection are likely to influence viral dynamics in Wolbachia-infected insect populations in nature and could also have important implications for the transmission of arboviruses in mosquito populations.

  1. Wolbachia-Mediated Antiviral Protection in Drosophila Larvae and Adults following Oral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stevanovic, Aleksej L.; Arnold, Pieter A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding viral dynamics in arthropods is of great importance when designing models to describe how viral spread can influence arthropod populations. The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia spp., which is present in up to 40% of all insect species, has the ability to alter viral dynamics in both Drosophila spp. and mosquitoes, a feature that in mosquitoes may be utilized to limit spread of important arboviruses. To understand the potential effect of Wolbachia on viral dynamics in nature, it is important to consider the impact of natural routes of virus infection on Wolbachia antiviral effects. Using adult Drosophila strains, we show here that Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that have previously been shown to confer antiviral protection following systemic viral infection also confer protection against virus-induced mortality following oral exposure to Drosophila C virus in adults. Interestingly, a different pattern was observed when the same fly lines were challenged with the virus when still larvae. Analysis of the four Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that were protective in adults indicated that only the w1118-wMelPop association conferred protection in larvae following oral delivery of the virus. Analysis of Wolbachia density using quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that a high Wolbachia density was congruent with antiviral protection in both adults and larvae. This study indicates that Wolbachia-mediated protection may vary between larval and adult stages of a given Wolbachia-host combination and that the variations in susceptibility by life stage correspond with Wolbachia density. The differences in the outcome of virus infection are likely to influence viral dynamics in Wolbachia-infected insect populations in nature and could also have important implications for the transmission of arboviruses in mosquito populations. PMID:26407882

  2. Neonatal Fc receptor expression in dendritic cells mediates protective immunity against colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kristi; Rath, Timo; Flak, Magdalena B; Arthur, Janelle C; Chen, Zhangguo; Glickman, Jonathan N; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Stachler, Matthew D; Odze, Robert D; Lencer, Wayne I; Jobin, Christian; Blumberg, Richard S

    2013-12-12

    Cancers arising in mucosal tissues account for a disproportionately large fraction of malignancies. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and the neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn) have an important function in the mucosal immune system that we have now shown extends to the induction of CD8(+) T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. We demonstrate that FcRn within dendritic cells (DCs) was critical for homeostatic activation of mucosal CD8(+) T cells that drove protection against the development of colorectal cancers and lung metastases. FcRn-mediated tumor protection was driven by DCs activation of endogenous tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells via the cross-presentation of IgG complexed antigens (IgG IC), as well as the induction of cytotoxicity-promoting cytokine secretion, particularly interleukin-12, both of which were independently triggered by the FcRn-IgG IC interaction in murine and human DCs. FcRn thus has a primary role within mucosal tissues in activating local immune responses that are critical for priming efficient anti-tumor immunosurveillance.

  3. Organ-Protective Effects of Red Wine Extract, Resveratrol, in Oxidative Stress-Mediated Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu-Chao; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol extracted from red wine, possesses potential antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, including the reduction of free radicals and proinflammatory mediators overproduction, the alteration of the expression of adhesion molecules, and the inhibition of neutrophil function. A growing body of evidence indicates that resveratrol plays an important role in reducing organ damage following ischemia- and hemorrhage-induced reperfusion injury. Such protective phenomenon is reported to be implicated in decreasing the formation and reaction of reactive oxygen species and pro-nflammatory cytokines, as well as the mediation of a variety of intracellular signaling pathways, including the nitric oxide synthase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, deacetylase sirtuin 1, mitogen-activated protein kinase, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha, hemeoxygenase-1, and estrogen receptor-related pathways. Reperfusion injury is a complex pathophysiological process that involves multiple factors and pathways. The resveratrol is an effective reactive oxygen species scavenger that exhibits an antioxidative property. In this review, the organ-protective effects of resveratrol in oxidative stress-related reperfusion injury will be discussed. PMID:26161238

  4. Novel Mode of ISG15-Mediated Protection against Influenza A Virus and Sendai Virus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Morales, David J.; Monte, Kristen; Sun, Lulu; Struckhoff, Jessica J.; Agapov, Eugene; Holtzman, Michael J.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2014-01-01

    small effect on virus replication in tissue culture, few studies have confirmed this mechanism of protection in vivo. In these studies we have found that while ISG15−/− mice are more susceptible to influenza A virus and Sendai virus infections, ISGylation does not appear to mediate this protection through the direct inhibition of virus replication or the modulation of the acute immune response. Thus, in addition to showing a novel mode of ISG15 mediated protection from virus infection, this study demonstrates the importance of studying the role of ISG15 in vivo. PMID:25320315

  5. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  6. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

    PubMed

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  7. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

    PubMed

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  8. Cch1p mediates Ca2+ influx to protect Saccharomyces cerevisiae against eugenol toxicity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Stephen K; McAinsh, Martin; Widdicks, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Eugenol has antifungal activity and is recognised as having therapeutic potential. However, little is known of the cellular basis of its antifungal activity and a better understanding of eugenol tolerance should lead to better exploitation of eugenol in antifungal therapies. The model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expressing apoaequorin was used to show that eugenol induces cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. We investigated the eugenol Ca(2+) signature in further detail and show that exponentially growing cells exhibit Ca(2+) elevation resulting exclusively from the influx of Ca(2+) across the plasma membrane whereas in stationary growth phase cells Ca(2+) influx from intracellular and extracellular sources contribute to the eugenol-induced Ca(2+) elevation. Ca(2+) channel deletion yeast mutants were used to identify the pathways mediating Ca(2+) influx; intracellular Ca(2+) release was mediated by the vacuolar Ca(2+) channel, Yvc1p, whereas the Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane could be resolved into Cch1p-dependent and Cch1p-independent pathways. We show that the growth of yeast devoid the plasma membrane Ca(2+) channel, Cch1p, was hypersensitive to eugenol and that this correlated with reduced Ca(2+) elevations. Taken together, these results indicate that a cch1p-mediated Ca(2+) influx is part of an intracellular signal which protects against eugenol toxicity. This study provides fresh insight into the mechanisms employed by fungi to tolerate eugenol toxicity which should lead to better exploitation of eugenol in antifungal therapies.

  9. Nitric oxide protects neuroblastoma cells from apoptosis induced by serum deprivation through cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) activation.

    PubMed

    Ciani, Elisabetta; Guidi, Sandra; Della Valle, Giuliano; Perini, Giovanni; Bartesaghi, Renata; Contestabile, Antonio

    2002-12-20

    The transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) mediates survival in many cells, including neurons. Recently, death of cerebellar granule neurons due to nitric oxide (NO) deprivation was shown to be accompanied by down-regulation of CREB activity (). We now provide evidence that overproduction of endogenous NO or supplementation with exogenous NO renders SK-N-BE human neuroblastoma cells more resistant to apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Parental cells underwent apoptosis after 24 h of serum deprivation, an outcome largely absent in clones overexpressing human neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). This protective effect was reversed by the inhibition of NOS itself or soluble guanylyl cyclase, pointing at cGMP as an intermediate effector of NO-mediated rescue. A slow-releasing NO donor protected parental cells to a significant extent, thus confirming the survival effect of NO. The impaired viability of serum-deprived parental cells was accompanied by a strong decrease of CREB phosphorylation and transcriptional activity, effects significantly attenuated in nNOS-overexpressing clones. To confirm the role of CREB in survival, the ectopic expression of CREB and/or protein kinase A largely counteracted serum deprivation-induced cell death of SK-N-BE cells, whereas transfection with a CREB negative mutant was ineffective. These experiments indicate that CREB activity is an important step for NO-mediated survival in neuronal cells.

  10. Nitric oxide protects neuroblastoma cells from apoptosis induced by serum deprivation through cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) activation.

    PubMed

    Ciani, Elisabetta; Guidi, Sandra; Della Valle, Giuliano; Perini, Giovanni; Bartesaghi, Renata; Contestabile, Antonio

    2002-12-20

    The transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) mediates survival in many cells, including neurons. Recently, death of cerebellar granule neurons due to nitric oxide (NO) deprivation was shown to be accompanied by down-regulation of CREB activity (). We now provide evidence that overproduction of endogenous NO or supplementation with exogenous NO renders SK-N-BE human neuroblastoma cells more resistant to apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Parental cells underwent apoptosis after 24 h of serum deprivation, an outcome largely absent in clones overexpressing human neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). This protective effect was reversed by the inhibition of NOS itself or soluble guanylyl cyclase, pointing at cGMP as an intermediate effector of NO-mediated rescue. A slow-releasing NO donor protected parental cells to a significant extent, thus confirming the survival effect of NO. The impaired viability of serum-deprived parental cells was accompanied by a strong decrease of CREB phosphorylation and transcriptional activity, effects significantly attenuated in nNOS-overexpressing clones. To confirm the role of CREB in survival, the ectopic expression of CREB and/or protein kinase A largely counteracted serum deprivation-induced cell death of SK-N-BE cells, whereas transfection with a CREB negative mutant was ineffective. These experiments indicate that CREB activity is an important step for NO-mediated survival in neuronal cells. PMID:12368293

  11. CXCR2 Signaling Protects Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells from IFN-γ/CXCL10-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    TIROTTA, EMANUELE; RANSOHOFF, RICHARD M.; LANE, THOMAS E.

    2016-01-01

    Infiltration of activated lymphocytes into the central nervous system (CNS) is potentially harmful by damaging resident cells through release of cytokines. Among these is IFN-γ that is secreted by activated natural killer (NK) cells and T lymphocytes and can exert a cytotoxic effect on resident glial populations including oligodendrocytes. Here we show that treatment of mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC)-enriched cultures with IFN-γ resulted in a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis. IFN-γ-induced apoptosis is mediated, in part, through induction of the CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10; IP-10) from cultured OPCs. Treatment of OPCs with CXCL10 resulted in cell death in a concentration-dependent manner and IFN-γ-treatment of CXCL10−/− OPCs resulted in >50% reduction in cell death. Further, treatment of CXCR3−/− OPC cultures with either IFN-γ or CXCL10 resulted in reduced cell death supporting an important role for CXCL10 signaling in IFN-γ-mediated OPC apoptosis. Data is also provided demonstrating that signaling through CXCR2 protects either IFN-γ or CXCL10-treated OPC cultures from apoptosis and this effect is abolished in CXCR2−/− OPCs. CXCR2-mediated protection from apoptosis is associated with impaired cleavage of caspase 3 and elevated expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. These findings demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for CXCL10 in contributing to neuropathology by promoting oligodendrocyte apoptosis and emphasize the potential relevance in targeting CXCL10 in treating human demyelinating diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS). PMID:21656856

  12. Finite element analysis for the evaluation of protective functions of helmets against ballistic impact.

    PubMed

    Lee, H P; Gong, S W

    2010-10-01

    The ballistic impact of a human head model protected by a Personnel Armor System Ground Troops Kevlar® helmet is analysed using the finite element method. The emphasis is to examine the effect of the interior cushioning system as a shock absorber in mitigating ballistic impact to the head. The simulations of the frontal and side impacts of the full metal jacket (FMJ) and fragment-simulating projectile (FSP) were carried out using LS-DYNA. It was found that the Kevlar® helmet with its interior nylon and leather strap was able to defeat both the FMJ and FSP without the projectiles penetrating the helmet. However, the head injuries caused by the FMJ impact can be fatal due to the high stiffness of the interior strap. The bulge section at the side of the Kevlar® helmet had more room for deformation that resulted in less serious head injuries.

  13. VIP1 response elements mediate mitogen-activated protein kinase 3-induced stress gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pitzschke, Andrea; Djamei, Armin; Teige, Markus; Hirt, Heribert

    2009-10-27

    The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens transforms plant cells by delivering its T-DNA into the plant cell nucleus where it integrates into the plant genome and causes tumor formation. A key role of VirE2-interacting protein 1 (VIP1) in the nuclear import of T-DNA during Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation has been unravelled and VIP1 was shown to undergo nuclear localization upon phosphorylation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3. Here, we provide evidence that VIP1 encodes a functional bZIP transcription factor that stimulates stress-dependent gene expression by binding to VIP1 response elements (VREs), a DNA hexamer motif. VREs are overrepresented in promoters responding to activation of the MPK3 pathway such as Trxh8 and MYB44. Accordingly, plants overexpressing VIP1 accumulate high levels of Trxh8 and MYB44 transcripts, whereas stress-induced expression of these genes is impaired in mpk3 mutants. Trxh8 and MYB44 promoters are activated by VIP1 in a VRE-dependent manner. VIP1 strongly enhances expression from a synthetic promoter harboring multiple VRE copies and directly interacts with VREs in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of the MYB44 promoter confirm that VIP1 binding to VREs is enhanced under conditions of MPK3 pathway stimulation. These results provide molecular insight into the cellular mechanism of target gene regulation by the MPK3 pathway. PMID:19820165

  14. Anti-pathogen protection versus survival costs mediated by an ectosymbiont in an ant host

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Matthias; Grasse, Anna V.; Tragust, Simon; Cremer, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    The fitness effects of symbionts on their hosts can be context-dependent, with usually benign symbionts causing detrimental effects when their hosts are stressed, or typically parasitic symbionts providing protection towards their hosts (e.g. against pathogen infection). Here, we studied the novel association between the invasive garden ant Lasius neglectus and its fungal ectosymbiont Laboulbenia formicarum for potential costs and benefits. We tested ants with different Laboulbenia levels for their survival and immunity under resource limitation and exposure to the obligate killing entomopathogen Metarhizium brunneum. While survival of L. neglectus workers under starvation was significantly decreased with increasing Laboulbenia levels, host survival under Metarhizium exposure increased with higher levels of the ectosymbiont, suggesting a symbiont-mediated anti-pathogen protection, which seems to be driven mechanistically by both improved sanitary behaviours and an upregulated immune system. Ants with high Laboulbenia levels showed significantly longer self-grooming and elevated expression of immune genes relevant for wound repair and antifungal responses (β-1,3-glucan binding protein, Prophenoloxidase), compared with ants carrying low Laboulbenia levels. This suggests that the ectosymbiont Laboulbenia formicarum weakens its ant host by either direct resource exploitation or the costs of an upregulated behavioural and immunological response, which, however, provides a prophylactic protection upon later exposure to pathogens. PMID:25473011

  15. Genetically Engineered Human Islets Protected From CD8-mediated Autoimmune Destruction In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zaldumbide, Arnaud; Alkemade, Gonnie; Carlotti, Françoise; Nikolic, Tatjana; Abreu, Joana RF; Engelse, Marten A; Skowera, Anja; de Koning, Eelco J; Peakman, Mark; Roep, Bart O; Hoeben, Rob C; Wiertz, Emmanuel JHJ

    2013-01-01

    Islet transplantation is a promising therapy for type 1 diabetes, but graft function and survival are compromised by recurrent islet autoimmunity. Immunoprotection of islets will be required to improve clinical outcome. We engineered human β cells to express herpesvirus-encoded immune-evasion proteins, “immunevasins.” The capacity of immunevasins to protect β cells from autoreactive T-cell killing was evaluated in vitro and in vivo in humanized mice. Lentiviral vectors were used for efficient genetic modification of primary human β cells without impairing their function. Using a novel β-cell–specific reporter gene assay, we show that autoreactive cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell clones isolated from patients with recent onset diabetes selectively destroyed human β cells, and that coexpression of the human cytomegalovirus-encoded US2 protein and serine proteinase inhibitor 9 offers highly efficient protection in vitro. Moreover, coimplantation of these genetically modified pseudoislets with β-cell–specific cytotoxic T cells into immunodeficient mice achieves preserved human insulin production and C-peptide secretion. Collectively, our data provide proof of concept that human β cells can be efficiently genetically modified to provide protection from killing mediated by autoreactive T cells and retain their function in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23689598

  16. SOD2 Mediates Amifostine-Induced Protection against Glutamate in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ji; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Xiaolei; Wu, Mingchun; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Xiaonan; Huo, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cytoprotectant amifostine attenuates radiation-induced oxidative injury by increasing intracellular manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in peripheral tissue. However, whether amifostine could protect neuronal cells against oxidative injury has not been reported. The purpose of this study is to explore the protection of amifostine in PC12 cells. Methods. PC12 cells exposed to glutamate were used to mimic neuronal oxidative injury. SOD assay kit was taken to evaluate intracellular Cu/Zn SOD (SOD1) and SOD2 activities; western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were performed to investigate SOD2 protein expression; MTT, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), release and cell morphology were used to evaluate cell injury degree, and apoptotic rate and cleaved caspase-3 expression were taken to assess apoptosis; mitochondrial superoxide production, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) levels were evaluated by reagent kits. Results. Amifostine increased SOD2 activity and expression, decreased cell injury and apoptosis, reduced mitochondrial superoxide production and intracellular ROS generation, and restored intracellular GSH and CAT levels in PC12 cells exposed to glutamate. SOD2-siRNA, however, significantly reversed the amifostine-induced cytoprotective and antioxidative actions. Conclusion. SOD2 mediates amifostine-induced protection in PC12 cells exposed to glutamate. PMID:26770652

  17. An endothelial TLR4-VEGFR2 pathway mediates lung protection against oxidant-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Takyar, Seyedtaghi; Zhang, Yi; Haslip, Maria; Jin, Lei; Shan, Peiying; Zhang, Xuchen; Lee, Patty J

    2016-03-01

    TLR4 deficiency causes hypersusceptibility to oxidant-induced injury. We investigated the role of TLR4 in lung protection, using used bone marrow chimeras; cell-specific transgenic modeling; and lentiviral delivery in vivo to knock down or express TLR4 in various lung compartments; and lung-specific VEGF transgenic mice to investigate the effect of TLR4 on VEGF-mediated protection. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to 100% oxygen in an enclosed chamber and assessed for survival and lung injury. Primary endothelial cells were stimulated with recombinant VEGF and exposed to hyperoxia or hydrogen peroxide. Endothelium-specific expression of human TLR4 (as opposed to its expression in epithelium or immune cells) increased the survival of TLR4-deficent mice in hyperoxia by 24 h and decreased LDH release and lung cell apoptosis after 72 h of exposure by 30%. TLR4 expression was necessary and sufficient for the protective effect of VEGF in the lungs and in primary endothelial cells in culture. TLR4 knockdown inhibited VEGF signaling through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), Akt, and ERK pathways in lungs and primary endothelial cells and decreased the availability of VEGFR2 at the cell surface. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism through which TLR4, an innate pattern receptor, interacts with an endothelial survival pathway.

  18. Virtual memory T cells develop and mediate bystander protective immunity in an IL-15-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    White, Jason T.; Cross, Eric W.; Burchill, Matthew A.; Danhorn, Thomas; McCarter, Martin D.; Rosen, Hugo R.; O'Connor, Brian; Kedl, Ross M.

    2016-01-01

    Virtual memory cells (VM) are an antigen-specific, memory phenotype CD8 T-cell subset found in lymphoreplete, unchallenged mice. Previous studies indicated that VM cells were the result of homeostatic proliferation (HP) resembling the proliferation observed in a lymphopenic environment. Here we demonstrate that HP is ongoing in lymphoreplete mice, the degree of which is dictated by the number of naive CD8 T cells with a sufficiently high affinity for self-antigen interacting with peripheral IL-15. VM cell transcriptional profiles suggest a capacity to mediate protective immunity via antigen non-specific bystander killing, a function we show is dependent on IL-15. Finally, we show a VM-like population of human cells that accumulate with age and traffic to the liver, displaying phenotypic and functional attributes consistent with the bystander protective functions of VM cells identified in the mouse. These data identify developmental and functional attributes of VM cells, including their likely role in protective immunity. PMID:27097762

  19. Virtual memory T cells develop and mediate bystander protective immunity in an IL-15-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    White, Jason T; Cross, Eric W; Burchill, Matthew A; Danhorn, Thomas; McCarter, Martin D; Rosen, Hugo R; O'Connor, Brian; Kedl, Ross M

    2016-01-01

    Virtual memory cells (VM) are an antigen-specific, memory phenotype CD8 T-cell subset found in lymphoreplete, unchallenged mice. Previous studies indicated that VM cells were the result of homeostatic proliferation (HP) resembling the proliferation observed in a lymphopenic environment. Here we demonstrate that HP is ongoing in lymphoreplete mice, the degree of which is dictated by the number of naive CD8 T cells with a sufficiently high affinity for self-antigen interacting with peripheral IL-15. VM cell transcriptional profiles suggest a capacity to mediate protective immunity via antigen non-specific bystander killing, a function we show is dependent on IL-15. Finally, we show a VM-like population of human cells that accumulate with age and traffic to the liver, displaying phenotypic and functional attributes consistent with the bystander protective functions of VM cells identified in the mouse. These data identify developmental and functional attributes of VM cells, including their likely role in protective immunity. PMID:27097762

  20. Dynamic simulation and finite element analysis of the human mandible injury protected by polyvinyl alcohol sponge.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-09-01

    There have been intensive efforts to find a suitable kinetic energy absorbing material for helmet and bulletproof vest design. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge is currently in extensive use as scaffolding material for tissue engineering applications. PVA can also be employed instead of commonly use kinetic energy absorbing materials to increase the kinetic energy absorption capacity of current helmet and bulletproof vest materials owing to its excellent mechanical properties. In this study, a combined hexahedral finite element (FE) model is established to determine the potential protection ability of PVA sponge in controlling the level of injury for gunshot wounds to the human mandible. Digital computed tomography data for the human mandible are used to establish a three-dimensional FE model of the human mandible. The mechanism by which a gunshot injures the protected mandible by PVA sponge is dynamically simulated using the LS-DYNA code under two different shot angles. The stress distributions in different parts of the mandible and sponge after injury are also simulated. The modeling results regardless of shot angle reveal that the substantial amount of kinetic energy of the steel ball (67%) is absorbed by the PVA sponge and, consequently, injury severity of the mandible is significantly decreased. The highest energy loss (170 J) is observed for the impact at entry angle of 70°. The results suggest the application of the PVA sponge as an alternative reinforcement material in helmet and bulletproof vest design to absorb most of the impact energy and reduce the transmitted load.

  1. Zinc-Dependent Protection of Tobacco and Rice Cells From Aluminum-Induced Superoxide-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cun; Hara, Ayaka; Comparini, Diego; Bouteau, François; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Al3+ toxicity in growing plants is considered as one of the major factors limiting the production of crops on acidic soils worldwide. In the last 15 years, it has been proposed that Al3+ toxicity are mediated with distortion of the cellular signaling mechanisms such as calcium signaling pathways, and production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) causing oxidative damages. On the other hand, zinc is normally present in plants at high concentrations and its deficiency is one of the most widespread micronutrient deficiencies in plants. Earlier studies suggested that lack of zinc often results in ROS-mediated oxidative damage to plant cells. Previously, inhibitory action of Zn2+ against lanthanide-induced superoxide generation in tobacco cells have been reported, suggesting that Zn2+ interferes with the cation-induced ROS production via stimulation of NADPH oxidase. In the present study, the effect of Zn2+ on Al3+-induced superoxide generation in the cell suspension cultures of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cell-line, BY-2) and rice (Oryza sativa L., cv. Nipponbare), was examined. The Zn2+-dependent inhibition of the Al3+-induced oxidative burst was observed in both model cells selected from the monocots and dicots (rice and tobacco), suggesting that this phenomenon (Al3+/Zn2+ interaction) can be preserved in higher plants. Subsequently induced cell death in tobacco cells was analyzed by lethal cell staining with Evans blue. Obtained results indicated that presence of Zn2+ at physiological concentrations can protect the cells by preventing the Al3+-induced superoxide generation and cell death. Furthermore, the regulation of the Ca2+ signaling, i.e., change in the cytosolic Ca2+ ion concentration, and the cross-talks among the elements which participate in the pathway were further explored. PMID:26648960

  2. Similar cation channels mediate protection from cerebellar exitotoxicity by exercise and inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ari, Shani; Ofek, Keren; Barbash, Shahar; Meiri, Hanoch; Kovalev, Eugenia; Greenberg, David Samuel; Soreq, Hermona; Shoham, Shai

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Exercise and inherited factors both affect recovery from stroke and head injury, but the underlying mechanisms and interconnections between them are yet unknown. Here, we report that similar cation channels mediate the protective effect of exercise and specific genetic background in a kainate injection model of cerebellar stroke. Microinjection to the cerebellum of the glutamatergic agonist, kainate, creates glutamatergic excito-toxicity characteristic of focal stroke, head injury or alcoholism. Inherited protection and prior exercise were both accompanied by higher cerebellar expression levels of the Kir6.1 ATP-dependent potassium channel in adjacent Bergmann glia, and voltage-gated KVbeta2 and cyclic nucleotide-gated cation HCN1 channels in basket cells. Sedentary FVB/N and exercised C57BL/6 mice both expressed higher levels of these cation channels compared to sedentary C57BL/6 mice, and were both found to be less sensitive to glutamate toxicity. Moreover, blocking ATP-dependent potassium channels with Glibenclamide enhanced kainate-induced cell death in cerebellar slices from the resilient sedentary FVB/N mice. Furthermore, exercise increased the number of acetylcholinesterase-positive fibres in the molecular layer, reduced cerebellar cytokine levels and suppressed serum acetylcholinesterase activity, suggesting anti-inflammatory protection by enhanced cholinergic signalling. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that routine exercise and specific genetic backgrounds confer protection from cerebellar glutamatergic damages by similar molecular mechanisms, including elevated expression of cation channels. In addition, our findings highlight the involvement of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in insult-inducible cerebellar processes. These mechanisms are likely to play similar roles in other brain regions and injuries as well, opening new venues for targeted research efforts. PMID:21507200

  3. EGFR mediates astragaloside IV-induced Nrf2 activation to protect cortical neurons against in vitro ischemia/reperfusion damages.

    PubMed

    Gu, Da-Min; Lu, Pei-Hua; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Xiang; Sun, Min; Chen, Guo-Qian; Wang, Qiong

    2015-02-13

    In this study, we tested the potential role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) against oxygen and glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R)-induced damages in murine cortical neurons, and studied the associated signaling mechanisms. AS-IV exerted significant neuroprotective effects against OGD/R by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, thereby attenuating oxidative stress and neuronal cell death. We found that AS-IV treatment in cortical neurons resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by Nrf2 Ser-40 phosphorylation, and its nuclear localization, as well as transcription of antioxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes: heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) and sulphiredoxin 1 (SRXN-1). Knockdown of Nrf2 through lentiviral shRNAs prevented AS-IV-induced ARE genes transcription, and abolished its anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. Further, we discovered that AS-IV stimulated heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) release to trans-activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cortical neurons. Blockage or silencing EGFR prevented Nrf2 activation by AS-IV, thus inhibiting AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities against OGD/R. In summary, AS-IV protects cortical neurons against OGD/R damages through activating of EGFR-Nrf2 signaling. PMID:25582778

  4. The protective role of prosocial behaviors on antisocial behaviors: the mediating effects of deviant peer affiliation.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gustavo; Mestre, Maria Vicenta; McGinley, Meredith M; Tur-Porcar, Ana; Samper, Paula; Opal, Deanna

    2014-06-01

    Prosocial behaviors, actions intended to help others, may serve a protective function against association with deviant peers and subsequent delinquent and antisocial behaviors. The present study examined the relations among specific types of prosocial behaviors, deviant peer affiliation, and delinquent and aggressive behaviors. Six hundred and sixty-six adolescents (46% girls; M age = 15.33, SD = .47) from Valencia, Spain completed questionnaires of prosocial behaviors, affiliation with deviant peers, antisocial behaviors, and aggression. Results showed that antisocial behaviors were negatively related only to specific forms of prosocial behaviors. Further analyses showed that deviant peer affiliation mediated the relations between compliant prosocial behavior and delinquency and aggression. Although altruism was not directly related to delinquency and aggression, it was indirectly linked to the behaviors via deviant peer affiliation. Discussion focuses on the relevance of specific forms of prosocial behaviors to antisocial behaviors and the risk of deviant peers for prosocial youth.

  5. CDK4-mediated MnSOD activation and mitochondrial homeostasis in radioadaptive protection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cuihong; Qin, Lili; Shi, Yan; Candas, Demet; Fan, Ming; Lu, Chung-Ling; Vaughan, Andrew T M; Shen, Rulong; Wu, Larry S; Liu, Rui; Li, Robert F; Murley, Jeffrey S; Woloschak, Gayle; Grdina, David J; Li, Jian Jian

    2015-04-01

    Mammalian cells are able to sense environmental oxidative and genotoxic conditions such as the environmental low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) present naturally on the earth's surface. The stressed cells then can induce a so-called radioadaptive response with an enhanced cellular homeostasis and repair capacity against subsequent similar genotoxic conditions such as a high dose radiation. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), a primary mitochondrial antioxidant in mammals, has long been known to play a crucial role in radioadaptive protection by detoxifying O2(•-) generated by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast to the well-studied mechanisms of SOD2 gene regulation, the mechanisms underlying posttranslational regulation of MnSOD for radioprotection remain to be defined. Herein, we demonstrate that cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) serves as the messenger to deliver the stress signal to mitochondria to boost mitochondrial homeostasis in human skin keratinocytes under LDIR-adaptive radioprotection. Cyclin D1/CDK4 relocates to mitochondria at the same time as MnSOD enzymatic activation peaks without significant changes in total MnSOD protein level. The mitochondrial-localized CDK4 directly phosphorylates MnSOD at serine-106 (S106), causing enhanced MnSOD enzymatic activity and mitochondrial respiration. Expression of mitochondria-targeted dominant negative CDK4 or the MnSOD-S106 mutant reverses LDIR-induced mitochondrial enhancement and adaptive protection. The CDK4-mediated MnSOD activation and mitochondrial metabolism boost are also detected in skin tissues of mice receiving in vivo whole-body LDIR. These results demonstrate a unique CDK4-mediated mitochondrial communication that allows cells to sense environmental genotoxic stress and boost mitochondrial homeostasis by enhancing phosphorylation and activation of MnSOD.

  6. CDK4-mediated MnSOD activation and mitochondrial homeostasis in radioadaptive protection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cuihong; Qin, Lili; Shi, Yan; Candas, Demet; Fan, Ming; Lu, Chung-Ling; Vaughan, Andrew T M; Shen, Rulong; Wu, Larry S; Liu, Rui; Li, Robert F; Murley, Jeffrey S; Woloschak, Gayle; Grdina, David J; Li, Jian Jian

    2015-04-01

    Mammalian cells are able to sense environmental oxidative and genotoxic conditions such as the environmental low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) present naturally on the earth's surface. The stressed cells then can induce a so-called radioadaptive response with an enhanced cellular homeostasis and repair capacity against subsequent similar genotoxic conditions such as a high dose radiation. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), a primary mitochondrial antioxidant in mammals, has long been known to play a crucial role in radioadaptive protection by detoxifying O2(•-) generated by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast to the well-studied mechanisms of SOD2 gene regulation, the mechanisms underlying posttranslational regulation of MnSOD for radioprotection remain to be defined. Herein, we demonstrate that cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) serves as the messenger to deliver the stress signal to mitochondria to boost mitochondrial homeostasis in human skin keratinocytes under LDIR-adaptive radioprotection. Cyclin D1/CDK4 relocates to mitochondria at the same time as MnSOD enzymatic activation peaks without significant changes in total MnSOD protein level. The mitochondrial-localized CDK4 directly phosphorylates MnSOD at serine-106 (S106), causing enhanced MnSOD enzymatic activity and mitochondrial respiration. Expression of mitochondria-targeted dominant negative CDK4 or the MnSOD-S106 mutant reverses LDIR-induced mitochondrial enhancement and adaptive protection. The CDK4-mediated MnSOD activation and mitochondrial metabolism boost are also detected in skin tissues of mice receiving in vivo whole-body LDIR. These results demonstrate a unique CDK4-mediated mitochondrial communication that allows cells to sense environmental genotoxic stress and boost mitochondrial homeostasis by enhancing phosphorylation and activation of MnSOD. PMID:25578653

  7. Unmasking of a Protective TNFR1 Mediated Signal in the Collagen Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Skipp, Cheryll; Raman, Thiagarajan; Valuck, Robert J.; Watkins, Herschel; Palmer, Brent E.; Scheinman, Robert I.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: TNFR1 plays a major role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we explore the relative importance of TNFR1 signaling in the hematopoietic tissue compartment for disease progression. METHODS: DBA/1 mice were lethally irradiated and rescued with bone marrow derived from either DBA/1 or TNFR1−/− animals. The mice were then input into the collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model and disease progression characterized. RESULTS: Surprisingly, TNFR1−/− transplant mice input into the CIA model develop increased disease as compared to controls. This could not be attributed to either an increased primary response to collagen or to the contribution of a non-DBA genetic background. Histological markers of advanced disease were evident in TNFR1−/− transplant mice shortly after initiation of the immune response to collagen and long before clinical evidence of disease. Serum TNFα was undetectable while serum IL-12p40 levels were increased in TNFR1−/− transplant mice at the end point of the study. CONCLUSION: These data raise the intriguing possibility of the existence of an anti-inflammatory TNFR1 mediated circuit in the hematopoietic compartment. This circuit bears a resemblance to emerging data delineating a switch in TNFα function observed in the resolution of bacterial infections. These data suggest that TNFR1 mediated signals in the radio-resistant tissues contributes to disease progression while TNFR1 mediated signals in the radio-sensitive tissues can contribute to protection from disease. We thus put forward the hypothesis that the degree of responce to TNFα blockade in RA is dependent, in part, on the relative genetic strengths of these two pathways. PMID:19180511

  8. Protective effect of thioredoxin upon NO-mediated cell injury in THP1 monocytic human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ferret, P J; Soum, E; Negre, O; Wollman, E E; Fradelizi, D

    2000-01-01

    Although NO has been postulated to play important roles in host defences, it is potentially damaging for exposed cells, including for the macrophages producing the NO. Thus a network of radical acceptors and enzymes is thought to play an important redox-buffering role to protect cells against NO-mediated injury. We examined the properties of the redox systems superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase, glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx), in regulating the viability of two human monocytic cell lines (THP1 and U937) exposed to the NO-generating compound diethylene triamine-nitric oxide (DETA-NO). We observed that NO-induced cytotoxic effects were time- and dose-dependent towards the two cell lines. After vitamin-induced differentiation in vitro with retinoic acid (RA) and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D(3) (VD), termed RA/VD, we observed that THP1 RA/VD cells became more resistant to NO-mediated cytotoxicity whereas the susceptibility of U937 cells was not modified. Using Western blotting and reverse-transcriptase PCR methods, we observed that gene transcription and protein expression of Trx and thioredoxin reductase were significantly increased upon RA/VD treatment and differentiation in THP1 cells. By contrast, SOD/catalase and GSH redox state remained unmodified. Finally, a stable transfectant THP1 line overexpressing Trx was found to be more resistant than THP1 control cells that were untransfected or transfected with an empty plasmid, when exposed to DETA-NO in vitro. In conclusion, we observed an inverse correlation between cell susceptibility to NO damaging effects and Trx expression, suggesting that the Trx system may have important preventative capacities towards NO-mediated cellular injury in monocytic macrophage cells. PMID:10698704

  9. Drinking Motives and Alcohol Use Behaviors among African American College Students: The Mediating Role of Protective Behavioral Strategies.

    PubMed

    Madson, Michael B; Villarosa, Margo C; Moorer, Kayla D; Zeigler-Hill, Virgil

    2015-01-01

    Drinking motives are robust predictors of alcohol use behaviors among college students. However, less is known about the link between drinking motives and alcohol use behaviors among African American college students. This study explored the associations between drinking motives and alcohol use behaviors in a sample of 215 African American college students. The study also assessed whether protective behavioral strategies mediated the associations between drinking motives and alcohol use behaviors. A direct relationship emerged between enhancement motives and alcohol consumption, harmful drinking and alcohol-related negative consequences. Protective behavioral strategies mediated each of these relationships. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  10. Role of Apoptotic Proteins in REC-2006 Mediated Radiation Protection in Hepatoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Ashok; Arora, Rajesh; Chawla, Raman; Jain, Swatantra Kumar; Tripathi, Rajendra Prasad; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the role of apoptotic proteins in REC-2006-mediated radiation protection in hepatoma cell lines. REC-2006 treatment 2 h before irradiation strongly inhibited the cleavage of ATM and PARP-1 in HepG2 cells. The expression of nuclear apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) was found to be more inhibited (~17%) in HepG2 cells in REC-2006 + radiation-treated group. More inhibition (~33%) of cytochrome c was observed in HepG2 cells upon REC-2006 treatment 2 h prior irradiation. Similarly, significantly more (P<.05) inhibition of Apaf-1, caspase-9 and caspase-3 was observed in REC-2006 + radition-treated group in HepG2 cells. REC-2006 treatment restored the expression of ICAD in HepG2 cells; however, no restoration was observed in Hep3B cells. Lower nuclear to cytoplasmic CAD ratio was observed in HepG2 cells (~0.6) as compared with Hep3B cells (~1.2) in REC-2006 + radiation-treated group. In conclusion, REC-2006 rendered higher protection in HepG2 cells by inhibiting the expression and translocation of AIF, inhibiting the cleavage of ATM and PARP-1, restoring the expression of ICAD, inhibiting the release of cytochrome c and thus modulating the expression of Apaf-1 caspase-9 and activity of caspase-3.

  11. Mcl-1 protects prostate cancer cells from cell death mediated by chemotherapy-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Teresita; de las Pozas, Alicia; Parrondo, Ricardo; Palenzuela, Deanna; Cayuso, William; Rai, Priyamvada; Perez-Stable, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 is highly expressed in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), resulting in resistance to apoptosis and association with poor prognosis. Although predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, there is evidence that Mcl-1 exhibits nuclear localization where it is thought to protect against DNA damage-induced cell death. The role of Mcl-1 in mediating resistance to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage in prostate cancer (PCa) is not known. We show in human PCa cell lines and in TRAMP, a transgenic mouse model of PCa, that the combination of the antimitotic agent ENMD-1198 (analog of 2-methoxyestradiol) with betulinic acid (BA, increases proteotoxic stress) targets Mcl-1 by increasing its proteasomal degradation, resulting in increased γH2AX (DNA damage) and apoptotic/necrotic cell death. Knockdown of Mcl-1 in CRPC cells leads to elevated γH2AX, DNA strand breaks, and cell death after treatment with 1198 + BA- or doxorubicin. Additional knockdowns in PC3 cells suggests that cytoplasmic Mcl-1 protects against DNA damage by blocking the mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor and thereby preventing its nuclear translocation and subsequent interaction with the cyclophilin A endonuclease. Overall, our results suggest that chemotherapeutic agents that target Mcl-1 will promote cell death in response to DNA damage, particularly in CRPC. PMID:26425662

  12. Bright cyclic light rearing-mediated retinal protection against damaging light exposure in adrenalectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Tanito, Masaki; Anderson, Robert E

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that albino rats and mice raised in bright cyclic light are protected from light-induced retinal damage. We tested if the stress response mediated by the adrenal grand is involved in the initiation of this neuroprotective phenomenon. Balb/c mice that were adrenalectomized (Adrex) or sham operated at 28 days of age were kept under dim (5 lux) or bright (400 lux) cyclic light (12h on/off) for 2 weeks. Thereafter, their electroretinogram (ERG), outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness and area, and plasma corticosterone levels were measured in animals with (dim+light and bright+light groups) and without (dim and bright groups) damaging light exposure (3000 lux for 24 h). In the dim+light group, a- and b-wave amplitudes and the ONL thicknesses and areas were significantly higher in the Adrex animals than the sham animals, indicating that adrenalectomy itself yielded retinal protection. In the Adrex animals, the ONL areas were significantly larger in the bright+light group than the dim+light group, indicating that bright cyclic light rearing yielded further retinal tolerance, even in the absence of the adrenal gland. In sham animals, the plasma corticosterone concentration did not change between the dim and the light groups. Accordingly, glucocorticoid secreted from the adrenal gland is not likely to be required for the mechanisms of the light-adaptation neuroprotection phenomenon in mice.

  13. Nanoparticle-mediated catalase delivery protects human neurons from oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, A; Morris, V B; Labhasetwar, V; Ghorpade, A

    2013-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases and brain injury involve reactive oxygen species and implicate oxidative stress in disease mechanisms. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formation due to mitochondrial superoxide leakage perpetuates oxidative stress in neuronal injury. Catalase, an H2O2-degrading enzyme, thus remains an important antioxidant therapy target. However, catalase therapy is restricted by its labile nature and inadequate delivery. Here, a nanotechnology approach was evaluated using catalase-loaded, poly(lactic co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (NPs) in human neuronal protection against oxidative damage. This study showed highly efficient catalase encapsulation capable of retaining∼99% enzymatic activity. NPs released catalase rapidly, and antioxidant activity was sustained for over a month. NP uptake in human neurons was rapid and nontoxic. Although human neurons were highly sensitive to H2O2, NP-mediated catalase delivery successfully protected cultured neurons from H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Catalase-loaded NPs significantly reduced H2O2-induced protein oxidation, DNA damage, mitochondrial membrane transition pore opening and loss of cell membrane integrity and restored neuronal morphology, neurite network and microtubule-associated protein-2 levels. Further, catalase-loaded NPs improved neuronal recovery from H2O2 pre-exposure better than free catalase, suggesting possible applications in ameliorating stroke-relevant oxidative stress. Brain targeting of catalase-loaded NPs may find wide therapeutic applications for oxidative stress-associated acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24201802

  14. The transrepression arm of glucocorticoid receptor signaling is protective in mutant huntingtin-mediated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Varadarajan, S; Breda, C; Smalley, J L; Butterworth, M; Farrow, S N; Giorgini, F; Cohen, G M

    2015-08-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) occurs following the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and orchestrates an intricate balance between its prosurvival and apoptotic arms to restore cellular homeostasis and integrity. However, in certain neurodegenerative diseases, the apoptotic arm of the UPR is enhanced, resulting in excessive neuronal cell death and disease progression, both of which can be overcome by modulating the UPR. Here, we describe a novel crosstalk between glucocorticoid receptor signaling and the apoptotic arm of the UPR, thus highlighting the potential of glucocorticoid therapy in treating neurodegenerative diseases. Several glucocorticoids, but not mineralocorticoids, selectively antagonize ER stress-induced apoptosis in a manner that is downstream of and/or independent of the conventional UPR pathways. Using GRT10, a novel selective pharmacological modulator of glucocorticoid signaling, we describe the importance of the transrepression arm of the glucocorticoid signaling pathway in protection against ER stress-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we also observe the protective effects of glucocorticoids in vivo in a Drosophila model of Huntington's disease (HD), wherein treatment with different glucocorticoids diminished rhabdomere loss and conferred neuroprotection. Finally, we find that growth differentiation factor 15 has an important role downstream of glucocorticoid signaling in antagonizing ER stress-induced apoptosis in cells, as well as in preventing HD-mediated neurodegeneration in flies. Thus, our studies demonstrate that this novel crosstalk has the potential to be effectively exploited in alleviating several neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Immune cell-mediated protection of the mammary gland and the infant during breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Hassiotou, Foteini; Geddes, Donna T

    2015-05-01

    Breastfeeding has been regarded first and foremost as a means of nutrition for infants, providing essential components for their unique growth and developmental requirements. However, breast milk is also rich in immunologic factors, highlighting its importance as a mediator of protection. In accordance with its evolutionary origin, the mammary gland offers via the breastfeeding route continuation of the maternal to infant immunologic support established in utero. At birth, the infant's immune system is immature, and although it was exposed to the maternal microbial flora during pregnancy, it experiences an abrupt change in its microbial environment during and after birth, which is challenging and renders the infant highly susceptible to infection. Active and passive immunity protects the infant via breast milk, which is rich in immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, lysozyme, cytokines, and numerous other immunologic factors, including maternal leukocytes. Breast milk leukocytes provide active immunity and promote development of immunocompetence in the infant. Additionally, it has been speculated that they play a role in the protection of the mammary gland from infection. Leukocytes are thought to exert these functions via phagocytosis, secretion of antimicrobial factors and/or antigen presentation in both the mammary gland and the gastrointestinal tract of the infant, and also in other infant tissues, where they are transported via the systemic circulation. Recently, it has been demonstrated that breast milk leukocytes respond dynamically to maternal as well as infant infections, and are fewer in nonexclusively compared with exclusively breastfeeding dyads, further emphasizing their importance for both the mother and infant. This review summarizes the current knowledge of human milk leukocytes and factors influencing them, and presents recent novel findings supporting their potential as a diagnostic marker for infections of the lactating breast and of the breastfed infant.

  16. Immune Cell–Mediated Protection of the Mammary Gland and the Infant during Breastfeeding1234

    PubMed Central

    Hassiotou, Foteini; Geddes, Donna T

    2015-01-01

    Breastfeeding has been regarded first and foremost as a means of nutrition for infants, providing essential components for their unique growth and developmental requirements. However, breast milk is also rich in immunologic factors, highlighting its importance as a mediator of protection. In accordance with its evolutionary origin, the mammary gland offers via the breastfeeding route continuation of the maternal to infant immunologic support established in utero. At birth, the infant’s immune system is immature, and although it was exposed to the maternal microbial flora during pregnancy, it experiences an abrupt change in its microbial environment during and after birth, which is challenging and renders the infant highly susceptible to infection. Active and passive immunity protects the infant via breast milk, which is rich in immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, lysozyme, cytokines, and numerous other immunologic factors, including maternal leukocytes. Breast milk leukocytes provide active immunity and promote development of immunocompetence in the infant. Additionally, it has been speculated that they play a role in the protection of the mammary gland from infection. Leukocytes are thought to exert these functions via phagocytosis, secretion of antimicrobial factors and/or antigen presentation in both the mammary gland and the gastrointestinal tract of the infant, and also in other infant tissues, where they are transported via the systemic circulation. Recently, it has been demonstrated that breast milk leukocytes respond dynamically to maternal as well as infant infections, and are fewer in nonexclusively compared with exclusively breastfeeding dyads, further emphasizing their importance for both the mother and infant. This review summarizes the current knowledge of human milk leukocytes and factors influencing them, and presents recent novel findings supporting their potential as a diagnostic marker for infections of the lactating breast and of the breastfed

  17. Using hierarchical linear growth models to evaluate protective mechanisms that mediate science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Secker, Clare Elaine

    The study of students at risk is a major topic of science education policy and discussion. Much research has focused on describing conditions and problems associated with the statistical risk of low science achievement among individuals who are members of groups characterized by problems such as poverty and social disadvantage. But outcomes attributed to these factors do not explain the nature and extent of mechanisms that account for differences in performance among individuals at risk. There is ample theoretical and empirical evidence that demographic differences should be conceptualized as social contexts, or collections of variables, that alter the psychological significance and social demands of life events, and affect subsequent relationships between risk and resilience. The hierarchical linear growth models used in this dissertation provide greater specification of the role of social context and the protective effects of attitude, expectations, parenting practices, peer influences, and learning opportunities on science achievement. While the individual influences of these protective factors on science achievement were small, their cumulative effect was substantial. Meta-analysis conducted on the effects associated with psychological and environmental processes that mediate risk mechanisms in sixteen social contexts revealed twenty-two significant differences between groups of students. Positive attitudes, high expectations, and more intense science course-taking had positive effects on achievement of all students, although these factors were not equally protective in all social contexts. In general, effects associated with authoritative parenting and peer influences were negative, regardless of social context. An evaluation comparing the performance and stability of hierarchical linear growth models with traditional repeated measures models is included as well.

  18. Composite IS1 elements encoding hydroxamate-mediated iron uptake in FIme plasmids from epidemic Salmonella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, B; Nicoletti, M; Visca, P; Casalino, M; Valenti, P; Maimone, F

    1985-01-01

    Eleven FIme plasmids representative of those identified in epidemic strains of Salmonella wien and Salmonella typhimurium isolated in North Africa, Europe, and the Middle East have been examined for the presence of determinants of toxigenicity, adherence, and iron-sequestering mechanisms. Chemical and genetic data indicated that all plasmids code for a hydroxamate-mediated iron assimilation system. Detailed analysis of derivative plasmids and cloned fragments of FIme plasmid pZM61 demonstrated that the general genetic and structural organization of the DNA region containing the genes for hydroxamate biosynthesis and cloacin DF13 receptor was virtually identical to that described for the aerobactin-mediated iron uptake system of pColV-K30. This DNA region is part of a composite element that is 16.7 kilobases long and carries its IS1 modules as inverted repeats. A very similar element is present in either orientation in all nine FIme plasmids analyzed. Images PMID:2984176

  19. Analysis of trace elements responsible for antioxidant protection by SRXFA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchar, A.; Kolmogorov, Yu; Dikalova, A.; Yelinova, V.; Kondratev, V.

    2001-09-01

    The possibilities of using the energy dispersion synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis (SRXFA) for control of blood plasma and liver trace element (TE) content in rats with hyperproduction of oxygen radicals and hair TE content in women with mammary hyperplasia and cancer are demonstrated. Our data show that activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in the blood and liver depends on the amount of TE incorporated into the structure of the active center of these enzymes, which are responsible for antioxidant protection. A decrease of activity of these enzymes is accompanied by an increase of production of free OH radicals in the tissues. Clinical data demonstrated that scalp hair of patients with oncological mammary pathology was characterized by a significant decrease of concentrations of selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) and by an increase of chromium (Cr). The Se deficit was more pronounced in patients with cancer than in those with mammary hyperplasia ( p<0.05). The SRXFA method permits one to carry out a controllable correction of TE imbalance in many diseases whose development is caused by oxygen radical injury.

  20. Proximal tubule sphingosine kinase-1 has a critical role in A1 adenosine receptor-mediated renal protection from ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; Kim, Joo Yun; Brown, Kevin M.; Haase, Volker H.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Renal ischemia reperfusion injury is a major cause of acute kidney injury. We previously found that renal A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR) activation attenuated multiple cell death pathways including necrosis, apoptosis and inflammation. Here, we tested whether induction of cytoprotective sphingosine kinase (SK)-1 and sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) synthesis might be the mechanism of protection. A selective A1AR agonist (CCPA) increased the synthesis of S1P and selectively induced SK-1 in mouse kidney and HK-2 cells. This agonist failed to protect SK1-knockout but protected SK2-knockout mice against renal ischemia reperfusion injury indicating a critical role of SK1 in A1AR-mediated renal protection. Inhibition of SK prevented A1AR-mediated defense against necrosis and apoptosis in HK-2 cells. A selective S1P1R antagonist (W146) and global in vivo gene knockdown of S1P1Rs with small interfering RNA completely abolished the renal protection provided by CCPA. Mice selectively deficient in renal proximal tubule S1P1Rs (S1P1Rflox/flox PEPCKCre/−) were not protected against renal ischemia reperfusion injury by CCPA. Mechanistically, CCPA increased nuclear translocation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α in HK-2 cells and selective hypoxia inducible factor-1α inhibition blocked A1AR-mediated induction of SK1. Thus, proximal tubule SK-1 has a critical role in A1AR-mediated protection against renal ischemia reperfusion injury. PMID:22695326

  1. Gang Membership, School Violence, and the Mediating Effects of Risk and Protective Behaviors in California High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Joey Nuñez, Jr.; Gilreath, Tamika D.; Astor, Ron Avi; Benbenishty, Rami

    2014-01-01

    There is insufficient empirical evidence exploring associations between gang membership and school violence behaviors. Using a sample of 272,863 high school students, this study employs a structural equation model to examine how school risk and protective behaviors and attitudes mediate effects of gang members' involvement with school…

  2. C1 inhibitor-mediated myocardial protection from chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jinrong; Guo, Furong; Chen, Cheng; Yu, Xiaoman; Hu, Ke; Li, Mingjiang

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment for chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH)-induced cardiovascular injuries has yet to be determined. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential protective effect and mechanism of a C1 inhibitor in CIH in the myocardium. The present study used a rat model of CIH in which complement regulatory protein, known as C1 inhibitor (C1INH), was administered to the rats in the intervention groups. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. The expression of proteins associated with the apoptotic pathway, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bax and caspase-3 were detected by western blot analysis. The expression of complement C3 protein and RNA were also analyzed. C1INH was observed to improve the cardiac function in rats with CIH. Myocardial myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, was significantly decreased in the C1INH intervention group compared with the CIH control group, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis was significantly attenuated (P<0.05). Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were decreased and those of Bax were increased in the CIH group compared with the normal control group, but the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were increased and those of Bax were decreased in the C1INH intervention group, as compared with the CIH group. Furthermore, the CIH-induced expression and synthesis of complement C3 in the myocardium were also reduced in the C1INH intervention group. C1INH, in addition to inhibiting complement activation and inflammation, preserved cardiac function in CIH-mediated myocardial cell injury through an anti-apoptotic mechanism. PMID:27698713

  3. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Painter, Meghan M; Morrison, James H; Zoecklein, Laurie J; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Watzlawik, Jens O; Papke, Louisa M; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Matchett, William E; Turkowski, Kari L; Poeschla, Eric M; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-12-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection. PMID:26633895

  4. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Painter, Meghan M; Morrison, James H; Zoecklein, Laurie J; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Watzlawik, Jens O; Papke, Louisa M; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Matchett, William E; Turkowski, Kari L; Poeschla, Eric M; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-12-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection.

  5. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Meghan M.; Morrison, James H.; Zoecklein, Laurie J.; Rinkoski, Tommy A.; Watzlawik, Jens O.; Papke, Louisa M.; Warrington, Arthur E.; Bieber, Allan J.; Matchett, William E.; Turkowski, Kari L.; Poeschla, Eric M.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-01-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection. PMID:26633895

  6. C1 inhibitor-mediated myocardial protection from chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jinrong; Guo, Furong; Chen, Cheng; Yu, Xiaoman; Hu, Ke; Li, Mingjiang

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment for chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH)-induced cardiovascular injuries has yet to be determined. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential protective effect and mechanism of a C1 inhibitor in CIH in the myocardium. The present study used a rat model of CIH in which complement regulatory protein, known as C1 inhibitor (C1INH), was administered to the rats in the intervention groups. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. The expression of proteins associated with the apoptotic pathway, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bax and caspase-3 were detected by western blot analysis. The expression of complement C3 protein and RNA were also analyzed. C1INH was observed to improve the cardiac function in rats with CIH. Myocardial myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, was significantly decreased in the C1INH intervention group compared with the CIH control group, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis was significantly attenuated (P<0.05). Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were decreased and those of Bax were increased in the CIH group compared with the normal control group, but the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were increased and those of Bax were decreased in the C1INH intervention group, as compared with the CIH group. Furthermore, the CIH-induced expression and synthesis of complement C3 in the myocardium were also reduced in the C1INH intervention group. C1INH, in addition to inhibiting complement activation and inflammation, preserved cardiac function in CIH-mediated myocardial cell injury through an anti-apoptotic mechanism.

  7. Characteristic element of matrix attachment region mediates vector attachment and enhances nerve growth factor expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Zhang, J H; Sun, Q L; Yao, Z Y; Deng, B G; Guo, W Y; Wang, L; Dong, W H; Wang, F; Zhao, C P; Wang, T Y

    2015-08-07

    Preliminary studies have suggested that a characteristic element of the matrix attachment region (MAR) in human interferon-β mediates the adhesion of vectors to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In this study, we investigated if vector adhesion increased nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in CHO cells. The MAR characteristic element sequence of human interferon-β was inserted into the multiple-cloning site of the pEGFP-C1 vector. The target NGF gene was inserted upstream of the MAR characteristic element sequence to construct the MAR/NGF expression vector. The recombinant plasmid was transfected into CHO cells and stable monoclonal cells were selected using G418. NGF mRNA and protein expression was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Plasmid reduction experiments were used to determine the state of transfected plasmid in mammalian cells. The insertion of MAR into the vector increased NGF expression levels in CHO cells (1.93- fold) compared to the control. The recombinant plasmid expressing the MAR sequence was digested into a linear space vector. The inserted MAR and NGF sequences were consistent with those inserted into the plasmid before recombination. Therefore, we concluded that the MAR characteristic element mediates vector adhesion to CHO cells and enhances the stability and efficiency of the target gene expression.

  8. DJ-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Cytokine- and Streptozotocin-Mediated Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepak; Weber, Gesine; Eberhard, Daniel; Mehana, Amir E; Eglinger, Jan; Welters, Alena; Bartosinska, Barbara; Jeruschke, Kay; Weiss, Jürgen; Päth, Günter; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Seufert, Jochen; Lammert, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark feature of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the progressive dysfunction and loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and inflammatory cytokines are known to trigger beta cell death. Here we asked whether the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 encoded by the Parkinson's disease gene PARK7 protects islet cells from cytokine- and streptozotocin-mediated cell death. Wild type and DJ-1 knockout mice (KO) were treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDS) to induce inflammatory beta cell stress and cell death. Subsequently, glucose tolerance tests were performed, and plasma insulin as well as fasting and random blood glucose concentrations were monitored. Mitochondrial morphology and number of insulin granules were quantified in beta cells. Moreover, islet cell damage was determined in vitro after streptozotocin and cytokine treatment of isolated wild type and DJ-1 KO islets using calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining and TUNEL staining. Compared to wild type mice, DJ-1 KO mice became diabetic following MLDS treatment. Insulin concentrations were substantially reduced, and fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly higher in MLDS-treated DJ-1 KO mice compared to equally treated wild type mice. Rates of beta cell apoptosis upon MLDS treatment were twofold higher in DJ-1 KO mice compared to wild type mice, and in vitro inflammatory cytokines led to twice as much beta cell death in pancreatic islets from DJ-1 KO mice versus those of wild type mice. In conclusion, this study identified the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 as being capable of protecting pancreatic islet cells from cell death induced by an inflammatory and cytotoxic setting. PMID:26422139

  9. Identification of resolvin D2 receptor mediating resolution of infections and organ protection

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Nan; Dalli, Jesmond; Colas, Romain A.

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous mechanisms that orchestrate resolution of acute inflammation are essential in host defense and the return to homeostasis. Resolvin (Rv)D2 is a potent immunoresolvent biosynthesized during active resolution that stereoselectively stimulates resolution of acute inflammation. Here, using an unbiased G protein–coupled receptor-β-arrestin–based screening and functional sensing systems, we identified a receptor for RvD2, namely GPR18, that is expressed on human leukocytes, including polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), monocytes, and macrophages (MΦ). In human MΦ, RvD2-stimulated intracellular cyclic AMP was dependent on GPR18. RvD2-stimulated phagocytosis of Escherichia coli and apoptotic PMN (efferocytosis) were enhanced with GPR18 overexpression and significantly reduced by shRNA knockdown. Specific binding of RvD2 to recombinant GPR18 was confirmed using a synthetic 3H-labeled-RvD2. Scatchard analysis gave a Kd of ∼10 nM consistent with RvD2 bioactive concentration range. In both E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus infections, RvD2 limited PMN infiltration, enhanced phagocyte clearance of bacteria, and accelerated resolution. These actions were lost in GPR18-deficient mice. During PMN-mediated second organ injury, RvD2’s protective actions were also significantly diminished in GPR18-deficient mice. Together, these results provide evidence for a novel RvD2–GPR18 resolution axis that stimulates human and mouse phagocyte functions to control bacterial infections and promote organ protection. PMID:26195725

  10. RBM3 mediates structural plasticity and protective effects of cooling in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peretti, Diego; Bastide, Amandine; Radford, Helois; Verity, Nicholas; Molloy, Colin; Martin, Maria Guerra; Moreno, Julie A.; Steinert, Joern R; Smith, Tim; Dinsdale, David; Willis, Anne E.; Mallucci, Giovanna R.

    2014-01-01

    In the healthy adult brain synapses are continuously remodelled through a process of elimination and formation known as structural plasticity1. Reduction in synapse number is a consistent early feature of neurodegenerative diseases2, 3, suggesting deficient compensatory mechanisms. While much is known about toxic processes leading to synaptic dysfunction and loss in these disorders2,3, how synaptic regeneration is affected is unknown. In hibernating mammals, cooling induces loss of synaptic contacts, which are reformed on rewarming, a form of structural plasticity4, 5. We have found that similar changes occur in artificially cooled laboratory rodents. Cooling and hibernation also induce a number cold-shock proteins in the brain, including the RNA binding protein, RBM36. The relationship of such proteins to structural plasticity is unknown. Here we show that synapse regeneration is impaired in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease, in association with the failure to induce RBM3. In both prion-infected and 5×FAD (Alzheimer-type) mice7, the capacity to regenerate synapses after cooling declined in parallel with the loss of induction of RBM3. Enhanced expression of RBM3 in the hippocampus prevented this deficit and restored the capacity for synapse reassembly after cooling. Further, RBM3 over-expression, achieved either by boosting endogenous levels through hypothermia prior to the loss of the RBM3 response, or by lentiviral delivery, resulted in sustained synaptic protection in 5×FAD mice and throughout the course of prion disease, preventing behavioural deficits and neuronal loss and significantly prolonging survival. In contrast, knockdown of RBM3 exacerbated synapse loss in both models and accelerated disease and prevented the neuroprotective effects of cooling. Thus, deficient synapse regeneration, mediated at least in part by failure of the RBM3 stress response, contributes to synapse loss throughout the course of neurodegenerative disease. The data support

  11. Transcriptional activation of transposable elements in mouse zygotes is independent of Tet3-mediated 5-methylcytosine oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Azusa; Matoba, Shogo; Zhang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The methylation state of the paternal genome is rapidly reprogrammed shortly after fertilization. Recent studies have revealed that loss of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in zygotes correlates with appearance of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC). This process is mediated by Tet3 and the 5mC oxidation products generated in zygotes are gradually lost during preimplantation development through a replication-dependent dilution process. Despite these findings, the biological significance of Tet3-mediated oxidation of 5mC to 5hmC/5fC/5caC in zygotes is unknown. DNA methylation plays an important role in silencing gene expression including the repression of transposable elements (TEs). Given that the activation of TEs during preimplantation development correlates with loss of DNA methylation, it is believed that paternal DNA demethylation may have an important role in TE activation. Here we examined this hypothesis and found that Tet3-mediated 5mC oxidation does not have a significant contribution to TE activation. We show that the expression of LINE-1 (long interspersed nucleotide element 1) and ERVL (endogenous retroviruses class III) are activated from both paternal and maternal genomes in zygotes. Inhibition of 5mC oxidation by siRNA-mediated depletion of Tet3 affected neither TE activation, nor global transcription in zygotes. Thus, our study provides the first evidence demonstrating that activation of both TEs and global transcription in zygotes are independent of Tet3-mediated 5mC oxidation. PMID:23184059

  12. A sterile sperm caste protects brother fertile sperm from female-mediated death in Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    PubMed

    Holman, Luke; Snook, Rhonda R

    2008-02-26

    Spermicide (i.e., female-mediated sperm death) is an understudied but potentially widespread phenomenon that has important ramifications for the study of sexual conflict, postcopulatory sexual selection, and fertility [1, 2]. Males are predicted to evolve adaptations against spermicide, but few antispermicidal mechanisms have been definitively identified. One such adaptation may be the enigmatic infertile sperm morphs or "parasperm" produced by many species, which have been hypothesized to protect their fertile brother "eusperm" from spermicide [2, 3]. Here, we show that female Drosophila pseudoobscura reproductive tracts are spermicidal and that the survival of eusperm after exposure to the female tract is highest when males produce many parasperm. This study clarifies the adaptive significance of infertile sperm castes, which has remained elusive in Drosophila and other taxa despite much recent interest [2-8]. We suggest that spermicide and male countermeasures against it are more common than is appreciated currently and discuss how spermicide could drive the evolution of several key male traits, including sperm size and number.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the protection of dietary restriction against renal senescence in aged F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Juan; Cai, Guang-Yan; Ning, Yi-Chun; Cui, Jing; Hong, Quan; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Xu, Xiao-Meng; Bu, Ru; Sun, Xue-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2016-07-26

    Renal aging is always accompanied by increased oxidative stress. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can be up-regulated by 50% dietary restriction (DR) for 7-day and can block mitochondrial oxidative stress. H2S production exerts a critical role in yeast, worm, and fruit fly models of DR-mediated longevity. In this study, we found that renal aging could be attenuated by 30% DR for 6-month (DR-6M) and life-long (DR-LL), but not for 6-week (DR-6W). The expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CGL) and cystathionine-β- synthase (CBS) were improved by DR-6M and DR-LL. Endogenous H2S production shared the same trend with CBS and CGL, while glutathione (GSH) didn't. When comparing efficiencies of DR for different durations, more evident production of H2S was found in DR-6M and DR-LL than in DR-6W. Finally the level of oxidative stress was improved by DR-6M and DR-LL rather than by DR-6W. It concluded that aged rats had the ability to produce enough H2S on 30% DR interventions protecting against renal aging, and the effect of DR for long-term were more significant than that of DR for short-term.

  14. The Importance of Human FcγRI in Mediating Protection to Malaria

    PubMed Central

    de Koning-Ward, Tania F; Smith, Tim; Green, Judith; van Egmond, Marjolein; Leusen, Jeanette H. W; Lazarou, Maria; van de Winkel, Jan; Jones, Tarran S; Crabb, Brendan S; Holder, Anthony A; Pleass, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    The success of passive immunization suggests that antibody-based therapies will be effective at controlling malaria. We describe the development of fully human antibodies specific for Plasmodium falciparum by antibody repertoire cloning from phage display libraries generated from immune Gambian adults. Although these novel reagents bind with strong affinity to malaria parasites, it remains unclear if in vitro assays are predictive of functional immunity in humans, due to the lack of suitable animal models permissive for P. falciparum. A potentially useful solution described herein allows the antimalarial efficacy of human antibodies to be determined using rodent malaria parasites transgenic for P. falciparum antigens in mice also transgenic for human Fc-receptors. These human IgG1s cured animals of an otherwise lethal malaria infection, and protection was crucially dependent on human FcγRI. This important finding documents the capacity of FcγRI to mediate potent antimalaria immunity and supports the development of FcγRI-directed therapy for human malaria. PMID:17511516

  15. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the protection of dietary restriction against renal senescence in aged F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Juan; Cai, Guang-Yan; Ning, Yi-Chun; Cui, Jing; Hong, Quan; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Xu, Xiao-Meng; Bu, Ru; Sun, Xue-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Renal aging is always accompanied by increased oxidative stress. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can be up-regulated by 50% dietary restriction (DR) for 7-day and can block mitochondrial oxidative stress. H2S production exerts a critical role in yeast, worm, and fruit fly models of DR-mediated longevity. In this study, we found that renal aging could be attenuated by 30% DR for 6-month (DR-6M) and life-long (DR-LL), but not for 6-week (DR-6W). The expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CGL) and cystathionine-β- synthase (CBS) were improved by DR-6M and DR-LL. Endogenous H2S production shared the same trend with CBS and CGL, while glutathione (GSH) didn't. When comparing efficiencies of DR for different durations, more evident production of H2S was found in DR-6M and DR-LL than in DR-6W. Finally the level of oxidative stress was improved by DR-6M and DR-LL rather than by DR-6W. It concluded that aged rats had the ability to produce enough H2S on 30% DR interventions protecting against renal aging, and the effect of DR for long-term were more significant than that of DR for short-term. PMID:27456368

  16. Identification of 14-series sulfido-conjugated mediators that promote resolution of infection and organ protection

    PubMed Central

    Dalli, Jesmond; Chiang, Nan; Serhan, Charles N.

    2014-01-01

    Upon infection and inflammation, tissue repair and regeneration are essential in reestablishing function. Here we identified potent molecules present in self-limited infectious murine exudates, regenerating planaria, and human milk as well as macrophages that stimulate tissue regeneration in planaria and are proresolving. Characterization of their physical properties and isotope tracking indicated that the bioactive structures contained docosahexaenoic acid and sulfido-conjugate (SC) of triene double bonds that proved to be 13-glutathionyl, 14-hydroxy-docosahexaenoic acid (SCI) and 13-cysteinylglycinyl, 14-hydroxy-docosahexaenoic acid (SCII). These molecules rescued Escherichia coli infection-mediated delay in tissue regeneration in planaria, improving regeneration intervals from ∼4.2 to ∼3.7 d. Administration of SCs protected mice from second-organ reflow injury, promoting repair via limiting neutrophil infiltration, up-regulating Ki67, and Roof plate-specific spondin 3. At nanomolar potencies these conjugates also resolved E. coli infections by limiting neutrophil infiltration and stimulating bacterial phagocytosis and clearance as well as efferocytosis of apoptotic cells. Together, these findings identify previously undescribed conserved chemical signals and pathways in planaria, mouse, and human tissues that enhance host responses to contain infections, stimulate resolution of inflammation, and promote the restoration of function. PMID:25324525

  17. Paracrine action of HO-1-modified mesenchymal stem cells mediates cardiac protection and functional improvement.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bin; Ren, Xiaofeng; Lin, Guosheng; Zhu, Chengang; Chen, Honglei; Yin, Jiechao; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Bo; Ding, Danhua

    2008-10-01

    The aim has been to determine whether the supernatants of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transfected with adenovirus carrying human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) gene protect cardiomyocytes from ischemic injury. We have found that hHO-1 infected MSCs (hHO-1-MSCs) increased expression of hHO-1 protein. Apoptosis of cultured hHO-1-MSCs exposed to hypoxia was suppressed. Several cytokines, including HGF, bFGF, TGF-beta, VEGF and IL-1beta, were produced by hHO-1-MSCs, some being significantly enhanced under hypoxia stimulation. Meanwhile, those cytokines reduced caspase-3 level and activity in cultured adult rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (ARVCs) exposed to hypoxia. Supernatants obtained from hHO-1-MSCs improved left ventricular function, limited myocardial infarct size, increased microvessel density, and inhibited apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in rat myocardial infarction. It can be concluded hHO-1-modified MSCs prevent myocardial cell injury via secretion of paracrine-acting mediators.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the protection of dietary restriction against renal senescence in aged F344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-juan; Cai, Guang-yan; Ning, Yi-chun; Cui, Jing; Hong, Quan; Bai, Xue-yuan; Xu, Xiao-meng; Bu, Ru; Sun, Xue-feng; Chen, Xiang-mei

    2016-01-01

    Renal aging is always accompanied by increased oxidative stress. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can be up-regulated by 50% dietary restriction (DR) for 7-day and can block mitochondrial oxidative stress. H2S production exerts a critical role in yeast, worm, and fruit fly models of DR-mediated longevity. In this study, we found that renal aging could be attenuated by 30% DR for 6-month (DR-6M) and life-long (DR-LL), but not for 6-week (DR-6W). The expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CGL) and cystathionine-β- synthase (CBS) were improved by DR-6M and DR-LL. Endogenous H2S production shared the same trend with CBS and CGL, while glutathione (GSH) didn’t. When comparing efficiencies of DR for different durations, more evident production of H2S was found in DR-6M and DR-LL than in DR-6W. Finally the level of oxidative stress was improved by DR-6M and DR-LL rather than by DR-6W. It concluded that aged rats had the ability to produce enough H2S on 30% DR interventions protecting against renal aging, and the effect of DR for long-term were more significant than that of DR for short-term. PMID:27456368

  19. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26351285

  20. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa.

  1. Common and unique cis-acting elements mediate xanthotoxin and flavone induction of the generalist P450 CYP321A1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunni; Wong, Andrew; Zhang, Yalin; Ni, Xinzhi; Li, Xianchun

    2014-01-01

    How polyphagous herbivores up-regulate their counterdefense genes in response to a broad range of structurally different allelochemicals remains largely unknown. To test whether this is accomplished by having more allelochemical-response elements or the similar number of functionally more diverse elements, we mapped out the cis-acting elements mediating the induction of the allelochemical-metabolizing CYP321A1 from the generalist Helicoverpa zea by xanthotoxin and flavone, two structurally distinct allelochemicals with very different encounter rate by this species. Seven xanthotoxin-responsive elements were localized by analyzing promoter activities of varying length of CYP321A1 promoter in H. zea fatbody cells. Compared with the 5 flavone-responsive elements mapped out previously, there are four common elements (1 essential element, 2 enhancers, and 1 negative element) mediating induction of CYP321A1 by both of the two allelochemicals. The remaining four elements (3 enhancers and 1 negative element), however, only regulate induction of CYP321A1 by either of the two allelochemicals. Co-administration of the two allelochemicals resulted in an induction fold that is significantly lower than the expected additive value of the two allelochemicals. These results indicate that xanthotoxin- and flavone-induced expressions of CYP321A1 are mediated mainly by the functionally more diverse common elements although the allelochemical-unique elements also play a role. PMID:25262756

  2. The Axial Element Protein DESYNAPTIC2 Mediates Meiotic Double-Strand Break Formation and Synaptonemal Complex Assembly in Maize.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ding Hua; Kao, Yu-Hsin; Ku, Jia-Chi; Lin, Chien-Yu; Meeley, Robert; Jan, Ya-Shiun; Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel

    2015-09-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair and recombine via repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSBs are formed in the context of chromatin loops, which are anchored to the proteinaceous axial element (AE). The AE later serves as a framework to assemble the synaptonemal complex (SC) that provides a transient but tight connection between homologous chromosomes. Here, we showed that DESYNAPTIC2 (DSY2), a coiled-coil protein, mediates DSB formation and is directly involved in SC assembly in maize (Zea mays). The dsy2 mutant exhibits homologous pairing defects, leading to sterility. Analyses revealed that DSB formation and the number of RADIATION SENSITIVE51 (RAD51) foci are largely reduced, and synapsis is completely abolished in dsy2 meiocytes. Super-resolution structured illumination microscopy showed that DSY2 is located on the AE and forms a distinct alternating pattern with the HORMA-domain protein ASYNAPTIC1 (ASY1). In the dsy2 mutant, localization of ASY1 is affected, and loading of the central element ZIPPER1 (ZYP1) is disrupted. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments further demonstrated that ZYP1 interacts with DSY2 but does not interact with ASY1. Therefore, DSY2, an AE protein, not only mediates DSB formation but also bridges the AE and central element of SC during meiosis. PMID:26296964

  3. Multiple elements within the 5' distal enhancer of the mouse heme oxygenase-1 gene mediate induction by heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Alam, J

    1994-10-01

    A 268-base pair 5' distal fragment, SX2, which mediates basal level and inducer-dependent activation of the mouse heme oxygenase-1 gene, contains two activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding sites (Alam, J., and Zhining, D. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 21894-21900). Mutation of both AP-1 binding elements diminishes (by 50-70%), but does not abolish, the enhancer activity of SX2 in transient expression assays, suggesting that other sequences contribute to enhancer function. Directly upstream of the AP-1 binding sites are two copies of a sequence motif, TGAGGAAAT, which resemble elements found in cellular and viral genes that are known to interact with the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family of transcription factors. These SX2 sequences bind specifically to liver-enriched, heat-stable nuclear proteins and confer C/EBP alpha-dependent transactivation of the heterologous chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. Site-directed mutagenesis of these 9-base pair elements abolishes protein binding and transactivation, establishing these sequences as functional C/EBP binding sites. Stably transfected SX2/CAT fusion genes are induced between 37- and 44-fold in mouse hepatoma, Hepa, cells and between 52- and 111-fold in mouse fibroblast L929 cells in response to CdCl2 treatment. Subfragments of SX2 lacking the AP-1 binding elements do not mediate cadmium-dependent activation of the CAT gene, whereas subfragments containing the AP-1 binding elements, but lacking the C/EBP binding sites, exhibit only partial transcriptional activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of one or more of the C/EBP and AP-1 binding sites indicates that each of these elements is required for optimal activity of the SX2 enhancer fragment. The AP-1 binding elements, however, appear to be more important for induction as constructs containing multiple copies of either of the AP-1 binding elements, but not the C/EBP binding sequences, are readily activated by CdCl2. Treatment of Hepa cells with cadmium or

  4. TAT-Mediated Delivery of Tousled Protein to Salivary Glands Protects Against Radiation-Induced Hypofunction

    SciTech Connect

    Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan; Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Richardson, Charles; De Benedetti, Arrigo; Schrott, Lisa; Caldito, Gloria

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer invariably suffer its deleterious side effect, xerostomia. Salivary hypofunction ensuing from the irreversible destruction of glands is the most common and debilitating oral complication affecting patients undergoing regional radiotherapy. Given that the current management of xerostomia is palliative and ineffective, efforts are now directed toward preventive measures to preserve gland function. The human homolog of Tousled protein, TLK1B, facilitates chromatin remodeling at DNA repair sites and improves cell survival against ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we wanted to determine whether a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to rat salivary glands could protect against IR-induced salivary hypofunction. Methods: The cell-permeable TAT-TLK1B fusion protein was generated. Rat acinar cell line and rat salivary glands were pretreated with TAT peptide or TAT-TLK1B before IR. The acinar cell survival in vitro and salivary function in vivo were assessed after radiation. Results: We demonstrated that rat acinar cells transduced with TAT-TLK1B were more resistant to radiation (D{sub 0} = 4.13 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 0 Gy) compared with cells transduced with the TAT peptide (D{sub 0} = 4.91 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 20.2 Gy). Correspondingly, retroductal instillation of TAT-TLK1B in rat submandibular glands better preserved salivary flow after IR (89%) compared with animals pretreated with Opti-MEM or TAT peptide (31% and 39%, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results demonstrate that a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to the salivary glands effectively attenuates radiation-mediated gland dysfunction. Prophylactic TLK1B-protein therapy could benefit patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  5. TrkB-mediated protection against circadian sensitivity to noise trauma in the murine cochlea.

    PubMed

    Meltser, Inna; Cederroth, Christopher R; Basinou, Vasiliki; Savelyev, Sergey; Lundkvist, Gabriella S; Canlon, Barbara

    2014-03-17

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a debilitating sensory impairment affecting 10%-15% of the population, caused primarily through damage to the sensory hair cells or to the auditory neurons. Once lost, these never regenerate [1], and no effective drugs are available [2, 3]. Emerging evidence points toward an important contribution of synaptic ribbons in the long-term coupling of the inner hair cell and afferent neuron synapse to maintain hearing [4]. Here we show in nocturnal mice that night noise overexposure triggers permanent hearing loss, whereas mice overexposed during the day recover to normal auditory thresholds. In view of this time-dependent sensitivity, we identified a self-sustained circadian rhythm in the isolated cochlea, as evidenced by circadian expression of clock genes and ample PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE oscillations, originating mainly from the primary auditory neurons and hair cells. The transcripts of the otoprotecting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) showed higher levels in response to day noise versus night noise, suggesting that BDNF-mediated signaling regulates noise sensitivity throughout the day. Administration of a selective BDNF receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase type B (TrkB), in the night protected the inner hair cell's synaptic ribbons and subsequent full recovery of hearing thresholds after night noise overexposure. The TrkB agonist shifted the phase and boosted the amplitude of circadian rhythms in the isolated cochlea. These findings highlight the coupling of circadian rhythmicity and the TrkB receptor for the successful prevention and treatment of NIHL. PMID:24583017

  6. JNK1 Protects against Glucolipotoxicity-Mediated Beta-Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Prause, Michala; Christensen, Dan Ploug; Billestrup, Nils; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cell dysfunction is central to type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. Prolonged elevated levels of circulating free-fatty acids and hyperglycemia, also termed glucolipotoxicity, mediate β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis associated with increased c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) activity. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress are elicited by palmitate and high glucose concentrations further potentiating JNK activity. Our aim was to determine the role of the JNK subtypes JNK1, JNK2 and JNK3 in palmitate and high glucose-induced β-cell apoptosis. We established insulin-producing INS1 cell lines stably expressing JNK subtype specific shRNAs to understand the differential roles of the individual JNK isoforms. JNK activity was increased after 3 h of palmitate and high glucose exposure associated with increased expression of ER and mitochondrial stress markers. JNK1 shRNA expressing INS1 cells showed increased apoptosis and cleaved caspase 9 and 3 compared to non-sense shRNA expressing control INS1 cells when exposed to palmitate and high glucose associated with increased CHOP expression, ROS formation and Puma mRNA expression. JNK2 shRNA expressing INS1 cells did not affect palmitate and high glucose induced apoptosis or ER stress markers, but increased Puma mRNA expression compared to non-sense shRNA expressing INS1 cells. Finally, JNK3 shRNA expressing INS1 cells did not induce apoptosis compared to non-sense shRNA expressing INS1 cells when exposed to palmitate and high glucose but showed increased caspase 9 and 3 cleavage associated with increased DP5 and Puma mRNA expression. These data suggest that JNK1 protects against palmitate and high glucose-induced β-cell apoptosis associated with reduced ER and mitochondrial stress. PMID:24475223

  7. Nanoparticles modulate surfactant protein A and D mediated protection against influenza A infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Zofi; Kendall, Michaela; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Tetley, Teresa D.; Morgan, Cliff; Griffiths, Mark; Clark, Howard W.; Madsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological and toxicological studies have indicated that respiratory infections are exacerbated following enhanced exposure to airborne particulates. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) and SP-D form an important part of the innate immune response in the lung and can interact with nanoparticles to modulate the cellular uptake of these particles. We hypothesize that this interaction will also affect the ability of these proteins to combat infections. TT1, A549 and differentiated THP-1 cells, representing the predominant cell types found in the alveolus namely alveolar type I (ATI) epithelial cells, ATII cells and macrophages, were used to examine the effect of two model nanoparticles, 100 nm amine modified (A-PS) and unmodified polystyrene (U-PS), on the ability of SP-A and SP-D to neutralize influenza A infections in vitro. Pre-incubation of low concentrations of U-PS with SP-A resulted in a reduction of SP-A anti-influenza activity in A549 cells, whereas at higher concentrations there was an increase in SP-A antiviral activity. This differential pattern of U-PS concentration on surfactant protein mediated protection against IAV was also shown with SP-D in TT1 cells. On the other hand, low concentrations of A-PS particles resulted in a reduction of SP-A activity in TT1 cells and a reduction in SP-D activity in A549 cells. These results indicate that nanoparticles can modulate the ability of SP-A and SP-D to combat viral challenges. Furthermore, the nanoparticle concentration, surface chemistry and cell type under investigation are important factors in determining the extent of these modulations. PMID:25533100

  8. A Corticosteroid-Responsive Transcription Factor, Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Protein, Mediates Protection of the Cochlea from Acoustic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Peppi, Marcello; Kujawa, Sharon G.; Sewell, William F.

    2012-01-01

    Animals can be induced to resist cochlear damage associated with acoustic trauma by exposure to a variety of “conditioning” stimuli, including restraint stress, moderate level sound, heat stress, hypoxia, and corticosteroids. Here we identify in mice a corticosteroid-responsive transcription factor, PLZF (promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein), which mediates conditioned protection of the cochlea from acoustic trauma. PLZF mRNA levels in the cochlea are increased following conditioning stimuli, including restraint stress, dexamethasone administration, and moderate-to-high level acoustic stimulation. Heterozygous mutant (luxoid.Zbtb16LU/J) mice deficient in PLZF have hearing and responses to acoustic trauma similar to their wild type littermates but are unable to generate conditioning-induced protection from acoustic trauma. PLZF immunoreactivity is present in the spiral ganglion, lateral wall of the cochlea, and organ of Corti, all targets for acoustic trauma. PLZF is also present in the brain and PLZF mRNA in brain is elevated following conditioning stimuli. The identification of a transcription factor that mediates conditioned protection from trauma provides a tool for understanding the protective action of corticosteroids, which are widely used in treating acute hearing loss, and has relevance to understanding the role of corticosteroids in trauma protection. PMID:21228182

  9. Protective effect of the long pentraxin PTX3 against histone-mediated endothelial cell cytotoxicity in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Daigo, Kenji; Nakakido, Makoto; Ohashi, Riuko; Fukuda, Rie; Matsubara, Koichi; Minami, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Naotaka; Inoue, Kenji; Jiang, Shuying; Naito, Makoto; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Hamakubo, Takao

    2014-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3), a member of the long pentraxin subfamily within the family of pentraxins, is a soluble pattern recognition molecule that functions in the innate immune system. Innate immunity affords the infected host protection against sepsis, a potentially life-threatening inflammatory response to infection. Extracellular histones are considered to be the main cause of septic death because of their cytotoxic effect on endothelial cells, which makes them a potential therapeutic target. We found that PTX3 interacted with histones to form coaggregates, which depended on polyvalent interactions and disorder in the secondary structure of PTX3. PTX3 exerted a protective effect, both in vitro and in vivo, against histone-mediated cytotoxicity toward endothelial cells. Additionally, the intraperitoneal administration of PTX3 reduced mortality in mouse models of sepsis. The amino-terminal domain of PTX3, which was required for coaggregation with histones, was sufficient to protect against cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that the host-protective effects of PTX3 in sepsis are a result of its coaggregation with histones rather than its ability to mediate pattern recognition. This long pentraxin-specific effect provides a potential basis for the treatment of sepsis directed at protecting cells from the toxic effects of extracellular histones.

  10. Isotope evidence for the microbially mediated formation of elemental sulfur: A case study from Lake Peten Itza, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchyn, A. V.; Bennett, V. A.; Hodell, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Elemental, or native, sulfur nodules or veins can be formed during aqueous diagenesis and have been found in a range of natural environments, including lake sediments. What governs the formation of elemental sulfur remains enigmatic, although it is widely thought to be microbially-mediated. While most of the literature suggests elemental sulfur is formed by partial re-oxidation of hydrogen sulphide, elemental sulfur can also form during incomplete bacterial sulfate reduction or during aborted sulfur disproportionation. Lake Peten Itza, in Northern Guatemala, which was cored during the International Continental Drilling program in 2006, is one of the few places where elemental sulfur nodules are forming during microbial diagenesis today. Sulfur isotopes are strongly partitioned during bacterial sulfate reduction and the magnitude of the partitioning yields insight into the microbial reactions and environmental conditions. For example, sulfate reduction that terminates at elemental sulfur likely requires the use of the intracellular trithonite pathway, which may drive larger overall sulfur isotope fractionation between the precursor sulfate and the elemental sulfur product. Sulfur isotopes combined with oxygen isotopes in the precursor sulfate may provide even more information about microbial mechanisms. We present coupled pore fluid sulfate concentrations and sulfur and oxygen isotope measurements, as well as co-existing nodule sulfur isotopes from the Lake Peten Itza sediments. The δ34S of the nodules in the lake sediments ranges from +12 to -13‰, often within a single nodule. This suggests formation from an open system where sulfate is replenished by diffusion, as might be expected during pore fluid diagenesis. The δ34S of the pore fluid sulfate at the depth of nodule formation is between 50 and 60‰ (versus the precursor gypsum which is 17 to 18‰) suggesting a large sulfur isotope fractionation between sulfate and elemental sulfur (38 to 73‰). Pyrite was

  11. EGFR mediates astragaloside IV-induced Nrf2 activation to protect cortical neurons against in vitro ischemia/reperfusion damages

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Da-min; Lu, Pei-Hua; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Xiang; Sun, Min; Chen, Guo-Qian; Wang, Qiong

    2015-02-13

    In this study, we tested the potential role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) against oxygen and glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R)-induced damages in murine cortical neurons, and studied the associated signaling mechanisms. AS-IV exerted significant neuroprotective effects against OGD/R by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, thereby attenuating oxidative stress and neuronal cell death. We found that AS-IV treatment in cortical neurons resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by Nrf2 Ser-40 phosphorylation, and its nuclear localization, as well as transcription of antioxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes: heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) and sulphiredoxin 1 (SRXN-1). Knockdown of Nrf2 through lentiviral shRNAs prevented AS-IV-induced ARE genes transcription, and abolished its anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. Further, we discovered that AS-IV stimulated heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) release to trans-activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cortical neurons. Blockage or silencing EGFR prevented Nrf2 activation by AS-IV, thus inhibiting AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities against OGD/R. In summary, AS-IV protects cortical neurons against OGD/R damages through activating of EGFR-Nrf2 signaling. - Highlights: • Pre-treatment of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) protects murine cortical neurons from OGD/R. • AS-IV activates Nrf2-ARE signaling in murine cortical neurons. • Nrf2 is required for AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. • AS-IV stimulates HB-EGF release to trans-activate EGFR in murine cortical neurons. • EGFR mediates AS-IV-induced Nrf2 activation and neuroprotection against OGD/R.

  12. The RY/Sph element mediates transcriptional repression of maturation genes from late maturation to early seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gea; Martin, Nathalie; Golovko, Anna; Sundström, Jens F; Rask, Lars; Ezcurra, Ines

    2009-11-01

    In orthodox seeds, the transcriptional activator ABI3 regulates two major stages in embryo maturation: a mid-maturation (MAT) stage leading to accumulation of storage compounds, and a late maturation (LEA) stage leading to quiescence and desiccation tolerance. Our aim was to elucidate mechanisms for transcriptional shutdown of MAT genes during late maturation, to better understand phase transition between MAT and LEA stages. Using transgenic and transient approaches in Nicotiana, we examined activities of two ABI3-dependent reporter genes driven by multimeric RY and abscisic acid response elements (ABREs) from a Brassica napus napin gene, termed RY and ABRE, where the RY reporter requires ABI3 DNA binding. Expression of RY peaks during mid-maturation and drops during late maturation, mimicking the MAT gene program, and in Arabidopsis thaliana RY elements are over-represented in MAT, but not in LEA, genes. The ABI3 transactivation of RY is inhibited by staurosporine, by a PP2C phosphatase, and by a repressor of maturation genes, VAL1/HSI2. The RY element mediates repression of MAT genes, and we propose that transcriptional shutdown of the MAT program during late maturation involves inhibition of ABI3 DNA binding by dephosphorylation. Later, during seedling growth, VAL1/HSI2 family repressors silence MAT genes by binding RY elements.

  13. Parasite-mediated protection against osmotic stress for Paramecium caudatum infected by Holospora undulata is host genotype specific.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Alison B; Fellous, Simon; Accot, Robin; Alart, Marie; Chantung Sobandi, Kevin; Cosiaux, Ariane; Kaltz, Oliver

    2010-11-01

    Under certain conditions, otherwise parasitic organisms may become beneficial to their host. Parasite-mediated heat and osmotic stress resistance have been demonstrated for Paramecium caudatum, infected by several species of parasitic bacteria of the genus Holospora. Here, using the micronucleus-specific bacterium Holospora undulata, we investigate how infection mediates the response of two genotypes (clones 'K8' and 'VEN') of P. caudatum to heat (35 °C) and osmotic (0.24% NaCl) stress. In contrast to previous findings, we find no evidence for heat stress protection in infected individuals. We do, however, show an effect of symbiont-mediated osmotic stress resistance for the K8 clone, with infected individuals having higher survival than their uninfected counterparts up to 24 h after the onset of salt exposure. Despite this, both infected and uninfected individuals of the VEN clone showed higher survival rates than clone K8 individuals under osmotic stress. Thus, it would seem that parasite-mediated stress protection is restricted to certain combinations of host genotypes and types of stress and does not represent a general phenomenon in this system.

  14. Cell mediated immune response after challenge in Omp25 liposome immunized mice contributes to protection against virulent Brucella abortus 544.

    PubMed

    Goel, Divya; Rajendran, Vinoth; Ghosh, Prahlad C; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2013-02-01

    Brucellosis is a disease affecting various domestic and wild life species, and is caused by a bacterium Brucella. Keeping in view the serious economic and medical consequences of brucellosis, efforts have been made to prevent the infection through the use of vaccines. Cell-mediated immune responses [CMI] involving interferon gamma and cytotoxic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are required for removal of intracellular Brucella. Omp25 has been reported to be involved in virulence of Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus and Brucella ovis. In our previous study, we have shown the protective efficacy of recombinant Omp25, when administered intradermally. In this study, the recombinant Omp25 was formulated in PC-PE liposomes and PLGA microparticles, to enhance the protective immunity generated by it. Significant protection was seen with prime and booster liposome immunization in Balb/c mice against virulent B. abortus 544 as it was comparable to B. abortus S-19 vaccine strain. However, microparticle prime and booster immunization failed to give better protection when compared to B. abortus S-19 vaccine strain. This difference can be attributed to the stimulation of cell mediated immune response in PC-PE liposome immunized mice even after challenge which converted to cytotoxicity seen in CD4(+) and CD8(+) enriched lymphocytes. However, in PLGA microparticle immunized mice, cell mediated immunity was not generated after challenge as observed by decreased cytotoxicity of CD4(+) and CD8(+) enriched lymphocytes. Our study emphasizes on the importance of liposome encapsulating Omp25 immunization in conferring protection against B. abortus 544 challenge in Balb/c mice with a single dose immunization regimen.

  15. Sp-1 binds promoter elements regulated by the RB protein and Sp-1-mediated transcription is stimulated by RB coexpression.

    PubMed Central

    Udvadia, A J; Rogers, K T; Higgins, P D; Murata, Y; Martin, K H; Humphrey, P A; Horowitz, J M

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) protein is implicated in transcriptional regulation of at least five cellular genes, including c-fos, c-myc, and transforming growth factor beta 1. Cotransfection of RB and truncated promoter constructs has defined a discrete element (retinoblastoma control element; RCE) within the promoters of each of these genes as being necessary for RB-mediated transcription control. Previously, we have shown that RCEs form protein-DNA complexes in vitro with three heretofore unidentified nuclear proteins and mutation of their DNA-binding site within the c-fos RCE results in an abrogation of RCE-dependent transcription in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that one of the nuclear proteins that binds the c-fos, c-myc, and transforming growth factor beta 1 RCEs in vitro is Sp-1 and that Sp-1 stimulates RCE-dependent transcription in vivo. Moreover, we show that Sp-1-mediated transcription is stimulated by the transient coexpression of RB protein. We conclude from these observations that RB may regulate transcription in part by virtue of its ability to functionally interact with Sp-1. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8475068

  16. Red blood cells protect endothelial cells against H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-mediated but not hyperoxia-induced damage

    SciTech Connect

    Tsan, M.F.; White, J.E.

    1988-07-01

    We studied the effect of intact red blood cells on the exogenous H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-mediated damage as well as on the hyperoxia-induced injury of cultured endothelial cells. Red blood cells protected endothelial cells against H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-mediated injury efficiently, but had no effect on the hyperoxia-induced damage. Failure of red blood cells to protect endothelial cells against hyperoxia-induced injury was not due to hemolysis. Furthermore, hyperoxia-exposed red blood cells were still capable of protecting endothelial cells against H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-mediated damage.

  17. Optimism and the brain: trait optimism mediates the protective role of the orbitofrontal cortex gray matter volume against anxiety.

    PubMed

    Dolcos, Sanda; Hu, Yifan; Iordan, Alexandru D; Moore, Matthew; Dolcos, Florin

    2016-02-01

    Converging evidence identifies trait optimism and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) as personality and brain factors influencing anxiety, but the nature of their relationships remains unclear. Here, the mechanisms underlying the protective role of trait optimism and of increased OFC volume against symptoms of anxiety were investigated in 61 healthy subjects, who completed measures of trait optimism and anxiety, and underwent structural scanning using magnetic resonance imaging. First, the OFC gray matter volume (GMV) was associated with increased optimism, which in turn was associated with reduced anxiety. Second, trait optimism mediated the relation between the left OFC volume and anxiety, thus demonstrating that increased GMV in this brain region protects against symptoms of anxiety through increased optimism. These results provide novel evidence about the brain-personality mechanisms protecting against anxiety symptoms in healthy functioning, and identify potential targets for preventive and therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing susceptibility and increasing resilience against emotional disturbances.

  18. Abscisic acid-induced gene expression in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha is mediated by evolutionarily conserved promoter elements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Totan K; Kaneko, Midori; Akter, Khaleda; Murai, Shuhei; Komatsu, Kenji; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Kohchi, Takayuki; Takezawa, Daisuke

    2016-04-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone widely distributed among members of the land plant lineage (Embryophyta), regulating dormancy, stomata closure and tolerance to environmental stresses. In angiosperms (Magnoliophyta), ABA-induced gene expression is mediated by promoter elements such as the G-box-like ACGT-core motifs recognized by bZIP transcription factors. In contrast, the mode of regulation by ABA of gene expression in liverworts (Marchantiophyta), representing one of the earliest diverging land plant groups, has not been elucidated. In this study, we used promoters of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha dehydrin and the wheat Em genes fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene to investigate ABA-induced gene expression in liverworts. Transient assays of cultured cells of Marchantia indicated that ACGT-core motifs proximal to the transcription initiation site play a role in the ABA-induced gene expression. The RY sequence recognized by B3 transcriptional regulators was also shown to be responsible for the ABA-induced gene expression. In transgenic Marchantia plants, ABA treatment elicited an increase in GUS expression in young gemmalings, which was abolished by simultaneous disruption of the ACGT-core and RY elements. ABA-induced GUS expression was less obvious in mature thalli than in young gemmalings, associated with reductions in sensitivity to exogenous ABA during gametophyte growth. In contrast, lunularic acid, which had been suggested to function as an ABA-like substance, had no effect on GUS expression. The results demonstrate the presence of ABA-specific response mechanisms mediated by conserved cis-regulatory elements in liverworts, implying that the mechanisms had been acquired in the common ancestors of embryophytes. PMID:26456006

  19. T cells play an essential role in anti-F1 mediated rapid protection against bubonic plague.

    PubMed

    Levy, Yinon; Flashner, Yehuda; Tidhar, Avital; Zauberman, Ayelet; Aftalion, Moshe; Lazar, Shirley; Gur, David; Shafferman, Avigdor; Mamroud, Emanuelle

    2011-09-16

    Plague, which is initiated by Yersinia pestis infection, is a fatal disease that progresses rapidly and leads to high mortality rates if not treated. Antibiotics are an effective plague therapy, but antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis strains have been reported and therefore alternative countermeasures are needed. In the present study, we assessed the potential of an F1 plus LcrV-based vaccine to provide protection shortly pre- or post-exposure to a lethal Y. pestis infection. Mice vaccinated up to one day before or even several hours after subcutaneous challenge were effectively protected. Mice immunized one or three days pre-challenge were protected even though their anti-F1 and anti-LcrV titers were below detection levels at the day of challenge. Moreover, using B-cell deficient μMT mice, we found that rapidly induced protective immunity requires the integrity of the humoral immune system. Analysis of the individual contributions of vaccine components to protection revealed that rF1 is responsible for the observed rapid antibody-mediated immunity. Applying anti-F1 passive therapy in the mouse model of bubonic plague demonstrated that anti-F1 F(ab')(2) can delay mortality, but it cannot provide long-lasting protection, as do intact anti-F1 molecules. Fc-dependent immune components, such as the complement system and (to a lesser extent) neutrophils, were found to contribute to mouse survival. Interestingly, T cells but not B cells were found to be essential for the recovery of infected animals following passive anti-F1 mediated therapy. These data extend our understanding of the immune mechanisms required for the development of a rapid and effective post-exposure therapy against plague.

  20. Erythropoietin-mediated protection of insect brain neurons involves JAK and STAT but not PI3K transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Miljus, N; Heibeck, S; Jarrar, M; Micke, M; Ostrowski, D; Ehrenreich, H; Heinrich, R

    2014-01-31

    The cytokine erythropoietin (Epo) initiates adaptive cellular responses to both moderate environmental challenges and tissue damaging insults in various non-hematopoietic mammalian tissues including the nervous system. Neuroprotective and neuroregenerative functions of Epo in mammals are mediated through receptor-associated Janus kinase 2 and intracellular signaling cascades that modify the transcription of Epo-regulated genes. Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) and phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) represent key components of two important Epo-induced transduction pathways. Our previous study on insects revealed neuroprotective and regenerative functions of recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) similar to those in mammalian nervous tissues. Here we demonstrate that rhEpo effectively rescues primary cultured locust brain neurons from apoptotic cell death induced by hypoxia or the chemical compound H-7. The Janus kinase inhibitor AG-490 and the STAT inhibitor sc-355797 abolished protective effects of rhEpo on locust brain neurons. In contrast, inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 had no effect on rhEpo-mediated neuroprotection. The results indicate that rhEpo mediates the protection of locust brain neurons through interference with apoptotic pathways by the activation of a Janus kinase-associated receptor and STAT transcription factor(s). The involvement of similar transduction pathways in mammals and insects for the mediation of neuroprotection and support of neural regeneration by Epo indicates that an Epo/Epo receptor-like signaling system with high structural and functional similarity exists in both groups of animals. Epo-like signaling involved in tissue protection appears to be an ancient beneficial function shared by vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:24269933

  1. Linear amplification mediated PCR--localization of genetic elements and characterization of unknown flanking DNA.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Richard; Kutschera, Ina; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred

    2014-06-25

    Linear-amplification mediated PCR (LAM-PCR) has been developed to study hematopoiesis in gene corrected cells of patients treated by gene therapy with integrating vector systems. Due to the stable integration of retroviral vectors, integration sites can be used to study the clonal fate of individual cells and their progeny. LAM- PCR for the first time provided evidence that leukemia in gene therapy treated patients originated from provirus induced overexpression of a neighboring proto-oncogene. The high sensitivity and specificity of LAM-PCR compared to existing methods like inverse PCR and ligation mediated (LM)-PCR is achieved by an initial preamplification step (linear PCR of 100 cycles) using biotinylated vector specific primers which allow subsequent reaction steps to be carried out on solid phase (magnetic beads). LAM-PCR is currently the most sensitive method available to identify unknown DNA which is located in the proximity of known DNA. Recently, a variant of LAM-PCR has been developed that circumvents restriction digest thus abrogating retrieval bias of integration sites and enables a comprehensive analysis of provirus locations in host genomes. The following protocol explains step-by-step the amplification of both 3'- and 5'- sequences adjacent to the integrated lentiviral vector.

  2. Protective effect of C. sativa leaf extract against UV mediated-DNA damage in a human keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Almeida, I F; Pinto, A S; Monteiro, C; Monteiro, H; Belo, L; Fernandes, J; Bento, A R; Duarte, T L; Garrido, J; Bahia, M F; Sousa Lobo, J M; Costa, P C

    2015-03-01

    Toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on skin include protein and lipid oxidation, and DNA damage. The latter is known to play a major role in photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. Many plant extracts and natural compounds are emerging as photoprotective agents. Castanea sativa leaf extract is able to scavenge several reactive species that have been associated to UV-induced oxidative stress. The aim of this work was to analyze the protective effect of C. sativa extract (ECS) at different concentrations (0.001, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 μg/mL) against the UV mediated-DNA damage in a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). For this purpose, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used. Elucidation of the protective mechanism was undertaken regarding UV absorption, influence on (1)O₂ mediated effects or NRF2 activation. ECS presented a concentration-dependent protective effect against UV-mediated DNA damage in HaCaT cells. The maximum protection afforded (66.4%) was achieved with the concentration of 0.1 μg/mL. This effect was found to be related to a direct antioxidant effect (involving (1)O₂) rather than activation of the endogenous antioxidant response coordinated by NRF2. Electrochemical studies showed that the good antioxidant capacity of the ECS can be ascribed to the presence of a pool of different phenolic antioxidants. No genotoxic or phototoxic effects were observed after incubation of HaCaT cells with ECS (up to 0.1 μg/mL). Taken together these results reinforce the putative application of this plant extract in the prevention/minimization of UV deleterious effects on skin.

  3. Theoretical Rationale of Heating Block for Testing Bench of Aerospace Crafts Thermal Protection Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Anna A.; Reznik, Sergey V.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical rationale for the structural layout of a testing bench with zirconium dioxide heating elements on the basis of modelling radiative-conductive heat transfer are presented. The numerical simulation of radiative-conductive heat transfer for the two-dimensional scaled model of the testing segment with the finite-element analysis software package Ansys 15.0 are performed. The simulation results showed that for the selected layout of the heaters the temperature non-uniformity along the length of the sample over time will not exceed 3 % even at a temperature of 2000 K.

  4. Protection against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by allopurinol is dependent on aldehyde oxidase-mediated liver preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe and occasionally fatal liver injury. Numerous drugs that attenuate APAP toxicity have been described. However these compounds frequently protect by cytochrome P450 inhibition, thereby preventing the initiating step of toxicity. We have previously shown that pretreatment with allopurinol can effectively protect against APAP toxicity, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the current study, C3HeB/FeJ mice were administered allopurinol 18 h or 1 h prior to an APAP overdose. Administration of allopurinol 18 h prior to APAP overdose resulted in an 88% reduction in liver injury (serum ALT) 6 h after APAP; however, 1 h pretreatment offered no protection. APAP-cysteine adducts and glutathione depletion kinetics were similar with or without allopurinol pretreatment. The phosphorylation and mitochondrial translocation of c-jun-N-terminal-kinase (JNK) have been implicated in the progression of APAP toxicity. In our study we showed equivalent early JNK activation (2 h) however late JNK activation (6 h) was attenuated in allopurinol treated mice, which suggests that later JNK activation is more critical for the toxicity. Additional mice were administered oxypurinol (primary metabolite of allopurinol) 18 h or 1 h pre-APAP, but neither treatment protected. This finding implicated an aldehyde oxidase (AO)-mediated metabolism of allopurinol, so mice were treated with hydralazine to inhibit AO prior to allopurinol/APAP administration, which eliminated the protective effects of allopurinol. We evaluated potential targets of AO-mediated preconditioning and found increased hepatic metallothionein 18 h post-allopurinol. These data show metabolism of allopurinol occurring independent of P450 isoenzymes preconditions the liver and renders the animal less susceptible to an APAP overdose. - Highlights: • 18 h allopurinol pretreatment protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • 1 h allopurinol pretreatment does not protect from APAP

  5. Translocation of cellular prion protein to non-lipid rafts protects human prion-mediated neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Moon, Myung-Hee; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Park, Sang-Youel

    2012-03-01

    Prions are the causative agents of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, such as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Cellular prion proteins (PrPC) connect with cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-rich lipid rafts through association of their glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor with saturated raft lipids and interaction of their N-terminal regions. Our previous study showed that cellular cholesterol enrichment prevented PrP(106-126)-induced neuronal death. We have now studied the influence of membrane cholesterol in PrP(106-126)-mediated neurotoxicity and identified membrane domains involved in this activity. We found that PrPC is normally distributed in lipid rafts, but high membrane cholesterol levels as a result of cholesterol treatment led to the translocation of PrPC from lipid rafts to non-lipid rafts. Moreover, cholesterol-mediated PrPC translocation protects PrP(106-126)-mediated apoptosis and p-38 activation and caspase-3 activation. In a mitochondrial functional assay including mitochondrial transmembrane potential, cholesterol treatment prevented the loss of mitochondrial potential, translocation of Bax and cytochrome c by prion protein fragment. Our results indicate that modulation of the PrPC location appears to protect against neuronal cell death caused by prion peptides. The results of this study suggest that regulation of membrane cholesterol affects the translocation of PrPC, which in turn regulates PrP(106-126)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neurotoxicity.

  6. Finite element analysis of various methods for protection of concrete structures against spalling during fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witek, A.; Gawin, D.; Pesavento, F.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2007-02-01

    A mathematical model of hygro-thermo-mechanical phenomena in heated concrete, treated as multiphase porous material is briefly presented. Some modifications necessary to analyse high-temperature performance of a concrete containing the PP-fibres have been introduced, experimentally validated and applied for analysis of performance of a concrete tunnel lining during a 10-MW fire and the ISO standard fire. Three methods for protecting concrete structures against excessive degradation in fire conditions have been numerically analysed by means of the computer model. The analysed protection methods are based either upon application on a structure surface of a reflective layer, or covering it with a protective layer made of a very porous concrete or an addition of the PP fibres to the concrete mix. Efficiency of these methods has been numerically analysed in thermal conditions corresponding to the ISO-834 standard fire. The results obtained show that even relatively simple methods, like application a protective layer or increasing the surface reflectance, can retard to some extent concrete degradation during a fire.

  7. Protection against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by allopurinol is dependent on aldehyde oxidase-mediated liver preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Williams, C David; McGill, Mitchell R; Lebofsky, Margitta; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe and occasionally fatal liver injury. Numerous drugs that attenuate APAP toxicity have been described. However these compounds frequently protect by cytochrome P450 inhibition, thereby preventing the initiating step of toxicity. We have previously shown that pretreatment with allopurinol can effectively protect against APAP toxicity, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the current study, C3HeB/FeJ mice were administered allopurinol 18h or 1h prior to an APAP overdose. Administration of allopurinol 18h prior to APAP overdose resulted in an 88% reduction in liver injury (serum ALT) 6h after APAP; however, 1h pretreatment offered no protection. APAP-cysteine adducts and glutathione depletion kinetics were similar with or without allopurinol pretreatment. The phosphorylation and mitochondrial translocation of c-jun-N-terminal-kinase (JNK) have been implicated in the progression of APAP toxicity. In our study we showed equivalent early JNK activation (2h) however late JNK activation (6h) was attenuated in allopurinol treated mice, which suggests that later JNK activation is more critical for the toxicity. Additional mice were administered oxypurinol (primary metabolite of allopurinol) 18h or 1h pre-APAP, but neither treatment protected. This finding implicated an aldehyde oxidase (AO)-mediated metabolism of allopurinol, so mice were treated with hydralazine to inhibit AO prior to allopurinol/APAP administration, which eliminated the protective effects of allopurinol. We evaluated potential targets of AO-mediated preconditioning and found increased hepatic metallothionein 18h post-allopurinol. These data show metabolism of allopurinol occurring independent of P450 isoenzymes preconditions the liver and renders the animal less susceptible to an APAP overdose.

  8. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of an anti-V antigen monoclonal antibody protects mice against a lethal Yersinia pestis challenge.

    PubMed

    Sofer-Podesta, Carolina; Ang, John; Hackett, Neil R; Senina, Svetlana; Perlin, David; Crystal, Ronald G; Boyer, Julie L

    2009-04-01

    Pneumonic plague, caused by inhalation of Yersinia pestis, represents a major bioterrorism threat for which no vaccine is available. Based on the knowledge that genetic delivery of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors results in rapid, high-level antibody expression, we evaluated the hypothesis that Ad-mediated delivery of a neutralizing antibody directed against the Y. pestis V antigen would protect mice against a Y. pestis challenge. MAbs specific for the Y. pestis V antigen were generated, and the most effective in protecting mice against a lethal intranasal Y. pestis challenge was chosen for further study. The coding sequences for the heavy and light chains were isolated from the corresponding hybridoma and inserted into a replication-defective serotype 5 human Ad gene transfer vector (AdalphaV). Western analysis of AdalphaV-infected cell supernatants demonstrated completely assembled antibodies reactive with V antigen. Following AdalphaV administration to mice, high levels of anti-V antigen antibody titers were detectable as early as 1 day postadministration, peaked by day 3, and remained detectable through a 12-week time course. When animals that received AdalphaV were challenged with Y. pestis at day 4 post-AdalphaV administration, 80% of the animals were protected, while 0% of control animals survived (P < 0.01). Ad-mediated delivery of a V antigen-neutralizing antibody is an effective therapy against plague in experimental animals and could be developed as a rapidly acting antiplague therapeutic.

  9. Short-term psychosocial stress protects photoreceptors from damage via corticosterone-mediated activation of the AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Forkwa, Tembei K; Neumann, Inga D; Tamm, Ernst R; Ohlmann, Andreas; Reber, Stefan O

    2014-02-01

    Apoptotic death of photoreceptors in hereditary retinal degenerations can be prevented by neuroprotective molecules. Here, we report that adrenal glucocorticoids (GC) released during psychosocial stress protect photoreceptors from apoptosis after light damage. Psychosocial stress is known to be the main type of stressor humans are exposed to and was induced here in mice by 10h of chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC). Photoreceptor damage was generated by subsequent exposure to white light. Short-term psychosocial stress prior to illumination significantly reduced the number of apoptotic photoreceptors, an effect that was absent in adrenalectomized (ADX) mice. The neuroprotective effect was completely restored in ADX mice substituted with GC. Moreover, phosphorylation of retinal AKT increased following CSC or exogenous GC treatment, an effect that was again absent in ADX mice exposed to CSC. Finally, inhibition of AKT signaling with triciribine blocked the stress- and GC-mediated neuroprotective effects on photoreceptors. In summary, we provide evidence that 1) short-term psychosocial stress protects photoreceptors from light-induced damage and 2) the protective effect is most likely mediated by GC-induced activation of the AKT signaling pathway.

  10. MgI2 -mediated chemoselective cleavage of protecting groups: an alternative to conventional deprotection methodologies.

    PubMed

    Berthet, Mathéo; Davanier, Florian; Dujardin, Gilles; Martinez, Jean; Parrot, Isabelle

    2015-07-27

    The scope of MgI2 as a valuable tool for quantitative and mild chemoselective cleavage of protecting groups is described here. This novel synthetic approach expands the use of protecting groups, widens the concept of orthogonality in synthetic processes, and offers a facile opportunity to release compounds from solid supports.

  11. A novel liposome adjuvant DPC mediates Mycobacterium tuberculosis subunit vaccine well to induce cell-mediated immunity and high protective efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xun; Da, Zejiao; Wang, Yue; Niu, Hongxia; Li, Ruiying; Yu, Hongjuan; He, Shanshan; Guo, Ming; Wang, Yong; Luo, Yanping; Ma, Xingming; Zhu, Bingdong

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious disease around the world, and protein based subunit vaccine is supposed to be a kind of promising novel vaccine against it. However, there is no effective adjuvant available in clinic to activate cell-mediated immune responses which is required for TB subunit vaccine. Therefore, it is imperative to develop new adjuvant. Here we reported an adjuvant composed of dimethyl dioctadecylammonium (DDA), Poly I:C and cholesterol (DPC for short). DDA can form a kind of cationic liposome with the ability to deliver and present antigen and can induce Th1 type cell-mediated immune response. Poly I:C, a ligand of TLR3 receptor, could attenuate the pathologic reaction induced by following Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. Cholesterol, which could enhance rigidity of lipid bilayer, is added to DDA and Poly I:C to improve the stability of the adjuvant. The particle size and Zeta-potential of DPC were analyzed in vitro. Furthermore, DPC was mixed with a TB fusion protein ESAT6-Ag85B-MPT64(190-198)-Mtb8.4-Rv2626c (LT70) to construct a subunit vaccine. The subunit vaccine-induced immune responses and protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis H37Rv infection in C57BL/6 mice were investigated. The results showed that the DPC adjuvant with particle size of 400 nm and zeta potential of 40 mV was in good stability. LT70 in the adjuvant of DPC generated strong antigen-specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and induced long-term higher protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis infection (5.41 ± 0.38log10CFU) than traditional vaccine Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) (6.01 ± 0.33log10CFU) and PBS control (6.53 ± 0.26log10CFU) at 30 weeks post-vaccination. In conclusion, DPC would be a promising vaccine adjuvant with the ability to stimulate Th1 type cell-mediated immunity, and could be used in TB subunit vaccine.

  12. On the transfer of protective coating elements on a metal surface from halide gaseous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraimov, N. V.

    2016-06-01

    The processes occurring during the formation of multicomponent diffusion coatings on nickel alloys at the stage of delivery of elements on the article surface when chlorine, bromine, and iodine halides are used as activators are considered. Balance equations and calculated values are given for the partial pressures in the composition of a gas phase of components participating in chemical transport reaction; the possible reactions of delivering elements on the article surfaces and the structures of Ni-Al, Ni-Cr, Ni-Cr-Al, Co-Cr-Al coatings deposited on the ZhS26, ZhS6U, ZhS32, and VZhL12U alloys are presented.

  13. Position-independent transgene expression mediated by boundary elements from the apolipoprotein B chromatin domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kalos, M; Fournier, R E

    1995-01-01

    The human apolipoprotein B (apoB) gene resides within a 47.5-kb chromatin domain that is flanked by sequences that bind to the nuclear matrix. These matrix attachment regions (MARs) are boundaries between nuclease-sensitive and -resistant chromatin. As domain boundaries are thought to function as insulator elements, shielding sequences between them from effects of neighboring chromatin, this raised the possibility that the apoB MARs have functions that could be assayed by transfection. To test this possibility, we examined effects of the apoB MARs on transgene expression in transiently and stably transfected rat and human hepatoma cells. The apoB MARs had no effects on expression of transiently transfected reporters, but they altered expression of stably integrated transgenes in dramatic and reproducible ways. Single integrated copies of transgenes that contained the apoB promoter and second intron enhancer, which are sufficient for high-level expression in transient assays, were expressed at low and variable levels in stable transfectant clones. In contrast, transgenes containing the apoB 5' and 3' MARs were expressed at levels nearly 200-fold higher than levels of the minimal reporters in stable transfectants, and expression was position independent. Transgenes that contained the apoB MARs and an additional 3.3 kb of apoB 5' flanking sequence were also expressed in an elevated, position-independent manner. Surprisingly, tandem transgene arrays in multicopy transfectants were transcriptionally inactive. These observations suggest that the apoB MARs function as insulator elements, shielding transgene expression from effects of neighboring chromatin domains. PMID:7799927

  14. Thyroid Hormone Response Element Half-Site Organization and Its Effect on Thyroid Hormone Mediated Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Martin A.; Atlas, Ella; Wade, Mike G.; Yauk, Carole L.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) exerts its effects by binding to the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), which binds to TH response elements (TREs) to regulate target gene expression. We investigated the relative ability of liganded homodimers TR and retinoid X receptor (RXR), and the heterodimer TR/RXR, to regulate gene expression for the TRE half-site organizations: direct repeat 4 (DR4), inverted repeat 0 (IR0) and everted repeat 6 (ER6). Luciferase reporter assays using a DR4 TRE suggest that both the TR homodimer and TR/RXR heterodimer regulate luciferase expression in the presence of their respective ligands. However, in the presence of the IR0 TRE, transfection with TR/RXR and RXR alone increased luciferase activity and there was no effect of TR alone. The presence of 9-cis-retinoic acid was necessary for luciferase expression, whereas TH treatment alone was insufficient. For the ER6 TRE, transfection with TR/RXR, TR alone and RXR alone (in the presence of their respective ligands) all caused a significant increase in luciferase activity. When both ligands were present, transfection with both TR/RXR caused more activation. Finally, we investigated the efficacy of the TR-antagonist 1–850 in inhibiting transcription by TR or TR/RXR at DR4 and ER6 TREs. We found that 1–850 did not suppress luciferase activation in the presence of TR/RXR for the ER6 TRE, suggesting conformational changes of the ligand binding domain of the TR when bound to different TRE half-site organizations. Collectively, the findings indicate that there are fundamental differences between TRE configurations that affect nuclear receptor interactions with the response element and ability to bind ligands and antagonists. PMID:24971931

  15. A multi-element approach for cathodic protection of reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Polder, R.B.; Nuiten, P.C. )

    1994-06-01

    A cathodic protection (CP) system was designed and installed on precast concrete cantilever beams that were suffering severe reinforcement corrosion due to mixed-in chloride. Activated titanium strip anodes were placed with a geometry based on laboratory current distribution experiments. The CP system was divided into relatively small zones for easy control and monitoring. Two years of monitoring has shown that the system functions satisfactorily.

  16. Neutralizing IgG at the Portal of Infection Mediates Protection against Vaginal Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Katja; Veazey, Ronald S.; Warrier, Ranjit; Hraber, Peter; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A.; Buffa, Viviana; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies may have critical importance in immunity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, the amount of protective antibody needed at mucosal surfaces has not been fully established. Here, we evaluated systemic and mucosal pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of 2F5 IgG and 2F5 Fab fragments with respect to protection against vaginal challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus-BaL in macaques. Antibody assessment demonstrated that 2F5 IgG was more potent than polymeric forms (IgM and IgA) across a range of cellular and tissue models. Vaginal challenge studies demonstrated a dose-dependent protection for 2F5 IgG and no protection with 2F5 Fab despite higher vaginal Fab levels at the time of challenge. Animals receiving 50 or 25 mg/kg of body weight 2F5 IgG were completely protected, while 3/5 animals receiving 5 mg/kg were protected. In the control animals, infection was established by a minimum of 1 to 4 transmitted/founder (T/F) variants, similar to natural human infection by this mucosal route; in the two infected animals that had received 5 mg 2F5 IgG, infection was established by a single T/F variant. Serum levels of 2F5 IgG were more predictive of sterilizing protection than measured vaginal levels. Fc-mediated antiviral activity did not appear to influence infection of primary target cells in cervical explants. However, PK studies highlighted the importance of the Fc portion in tissue biodistribution. Data presented in this study may be important in modeling serum levels of neutralizing antibodies that need to be achieved by either vaccination or passive infusion to prevent mucosal acquisition of HIV-1 infection in humans. PMID:23966410

  17. Hormone stimulation of androgen receptor mediates dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns at regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Vineet K.; Attwood, Kristopher; Campbell, Moray J.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that contributes to stable gene silencing by interfering with the ability of transcriptional regulators to bind to DNA. Recent findings have revealed that hormone stimulation of certain nuclear receptors induces rapid, dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns alongside transcriptional responses at a subset of target loci, over time. However, the ability of androgen receptor (AR) to dynamically regulate gene transcription is relatively under-studied and its role in the regulation of DNA methylation patterns remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate in normal prostate cells that hormone stimulated AR activity results in dynamic changes in the transcription rate and DNA methylation patterns at the AR target genes, TIPARP and SGK1. Time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on the SGK1 locus reveals dynamic recruitment of AR and RNA Polymerase II, as well as the recruitment of proteins involved in the DNA demethylation process, TET1 and TDG. Furthermore, the presence of DNA methylation at dynamic regions inhibits protein binding and transcriptional activity of SGK1. These findings establish AR activity as a contributing factor to the dynamic regulation of DNA methylation patterns at target genes in prostate biology and infer further complexity involved in nuclear receptor mediation of transcriptional regulation. PMID:26646795

  18. Induction of electrophile-responsive element (EpRE)-mediated gene expression by tomato extracts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, Linda; van Eekelen, Henriëtte D L M; Nguyen, Thuy H; de Haan, Laura H J; van der Burg, Bart; Aarts, Jac M M J G; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Bovy, Arnaud G

    2012-12-01

    The market for food products with additional health benefits is increasing rapidly and tools for identification of bio-functional characteristics of food items are essential. To facilitate the detection of beneficial effects of tomato on gene expression, methods to prepare tomato extracts suitable to test in the EpRE LUX assay and other cell-based reporter gene assays for health-related bioactivity mechanisms, were developed. An isoprenoid-containing chloroform extract of tomato fruit and most individual isoprenoids did not induce electrophile-responsive element (EpRE)-mediated gene expression. A semi-polar extract of tomato fruits, enzymatically hydrolysed to remove the glycosyl residues from the phenolic ingredients was able to induce EpRE-mediated luciferase expression at both mRNA and protein level, which might be partly due to the presence of quercetin, kaempferol, naringenin and naringenin chalcone. It was concluded that induction of EpRE-regulated genes, such as detoxifying phase II and antioxidant enzymes, may contribute to the beneficial health effects of tomato.

  19. Glycyrrhizin Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury via Alleviating Tumor Necrosis Factor α–Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Min; Yagai, Tomoki; Chai, Yingying; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Xie, Cen; Cheng, Xuefang; Zhang, Jun; Che, Yuan; Li, Feiyan; Wu, Yuzheng; Brocker, Chad N.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in Western countries. Glycyrrhizin (GL), a potent hepatoprotective constituent extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine liquorice, has potential clinical use in treating APAP-induced liver failure. The present study determined the hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of action of GL and its active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid (GA). Various administration routes and pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics analyses were used to differentiate the effects of GL and GA on APAP toxicity in mice. Mice deficient in cytochrome P450 2E1 enzyme (CYP2E1) or receptor interacting protein 3 (RIPK3) and their relative wild-type littermates were subjected to histologic and biochemical analyses to determine the potential mechanisms. Hepatocyte death mediated by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)/caspase was analyzed by use of human liver-derived LO2 cells. The pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics analysis using various administration routes revealed that GL but not GA potently attenuated APAP-induced liver injury. The protective effect of GL was found only with intraperitoneal and intravenous administration and not with gastric administration. CYP2E1-mediated metabolic activation and RIPK3-mediated necroptosis were unrelated to GL’s protective effect. However, GL inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via interference with TNFα-induced apoptotic hepatocyte death. These results demonstrate that GL rapidly attenuates APAP-induced liver injury by directly inhibiting TNFα-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. The protective effect against APAP-induced liver toxicity by GL in mice suggests the therapeutic potential of GL for the treatment of APAP overdose. PMID:26965985

  20. Glycyrrhizin Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury via Alleviating Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Mediated Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Min; Yagai, Tomoki; Chai, Yingying; Krausz, Kristopher W; Xie, Cen; Cheng, Xuefang; Zhang, Jun; Che, Yuan; Li, Feiyan; Wu, Yuzheng; Brocker, Chad N; Gonzalez, Frank J; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2016-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in Western countries. Glycyrrhizin (GL), a potent hepatoprotective constituent extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine liquorice, has potential clinical use in treating APAP-induced liver failure. The present study determined the hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of action of GL and its active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid (GA). Various administration routes and pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analyses were used to differentiate the effects of GL and GA on APAP toxicity in mice. Mice deficient in cytochrome P450 2E1 enzyme (CYP2E1) or receptor interacting protein 3 (RIPK3) and their relative wild-type littermates were subjected to histologic and biochemical analyses to determine the potential mechanisms. Hepatocyte death mediated by tumor necrosis factorα(TNFα)/caspase was analyzed by use of human liver-derived LO2 cells. The pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analysis using various administration routes revealed that GL but not GA potently attenuated APAP-induced liver injury. The protective effect of GL was found only with intraperitoneal and intravenous administration and not with gastric administration. CYP2E1-mediated metabolic activation and RIPK3-mediated necroptosis were unrelated to GL's protective effect. However, GL inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via interference with TNFα-induced apoptotic hepatocyte death. These results demonstrate that GL rapidly attenuates APAP-induced liver injury by directly inhibiting TNFα-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. The protective effect against APAP-induced liver toxicity by GL in mice suggests the therapeutic potential of GL for the treatment of APAP overdose. PMID:26965985

  1. Silibinin protects OTA-mediated TNF-alpha release from perfused rat livers and isolated rat Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Anati, Lauy; Essid, Ebtisam; Reinehr, Roland; Petzinger, Ernst

    2009-04-01

    We studied the inhibitory effect of silibinin on ochratoxin A (OTA) and LPS-mediated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) release and the leakage of cytotoxic markers glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), from isolated blood-free perfused rat livers, and from isolated pure rat Kupffer cells. In the recirculation perfusion model at the end point 90 min, 2.5 micromol/L OTA released 2600 pg/mL TNF-alpha without effects on liver vitality. LPS at 0.1 microg/mL induced 3000 pg TNF-alpha/mL with slight leakage of GLDH and LDH. Under similar experimental conditions, the addition of silibinin 10 min prior to OTA and LPS showed dose-dependent protection against OTA or LPS-induced hepatic TNF-alpha release. High-dose of silibinin (12.5 microg/mL) also completely restored GLDH and LDH levels in the perfusate. Pretreatment of isolated Kupffer cells with 0.02, 0.1, 0.5, 2.5, and 12.5 microg silibinin/mL 30 min prior to OTA reduced OTA-induced TNF-alpha levels to 90, 70, 25, 25, and 25% at 4 h, respectively, and abrogated any TNF-alpha release at 24 h. Similarly, in the presence of silibinin LPS-induced TNF-alpha levels decreased at 4 h to 71, 57, 18, 22, and 18%, respectively. However, after 24 h of LPS exposition the protection by silibinin vanished and TNF-alpha partially recurred into the incubation medium under LPS. In summary, silibinin had hepatoprotective effects against OTA- or LPS-mediated TNF-alpha release and also reduced the cytotoxicity of both toxins. Isolated Kupffer cells were even more sensitive to the protective effect than perfused livers and responded to very low concentrations of silibinin with a strong inhibition of toxins-mediated TNF-alpha release. PMID:19156713

  2. Protection of SJL/J mice from demyelinating disease mediated by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, C I; Sun, X M; Fujinami, R S

    1995-01-01

    Intracerebral infection with the DA strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus induces a chronic demyelinating disease in SJL/J mice. Intraperitoneal inoculation with either the wild-type DA virus or an attenuated variant virus of DA, H7A6-2, results in protection from development of chronic demyelinating disease. Protective anti-viral immune responses result in reduced viral titers and decreased inflammation in the central nervous system within the first week following intracerebral challenge with virus. Development of protective immunity requires the presence of B cells and CD4+ T cells but does not require CD8+ T cells. High titers of serum anti-viral IgG and neutralizing antibodies are induced following the intraperitoneal inoculation with the DA virus or H7A6-2 virus prior to challenge. While protection could not be transferred with immune serum from DA virus-infected mice or neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, protection was correlated with increased numbers of DA virus-specific plasma cells in the central nervous system within the first week following intracerebral challenge. Protected mice also had enhanced levels of anti-DA virus IgG and neutralizing antibodies in the cerebral spinal fluid by 1 week following intracerebral challenge with DA virus. Thus, we conclude that vaccination with live virus results in protection from chronic demyelinating disease by inducing immune responses which are manifested in the central nervous system and rapidly clear infection after intracerebral challenge with DA virus.

  3. Cross Protective Mucosal Immunity Mediated by Memory Th17 Cells against Streptococcus pneumoniae Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Yongli; Li, Wenchao; Tian, Ying; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Weiser, Jeffery N.; Ni, Xin; Shen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) remains a leading cause of serious illness and death worldwide. Immunization with conjugated pneumococcal vaccine has lowered the colonization rate and consequently invasive diseases by inducing serotype-specific antibodies. However, many of current pneumonia cases result from infection by serotype strains not included in the vaccine. In this study, we asked if cross-protection against lung infection by heterologous strains can be induced and investigated the underlying immune mechanism. We found that immune mice recovered from a prior infection were protected against heterologous Sp strains in the pneumonia challenge model, as evident by accelerated bacterial clearance, reduced pathology and apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Sp infection in the lung induced strong Th17 responses at the lung mucosal site. Transfer of CD4+ T cells from immune mice provided heterologous protection against pneumonia, and this protection was abrogated by IL-17A blockade. Transfer of memory CD4+ T cells from IL-17A knockout mice failed to provide protection. These results indicate that memory Th17 cells played a key role in providing protection against pneumonia in a serotype independent manner and suggest the feasibility of developing a broadly protective vaccine against bacterial pneumonia by targeting mucosal Th17 T cells. PMID:27118490

  4. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vector mediates postexposure protection against Sudan Ebola hemorrhagic fever in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Geisbert, Thomas W; Daddario-DiCaprio, Kathleen M; Williams, Kinola J N; Geisbert, Joan B; Leung, Anders; Feldmann, Friederike; Hensley, Lisa E; Feldmann, Heinz; Jones, Steven M

    2008-06-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors expressing homologous filoviral glycoproteins can completely protect rhesus monkeys against Marburg virus when administered after exposure and can partially protect macaques after challenge with Zaire ebolavirus. Here, we administered a VSV vector expressing the Sudan ebolavirus (SEBOV) glycoprotein to four rhesus macaques shortly after exposure to SEBOV. All four animals survived SEBOV challenge, while a control animal that received a nonspecific vector developed fulminant SEBOV hemorrhagic fever and succumbed. This is the first demonstration of complete postexposure protection against an Ebola virus in nonhuman primates and provides further evidence that postexposure vaccination may have utility in treating exposures to filoviruses.

  5. Thioacetic acid/NaSH-mediated synthesis of N-protected amino thioacids and their utility in peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mali, Sachitanand M; Gopi, Hosahudya N

    2014-03-21

    Thioacids are recently gaining momentum due to their versatile reactivity. The reactivity of thioacids has been widely explored in the selective amide/peptide bond formation. Thioacids are generally synthesized from the reaction between activated carboxylic acids such as acid chlorides, active esters, etc., and Na2S, H2S, or NaSH. We sought to investigate whether the versatile reactivity of the thioacids can be tuned for the conversion of carboxylic acids into corresponding thioacids in the presence of NaSH. Herein, we report that thioacetic acid- and NaSH-mediated synthesis of N-protected amino thioacids from the corresponding N-protected amino acids, oxidative dimerization of thioacids, crystal conformations of thioacid oxidative dimers, and the utility of thioacids and oxidative dimers in peptide synthesis. Our results suggest that peptides can be synthesized without using standard coupling agents.

  6. Mechanisms of biochar-mediated alleviation of toxicity of trace elements in plants: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Qayyum, Muhammad Farooq; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Zia-ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Abbas, Tahir; Ok, Yong Sik

    2016-02-01

    Trace elements (TEs) contamination is one of the main abiotic stresses which limit plant growth and deteriorate the food quality by their entry into food chain. In recent, biochar (BC) soil amendment has been widely reported for the reduction of TE(s) uptake and toxicity in plants. This review summarizes the role of BC in enhancing TE(s) tolerance in plants. Under TE(s) stress, BC application increased plant growth, biomass, photosynthetic pigments, grain yield, and quality. The key mechanisms evoked are immobilization of TE(s) in the soil, increase in soil pH, alteration of TE(s) redox state in the soil, and improvement in soil physical and biological properties under TE(s) stress. However, these mechanisms vary with plant species, genotypes, growth conditions, duration of stress imposed, BC type, and preparation methods. This review highlights the potential for improving plant resistance to TE(s) stress by BC application and provides a theoretical basis for application of BC in TE(s) contaminated soils worldwide.

  7. Essential structural elements in tRNAPro for EF-P-mediated alleviation of translation stalling

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Takayuki; Wohlgemuth, Ingo; Nagano, Masanobu; Rodnina, Marina V.; Suga, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome stalls on translation of polyproline sequences due to inefficient peptide bond formation between consecutive prolines. The translation factor EF-P is able to alleviate this stalling by accelerating Pro-Pro formation. However, the mechanism by which EF-P recognizes the stalled complexes and accelerates peptide bond formation is not known. Here, we use genetic code reprogramming through a flexible in-vitro translation (FIT) system to investigate how mutations in tRNAPro affect EF-P function. We show that the 9-nt D-loop closed by the stable D-stem sequence in tRNAPro is a crucial recognition determinant for EF-P. Such D-arm structures are shared only among the tRNAPro isoacceptors and tRNAfMet in Escherichia coli, and the D-arm of tRNAfMet is essential for EF-P-induced acceleration of fMet–puromycin formation. Thus, the activity of EF-P is controlled by recognition elements in the tRNA D-arm. PMID:27216360

  8. Enhanced efficiency of P-element mediated transgenesis in Drosophila: Microinjection of DNA complexed with nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Sonane, Madhavi; Goyal, Ritu; Chowdhuri, Debapratim K; Ram, Kristipati Ravi; Gupta, Kailash C

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of genetic transformation technology to generate stable transgenics depends upon the successful delivery of plasmid DNA in embryonic cells. The available gene vectors facilitate efficient plasmid DNA delivery to the cellular milieu but are exposed to nuclease degradation. Recent in vitro studies suggest encapsulation of plasmid DNA with nanomaterial(s) for better protection against nucleases. Therefore, in this study, we tested if complexing of free plasmid DNA with linear polyethylenimine (LPEI, 25 kDa) based nanoparticle (LPN) enhances the efficiency of transformation (transgenesis) by using Drosophila based germ-line transformation technology. Here, we show that the LPN-DNA complex not only enhances the efficiency of this transgenic technology at a DNA concentration of 0.04 μg/μl but also reduces the DNA quantity required to generate transgenics by ten folds. This approach has potential applications for other types of transgenesis and nucleic acid injection methods in Drosophila as well as other popular genetic model systems.

  9. Metformin Protects Kidney Cells From Insulin-Mediated Genotoxicity In Vitro and in Male Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats.

    PubMed

    Othman, Eman Maher; Oli, R G; Arias-Loza, Paula-Anahi; Kreissl, Michael C; Stopper, Helga

    2016-02-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is thought to enhance cancer risk. A possible mechanism is induction of oxidative stress and DNA damage by insulin, Here, the effect of a combination of metformin with insulin was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The rationales for this were the reported antioxidative properties of metformin and the aim to gain further insights into the mechanisms responsible for protecting the genome from insulin-mediated oxidative stress and damage. The comet assay, a micronucleus frequency test, and a mammalian gene mutation assay were used to evaluate the DNA damage produced by insulin alone or in combination with metformin. For analysis of antioxidant activity, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial disturbances, the cell-free ferric reducing antioxidant power assay, the superoxide-sensitive dye dihydroethidium, and the mitochondrial membrane potential-sensitive dye 5,5',6,6'tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazol-carbocyanine iodide were applied. Accumulation of p53 and pAKT were analyzed. As an in vivo model, hyperinsulinemic Zucker diabetic fatty rats, additionally exposed to insulin during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, were treated with metformin. In the rat kidney samples, dihydroethidium staining, p53 and pAKT analysis, and quantification of the oxidized DNA base 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine were performed. Metformin did not show intrinsic antioxidant activity in the cell-free assay, but protected cultured cells from insulin-mediated oxidative stress, DNA damage, and mutation. Treatment of the rats with metformin protected their kidneys from oxidative stress and genomic damage induced by hyperinsulinemia. Metformin may protect patients from genomic damage induced by elevated insulin levels. This may support efforts to reduce the elevated cancer risk that is associated with hyperinsulinemia.

  10. Coenzyme Q10 protects astrocytes from ROS-induced damage through inhibition of mitochondria-mediated cell death pathway.

    PubMed

    Jing, Li; He, Mao-Tao; Chang, Yue; Mehta, Suresh L; He, Qing-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Li, P Andy

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) acts by scavenging reactive oxygen species to protect neuronal cells against oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was designed to examine whether CoQ10 was capable of protecting astrocytes from reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated damage. For this purpose, ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation was used as a tool to induce ROS stress to cultured astrocytes. The cells were treated with 10 and 25 μg/ml of CoQ10 for 3 or 24 h prior to the cells being exposed to UVB irradiation and maintained for 24 h post UVB exposure. Cell viability was assessed by MTT conversion assay. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed by respirometer. While superoxide production and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured using fluorescent probes, levels of cytochrome C (cyto-c), cleaved caspase-9, and caspase-8 were detected using Western blotting and/or immunocytochemistry. The results showed that UVB irradiation decreased cell viability and this damaging effect was associated with superoxide accumulation, mitochondrial membrane potential hyperpolarization, mitochondrial respiration suppression, cyto-c release, and the activation of both caspase-9 and -8. Treatment with CoQ10 at two different concentrations started 24 h before UVB exposure significantly increased the cell viability. The protective effect of CoQ10 was associated with reduction in superoxide, normalization of mitochondrial membrane potential, improvement of mitochondrial respiration, inhibition of cyto-c release, suppression of caspase-9. Furthermore, CoQ10 enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. It is concluded that CoQ10 may protect astrocytes through suppression of oxidative stress, prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction, blockade of mitochondria-mediated cell death pathway, and enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25552930

  11. Latent infection of myeloid progenitors by human cytomegalovirus protects cells from FAS-mediated apoptosis through the cellular IL-10/PEA-15 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jonathan C. H.; Sinclair, John

    2015-01-01

    Latent infection of primary CD34+ progenitor cells by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in their increased survival in the face of pro-apoptotic signals. For instance, we have shown previously that primary myeloid cells are refractory to FAS-mediated killing and that cellular IL-10 (cIL-10) is an important survival factor for this effect. However, how cIL-10 mediates this protection is unclear. Here, we have shown that cIL-10 signalling leading to upregulation of the cellular factor PEA-15 mediates latency-associated protection of CD34+ progenitor cells from the extrinsic death pathway. PMID:25957098

  12. STUbL-mediated degradation of the transcription factor MATα2 requires degradation elements that coincide with corepressor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Christopher M; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2015-10-01

    The yeast transcription factor MATα2 (α2) is a short-lived protein known to be ubiquitylated by two distinct pathways, one involving the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) Ubc6 and Ubc7 and the ubiquitin ligase (E3) Doa10 and the other operating with the E2 Ubc4 and the heterodimeric E3 Slx5/Slx8. Although Slx5/Slx8 is a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL), it does not require SUMO to target α2 but instead directly recognizes α2. Little is known about the α2 determinants required for its Ubc4- and STUbL-mediated degradation or how these determinants substitute for SUMO in recognition by the STUbL pathway. We describe two distinct degradation elements within α2, both of which are necessary for α2 recognition specifically by the Ubc4 pathway. Slx5/Slx8 can directly ubiquitylate a C-terminal fragment of α2, and mutating one of the degradation elements impairs this ubiquitylation. Surprisingly, both degradation elements identified here overlap specific interaction sites for α2 corepressors: the Mcm1 interaction site in the central α2 linker and the Ssn6 (Cyc8) binding site in the α2 homeodomain. We propose that competitive binding to α2 by the ubiquitylation machinery and α2 cofactors is balanced so that α2 can function in transcription repression yet be short lived enough to allow cell-type switching.

  13. SIRT1 Functions as an Important Regulator of Estrogen-Mediated Cardiomyocyte Protection in Angiotensin II-Induced Heart Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tao; Ding, Ling; Ruan, Yang; Qin, Weiwei; Lin, Yajun; Xi, Chao; Lu, Yonggang; Dou, Lin; Zhu, Yuping; Cao, Yuan; Man, Yong; Bian, Yunfei; Wang, Shu; Xiao, Chuanshi; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Background. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a member of the sirtuin family, which could activate cell survival machinery and has been shown to be protective in regulation of heart function. Here, we determined the mechanism by which SIRT1 regulates Angiotensin II- (AngII-) induced cardiac hypertrophy and injury in vivo and in vitro. Methods. We analyzed SIRT1 expression in the hearts of control and AngII-induced mouse hypertrophy. Female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and pretreated with 17β-estradiol to measure SIRT1 expression. Protein synthesis, cardiomyocyte surface area analysis, qRT-PCR, TUNEL staining, and Western blot were performed on AngII-induced mouse heart hypertrophy samples and cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) to investigate the function of SIRT1. Results. SIRT1 expression was slightly upregulated in AngII-induced mouse heart hypertrophy in vivo and in vitro, accompanied by elevated cardiomyocyte apoptosis. SIRT1 overexpression relieves AngII-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis. 17β-Estradiol was able to protect cardiomyocytes from AngII-induced injury with a profound upregulation of SIRT1 and activation of AMPK. Moreover, estrogen receptor inhibitor ICI 182,780 and SIRT1 inhibitor niacinamide could block SIRT1's protective effect. Conclusions. These results indicate that SIRT1 functions as an important regulator of estrogen-mediated cardiomyocyte protection during AngII-induced heart hypertrophy and injury. PMID:25614777

  14. Replacement of Ablators with Phase-Change Material for Thermal Protection of STS Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Raj K.; Stuckey, Irvin; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of the research and development program to develop new Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials for aerospace applications at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), an experimental study was conducted on a new concept for a non-ablative TPS material. Potential loss of TPS material and ablation by-products from the External Tank (ET) or Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) during Shuttle flight with the related Orbiter tile damage necessitates development of a non-ablative thermal protection system. The new Thermal Management Coating (TMC) consists of phase-change material encapsulated in micro spheres and a two-part resin system to adhere the coating to the structure material. The TMC uses a phase-change material to dissipate the heat produced during supersonic flight rather than an ablative material. This new material absorbs energy as it goes through a phase change during the heating portion of the flight profile and then the energy is slowly released as the phase-change material cools and returns to its solid state inside the micro spheres. The coating was subjected to different test conditions simulating design flight environments at the NASA/MSFC Improved Hot Gas Facility (IHGF) to study its performance.

  15. Nrf2-mediated liver protection by sauchinone, an antioxidant lignan, from acetaminophen toxicity through the PKCδ-GSK3β pathway.

    PubMed

    Kay, Hee Yeon; Kim, Young Woo; Ryu, Da Hye; Sung, Sang Hyun; Hwang, Se Jin; Kim, Sang Geon

    2011-08-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Sauchinone, an antioxidant lignan, protects hepatocytes from iron-induced toxicity. This study investigated the protective effects of sauchinone against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity in the liver and the role of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in this effect. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Blood biochemistry and histopathology were assessed in mice treated with APAP or APAP + sauchinone. The levels of mRNA and protein were measured using real-time PCR assays and immunoblottings. KEY RESULTS Sauchinone ameliorated liver injury caused by a high dose of APAP. This effect was prevented by a deficiency of Nrf2. Sauchinone treatment induced modifier subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) and heat shock protein 32 in the liver, which was abolished by Nrf2 deficiency. In a hepatocyte model, sauchinone activated Nrf2, as evidenced by the increased nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, the induction of NQO1-antioxidant response element reporter gene, and glutamate-cysteine ligase and NQO1 protein induction, which contributed to the restoration of hepatic glutathione content. Consistently, treatment of sauchinone enhanced Nrf2 phosphorylation with a reciprocal decrease in its interaction with Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1. Intriguingly, sauchinone activated protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ), which led to Nrf2 phosphorylation. In addition, it increased the inhibitory phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), derepressing Nrf2 activity, which was supported by the reversal of sauchinone's activation of Nrf2 by an activated mutant of GSK3β. Moreover, phosphorylation of GSK3β by sauchinone depended on PKCδ activation. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Our results demonstrate that sauchinone protects the liver from APAP-induced toxicity by activating Nrf2, and this effect is mediated by PKCδ activation, which induces inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK3β.

  16. Melatonin protects skin keratinocyte from hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell death via the SIRT1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin MD.; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), which is primarily synthesized in and secreted from the pineal gland, plays a pivotal role in cell proliferation as well as in the regulation of cell metastasis and cell survival in a diverse range of cells. The aim of this study is to investigate protection effect of melatonin on H2O2-induced cell damage and the mechanisms of melatonin in human keratinocytes. Hydrogen peroxide dose-dependently induced cell damages in human keratinocytes and co-treatment of melatonin protected the keratinocytes against H2O2-induced cell damage. Melatonin treatment activated the autophagy flux signals, which were identified by the decreased levels of p62 protein. Inhibition of autophagy flux via an autophagy inhibitor and ATG5 siRNA technique blocked the protective effects of melatonin against H2O2-induced cell death in human keratinocytes. And we found the inhibition of sirt1 using sirtinol and sirt1 siRNA reversed the protective effects of melatonin and induces the autophagy process in H2O2-treated cells. This is the first report demonstrating that autophagy flux activated by melatonin protects human keratinocytes through sirt1 pathway against hydrogen peroxide-induced damages. And this study also suggest that melatonin could potentially be utilized as a therapeutic agent in skin disease. PMID:26918354

  17. Combined iron sucrose and protoporphyrin treatment protects against ischemic and toxin-mediated acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Frostad, Kirsten B

    2016-07-01

    Tissue preconditioning, whereby various short-term stressors initiate organ resistance to subsequent injury, is well recognized. However, clinical preconditioning of the kidney for protection against acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been established. Here we tested whether a pro-oxidant agent, iron sucrose, combined with a protoporphyrin (Sn protoporphyrin), can induce preconditioning and protect against acute renal failure. Mice were pretreated with iron sucrose, protoporphyrin, cyanocobalamin, iron sucrose and protoporphyrin, or iron sucrose and cyanocobalamin. Eighteen hours later, ischemic, maleate, or glycerol models of AKI were induced, and its severity was assessed the following day (blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine concentrations; post-ischemic histology). Agent impact on cytoprotective gene expression (heme oxygenase 1, hepcidin, haptoglobin, hemopexin, α1-antitrypsin, α1-microglobulin, IL-10) was assessed as renal mRNA and protein levels. AKI-associated myocardial injury was gauged by plasma troponin I levels. Combination agent administration upregulated multiple cytoprotective genes and, unlike single agent administration, conferred marked protection against each tested model of acute renal failure. Heme oxygenase was shown to be a marked contributor to this cytoprotective effect. Preconditioning also blunted AKI-induced cardiac troponin release. Thus, iron sucrose and protoporphyrin administration can upregulate diverse cytoprotective genes and protect against acute renal failure. Associated cardiac protection implies potential relevance to both AKI and its associated adverse downstream effects. PMID:27165818

  18. Ankyrin-mediated self-protection during cell invasion by the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Carey; Cadby, Ian T; Till, Rob; Bui, Nhat Khai; Lerner, Thomas R; Hughes, William S; Lee, David J; Alderwick, Luke J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Sockett, R Elizabeth; Sockett, Elizabeth R; Lovering, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus are natural antimicrobial organisms, killing other bacteria by whole-cell invasion. Self-protection against prey-metabolizing enzymes is important for the evolution of predation. Initial prey entry involves the predator's peptidoglycan DD-endopeptidases, which decrosslink cell walls and prevent wasteful entry by a second predator. Here we identify and characterize a self-protection protein from B. bacteriovorus, Bd3460, which displays an ankyrin-based fold common to intracellular pathogens of eukaryotes. Co-crystal structures reveal Bd3460 complexation of dual targets, binding a conserved epitope of each of the Bd3459 and Bd0816 endopeptidases. Complexation inhibits endopeptidase activity and cell wall decrosslinking in vitro. Self-protection is vital - ΔBd3460 Bdellovibrio deleteriously decrosslink self-peptidoglycan upon invasion, adopt a round morphology, and lose predatory capacity and cellular integrity. Our analysis provides the first mechanistic examination of self-protection in Bdellovibrio, documents protection-multiplicity for products of two different genomic loci, and reveals an important evolutionary adaptation to an invasive predatory bacterial lifestyle. PMID:26626559

  19. A new regulatory element modulates homoserine lactone-mediated autoinduction of Ti plasmid conjugal transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, I; Cook, D M; Farrand, S K

    1995-01-01

    Conjugal transfer of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline-type Ti plasmid pTiC58 is induced by agrocinopines A and B, opines secreted by crown gall tumors induced by the bacterium. This regulation functions through the transcriptional repressor, AccR. However, actual transcription of the tra genes is regulated by autoinduction through the activator TraR and the substituted homoserine lactone second messenger, Agrobacterium autoinducer (AAI). We have identified a new regulatory element that modulates the response of TraR to AAI. The gene, called traM, suppresses TraR-AAI activation of transcription of tra genes carried on recombinant clones. The suppression could be relieved by increasing the expression of TraR but not by increasing AAI levels. traM is located between traR and traAF on pTiC58 and is transcribed in the clockwise direction. The 306-bp gene encodes an 11.2-kDa protein showing no significant relatedness to other proteins in the databases. Mutations in traM in pTiC58 conferred a transfer-constitutive phenotype, and strains harboring the Ti plasmid produced easily detectable amounts of AAI. These same mutations engineered into the transfer-constitutive Ti plasmid pTiC58 delta accR conferred a hyperconjugal phenotype and very high levels of AAI production. Expression of traM required TraR, indicating that transcription of the gene is regulated by the autoinduction system. TraM had no effect on the expression of traR, demonstrating that the suppressive effect is not due to repression of the gene encoding the activator. These results suggest that TraM is not a direct transcriptional regulator. Since the suppressive effect is demonstrable only when traM is overexpressed with respect to traR, we suggest that TraM functions to sequester TraR from the very small amounts of AAI produced under conditions when the agrocinopines are not present. PMID:7814335

  20. Folic acid protects against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Luo, Hai-Yan; Chen, Yang; Li, Hui-hua; Ma, Xu; Lu, Cai-Ling

    2015-11-05

    As a nutritional factor, folic acid can prevent cardiac and neural defects during embryo development. Our previous study showed that arsenic impairs embryo development by down-regulating Dvr1/GDF1 expression in zebrafish. Here, we investigated whether folic acid could protect against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity. We found that folic acid supplementation increases hatching and survival rates, decreases malformation rate and ameliorates abnormal cardiac and neural development of zebrafish embryos exposed to arsenite. Both real-time PCR analysis and whole in-mount hybridization showed that folic acid significantly rescued the decrease in Dvr1 expression caused by arsenite. Subsequently, our data demonstrated that arsenite significantly decreased cell viability and GDF1 mRNA and protein levels in HEK293ET cells, while folic acid reversed these effects. Folic acid attenuated the increase in subcellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and oxidative adaptor p66Shc protein expression in parallel with the changes in GDF1 expression and cell viability. P66Shc knockdown significantly inhibited the production of ROS and the down-regulation of GDF1 induced by arsenite. Our data demonstrated that folic acid supplementation protected against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1/GDF1, and folic acid enhanced the expression of GDF1 by decreasing p66Shc expression and subcellular ROS levels.

  1. Folic acid protects against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Luo, Hai-Yan; Chen, Yang; Li, Hui-hua; Ma, Xu; Lu, Cai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    As a nutritional factor, folic acid can prevent cardiac and neural defects during embryo development. Our previous study showed that arsenic impairs embryo development by down-regulating Dvr1/GDF1 expression in zebrafish. Here, we investigated whether folic acid could protect against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity. We found that folic acid supplementation increases hatching and survival rates, decreases malformation rate and ameliorates abnormal cardiac and neural development of zebrafish embryos exposed to arsenite. Both real-time PCR analysis and whole in-mount hybridization showed that folic acid significantly rescued the decrease in Dvr1 expression caused by arsenite. Subsequently, our data demonstrated that arsenite significantly decreased cell viability and GDF1 mRNA and protein levels in HEK293ET cells, while folic acid reversed these effects. Folic acid attenuated the increase in subcellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and oxidative adaptor p66Shc protein expression in parallel with the changes in GDF1 expression and cell viability. P66Shc knockdown significantly inhibited the production of ROS and the down-regulation of GDF1 induced by arsenite. Our data demonstrated that folic acid supplementation protected against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1/GDF1, and folic acid enhanced the expression of GDF1 by decreasing p66Shc expression and subcellular ROS levels. PMID:26537450

  2. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Cappellari, Gianluca Gortan; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  3. Anthracyclines Induce DNA Damage Response-Mediated Protection against Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Nuno; Chora, Angelo; Raquel, Helena; Pejanovic, Nadja; Pereira, Pedro; Hartleben, Björn; Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Catarina; Pedroso, Dora; Pinto, Andreia; Marques, Sofia; Faridi, Hafeez; Costa, Paulo; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Zhao, Jimmy L.; Soares, Miguel P.; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Martinez, Jennifer; Zhang, Qingshuo; Döring, Gerd; Grompe, Markus; Simas, J. Pedro; Huber, Tobias B.; Baltimore, David; Gupta, Vineet; Green, Douglas R.; Ferreira, João A.; Moita, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Severe sepsis remains a poorly understood systemic inflammatory condition with high mortality rates and limited therapeutic options in addition to organ support measures. Here we show that the clinically approved group of anthracyclines acts therapeutically at a low dose regimen to confer robust protection against severe sepsis in mice. This salutary effect is strictly dependent on the activation of DNA damage response and autophagy pathways in the lung, as demonstrated by deletion of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) or the autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) specifically in this organ. The protective effect of anthracyclines occurs irrespectively of pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to severe sepsis. These findings demonstrate that DNA damage responses, including the ATM and Fancony Anemia pathways, are important modulators of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to inflammation-driven conditions, including severe sepsis. PMID:24184056

  4. Germ line and embryonic expression of Fex, a member of the Drosophila F-element retrotransposon family, is mediated by an internal cis-regulatory control region.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, B; Fellert, S; Taubert, H; Hoch, M

    1996-01-01

    The F elements of Drosophila melanogaster belong to the superfamily of long interspersed nucleotide element retrotransposons. To date, F-element transcription has not been detected in flies. Here we describe the isolation of a member of the F-element family, termed Fex, which is transcribed in specific cells of the female and male germ lines and in various tissues during embryogenesis of D. melanogaster. Sequence analysis revealed that this element contains two complete open reading frames coding for a putative nucleic acid-binding protein and a putative reverse transcriptase. Functional analysis of the 5' region, using germ line transformation of Fex-lacZ reporter gene constructs, demonstrates that major aspects of tissue-specific Fex expression are controlled by internal cis-acting elements that lie in the putative coding region of open reading frame 1. These sequences mediate dynamic gene expression in eight expression domains during embryonic and germ line development. The capacity of the cis-regulatory region of the Fex element to mediate such complex expression patterns is unique among members of the long interspersed nucleotide element superfamily of retrotransposons and is reminiscent of regulatory regions of developmental control genes. PMID:8649411

  5. Extraordinarily few organisms of a live recombinant BCG vaccine against tuberculosis induce maximal cell-mediated and protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Marcus A; Harth, Günter; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Maslesa-Galić, Sasa

    2006-01-23

    In previous studies, we have described a live recombinant BCG vaccine (rBCG30) overexpressing the 30 kDa major secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that induces greater protective immunity against tuberculosis than the current vaccine in the demanding guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis. In this study, we have investigated the impact of vaccine dose on the development of cell-mediated and protective immunity in the guinea pig model. We found that the protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis aerosol challenge of both BCG and rBCG30 was essentially dose-independent over a dose range of 10(1)-10(6) live organisms. As previously observed, rBCG30 was more potent, reducing colony-forming units (CFU) below the level observed in animals immunized with the parental BCG vaccine by 0.7 logs in the lungs and 1.0 logs in the spleen (P<0.0001). To gain a better understanding of the influence of dose on bacterial clearance and immunity, we assessed animals immunized with 10(1), 10(3), or 10(6)CFU of rBCG30. The higher the dose, the higher the peak CFU level achieved in animal organs. However, whereas humoral immune responses to the 30 kDa protein reflected the disparate CFU levels, cell-mediated immune responses did not; high and low doses of rBCG30 ultimately induced comparable peak lymphocyte proliferative responses and cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to the 30 kDa protein. We estimate that the amount of the 30 kDa protein required to induce a strong cell-mediated immune response when delivered via 10 rBCG30 organisms is about 9 orders of magnitude less than that required when the protein is delivered in a conventional protein/adjuvant vaccine. This study demonstrates that a very low inoculum of rBCG30 organisms has the capacity to induce strong protective immunity against tuberculosis and that rBCG30 is an extremely potent delivery system for mycobacterial antigens.

  6. FABP4-Cre mediated expression of constitutively active ChREBP protects against obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) regulates cellular glucose and lipid homeostasis. Although ChREBP is highly expressed in many key metabolic tissues, the role of ChREBP in most of those tissues and consequent effects on whole-body glucose and lipid metabolism are not well under...

  7. Dietary selenium protect against redox-mediated immune suppression induced by methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Yin, Daqiang; Yin, Jiaoyang; Chen, Qiqing; Wang, Rui

    2014-10-01

    The antagonism between selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) has been widely recognized, however, the protective role of Se against methylmercury (MeHg) induced immunotoxicity and the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In the current study, MeHg exposure (0.01 mM via drinking water) significantly inhibited the lymphoproliferation and NK cells functions of the female Balb/c mice, while dietary Se supplementation (as Se-rich yeast) partly or fully recovered the observed immunotoxicity, indicating the protective role of Se against MeHg-induced immune suppression in mice. Besides, MeHg exposure promoted the generation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced the levels of nonenzymic and enzymic antioxidants in target organs, while dietary Se administration significantly diminished the MeHg-induced oxidative stress and subsequent cellular dysfunctions (lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation). Two possible mechanisms of Se's protective effects were further revealed. Firstly, the reduction of mercury concentrations (less than 25%, modulated by Se supplementation) in the target organs might contribute, but not fully explain the alleviated immune suppression. Secondly and more importantly, Se could help to maintain/or elevate the activities of several key antioxidants, therefore protect the immune cells against MeHg-induced oxidative damage.

  8. Mechanism of T cell mediated protection in newborn mice against a Chlamydia infection

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sukumar; de la Maza, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the immune components needed for protection of newborn mice against Chlamydia muridarum, animals born to Chlamydia-immunized and to sham-immunized dams were infected intranasally with C. muridarum at 2 post-natal days. T-cells isolated from immunized or sham-immunized adult mice were adoptively transferred to newborn mice at the time of infection. Also, to establish what cytokines are involved in protection, IFN-γ TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 were passively transferred to newborn mice. To assess the Chlamydia burden in the lungs mice were euthanized at 12 post-natal days. When T-cells from immunized adult mice were transferred, mice born to and fed by immunized dams were significantly protected as evidenced by the reduced number of Chlamydia isolated from the lungs compared to mice born to and fed by sham-immunized dams. Transfer of IFN-γ and TNF-α also significantly reduced the number of Chlamydia in the lungs of mice born to immunized dams. Transfer of IL-10 or IL-12 did not result in a significant reduction of Chlamydia. In vitro T-cell proliferation data suggest that neonatal antigen presenting cells can present Chlamydia antigens to adult T-cells. In conclusion, maternal antibodies and Chlamydia specific T-cells or Th1 cytokines are required for protection of neonates against this pathogen. PMID:23644176

  9. SNMIB/Apollo protects leading-strand telomeres against NHEJ-mediated repair.

    PubMed

    Lam, Yung C; Akhter, Shamima; Gu, Peili; Ye, Jing; Poulet, Anaïs; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Bailey, Susan M; Gilson, Eric; Legerski, Randy J; Chang, Sandy

    2010-07-01

    Progressive telomere attrition or deficiency of the protective shelterin complex elicits a DNA damage response as a result of a cell's inability to distinguish dysfunctional telomeric ends from DNA double-strand breaks. SNMIB/Apollo is a shelterin-associated protein and a member of the SMN1/PSO2 nuclease family that localizes to telomeres through its interaction with TRF2. Here, we generated SNMIB/Apollo knockout mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) to probe the function of SNMIB/Apollo at mammalian telomeres. SNMIB/Apollo null MEFs exhibit an increased incidence of G2 chromatid-type fusions involving telomeres created by leading-strand DNA synthesis, reflective of a failure to protect these telomeres after DNA replication. Mutations within SNMIB/Apollo's conserved nuclease domain failed to suppress this phenotype, suggesting that its nuclease activity is required to protect leading-strand telomeres. SNMIB/Apollo(-/-)ATM(-/-) MEFs display robust telomere fusions when Trf2 is depleted, indicating that ATM is dispensable for repair of uncapped telomeres in this setting. Our data implicate the 5'-3' exonuclease function of SNM1B/Apollo in the generation of 3' single-stranded overhangs at newly replicated leading-strand telomeres to protect them from engaging the non-homologous end-joining pathway. PMID:20551906

  10. SNMIB/Apollo protects leading-strand telomeres against NHEJ-mediated repair.

    PubMed

    Lam, Yung C; Akhter, Shamima; Gu, Peili; Ye, Jing; Poulet, Anaïs; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Bailey, Susan M; Gilson, Eric; Legerski, Randy J; Chang, Sandy

    2010-07-01

    Progressive telomere attrition or deficiency of the protective shelterin complex elicits a DNA damage response as a result of a cell's inability to distinguish dysfunctional telomeric ends from DNA double-strand breaks. SNMIB/Apollo is a shelterin-associated protein and a member of the SMN1/PSO2 nuclease family that localizes to telomeres through its interaction with TRF2. Here, we generated SNMIB/Apollo knockout mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) to probe the function of SNMIB/Apollo at mammalian telomeres. SNMIB/Apollo null MEFs exhibit an increased incidence of G2 chromatid-type fusions involving telomeres created by leading-strand DNA synthesis, reflective of a failure to protect these telomeres after DNA replication. Mutations within SNMIB/Apollo's conserved nuclease domain failed to suppress this phenotype, suggesting that its nuclease activity is required to protect leading-strand telomeres. SNMIB/Apollo(-/-)ATM(-/-) MEFs display robust telomere fusions when Trf2 is depleted, indicating that ATM is dispensable for repair of uncapped telomeres in this setting. Our data implicate the 5'-3' exonuclease function of SNM1B/Apollo in the generation of 3' single-stranded overhangs at newly replicated leading-strand telomeres to protect them from engaging the non-homologous end-joining pathway.

  11. Symbiont-Mediated Protection against Fungal Pathogens in Pea Aphids: a Role for Pathogen Specificity?

    PubMed Central

    Spragg, Chelsea J.; Altincicek, Boran; Gerardo, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Here we show that a bacterial endosymbiont, Regiella insecticola, protects pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) from the aphid-specific fungal entomopathogen Zoophthora occidentalis but not from the generalist insect fungal pathogen Beauveria bassiana. This finding highlights the complex influence of fungi on the dynamics of this economically important agricultural pest. PMID:23354709

  12. Mechanism of T-cell mediated protection in newborn mice against a Chlamydia infection.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukumar; de la Maza, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the immune components needed for protection of newborn mice against Chlamydia muridarum, animals born to Chlamydia-immunized and to sham-immunized dams were infected intranasally with C. muridarum at 2 post-natal days. T-cells isolated from immunized or sham-immunized adult mice were adoptively transferred to newborn mice at the time of infection. Also, to establish what cytokines are involved in protection, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 were passively transferred to newborn mice. To assess the Chlamydia burden in the lungs mice were euthanized at 12 post-natal days. When T-cells from immunized adult mice were transferred, mice born to and fed by immunized dams were significantly protected as evidenced by the reduced number of Chlamydia isolated from the lungs compared to mice born to and fed by sham-immunized dams. Transfer of IFN-γ and TNF-α also significantly reduced the number of Chlamydia in the lungs of mice born to immunized dams. Transfer of IL-10 or IL-12 did not result in a significant reduction of Chlamydia. In vitro T-cell proliferation data suggest that neonatal antigen presenting cells can present Chlamydia antigens to adult T-cells. In conclusion, maternal antibodies and Chlamydia specific T-cells or Th1 cytokines are required for protection of neonates against this pathogen.

  13. Protective Behavioral Strategies as a Mediator of the Generalized Anxiety and Alcohol Use Relationship Among Lesbian and Bisexual Women

    PubMed Central

    Litt, Dana M.; Lewis, Melissa A.; Blayney, Jessica A.; Kaysen, Debra L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol use disorders and anxiety disorders often co-occur; moreover, lesbian and bisexual women appear at higher risk for both alcohol and anxiety disorders. Although research among college student samples has found direct effects of increased use of protective behavioral strategies on decreasing alcohol use and alcoholrelated negative consequences, this has yet to be demonstrated among lesbian and bisexual women. Furthermore, it is unclear whether generalized anxiety influences the use of such strategies, which in turn predict alcohol consumption and related negative consequences. The primary objective of the present study was to examine the mediating role of protective behavioral strategies on the relationships between generalized anxiety and alcohol consumption and related negative consequences among a young adult sample of lesbian and bisexual women. Method: A national sample of 1,083 lesbian and bisexual women between the ages of 18 and 25 years completed an online survey that assessed the constructs of interest. Results: Results showed support for mediation such that lesbian and bisexual women who reported having higher levels of generalized anxiety were less likely to use drinking protective behavioral strategies, which in turn led to higher levels of alcohol consumption as well as negative alcohol-related consequences. Conclusions: These findings highlight the importance of examining who is at risk for alcohol use disorders as well as why they are at risk. Results indicate that interventions for high-risk drinking among younger lesbian and bisexual women may need to specifically address factors such as affect management or coping with anxiety, at least for the proportion of women who are endorsing significant symptoms of anxiety. PMID:23200163

  14. Gαi2-mediated protection from ischaemic injury is modulated by endogenous RGS proteins in the mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    Waterson, Rachael E.; Thompson, Corbin G.; Mabe, Nathaniel W.; Kaur, Kuljeet; Talbot, Jeffery N.; Neubig, Richard R.; Rorabaugh, Boyd R.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Regulator of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins act as molecular ‘off switches’ that terminate G protein signalling by catalyzing the hydrolysis of Gα-bound GTP to GDP. Many different Gαi-coupled receptors have been implicated in the cardioprotective effects of ischaemic preconditioning. However, the role of RGS proteins in modulating cardioprotection has not been previously investigated. We used mice that were homozygous (GS/GS) or heterozygous (GS/+) for a mutation in Gαi2 rendering it RGS-insensitive (G184S) to determine whether interactions between endogenous RGS proteins and Gαi2 modulate Gαi-mediated protection from ischaemic injury. Methods and results Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts were subjected to 30 min global ischaemia and 2 h reperfusion. Infarcts in GS/GS (14.5% of area at risk) and GS/+ (22.6% of AAR) hearts were significantly smaller than those of +/+ hearts (37.2% of AAR) and recovery of contractile function was significantly enhanced in GS/GS and GS/+ hearts compared with +/+ hearts. The cardioprotective phenotype was not reversed by wortmannin or U0126 but was reversed by 5-hydroxydecanoic acid and HMR 1098, indicating that RGS-insensitive Gαi2 protects the heart through a mechanism that requires functional ATP-dependent potassium channels but does not require acute activation of extracellular-regulated kinase or Akt signalling pathways. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that Gαi2-mediated cardioprotection is suppressed by RGS proteins. These data suggest that RGS proteins may provide novel therapeutic targets to protect the heart from ischaemic injury. PMID:21349876

  15. Protection from radiation-induced enteropathy by elemental diet feeding: The role of free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    McArdle, A.H.; Duong, M.N. )

    1991-03-15

    Free radicals have been implicated in intestinal reperfusion injury following ischemia and in epithelial cell damage resulting from ionizing radiation. Elemental diets (ED) have been shown to afford significant prophylaxis to the intestine from these injuries. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether ED alters the activity of the defense mechanisms necessary for free radical removal. Six female dogs, fed on normal dog chow, had a 30 cm resection of terminal ileum to form Thiry-Vella loops. The main intestine was biopsied and anastomosed. Two weeks later, biopsies were taken from the lips of the loops. Following this, the loops were fed daily with ED another 2 weeks and biopsied again. The dogs were then placed on ED for 3 days before and during 4 days of pelvic irradiation, and the loops also were fed ED daily; after which the animals were again anesthetized, and the loops and main intestine were biopsied. All biopsies were processed for histology, and assayed for xanthine oxidase (XO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSP) and catalase (CAT). The XO and SOD pathway of free oxygen radical generation and scavenging are not affected by radiation. However, ED lowers both XO and SOD activity and may result in a reduced production of peroxides. The significantly increased activity of GSP and CAT when ED is fed improves the scavenging capacity of the free hydroxyl radicals generated by the radiation, and is an important adjunct to an understanding of ED prophylaxis.

  16. Eugenol protects nicotine-induced superoxide mediated oxidative damage in murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kar Mahapatra, Santanu; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Majumdar, Subrata; Bag, Braja Gopal; Roy, Somenath

    2009-11-25

    The present work is aimed at evaluating the protective effect of eugenol against in vitro nicotine-induced toxicity in murine peritoneal macrophages, compared with N-acetylcysteine. Eugenol was isolated from Ocimum gratissimum and characterized by HPLC, FTIR, (1)H NMR. To establish most effective protective support, we used five different concentrations of eugenol (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20microg/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0microg/ml) against 10mM nicotine in mice peritoneal macrophages. A dose-dependent protective effect was observed with all doses of eugenol and N-acetylcysteine, as evidenced by decreased level of superoxide anion generation and malondialdehyde, and also increased level of reduced glutathione, and superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, maximum protection was observed at the concentration of 15.0microg/ml eugenol (0.09nM) and 1.0microg/ml N-acetylcysteine (0.006nM). Further, eugenol (15.0microg/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (1.0microg/ml) were tested against nicotine (10mM) toxicity by analyzing the radical generation, lipid, protein, DNA damage, and endogenous antioxidant status. There was a significant increase in the level of radical generation, NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity, lipid, protein, DNA damage and oxidized glutathione level in nicotine-treated group, which were significantly reduced by eugenol and N-acetylcysteine supplementation. Antioxidant status was significantly depleted in the nicotine-treated group, which was effectively restored by eugenol and N-acetylcysteine supplementation. The protection by eugenol against nicotine toxicity was merely equal effective to that of N-acetylcysteine. These findings suggest the potential use and benefit of eugenol isolated from O. gratissimum as a modulator of nicotine-induced cellular damage and it may be used as an immunomodulatory drug against nicotine toxicity.

  17. Eugenol protects nicotine-induced superoxide mediated oxidative damage in murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kar Mahapatra, Santanu; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Majumdar, Subrata; Bag, Braja Gopal; Roy, Somenath

    2009-11-25

    The present work is aimed at evaluating the protective effect of eugenol against in vitro nicotine-induced toxicity in murine peritoneal macrophages, compared with N-acetylcysteine. Eugenol was isolated from Ocimum gratissimum and characterized by HPLC, FTIR, (1)H NMR. To establish most effective protective support, we used five different concentrations of eugenol (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20microg/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0microg/ml) against 10mM nicotine in mice peritoneal macrophages. A dose-dependent protective effect was observed with all doses of eugenol and N-acetylcysteine, as evidenced by decreased level of superoxide anion generation and malondialdehyde, and also increased level of reduced glutathione, and superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, maximum protection was observed at the concentration of 15.0microg/ml eugenol (0.09nM) and 1.0microg/ml N-acetylcysteine (0.006nM). Further, eugenol (15.0microg/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (1.0microg/ml) were tested against nicotine (10mM) toxicity by analyzing the radical generation, lipid, protein, DNA damage, and endogenous antioxidant status. There was a significant increase in the level of radical generation, NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity, lipid, protein, DNA damage and oxidized glutathione level in nicotine-treated group, which were significantly reduced by eugenol and N-acetylcysteine supplementation. Antioxidant status was significantly depleted in the nicotine-treated group, which was effectively restored by eugenol and N-acetylcysteine supplementation. The protection by eugenol against nicotine toxicity was merely equal effective to that of N-acetylcysteine. These findings suggest the potential use and benefit of eugenol isolated from O. gratissimum as a modulator of nicotine-induced cellular damage and it may be used as an immunomodulatory drug against nicotine toxicity. PMID:19769960

  18. Delineating the core regulatory elements crucial for directed cell migration by examining folic-acid-mediated responses.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Kamalakkannan; Wright, Gus A; Hames, Nicole; Housman, Max; Roberts, Alayna; Aufderheide, Karl J; Janetopoulos, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum shows chemotaxis towards folic acid (FA) throughout vegetative growth, and towards cAMP during development. We determined the spatiotemporal localization of cytoskeletal and signaling molecules and investigated the FA-mediated responses in a number of signaling mutants to further our understanding of the core regulatory elements that are crucial for cell migration. Proteins enriched in the pseudopods during chemotaxis also relocalize transiently to the plasma membrane during uniform FA stimulation. In contrast, proteins that are absent from the pseudopods during migration redistribute transiently from the PM to the cytosol when cells are globally stimulated with FA. These chemotactic responses to FA were also examined in cells lacking the GTPases Ras C and G. Although Ras and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity were significantly decreased in Ras G and Ras C/G nulls, these mutants still migrated towards FA, indicating that other pathways must support FA-mediated chemotaxis. We also examined the spatial movements of PTEN in response to uniform FA and cAMP stimulation in phospholipase C (PLC) null cells. The lack of PLC strongly influences the localization of PTEN in response to FA, but not cAMP. In addition, we compared the gradient-sensing behavior of polarized cells migrating towards cAMP to that of unpolarized cells migrating towards FA. The majority of polarized cells make U-turns when the cAMP gradient is switched from the front of the cell to the rear. Conversely, unpolarized cells immediately extend pseudopods towards the new FA source. We also observed that plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3] levels oscillate in unpolarized cells treated with Latrunculin-A, whereas polarized cells had stable plasma membrane PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 responses toward the chemoattractant gradient source. Results were similar for cells that were starved for 4 hours, with a mixture of polarized and unpolarized cells responding

  19. Delineating the core regulatory elements crucial for directed cell migration by examining folic-acid-mediated responses

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Kamalakkannan; Wright, Gus A.; Hames, Nicole; Housman, Max; Roberts, Alayna; Aufderheide, Karl J.; Janetopoulos, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dictyostelium discoideum shows chemotaxis towards folic acid (FA) throughout vegetative growth, and towards cAMP during development. We determined the spatiotemporal localization of cytoskeletal and signaling molecules and investigated the FA-mediated responses in a number of signaling mutants to further our understanding of the core regulatory elements that are crucial for cell migration. Proteins enriched in the pseudopods during chemotaxis also relocalize transiently to the plasma membrane during uniform FA stimulation. In contrast, proteins that are absent from the pseudopods during migration redistribute transiently from the PM to the cytosol when cells are globally stimulated with FA. These chemotactic responses to FA were also examined in cells lacking the GTPases Ras C and G. Although Ras and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity were significantly decreased in Ras G and Ras C/G nulls, these mutants still migrated towards FA, indicating that other pathways must support FA-mediated chemotaxis. We also examined the spatial movements of PTEN in response to uniform FA and cAMP stimulation in phospholipase C (PLC) null cells. The lack of PLC strongly influences the localization of PTEN in response to FA, but not cAMP. In addition, we compared the gradient-sensing behavior of polarized cells migrating towards cAMP to that of unpolarized cells migrating towards FA. The majority of polarized cells make U-turns when the cAMP gradient is switched from the front of the cell to the rear. Conversely, unpolarized cells immediately extend pseudopods towards the new FA source. We also observed that plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3] levels oscillate in unpolarized cells treated with Latrunculin-A, whereas polarized cells had stable plasma membrane PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 responses toward the chemoattractant gradient source. Results were similar for cells that were starved for 4 hours, with a mixture of polarized and unpolarized cells

  20. Th1-Th17 cells mediate protective adaptive immunity against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Ibrahim, Ashraf S; Xu, Xin; Farber, Joshua M; Avanesian, Valentina; Baquir, Beverlie; Fu, Yue; French, Samuel W; Edwards, John E; Spellberg, Brad

    2009-12-01

    We sought to define protective mechanisms of immunity to Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans bloodstream infections in mice immunized with the recombinant N-terminus of Als3p (rAls3p-N) vaccine plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH(3)) adjuvant, or adjuvant controls. Deficiency of IFN-gamma but not IL-17A enhanced susceptibility of control mice to both infections. However, vaccine-induced protective immunity against both infections required CD4+ T-cell-derived IFN-gamma and IL-17A, and functional phagocytic effectors. Vaccination primed Th1, Th17, and Th1/17 lymphocytes, which produced pro-inflammatory cytokines that enhanced phagocytic killing of both organisms. Vaccinated, infected mice had increased IFN-gamma, IL-17, and KC, increased neutrophil influx, and decreased organism burden in tissues. In summary, rAls3p-N vaccination induced a Th1/Th17 response, resulting in recruitment and activation of phagocytes at sites of infection, and more effective clearance of S. aureus and C. albicans from tissues. Thus, vaccine-mediated adaptive immunity can protect against both infections by targeting microbes for destruction by innate effectors.

  1. β Common Receptor Mediates Erythropoietin-Conferred Protection on OxLDL-Induced Lipid Accumulation and Inflammation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kuo-Yun; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Tsai, Feng-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), the key factor for erythropoiesis, also protects macrophage foam cells from lipid accumulation, yet the definitive mechanisms are not fully understood. β common receptor (βCR) plays a crucial role in the nonhematopoietic effects of EPO. In the current study, we investigated the role of βCR in EPO-mediated protection in macrophages against oxidized low-density lipoprotein- (oxLDL-) induced deregulation of lipid metabolism and inflammation. Here, we show that βCR expression was mainly in foamy macrophages of atherosclerotic aortas from apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Results of confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that βCR was colocalized and interacted with EPO receptor (EPOR) in macrophages. Inhibition of βCR activation by neutralizing antibody or small interfering RNA (siRNA) abolished the EPO-conferred protection in oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation. Furthermore, EPO-promoted cholesterol efflux and upregulation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 were prevented by pretreatment with βCR neutralizing antibody or βCR siRNA. Additionally, blockage of βCR abrogated the EPO-conferred anti-inflammatory action on oxLDL-induced production of macrophage inflammatory protein-2. Collectively, our findings suggest that βCR may play an important role in the beneficial effects of EPO against oxLDL-elicited dysfunction of macrophage foam cells. PMID:26101463

  2. The Evolutionarily Conserved Mediator Subunit MDT-15/MED15 Links Protective Innate Immune Responses and Xenobiotic Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, Deborah L.; Conery, Annie L.; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2014-01-01

    Metazoans protect themselves from environmental toxins and virulent pathogens through detoxification and immune responses. We previously identified a small molecule xenobiotic toxin that extends survival of Caenorhabditis elegans infected with human bacterial pathogens by activating the conserved p38 MAP kinase PMK-1 host defense pathway. Here we investigate the cellular mechanisms that couple activation of a detoxification response to innate immunity. From an RNAi screen of 1,420 genes expressed in the C. elegans intestine, we identified the conserved Mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 and 28 other gene inactivations that abrogate the induction of PMK-1-dependent immune effectors by this small molecule. We demonstrate that MDT-15/MED15 is required for the xenobiotic-induced expression of p38 MAP kinase PMK-1-dependent immune genes and protection from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We also show that MDT-15 controls the induction of detoxification genes and functions to protect the host from bacteria-derived phenazine toxins. These data define a central role for MDT-15/MED15 in the coordination of xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune responses. PMID:24875643

  3. Vaccination with a recombinant fragment of collagen adhesin provides protection against Staphylococcus aureus-mediated septic death.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, I M; Patti, J M; Bremell, T; Höök, M; Tarkowski, A

    1998-06-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Morbidity and mortality due to infections such as sepsis, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, and invasive endocarditis remain high despite the use of antibiotics. The emergence of antibiotic resistant super bugs mandates that alternative strategies for the prevention and treatment of S. aureus infections are developed. We investigated the ability of vaccination with a recombinant fragment of the S. aureus collagen adhesin to protect mice against sepsis-induced death. Actively immunized NMRI mice were intravenously inoculated with the S. aureus clinical isolate strain Phillips. 14 d after inoculation, mortality in the collagen adhesin-vaccinated group was only 13%, compared with 87% in the control antigen immunized group (P < 0.001). To determine if the protective effect was antibody mediated, we passively immunized naive mice with collagen adhesin-specific antibodies. Similar to the active immunization strategy, passive transfer of collagen adhesin-specific antibodies protected mice against sepsis-induced death. In vitro experiments indicated that S. aureus opsonized with sera from collagen adhesin immunized mice promoted phagocytic uptake and enhanced intracellular killing compared with bacteria opsonized with sera from control animals. These results indicate that the collagen adhesin is a viable target in the development of immunotherapeutics against S. aureus.

  4. The regulatory element READ1 epistatically influences reading and language, with both deleterious and protective alleles

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Natalie R; Eicher, John D; Miller, Laura L; Kong, Yong; Smith, Shelley D; Pennington, Bruce F; Willcutt, Erik G; Olson, Richard K; Ring, Susan M; Gruen, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Background Reading disability (RD) and language impairment (LI) are heritable learning disabilities that obstruct acquisition and use of written and spoken language, respectively. We previously reported that two risk haplotypes, each in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with an allele of READ1, a polymorphic compound short tandem repeat within intron 2 of risk gene DCDC2, are associated with RD and LI. Additionally, we showed a non-additive genetic interaction between READ1 and KIAHap, a previously reported risk haplotype in risk gene KIAA0319, and that READ1 binds the transcriptional regulator ETV6. Objective To examine the hypothesis that READ1 is a transcriptional regulator of KIAA0319. Methods We characterised associations between READ1 alleles and RD and LI in a large European cohort, and also assessed interactions between READ1 and KIAHap and their effect on performance on measures of reading, language and IQ. We also used family-based data to characterise the genetic interaction, and chromatin conformation capture (3C) to investigate the possibility of a physical interaction between READ1 and KIAHap. Results and conclusions READ1 and KIAHap show interdependence—READ1 risk alleles synergise with KIAHap, whereas READ1 protective alleles act epistatically to negate the effects of KIAHap. The family data suggest that these variants interact in trans genetically, while the 3C results show that a region of DCDC2 containing READ1 interacts physically with the region upstream of KIAA0319. These data support a model in which READ1 regulates KIAA0319 expression through KIAHap and in which the additive effects of READ1 and KIAHap alleles are responsible for the trans genetic interaction. PMID:26660103

  5. NK Cell-Mediated Regulation of Protective Memory Responses against Intracellular Ehrlichial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Samar; El Andaloussi, Abdeljabar; Hisham, Ahmed; Ismail, Nahed

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichiae are gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that cause potentially fatal human monocytic ehrlichiosis. We previously showed that natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in host defense against Ehrlichia during primary infection. However, the contribution of NK cells to the memory response against Ehrlichia remains elusive. Primary infection of C57BL/6 mice with Ehrlichia muris provides long-term protection against a second challenge with the highly virulent Ixodes ovatus Ehrlichia (IOE), which ordinarily causes fatal disease in naïve mice. Here, we show that the depletion of NK cells in E. muris-primed mice abrogates the protective memory response against IOE. Approximately, 80% of NK cell-depleted E. muris-primed mice succumbed to lethal IOE infection on days 8–10 after IOE infection, similar to naïve mice infected with the same dose of IOE. The lack of a recall response in NK cell-depleted mice correlated with an increased bacterial burden, extensive liver injury, decreased frequency of Ehrlichia-specific IFN-γ-producing memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and a low titer of Ehrlichia-specific antibodies. Intraperitoneal infection of mice with E. muris resulted in the production of IL-15, IL-12, and IFN-γ as well as an expansion of activated NKG2D+ NK cells. The adoptive transfer of purified E. muris-primed hepatic and splenic NK cells into Rag2-/-Il2rg-/- recipient mice provided protective immunity against challenge with E. muris. Together, these data suggest that E. muris-induced memory-like NK cells, which contribute to the protective, recall response against Ehrlichia. PMID:27092553

  6. Suicidal inactivation of methemoglobin by generation of thiyl radical: insight into NAC mediated protection in RBC.

    PubMed

    Balaji, S N; Trivedi, V

    2013-07-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) improves antioxidant potentials of RBCs to provide protection against oxidative stress induced hemolysis. The antioxidant mechanism of NAC to reduce oxidative stress in RBC, studied through inactivation of pro-oxidant MetHb. NAC causes irreversible inactivation of the MetHb in an H2O2 dependent manner, and the inactivation follows the pseudo- first- order kinetics. The kinetic constants are ki = 8.5μM, kinact = 0.706 min(-1) and t1/2 = 0.9 min. Spectroscopic studies indicate that MetHb accepts NAC as a substrate and oxidizes through a single electron transfer mechanism to the NACox. The single e- oxidation product of NAC has been identified as the 5, 5'- dimethyl-1- pyrroline N- oxide (DMPO) adduct of the sulfur centered radical (a(N) = 15.2 G and a(H)=16.78 G). Binding studies indicate that NACox interacts at the heme moiety and NAC oxidation through MetHb is essential for NAC binding. Heme-NAC adduct dissociated from MetHb and identified (m/z 1011.19) as 2:1 ratio of NAC/heme in the adduct. TEMPO and PBN treatment reduces NAC binding to MetHb and protects against inactivation confirms the role of thiyl radical in the inactivation process. Furthermore, scavenging thiyl radicals by TEMPO abolish the protective effect of NAC in hemolysis. Current work highlights antioxidant mechanism of NAC through NAC thiyl radical generation, and MetHb inactivation to exhibit protection in RBC against oxidative stress induced hemolysis.

  7. The Mutualistic Side of Wolbachia-Isopod Interactions: Wolbachia Mediated Protection Against Pathogenic Intracellular Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Braquart-Varnier, Christine; Altinli, Mine; Pigeault, Romain; Chevalier, Frédéric D; Grève, Pierre; Bouchon, Didier; Sicard, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Wolbachia is a vertically transmitted endosymbiont whose radiative success is mainly related to various host reproductive manipulations that led to consider this symbiont as a conflictual reproductive parasite. However, lately, some Wolbachia have been shown to act as beneficial symbionts by protecting hosts against a broad range of parasites. Still, this protection has been mostly demonstrated in artificial Wolbachia-host associations between partners that did not co-evolved together. Here, we tested in two terrestrial isopod species Armadillidium vulgare and Porcellio dilatatus whether resident Wolbachia (native or non-native) could confer protection during infections with Listeria ivanovii and Salmonella typhimurium and also during a transinfection with a Wolbachia strain that kills the recipient host (i.e., wVulC in P. dilatatus). Survival analyses showed that (i) A. vulgare lines hosting their native Wolbachia (wVulC) always exhibited higher survival than asymbiotic ones when infected with pathogenic bacteria (ii) P. dilatatus lines hosting their native wDil Wolbachia strain survived the S. typhimurium infection better, while lines hosting non-native wCon Wolbachia strain survived the L. ivanovii and also the transinfection with wVulC from A. vulgare better. By studying L. ivanovii and S. typhimurium loads in the hemolymph of the different host-Wolbachia systems, we showed that (i) the difference in survival between lines after L. ivanovii infections were not linked to the difference between their pathogenic bacterial loads, and (ii) the difference in survival after S. typhimurium infections corresponds to lower loads of pathogenic bacteria. Overall, our results demonstrate a beneficial effect of Wolbachia on survival of terrestrial isopods when infected with pathogenic intracellular bacteria. This protective effect may rely on different mechanisms depending on the resident symbiont and the invasive bacteria interacting together within the hosts. PMID:26733946

  8. Copper(II)-mediated O-arylation of protected serines and threonines.

    PubMed

    El Khatib, Mirna; Molander, Gary A

    2014-09-19

    An effective protocol toward the O-arylation of β-hydroxy-α-amino acid substrates serine and threonine has been developed via Chan-Lam cross-coupling. This Cu(II)-catalyzed transformation involves benign open-flask conditions that are well-tolerated with a variety of protected (Boc-, Cbz-, Tr-, and Fmoc-) serine and threonine derivatives and various potassium organotrifluoroborates and boronic acids. PMID:25208062

  9. The Mutualistic Side of Wolbachia–Isopod Interactions: Wolbachia Mediated Protection Against Pathogenic Intracellular Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Braquart-Varnier, Christine; Altinli, Mine; Pigeault, Romain; Chevalier, Frédéric D.; Grève, Pierre; Bouchon, Didier; Sicard, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Wolbachia is a vertically transmitted endosymbiont whose radiative success is mainly related to various host reproductive manipulations that led to consider this symbiont as a conflictual reproductive parasite. However, lately, some Wolbachia have been shown to act as beneficial symbionts by protecting hosts against a broad range of parasites. Still, this protection has been mostly demonstrated in artificial Wolbachia-host associations between partners that did not co-evolved together. Here, we tested in two terrestrial isopod species Armadillidium vulgare and Porcellio dilatatus whether resident Wolbachia (native or non-native) could confer protection during infections with Listeria ivanovii and Salmonella typhimurium and also during a transinfection with a Wolbachia strain that kills the recipient host (i.e., wVulC in P. dilatatus). Survival analyses showed that (i) A. vulgare lines hosting their native Wolbachia (wVulC) always exhibited higher survival than asymbiotic ones when infected with pathogenic bacteria (ii) P. dilatatus lines hosting their native wDil Wolbachia strain survived the S. typhimurium infection better, while lines hosting non-native wCon Wolbachia strain survived the L. ivanovii and also the transinfection with wVulC from A. vulgare better. By studying L. ivanovii and S. typhimurium loads in the hemolymph of the different host-Wolbachia systems, we showed that (i) the difference in survival between lines after L. ivanovii infections were not linked to the difference between their pathogenic bacterial loads, and (ii) the difference in survival after S. typhimurium infections corresponds to lower loads of pathogenic bacteria. Overall, our results demonstrate a beneficial effect of Wolbachia on survival of terrestrial isopods when infected with pathogenic intracellular bacteria. This protective effect may rely on different mechanisms depending on the resident symbiont and the invasive bacteria interacting together within the hosts. PMID:26733946

  10. Protective effects of nonionic tri-block copolymers on bile acid-mediated epithelial barrier disruption.

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, A.; Fink, D.; Musch, M.; Valuckaite, V.; Zabornia, O.; Grubjesic, S.; Firestone, M. A.; Matthews, J. B.; Alverdy, J. C.

    2011-11-01

    Translocation of bacteria and other luminal factors from the intestine following surgical injury can be a major driver of critical illness. Bile acids have been shown to play a key role in the loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function during states of host stress. Experiments to study the ability of nonionic block copolymers to abrogate barrier failure in response to bile acid exposure are described. In vitro experiments were performed with the bile salt sodium deoxycholate on Caco-2 enterocyte monolayers using transepithelial electrical resistance to assay barrier function. A bisphenol A coupled triblock polyethylene glycol (PEG), PEG 15-20, was shown to prevent sodium deoxycholate-induced barrier failure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, lactate dehydrogenase, and caspase 3-based cell death detection assays demonstrated that bile acid-induced apoptosis and necrosis were prevented with PEG 15-20. Immunofluorescence microscopic visualization of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented significant changes in tight junction organization induced by bile acid exposure. Preliminary transepithelial electrical resistance-based studies examining structure-function correlates of polymer protection against bile acid damage were performed with a small library of PEG-based copolymers. Polymer properties associated with optimal protection against bile acid-induced barrier disruption were PEG-based compounds with a molecular weight greater than 10 kd and amphiphilicity. The data demonstrate that PEG-based copolymer architecture is an important determinant that confers protection against bile acid injury of intestinal epithelia.

  11. Evidence for macrophage-mediated protection against lethal Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed Central

    Bistoni, F; Vecchiarelli, A; Cenci, E; Puccetti, P; Marconi, P; Cassone, A

    1986-01-01

    Systemic infection of mice with a Candida albicans strain (PCA-2) incapable of yeast-mycelial conversion conferred protection against a subsequent intravenous challenge with the pathogenic strain of the parent organism, strain CA-6. Protection was nonspecific since it was also detected upon challenge of mice with Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, the PCA-2 organisms had to be viable, their effects being most evident when they were given intravenously at a dose of 10(6) cells 7 to 14 days prior to microbial challenge. Thus, all mice pretreated with PCA-2 and challenged 14 days later with viable CA-6 cells lived through a 60-day observation period, whereas all control mice not treated with PCA-2 died within 3 days. In an attempt to correlate the immunostimulatory effects observed in vivo with possible modifications in in vitro functions, it was found that administration of PCA-2 was accompanied by an increase in the number of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells and by the activation in the spleen of cells with highly candidacidal activity in vitro. Moreover, the adoptive transfer of plastic-adherent cells from PCA-2-infected mice into histocompatible recipients conferred considerable protection against subsequent CA-6 challenge. PMID:3943907

  12. CP12-mediated protection of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Marri, Lucia; Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Lebrun, Régine; Puppo, Rémy; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Trost, Paolo; Gontero, Brigitte; Sparla, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) are two energy-consuming enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle, whose regulation is crucial for the global balance of the photosynthetic process under different environmental conditions. In oxygen phototrophs, GAPDH and PRK regulation involves the redox-sensitive protein CP12. In the dark, oxidized chloroplast thioredoxins trigger the formation of a GAPDH/CP12/PRK complex in which both enzyme activities are down-regulated. In this report, we show that free GAPDH (A4-isoform) and PRK are also inhibited by oxidants like H2O2, GSSG and GSNO. Both in the land plant Arabidopsis thaliana and in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, both enzymes can be glutathionylated as shown by biotinylated-GSSG assay and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. CP12 is not glutathionylated but homodisulfides are formed upon oxidant treatments. In Arabidopsis but not in Chlamydomonas, the interaction between oxidized CP12 and GAPDH provides full protection from oxidative damage. In both organisms, preformed GAPDH/CP12/PRK complexes are protected from GSSG or GSNO oxidation, and in Arabidopsis also from H2O2 treatment. Overall, the results suggest that the role of CP12 in oxygen phototrophs needs to be extended beyond light/dark regulation, and include protection of enzymes belonging to Calvin-Benson cycle from oxidative stress.

  13. CP12-mediated protection of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Marri, Lucia; Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Lebrun, Régine; Puppo, Rémy; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Trost, Paolo; Gontero, Brigitte; Sparla, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) are two energy-consuming enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle, whose regulation is crucial for the global balance of the photosynthetic process under different environmental conditions. In oxygen phototrophs, GAPDH and PRK regulation involves the redox-sensitive protein CP12. In the dark, oxidized chloroplast thioredoxins trigger the formation of a GAPDH/CP12/PRK complex in which both enzyme activities are down-regulated. In this report, we show that free GAPDH (A4-isoform) and PRK are also inhibited by oxidants like H2O2, GSSG and GSNO. Both in the land plant Arabidopsis thaliana and in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, both enzymes can be glutathionylated as shown by biotinylated-GSSG assay and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. CP12 is not glutathionylated but homodisulfides are formed upon oxidant treatments. In Arabidopsis but not in Chlamydomonas, the interaction between oxidized CP12 and GAPDH provides full protection from oxidative damage. In both organisms, preformed GAPDH/CP12/PRK complexes are protected from GSSG or GSNO oxidation, and in Arabidopsis also from H2O2 treatment. Overall, the results suggest that the role of CP12 in oxygen phototrophs needs to be extended beyond light/dark regulation, and include protection of enzymes belonging to Calvin-Benson cycle from oxidative stress. PMID:24211189

  14. The Potential Protective Effects of Polyphenols in Asbestos-Mediated Inflammation and Carcinogenesis of Mesothelium

    PubMed Central

    Benvenuto, Monica; Mattera, Rosanna; Taffera, Gloria; Giganti, Maria Gabriella; Lido, Paolo; Masuelli, Laura; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) is a tumor of the serous membranes linked to exposure to asbestos. A chronic inflammatory response orchestrated by mesothelial cells contributes to the development and progression of MM. The evidence that: (a) multiple signaling pathways are aberrantly activated in MM cells; (b) asbestos mediated-chronic inflammation has a key role in MM carcinogenesis; (c) the deregulation of the immune system might favor the development of MM; and (d) a drug might have a better efficacy when injected into a serous cavity thus bypassing biotransformation and reaching an effective dose has prompted investigations to evaluate the effects of polyphenols for the therapy and prevention of MM. Dietary polyphenols are able to inhibit cancer cell growth by targeting multiple signaling pathways, reducing inflammation, and modulating immune response. The ability of polyphenols to modulate the production of pro-inflammatory molecules by targeting signaling pathways or ROS might represent a key mechanism to prevent and/or to contrast the development of MM. In this review, we will report the current knowledge on the ability of polyphenols to modulate the immune system and production of mediators of inflammation, thus revealing an important tool in preventing and/or counteracting the growth of MM. PMID:27171110

  15. PXR Mediated Protection against Liver Inflammation by Ginkgolide A in Tetrachloromethane Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Nanhui; Wang, Hang; Hong, Jing; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Chaotong; Meng, Chun

    2016-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR), a liver and intestine specific receptor,, has been reported to be related with the repression of inflammation as well as activation of cytochromosome P450 3A (CYP3A) expression. We examined the effect of PXR on tetrachloromethane (CCl4)-induced mouse liver inflammation in this work. Ginkgolide A, one main component of Ginkgo biloba extracts (GBE), activated PXR and enhanced PXR expression level, displayed both significant therapeutic effect and preventive effect against CCl4-induced mouse hepatitis. siRNA-mediated decrease of PXR expression significantly reduced the efficacy of Ginkgolide A in treating CCl4-induced inflammation in mice. Flavonoids, another important components of GBE, were shown anti-inflammatory effect in a different way from Ginkgolide A which might be independent on PXR because flavonoids significantly inhibited CYP3A11 activities in mice. The results indicated that anti-inflammatory effect of PXR might be mediated by enhancing transcription level of IκBα through binding of IκBα. Inhibition of NF-κB activity by NF-κB-specific suppressor IκBα is one of the potential mechanisms of Ginkgolide A against CCl4-induced liver inflammation. PMID:26759700

  16. TGFβ1 inhibits IFNγ-mediated microglia activation and protects mDA neurons from IFNγ-driven neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolai; Zöller, Tanja; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Spittau, Björn

    2015-07-01

    Microglia-mediated neuroinflammation has been reported as a common feature of familial and sporadic forms of Parkinson's disease (PD), and a growing body of evidence indicates that onset and progression of PD correlates with the extent of neuroinflammatory responses involving Interferon γ (IFNγ). Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) has been shown to be a major player in the regulation of microglia activation states and functions and, thus, might be a potential therapeutic agent by shaping microglial activation phenotypes during the course of neurodegenerative diseases such as PD. In this study, we demonstrate that TGFβ1 is able to block IFNγ-induced microglia activation by attenuating STAT1 phosphorylation and IFNγRα expression. Moreover, we identified a set of genes involved in microglial IFNγ signaling transduction that were significantly down-regulated upon TGFβ1 treatment, resulting in decreased sensitivity of microglia toward IFNγ stimuli. Interestingly, genes mediating negative regulation of IFNγ signaling, such as SOCS2 and SOCS6, were up-regulated after TGFβ1 treatment. Finally, we demonstrate that TGFβ1 is capable of protecting midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons from IFNγ-driven neurotoxicity in mixed neuron-glia cultures derived from embryonic day 14 (E14) midbrain tissue. Together, these data underline the importance of TGFβ1 as a key immunoregulatory factor for microglia by silencing IFNγ-mediated microglia activation and, thereby, rescuing mDA neurons from IFNγ-induced neurotoxicity. Interferon γ (IFNγ) is a potent pro-inflammatory factor that triggers the activation of microglia and the subsequent release of neurotoxic factors. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) is able to inhibit the IFNγ-mediated activation of microglia, which is characterized by the release of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). By decreasing the expression of IFNγ-induced genes as well as the signaling receptor IFNγR1, TGFβ1

  17. Schisandrol B protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation and regulation of liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Tan, Huasen; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra sphenanthera is a traditional hepato-protective Chinese medicine and Schisandrol B (SolB) is one of its major active constituents. In this study, the protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice and the involved mechanisms were investigated. Morphological and biochemical assessments clearly demonstrated a protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced liver injury. SolB pretreatment significantly attenuated the increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity, and prevented elevated hepatic malondialdehyde formation and the depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) in a dose-dependent manner. SolB also dramatically altered APAP metabolic activation by inhibiting the activities of CYP2E1 and CYP3A11, which was evidenced by significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite NAPQI-GSH. A molecular docking model also predicted that SolB had potential to interact with the CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 active sites. In addition, SolB abrogated APAP-induced activation of p53 and p21, and increased expression of liver regeneration and antiapoptotic-related proteins such as cyclin D1 (CCND1), PCNA, and BCL-2. This study demonstrated that SolB exhibited a significant protective effect toward APAP-induced liver injury, potentially through inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation and regulation of the p53, p21, CCND1, PCNA, and BCL-2 to promote liver regeneration. PMID:25319358

  18. Schisandrol B protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation and regulation of liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Tan, Huasen; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra sphenanthera is a traditional hepato-protective Chinese medicine and Schisandrol B (SolB) is one of its major active constituents. In this study, the protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice and the involved mechanisms were investigated. Morphological and biochemical assessments clearly demonstrated a protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced liver injury. SolB pretreatment significantly attenuated the increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity, and prevented elevated hepatic malondialdehyde formation and the depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) in a dose-dependent manner. SolB also dramatically altered APAP metabolic activation by inhibiting the activities of CYP2E1 and CYP3A11, which was evidenced by significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite NAPQI-GSH. A molecular docking model also predicted that SolB had potential to interact with the CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 active sites. In addition, SolB abrogated APAP-induced activation of p53 and p21, and increased expression of liver regeneration and antiapoptotic-related proteins such as cyclin D1 (CCND1), PCNA, and BCL-2. This study demonstrated that SolB exhibited a significant protective effect toward APAP-induced liver injury, potentially through inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation and regulation of the p53, p21, CCND1, PCNA, and BCL-2 to promote liver regeneration.

  19. B. subtilis GS67 protects C. elegans from Gram-positive pathogens via fengycin-mediated microbial antagonism.

    PubMed

    Iatsenko, Igor; Yim, Joshua J; Schroeder, Frank C; Sommer, Ralf J

    2014-11-17

    Studies on Caenorhabditis elegans have provided detailed insight into host-pathogen interactions. Usually, the E. coli strain OP50 is used as food source for laboratory studies, but recent work has shown that a variety of bacteria have dramatic effects on C. elegans physiology, including immune responses. However, the mechanisms by which different bacteria impact worm resistance to pathogens are poorly understood. Although pathogen-specific immune priming is often discussed as a mechanism underlying such observations, interspecies microbial antagonism might represent an alternative mode of action. Here, we use several natural Bacillus strains to study their effects on nematode survival upon pathogen challenge. We show that B. subtilis GS67 persists in the C. elegans intestine and increases worm resistance to Gram-positive pathogens, suggesting that direct inhibition of pathogens might be the primary protective mechanism. Indeed, chemical and genetic analyses identified the lipopeptide fengycin as the major inhibitory molecule produced by B. subtilis GS67. Specifically, a fengycin-defective mutant of B. subtilis GS67 lost inhibitory activity against pathogens and was unable to protect C. elegans from infections. Furthermore, we found that purified fengycin cures infected worms in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that it acts as an antibiotic. Our results reveal a molecular mechanism for commensal-mediated C. elegans protection and highlight the importance of interspecies microbial antagonism for the outcome of animal-pathogen interactions. Furthermore, our work strengthens C. elegans as an in vivo model to reveal protective mechanisms of commensal bacteria, including those relevant to mammalian hosts.

  20. DNA-based vaccine against La Crosse virus: protective immune response mediated by neutralizing antibodies and CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Schuh, T; Schultz, J; Moelling, K; Pavlovic, J

    1999-07-01

    La Crosse virus (LACV)-mediated encephalitis is the most frequently reported arboviral disease in the United States, but to date no vaccine against this virus is available. We have established a new animal model, genetically targeted mice lacking a functional interferon type I receptor (IFNAR-1). These mice show an age-independent susceptibility to LACV and develop an acute encephalitis within 6 days of infection, thereby allowing the evaluation of vaccines against LACV. Taking advantage of this knockout mouse model, we have assessed the feasibility of DNA vaccination against this viral disease. Plasmid DNAs, encoding either the virus surface glycoproteins G1 and G2 or the internal nucleocapsid protein N, were used to immunize IFNAR-1-deficient mice. Mice vaccinated with DNA encoding the glycoproteins G1 and G2 produced neutralizing antibodies and exhibited a high degree of protection against challenge with high doses of LACV. Depletion of CD4+ T cells in mice vaccinated with DNA encoding G1/G2 reduced their capacity to control the infection. Virus titration and immunohistological analysis revealed that the protected mice showed no evidence of LACV particles in the brain. This indicates that the vaccine-induced immune response efficiently blocked viral spreading from the primary replication site to the brain. In contrast, immunization with DNA encoding protein N yielded only a partial protective effect that can be attributed to the cellular immune response. Taken together, this study shows that DNA vaccines can be designed to efficiently induce a protective immune response based on neutralizing antibodies and CD4+ T cells.

  1. B. subtilis GS67 protects C. elegans from Gram-positive pathogens via fengycin-mediated microbial antagonism.

    PubMed

    Iatsenko, Igor; Yim, Joshua J; Schroeder, Frank C; Sommer, Ralf J

    2014-11-17

    Studies on Caenorhabditis elegans have provided detailed insight into host-pathogen interactions. Usually, the E. coli strain OP50 is used as food source for laboratory studies, but recent work has shown that a variety of bacteria have dramatic effects on C. elegans physiology, including immune responses. However, the mechanisms by which different bacteria impact worm resistance to pathogens are poorly understood. Although pathogen-specific immune priming is often discussed as a mechanism underlying such observations, interspecies microbial antagonism might represent an alternative mode of action. Here, we use several natural Bacillus strains to study their effects on nematode survival upon pathogen challenge. We show that B. subtilis GS67 persists in the C. elegans intestine and increases worm resistance to Gram-positive pathogens, suggesting that direct inhibition of pathogens might be the primary protective mechanism. Indeed, chemical and genetic analyses identified the lipopeptide fengycin as the major inhibitory molecule produced by B. subtilis GS67. Specifically, a fengycin-defective mutant of B. subtilis GS67 lost inhibitory activity against pathogens and was unable to protect C. elegans from infections. Furthermore, we found that purified fengycin cures infected worms in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that it acts as an antibiotic. Our results reveal a molecular mechanism for commensal-mediated C. elegans protection and highlight the importance of interspecies microbial antagonism for the outcome of animal-pathogen interactions. Furthermore, our work strengthens C. elegans as an in vivo model to reveal protective mechanisms of commensal bacteria, including those relevant to mammalian hosts. PMID:25448001

  2. Protective Effects of Isorhamnetin on Cardiomyocytes Against Anoxia/Reoxygenation-induced Injury Is Mediated by SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liqing; He, Huan; Liu, Zhantu; Liu, Dan; Yin, Dong; He, Ming

    2016-06-01

    It has been reported that apoptosis plays a very important role on anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R)-induced injury, and human silent information regulator type 1 (SIRT1) can inhibit the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. It has been proved that isorhamnetin (IsoRN), 3'-O-methyl-quecetin, can protect the cardiomyocytes, but the mechanism is still not clear. The aim of the study was to explore whether the protective effects of IsoRN on the cardiomyocytes against the A/R-induced injury are mediated by SIRT1. The effects of IsoRN on cardioprotection against A/R injury in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were monitored by cell viability, the levels of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), apoptosis, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and mitochondrial permeability transition pores (mPTP). The effects on protein expression were measured by western blot assay. The results showed that IsoRN can reduce A/R-induced injury by decreasing the level of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine phosphokinase release from the cardiomyocytes, increasing cell viability and expression of SIRT1, reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species, inhibiting opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores and loss of Δψm and activation of caspase-3, and decreasing the release of cytochrome c, and reducing apoptosis. In addition, sirtinol, a SIRT1 inhibitor, drastically reduced the protective effects of IsoRN on cardioprotective effects in cardiomocytes. In conclusion, we firstly demonstrated that SIRT1 may be involved in the protective effects of IsoRN on cardiomocytes against the A/R-induced injury. PMID:26859194

  3. Critical Role of Interleukin-11 in Isoflurane-mediated Protection against Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Ahrom; Kim, Mihwa; Kim, Joo Yun; Brown, Kevin M.; Yeh, James; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Isoflurane releases renal tubular transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and protects against ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI). Recent studies suggest that TGF-β1 can induce a cytoprotective cytokine interleukin (IL)-11. Here, we tested the hypothesis that isoflurane protects against ischemic AKI by direct induction of renal tubular IL-11 synthesis. Methods Human kidney proximal tubule (HK-2) cells were treated with 1.25-2.5% isoflurane or carrier gas (room air+5% carbon dioxide) for 0-16 h. We also anesthetized C57BL/6 mice with 1.2% isoflurane or with equi-anesthetic dose of pentobarbital for 4 h. In addition, we subjected IL-11 receptor (IL-11R) wild type, IL-11R deficient or IL-11 neutralized mice to 30-min renal ischemia followed by reperfusion under 4 h of pentobarbital or isoflurane (1.2%) anesthesia. Results Isoflurane increased IL-11 synthesis in human (~300-500% increase, N = 6) and mouse (23 ± 4 (mean ± SD) fold over carrier gas group, N = 4) proximal tubule cells that were attenuated by a TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody. Mice anesthetized with isoflurane showed significantly increased kidney IL-11 messenger RNA (13.8 ± 2 fold over carrier gas group, N = 4) and protein (31 ± 9 vs. 18±2 pg/mg protein or ~80% increase, N = 4) expression compared to pentobarbital anesthetized mice and this increase was also attenuated by a TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody. Furthermore, isoflurane-mediated renal protection in IL-11R wild-type mice were absent in IL-11R deficient mice or in IL-11R wild-type mice treated with IL-11 neutralizing antibody (N = 4-6). Conclusions Our studies suggest that isoflurane induces renal tubular IL-11 via TGF-β1 signaling to protect against ischemic AKI. PMID:24037316

  4. Tryptophan biosynthesis protects mycobacteria from CD4 T cell-mediated killing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanjia J.; Reddy, Manchi C.; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Rothchild, Alissa C.; Dartois, Veronique; Schuster, Brian M.; Trauner, Andrej; Wallis, Deeann; Galaviz, Stacy; Huttenhower, Curtis; Sacchettini, James C.; Behar, Samuel M.; Rubin, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacteria that cause disease rely on their ability to counteract and overcome host defenses. Here we present a genome-scale study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that uncovers the bacterial determinants of surviving host immunity, sets of genes we term “counteractomes.” Through this, we find that CD4 T cells attempt to starve Mtb of tryptophan through a mechanism that limits Chlamydia and Leishmania infections. In those cases, tryptophan starvation works well, since those pathogens are natural tryptophan auxotrophs. Mtb, however, can synthesize tryptophan, and thus starvation fails as an Mtb-killing mechanism. We then describe a small molecule inhibitor of Mtb tryptophan synthesis, which turns Mtb into a tryptophan auxotroph and restores the efficacy of a failed host defense. Together, our findings demonstrate that the Mtb determinants for surviving host immunity—Mtb’s immune counteractomes—serve as probes of host immunity, uncovering immune-mediated stresses that can be leveraged for therapeutic discovery. PMID:24315099

  5. Plasma-Mediated Gut Protection After Hemorrhagic Shock is Lessened in Syndecan-1-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Ban, Kechen; Peng, Zhanglong; Pati, Shibani; Witkov, Richard B; Park, Pyong Woo; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2015-11-01

    We have shown in a rodent model of hemorrhagic shock (HS) that fresh frozen plasma (FFP) reduces lung inflammation and injury that are correlated with restitution of syndecan-1. As the gut is believed to contribute to distant organ injury and inflammation after shock, the current study sought to determine if the protective effects of plasma would extend to the gut and to elucidate the contribution of syndecan-1 to this protective effect. We also examined the potential role of TNFα, and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)-17, both intestinal sheddases of syndecan-1. Wild-type (WT) and syndecan-1 (KO) mice were subjected to HS followed by resuscitation with lactated Ringer's (LR) or FFP and compared with shock alone and shams. Small bowel and blood were obtained after 3  h for analysis of mucosal injury and inflammation and TNFα and ADAM-17 protein expression and activity. After HS, gut injury and inflammation were significantly increased compared with shams. Resuscitation with LR decreased both injury and inflammation that were further lessened by FFP. KO mice displayed worsened gut injury and inflammation after HS compared with WT mice, and LR and FFP equivalently inhibited injury and inflammation. Both systemic and intestinal TNFα and ADAM-17 followed similar trends, with increases after HS, reduction by LR, and a further decrease by FFP in WT but not KO mice. In conclusion, FFP decreased gut injury and inflammation after hemorrhagic shock, an effect that was abrogated in syndecan-1 mice. Plasma also decreased TNFα and ADAM-17, representing a potential mechanistic link to its protection via syndecan-1.

  6. Oxygen radicals mediate ultrastructural and metabolic protection of preconditioning in vivo in pig hearts.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Masami; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi; Tanaka, Masaru; Yokota, Ryoji; Takemura, Genzou; Itoh, Shuji; Domae, Naochika; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2002-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (PC) preserves myocardial high-energy phosphate metabolites and intracellular pH during subsequent sustained ischemia. Generation of reactive oxygen species may be required to mediate PC, as seen in vitro. In the present study, the effects of inhibiting reactive oxygen species generation during a PC protocol in vivo using an open-chest porcine model were examined. Myocyte ultrastructural changes assessed by electron microscopy were correlated with phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy data. Open-chest pigs underwent 60 min of left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion. PC was elicited by a single episode of 5 min occlusion and 5 min reperfusion. The cell-diffusible hydroxyl radical and superoxide radical scavenger, N-2-mercapto-propionyl glycine (MPG, 20 mg/kg), or placebo saline were infused for 40 min, starting 30 min before PC (PC plus MPG group, n=10; and PC group, n=9). After PC, ATP and intracellular pH were significantly preserved through 25 min of ischemia (control versus PC, 46+/-3% versus 55+/-5% of baseline [P<0.05]; and control versus PC, 6.18+/-0.08 versus 6.42+/-0.03 [P<0.05], respectively). Phosphocreatine was significantly preserved through 20 min of ischemia (control versus PC, 0+/-0% versus 7+/-2% of baseline [P<0.05]). The preservation of high-energy phosphate metabolites and intracellular pH was abolished by inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species with MPG. Preservation of high-energy phosphate metabolites with PC was associated with reduced ultrastructural damage, as seen by electron microscopy, including less myocyte swelling, myofibrillar disruption and nuclear chromatin margination. The present study demonstrates the importance of reactive oxygen species generation in mediating PC preservation of myocyte ultrastructure and high-energy phosphate metabolites during prolonged ischemia in vivo.

  7. Protection by dexamethasone of the functional desensitization to β2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in human lung mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Lee K; Drury, Duncan E J; Dummer, Jack F; Ghahramani, Parviz; Schleimer, Robert P; Peachell, Peter T

    1997-01-01

    The β-adrenoceptor agonist, isoprenaline, inhibited the IgE-mediated release of histamine from human lung mast cells (HLMC) in a dose-dependent manner. Maximal inhibitory effects were obtained with 0.1 μM isoprenaline. However, the inhibition of histamine release from HLMC by isoprenaline (0.1 μM) was highly variable ranging from 33 to 97% inhibition (mean, 59±3%, n=27). Long-term (24 h) incubation of HLMC with isoprenaline led to a subsequent reduction in the ability of a second exposure of isoprenaline to inhibit IgE-mediated histamine release from HLMC. The impairment in the ability of isoprenaline (0.1 μM) to inhibit histamine release following desensitizing conditions (1 μM isoprenaline for 24 h) was highly variable amongst HLMC preparations ranging from essentially negligible levels of desensitization in some preparations to complete abrogation of the inhibitory response in others (mean, 65±6% desensitization, n=27). The ability of HLMC to recover from desensitization was investigated. Following desensitizing conditions (1 μM isoprenaline for 24 h), HLMC were washed and incubated for 24 h in buffer and the effectiveness of isoprenaline (0.1 μM) to inhibit IgE-mediated histamine release from HLMC was assessed. The extent of recovery was highly variable with some HLMC preparations failing to recover and others displaying a complete restoration of responsiveness to isoprenaline (mean, 40±6% recovery, n=23). The effects of the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, were also investigated. Long-term (24–72 h) treatments with dexamethasone (0.1 μM) had no effect on IgE-mediated histamine release from HLMC. Additionally, long-term (24–72 h) treatments with dexamethasone (0.1 μM) had no effect on the effectiveness of isoprenaline to inhibit histamine release. However, long-term (24–72 h) treatments with dexamethasone (0.1 μM) protected against the functional desensitization induced by incubation (24 h) of HLMC with

  8. LFG: an anti-apoptotic gene that provides protection from Fas-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Somia, N V; Schmitt, M J; Vetter, D E; Van Antwerp, D; Heinemann, S F; Verma, I M

    1999-10-26

    Programmed cell death regulates a number of biological phenomena, and the apoptotic signal must itself be tightly controlled to avoid inappropriate cell death. We established a genetic screen to search for molecules that inhibit the apoptotic signal from the Fas receptor. Here we report the isolation of a gene, LFG, that protects cells uniquely from Fas but not from the mechanistically related tumor necrosis factor alpha death signal. LFG is widely distributed, but remarkably is highly expressed in the hippocampus. LFG can bind to the Fas receptor, but does not regulate Fas expression or interfere with binding of an agonist antibody. Furthermore LFG does not inhibit binding of FADD to Fas.

  9. Leptin protection of salivary gland acinar cells against ethanol cytotoxicity involves Src kinase-mediated parallel activation of prostaglandin and constitutive nitric oxide synthase pathways.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Slomiany, A

    2008-04-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic cytokine secreted by adipocytes but also identified in salivary glands and saliva, is recognized as an important element of oral mucosal defense. Here, we report that in sublingual salivary glands leptin protects the acinar cells of against ethanol cytotoxicity. We show that ethanol- induced cytotoxicity, characterized by a marked drop in the acinar cell capacity for NO production, arachidonic acid release and prostaglandin generation, was subject to suppression by leptin. The loss in countering capacity of leptin on the ethanol-induced cytotoxicity was attained with cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin and nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, as well as PP2, an inhibitor of Src kinase. Indomethacin, while not affecting leptin-induced arachidonic acid release, caused the inhibition in PGE2 generation, pretreatment with L-NAME led to the inhibition in NO production, whereas PP2 exerted the inhibitory effect on leptin-induced changes in NO, arachidonic acid, and PGE2. The leptin-induced changes in arachidonic acid release and PGE2 generation were blocked by ERK inhibitor, PD98059, but not by PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin. Further, leptin suppression of ethanol cytotoxicity was reflected in the increased Akt and cNOS phosphorylation that was sensitive to PP2. Moreover, the stimulatory effect of leptin on the acinar cell cNOS activity was inhibited not only by PP2, but also by Akt inhibitor, SH-5, while wortmannin had no effect. Our findings demonstrate that leptin protection of salivary gland acinar cells against ethanol cytotoxicity involves Src kinase-mediated parallel activation of MAPK/ERK and Akt that result in up-regulation of the respective prostaglandin and nitric oxide synthase pathways.

  10. Epoxypukalide Induces Proliferation and Protects against Cytokine-Mediated Apoptosis in Primary Cultures of Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    López-Acosta, José Francisco; Moreno-Amador, José Luis; Jiménez-Palomares, Margarita; Díaz-Marrero, Ana R.; Cueto, Mercedes; Perdomo, Germán; Cózar-Castellano, Irene

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgency to find new treatments for the devastating epidemic of diabetes. Pancreatic β-cells viability and function are impaired in the two most common forms of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. Regeneration of pancreatic β-cells has been proposed as a potential therapy for diabetes. In a preliminary study, we screened a collection of marine products for β-cell proliferation. One unique compound (epoxypukalide) showed capability to induce β-cell replication in the cell line INS1 832/13 and in primary rat cell cultures. Epoxypukalide was used to study β-cell proliferation by [3H]thymidine incorporation and BrdU incorporation followed by BrdU/insulin staining in primary cultures of rat islets. AKT and ERK1/2 signalling pathways were analyzed. Cell cycle activators, cyclin D2 and cyclin E, were detected by western-blot. Apoptosis was studied by TUNEL and cleaved caspase 3. β-cell function was measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Epoxypukalide induced 2.5-fold increase in β-cell proliferation; this effect was mediated by activation of ERK1/2 signalling pathway and upregulation of the cell cycle activators, cyclin D2 and cyclin E. Interestingly, epoxypukalide showed protection from basal (40% lower versus control) and cytokine-induced apoptosis (80% lower versus control). Finally, epoxypukalide did not impair β-cell function when measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In conclusion, epoxypukalide induces β-cell proliferation and protects against basal and cytokine-mediated β-cell death in primary cultures of rat islets. These findings may be translated into new treatments for diabetes. PMID:23300997

  11. The Protective Role of Antioxidants in the Defence against ROS/RNS-Mediated Environmental Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Poljšak, Borut; Fink, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can result from exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ionising and nonionising radiation, ultraviolet radiation, elevated concentrations of ozone, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, cigarette smoke, asbestos, particulate matter, pesticides, dioxins and furans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and many other compounds present in the environment. It appears that increased oxidative/nitrosative stress is often neglected mechanism by which environmental pollutants affect human health. Oxidation of and oxidative damage to cellular components and biomolecules have been suggested to be involved in the aetiology of several chronic diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, and aging. Several studies have demonstrated that the human body can alleviate oxidative stress using exogenous antioxidants. However, not all dietary antioxidant supplements display protective effects, for example, β-carotene for lung cancer prevention in smokers or tocopherols for photooxidative stress. In this review, we explore the increases in oxidative stress caused by exposure to environmental pollutants and the protective effects of antioxidants. PMID:25140198

  12. Regulation of Cardiovascular Development by Adenosine and Adenosine-Mediated Embryo Protection

    PubMed Central

    Rivkees, Scott A.; Wendler, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    Few signaling molecules have the potential to influence the developing mammal as the nucleoside adenosine. Adenosine levels increase rapidly with tissue hypoxia and inflammation. Adenosine antagonists include the methlyxanthines caffeine and theophylline. The receptors that transduce adenosine action are the A1, A2a, A2b, and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs). We examined how adenosine acts via A1ARs to influence embryo development. Transgenic mice were studied along with embryo cultures. Embryos lacking A1ARs were markedly growth retarded following intrauterine hypoxia exposure. Studies of mice selectively lacking A1AR in the heart identify the heart as a key site of adenosines embryo protective effects. Studies of isolated embryos showed that adenosine plays a key role in modulating embryo cardiac function, especially in the setting of hypoxia. When pregnant mice were treated during embryogenesis with the adenosine antagonist caffeine, adult mice had abnormal heart function. Adenosine acts via A1ARs to play an essential role in protecting the embryo against intra uterine stress, and adenosine antagonists, including caffeine, may be an unwelcome exposure for the embryo. PMID:22423036

  13. The role of lactoferrin binding protein B in mediating protection against human lactoferricin.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Ari; Livingstone, Margaret; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria that inhabit the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory and genitourinary tracts of mammals encounter an iron-deficient environment because of iron sequestration by the host iron-binding proteins transferrin and lactoferrin. Lactoferrin is also present in high concentrations at sites of inflammation where the cationic, antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin is produced by proteolysis of lactoferrin. Several Gram-negative pathogens express a lactoferrin receptor that enables the bacteria to use lactoferrin as an iron source. The receptor is composed of an integral membrane protein, lactoferrin binding protein A (LbpA), and a membrane-bound lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB). LbpA is essential for growth with lactoferrin as the sole iron source, whereas the role of LbpB in iron acquisition is not yet known. In this study, we demonstrate that LbpB from 2 different species is capable of providing protection against the killing activity of a human lactoferrin-derived peptide. We investigated the prevalence of lactoferrin receptors in bacteria and examined their sequence diversity. We propose that the protection against the cationic antimicrobial human lactoferrin-derived peptide is associated with clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the C-terminal lobe of LbpB that is a common feature of this protein. PMID:22332888

  14. Protective activity of green tea against free radical- and glucose-mediated protein damage.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Takako; Yokozawa, Takako; Terasawa, Katsutoshi; Shu, Seiji; Juneja, Lekh Raj

    2002-04-10

    Protein oxidation and glycation are posttranslational modifications that are implicated in the pathological development of many age-related disease processes. This study investigated the effects of green tea extract, and a green tea tannin mixture and its components, on protein damage induced by 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (a free radical generator) and glucose in in vitro assay systems. We found that green tea extract can effectively protect against protein damage, and showed that its action is mainly due to tannin. In addition, it was shown that the chemical structures of tannin components are also involved in this activity, suggesting that the presence of the gallate group at the 3 position plays the most important role in the protective activity against protein oxidation and glycation, and that there is also a contribution by the hydroxyl group at the 5' position in the B ring and the sterical structure. These findings demonstrate the mechanisms of the usefulness of green tea in protein oxidation- and glycation-associated diseases.

  15. Selective protection of the cerebellum against intracerebroventricular LPS is mediated by local melatonin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pinato, Luciana; da Silveira Cruz-Machado, Sanseray; Franco, Daiane G; Campos, Leila M G; Cecon, Erika; Fernandes, Pedro A C M; Bittencourt, Jackson C; Markus, Regina P

    2015-03-01

    Although melatonin is mainly produced by the pineal gland, an increasing number of extra-pineal sites of melatonin synthesis have been described. We previously demonstrated the existence of bidirectional communication between the pineal gland and the immune system that drives a switch in melatonin production from the pineal gland to peripheral organs during the mounting of an innate immune response. In the present study, we show that acute neuroinflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injected directly into the lateral ventricles of adult rats reduces the nocturnal peak of melatonin in the plasma and induces its synthesis in the cerebellum, though not in the cortex or hippocampus. This increase in cerebellar melatonin content requires the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), which positively regulates the expression of the key enzyme for melatonin synthesis, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT). Interestingly, LPS treatment led to neuronal death in the hippocampus and cortex, but not in the cerebellum. This privileged protection of cerebellar cells was abrogated when G-protein-coupled melatonin receptors were blocked by the melatonin antagonist luzindole, suggesting that the local production of melatonin protects cerebellar neurons from LPS toxicity. This is the first demonstration of a switch between pineal and extra-pineal melatonin production in the central nervous system following a neuroinflammatory response. These results have direct implications concerning the differential susceptibility of specific brain areas to neuronal death.

  16. Immunological mechanisms involved in probiotic-mediated protection against Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Yang, G; Meng, F; Yang, W; Hu, J; Ye, L; Shi, C; Wang, C

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a group of chronic, incurable inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract that cause severe diarrhoea, intestinal inflammation, pain, fatigue and weight loss. In this study, we first developed a model of Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis and then evaluated the protective effects of selected probiotics on inflammation. The results showed that administration of a combination of probiotics including Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 and Lactobacillus plantarum A significantly increased the production of CD11c(+) dendritic cells in the spleen (3.62% vs phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-treated control, P<0.01) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). In addition, the presence of probiotics significantly up-regulated the development of CD4(+)/CD25(+)/Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in MLNs by approximately 2.07% compared to the effect observed in the PBS-treated control (P<0.01) and down-regulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-17, tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ, by 0.11, 0.11 and 0.15%, respectively, compared to the effect observed in the PBS-treated control (P<0.01).These effects conferred protection against colitis, as shown by histopathological analyses.

  17. Overexpression of human kynurenine-3-monooxygenase protects against 3-hydroxykynurenine-mediated apoptosis through bidirectional nonlinear feedback.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; Auer, M; Binnie, M; Zheng, X; Pham, N T; Iredale, J P; Webster, S P; Mole, D J

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a critical regulator of inflammation. The preferred KMO substrate, kynurenine, is converted to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK), and this product exhibits cytotoxicity through mechanisms that culminate in apoptosis. Here, we report that overexpression of human KMO with orthotopic localisation to mitochondria creates a metabolic environment during which the cell exhibits increased tolerance for exogenous 3HK-mediated cellular injury. Using the selective KMO inhibitor Ro61-8048, we show that KMO enzyme function is essential for cellular protection. Pan-caspase inhibition with Z-VAD-FMK confirmed apoptosis as the mode of cell death. By defining expression of pathway components upstream and downstream of KMO, we observed alterations in other key kynurenine pathway components, particularly tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase upregulation, through bidirectional nonlinear feedback. KMO overexpression also increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). These changes in gene expression are functionally relevant, because siRNA knockdown of the pathway components kynureninase and quinolinate phosphoribosyl transferase caused cells to revert to a state of susceptibility to 3HK-mediated apoptosis. In summary, KMO overexpression, and importantly KMO activity, have metabolic repercussions that fundamentally affect resistance to cell stress. PMID:27077813

  18. Overexpression of human kynurenine-3-monooxygenase protects against 3-hydroxykynurenine-mediated apoptosis through bidirectional nonlinear feedback

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, K; Auer, M; Binnie, M; Zheng, X; Pham, N T; Iredale, J P; Webster, S P; Mole, D J

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a critical regulator of inflammation. The preferred KMO substrate, kynurenine, is converted to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK), and this product exhibits cytotoxicity through mechanisms that culminate in apoptosis. Here, we report that overexpression of human KMO with orthotopic localisation to mitochondria creates a metabolic environment during which the cell exhibits increased tolerance for exogenous 3HK-mediated cellular injury. Using the selective KMO inhibitor Ro61-8048, we show that KMO enzyme function is essential for cellular protection. Pan-caspase inhibition with Z-VAD-FMK confirmed apoptosis as the mode of cell death. By defining expression of pathway components upstream and downstream of KMO, we observed alterations in other key kynurenine pathway components, particularly tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase upregulation, through bidirectional nonlinear feedback. KMO overexpression also increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). These changes in gene expression are functionally relevant, because siRNA knockdown of the pathway components kynureninase and quinolinate phosphoribosyl transferase caused cells to revert to a state of susceptibility to 3HK-mediated apoptosis. In summary, KMO overexpression, and importantly KMO activity, have metabolic repercussions that fundamentally affect resistance to cell stress. PMID:27077813

  19. Iron-Mediated Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization in Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Oxidative Damage and Apoptosis: Protective Effects of Quercetin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Chen, Man; Xu, Yanyan; Yu, Xiao; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Sun, Jian; Liu, Liegang; Tang, Yuhan; Yao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Iron, in its free ferrous states, can catalyze Fenton reaction to produce OH∙, which is recognized as a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). As a result of continuous decomposition of iron-containing compounds, lysosomes contain a pool of redox-active iron. To investigate the important role of intralysosomal iron in alcoholic liver injury and the potential protection of quercetin, male C57BL/6J mice fed by Lieber De Carli diets containing ethanol (30% of total calories) were cotreated by quercetin or deferoxamine (DFO) for 15 weeks and ethanol-incubated mice primary hepatocytes were pretreated with FeCl3, DFO, and bafilomycin A1 at their optimal concentrations and exposure times. Chronic ethanol consumption caused an evident increase in lysosomal redox-active iron accompanying sustained oxidative damage. Iron-mediated ROS could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and subsequent mitochondria apoptosis. The hepatotoxicity was attenuated by reducing lysosomal iron while being exacerbated by escalating lysosomal iron. Quercetin substantially alleviated the alcoholic liver oxidative damage and apoptosis by decreasing lysosome iron and ameliorating iron-mediated LMP, which provided a new prospective of the use of quercetin against ALD. PMID:27057276

  20. Nobiletin Induces Protective Autophagy Accompanied by ER-Stress Mediated Apoptosis in Human Gastric Cancer SNU-16 Cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Yong; Cho, Somi Kim

    2016-07-14

    Nobiletin, a major component of citrus fruits, is a polymethoxyflavone derivative that exhibits anticancer activity against several forms of cancer, including SNU-16 human gastric cancer cells. To explore the nobiletin-induced cell death mechanism, we examined the changes in protein expression caused by nobiletin in human gastric cancer SNU-16 cells by means of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE), followed by peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) analysis. Seventeen of 20 selected protein spots were successfully identified, including nine upregulated and eight downregulated proteins. In nobiletin-treated SNU-16 cells the glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78) mRNA level was induced most significantly among six proteins related to cell survival and death. Western blot analysis was used to confirm the expression of GRP78 protein. We detected increases in the levels of the ER-stress related proteins inositol requiring enzyme 1 alpha (IRE1-α), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF-4), and C/EBP homology protein (CHOP), as well as GRP78, in response to nobiletin in SNU-16 cells. Furthermore, the ER stress-mediated apoptotic protein caspase-4 was proteolytically activated by nobiletin. Pretreatment with chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, strongly augmented apoptosis in SNU-16 cells, as evidenced by decreased cell viability, an increased number of sub-G1 phase cells and increased levels of cleaved PARP. Our results suggest that nobiletin-induced apoptosis in SNU-16 cells is mediated by pathways involving intracellular ER stress-mediated protective autophagy. Thus, the combination of nobiletin and an autophagy inhibitor could be a promising treatment for gastric cancer patients.

  1. PGC-1α Mediated Peripheral Nerve Protection of Tongxinluo in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaopei; Feng, Hua; Xu, Xia; Li, Haijun; Zhang, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effect of Tongxinluo (Txl), a Chinese herbal compound, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Methods and Results. Diabetic rat model was established by peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Txl ultrafine powder treatment for 16 weeks from the baseline significantly reversed the impairment of motor nerve conductive velocity (MNCV), mechanical hyperalgesia, and nerve structure. We further proved that Tongxinluo upregulates PGC-1α and its downstream factors including COX IV and SOD, which were involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. Conclusion. Our study indicates that the protective effect of Txl in diabetic neuropathy may be attributed to the induction of PGC-1α and its downstream targets. This finding may further illustrate the pleiotropic effect of the medicine. PMID:27504136

  2. Myoglobin protects the heart from inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS)-mediated nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Gödecke, Axel; Molojavyi, Andre; Heger, Jacqueline; Flögel, Ulrich; Ding, Zhaoping; Jacoby, Christoph; Schrader, Jürgen

    2003-06-13

    The role of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) in the pathogenesis of heart failure is still a matter of controversy. In contrast to early reports favoring a contribution of iNOS because of the negative inotropic and apoptotic potential of NO, more recent clinical and experimental data question a causative role. Here we report that transgenic mice with cardiac specific iNOS-overexpression and concomitant myoglobin-deficiency (tg-iNOS+/myo-/-) develop signs of heart failure with cardiac hypertrophy, ventricular dilatation, and interstitial fibrosis. In addition, reactivation of the fetal gene expression program typical for heart failure occurs. The structural and molecular changes are accompanied by functional depression such as reduced contractility, ejection fraction, and cardiac energetics. Our findings indicate that excessive cardiac NO formation can cause heart failure; however, under normal circumstances myoglobin constitutes the important barrier that efficiently protects the heart from nitrosative stress. PMID:12665503

  3. PGC-1α Mediated Peripheral Nerve Protection of Tongxinluo in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaopei; Feng, Hua; Xu, Xia; Li, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effect of Tongxinluo (Txl), a Chinese herbal compound, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Methods and Results. Diabetic rat model was established by peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Txl ultrafine powder treatment for 16 weeks from the baseline significantly reversed the impairment of motor nerve conductive velocity (MNCV), mechanical hyperalgesia, and nerve structure. We further proved that Tongxinluo upregulates PGC-1α and its downstream factors including COX IV and SOD, which were involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. Conclusion. Our study indicates that the protective effect of Txl in diabetic neuropathy may be attributed to the induction of PGC-1α and its downstream targets. This finding may further illustrate the pleiotropic effect of the medicine. PMID:27504136

  4. Myoglobin protects the heart from inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS)-mediated nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Gödecke, Axel; Molojavyi, Andre; Heger, Jacqueline; Flögel, Ulrich; Ding, Zhaoping; Jacoby, Christoph; Schrader, Jürgen

    2003-06-13

    The role of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) in the pathogenesis of heart failure is still a matter of controversy. In contrast to early reports favoring a contribution of iNOS because of the negative inotropic and apoptotic potential of NO, more recent clinical and experimental data question a causative role. Here we report that transgenic mice with cardiac specific iNOS-overexpression and concomitant myoglobin-deficiency (tg-iNOS+/myo-/-) develop signs of heart failure with cardiac hypertrophy, ventricular dilatation, and interstitial fibrosis. In addition, reactivation of the fetal gene expression program typical for heart failure occurs. The structural and molecular changes are accompanied by functional depression such as reduced contractility, ejection fraction, and cardiac energetics. Our findings indicate that excessive cardiac NO formation can cause heart failure; however, under normal circumstances myoglobin constitutes the important barrier that efficiently protects the heart from nitrosative stress.

  5. IL-22 Restrains Tapeworm-Mediated Protection against Experimental Colitis via Regulation of IL-25 Expression.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Fernando, Maria R; Lopes, Fernando; Leung, Gabriella; Mancini, Nicole L; Matisz, Chelsea E; Wang, Arthur; McKay, Derek M

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22, an immune cell-derived cytokine whose receptor expression is restricted to non-immune cells (e.g. epithelial cells), can be anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory. Mice infected with the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta are protected from dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis. Here we assessed expulsion of H. diminuta, the concomitant immune response and the outcome of DNBS-induced colitis in wild-type (WT) and IL-22 deficient mice (IL-22-/-) ± infection. Interleukin-22-/- mice had a mildly impaired ability to expel the worm and this correlated with reduced or delayed induction of TH2 immunity as measured by splenic and mesenteric lymph node production of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 and intestinal Muc-2 mRNA and goblet cell hyperplasia; in contrast, IL-25 increased in the small intestine of IL-22-/- mice 8 and 12 days post-infection compared to WT mice. In vitro experiments revealed that H. diminuta directly evoked epithelial production of IL-25 that was inhibited by recombinant IL-22. Also, IL-10 and markers of regulatory T cells were increased in IL-22-/- mice that displayed less DNBS (3 mg, ir. 72h)-induced colitis. Wild-type mice infected with H. diminuta were protected from colitis, as were infected IL-22-/- mice and the latter to a degree that they were almost indistinguishable from control, non-DNBS treated mice. Finally, treatment with anti-IL-25 antibodies exaggerated DNBS-induced colitis in IL-22-/- mice and blocked the anti-colitic effect of infection with H. diminuta. Thus, IL-22 is identified as an endogenous brake on helminth-elicited TH2 immunity, reducing the efficacy of expulsion of H. diminuta and limiting the effectiveness of the anti-colitic events mobilized following infection with H. diminuta in a non-permissive host. PMID:27055194

  6. IL-22 Restrains Tapeworm-Mediated Protection against Experimental Colitis via Regulation of IL-25 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José L.; Fernando, Maria R.; Lopes, Fernando; Leung, Gabriella; Mancini, Nicole L.; Matisz, Chelsea E.; Wang, Arthur; McKay, Derek M.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22, an immune cell-derived cytokine whose receptor expression is restricted to non-immune cells (e.g. epithelial cells), can be anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory. Mice infected with the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta are protected from dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis. Here we assessed expulsion of H. diminuta, the concomitant immune response and the outcome of DNBS-induced colitis in wild-type (WT) and IL-22 deficient mice (IL-22-/-) ± infection. Interleukin-22-/- mice had a mildly impaired ability to expel the worm and this correlated with reduced or delayed induction of TH2 immunity as measured by splenic and mesenteric lymph node production of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 and intestinal Muc-2 mRNA and goblet cell hyperplasia; in contrast, IL-25 increased in the small intestine of IL-22-/- mice 8 and 12 days post-infection compared to WT mice. In vitro experiments revealed that H. diminuta directly evoked epithelial production of IL-25 that was inhibited by recombinant IL-22. Also, IL-10 and markers of regulatory T cells were increased in IL-22-/- mice that displayed less DNBS (3 mg, ir. 72h)-induced colitis. Wild-type mice infected with H. diminuta were protected from colitis, as were infected IL-22-/- mice and the latter to a degree that they were almost indistinguishable from control, non-DNBS treated mice. Finally, treatment with anti-IL-25 antibodies exaggerated DNBS-induced colitis in IL-22-/- mice and blocked the anti-colitic effect of infection with H. diminuta. Thus, IL-22 is identified as an endogenous brake on helminth-elicited TH2 immunity, reducing the efficacy of expulsion of H. diminuta and limiting the effectiveness of the anti-colitic events mobilized following infection with H. diminuta in a non-permissive host. PMID:27055194

  7. IL-22 Restrains Tapeworm-Mediated Protection against Experimental Colitis via Regulation of IL-25 Expression.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Fernando, Maria R; Lopes, Fernando; Leung, Gabriella; Mancini, Nicole L; Matisz, Chelsea E; Wang, Arthur; McKay, Derek M

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22, an immune cell-derived cytokine whose receptor expression is restricted to non-immune cells (e.g. epithelial cells), can be anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory. Mice infected with the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta are protected from dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis. Here we assessed expulsion of H. diminuta, the concomitant immune response and the outcome of DNBS-induced colitis in wild-type (WT) and IL-22 deficient mice (IL-22-/-) ± infection. Interleukin-22-/- mice had a mildly impaired ability to expel the worm and this correlated with reduced or delayed induction of TH2 immunity as measured by splenic and mesenteric lymph node production of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 and intestinal Muc-2 mRNA and goblet cell hyperplasia; in contrast, IL-25 increased in the small intestine of IL-22-/- mice 8 and 12 days post-infection compared to WT mice. In vitro experiments revealed that H. diminuta directly evoked epithelial production of IL-25 that was inhibited by recombinant IL-22. Also, IL-10 and markers of regulatory T cells were increased in IL-22-/- mice that displayed less DNBS (3 mg, ir. 72h)-induced colitis. Wild-type mice infected with H. diminuta were protected from colitis, as were infected IL-22-/- mice and the latter to a degree that they were almost indistinguishable from control, non-DNBS treated mice. Finally, treatment with anti-IL-25 antibodies exaggerated DNBS-induced colitis in IL-22-/- mice and blocked the anti-colitic effect of infection with H. diminuta. Thus, IL-22 is identified as an endogenous brake on helminth-elicited TH2 immunity, reducing the efficacy of expulsion of H. diminuta and limiting the effectiveness of the anti-colitic events mobilized following infection with H. diminuta in a non-permissive host.

  8. Dynamics of symbiont-mediated antibiotic production reveal efficient long-term protection for beewolf offspring

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insects have evolved a wide range of mechanisms to defend themselves and their offspring against antagonists. One of these strategies involves the utilization of antimicrobial compounds provided by symbiotic bacteria to protect the host or its nutritional resources from pathogens and parasites. In the symbiosis of the solitary digger wasp, Philanthus triangulum (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae), the bacterial symbiont ‘Candidatus Streptomyces philanthi’ defends the developing larvae against pathogens by producing a mixture of at least nine antimicrobial substances on the cocoon surface. This antibiotic cocktail inhibits the growth of a broad range of detrimental fungi and bacteria, thereby significantly enhancing the offspring’s survival probability. Results Here we show that the production of antimicrobial compounds by the beewolf symbionts is confined to the first two weeks after cocoon spinning, leading to a high concentration of piericidins and streptochlorin on the cocoon surface. Expression profiling of housekeeping, sporulation, and antibiotic biosynthesis genes indicates that antibiotic production coincides with morphological differentiation that enables the symbionts to survive the nutrient-limited conditions on the beewolf cocoon. The antibiotic substances remain stable on the cocoon surface for the entire duration of the beewolf’s hibernation period, demonstrating that the compounds are resistant against environmental influences. Conclusions The antibiotic production by the beewolf symbionts serves as a reliable protection for the wasp offspring against pathogenic microorganisms during the long and unpredictable developmental phase in the subterranean brood cells. Thus, the beewolf-Streptomyces symbiosis provides one of the rare examples of antibiotics serving as an efficient defense in the natural environment and may aid in devising new strategies for the utilization of antibiotic combination therapies in human medicine against increasingly

  9. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2010-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  10. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  11. L-Lactate protects neurons against excitotoxicity: implication of an ATP-mediated signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, P.; Allaman, I.; Rothenfusser, K.; Fiumelli, H.; Marquet, P.; Magistretti, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Converging experimental data indicate a neuroprotective action of L-Lactate. Using Digital Holographic Microscopy, we observe that transient application of glutamate (100 μM; 2 min) elicits a NMDA-dependent death in 65% of mouse cortical neurons in culture. In the presence of L-Lactate (or Pyruvate), the percentage of neuronal death decreases to 32%. UK5099, a blocker of the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier, fully prevents L-Lactate-mediated neuroprotection. In addition, L-Lactate-induced neuroprotection is not only inhibited by probenicid and carbenoxolone, two blockers of ATP channel pannexins, but also abolished by apyrase, an enzyme degrading ATP, suggesting that ATP produced by the Lactate/Pyruvate pathway is released to act on purinergic receptors in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Finally, pharmacological approaches support the involvement of the P2Y receptors associated to the PI3-kinase pathway, leading to activation of KATP channels. This set of results indicates that L-Lactate acts as a signalling molecule for neuroprotection against excitotoxicity through coordinated cellular pathways involving ATP production, release and activation of a P2Y/KATP cascade. PMID:26893204

  12. Further evidence of centrophenoxine mediated protection in aluminium exposed rats by biochemical and light microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Nehru, Bimla; Bhalla, Punita; Garg, Aarti

    2007-12-01

    The environmental agent aluminium has been intensively investigated in the initiation and progression of various neurological disorders and the role of oxidative stress in these disorders is a widely discussed phenomenon. In this light, the present study is focused on the role of aluminium in mediating oxidative stress, which may help in better understanding its role in neuronal degeneration. Further, we have exploited a known anti-aging drug centrophenoxine to explore its potential in the conditions of metal induced oxidative damage. Aluminium was administered orally at a dose level of 100 mg/kg b.wt./day for a period of 6 weeks followed by a post treatment of centrophenoxine at a dose level of 100 mg/kg b.wt./day for another 6 weeks. Following aluminium exposure, a significant increase in lipid peroxidation levels (estimated by MDA) were observed which was accompanied by a decrease in reduced glutathione content in both cerebrum and cerebellum of rat brain. Post treatment of centrophenoxine significantly reduced the lipid peroxidation levels and also increased the reduced glutathione content in both the regions. Histologically observed marked deteriorations in the organization of various cellular layers in both cerebrum and cerebellum were observed after aluminium administration. Centrophenoxine treated animals showed an appreciable improvement in the histoarchitecture of the cellular layers. Our results indicate that centrophenoxine has an antioxidant potential and should be examined further in aluminium toxic conditions.

  13. Natural Killer Cells Mediate Protection against Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in the Mesenteric Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Rosenheinrich, Maik; Heine, Wiebke; Schmühl, Carina M.; Pisano, Fabio; Dersch, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells play a crucial role in the initial defense against bacterial pathogens. The crosstalk between host cells infected with intracellular pathogens and NK cells has been studied intensively, but not much attention has been given to characterize the role of NK cells in the response to extracellular bacterial pathogens such as yersiniae. In this study we used antibody-mediated NK cell depletion to address the importance of this immune cell type in controlling a Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. Analysis of the bacterial counts was used to follow the infection and flow cytometry was performed to characterize the composition and dynamic of immune cells. Depletion of NK cells led to higher bacterial loads within the mesenteric lymph nodes. We further show that in particular CD11b+ CD27+ NK cells which express higher levels of the activation marker CD69 increase within the mesenteric lymph nodes during a Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. Moreover, in response to the activation NK cells secrete higher levels of IFNy, which in turn triggers the production of the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. These results suggest, that NK cells aid in the clearance of Y. pseudotuberculosis infections mainly by triggering the expression of proinflammatory cytokines manipulating the host immune response. PMID:26296209

  14. Inhibition of insulin/IGF-1 receptor signaling protects from mitochondria-mediated kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Ising, Christina; Koehler, Sybille; Brähler, Sebastian; Merkwirth, Carsten; Höhne, Martin; Baris, Olivier R; Hagmann, Henning; Kann, Martin; Fabretti, Francesca; Dafinger, Claudia; Bloch, Wilhelm; Schermer, Bernhard; Linkermann, Andreas; Brüning, Jens C; Kurschat, Christine E; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Langer, Thomas; Benzing, Thomas; Brinkkoetter, Paul Thomas

    2015-02-02

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and alterations in energy metabolism have been implicated in a variety of human diseases. Mitochondrial fusion is essential for maintenance of mitochondrial function and requires the prohibitin ring complex subunit prohibitin-2 (PHB2) at the mitochondrial inner membrane. Here, we provide a link between PHB2 deficiency and hyperactive insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Deletion of PHB2 in podocytes of mice, terminally differentiated cells at the kidney filtration barrier, caused progressive proteinuria, kidney failure, and death of the animals and resulted in hyperphosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP), a known mediator of the mTOR signaling pathway. Inhibition of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling system through genetic deletion of the insulin receptor alone or in combination with the IGF-1 receptor or treatment with rapamycin prevented hyperphosphorylation of S6RP without affecting the mitochondrial structural defect, alleviated renal disease, and delayed the onset of kidney failure in PHB2-deficient animals. Evidently, perturbation of insulin/IGF-1 receptor signaling contributes to tissue damage in mitochondrial disease, which may allow therapeutic intervention against a wide spectrum of diseases.

  15. Custom cerium oxide nanoparticles protect against a free radical mediated autoimmune degenerative disease in the brain.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Karin L; DeCoteau, William; Estevez, Ana; Reed, Kenneth J; Costanzo, Wendi; Sanford, David; Leiter, James C; Clauss, Jennifer; Knapp, Kylie; Gomez, Carlos; Mullen, Patrick; Rathbun, Elle; Prime, Kelly; Marini, Jessica; Patchefsky, Jamie; Patchefsky, Arthur S; Hailstone, Richard K; Erlichman, Joseph S

    2013-12-23

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles are potent antioxidants, based on their ability to either donate or receive electrons as they alternate between the +3 and +4 valence states. The dual oxidation state of ceria has made it an ideal catalyst in industrial applications, and more recently, nanoceria's efficacy in neutralizing biologically generated free radicals has been explored in biological applications. Here, we report the in vivo characteristics of custom-synthesized cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) in an animal model of immunological and free-radical mediated oxidative injury leading to neurodegenerative disease. The CeNPs are 2.9 nm in diameter, monodispersed and have a -23.5 mV zeta potential when stabilized with citrate/EDTA. This stabilizer coating resists being 'washed' off in physiological salt solutions, and the CeNPs remain monodispersed for long durations in high ionic strength saline. The plasma half-life of the CeNPs is ∼4.0 h, far longer than previously described, stabilized ceria nanoparticles. When administered intravenously to mice, the CeNPs were well tolerated and taken up by the liver and spleen much less than previous nanoceria formulations. The CeNPs were also able to penetrate the brain, reduce reactive oxygen species levels, and alleviate clinical symptoms and motor deficits in mice with a murine model of multiple sclerosis. Thus, CeNPs may be useful in mitigating tissue damage arising from free radical accumulation in biological systems.

  16. Hrd1 suppresses Nrf2-mediated cellular protection during liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tongde; Zhao, Fei; Gao, Beixue; Tan, Can; Yagishita, Naoko; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Wong, Pak K.; Chapman, Eli; Fang, Deyu; Zhang, Donna D.

    2014-01-01

    Increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the salient features of end-stage liver diseases. Using liver tissues from liver cirrhosis patients, we observed up-regulation of the XBP1–Hrd1 arm of the ER stress response pathway and down-regulation of the Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response pathway. We further confirmed this negative regulation of Nrf2 by Hrd1 using Hrd1 conditional knockout mice. Down-regulation of Nrf2 was a surprising result, since the high levels of ROS should have inactivated Keap1, the primary ubiquitin ligase regulating Nrf2 levels. Here, we identified Hrd1 as a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for compromised Nrf2 response during liver cirrhosis. In cirrhotic livers, activation of the XBP1–Hrd1 arm of ER stress transcriptionally up-regulated Hrd1, resulting in enhanced Nrf2 ubiquitylation and degradation and attenuation of the Nrf2 signaling pathway. Our study reveals not only the convergence of ER and oxidative stress response pathways but also the pathological importance of this cross-talk in liver cirrhosis. Finally, we showed the therapeutic importance of targeting Hrd1, rather than Keap1, to prevent Nrf2 loss and suppress liver cirrhosis. PMID:24636985

  17. CD44 is a macrophage binding site for Mycobacterium tuberculosis that mediates macrophage recruitment and protective immunity against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Leemans, Jaklien C.; Florquin, Sandrine; Heikens, Mirjam; Pals, Steven T.; Neut, Ronald van der; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Cell migration and phagocytosis are both important for controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and are critically dependent on the reorganization of the cytoskeleton. Since CD44 is an adhesion molecule involved in inflammatory responses and is connected to the actin cytoskeleton, we investigated the role of CD44 in both these processes. Macrophage (Mφ) recruitment into M. tuberculosis–infected lungs and delayed-type hypersensitivity sites was impaired in CD44-deficient (CD44–/–) mice. In addition, the number of T lymphocytes and the concentration of the protective key cytokine IFN-γ were reduced in the lungs of infected CD44–/– mice. The production of IFN-γ by splenocytes of CD44–/– mice was profoundly increased upon antigen-specific stimulation. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that soluble CD44 can directly bind to virulent M. tuberculosis. Mycobacteria also interacted with Mφ-associated CD44, as reflected by reduced binding and internalization of bacilli by CD44–/– Mφs. This suggests that CD44 is a receptor on Mφs for binding of M. tuberculosis. CD44–/– mice displayed a decreased survival and an enhanced mycobacterial outgrowth in lungs and liver during pulmonary tuberculosis. In summary, we have identified CD44 as a new Mφ binding site for M. tuberculosis that mediates mycobacterial phagocytosis, Mφ recruitment, and protective immunity against pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:12618522

  18. The second amino acid of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein is critical for coat protein-mediated protection.

    PubMed Central

    Tumer, N E; Kaniewski, W; Haley, L; Gehrke, L; Lodge, J K; Sanders, P

    1991-01-01

    Transgenic plants expressing the coat protein (CP) of alfalfa mosaic virus (AIMV) are resistant to infection by AIMV. A mutation was introduced into the second amino acid of the cDNA for the CP of AIMV. Three different transgenic tobacco lines expressing the mutant CP and two different transgenic tobacco lines expressing the wild-type CP at similar levels were challenged with AIMV virions and viral RNA. Whereas the lines expressing the wild-type CP were highly resistant to infection by AIMV virions and viral RNA, the lines expressing the mutant CP were susceptible to infection by both. The binding affinity of the mutant and the wild-type CPs for the 3' terminal protein binding site on AIMV RNAs was similar, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. A mixture of AIMV genomic RNAs 1-3 was infectious on the plants expressing the mutant CP but not on vector control plants or plants expressing the wild-type CP, indicating that the mutant CP can activate the AIMV genomic RNAs for infection. These results demonstrate that the second amino acid of the AIMV CP is critical for protection from AIMV but not for the initial interaction between the AIMV RNA and CP, suggesting that this initial interaction does not play a major role in CP-mediated protection. Images PMID:11607167

  19. Vagus nerve stimulation mediates protection from kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury through α7nAChR+ splenocytes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Chikara; Sung, Sun-sang J.; Moscalu, Stefan; Jankowski, Jakub; Huang, Liping; Ye, Hong; Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2016-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems interact in complex ways to maintain homeostasis and respond to stress or injury, and rapid nerve conduction can provide instantaneous input for modulating inflammation. The inflammatory reflex referred to as the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway regulates innate and adaptive immunity, and modulation of this reflex by vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is effective in various inflammatory disease models, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Effectiveness of VNS in these models necessitates the integration of neural signals and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) on splenic macrophages. Here, we sought to determine whether electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve attenuates kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), which promotes the release of proinflammatory molecules. Stimulation of vagal afferents or efferents in mice 24 hours before IRI markedly attenuated acute kidney injury (AKI) and decreased plasma TNF. Furthermore, this protection was abolished in animals in which splenectomy was performed 7 days before VNS and IRI. In mice lacking α7nAChR, prior VNS did not prevent IRI. Conversely, adoptive transfer of VNS-conditioned α7nAChR splenocytes conferred protection to recipient mice subjected to IRI. Together, these results demonstrate that VNS-mediated attenuation of AKI and systemic inflammation depends on α7nAChR-positive splenocytes. PMID:27088805

  20. AAV8-mediated in vivo overexpression of miR-155 enhances the protective capacity of genetically attenuated malarial parasites.

    PubMed

    Hentzschel, Franziska; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Börner, Kathleen; Heiss, Kirsten; Knapp, Bettina; Sattler, Julia M; Kaderali, Lars; Castoldi, Mirco; Bindman, Julia G; Malato, Yann; Willenbring, Holger; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Grimm, Dirk

    2014-12-01

    Malaria, caused by protozoan Plasmodium parasites, remains a prevalent infectious human disease due to the lack of an efficient and safe vaccine. This is directly related to the persisting gaps in our understanding of the parasite's interactions with the infected host, especially during the clinically silent yet essential liver stage of Plasmodium development. Previously, we and others showed that genetically attenuated parasites (GAP) that arrest in the liver induce sterile immunity, but only upon multiple administrations. Here, we comprehensively studied hepatic gene and miRNA expression in GAP-injected mice, and found both a broad activation of IFNγ-associated pathways and a significant increase of murine microRNA-155 (miR-155), that was especially pronounced in non-parenchymal cells including liver-resident macrophages (Kupffer cells). Remarkably, ectopic upregulation of this miRNA in the liver of mice using robust hepatotropic adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) vectors enhanced GAP's protective capacity substantially. In turn, this AAV8-mediated miR-155 expression permitted a reduction of GAP injections needed to achieve complete protection against infectious parasite challenge from previously three to only one. Our study highlights a crucial role of mammalian miRNAs in Plasmodium liver infection in vivo and concurrently implies their great potential as future immune-augmenting agents in improved vaccination regimes against malaria and other diseases.

  1. A bipartite operator interacts with a heat shock element to mediate early meiotic induction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae HSP82

    SciTech Connect

    Szent-Gyorgyi, C.

    1995-12-01

    This report seeks to characterize the activation of meiotic gene in terms of cis-acting DNA elements and their associated factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was found that vegetative repression and meiotic induction depend on interactions of the promoter-proximal heat shock element with a nearby bipartite repression element. The experiments described explore how two different regulatory pathways induce transcription by stimulating a single classical activation element, a nonspecific heat shock element. 81 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Corepressor for element-1-silencing transcription factor preferentially mediates gene networks underlying neural stem cell fate decisions.

    PubMed

    Abrajano, Joseph J; Qureshi, Irfan A; Gokhan, Solen; Molero, Aldrin E; Zheng, Deyou; Bergman, Aviv; Mehler, Mark F

    2010-09-21

    The repressor element-1 (RE1) silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) silences neuronal genes in neural stem cells (NSCs) and nonneuronal cells through its role as a dynamic modular platform for recruitment of transcriptional and epigenetic regulatory cofactors to RE1-containing promoters. In embryonic stem cells, the REST regulatory network is highly integrated with the transcriptional circuitry governing self-renewal and pluripotency, although its exact functional role is unclear. The C-terminal cofactor for REST, CoREST, also acts as a modular scaffold, but its cell type-specific roles have not been elucidated. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip to examine CoREST and REST binding sites in NSCs and their proximate progenitor species. In NSCs, we identified a larger number of CoREST (1,820) compared with REST (322) target genes. The majority of these CoREST targets do not contain known RE1 motifs. Notably, these CoREST target genes do play important roles in pluripotency networks, in modulating NSC identity and fate decisions and in epigenetic processes previously associated with both REST and CoREST. Moreover, we found that NSC-mediated developmental transitions were associated primarily with liberation of CoREST from promoters with transcriptional repression favored in less lineage-restricted radial glia and transcriptional activation favored in more lineage-restricted neuronal-oligodendrocyte precursors. Clonal NSC REST and CoREST gene manipulation paradigms further revealed that CoREST has largely independent and previously uncharacterized roles in promoting NSC multilineage potential and modulating early neural fate decisions. PMID:20823235

  3. Potent inhibition of peroxynitrite-induced DNA strand breakage by ethanol: possible implications for ethanol-mediated cardiovascular protection.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhuoxiao; Li, Yunbo

    2004-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have conclusively demonstrated that moderate consumption of ethanol is causally associated with a significant reduction in cardiovascular events. However, the exact mechanisms underlying the ethanol-mediated cardiovascular protection remain to be elucidated. Because peroxynitrite has been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of various forms of cardiovascular disorders via its cytotoxic effects, this study was undertaken to investigate if ethanol could inhibit peroxynitrite-induced DNA strand breaks, a critical event leading to peroxynitrite-elicited cytotoxicity. Toward this goal, phiX-174 RF I plasmid DNA was used as an in vitro model to determine the protective effects of ethanol on peroxynitrite-induced DNA strand breaks. Incubation of phiX-174 plasmid DNA with the peroxynitrite generator, 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) led to the formation of both single- and double-stranded DNA breaks in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The presence of ethanol at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 1% (w/v) resulted in a significant inhibition of SIN-1-induced DNA strand breaks. Ethanol also showed inhibitory effects on SIN-1-induced DNA strand breakage in the presence of bicarbonate. The inhibition of SIN-1-induced DNA strand breaks by ethanol exhibited a concentration-dependent manner. Notably, a marked inhibition of SIN-1-elicited DNA strand breaks was observed with 0.01% ethanol. Ethanol at 0.01-1% was unable to affect SIN-1-mediated oxygen consumption, indicating that ethanol did not affect the auto-oxidation of SIN-1 to form peroxynitrite. Furthermore, incubation of the plasmid DNA with authentic peroxynitrite resulted in a significant formation of DNA strand breaks, which could be dramatically inhibited by the presence of 0.02-0.1% ethanol. Taken together, this study demonstrates for the first time that ethanol at physiologically relevant concentrations can potently inhibit peroxynitrite-induced DNA strand breakage. In view of

  4. Only a Subset of Phosphoantigen-responsive γ9δ2 T cells Mediate Protective TB Immunity1

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Charles Thomas; Abate, Getahun; Blazevic, Azra; Hoft, Daniel F.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis-BCG induce potent expansions of human memory Vγ9+Vδ2+ T cells capable of IFN-γ production, cytolytic activity and mycobacterial growth inhibition. Certain phosphoantigens expressed by mycobacteria can stimulate γ9δ2 T cell expansions, suggesting that purified or synthetic forms of these phosphoantigens may be useful alone or as components of new vaccines or immunotherapeutics. However, we show that while mycobacteria-activated γ9δ2 T cells potently inhibit intracellular mycobacterial growth, phosphoantigen-activated γ9δ2 T cells fail to inhibit mycobacteria, although both develop similar effector cytokine and cytolytic functional capacities. γ9δ2 T cells receiving TLR-mediated co-stimulation during phosphoantigen activation also failed to inhibit mycobacterial growth. We hypothesized that mycobacteria express antigens, other than the previously identified phosphoantigens, that induce protective subsets of γ9δ2 T cells. Testing this hypothesis, we compared the TCR sequence diversity of γ9δ2 T cells expanded with BCG-infected versus phosphoantigen-treated DC. BCG-stimulated γ9δ2 T cells displayed a more restricted TCR diversity than phosphoantigen-activated γ9δ2 T cells. In addition, only a subset of phosphoantigen-activated γ9δ2 T cells functionally responded to mycobacteria-infected DC. Furthermore, differential inhibitory functions of BCG- and phosphoantigen-activated γ9δ2 T cells were confirmed at the clonal level and were not due to differences in TCR avidity. Our results demonstrate that BCG infection can activate and expand protective subsets of phosphoantigen responsive γ9δ2 T cells, and provide the first indication that γ9δ2 T cells can develop pathogen specificity similar to αβ T cells. Specific targeting of protective γ9δ2 T cell subsets will be important for future tuberculosis vaccines. PMID:18802050

  5. Protective roles of selenium on nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis of immune organs induced by cadmium in chickens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-li; Zhang, Jiu-li; Zhang, Zi-wei; Yao, Hai-dong; Sun, Gang; Xu, Shi-wen

    2014-06-01

    Little is known about the influence of subchronic cadmium exposure on apoptosis in the immune organs of birds and the protective effects on apoptosis by selenium against cadmium. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of subchronic cadmium exposure on nitric oxide and apoptosis in the immune organs of chicken and the protective roles of selenium against cadmium-induced apoptosis. Two hundred ten 30-day-old chickens were randomly assigned to three groups and were fed a basal diet, cadmium+selenium (as 150 mg of CdCl2 per kg of diet+10 mg of Na2SeO3 per kg of diet ) or cadmium (as 150 mg of CdCl2 per kg of diet) in basic diets for 15, 30, 45, and 60 days. Then, the production of nitric oxide, messenger RNA (mRNA level), and the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase, ultrastructural changes, TUNEL assay, and flow cytometric analysis of apoptosis and Bcl-2 and p53 mRNA levels in the immune organs were examined. The results showed that cadmium exposure caused ultrastructural damage and increased production of nitric oxide, mRNA level, and activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase, the degree, and the number of apoptotic cells in a time-dependent manner. Cadmium exposure decreased Bcl-2 mRNA level and increased p53 mRNA level in a time-dependent manner. Selenium supplementation during dietary cadmium reduced the production of nitric oxide, the mRNA level, and activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase, ultrastructural damage, and apoptosis in the immune organs of chicken. It indicated that cadmium induced nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis of immune organs, and selenium played protective effects against cadmium-induced apoptosis in the immune organs of chickens.

  6. REST/NRSF-mediated intrinsic homeostasis protects neuronal networks from hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Davide; Lignani, Gabriele; Ferrea, Enrico; Contestabile, Andrea; Paonessa, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Rosalba; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Boido, Davide; Fassio, Anna; Meldolesi, Jacopo; Valtorta, Flavia; Benfenati, Fabio; Baldelli, Pietro

    2013-11-13

    Intrinsic homeostasis enables neuronal circuits to maintain activity levels within an appropriate range by modulating neuronal voltage-gated conductances, but the signalling pathways involved in this process are largely unknown. We characterized the process of intrinsic homeostasis induced by sustained electrical activity in cultured hippocampal neurons based on the activation of the Repressor Element-1 Silencing Transcription Factor/Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor (REST/NRSF). We showed that 4-aminopyridine-induced hyperactivity enhances the expression of REST/NRSF, which in turn, reduces the expression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, thereby decreasing the neuronal Na(+) current density. This mechanism plays an important role in the downregulation of the firing activity at the single-cell level, re-establishing a physiological spiking activity in the entire neuronal network. Conversely, interfering with REST/NRSF expression impaired this homeostatic response. Our results identify REST/NRSF as a critical factor linking neuronal activity to the activation of intrinsic homeostasis and restoring a physiological level of activity in the entire neuronal network. PMID:24149584

  7. Butea monosperma and chemomodulation: protective role against thioacetamide-mediated hepatic alterations in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sehrawat, A; Khan, T H; Prasad, L; Sultana, S

    2006-02-01

    The present study was carried out to study the effect of Butea monosperma, a known liver acting drug on the tumor promotion related events of carcinogenesis in rat liver. Thioacetamide (TAA) was used to induce tumor promotion response and oxidative stress and caused significant depletion in the detoxification and antioxidant enzyme armory with concomitant elevation in malondialdehyde (MDA) formation, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) generation, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity and unscheduled DNA synthesis. However, B. monosperma pretreatment at two different doses restored the levels of the above-said parameters (p < 0.001) in a dose-dependent manner. The alcoholic extract of B. monosperma used in the present study seems to offer dose-dependent protection and maintain the structural integrity of hepatic cells. This was evident from the significant reduction in TAA-induced serum GOT, GPT, Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase activity (GGT) activities (p < 0.001). These investigations validate the use of B. monosperma in liver disorders by Ayurvedic physicians. Overall results indicate that the methanolic extract of B. monosperma possesses hepatoprotective effects and also it might suppress the promotion stage via inhibition of oxidative stress and polyamine biosynthetic pathway. PMID:16428022

  8. Mammalian RAD51 paralogs protect nascent DNA at stalled forks and mediate replication restart.

    PubMed

    Somyajit, Kumar; Saxena, Sneha; Babu, Sharath; Mishra, Anup; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-11-16

    Mammalian RAD51 paralogs are implicated in the repair of collapsed replication forks by homologous recombination. However, their physiological roles in replication fork maintenance prior to fork collapse remain obscure. Here, we report on the role of RAD51 paralogs in short-term replicative stress devoid of DSBs. We show that RAD51 paralogs localize to nascent DNA and common fragile sites upon replication fork stalling. Strikingly, RAD51 paralogs deficient cells exhibit elevated levels of 53BP1 nuclear bodies and increased DSB formation, the latter being attributed to extensive degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks. RAD51C and XRCC3 promote the restart of stalled replication in an ATP hydrolysis dependent manner by disengaging RAD51 and other RAD51 paralogs from the halted forks. Notably, we find that Fanconi anemia (FA)-like disorder and breast and ovarian cancer patient derived mutations of RAD51C fails to protect replication fork, exhibit under-replicated genomic regions and elevated micro-nucleation. Taken together, RAD51 paralogs prevent degradation of stalled forks and promote the restart of halted replication to avoid replication fork collapse, thereby maintaining genomic integrity and suppressing tumorigenesis.

  9. Prokineticin-2 upregulation during neuronal injury mediates a compensatory protective response against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Richard; Neal, Matthew L.; Luo, Jie; Langley, Monica R.; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Panicker, Nikhil; Charli, Adhithiya; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Woodruff, Trent M.; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-01-01

    Prokineticin-2 (PK2), a recently discovered secreted protein, regulates important physiological functions including olfactory biogenesis and circadian rhythms in the CNS. Interestingly, although PK2 expression is low in the nigral system, its receptors are constitutively expressed on nigrostriatal neurons. Herein, we demonstrate that PK2 expression is highly induced in nigral dopaminergic neurons during early stages of degeneration in multiple models of Parkinson's disease (PD), including PK2 reporter mice and MitoPark mice. Functional studies demonstrate that PK2 promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and activates ERK and Akt survival signalling pathways, thereby driving neuroprotection. Importantly, PK2 overexpression is protective whereas PK2 receptor antagonism exacerbates dopaminergic degeneration in experimental PD. Furthermore, PK2 expression increased in surviving nigral dopaminergic neurons from PD brains, indicating that PK2 upregulation is clinically relevant to human PD. Collectively, our results identify a paradigm for compensatory neuroprotective PK2 signalling in nigral dopaminergic neurons that could have important therapeutic implications for PD. PMID:27703142

  10. Tempol protects blood proteins and lipids against peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ayman G; Bani-Ahmad, Mohammad A; Jaradat, Ahmad Q

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is characterized by excessive production of various free radicals and reactive species among which, peroxynitrite is most frequently produced in several pathological conditions. Peroxynitrite is the product of the superoxide anion reaction with nitric oxide, which is reported to take place in the intravascular compartment. Several studies have reported that peroxynitrite targets red blood cells, platelets and plasma proteins, and induces various forms of oxidative damage. This in vitro study was designed to further characterize the types of oxidative damage induced in platelets and plasma proteins by peroxynitrite. This study also determined the ability of tempol to protect blood plasma and platelets against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage. The ability of various concentrations of tempol (25, 50, 75, and 100 µM) to antagonize peroxynitrite-induced oxidation was evaluated by measuring the levels of protein carbonyl groups and thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substances in experimental groups. Exposure of platelets and plasma to 100 µM peroxynitrite resulted in an increased levels of carbonyl groups and lipid peroxidation (P < 0.05). Tempol significantly inhibited carbonyl group formation in plasma and platelet proteins (P < 0.05). In addition, tempol significantly reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation in both plasma and platelet samples (P < 0.05). Thus, tempol has antioxidative properties against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage in blood plasma and platelets. PMID:25107897

  11. A possibly sigma-1 receptor mediated role of dimethyltryptamine in tissue protection, regeneration, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Frecska, Ede; Szabo, Attila; Winkelman, Michael J; Luna, Luis E; McKenna, Dennis J

    2013-09-01

    N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is classified as a naturally occurring serotonergic hallucinogen of plant origin. It has also been found in animal tissues and regarded as an endogenous trace amine transmitter. The vast majority of research on DMT has targeted its psychotropic/psychedelic properties with less focus on its effects beyond the nervous system. The recent discovery that DMT is an endogenous ligand of the sigma-1 receptor may shed light on yet undiscovered physiological mechanisms of DMT activity and reveal some of its putative biological functions. A three-step active uptake process of DMT from peripheral sources to neurons underscores a presumed physiological significance of this endogenous hallucinogen. In this paper, we overview the literature on the effects of sigma-1 receptor ligands on cellular bioenergetics, the role of serotonin, and serotoninergic analogues in immunoregulation and the data regarding gene expression of the DMT synthesizing enzyme indolethylamine-N-methyltransferase in carcinogenesis. We conclude that the function of DMT may extend central nervous activity and involve a more universal role in cellular protective mechanisms. Suggestions are offered for future directions of indole alkaloid research in the general medical field. We provide converging evidence that while DMT is a substance which produces powerful psychedelic experiences, it is better understood not as a hallucinogenic drug of abuse, but rather an agent of significant adaptive mechanisms that can also serve as a promising tool in the development of future medical therapies.

  12. Intraspecific facilitation by allelochemical mediated grazing protection within a toxigenic dinoflagellate population

    PubMed Central

    John, Uwe; Tillmann, Urban; Hülskötter, Jennifer; Alpermann, Tilman J.; Wohlrab, Sylke; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.

    2015-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a major cause of harmful algal blooms (HABs), with consequences for coastal marine ecosystem functioning and services. Alexandrium fundyense (previously Alexandrium tamarense) is one of the most abundant and widespread toxigenic species in the temperate Northern and Southern Hemisphere and produces paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins as well as lytic allelochemical substances. These bioactive compounds may support the success of A. fundyense and its ability to form blooms. Here we investigate the impact of grazing on monoclonal and mixed set-ups of highly (Alex2) and moderately (Alex4) allelochemically active A. fundyense strains and a non-allelochemically active conspecific (Alex5) by the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Polykrikos kofoidii. While Alex4 and particularly Alex5 were strongly grazed by P. kofoidii when offered alone, both strains grew well in the mixed assemblages (Alex4 + Alex5 and Alex2 + Alex5). Hence, the allelochemical active strains facilitated growth of the non-active strain by protecting the population as a whole against grazing. Based on our results, we argue that facilitation among clonal lineages within a species may partly explain the high genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Alexandrium populations. Populations of Alexandrium may comprise multiple cooperative traits that act in concert with intraspecific facilitation, and hence promote the success of this notorious HAB species. PMID:25411447

  13. Danshensu-mediated protective effect against hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride in rats.

    PubMed

    Qu, W; Huang, H; Li, K; Qin, C

    2014-12-01

    The culprit of hepatic fibrosis (HF) is linked to suprathreshold deposition of collagen. Thus, collagen reduction by improved metabolism contributes to HF management. In this study, we aimed to investigate the hepatoprotective effects of Danshensu (DSS) against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced HF rats. The results showed that DSS-administrated rats resulted in decreasing in hepatosomatic indexes, and lowering serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Meanwhile, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were increased, while the content of malonaldehyde (MDA) was lessened in liver tissue of DSS administration group. In addition, the pro-fibrotic markers of hydroxyproline (Hyp), type III procollagen (PCIII) and hyaluronic acid (HA) contents were decreased. Histopathological examination confirmed that the hepatotoxicity in CCl4-injured rats was alleviated following the DSS administration. Furthermore, intrahepatic protein expressions of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), phosphorylated JAK2 (p-JAK2) and phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) were effectively down-regulated, respectively. Overall, this work demonstrates that DSS played the protective effect against CCl4-induced cytotoxicity in liver tissue, which the probable mechanism is associated with attenuation of lipid peroxidation, collagen accumulation and enhancement of anti-oxidative defense capability, as well as regulation of intrahepatic JAK/STAT pathway for maintaining collagenic homoeostasis. PMID:25201143

  14. IL-23-mediated mononuclear phagocyte crosstalk protects mice from Citrobacter rodentium-induced colon immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Aychek, Tegest; Mildner, Alexander; Yona, Simon; Kim, Ki-Wook; Lampl, Nardy; Reich-Zeliger, Shlomit; Boon, Louis; Yogev, Nir; Waisman, Ari; Cua, Daniel J; Jung, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Gut homeostasis and mucosal immune defense rely on the differential contributions of dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages. Here we show that colonic CX3CR1(+) mononuclear phagocytes are critical inducers of the innate response to Citrobacter rodentium infection. Specifically, the absence of IL-23 expression in macrophages or CD11b(+) DC results in the impairment of IL-22 production and in acute lethality. Highlighting immunopathology as a death cause, infected animals are rescued by the neutralization of IL-12 or IFNγ. Moreover, mice are also protected when the CD103(+) CD11b(-) DC compartment is rendered deficient for IL-12 production. We show that IL-12 production by colonic CD103(+) CD11b(-) DC is repressed by IL-23. Collectively, in addition to its role in inducing IL-22 production, macrophage-derived or CD103(-) CD11b(+) DC-derived IL-23 is required to negatively control the otherwise deleterious production of IL-12 by CD103(+) CD11b(-) DC. Impairment of this critical mononuclear phagocyte crosstalk results in the generation of IFNγ-producing former TH17 cells and fatal immunopathology.

  15. Protected Nuclear Fuel Element

    DOEpatents

    Kittel, J. H.; Schumar, J. F.

    1962-12-01

    A stainless steel-clad actinide metal fuel rod for use in fast reactors is reported. In order to prevert cladding failures due to alloy formation between the actinide metal and the stainless steel, a mesh-like sleeve of expanded metal is interposed between them, the sleeve metal being of niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, tungsten, zirconium, or vanadium. Liquid alkali metal is added as a heat transfer agent. (AEC)

  16. N-Acetylcysteine protects against trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity by attenuating oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gangduo; Wang, Jianling; Ma, Huaxian; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2013-11-15

    Exposure to trichloroethene (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, is known to induce autoimmunity both in humans and animal models. However, mechanisms underlying TCE-mediated autoimmunity remain largely unknown. Previous studies from our laboratory in MRL +/+ mice suggest that oxidative stress may contribute to TCE-induced autoimmune response. The current study was undertaken to further assess the role of oxidative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity by supplementing with an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Groups of female MRL +/+ mice were given TCE, NAC or TCE + NAC for 6 weeks (TCE, 10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day; NAC, 250 mg/kg/day through drinking water). TCE exposure led to significant increases in serum levels of anti-nuclear, anti-dsDNA and anti-Sm antibodies. TCE exposure also led to significant induction of anti-malondiadelhyde (MDA)- and anti-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-protein adduct antibodies which were associated with increased ANA in the sera along with increased MDA-/HNE-protein adducts in the livers and kidneys, and increases in protein oxidation (carbonylation) in the sera, livers and kidneys, suggesting an overall increase in oxidative stress. Moreover, TCE exposure also resulted in increased release of IL-17 from splenocytes and increases in IL-17 mRNA expression. Remarkably, NAC supplementation attenuated not only the TCE-induced oxidative stress, IL-17 release and mRNA expression, but also the markers of autoimmunity, as evident from decreased levels of ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-Sm antibodies in the sera. These results provide further support to a role of oxidative stress in TCE-induced autoimmune response. Attenuation of TCE-induced autoimmunity in mice by NAC provides an approach for preventive and/or therapeutic strategies. - Highlights: • TCE led to increased autoantibodies, supporting its potential to induce autoimmunity. • TCE exposure led to increases in lipid perioxidation and protein carbonyls. • TCE exposure resulted in

  17. C6 knock-out Mice Are Protected from Thrombophilia Mediated by Antiphospholipid Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Laura, Carrera-Marín Ana; Zurina, Romay-Penabad; Elizabeth, Papalardo; Elba, Reyes-Maldonado; Ethel, Garcia-Latorre; Gracie, Vargas; Tuya, Shilagard; Silvia, Pierangeli

    2013-01-01

    Background Complement activation plays a role in pathogenesis of the Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS), but the involvement of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex (MAC) is unknown. Here we studied the effects of human polyclonal antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies on thrombosis and tissue factor (TF) up-regulation in C6 deficient (C6-/-) mice. Methods C6-/- or the wild-type (C3H/HeJ) C6+/+ mice were injected twice with IgG-APS (n=2) or IgM-APS (n=1) isolated from APS patients or with the corresponding control Igs (IgG-NHS or IgM-NHS). Then, the size of induced thrombi in the femoral vein were determined 72 hours after the first injection. Tissue factor was determined in homogenates of carotid arteries and in peritoneal macrophages. Results Thrombus sizes were significantly larger in C6+/+ treated with IgG-APS1 or with IgG-APS2 or with IgM-APS when compared with C6+/+ mice treated with IgG-NHS or with IgM-NHS, respectively. The sizes of thrombi were significantly smaller in the C6-/- mice injected with IgG-APS1, IgG-APS2 or IgM-APS (p<0.001), compared to their C6+/+ counterparts showing an important abrogation of thrombus formation in mice lacking C6. The TF expression and activity in the C6-/- mice treated with IgG-APS were diminished when compared to C6+/+ treated with the same immunoglobulins. All mice injected with IgG-APS and IgM-APS had medium-high titers of aCL and aβ2GPI antibodies. Conclusions These data indicate that the C6 component of the complement system mediates aPL-thrombogenic effects, underscoring an important pathogenic mechanism and indicating the possibility of inhibiting complement to ameliorate APS-related manifestations. PMID:22933620

  18. Podophyllum hexandrum-Mediated Survival Protection and Restoration of Other Cellular Injuries in Lethally Irradiated Mice.

    PubMed

    Sankhwar, Sanghmitra; Gupta, Manju Lata; Gupta, Vanita; Verma, Savita; Suri, Krishna Avtar; Devi, Memita; Sharma, Punita; Khan, Ehsan Ahmed; Alam, M Sarwar

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at the development of a safe and effective formulation to counter the effects of lethal irradiation. The sub-fraction (G-001M), prepared from Podophyllum hexandrum has rendered high degree of survival (>90%) at a dose of 6 mg kg(-1) body weight (intramuscular) in lethally irradiated mice. Therapeutic dose of G-001M, at about 20 times lower concentration than its LD(100), has revealed a DRF of 1.62. Comet assay studies in peripheral blood leukocytes have reflected that, treatment of G-001M before irradiation has significantly reduced DNA tail length (P < .001) and DNA damage score (P < .001), as compared to radiation-only group. Spleen cell counts in irradiated animals had declined drastically at the very first day of exposure, and the fall continued till the 5th day (P < .001). In the treated irradiated groups, there was a steep reduction in the counts initially, but this phase did not prolong. More than 60% decline in thymocytes of irradiated group animals was registered at 5 h of irradiation when compared with controls, and the fall progressed further downwards with the similar pace till 5th day of exposure (P < .001). At later intervals, thymus was found fully regressed. In G-001M pre-treated irradiated groups also, thymocytes decreased till the 5th day but thereafter rejuvenated and within 30 days of treatment the values were close to normal. Current studies have explicitly indicated that, G-001M in very small doses has not only rendered high survivability in lethally irradiated mice, but also protected their cellular DNA, besides supporting fast replenishment of the immune system.

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation protects Miscanthus × giganteus against trace element toxicity in a highly metal-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Firmin, Stéphane; Labidi, Sonia; Fontaine, Joël; Laruelle, Frédéric; Tisserant, Benoit; Nsanganwimana, Florian; Pourrut, Bertrand; Dalpé, Yolande; Grandmougin, Anne; Douay, Francis; Shirali, Pirouz; Verdin, Anthony; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa

    2015-09-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF)-assisted phytoremediation could constitute an ecological and economic method in polluted soil rehabilitation programs. The aim of this work was to characterize the trace element (TE) phytoremediation potential of mycorrhizal Miscanthus × giganteus. To understand the mechanisms involved in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis tolerance to TE toxicity, the fatty acid compositions and several stress oxidative biomarkers were compared in the roots and leaves of Miscanthus × giganteus cultivated under field conditions in either TE-contaminated or control soils. TEs were accumulated in greater amounts in roots, but the leaves were the organ most affected by TE contamination and were characterized by a strong decrease in fatty acid contents. TE-induced oxidative stress in leaves was confirmed by an increase in the lipid peroxidation biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA). TE contamination decreased the GSSG/GSH ratio in the leaves of exposed plants, while peroxidase (PO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were increased in leaves and in whole plants, respectively. AMF inoculation also increased root colonization in the presence of TE contamination. The mycorrhizal colonization determined a decrease in SOD activity in the whole plant and PO activities in leaves and induced a significant increase in the fatty acid content in leaves and a decrease in MDA formation in whole plants. These results suggested that mycorrhization is able to confer protection against oxidative stress induced by soil pollution. Our findings suggest that mycorrhizal inoculation could be used as a bioaugmentation technique, facilitating Miscanthus cultivation on highly TE-contaminated soil.

  20. PDGF-mediated protection of SH-SY5Y cells against Tat toxin involves regulation of extracellular glutamate and intracellular calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Xuhui; Yao Honghong; Peng Fuwang; Callen, Shannon; Buch, Shilpa

    2009-10-15

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) protein Tat has been implicated in mediating neuronal apoptosis, one of the hallmark features of HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Mitigation of the toxic effects of Tat could thus be a potential mechanism for reducing HIV toxicity in the brain. In this study we demonstrated that Tat-induced neurotoxicity was abolished by NMDA antagonist-MK801, suggesting the role of glutamate in this process. Furthermore, we also found that pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with PDGF exerted protection against Tat toxicity by decreasing extracellular glutamate levels. We also demonstrated that extracellular calcium chelator EGTA was able to abolish PDGF-mediated neuroprotection, thereby underscoring the role of calcium signaling in PDGF-mediated neuroprotection. We also showed that Erk signaling pathway was critical for PDGF-mediated protection of cells. Additionally, blocking calcium entry with EGTA resulted in suppression of PDGF-induced Erk activation. These findings thus underscore the role of PDGF-mediated calcium signaling and Erk phosphorylation in the protection of cells against HIV Tat toxicity.

  1. IDO1 and TGF-β Mediate Protective Effects of IFN-α in Antigen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pallotta, Maria Teresa; Narendra, Sudeep Chenna; Carlsson, Björn; Iacono, Alberta; Namale, Joanitah; Boon, Louis; Grohmann, Ursula; Magnusson, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    IFN-α prevents Ag-induced arthritis (AIA), and in this study we investigated the role of IDO1 and TGF-β signaling for this anti-inflammatory property of IFN-α. Arthritis was induced by methylated BSA (mBSA) in mBSA-sensitized wild-type (WT), Ido1−/−, or Ifnar−/− mice, treated or not with IFN-α or the IDO1 product kynurenine (Kyn). Enzymatic IDO1 activity, TGF-β, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) were neutralized by 1-methyltryptophan and Abs against TGF-β and pDC, respectively. IDO1 expression was determined by RT-PCR, Western blot, and FACS, and enzymatic activity by HPLC. Proliferation was measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation and TGF-β by RT-PCR and ELISA. WT but not Ido1−/− mice were protected from AIA by IFN-α, and Kyn, the main IDO1 product, also prevented AIA, both in WT and Ifnar−/− mice. Protective treatment with IFN-α increased the expression of IDO1 in pDC during AIA, and Ab-mediated depletion of pDC, either during mBSA sensitization or after triggering of arthritis, completely abrogated the protective effect of IFN-α. IFN-α treatment also increased the enzymatic IDO1 activity (Kyn/tryptophan ratio), which in turn activated production of TGF-β. Neutralization of enzymatic IDO1 activity or TGF-β signaling blocked the protective effect of IFN-α against AIA, but only during sensitization and not after triggering of arthritis. Likewise, inhibition of the IDO1 enzymatic activity in the sensitization phase, but not after triggering of arthritis, subdued the IFN-α–induced inhibition of mBSA-induced proliferation. In conclusion, presence of IFN-α at Ag sensitization activates an IDO1/TGF-β–dependent anti-inflammatory program that upon antigenic rechallenge prevents inflammation via pDC. PMID:27647832

  2. Birth of Three Stowaway-like MITE Families via Microhomology-Mediated Miniaturization of a Tc1/Mariner Element in the Yellow Fever Mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guojun; Fattash, Isam; Lee, Chia-Ni; Liu, Kun; Cavinder, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain numerous DNA transposons that move by a cut-and-paste mechanism. The majority of these elements are self-insufficient and dependent on their autonomous relatives to transpose. Miniature inverted repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are often the most numerous nonautonomous DNA elements in a higher eukaryotic genome. Little is known about the origin of these MITE families as few of them are accompanied by their direct ancestral elements in a genome. Analyses of MITEs in the yellow fever mosquito identified its youngest MITE family, designated as Gnome, that contains at least 116 identical copies. Genome-wide search for direct ancestral autonomous elements of Gnome revealed an elusive single copy Tc1/Mariner-like element, named as Ozma, that encodes a transposase with a DD37E triad motif. Strikingly, Ozma also gave rise to two additional MITE families, designated as Elf and Goblin. These three MITE families were derived at different times during evolution and bear internal sequences originated from different regions of Ozma. Upon close inspection of the sequence junctions, the internal deletions during the formation of these three MITE families always occurred between two microhomologous sites (6–8 bp). These results suggest that multiple MITE families may originate from a single ancestral autonomous element, and formation of MITEs can be mediated by sequence microhomology. Ozma and its related MITEs are exceptional candidates for the long sought-after endogenous active transposon tool in genetic control of mosquitoes. PMID:24068652

  3. Protective and damaging effects of stress mediators: central role of the brain

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Bruce S.

    2006-01-01

    The mind involves the whole body, and two-way communication between the brain and the cardiovascular, immune, and other systems via neural and endocrine mechanisms. Stress is a condition of the mind-body interaction, and a factor in the expression of disease that differs among individuals. It is not just the dramatic stressful events that exact their toll, but rather the many events of daily life that elevate and sustain activities of physiological systems and cause sleep deprivation, overeating, and other health-damaging behaviors, producing the feeling of being “stressed out.” Over time, this results in wear and tear on the body, which is called “allostatic load,” and it reflects not only the impact of life experiences but also of genetic load, individual lifestyle habits reflecting items such as diet, exercise, and substance abuse, and developmental experiences that set life-long patterns of behavior and physiological reactivity. Hormones associated with stress and allostatic load protect the body in the short run and promote adaptation by the process known as allostasis, but in the long run allostatic load causes changes in the body that can lead to disease. The brain is the key organ of stress, allostasis, and allostatic load, because it determines what is threatening and therefore stressful, and also determines the physiological and behavioral responses. Brain regions such as the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex respond to acute and chronic stress by undergoing structural remodeling, which alters behavioral and physiological responses. Translational studies in humans with structural and functional imaging reveal smaller hippocampal volume in stress-related conditions, such as mild cognitive impairment in aging and prolonged major depressive illness, as well as in individuals with low self-esteem. Alterations in amygdala and prefrontal cortex are also reported. Besides Pharmaceuticals, approaches to alleviate chronic stress and reduce

  4. Protective effect of selenium on hemoglobin mediated lipid peroxidation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Simoni, J; Simoni, G; Garcia, E L; Prien, S D; Tran, R M; Feola, M; Shires, G T

    1995-01-01

    increased, but the creatinine and PaO2 was similar to that of the control and corresponded with histopathological findings. The liver and heart intracellular free Fe was found to be higher than that of control. Treatment with Se was very effective in the prevention of oxidative damage introduced by Hb. Full protection from MDA formation was noted in liver tissue (p < 0.001). Also, plasma levels of MDA, SGPT and LDH were significantly decreased and appeared similar to that of the control group (I). Treatment with Se increased liver (p < 0.05) and plasma (p < 0.1) level of GSH-Px.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7581833

  5. Effect of Selenium on the Levels of Cytokines and Trace Elements in Toxin-Mediated Oxidative Stress in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Ansar, S

    2016-01-01

    Selenium is an essential cofactor in the key enzymes involved in cellular antioxidant defense. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of selenium on mercury chloride (HgCl2)-induced toxicity. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups of six animals each. The first group was control; the second group was treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl2: 50 mg/kg/bw). The third group was treated with sodium selenite (Se 0.2 mg/kg/bw), and the fourth group received Se (0.2 mg/kg/bw) plus HgCl2 (50 mg/kg for 24 h). The influence of Se on mercury induced levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and zinc, copper, and iron in serum of rats were observed. The serum MDA, SOD, zinc, and iron concentrations were found to be statistically different among the control and toxin-treated group. The serum levels of IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α were also measured. There was a significant decrease in the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 in toxin-treated group II compared with that of the control group (p < 0.05). A significant increase in the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 after administration of Se seemed to counteract some of the damage, as indicated by differences in the serum concentrations of major elements. PMID:26089086

  6. β-Catenin is Essential for Ethanol Metabolism and Protection Against Alcohol-mediated Liver Steatosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiguang; Yeh, Tzu-Hsuan; Singh, Vijay P.; Shiva, Sruti; Krauland, Lindsay; Li, Huanan; Zhang, Pili; Kharbanda, Kusum; Ritov, Vladimir; Monga, Satdarshan P. S.; Scott, Donald K.; Eagon, Patricia K.; Behari, Jaideep

    2011-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress is implicated in alcohol-mediated liver injury. β-Catenin regulates hepatic metabolic zonation and adaptive response to oxidative stress. We hypothesized that β-catenin regulates the hepatic response to ethanol ingestion. Female liver-specific β-catenin knockout (KO) mice and wild type (WT) littermates were fed the Lieber-Decarli liquid diet (5% ethanol) in a pair-wise fashion. Liver histology, biochemistry, and gene expression studies were performed. Plasma alcohol and ammonia levels were measured using standard assays. Ethanol-fed KO mice exhibited systemic toxicity and early mortality. KO mice exhibited severe macrovesicular steatosis and five to six-fold higher serum ALT and AST levels. KO mice had modest increase in hepatic oxidative stress, lower expression of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD-2), and lower citrate synthase activity, the first step in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. N-Acetyl cysteine (NAC) did not prevent ethanol-induced mortality in KO mice. In WT livers, β-catenin was found to co-precipitate with FoxO3, the upstream regulator of SOD-2. Hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities and expression were lower in KO mice. Hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 protein levels were upregulated in ethanol-fed WT mice but were nearly undetectable in KO mice. These changes in ethanol-metabolizing enzymes were associated with 30-fold higher blood alcohol levels in KO mice. Conclusion β-catenin is essential for hepatic ethanol metabolism and plays a protective role in alcohol-mediated liver steatosis. Our results strongly suggest that integration of these functions by β-catenin is critical for adaptation to ethanol ingestion in vivo. PMID:22031168

  7. Insulin Receptor Substrate-1 Activation Mediated p53 Downregulation Protects Against Hypoxic-Ischemia in the Neonatal Brain.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yi-Fang; Jiang, Si-Tse; Chow, Yen-Hung; Huang, Chao-Ching; Ho, Chien-Jung; Chou, Ya-Ping

    2016-08-01

    This study determined if dietary restriction (DR) protects against hypoxic-ischemia (HI) in the neonatal brain via insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1)/Akt pathway-mediated downregulation of p53 in the neurovascular unit. On postnatal (P) day 7, HI was induced in rat pups grouped from P1 into normal litter size (NL, 12 pups/dam) and increased litter size (DR, 18 pups/dam). In vivo IRS-1 anti-sense oligonucleotide and IRS-1 overexpressed recombinant adenovirus were given, and neurovascular damage was assessed. In vitro models of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) examined the inhibition and overexpression of IRS-1 on p53 and cell death in neurons and endothelial cells. Compared to NL pups, DR pups had significantly higher IRS-1, p-IRS-1, and pAkt levels, decreased p53, more tight junction proteins, reduced blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage after HI, and less infarct volumes at P21. Immunofluorescence revealed that IRS-1 was upregulated in the endothelial cells and neurons of DR pups. IRS-1 downregulation in DR pups reduced p-Akt, increased p53, worsened BBB damage, and increased brain injury, whereas IRS-1 overexpression in NL pups upregulated p-Akt, decreased p53, attenuated BBB damage, and decreased brain injury. In vitro, IRS-1 downregulation aggravated cell death in neurons and endothelial cells and is associated with decreased p-Akt and increased p53. In contrast, IRS-1 overexpression reduced cell death in endothelial cells with increased p-Akt and decreased p53. In conclusion, DR reduces neurovascular damage after HI in the neonatal brain through an IRS-1/Akt-mediated p53 downregulation, suggesting that IRS-1 signaling is a therapeutic target for hypoxic brain injury in neonates.

  8. The materials and elements production practice of counter-erosional and thermal protection system of the SPR-solid-propellant sustainer nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkurenko, V. M.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents the production scheme for heat- and erosion-protective carbon plastic materials for heat shield elements of solid-propellant nozzles. Attention is also given the method of manufacturing adhesive joint assemblies, and the production scheme is included.

  9. Secretory IgA-mediated protection against V. cholerae and heat-labile enterotoxin-producing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli by rice-based vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tokuhara, Daisuke; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Nochi, Tomonori; Kodama, Toshio; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Takahashi, Yuko; Nanno, Masanobu; Nakanishi, Ushio; Takaiwa, Fumio; Honda, Takeshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2010-05-11

    Cholera and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are among the most common causes of acute infantile gastroenteritis globally. We previously developed a rice-based vaccine that expressed cholera toxin B subunit (MucoRice-CTB) and had the advantages of being cold chain-free and providing protection against cholera toxin (CT)-induced diarrhea. To advance the development of MucoRice-CTB for human clinical application, we investigated whether the CTB-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) induced by MucoRice-CTB gives longstanding protection against diarrhea induced by Vibrio cholerae and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT)-producing ETEC (LT-ETEC) in mice. Oral immunization with MucoRice-CTB stored at room temperature for more than 3 y provided effective SIgA-mediated protection against CT- or LT-induced diarrhea, but the protection was impaired in polymeric Ig receptor-deficient mice lacking SIgA. The vaccine gave longstanding protection against CT- or LT-induced diarrhea (for > or = 6 months after primary immunization), and a single booster immunization extended the duration of protective immunity by at least 4 months. Furthermore, MucoRice-CTB vaccination prevented diarrhea in the event of V. cholerae and LT-ETEC challenges. Thus, MucoRice-CTB is an effective long-term cold chain-free oral vaccine that induces CTB-specific SIgA-mediated longstanding protection against V. cholerae- or LT-ETEC-induced diarrhea.

  10. Stanniocalcin-1 Protects a Mouse Model from Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Affecting ROS-Mediated Multiple Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dajun; Shang, Huiping; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) protects against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (RIRI). However, the molecular mechanisms remain widely unknown. STC-1 inhibits reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas most ROS-mediated pathways are associated with ischemic injury. Therefore, to explore the mechanism, the effects of STC-1 on ROS-medicated pathways were studied. Non-traumatic vascular clamps were used to establish RIRI mouse models. The serum levels of STC-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon (IFN) γ, P53, and capase-3 were measured by ELISA kits. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured by fluorescence spectrofluorometer. All these molecules changed significantly in a RIRI model mouse when compared with those in a sham control. Kidney cells were isolated from sham and model mice. STC-1 was overexpressed or knockout in these kidney cells. The molecules in ROS-medicated pathways were measured by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot. The results showed that STC-1 is an effective ROS scavenger. The serum levels of STC-1, MDA and SOD activity were increased while the serum levels of IL-6, iIFN-γ, P53, and capase-3 were decreased in a model group when compared with a sham control (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the levels of STC-1,p53, phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (p-MEKK-1), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), IkB kinase (p-IKK), nuclear factor (NF) κB, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK-1) and caspase-3 changed significantly in kidney cells isolated from a RIRI model when compared to those isolated from a sham control (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, STC-1 overexpression or silence caused significant changes of the levels of these ROS-mediated molecules. Therefore, STC-1 maybe improve anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptosis activities by affecting ROS-mediated pathways, especially the phospho-modifications of the respective proteins, resulting in the increase of SOD and

  11. Stanniocalcin-1 Protects a Mouse Model from Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Affecting ROS-Mediated Multiple Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dajun; Shang, Huiping; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) protects against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (RIRI). However, the molecular mechanisms remain widely unknown. STC-1 inhibits reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas most ROS-mediated pathways are associated with ischemic injury. Therefore, to explore the mechanism, the effects of STC-1 on ROS-medicated pathways were studied. Non-traumatic vascular clamps were used to establish RIRI mouse models. The serum levels of STC-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon (IFN) γ, P53, and capase-3 were measured by ELISA kits. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured by fluorescence spectrofluorometer. All these molecules changed significantly in a RIRI model mouse when compared with those in a sham control. Kidney cells were isolated from sham and model mice. STC-1 was overexpressed or knockout in these kidney cells. The molecules in ROS-medicated pathways were measured by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot. The results showed that STC-1 is an effective ROS scavenger. The serum levels of STC-1, MDA and SOD activity were increased while the serum levels of IL-6, iIFN-γ, P53, and capase-3 were decreased in a model group when compared with a sham control (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the levels of STC-1,p53, phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (p-MEKK-1), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), IkB kinase (p-IKK), nuclear factor (NF) κB, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK-1) and caspase-3 changed significantly in kidney cells isolated from a RIRI model when compared to those isolated from a sham control (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, STC-1 overexpression or silence caused significant changes of the levels of these ROS-mediated molecules. Therefore, STC-1 maybe improve anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptosis activities by affecting ROS-mediated pathways, especially the phospho-modifications of the respective proteins, resulting in the increase of SOD and

  12. Ethanol Extract of Cirsium japonicum var. ussuriense Kitamura Exhibits the Activation of Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2-dependent Antioxidant Response Element and Protects Human Keratinocyte HaCaT Cells Against Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ok-Kyung; Choi, Bu Young; Park, Jin-Oh; Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Byoung-Kwon; Joo, Chul Gue; Heo, Hyo-Jung; Keum, Young-Sam

    2016-01-01

    Keratinocytes are constantly exposed to extracellular insults, such as ultraviolet B, toxic chemicals and mechanical stress, all of which can facilitate the aging of keratinocytes via the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in protecting keratinocytes against oxidants and xenobiotics by binding to the antioxidant response element (ARE), a cis-acting element existing in the promoter of most phase II cytoprotective genes. In the present study, we have attempted to find novel ethanol extract(s) of indigenous plants of Jeju island, Korea that can activate the Nrf2/ARE-dependent gene expression in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. As a result, we identified that ethanol extract of Cirsium japonicum var. ussuriense Kitamura (ECJUK) elicited strong stimulatory effect on the ARE-dependent gene expression. Supporting this observation, we found that ECJUK induced the expression of Nrf2, hemoxygenase-1, and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 and this event was correlated with Akt1 phosphorylation. We also found that ECJUK increased the intracellular reduced glutathione level and suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol acetate-induced 8-hydroxyguanosine formation without affecting the overall viability. Collectively, our results provide evidence that ECJUK can protect against oxidative stress-mediated damages through the activation of Nrf2/ARE-dependent phase II cytoprotective gene expression. PMID:27051652

  13. Leflunomide or A77 1726 protect from acetaminophen-induced cell injury through inhibition of JNK-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition in immortalized human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Seah, Quee Ming; Tan, Rachel C.H.; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Beerheide, Walter; Boelsterli, Urs A. . E-mail: phcbua@nus.edu.sg

    2006-11-15

    Leflunomide, a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug, protects against T-cell-mediated liver injury by poorly understood mechanisms. The active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726 (teriflunomide) has been shown to inhibit stress-activated protein kinases (JNK pathway), which are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that leflunomide may protect from drugs that induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) by blocking the JNK signaling pathway. To this end, we exposed cultured immortalized human hepatocytes (HC-04) to the standard protoxicant drug acetaminophen (APAP), which induces CsA-sensitive mPT-mediated cell death. We determined the effects of leflunomide on the extent of APAP-induced hepatocyte injury and the upstream JNK-mediated mitochondrial signaling pathways. We found that leflunomide or A77 1726 concentration-dependently protected hepatocytes from APAP (1 mM)-induced mitochondrial permeabilization and lethal cell injury. This was not due to proximal inhibition of CYP-catalyzed APAP bioactivation to its thiol-reactive metabolite. Instead, we demonstrate that leflunomide (20 {mu}M) inhibited the APAP-induced early (3 h) activation (phosphorylation) of JNK1/2, thus inhibiting phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and preventing P-Bcl-2-mediated induction of the mPT. This greatly attenuated mitochondrial cytochrome c release, which we used as a marker for mitochondrial permeabilization. The specific JNK2 inhibitor SP600125 similarly protected from APAP-induced cell death. In conclusion, these findings are consistent with our hypothesis that leflunomide protects from protoxicant-induced hepatocyte injury by inhibiting JNK signaling and preventing mPT induction.

  14. Weak electromagnetic fields alter Ca(2+) handling and protect against hypoxia-mediated damage in primary newborn rat myotube cultures.

    PubMed

    Adler, Dana; Fixler, Dror; Scheinowitz, Mickey; Shainberg, Asher; Katz, Abram

    2016-08-01

    Weak electromagnetic fields (WEF) enhance Ca(2+) entry into cells via voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and affect various aspects of metabolism, structure, and function. However, little information is available on the effect of WEF on skeletal muscle, which depends primarily on intracellular Ca(2+) stores for function and metabolism. Here, we examine the effects of 30 min exposure of rat primary myotube cultures to WEF (1.75 μT, 16 Hz) on Ca(2+) handling and creatine kinase (CK) release. Free myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) i]) was measured with the ratiometric dye indo-1. WEF did not affect basal [Ca(2+)]i but decreased the twitch [Ca(2+)]i transient in a time-dependent manner, and the twitch amplitude was decreased to ∼30 % after 30 min. WEF completely abolished the increase in [Ca(2+)]i induced by potassium chloride (∼60 mM) but had no effect on the increase induced by caffeine (∼6 mM). Hypoxia (2 h exposure to 100 % argon) resulted in a marked loss of CK into the medium (400 % of normoxic value), as well as a rapid (within 20 min) and sustained increase in basal [Ca(2+)]i (∼20 % above baseline). However, during exposure to WEF, basal [Ca(2+)]i remained constant during the initial 60 min of hypoxia and, thereafter, increased to levels similar to those observed in the absence of WEF. Finally, WEF blocked about 80 % of hypoxia-mediated CK release (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that WEF inhibits increases in [Ca(2+)]i by interfering with muscle excitation and protects against muscle damage induced by hypoxia. Thus, WEF may have therapeutic/protective effects on skeletal muscle.

  15. Weak electromagnetic fields alter Ca(2+) handling and protect against hypoxia-mediated damage in primary newborn rat myotube cultures.

    PubMed

    Adler, Dana; Fixler, Dror; Scheinowitz, Mickey; Shainberg, Asher; Katz, Abram

    2016-08-01

    Weak electromagnetic fields (WEF) enhance Ca(2+) entry into cells via voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and affect various aspects of metabolism, structure, and function. However, little information is available on the effect of WEF on skeletal muscle, which depends primarily on intracellular Ca(2+) stores for function and metabolism. Here, we examine the effects of 30 min exposure of rat primary myotube cultures to WEF (1.75 μT, 16 Hz) on Ca(2+) handling and creatine kinase (CK) release. Free myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) i]) was measured with the ratiometric dye indo-1. WEF did not affect basal [Ca(2+)]i but decreased the twitch [Ca(2+)]i transient in a time-dependent manner, and the twitch amplitude was decreased to ∼30 % after 30 min. WEF completely abolished the increase in [Ca(2+)]i induced by potassium chloride (∼60 mM) but had no effect on the increase induced by caffeine (∼6 mM). Hypoxia (2 h exposure to 100 % argon) resulted in a marked loss of CK into the medium (400 % of normoxic value), as well as a rapid (within 20 min) and sustained increase in basal [Ca(2+)]i (∼20 % above baseline). However, during exposure to WEF, basal [Ca(2+)]i remained constant during the initial 60 min of hypoxia and, thereafter, increased to levels similar to those observed in the absence of WEF. Finally, WEF blocked about 80 % of hypoxia-mediated CK release (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that WEF inhibits increases in [Ca(2+)]i by interfering with muscle excitation and protects against muscle damage induced by hypoxia. Thus, WEF may have therapeutic/protective effects on skeletal muscle. PMID:27194243

  16. Intra-epithelial vaccination with COPV L1 DNA by particle-mediated DNA delivery protects against mucosal challenge with infectious COPV in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Stanley, M A; Moore, R A; Nicholls, P K; Santos, E B; Thomsen, L; Parry, N; Walcott, S; Gough, G

    2001-04-01

    Protection against viral challenge with canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was achieved by immunisation via particle-mediated DNA delivery (PMDD) of a plasmid encoding the COPV L1 gene to cutaneous and oral mucosal sites in beagle dogs. The initial dose of approximately 9 microg of DNA was followed by two booster doses at 6 week intervals. A similar approach was used to vaccinate a control group of animals with plasmid DNA encoding the Hepatitis B virus S gene. Following challenge at the oral mucosa with COPV all animals vaccinated with the COPV L1 gene were protected against disease. However five of six animals in the control group developed COPV induced papillomas at the oral mucosa. Both cell-mediated lymphoproliferative and humoral antibody responses to the DNA vaccine were observed. Our data indicate that PMDD of plasmid DNA can protect against mucosal challenge with papillomavirus. PMID:11282188

  17. Vaccination with Legionella pneumophila membranes induces cell-mediated and protective immunity in a guinea pig model of Legionnaires' disease. Protective immunity independent of the major secretory protein of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Blander, S J; Horwitz, M A

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the capacity of Legionella pneumophila membranes to induce cell-mediated immune responses and protective immunity in a guinea pig model of Legionnaires' disease. Guinea pigs immunized by aerosol with L. pneumophila membranes developed strong cell-mediated immune responses to L. pneumophila membranes as demonstrated by cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity and in vitro splenic lymphocyte proliferation. Guinea pigs immunized by aerosol or by subcutaneous inoculation with L. pneumophila membranes developed strong protective immunity against lethal aerosol challenge with L. pneumophila. Overall, in six independent experiments, 39 of 49 (80%) guinea pigs immunized with L. pneumophila membranes survived challenge compared with 2 of 40 (5%) sham-immunized controls (P = 2 x 10(-13). In contrast, guinea pigs immunized by aerosol with formalin-killed L. pneumophila did not develop either a strong cell-mediated immune response to L. pneumophila antigens or protective immunity to lethal aerosol challenge. The capacity of L. pneumophila membranes to induce protective immunity was independent of the major secretory protein of L. pneumophila, which we previously demonstrated is an immunoprotective molecule. Purified L. pneumophila membranes did not contain detectable major secretory protein (MSP) on immunoblots; immunization of guinea pigs with L. pneumophila membranes did not induce anti-MSP antibody; and guinea pigs developed comparable protective immunity after immunization with membranes from either an L. pneumophila strain that secretes the major secretory protein or an isogenic mutant that does not. This study demonstrates that (a) immunization with L. pneumophila membranes but not formalin-killed L. pneumophila induces strong cell-mediated immune responses and protective immunity, (b) L. pneumophila membranes contain immunoprotective molecules distinct from the major secretory protein of L. pneumophila, and (c) L. pneumophila membranes have potential as

  18. Protection from hypertension in mice by the Mediterranean diet is mediated by nitro fatty acid inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Rebecca L.; Rudyk, Olena; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Kamynina, Alisa; Yang, Jun; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Eaton, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is inhibited by electrophilic lipids by their adduction to Cys521 proximal to its catalytic center. This inhibition prevents hydrolysis of the enzymes’ epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) substrates, so they accumulate inducing vasodilation to lower blood pressure (BP). We generated a Cys521Ser sEH redox-dead knockin (KI) mouse model that was resistant to this mode of inhibition. The electrophilic lipid 10-nitro-oleic acid (NO2-OA) inhibited hydrolase activity and also lowered BP in an angiotensin II-induced hypertension model in wild-type (WT) but not KI mice. Furthermore, EET/dihydroxy-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid isomer ratios were elevated in plasma from WT but not KI mice following NO2-OA treatment, consistent with the redox-dead mutant being resistant to inhibition by lipid electrophiles. sEH was inhibited in WT mice fed linoleic acid and nitrite, key constituents of the Mediterranean diet that elevates electrophilic nitro fatty acid levels, whereas KIs were unaffected. These observations reveal that lipid electrophiles such as NO2-OA mediate antihypertensive signaling actions by inhibiting sEH and suggest a mechanism accounting for protection from hypertension afforded by the Mediterranean diet. PMID:24843165

  19. Moonlighting of Helicobacter pylori catalase protects against complement-mediated killing by utilising the host molecule vitronectin

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Corinna; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Ermert, David; Singh, Birendra; Su, Yu-Ching; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Blom, Anna M.; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important human pathogen and a common cause of peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Despite H. pylori provoking strong innate and adaptive immune responses, the bacterium is able to successfully establish long-term infections. Vitronectin (Vn), a component of both the extracellular matrix and plasma, is involved in many physiological processes, including regulation of the complement system. The aim of this study was to define a receptor in H. pylori that binds Vn and determine the significance of the interaction for virulence. Surprisingly, by using proteomics, we found that the hydrogen peroxide-neutralizing enzyme catalase KatA is a major Vn-binding protein. Deletion of the katA gene in three different strains resulted in impaired binding of Vn. Recombinant KatA was generated and shown to bind with high affinity to a region between heparin-binding domain 2 and 3 of Vn that differs from previously characterised bacterial binding sites on the molecule. In terms of function, KatA protected H. pylori from complement-mediated killing in a Vn-dependent manner. Taken together, the virulence factor KatA is a Vn-binding protein that moonlights on the surface of H. pylori to promote bacterial evasion of host innate immunity. PMID:27087644

  20. Berberine Protects Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells against LPS-Induced Apoptosis by Blocking JNK-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Junping; Wang, Lijun; Wang, Linyao; Qian, Senmi; Fang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor during the initiation of atherosclerosis. Berberine has a beneficial effect on endothelial function; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of berberine on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the molecular mechanisms mediating the effect. The effects of berberine on LPS-induced cell apoptosis and viability were measured with 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine staining, flow cytometry, and Cell Counting Kit-8 assays. The expression and/or activation of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins or signaling pathways, including caspase-3, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, were determined with western blotting. The malondialdehyde levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and production of proinflammatory cytokines were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The results demonstrated that berberine pretreatment protected HUVECs from LPS-induced apoptosis, attenuated LPS-induced injury, inhibited LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation, increased MCL-1 expression and SOD activity, and decreased proinflammatory cytokine production. The effects of berberine on LPS-treated HUVECs were prevented by SP600125, a JNK-specific inhibitor. Thus, berberine might be a potential candidate in the treatment of endothelial cell injury-related vascular diseases. PMID:27478481

  1. Lentiviral vector-mediated over-expression of Sox9 protected chondrocytes from IL-1β induced degeneration and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huading; Zeng, Chun; Chen, Mingwei; Lian, Liyi; Dai, Yuhu; Zhao, Huiqing

    2015-01-01

    To explore whether the over-expression of Sry-related HMG box (Sox9) in degenerative chondrocytes is able to improve cell regeneration and protects cells from inflammation induced apoptosis, we generated a Sox9 over-expressing vector delivery system in which the Sox9 gene was inserted into a lentiviral vector. After infecting mouse chondrocytes with the Sox9-encoding vector, we observed a high level of gene transduction efficiency and achieved a high level of Sox9 expression in the infected chondrocytes. To explore whether over-expression of Sox9 is able to induce cell regeneration and improve cell survival, we induced Sox9 over-expression by lentiviral vector infection 48 hours before IL-1β treatment. The cells were infected with the reporter gene GFP-encoded lentiviral vector as a negative control or left uninfected. 48-hours after IL-1β treatment, the chrondrocytes treated with IL-1β alone, underwent a degenerative process, with elevated expression of MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5 and ALP, but the cell specific anabolic proteins collagen II and aggrecan were significantly suppressed. The cells infected with the GFP reporter vector had no increased regeneration after IL-1β treatment. The results indicated that Sox9 is an important chondrocyte transcription factor, promoting chondrocyte regeneration and cell survival, which were mediated through affecting multiple cell differentiation as well as anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. PMID:26617711

  2. Transcription factor Six2 mediates the protection of GDNF on 6-OHDA lesioned dopaminergic neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J; Kang, X-y; Sun, S; Li, L; Zhang, B-l; Li, Y-q; Gao, D-s

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has strong neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects on dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the expression level of transcription factor Six2 was increased in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of Six2 resulted in decreased cell viability and increased the apoptosis of damaged DA neurons after GDNF treatment in vitro. In contrast, Six2 overexpression increased cell viability and decreased cell apoptosis. Furthermore, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) indicated that Six2 directly bound to the promoter CAGCTG sequence of smad ubiquitylation regulatory factor 1 (Smurf1). ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis showed that Smurf1 expression was significantly upregulated after GDNF rescue. Moreover, knockdown of Six2 decreased Smurf1 expression, whereas overexpression of Six2 increased Smurf1 expression in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue. Meanwhile, knockdown and overexpression of Smurf1 increased and decreased p53 expression, respectively. Taken together, our results from in vitro and in vivo analysis indicate that Six2 mediates the protective effects of GDNF on damaged DA neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression, which could be useful in identifying potential drug targets for injured DA neurons. PMID:27148690

  3. Transcription factor Six2 mediates the protection of GDNF on 6-OHDA lesioned dopaminergic neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; Kang, X-Y; Sun, S; Li, L; Zhang, B-L; Li, Y-Q; Gao, D-S

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has strong neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects on dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the expression level of transcription factor Six2 was increased in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of Six2 resulted in decreased cell viability and increased the apoptosis of damaged DA neurons after GDNF treatment in vitro. In contrast, Six2 overexpression increased cell viability and decreased cell apoptosis. Furthermore, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) indicated that Six2 directly bound to the promoter CAGCTG sequence of smad ubiquitylation regulatory factor 1 (Smurf1). ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis showed that Smurf1 expression was significantly upregulated after GDNF rescue. Moreover, knockdown of Six2 decreased Smurf1 expression, whereas overexpression of Six2 increased Smurf1 expression in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue. Meanwhile, knockdown and overexpression of Smurf1 increased and decreased p53 expression, respectively. Taken together, our results from in vitro and in vivo analysis indicate that Six2 mediates the protective effects of GDNF on damaged DA neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression, which could be useful in identifying potential drug targets for injured DA neurons. PMID:27148690

  4. Berberine Protects Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells against LPS-Induced Apoptosis by Blocking JNK-Mediated Signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junping; Wang, Lijun; Wang, Linyao; Qian, Senmi; Zhang, Dayong; Fang, Jie; Pan, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor during the initiation of atherosclerosis. Berberine has a beneficial effect on endothelial function; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of berberine on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the molecular mechanisms mediating the effect. The effects of berberine on LPS-induced cell apoptosis and viability were measured with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine staining, flow cytometry, and Cell Counting Kit-8 assays. The expression and/or activation of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins or signaling pathways, including caspase-3, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, were determined with western blotting. The malondialdehyde levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and production of proinflammatory cytokines were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The results demonstrated that berberine pretreatment protected HUVECs from LPS-induced apoptosis, attenuated LPS-induced injury, inhibited LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation, increased MCL-1 expression and SOD activity, and decreased proinflammatory cytokine production. The effects of berberine on LPS-treated HUVECs were prevented by SP600125, a JNK-specific inhibitor. Thus, berberine might be a potential candidate in the treatment of endothelial cell injury-related vascular diseases. PMID:27478481

  5. Helicobacter pylori-Mediated Protection from Allergy Is Associated with IL-10-Secreting Peripheral Blood Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Khiyam; Letley, Darren P.; Greenaway, A. Borgel; Kenefeck, Rupert; Winter, Jody A.; Tomlinson, William; Rhead, Joanne; Staples, Emily; Kaneko, Kazuyo; Atherton, John C.; Robinson, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections are usually established in early childhood and continuously stimulate immunity, including T-helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and regulatory T-cell (Treg) responses, throughout life. Although known to be the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, disease occurs in a minority of those who are infected. Recently, there has been much interest in beneficial effects arising from infection with this pathogen. Published data robustly show that the infection is protective against asthma in mouse models. Epidemiological studies show that H. pylori is inversely associated with human allergy and asthma, but there is a paucity of mechanistic data to explain this. Since Th1 and Treg responses are reported to protect against allergic responses, we investigated if there were links between the human systemic Th1 and Treg response to H. pylori and allergen-specific IgE levels. The human cytokine and T-cell responses were examined using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 49 infected and 58 uninfected adult patients. Concentrations of total and allergen-specific plasma IgE were determined by ELISA and ImmunoCAP assays. These responses were analyzed according to major virulence factor genotypes of the patients’ colonizing H. pylori strains. An in vitro assay was employed, using PBMCs from infected and uninfected donors, to determine the role of Treg cytokines in the suppression of IgE. Significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-secreting CD4+CD25hi Tregs, but not H. pylori-specific Th1 cells, were present in the peripheral blood of infected patients. Total and allergen-specific IgE concentrations were lower when there was a strong Treg response, and blocking IL-10 in vitro dramatically restored IgE responses. IgE concentrations were also significantly lower when patients were infected with CagA+ strains or those expressing the more active i1 form of VacA. The systemic IL-10+ Treg response is therefore likely to play a role in H. pylori-mediated

  6. Benzo(a)pyrene Induced p53 Mediated Male Germ Cell Apoptosis: Synergistic Protective Effects of Curcumin and Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Bhaswati; Chakraborty, Supriya; Ghosh, Debidas; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Parimal C.; Jana, Kuladip

    2016-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) is an environmental toxicant that induces male germ cell apoptosis. Curcumin and resveratrol are phytochemicals with cytoprotective and anti-oxidative properties. At the same time resveratrol is also a natural Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) antagonist. Our present study in isolated testicular germ cell population from adult male Wistar rats, highlighted the synergistic protective effect of curcumin and resveratrol against B(a)P induced p53 mediated germ cell apoptosis. Curcumin-resveratrol significantly prevented B(a)P induced decrease in sperm cell count and motility, as well as increased serum testosterone level. Curcumin-resveratrol co-treatment actively protected B(a)P induced testicular germ cell apoptosis. Curcumin-resveratrol co-treatment decreased the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins like cleaved caspase 3, 8 and 9, cleaved PARP, Apaf1, FasL, tBid. Curcumin-resveratrol co-treatment decreased Bax/Bcl2 ratio, mitochondria to cytosolic translocation of cytochrome c and activated the survival protein Akt. Curcumin-resveratrol decreased the expression of p53 dependent apoptotic genes like Fas, FasL, Bax, Bcl2, and Apaf1. B(a)P induced testicular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and oxidative stress were significantly ameliorated with curcumin and resveratrol. Curcumin-resveratrol co-treatment prevented B(a)P induced nuclear translocation of AhR and CYP1A1 (Cytochrome P4501A1) expression. The combinatorial treatment significantly inhibited B(a)P induced ERK 1/2, p38 MAPK and JNK 1/2 activation. B(a)P treatment increased the expression of p53 and its phosphorylation (p53 ser 15). Curcumin-resveratrol co-treatment significantly decreased p53 level and its phosphorylation (p53 ser 15). The study concludes that curcumin-resveratrol synergistically modulated MAPKs and p53, prevented oxidative stress, regulated the expression of pro and anti-apoptotic proteins as well as the proteins involved in B(a)P metabolism thus protected germ

  7. Helicobacter pylori-Mediated Protection from Allergy Is Associated with IL-10-Secreting Peripheral Blood Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Khiyam; Letley, Darren P; Greenaway, A Borgel; Kenefeck, Rupert; Winter, Jody A; Tomlinson, William; Rhead, Joanne; Staples, Emily; Kaneko, Kazuyo; Atherton, John C; Robinson, Karen

    2016-01-01

    . pylori-mediated protection against allergy in humans.

  8. Benzo(a)pyrene Induced p53 Mediated Male Germ Cell Apoptosis: Synergistic Protective Effects of Curcumin and Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Bhaswati; Chakraborty, Supriya; Ghosh, Debidas; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Parimal C; Jana, Kuladip

    2016-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) is an environmental toxicant that induces male germ cell apoptosis. Curcumin and resveratrol are phytochemicals with cytoprotective and anti-oxidative properties. At the same time resveratrol is also a natural Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) antagonist. Our present study in isolated testicular germ cell population from adult male Wistar rats, highlighted the synergistic protective effect of curcumin and resveratrol against B(a)P induced p53 mediated germ cell apoptosis. Curcumin-resveratrol significantly prevented B(a)P induced decrease in sperm cell count and motility, as well as increased serum testosterone level. Curcumin-resveratrol co-treatment actively protected B(a)P induced testicular germ cell apoptosis. Curcumin-resveratrol co-treatment decreased the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins like cleaved caspase 3, 8 and 9, cleaved PARP, Apaf1, FasL, tBid. Curcumin-resveratrol co-treatment decreased Bax/Bcl2 ratio, mitochondria to cytosolic translocation of cytochrome c and activated the survival protein Akt. Curcumin-resveratrol decreased the expression of p53 dependent apoptotic genes like Fas, FasL, Bax, Bcl2, and Apaf1. B(a)P induced testicular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and oxidative stress were significantly ameliorated with curcumin and resveratrol. Curcumin-resveratrol co-treatment prevented B(a)P induced nuclear translocation of AhR and CYP1A1 (Cytochrome P4501A1) expression. The combinatorial treatment significantly inhibited B(a)P induced ERK 1/2, p38 MAPK and JNK 1/2 activation. B(a)P treatment increased the expression of p53 and its phosphorylation (p53 ser 15). Curcumin-resveratrol co-treatment significantly decreased p53 level and its phosphorylation (p53 ser 15). The study concludes that curcumin-resveratrol synergistically modulated MAPKs and p53, prevented oxidative stress, regulated the expression of pro and anti-apoptotic proteins as well as the proteins involved in B(a)P metabolism thus protected germ

  9. Parental Protectiveness Mediates the Association between Parent-Perceived Child Self-Efficacy and Health Outcomes in Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder.

    PubMed

    DuPen, Melissa M; van Tilburg, Miranda A L; Langer, Shelby L; Murphy, Tasha B; Romano, Joan M; Levy, Rona L

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that parental protectiveness is associated with increased pain and disability in Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder (FAPD) but the role that perceived child self-efficacy may play remains unclear. One reason why parents may react protectively towards their child's pain is that they perceive their child to be unable to cope or function normally while in pain (perceived low self-efficacy). This study sought to examine (a) the association between parent-perceived child pain self-efficacy and child health outcomes (symptom severity and disability); and (b) the role of parental protectiveness as a mediator of this association. Participants were 316 parents of children aged 7-12 years with FAPD. Parents completed measures of perceived child self-efficacy when in pain, their own protective responses to their child's pain, child gastrointestinal (GI) symptom severity, and child functional disability. Parent-perceived child self-efficacy was inversely associated with parent-reported child GI symptom severity and disability, and parental protectiveness mediated these associations. These results suggest that parents who perceive their child to have low self-efficacy to cope with pain respond more protectively when they believe he/she is in pain, and this, in turn, is associated with higher levels of GI symptoms and disability in their child. This finding suggests that directly addressing parent beliefs about their child's ability to manage pain should be included as a component of FAPD, and potentially other child treatment interventions. PMID:27657151

  10. Negundoside, an iridiod glycoside from leaves of Vitex negundo, protects human liver cells against calcium-mediated toxicity induced by carbon tetrachloride

    PubMed Central

    Tasduq, Sheikh A; Kaiser, Peerzada J; Gupta, Bishan D; Gupta, Vijay K; Johri, Rakesh K

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the protective effect of 2'-p-hydroxybenzoylmussaenosidic acid [negundoside (NG), against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced toxicity in HuH-7 cells. METHODS: CCl4 is a well characterized hepatotoxin, and inducer of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1)-mediated oxidative stress. In addition, lipid peroxidation and accumulation of intracellular calcium are important steps in the pathway involved in CCl4 toxicity. Liver cells (HuH-7) were treated with CCl4, and the mechanism of the cytoprotective effect of NG was assessed. Silymarin, a known hepatoprotective drug, was used as control. RESULTS: NG protected HuH-7 cells against CCl4 toxicity and loss of viability without modulating CYP2E1 activity. Prevention of CCl4 toxicity was associated with a reduction in oxidative damage as reflected by decreased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a decrease in lipid peroxidation and accumulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels and maintenance of intracellular glutathione homeostasis. Decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), induction of caspases mediated DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest, as a result of CCl4 treatment, were also blocked by NG. The protection afforded by NG seemed to be mediated by activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis and inhibition of phospholipases (cPLA2). CONCLUSION: NG exerts a protective effect on CYP2E1-dependent CCl4 toxicity via inhibition of lipid peroxidation, followed by an improved intracellular calcium homeostasis and inhibition of Ca2+-dependent proteases. PMID:18595136

  11. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated cytotoxicity of rat endothelial cells: Changes in ATP and purine products and the effects of protective interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, D.F.; Varanl, J.; Phan, S.H.; Ward, P.A. )

    1990-02-26

    Hydrogen peroxide-mediated cytotoxicity (as measured by {sup 51}Cr-release) of rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells was time-dependent and related to the concentration of peroxide employed. The cytotoxic effects of hydrogen peroxide were, as expected, prevented by catalase and the degree of protection was directly related to its time of addition. Endothelial cells were incubated with {sup 14}C-adenosine to achieve intracellular labeling of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), following which the cells were washed and exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Based on analysis of cell extracts by high-performance liquid chromatography, there was a time-dependent loss of intracellular radioactivity and ATP with the simultaneous appearance of purine degradation products including xanthine/hypoxanthine. The extracellular fluid of cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide contained significant amounts of xanthine/hypoxanthine. The ferric iron chelator deferoxamine provided almost complete protection against hydrogen peroxide-mediated cytotoxicity. Two inhibitors of xanthine oxidase-(allopurinol and oxypurinol) were protective as was deoxycoformycin, an inhibitor of adenosine deaminase. Remarkably, cells protected by these agents showed the same loss of intracellular ATP as unprotected, hydrogen peroxide-treated cells. These findings demonstrate the dissociation between ATP loss per se and oxidant mediated cytotoxicity of endothelial cells.

  12. Induction of activation of the antioxidant response element and stabilization of Nrf2 by 3-(3-pyridylmethylidene)-2-indolinone (PMID) confers protection against oxidative stress-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jia-Wei; Liu, Jing; Kong, Xiang-Zhen; Zhang, Shou-Guo; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Yu, Miao; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Li, Wei; Xu, Wang-Xiang; Tang, Liu-Jun; Ge, Chang-Hui; Wang, Lin; Li, Chang-Yan; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2012-03-01

    The antioxidant response elements (ARE) are a cis-acting enhancer sequence located in regulatory regions of antioxidant and detoxifying genes. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a member of the Cap ‘n’ Collar family of transcription factors that binds to the ARE and regulates the transcription of specific ARE-containing genes. Under oxidative stress, Nrf2/ARE induction is fundamental to defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and serves as a key factor in the protection against toxic xenobiotics. 3-(3-Pyridylmethylidene)-2-Indolinone (PMID) is a derivative of 2-indolinone compounds which act as protein kinase inhibitors and show anti-tumor activity. However, the role of PMID in the oxidative stress remains unknown. In the present study, we showed that PMID induced the activation of ARE-mediated transcription, increased the DNA-binding activity of Nrf2 and then up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes such as HO-1, SOD, and NQO1. The level of Nrf2 protein was increased in cells treated with PMID by a post-transcriptional mechanism. Under CHX treatment, the stability of Nrf2 protein was enhanced by PMID with decreased turnover rate. We showed that PMID reduced the ubiquitination of Nrf2 and disrupted the Cullin3 (Cul3)-Keap1 interaction. Furthermore, cells treated with PMID showed resistance to cytotoxicity by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and pro-oxidant 6-OHDA. PMID also up-regulated the antioxidant level in BALB/c mice. Taken together, the compound PMID induces the ARE-mediated gene expression through stabilization of Nrf2 protein and activation of Nrf2/ARE pathway and protects against oxidative stress-mediated cell death. -- Highlights: ► PMID up-regulates ARE-mediated antioxidant gene expression in vitro and in vivo. ► PMID enhances the stabilization of Nrf2 protein, decreasing Nrf2 turnover rate. ► PMID disrupted the Cullin3 (Cul3)-Keap1 interaction. ► PMID protects against cell death induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and pro-oxidant 6

  13. Deletion of Rac1GTPase in the Myeloid Lineage Protects against Inflammation-Mediated Kidney Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Miki; Kurihara, Hidetake; Aiba, Atsu; Young, Morag J; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage-mediated inflammation has been implicated in various kidney diseases. We previously reported that Rac1, a Rho family small GTP-binding protein, was overactivated in several chronic kidney disease models, and that Rac1 inhibitors ameliorated renal injury, in part via inhibition of inflammation, but the detailed mechanisms have not been clarified. In the present study, we examined whether Rac1 in macrophages effects cytokine production and the inflammatory mechanisms contributing to kidney derangement. Myeloid-selective Rac1 flox control (M-Rac1 FC) and knockout (M-Rac1 KO) mice were generated using the cre-loxP system. Renal function under basal conditions did not differ between M-Rac1 FC and KO mice. Accordingly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-evoked kidney injury model was created. LPS elevated blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, enhanced expressions of kidney injury biomarkers, Kim-1 and Ngal, and promoted tubular injury in M-Rac1 FC mice. By contrast, deletion of myeloid Rac1 almost completely prevented the LPS-mediated renal impairment. LPS triggered a marked induction of macrophage-derived inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNFα, in M-Rac1 FC mice, which was accompanied by Rac1 activation, stimulation of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, and reactive oxygen species overproduction. These changes were inhibited in M-Rac1 KO mice. LPS evoked F4/80-positive macrophages accumulation in the kidney, which was not affected by myeloid Rac1 deficiency. We further tested the role of Rac1 signaling in cytokine production using macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Exposure to LPS increased IL-6 and TNFα mRNA expression. The LPS-driven cytokine induction was dose-dependently blocked by the Rac1 inhibitor EHT1864, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium, and NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. In conclusion, genetic ablation of Rac1 in the myeloid lineage protected against LPS-induced renal inflammation and injury, by suppressing

  14. Deletion of Rac1GTPase in the Myeloid Lineage Protects against Inflammation-Mediated Kidney Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Miki; Kurihara, Hidetake; Aiba, Atsu; Young, Morag J; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage-mediated inflammation has been implicated in various kidney diseases. We previously reported that Rac1, a Rho family small GTP-binding protein, was overactivated in several chronic kidney disease models, and that Rac1 inhibitors ameliorated renal injury, in part via inhibition of inflammation, but the detailed mechanisms have not been clarified. In the present study, we examined whether Rac1 in macrophages effects cytokine production and the inflammatory mechanisms contributing to kidney derangement. Myeloid-selective Rac1 flox control (M-Rac1 FC) and knockout (M-Rac1 KO) mice were generated using the cre-loxP system. Renal function under basal conditions did not differ between M-Rac1 FC and KO mice. Accordingly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-evoked kidney injury model was created. LPS elevated blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, enhanced expressions of kidney injury biomarkers, Kim-1 and Ngal, and promoted tubular injury in M-Rac1 FC mice. By contrast, deletion of myeloid Rac1 almost completely prevented the LPS-mediated renal impairment. LPS triggered a marked induction of macrophage-derived inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNFα, in M-Rac1 FC mice, which was accompanied by Rac1 activation, stimulation of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, and reactive oxygen species overproduction. These changes were inhibited in M-Rac1 KO mice. LPS evoked F4/80-positive macrophages accumulation in the kidney, which was not affected by myeloid Rac1 deficiency. We further tested the role of Rac1 signaling in cytokine production using macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Exposure to LPS increased IL-6 and TNFα mRNA expression. The LPS-driven cytokine induction was dose-dependently blocked by the Rac1 inhibitor EHT1864, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium, and NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. In conclusion, genetic ablation of Rac1 in the myeloid lineage protected against LPS-induced renal inflammation and injury, by suppressing

  15. Deletion of Rac1GTPase in the Myeloid Lineage Protects against Inflammation-Mediated Kidney Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagase, Miki; Kurihara, Hidetake; Aiba, Atsu; Young, Morag J.; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage-mediated inflammation has been implicated in various kidney diseases. We previously reported that Rac1, a Rho family small GTP-binding protein, was overactivated in several chronic kidney disease models, and that Rac1 inhibitors ameliorated renal injury, in part via inhibition of inflammation, but the detailed mechanisms have not been clarified. In the present study, we examined whether Rac1 in macrophages effects cytokine production and the inflammatory mechanisms contributing to kidney derangement. Myeloid-selective Rac1 flox control (M-Rac1 FC) and knockout (M-Rac1 KO) mice were generated using the cre-loxP system. Renal function under basal conditions did not differ between M-Rac1 FC and KO mice. Accordingly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-evoked kidney injury model was created. LPS elevated blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, enhanced expressions of kidney injury biomarkers, Kim-1 and Ngal, and promoted tubular injury in M-Rac1 FC mice. By contrast, deletion of myeloid Rac1 almost completely prevented the LPS-mediated renal impairment. LPS triggered a marked induction of macrophage-derived inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNFα, in M-Rac1 FC mice, which was accompanied by Rac1 activation, stimulation of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, and reactive oxygen species overproduction. These changes were inhibited in M-Rac1 KO mice. LPS evoked F4/80-positive macrophages accumulation in the kidney, which was not affected by myeloid Rac1 deficiency. We further tested the role of Rac1 signaling in cytokine production using macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Exposure to LPS increased IL-6 and TNFα mRNA expression. The LPS-driven cytokine induction was dose-dependently blocked by the Rac1 inhibitor EHT1864, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium, and NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. In conclusion, genetic ablation of Rac1 in the myeloid lineage protected against LPS-induced renal inflammation and injury, by suppressing

  16. Human Papillomavirus E6 Knockdown Restores Adenovirus Mediated-estrogen Response Element Linked p53 Gene Transfer in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Kajitani, Koji; Honda, Ken-Ichi; Terada, Hiroyuki; Yasui, Tomoyo; Sumi, Toshiyuki; Koyama, Masayasu; Ishiko, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    The p53 gene is inactivated by the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 protein in the majority of cervical cancers. Treatment of HeLa S3 cells with siRNA for HPV E6 permitted adenovirus-mediated transduction of a p53 gene linked to an upstream estrogen response element (ERE). Our previous study in non-siRNA treated HHUA cells, which are derived from an endometrial cancer and express estrogen receptor β, showed enhancing effects of an upstream ERE on adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction. In HeLa S3 cells treated with siRNA for HPV E6, adenovirus-mediated transduction was enhanced by an upstream ERE linked to a p53 gene carrying a proline variant at codon 72, but not for a p53 gene with arginine variant at codon 72. Expression levels of p53 mRNA and Coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (CAR) mRNA after adenovirus-mediated transfer of an ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) were higher compared with those after non-ERE-linked p53 gene transfer in siRNA-treated HeLa S3 cells. Western blot analysis showed lower β-tubulin levels and comparatively higher p53/β-tubulin or CAR /β-tubulin ratios in siRNA-treated HeLa S3 cells after adenovirus-mediated ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) transfer compared with those in non-siRNA-treated cells. Apoptosis, as measured by annexin V binding, was higher after adenovirus-mediated ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) transfer compared with that after non-ERE-linked p53 gene transfer in siRNA-treated cells.

  17. Lineage-specific compaction of Tcrb requires a chromatin barrier to protect the function of a long-range tethering element

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Kinjal; Koues, Olivia I.; Chan, Elizabeth A.W.; Kyle, Katherine E.; Horowitz, Julie E.; Yang-Iott, Katherine; Bassing, Craig H.; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Krangel, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulation relies on dynamic changes in three-dimensional chromatin conformation, which are shaped by composite regulatory and architectural elements. However, mechanisms that govern such conformational switches within chromosomal domains remain unknown. We identify a novel mechanism by which cis-elements promote long-range interactions, inducing conformational changes critical for diversification of the TCRβ antigen receptor locus (Tcrb). Association between distal Vβ gene segments and the highly expressed DβJβ clusters, termed the recombination center (RC), is independent of enhancer function and recruitment of V(D)J recombinase. Instead, we find that tissue-specific folding of Tcrb relies on two distinct architectural elements located upstream of the RC. The first, a CTCF-containing element, directly tethers distal portions of the Vβ array to the RC. The second element is a chromatin barrier that protects the tether from hyperactive RC chromatin. When the second element is removed, active RC chromatin spreads upstream, forcing the tether to serve as a new barrier. Acquisition of barrier function by the CTCF element disrupts contacts between distal Vβ gene segments and significantly alters Tcrb repertoires. Our findings reveal a separation of function for RC-flanking regions, in which anchors for long-range recombination must be cordoned off from hyperactive RC landscapes by chromatin barriers. PMID:25512470

  18. The Axial Element Protein DESYNAPTIC2 Mediates Meiotic Double-Strand Break Formation and Synaptonemal Complex Assembly in Maize[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Yu-Hsin; Ku, Jia-Chi; Lin, Chien-Yu; Meeley, Robert

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair and recombine via repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSBs are formed in the context of chromatin loops, which are anchored to the proteinaceous axial element (AE). The AE later serves as a framework to assemble the synaptonemal complex (SC) that provides a transient but tight connection between homologous chromosomes. Here, we showed that DESYNAPTIC2 (DSY2), a coiled-coil protein, mediates DSB formation and is directly involved in SC assembly in maize (Zea mays). The dsy2 mutant exhibits homologous pairing defects, leading to sterility. Analyses revealed that DSB formation and the number of RADIATION SENSITIVE51 (RAD51) foci are largely reduced, and synapsis is completely abolished in dsy2 meiocytes. Super-resolution structured illumination microscopy showed that DSY2 is located on the AE and forms a distinct alternating pattern with the HORMA-domain protein ASYNAPTIC1 (ASY1). In the dsy2 mutant, localization of ASY1 is affected, and loading of the central element ZIPPER1 (ZYP1) is disrupted. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments further demonstrated that ZYP1 interacts with DSY2 but does not interact with ASY1. Therefore, DSY2, an AE protein, not only mediates DSB formation but also bridges the AE and central element of SC during meiosis. PMID:26296964

  19. No Effect of Remote Ischemic Conditioning Strategies on Recovery from Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Protective Molecular Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Kristensen, Marie Louise Vindvad; Birn, Henrik; Jespersen, Bente; Nørregaard, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is the major cause of acute kidney injury. Remote ischemic conditioning (rIC) performed as brief intermittent sub-lethal ischemia and reperfusion episodes in a distant organ may protect the kidney against IRI. Here we investigated the renal effects of rIC applied either prior to (remote ischemic preconditioning; rIPC) or during (remote ischemic perconditioning; rIPerC) sustained ischemic kidney injury in rats. The effects were evaluated as differences in creatinine clearance (CrCl) rate, tissue tubular damage marker expression, and potential kidney recovery mediators. One week after undergoing right-sided nephrectomy, rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham (n = 7), ischemia and reperfusion (IR; n = 10), IR+rIPC (n = 10), and IR+rIPerC (n = 10). The rIC was performed as four repeated episodes of 5-minute clamping of the infrarenal aorta followed by 5-minute release either before or during 37 minutes of left renal artery clamping representing the IRI. Urine and blood were sampled prior to ischemia as well as 3 and 7 days after reperfusion. The kidney was harvested for mRNA and protein isolation. Seven days after IRI, the CrCl change from baseline values was similar in the IR (δ: 0.74 mL/min/kg [-0.45 to 1.94]), IR+rIPC (δ: 0.21 mL/min/kg [-0.75 to 1.17], p > 0.9999), and IR+rIPerC (δ: 0.41 mL/min/kg [-0.43 to 1.25], p > 0.9999) groups. Kidney function recovery was associated with a significant up-regulation of phosphorylated protein kinase B (pAkt), extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2), and heat shock proteins (HSPs) pHSP27, HSP32, and HSP70, but rIC was not associated with any significant differences in tubular damage, inflammatory, or fibrosis marker expression. In our study, rIC did not protect the kidney against IRI. However, on days 3–7 after IRI, all groups recovered renal function. This was associated with pAkt and pERK1/2 up-regulation and increased HSP expression at day 7. PMID:26720280

  20. No Effect of Remote Ischemic Conditioning Strategies on Recovery from Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Protective Molecular Mediators.

    PubMed

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Kristensen, Marie Louise Vindvad; Birn, Henrik; Jespersen, Bente; Nørregaard, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is the major cause of acute kidney injury. Remote ischemic conditioning (rIC) performed as brief intermittent sub-lethal ischemia and reperfusion episodes in a distant organ may protect the kidney against IRI. Here we investigated the renal effects of rIC applied either prior to (remote ischemic preconditioning; rIPC) or during (remote ischemic perconditioning; rIPerC) sustained ischemic kidney injury in rats. The effects were evaluated as differences in creatinine clearance (CrCl) rate, tissue tubular damage marker expression, and potential kidney recovery mediators. One week after undergoing right-sided nephrectomy, rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham (n = 7), ischemia and reperfusion (IR; n = 10), IR+rIPC (n = 10), and IR+rIPerC (n = 10). The rIC was performed as four repeated episodes of 5-minute clamping of the infrarenal aorta followed by 5-minute release either before or during 37 minutes of left renal artery clamping representing the IRI. Urine and blood were sampled prior to ischemia as well as 3 and 7 days after reperfusion. The kidney was harvested for mRNA and protein isolation. Seven days after IRI, the CrCl change from baseline values was similar in the IR (δ: 0.74 mL/min/kg [-0.45 to 1.94]), IR+rIPC (δ: 0.21 mL/min/kg [-0.75 to 1.17], p > 0.9999), and IR+rIPerC (δ: 0.41 mL/min/kg [-0.43 to 1.25], p > 0.9999) groups. Kidney function recovery was associated with a significant up-regulation of phosphorylated protein kinase B (pAkt), extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2), and heat shock proteins (HSPs) pHSP27, HSP32, and HSP70, but rIC was not associated with any significant differences in tubular damage, inflammatory, or fibrosis marker expression. In our study, rIC did not protect the kidney against IRI. However, on days 3-7 after IRI, all groups recovered renal function. This was associated with pAkt and pERK1/2 up-regulation and increased HSP expression at day 7. PMID:26720280

  1. Fire and Brimstone: The Microbially Mediated Formation of Elemental Sulfur Nodules from an Isotope and Major Element Study in the Paleo-Dead Sea

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tom; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Sivan, Orit

    2013-01-01

    We present coupled sulfur and oxygen isotope data from sulfur nodules and surrounding gypsum, as well as iron and manganese concentration data, from the Lisan Formation near the Dead Sea (Israel). The sulfur isotope composition in the nodules ranges between -9 and -11‰, 27 to 29‰ lighter than the surrounding gypsum, while the oxygen isotope composition of the gypsum is constant around 24‰. The constant sulfur isotope composition of the nodule is consistent with formation in an ‘open system’. Iron concentrations in the gypsum increase toward the nodule, while manganese concentrations decrease, suggesting a redox boundary at the nodule-gypsum interface during aqueous phase diagenesis. We propose that sulfur nodules in the Lisan Formation are generated through bacterial sulfate reduction, which terminates at elemental sulfur. We speculate that the sulfate-saturated pore fluids, coupled with the low availability of an electron donor, terminates the trithionate pathway before the final two-electron reduction, producing thionites, which then disproportionate to form abundant elemental sulfur. PMID:24098403

  2. The Bordetella pertussis Bps polysaccharide enhances lung colonization by conferring protection from complement-mediated killing.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Tridib; Johnson, John B; Kock, Nancy D; Parks, Griffith D; Deora, Rajendar

    2014-07-01

    Bordetella pertussis is a human-restricted Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes whooping cough or pertussis. Pertussis is the leading vaccine preventable disease that is resurging in the USA and other parts of the developed world. There is an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which B. pertussis evades killing and clearance by the complement system, a first line of host innate immune defence. The present study examined the role of the Bps polysaccharide to resist complement activity in vitro and in the mouse respiratory tract. The isogenic bps mutant strain containing a large non-polar in-frame deletion of the bpsA-D locus was more sensitive to serum and complement mediated killing than the WT strain. As determined by Western blotting, flow cytometry and electron microscopic studies, the heightened sensitivity of the mutant strain was due to enhanced deposition of complement proteins and the formation of membrane attack complex, the end-product of complement activation. Bps was sufficient to confer complement resistance as evidenced by a Bps-expressing Escherichia coli being protected by serum killing. Additionally, Western blotting and flow cytometry assays revealed that Bps inhibited the deposition of complement proteins independent of other B. pertussis factors. The bps mutant strain colonized the lungs of complement-deficient mice at higher levels than that observed in C57Bl/6 mice. These results reveal a previously unknown interaction between Bps and the complement system in controlling B. pertussis colonization of the respiratory tract. These findings also make Bps a potential target for the prevention and therapy of whooping cough.

  3. Complement Evasion Mediated by Enhancement of Captured Factor H: Implications for Protection of Self-Surfaces from Complement

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Andrew P.; Makou, Elisavet; Chen, Zhuo A.; Kerr, Heather; Richards, Anna; Rappsilber, Juri

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to evade annihilation by the vertebrate complement system, many microbes capture factor H (FH), the key soluble complement-regulating protein in human plasma. However, FH is normally an active complement suppressor exclusively on self-surfaces and this selective action of FH is pivotal to self versus non-self discrimination by the complement system. We investigated whether the bacterially captured FH becomes functionally enhanced and, if so, how this is achieved at a structural level. We found, using site-directed and truncation mutagenesis, surface plasmon resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cross-linking and mass spectrometry, that the N-terminal domain of Streptococcus pneumoniae protein PspC (PspCN) not only binds FH extraordinarily tightly but also holds it in a previously uncharacterized conformation. Functional enhancement arises from exposure of a C-terminal cryptic second binding site in FH for C3b, the activation-specific fragment of the pivotal complement component, C3. This conformational change of FH doubles its affinity for C3b and increases 5-fold its ability to accelerate decay of the binary enzyme (C3bBb) responsible for converting C3 to C3b in an amplification loop. Despite not sharing critical FH-binding residues, PspCNs from D39 and Tigr4 S. pneumoniae exhibit similar FH-anchoring and enhancing properties. We propose that these bacterial proteins mimic molecular markers of self-surfaces, providing a compelling hypothesis for how FH prevents complement-mediated injury to host tissue while lacking efficacy on virtually all other surfaces. In hemolysis assays with 2-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide–treated erythrocytes that recapitulate paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, PspCN enhanced protection of cells by FH, suggesting a new paradigm for therapeutic complement suppression. PMID:26459349

  4. Modelisation numerique et validation experimentale d'un systeme de protection contre le givre par elements piezoelectriques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Derek

    Le degivrage au moyen d'actuateurs piezoelectriques est considere comme une avenue prometteuse pour le developpement de systemes a faible consommation d'energie applicables aux helicopteres legers. Ce type de systeme excite des frequences de resonances d'une structure pour produire des deformations suffisantes pour rompre l'adherence de la glace. Par contre, la conception de tel systeme demeure generalement mal comprise. Ce projet de maitrise etudie l'utilisation de methodes numeriques pour assister la conception des systemes de protection contre le givre a base d'elements piezoelectriques. La methodologie retenue pour ce projet a ete de modeliser differentes structures simples et de simuler l'excitation harmonique des frequences de resonance au moyen d'actuateurs piezoelectriques. Le calcul des frequences de resonances ainsi que la simulation de leur excitation a ensuite ete validee a l'aide de montages experimentaux. La procedure a ete realisee pour une poutre en porte-a-faux et pour une plaque plane a l'aide du logiciel de calcul par elements finis, Abaqus. De plus, le modele de la plaque plane a ete utilise afin de realiser une etude parametrique portant sur le positionnement des actuateurs, l'effet de la rigidite ainsi que de l'epaisseur de la plaque. Finalement, la plaque plane a ete degivree en chambre climatique. Des cas de degivrage ont ete simules numeriquement afin d'etudier la possibilite d'utiliser un critere base sur la deformation pour predire le succes du systeme. La validation experimentale a confirme la capacite du logiciel a calculer precisement a la fois les frequences et les modes de resonance d'une structure et a simuler leur excitation par des actuateurs piezoelectriques. L'etude revele que la definition de l'amortissement dans le modele numerique est essentiel pour l'obtention de resultats precis. Les resultats de l'etude parametrique ont demontre l'importance de minimiser l'epaisseur et la rigidite afin de reduire la valeur des frequences

  5. The Hexane Fraction of cyperus rotundus Prevents Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Through the Inhibition of Liver X Receptor α-Mediated Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein-1c.

    PubMed

    Oh, Gyun-Sik; Yoon, Jin; Lee, Gang Gu; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seung-Whan

    2015-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to examine the effects of Cyperus rotundus (CR) rhizome on cellular lipogenesis and non-alcoholic/diet-induced fatty liver disease, and (2) to elucidate the molecular mechanism behind its actions. The present investigation showed that the hexane fraction of CR rhizome (CRHF) reduced the elevated transcription levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) in primary hepatocytes following exposure to the liver X receptor α (LXRα) agonist. The SREBP-1c gene is a master regulator of lipogenesis and a key target of LXRα. CRHF inhibited not only the LXRα-dependent activation of the synthetic LXR response element (LXRE) promoter, but also the activation of the natural SREBP-1c promoter. Moreover, CRHF decreased (a) the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the LXRE of the SREBP-1c gene; (b) the LXRα-dependent up-regulation of various lipogenic genes; and (c) the LXRα-mediated accumulation of triglycerides in primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, CRHF ameliorated fatty liver disease and reduced the expression levels of hepatic lipogenic genes in high sucrose diet (HSD)-fed mice. Interestingly, CRHF did not affect the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1, another important LXR target gene that is required for reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and protects against atherosclerosis. Taken together, these results suggest that CRHF might be a novel therapeutic remedy for fatty liver disease through the selective inhibition of the lipogenic pathway. PMID:25967664

  6. Membrane attack complex (MAC)-mediated damage to spermatozoa: protection of the cells by the presence on their membranes of MAC inhibitory proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, I A; Davies, A; Morgan, B P

    1992-01-01

    Although antibody and complement are known to cause immobilization and killing of spermatozoa in vitro the components of the complement system mediating these effects remain undefined. Here we have examined the effects of the membrane attack complex (MAC) on spermatozoa and demonstrate that spermatotoxic effects are dependent on assembly of the complete MAC. We subsequently examined the presence and functional significance of the complement regulatory proteins decay accelerating factor (DAF), MAC-inhibiting protein (MIP) and CD59 antigen on spermatozoa. Both DAF and CD59 antigen were present on the membranes of these cells. Neutralization of CD59 antigen with specific antibodies increased the susceptibility of the cells to MAC-mediated damage, suggesting a role for this molecule in the protection of spermatozoa from complement-mediated damage in the female reproductive tract. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:1374057

  7. Leptin receptor isoform 219.1: an example of protein evolution by LINE-1-mediated human-specific retrotransposition of a coding SVA element.

    PubMed

    Damert, Annette; Löwer, Johannes; Löwer, Roswitha

    2004-04-01

    Phylogenetically new insertions of repetitive sequences may contribute to genome evolution by altering the function of preexisting proteins. One example is the SVA sequence, which forms the C-terminal coding exon of the human leptin receptor isoform 219.1. Here, we report that the SVA insertion into the LEPR locus has occurred after divergence of humans and chimpanzees. The SVA element was inserted into a Hal-1/LINE element present in all monkeys and apes tested. Structural features point toward an integration event that was mediated by the L1 protein machinery acting in trans. Thus, our findings add evidence to the hypothesis that retrotransposition events are a driving force in genomic evolution and that the presence or absence of specific retroelements are one distinguishing feature that separates humans from chimpanzees.

  8. Chronic dietary supplementation with turmeric protects against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-mediated neurotoxicity in vivo: implications for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mythri, Rajeswara Babu; Veena, Jayagopalan; Harish, G; Shankaranarayana Rao, B S; Srinivas Bharath, M M

    2011-07-01

    Multiple pathways including oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage are implicated in neurodegeneration during Parkinson's disease (PD). The current PD drugs provide only symptomatic relief and have limitations in terms of adverse effects and inability to prevent neurodegeneration. Therefore, there is a demand for novel compound(s)/products that could target multiple pathways and protect the dying midbrain dopaminergic neurons, with potential utility as adjunctive therapy along with conventional drugs. Turmeric is a spice used in traditional Indian cuisine and medicine with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and potential neuroprotective properties. To explore the neuroprotective property of turmeric in PD, mice were subjected to dietary supplementation with aqueous suspensions of turmeric for 3 months, mimicking its chronic consumption and challenged in vivo with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Brain samples from untreated and treated groups were characterised based on mitochondrial complex I (CI) activity, protein nitration and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Chronic turmeric supplementation induced the enzyme activity of γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase, which in turn increased glutathione levels and protected against peroxynitrite-mediated inhibition of brain CI. These mice were also protected against MPTP-mediated protein nitration, CI inhibition and degeneration of substantia nigra neurons in the brain. We conclude that chronic dietary consumption of turmeric protects the brain against neurotoxic insults, with potential application in neurodegeneration. Further characterisation of the active constituents of turmeric that potentially promote neuroprotection could improve the utility of dietary turmeric in brain function and disease. PMID:21473798

  9. Protecting against peroxynitrite-mediated cytotoxicity in vascular smooth muscle cells via upregulating endogenous glutathione biosynthesis by 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhuoxiao; Li, Yunbo

    2004-01-01

    Peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) is critically involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Reaction with glutathione (GSH) was proposed to be a major detoxification pathway of ONOO(-) in the biological system. This study was undertaken to determine if chemically elevated intracellular GSH affords protection against ONOO(-)-mediated toxicity in vascular cells. Incubation of aortic smooth muscle A10 cells with 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T) led to a concentration- and time-dependent elevation of cellular GSH. Treatment of the cells with D3T also augmented protein and gene expression of gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase. To examine the effects of D3T-induced GSH on ONOO(-)-mediated toxicity, we pretreated A10 cells with D3T and then exposed them to either authentic ONOO(-) or the ONOO(-) generator, 3-morpholinosydnonimine. We observed that D3T pretreatment of A10 cells resulted in a significant protection against ONOO(-) cytotoxicity. Conversely, depletion of cellular GSH by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) caused a marked potentiation of ONOO(-) cytotoxicity. To further demonstrate the causal involvement of GSH induction in D3T cytoprotection, we cotreated A10 cells with BSO to abolish D3T-induced GSH elevation. BSO cotreatment was found to greatly reverse the protective effects of D3T on ONOO(-)-elicited cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that upregulating GSH biosynthesis by D3T results in a marked protection against ONOO(-)-induced toxicity in vascular cells.

  10. [The role of trace elements in radiation protection of plants and animals on radionuclide contaminated territories of Poles'e].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, I N; Lazarev, N M; Grusha, V V; Bidenko, V N

    2011-01-01

    The retrospective review and analysis of works on some physiologically active trace elements influence on the radionuclides transfer from soil to plants and with forage to animals are presented. Also reviewed is their radioresistance in the contaminated territories. It is shown that some elements--zinc, manganese, cobalt--being appled to the soil at seeding or spraying plants with aqueous solutions and also in complex compounds are capable of reducing significantly the 90Sr and 137Cs transit to agricultural plants, and with forage--into the animals bodies. We have also shown that trace elements reduce the effects of radiation injury. The mechanisms of the radioprotective action of trace elements are also discussed in the paper. PMID:21520614

  11. ZINC-mediated gene expression offers protection against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.J.; Walker, Paul A.; Brown, Ray W.; Hogstrand, Christer . E-mail: christer.hogstrand@kcl.ac.uk

    2005-06-15

    The ability of zinc to mobilize defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis was studied using a primary culture of rainbow trout gill cells. Gill cells were pretreated for 24 h with 100 {mu}M ZnSO{sub 4} followed by 24-h exposure to 100 or 200 {mu}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, or were subjected to 100 {mu}M ZnSO{sub 4} together with 100 or 200 {mu}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Metallothionein-A (MTA) and metallothionein-B (MTB) mRNA levels were increased after treatment with zinc or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, separately or in combination. Similarly, mRNA for glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) were increased in response to either zinc or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, or after sequential treatments with zinc followed by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The stimulatory effects of zinc or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on MTA, MTB, GST, and G6PD mRNA levels could be blocked by addition of the membrane permeable zinc chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN), suggesting that H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced upregulation of these genes is zinc-dependent. Pretreatment with zinc protected the cells from subsequent cell damage and apoptosis, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase leakage, mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity (MTT assay), caspase-3 activity, and DNA fragmentation. In contrast, when gill cells were coincubated with zinc and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at the same time, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} toxicity was higher than after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone. It is concluded that zinc had a direct pro-oxidant effect when administered together with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, but that pretreatment of zinc inhibited cytotoxicity and apoptosis through an indirect antioxidant action. We propose that the antioxidant action is manifested through zinc-dependent expression of several genes encoding antioxidant proteins (e.g., MTA, MTB, G6PD, and GST). Furthermore, the apparent zinc-dependency of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced expression of antioxidant genes suggests

  12. Parental Protectiveness Mediates the Association between Parent-Perceived Child Self-Efficacy and Health Outcomes in Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder

    PubMed Central

    DuPen, Melissa M.; van Tilburg, Miranda A. L.; Langer, Shelby L.; Murphy, Tasha B.; Romano, Joan M.; Levy, Rona L.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that parental protectiveness is associated with increased pain and disability in Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder (FAPD) but the role that perceived child self-efficacy may play remains unclear. One reason why parents may react protectively towards their child’s pain is that they perceive their child to be unable to cope or function normally while in pain (perceived low self-efficacy). This study sought to examine (a) the association between parent-perceived child pain self-efficacy and child health outcomes (symptom severity and disability); and (b) the role of parental protectiveness as a mediator of this association. Participants were 316 parents of children aged 7–12 years with FAPD. Parents completed measures of perceived child self-efficacy when in pain, their own protective responses to their child’s pain, child gastrointestinal (GI) symptom severity, and child functional disability. Parent-perceived child self-efficacy was inversely associated with parent-reported child GI symptom severity and disability, and parental protectiveness mediated these associations. These results suggest that parents who perceive their child to have low self-efficacy to cope with pain respond more protectively when they believe he/she is in pain, and this, in turn, is associated with higher levels of GI symptoms and disability in their child. This finding suggests that directly addressing parent beliefs about their child’s ability to manage pain should be included as a component of FAPD, and potentially other child treatment interventions. PMID:27657151

  13. Immunization with extracellular proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces cell-mediated immune responses and substantial protective immunity in a guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pal, P G; Horwitz, M A

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the capacity of a selected fraction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis extracellular proteins (EP) released into broth culture by mid-logarithmic-growth-phase organisms to induce cell-mediated immune responses and protective immunity in a guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis. Guinea pigs infected with M. tuberculosis by aerosol but not uninfected control guinea pigs exhibit strong cell-mediated immune responses to EP, manifest by dose-dependent cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity and splenic lymphocyte proliferation. Guinea pigs immunized subcutaneously with EP but not sham-immunized control guinea pigs also develop strong cell-mediated immune responses to EP, manifest by dose-dependent cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity and splenic lymphocyte proliferation. EP is nonlethal and nontoxic to guinea pigs upon subcutaneous immunization. Guinea pigs immunized with EP and then challenged with aerosolized M. tuberculosis exhibit protective immunity. In five independent experiments, EP-immunized guinea pigs were consistently protected against clinical illness, including weight loss. Compared with EP-immunized guinea pigs, sham-immunized control guinea pigs lost 12.9 +/- 2.0% (mean +/- SE) of their total weight. EP-immunized guinea pigs also had a 10-fold reduction in viable M. tuberculosis bacilli in their lungs and spleens (P = 0.004 and 0.001, respectively) compared with sham-immunized control animals. In the two experiments in which some guinea pigs died after aerosol challenge, EP-immunized animals were protected from death. Whereas all 12 (100%) EP-immunized guinea pigs survived challenge with aerosolized M. tuberculosis, only 6 of 12 (50%) sham-immunized control guinea pigs survived challenge (P = 0.007, Fisher exact test). This study demonstrates that actively growing M. tuberculosis cells release immunoprotective molecules extracellularly, that a subunit vaccine against tuberculosis is feasible, and that extracellular molecules of M

  14. ICESp1116, the genetic element responsible for erm(B)-mediated, inducible resistance to erythromycin in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Brenciani, Andrea; Tiberi, Erika; Morici, Eleonora; Oryasin, Erman; Giovanetti, Eleonora; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2012-12-01

    ICESp1116, responsible for erm(B)-mediated, inducible erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes, was comprehensively characterized, and its chromosomal integration site was determined. It displayed a unique mosaic organization consisting of a scaffold, related to TnGallo1 from Streptococcus gallolyticus, with two inserted fragments separated by IS1216. One fragment, containing erm(B), displayed high-level identity to a portion of the S. pyogenes plasmid pSM19035; the other, containing a truncated tet(M) gene, displayed high-level identity to the right-hand portion of Clostridium difficile Tn5397.

  15. Functional validation of mouse tyrosinase non-coding regulatory DNA elements by CRISPR–Cas9-mediated mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seruggia, Davide; Fernández, Almudena; Cantero, Marta; Pelczar, Pawel; Montoliu, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Newly developed genome-editing tools, such as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–Cas9 system, allow simple and rapid genetic modification in most model organisms and human cell lines. Here, we report the production and analysis of mice carrying the inactivation via deletion of a genomic insulator, a key non-coding regulatory DNA element found 5′ upstream of the mouse tyrosinase (Tyr) gene. Targeting sequences flanking this boundary in mouse fertilized eggs resulted in the efficient deletion or inversion of large intervening DNA fragments delineated by the RNA guides. The resulting genome-edited mice showed a dramatic decrease in Tyr gene expression as inferred from the evident decrease of coat pigmentation, thus supporting the functionality of this boundary sequence in vivo, at the endogenous locus. Several potential off-targets bearing sequence similarity with each of the two RNA guides used were analyzed and found to be largely intact. This study reports how non-coding DNA elements, even if located in repeat-rich genomic sequences, can be efficiently and functionally evaluated in vivo and, furthermore, it illustrates how the regulatory elements described by the ENCODE and EPIGENOME projects, in the mouse and human genomes, can be systematically validated. PMID:25897126

  16. Small heat shock proteins mediate cell-autonomous and -nonautonomous protection in a Drosophila model for environmental-stress-induced degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Fumiko; Koonce, Noelle L; Guo, Linda; Fatima, Shahroz; Qiu, Catherine; Moon, Mackenzie T; Zheng, Yunzhen; Ordway, Richard W

    2016-09-01

    Cell and tissue degeneration, and the development of degenerative diseases, are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that affect protein misfolding and proteotoxicity. To better understand the role of the environment in degeneration, we developed a genetic model for heat shock (HS)-stress-induced degeneration in Drosophila This model exhibits a unique combination of features that enhance genetic analysis of degeneration and protection mechanisms involving environmental stress. These include cell-type-specific failure of proteostasis and degeneration in response to global stress, cell-nonautonomous interactions within a simple and accessible network of susceptible cell types, and precise temporal control over the induction of degeneration. In wild-type flies, HS stress causes selective loss of the flight ability and degeneration of three susceptible cell types comprising the flight motor: muscle, motor neurons and associated glia. Other motor behaviors persist and, accordingly, the corresponding cell types controlling leg motor function are resistant to degeneration. Flight motor degeneration was preceded by a failure of muscle proteostasis characterized by diffuse ubiquitinated protein aggregates. Moreover, muscle-specific overexpression of a small heat shock protein (HSP), HSP23, promoted proteostasis and protected muscle from HS stress. Notably, neurons and glia were protected as well, indicating that a small HSP can mediate cell-nonautonomous protection. Cell-autonomous protection of muscle was characterized by a distinct distribution of ubiquitinated proteins, including perinuclear localization and clearance of protein aggregates associated with the perinuclear microtubule network. This network was severely disrupted in wild-type preparations prior to degeneration, suggesting that it serves an important role in muscle proteostasis and protection. Finally, studies of resistant leg muscles revealed that they sustain proteostasis and the microtubule

  17. Small heat shock proteins mediate cell-autonomous and -nonautonomous protection in a Drosophila model for environmental-stress-induced degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Fumiko; Koonce, Noelle L.; Guo, Linda; Fatima, Shahroz; Qiu, Catherine; Moon, Mackenzie T.; Zheng, Yunzhen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell and tissue degeneration, and the development of degenerative diseases, are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that affect protein misfolding and proteotoxicity. To better understand the role of the environment in degeneration, we developed a genetic model for heat shock (HS)-stress-induced degeneration in Drosophila. This model exhibits a unique combination of features that enhance genetic analysis of degeneration and protection mechanisms involving environmental stress. These include cell-type-specific failure of proteostasis and degeneration in response to global stress, cell-nonautonomous interactions within a simple and accessible network of susceptible cell types, and precise temporal control over the induction of degeneration. In wild-type flies, HS stress causes selective loss of the flight ability and degeneration of three susceptible cell types comprising the flight motor: muscle, motor neurons and associated glia. Other motor behaviors persist and, accordingly, the corresponding cell types controlling leg motor function are resistant to degeneration. Flight motor degeneration was preceded by a failure of muscle proteostasis characterized by diffuse ubiquitinated protein aggregates. Moreover, muscle-specific overexpression of a small heat shock protein (HSP), HSP23, promoted proteostasis and protected muscle from HS stress. Notably, neurons and glia were protected as well, indicating that a small HSP can mediate cell-nonautonomous protection. Cell-autonomous protection of muscle was characterized by a distinct distribution of ubiquitinated proteins, including perinuclear localization and clearance of protein aggregates associated with the perinuclear microtubule network. This network was severely disrupted in wild-type preparations prior to degeneration, suggesting that it serves an important role in muscle proteostasis and protection. Finally, studies of resistant leg muscles revealed that they sustain proteostasis and the

  18. A novel mechanism for the pyruvate protection against zinc-induced cytotoxicity: mediation by the chelating effect of citrate and isocitrate.

    PubMed

    Sul, Jee-Won; Kim, Tae-Youn; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jean; Suh, Young-Ah; Hwang, Jung Jin; Koh, Jae-Young

    2016-08-01

    Intracellular accumulation of free zinc contributes to neuronal death in brain injuries such as ischemia and epilepsy. Pyruvate, a glucose metabolite, has been shown to block zinc neurotoxicity. However, it is largely unknown how pyruvate shows such a selective and remarkable protective effect. In this study, we sought to find a plausible mechanism of pyruvate protection against zinc toxicity. Pyruvate almost completely blocked cortical neuronal death induced by zinc, yet showed no protective effects against death induced by calcium (ionomycin, NMDA) or ferrous iron. Of the TCA cycle intermediates, citrate, isocitrate, and to a lesser extent oxaloacetate, protected against zinc toxicity. We then noted with LC-MS/MS assay that exposure to pyruvate, and to a lesser degree oxaloacetate, increased levels of citrate and isocitrate, which are known zinc chelators. While pyruvate added only during zinc exposure did not reduce zinc toxicity, citrate and isocitrate added only during zinc exposure, as did extracellular zinc chelator CaEDTA, completely blocked it. Furthermore, addition of pyruvate after zinc exposure substantially reduced intracellular zinc levels. Our results suggest that the remarkable protective effect of pyruvate against zinc cytotoxicity may be mediated indirectly by the accumulation of intracellular citrate and isocitrate, which act as intracellular zinc chelators. PMID:27515054

  19. Prospective Relations among Fearful Temperament, Protective Parenting, and Social Withdrawal: The Role of Maternal Accuracy in a Moderated Mediation Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    Early social withdrawal and protective parenting predict a host of negative outcomes, warranting examination of their development. Mothers' accurate anticipation of their toddlers' fearfulness may facilitate transactional relations between toddler fearful temperament and protective parenting, leading to these outcomes. Currently, we followed 93…

  20. Prospective Relations among Fearful Temperament, Protective Parenting, and Social Withdrawal: The Role of Maternal Accuracy in a Moderated Mediation Framework

    PubMed Central

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    Early social withdrawal and protective parenting predict a host of negative outcomes, warranting examination of their development. Mothers’ accurate anticipation of their toddlers’ fearfulness may facilitate transactional relations between toddler fearful temperament and protective parenting, leading to these outcomes. Currently, we followed 93 toddlers (42 female; on average 24.76 months) and their mothers (9% underrepresented racial/ethnic backgrounds) over 3 years. We gathered laboratory observation of fearful temperament, maternal protective behavior, and maternal accuracy during toddlerhood and a multi-method assessment of children’s social withdrawal and mothers’ self-reported protective behavior at kindergarten entry. When mothers displayed higher accuracy, toddler fearful temperament significantly related to concurrent maternal protective behavior and indirectly predicted kindergarten social withdrawal and maternal protective behavior. These results highlight the important role of maternal accuracy in linking fearful temperament and protective parenting, which predict further social withdrawal and protection, and point to toddlerhood for efforts of prevention of anxiety-spectrum outcomes. PMID:21537895

  1. Activation of Tag1 transposable elements in Arabidopsis dedifferentiating cells and their regulation by CHROMOMETHYLASE 3-mediated CHG methylation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asif; Yadav, Narendra Singh; Morgenstern, Yaakov; Zemach, Assaf; Grafi, Gideon

    2016-10-01

    Dedifferentiation, that is, the acquisition of stem cell-like state, commonly induced by stress (e.g., protoplasting), is characterized by open chromatin conformation, a chromatin state that could lead to activation of transposable elements (TEs). Here, we studied the activation of the Arabidopsis class II TE Tag1, in which two copies, situated close to each other (near genes) on chromosome 1 are found in Landsberg erecta (Ler) but not in Columbia (Col). We first transformed protoplasts with a construct in which a truncated Tag1 (ΔTag1 non-autonomous) blocks the expression of a reporter gene AtMBD5-GFP and found a relatively high ectopic excision of ΔTag1 accompanied by expression of AtMBD5-GFP in protoplasts derived from Ler compared to Col; further increase was observed in ddm1 (decrease in DNA methylation1) protoplasts (Ler background). Ectopic excision was associated with transcription of the endogenous Tag1 and changes in histone H3 methylation at the promoter region. Focusing on the endogenous Tag1 elements we found low level of excision in Ler protoplasts, which was slightly and strongly enhanced in ddm1 and cmt3 (chromomethylase3) protoplasts, respectively, concomitantly with reduction in Tag1 gene body (GB) CHG methylation and increased Tag1 transcription; strong activation of Tag1 was also observed in cmt3 leaves. Notably, in cmt3, but not in ddm1, Tag1 elements were excised out from their original sites and transposed elsewhere in the genome. Our results suggest that dedifferentiation is associated with Tag1 activation and that CMT3 rather than DDM1 plays a central role in restraining Tag1 activation via inducing GB CHG methylation. PMID:27475038

  2. PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy play a protective role in manganese induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Tao; Mi, Lan; Wang, Ting; Yuan, Lan; Li, Xue-Hui; Dong, Li-Sha; Zhao, Peng; Fu, Juan-Ling; Yao, Bi-Yun; Zhou, Zong-Can

    2016-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) as an environmental risk factor of Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered to cause manganism. Mitophagy is thought to play a key role in elimination the injured mitochondria. The goal of this paper was to explore whether the PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy is activated and its role in Mn-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. Here, we investigated effects of MnCl2 on ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP/ΔΨm) and apoptosis by FACS and examined PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy by western-blotting and the co-localization of mitochondria and acidic lysosomes. Further, we explore the role of mitophagy in Mn-induced apoptosis by inhibition the mitophagy by knockdown Parkin level. Results show that MnCl2 dose-dependently caused ΔΨm decrease, ROS generation and apoptosis of dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, Mn could induce mitophagy and PINK1/Parkin-mediated pathway was activated in SH-SY5Y cells. Transient transfection of Parkin siRNA knockdown the expressing level of parkin inhibited Mn-induced mitophagy and aggravated apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that Mn may induce PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy, which may exert significant neuro-protective effect against Mn-induced dopaminergic neuronal cells apoptosis.

  3. Transition metal-mediated donor-acceptor coordination of low-oxidation state Group 14 element halides.

    PubMed

    Swarnakar, Anindya K; Ferguson, Michael J; McDonald, Robert; Rivard, Eric

    2016-04-14

    The reactivity of tungsten carbonyl adducts of Group 14 element (Ge, Sn and Pb) dihalides towards the metal-based donors (η(5)-C5H5)Rh(PMe2Ph)2 and Pt(PCy3)2 was examined. When (η(5)-C5H5)Rh(PMe2Ph)2 was treated with the Lewis acid supported Ge(ii) complex, THF·GeCl2·W(CO)5, cyclopentadienyl ring activation occurred, whereas the analogous Lewis acidic units SnCl2·W(CO)5 and PbCl2 form direct adducts with the Rh complex to yield Rh-Sn and Rh-Pb dative bonds. Attempts to prepare metal coordinated element(ii) hydrides by adding hydride sources to the above mentioned rhodium-E(ii) halide complexes were unsuccessful; in each case insoluble products were formed along with regeneration of free (η(5)-C5H5)Rh(PMe2Ph)2. In a parallel study, ECl2·W(CO)5 (E = Ge or Sn) groups were shown to participate in E-Cl oxidation addition chemistry with (Cy3P)2Pt to give the formal Pt(ii) complexes ClPt(PCy3)2ECl·W(CO)5.

  4. PCR and magnetic bead-mediated target capture for the isolation of short interspersed nucleotide elements in fishes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Zhu, Guoli; Tang, Wenqiao; Yang, Jinquan; Guo, Hongyi

    2012-01-01

    Short interspersed nucleotide elements (SINEs), a type of retrotransposon, are widely distributed in various genomes with multiple copies arranged in different orientations, and cause changes to genes and genomes during evolutionary history. This can provide the basis for determining genome diversity, genetic variation and molecular phylogeny, etc. SINE DNA is transcribed into RNA by polymerase III from an internal promoter, which is composed of two conserved boxes, box A and box B. Here we present an approach to isolate novel SINEs based on these promoter elements. Box A of a SINE is obtained via PCR with only one primer identical to box B (B-PCR). Box B and its downstream sequence are acquired by PCR with one primer corresponding to box A (A-PCR). The SINE clone produced by A-PCR is selected as a template to label a probe with biotin. The full-length SINEs are isolated from the genomic pool through complex capture using the biotinylated probe bound to magnetic particles. Using this approach, a novel SINE family, Cn-SINE, from the genomes of Coilia nasus, was isolated. The members are 180-360 bp long. Sequence homology suggests that Cn-SINEs evolved from a leucine tRNA gene. This is the first report of a tRNA(Leu)-related SINE obtained without the use of a genomic library or inverse PCR. These results provide new insights into the origin of SINEs. PMID:22408437

  5. β-Arrestin-1 protects against endoplasmic reticulum stress/p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis-mediated apoptosis via repressing p-p65/inducible nitric oxide synthase in portal hypertensive gastropathy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Siwei; Li, Leijia; Chen, Tingting; Chen, Xiaoliang; Tao, Li; Lin, Xianyi; Tao, Jin; Huang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Jie; Liu, Huiling; Wu, Bin

    2015-10-01

    Portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) is a serious cause of bleeding in patients, and is associated with portal hypertension. β-Arrestins (β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2) are well-established mediators of endocytosis of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), ubiquitination, and G-protein-independent signaling. The role of β-arrestin-1 (β-arr1) in mucosal apoptosis in PHG remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of β-arr1 in PHG via its regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress/p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) apoptotic signaling. Gastric mucosal injury and apoptosis were studied in PHG patients and in PHG mouse models. The induction of β-arr1 and the ER stress/PUMA signaling pathway were investigated, and the mechanisms of β-arr1-regulated gastric mucosal apoptosis were analyzed in vivo and in vitro experiments. β-arr1 and ER stress/PUMA signaling elements were markedly induced in the gastric mucosa of PHG patients and mouse models. Blockage of ER stress demonstrably attenuated the mucosal apoptosis of PHG, while targeted deletion of β-arr1 significantly aggravated the injury and ER stress/PUMA-mediated apoptosis. β-arr1 limited the activation of p65 to repress TNF-α-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO release, which could regulate ER stress/PUMA-mediated mucosal apoptosis in PHG. In vivo and in vitro experiments further demonstrated that β-arr1 protected against mucosal apoptosis by repressing TNF-α-induced iNOS expression via inhibiting the activation of p65. These results indicated that β-arr1 regulated ER stress/PUMA-induced mucosal epithelial apoptosis through suppression of the TNF-α/p65/iNOS signaling pathway activation and that β-arr1 is a potential therapeutic target for PHG.

  6. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b in proopiomelanocortin neurons reduces neurogenic control of blood pressure and protects mice from leptin- and sympatho-mediated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Butler, Benjamin R; Herren, David J; Brands, Michael W; Bence, Kendra K; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (Ptp1b), which represses leptin signaling, is a promising therapeutic target for obesity. Genome wide deletion of Ptp1b, increases leptin sensitivity, protects mice from obesity and diabetes, but alters cardiovascular function by increasing blood pressure (BP). Leptin-control of metabolism is centrally mediated and involves proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. Whether these neurons contribute to leptin-mediated increases in BP remain unclear. We hypothesized that increasing leptin signaling in POMC neurons with Ptp1b deletion will sensitize the cardiovascular system to leptin and enhance neurogenic control of BP. We analyzed the cardiovascular phenotype of Ptp1b+/+ and POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice, at baseline and after 7 days of leptin infusion or sympatho-activation with phenylephrine. POMCPtp1b deletion did not alter baseline cardiovascular hemodynamics (BP, heart rate) but reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade and plasma catecholamine levels that suggests a decreased neurogenic control of BP. In contrast, POMC-Ptp1b deletion increased vascular adrenergic reactivity and aortic α-adrenergic receptors expression. Chronic leptin treatment reduced vascular adrenergic reactivity and blunted diastolic and mean BP increases in POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice only. Similarly POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice exhibited a blunted increased in diastolic and mean BP accompanied by a gradual reduction in adrenergic reactivity in response to chronic vascular sympatho-activation with phenylephrine. Together these data rule out our hypothesis but suggest that deletion of Ptp1b in POMC neurons protects from leptin- and sympatho-mediated increases in BP. Vascular adrenergic desensitization appears as a protective mechanism against hypertension, and POMC-Ptp1b as a key therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunctions associated with obesity.

  7. Physiological and Pathological Role of Alpha-synuclein in Parkinson’s Disease Through Iron Mediated Oxidative Stress; The Role of a Putative Iron-responsive Element

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, David; Huang, Xudong; Branden, Lars; Greig, Nigel H.; Rogers, Jack T.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and represents a large health burden to society. Genetic and oxidative risk factors have been proposed as possible causes, but their relative contribution remains unclear. Dysfunction of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) has been associated with PD due to its increased presence, together with iron, in Lewy bodies. Brain oxidative damage caused by iron may be partly mediated by α-syn oligomerization during PD pathology. Also, α-syn gene dosage can cause familial PD and inhibition of its gene expression by blocking translation via a newly identified Iron Responsive Element-like RNA sequence in its 5’-untranslated region may provide a new PD drug target. PMID:19399246

  8. Titanium(IV)-mediated tandem deprotection-cyclodehydration of protected cysteine N-amides: biomimetic syntheses of thiazoline- and thiazole-containing heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Raman, P; Razavi, H; Kelly, J W

    2000-10-19

    The scope and limitations of TiCl(4)-mediated Delta(2)-thiazoline synthesis via tandem deprotection-dehydrocyclization of trityl-protected cysteine N-amides is presented. While chemical yields are acceptable (53-96%), the stereochemical outcomes vary on the basis of structural considerations and reaction conditions (22-99% ee). Racemization at the C(2)-exomethine position limits the utility of this method for the formation of a thiazoline within a peptide. Treatment of a tritylated Cys-Cys dipeptide with TiCl(4) afforded the corresponding thiazole-thiazoline heterocycle 12 (38% yield, 97% ee).

  9. Hepatic expression of heme oxygenase-1 and antioxidant response element-mediated genes following administration of ethinyl estradiol to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Morio, Lisa A.; Leone, Angelique; Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Nie, Alex Y.; Brandon Parker, J.; Taggart, Peter; Barron, Alfred M.; McMillian, Michael K. . E-mail: mmcmilli@prdus.jnj.com; Lord, Peter

    2006-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is one of several enzymes induced by hepatotoxicants, and is thought to have an important protective role against cellular stress during liver inflammation and injury. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of HO-1 in estradiol-induced liver injury. A single dose of ethinyl estradiol (500 mg/kg, po) resulted in mild liver injury. Repeated administration of ethinyl estradiol (500 mg/kg/day for 4 days, po) resulted in no detectable liver injury or dysfunction. Using RT-PCR analysis, we demonstrate that HO-1 gene expression in whole liver tissue is elevated (> 20-fold) after the single dose of ethinyl estradiol. The number and intensity of HO-1 immunoreactive macrophages were increased after the single dose of ethinyl estradiol. HO-1 expression was undetectable in hepatic parenchymal cells from rats receiving Methocel control or a single dose of ethinyl estradiol, however cytosolic HO-1 immunoreactivity in these cells after repeated dosing of ethinyl estradiol was pronounced. The increases in HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 immunoreactivity following administration of a single dose of ethinyl estradiol suggested that this enzyme might be responsible for the observed protection of the liver during repeated dosing. To investigate the effect of HO-1 expression on ethinyl estradiol-induced hepatotoxicity, rats were pretreated with hemin (50 {mu}mol/kg, ip, a substrate and inducer of HO-1), with tin protoporphyrin IX (60 {mu}mol/kg, ip, an HO-1 inhibitor), or with gadolinium chloride (10 mg/kg, iv, an inhibitor/toxin of Kupffer cells) 24 h before ethinyl estradiol treatment. Pretreatment with modulators of HO-1 expression and activity had generally minimal effects on ethinyl estradiol-induced liver injury. These data suggest that HO-1 plays a limited role in antioxidant defense against ethinyl estradiol-induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity, and suggests that other coordinately induced enzymes are responsible for protection observed

  10. Production of Ag Nanocubes on a Scale of 0.1 g per Batch by Protecting the NaHS-Mediated Polyol Synthesis with Argon

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Cobley, Claire; Au, Leslie; McKiernan, Maureen; Schwartz, Andrea; Wen, Long-Ping; Chen, Jingyi; Xia, Younan

    2009-01-01

    Gold nanocages synthesized from Ag nanocubes via the galvanic replacement reaction are finding widespread use in a range of applications due to their tunable optical properties. Most of these applications require the use of nanocages with a uniform size and in large quantities. This requirement translates into a demand for scaling up the production of Ag nanocubes with uniform, well-controlled sizes. Here we report such a method based on the modification of NaHS-mediated polyol synthesis with argon protection for fast reduction, which allows for the production of Ag nanocubes on a scale of 0.1 g per batch. The Ag nanocubes had an edge length tunable from 25 nm to 45 nm together with a size variation within ±5 nm. The use of argon protection was the key to the success of this scale-up synthesis, suggesting the importance of controlling oxidative etching during a synthesis. PMID:20305725

  11. Protective effect of ganodermanondiol isolated from the Lingzhi mushroom against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced hepatotoxicity through Nrf2-mediated antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Lee, Dong-Sung; Kang, Yue; Yao, Nai-Qi; An, Ren-Bo; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2013-03-01

    Ganodermanondiol, a biologically active compound, was isolated from the Lingzhi mushroom (Ganoderma lucidum). The present study examined the protective effects of ganodermanondiol against tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Ganodermanondiol protected human liver-derived HepG2 cells through nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway-dependent heme oxygenase-1 expressions. Moreover, ganodermanondiol increased cellular glutathione levels and the expression of the glutamine-cysteine ligase gene in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ganodermanondiol exposure enhanced the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its upstream kinase activators, LKB1 and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-II (CaMKII). This study indicates that ganodermanondiol exhibits potent cytoprotective effects on t-BHP-induced hepatotoxicity in human liver-derived HepG2 cells, presumably through Nrf2-mediated antioxidant enzymes and AMPK.

  12. High Glutathione and Glutathione Peroxidase-2 Levels Mediate Cell-Type-Specific DNA Damage Protection in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dannenmann, Benjamin; Lehle, Simon; Hildebrand, Dominic G.; Kübler, Ayline; Grondona, Paula; Schmid, Vera; Holzer, Katharina; Fröschl, Mirjam; Essmann, Frank; Rothfuss, Oliver; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pluripotent stem cells must strictly maintain genomic integrity to prevent transmission of mutations. In human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we found that genome surveillance is achieved via two ways, namely, a hypersensitivity to apoptosis and a very low accumulation of DNA lesions. The low apoptosis threshold was mediated by constitutive p53 expression and a marked upregulation of proapoptotic p53 target genes of the BCL-2 family, ensuring the efficient iPSC removal upon genotoxic insults. Intriguingly, despite the elevated apoptosis sensitivity, both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA lesions induced by genotoxins were less frequent in iPSCs compared to fibroblasts. Gene profiling identified that mRNA expression of several antioxidant proteins was considerably upregulated in iPSCs. Knockdown of glutathione peroxidase-2 and depletion of glutathione impaired protection against DNA lesions. Thus, iPSCs ensure genomic integrity through enhanced apoptosis induction and increased antioxidant defense, contributing to protection against DNA damage. PMID:25937369

  13. Additive Promotion of Viral Internal Ribosome Entry Site-Mediated Translation by Far Upstream Element-Binding Protein 1 and an Enterovirus 71-Induced Cleavage Product

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chuan-Tien; Kung, Yu-An; Li, Mei-Ling; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Liu, Shih-Tung; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of the enterovirus 71 (EV71) RNA genome contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is indispensable for viral protein translation. Due to the limited coding capacity of their RNA genomes, EV71 and other picornaviruses typically recruit host factors, known as IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs), to mediate IRES-dependent translation. Here, we show that EV71 viral proteinase 2A is capable of cleaving far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FBP1), a positive ITAF that directly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region to promote viral IRES-driven translation. The cleavage occurs at the Gly-371 residue of FBP1 during the EV71 infection process, and this generates a functional cleavage product, FBP11-371. Interestingly, the cleavage product acts to promote viral IRES activity. Footprinting analysis and gel mobility shift assay results showed that FBP11-371 similarly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region, but at a different site from full-length FBP1; moreover, FBP1 and FBP11-371 were found to act additively to promote IRES-mediated translation and virus yield. Our findings expand the current understanding of virus-host interactions with regard to viral recruitment and modulation of ITAFs, and provide new insights into translational control during viral infection. PMID:27780225

  14. Effect of mitochondrial potassium channel on the renal protection mediated by sodium thiosulfate against ethylene glycol induced nephrolithiasis in rat model

    PubMed Central

    Baldev, N.; Sriram, R.; Prabu, P.C.; Gino, A. Kurian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Sodium thiosulfate (STS) is clinically reported to be a promising drug in preventing nephrolithiasis. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of mitochondrial KATP channel in the renal protection mediated by STS. Materials and Methods: Nephrolithiasis was induced in Wistar rats by administrating 0.4% ethylene glycol (EG) along with 1% ammonium chloride for one week in drinking water followed by only 0.75% EG for two weeks. Treatment groups received STS, mitochondrial KATP channel opener and closer exclusively or in combination with STS for two weeks. Results: Animals treated with STS showed normal renal tissue architecture, supported by near normal serum creatinine, urea and ALP activity. Diazoxide (mitochondria KATP channel opening) treatment to the animal also showed normal renal tissue histology and improved serum chemistry. However, an opposite result was shown by glibenclamide (mitochondria KATP channel closer) treated rats. STS administered along with diazoxide negated the renal protection rendered by diazoxide alone, while it imparted protection to the glibenclamide treated rats, formulating a mitochondria modulated STS action. Conclusion: The present study confirmed that STS render renal protection not only through chelation and antioxidant effect but also by modulating the mitochondrial KATP channel for preventing urolithiasis. PMID:26742969

  15. Hepato-protective effects of six schisandra lignans on acetaminophen-induced liver injury are partially associated with the inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Tan, Huasen; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-04-25

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra fructus is widely-used traditional Chinese medicine which possesses hepato-protective potential. Schisandrin A (SinA), Schisandrin B (SinB), Schisandrin C (SinC), Schisandrol A (SolA), Schisandrol B (SolB), and Schisantherin A (SthA) are the major bioactive lignans. Most recently, we found SolB exerts significant hepato-protection against APAP-induced liver injury. In this study, the protective effects of the other five schisandra lignans against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice were investigated and compared with that of SolB. The results of morphological and biochemical assessment clearly demonstrated significant protective effects of SinA, SinB, SinC, SolA, SolB, and SthA against APAP-induced liver injury. Among these schisandra lignans, SinC and SolB exerted the strongest hepato-protective effects against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Six lignans pretreatment before APAP dosing could prevent the depletions of total liver glutathione (GSH) and mitochondrial GSH caused by APAP. Additionally, the lignans treatment inhibited the enzymatic activities of three CYP450 isoforms (CYP2E1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A11) related to APAP bioactivation, and further decreased the formation of APAP toxic intermediate N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI) in mouse microsomal incubation system. This study demonstrated that SinA, SinB, SinC, SolA, SolB and SthA exhibited significant protective actions toward APAP-induced liver injury, which was partially associated with the inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation.

  16. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester stimulates human antioxidant response element-mediated expression of the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) gene.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, A K; Venugopal, R; Mucha, J; Carothers, A M; Grunberger, D

    1997-02-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a phenolic antioxidant derived from the propolis of honeybee hives. CAPE was shown to inhibit the formation of intracellular hydrogen peroxide and oxidized bases in DNA of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-treated HeLa cells and was also found to induce a redox change that correlated with differential growth effects in transformed cells but not the nontumorigenic parental ones. Mediated via the electrophile or human antioxidant response element (hARE), induction of the expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit genes by certain phenolic antioxidants has been correlated with the chemopreventive properties of these agents. Here, we determined by Northern analysis that CAPE treatment of hepatoma cells stimulates NQO1 gene expression in cultured human hepatoma cells (HepG2), and we characterized the effects of CAPE treatment on the expression of a reporter gene either containing or lacking the hARE or carrying a mutant version of this element in rodent hepatoma (Hepa-1) transfectants. A dose-dependent transactivation of human hARE-mediated chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene expression was observed upon treatments of the Hepa-1 transfectants with TPA, a known inducer, as well as with CAPE. The combined treatments resulted in an apparent additive stimulation of the reporter expression. To learn whether this activation of cat gene expression was effected by protein kinase C in CAPE-treated cells, a comparison was made of cat gene activity after addition of calphostin, a protein kinase C inhibitor. Calphostin reduced the cat gene induction by TPA but not by CAPE, suggesting that stimulation of gene expression in this system by these agents proceeds via distinct mechanisms. Band-shift experiments to examine binding of transactivator proteins from nuclear extracts of treated and untreated cells to a hARE DNA probe showed that TPA exposure increased the binding level

  17. Human antioxidant-response-element-mediated regulation of type 1 NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase gene expression. Effect of sulfhydryl modifying agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Jaiswal, A K

    1994-11-15

    Human antioxidant-response element (hARE) containing two copies of the AP1/AP1-like elements arranged as inverse repeat is known to mediate basal and beta-naphthoflavone-induced transcription of the type 1 NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) gene. Band-shift assays revealed that beta-naphthoflavone increased binding of nuclear proteins at the hARE. Super shift assays identified Jun-D and c-Fos proteins in the band-shift complexes observed with control and beta-naphthoflavone-treated Hepa-1 nuclear extracts. Hepa-1 cells stably transformed with hARE-tk-chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) recombinant plasmid were used to demonstrate that, in addition to beta-naphthoflavone, a variety of antioxidants, tumor promoters and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) also increased expression of hARE-mediated CAT gene. beta-naphthoflavone induction of the CAT gene expression in Hepa-1 cells was found insensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases. However, binding of regulatory proteins at the hARE and the CAT gene expression in Hepa-1 cells were increased by dithiothreitol, 2-mercaptoethanol and diamide. Treatment of the Hepa-1 cells with N-ethylmaleimide reduced binding of proteins at the hARE and interfered with expression and beta-naphthoflavone induction of the CAT gene. These results suggested a role of sulfhydryl modification of hARE binding (Jun and Fos) proteins which mediate basal and induced expression of the NQO1 gene. We also report that in-vitro-translated products of the proto-oncogenes, Jun and Fos, bind to the hARE in band-shift assays. The incubation of Jun and Fos proteins with small amounts of nuclear extract from dimethylsulfoxide-treated (control) or beta-naphthoflavone treated Hepa-1 cells prior to band-shift assays increased the binding of Jun and Fos proteins to the hARE. Interestingly, the increase in binding of Jun and Fos proteins to the hARE was more prominent with beta-naphthoflavone-treated nuclear extract as compared to the control

  18. Biotin sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by a conserved DNA element and requires the activity of biotin-protein ligase.

    PubMed

    Pirner, Heike M; Stolz, Jürgen

    2006-05-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that functions as a prosthetic group in carboxylation reactions. In addition to its role as a cofactor, biotin has multiple roles in gene regulation. We analyzed biotin effects on gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and demonstrated by microarray, Northern, and Western analyses that all yeast genes encoding proteins involved in biotin metabolism are up-regulated following biotin depletion. Many of these genes contain a palindromic promoter element that is necessary and sufficient for mediating the biotin response and functions as an upstream-activating sequence. Mutants lacking the plasma membrane biotin transporter Vht1p display constitutively high expression levels of biotin-responsive genes. However, they react normally to biotin precursors that do not require Vht1p for uptake. The biotin-like effect of precursors with regard to gene expression requires their intracellular conversion to biotin. This demonstrates that Vht1p does not act as a sensor for biotin and that intracellular biotin is crucial for gene expression. Mutants with defects in biotin-protein ligase, similar to vht1delta mutants, also display aberrantly high expression of biotin-responsive genes. Like vht1delta cells, they have reduced levels of protein biotinylation, but unlike vht1delta mutants, they possess normal levels of free intracellular biotin. This indicates that free intracellular biotin is irrelevant for gene regulation and identifies biotin-protein ligase as an important element of the biotin-sensing pathway in yeast.

  19. Factor recruitment and TIF2/GRIP1 corepressor activity at a collagenase-3 response element that mediates regulation by phorbol esters and hormones

    PubMed Central

    Rogatsky, Inez; Zarember, Kol A.; Yamamoto, Keith R.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate determinants of specific transcriptional regulation, we measured factor occupancy and function at a response element, col3A, associated with the collagenase-3 gene in human U2OS osteosarcoma cells; col3A confers activation by phorbol esters, and repression by glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones. The subunit composition and activity of AP-1, which binds col3A, paralleled the intracellular level of cFos, which is modulated by phorbol esters and glucocorticoids. In contrast, a similar AP-1 site at the collagenase-1 gene, not inducible in U2OS cells, was not bound by AP-1. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) associated with col3A through protein–protein interactions with AP-1, regardless of AP-1 subunit composition, and repressed transcription. TIF2/GRIP1, reportedly a coactivator for GR and the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), was recruited to col3A and potentiated GR-mediated repression in the presence of a GR agonist but not antagonist. GRIP1 mutants deficient in GR binding and coactivator functions were also defective for corepression, and a GRIP1 fragment containing the GR-interacting region functioned as a dominant-negative for repression. In contrast, repression by TR was unaffected by GRIP1. Thus, the composition of regulatory complexes, and the biological activities of the bound factors, are dynamic and dependent on cell and response element contexts. Cofactors such as GRIP1 probably contain distinct surfaces for activation and repression that function in a context-dependent manner. PMID:11689447

  20. Factor recruitment and TIF2/GRIP1 corepressor activity at a collagenase-3 response element that mediates regulation by phorbol esters and hormones.

    PubMed

    Rogatsky, I; Zarember, K A; Yamamoto, K R

    2001-11-01

    To investigate determinants of specific transcriptional regulation, we measured factor occupancy and function at a response element, col3A, associated with the collagenase-3 gene in human U2OS osteosarcoma cells; col3A confers activation by phorbol esters, and repression by glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones. The subunit composition and activity of AP-1, which binds col3A, paralleled the intracellular level of cFos, which is modulated by phorbol esters and glucocorticoids. In contrast, a similar AP-1 site at the collagenase-1 gene, not inducible in U2OS cells, was not bound by AP-1. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) associated with col3A through protein-protein interactions with AP-1, regardless of AP-1 subunit composition, and repressed transcription. TIF2/GRIP1, reportedly a coactivator for GR and the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), was recruited to col3A and potentiated GR-mediated repression in the presence of a GR agonist but not antagonist. GRIP1 mutants deficient in GR binding and coactivator functions were also defective for corepression, and a GRIP1 fragment containing the GR-interacting region functioned as a dominant-negative for repression. In contrast, repression by TR was unaffected by GRIP1. Thus, the composition of regulatory complexes, and the biological activities of the bound factors, are dynamic and dependent on cell and response element contexts. Cofactors such as GRIP1 probably contain distinct surfaces for activation and repression that function in a context-dependent manner. PMID:11689447

  1. Disentangling the effects of promised and delivered inducements: relational and transactional contract elements and the mediating role of trust.

    PubMed

    Montes, Samantha D; Irving, P Gregory

    2008-11-01

    Psychological contracts contain both relational and transactional elements, each of which is associated with unique characteristics. In the present research, the authors drew on these distinct qualities to develop and test hypotheses regarding differential employee reactions to underfulfillment, fulfillment, and overfulfillment of relational and transactional promises. Further, the authors extended their test of the theoretical distinctions between relational and transactional contracts by assessing the relevance of trust as a key underlying mechanism of relational and transactional psychological contract breach effects. Participants in this 3-wave longitudinal study included 342 full-time temporary employees. In support of existing theoretical distinctions, results indicated that employees reacted differently to varying levels of fulfillment of their relational and transactional contracts and that trust is a more central mechanism of relational, as opposed to transactional, psychological contract breach effects. These findings underscore L.S. Lambert, J. R. Edwards, and D. M. Cable's (2003) recent recommendation that the traditional conceptualization and study of psychological contract breach requires expansion.

  2. Microbiota Modulates Behavior and Protein Kinase C mediated cAMP response element-binding protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Li; Zeng, Benhua; Wang, Haiyang; Li, Bo; Huo, Ran; Zheng, Peng; Zhang, Xiaotong; Du, Xiangyu; Liu, Meiling; Fang, Zheng; Xu, Xuejiao; Zhou, Chanjuan; Chen, Jianjun; Li, Wenxia; Guo, Jing; Wei, Hong; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary pressure drives gut microbiota-host coevolution and results in complex interactions between gut microbiota and neural development; however, the molecular mechanisms by which the microbiota governs host behavior remain obscure. Here, we report that colonization early in life is crucial for the microbiota to modulate brain development and behavior; later colonization or deletion of microbiota cannot completely reverse the behaviors. Microarray analysis revealed an association between absence of gut microbiota and expression in cAMP responding element-binding protein (CREB) regulated genes in the hippocampus. The absence of gut microbiota from birth was shown to be associated with decreased CREB expression, followed by decreases of protein kinase C beta (PRKCB) and AMPA receptors expression, and an increase of phosphorylation CREB (pCREB) expression. Microbiota colonization in adolescence restored CREB and pCREB expression, but did not alter PRKCB and AMPARs expression. The removal of the gut microbiota from SPF mice using antibiotics only reduced pCREB expression. These findings suggest that (i) colonization of the gut microbiota early in life might facilitate neurodevelopment via PKC-CREB signaling and (ii) although GF mice and ABX mice display reduced anxiety-related behaviors, the molecular mechanisms behind this might differ. PMID:27444685

  3. Microbiota Modulates Behavior and Protein Kinase C mediated cAMP response element-binding protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Li; Zeng, Benhua; Wang, Haiyang; Li, Bo; Huo, Ran; Zheng, Peng; Zhang, Xiaotong; Du, Xiangyu; Liu, Meiling; Fang, Zheng; Xu, Xuejiao; Zhou, Chanjuan; Chen, Jianjun; Li, Wenxia; Guo, Jing; Wei, Hong; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary pressure drives gut microbiota–host coevolution and results in complex interactions between gut microbiota and neural development; however, the molecular mechanisms by which the microbiota governs host behavior remain obscure. Here, we report that colonization early in life is crucial for the microbiota to modulate brain development and behavior; later colonization or deletion of microbiota cannot completely reverse the behaviors. Microarray analysis revealed an association between absence of gut microbiota and expression in cAMP responding element-binding protein (CREB) regulated genes in the hippocampus. The absence of gut microbiota from birth was shown to be associated with decreased CREB expression, followed by decreases of protein kinase C beta (PRKCB) and AMPA receptors expression, and an increase of phosphorylation CREB (pCREB) expression. Microbiota colonization in adolescence restored CREB and pCREB expression, but did not alter PRKCB and AMPARs expression. The removal of the gut microbiota from SPF mice using antibiotics only reduced pCREB expression. These findings suggest that (i) colonization of the gut microbiota early in life might facilitate neurodevelopment via PKC–CREB signaling and (ii) although GF mice and ABX mice display reduced anxiety-related behaviors, the molecular mechanisms behind this might differ. PMID:27444685

  4. Protective effect of methanol extract from citrus press cakes prepared by far-infrared radiation drying on H2O2-mediated oxidative damage in Vero cells

    PubMed Central

    Wijesinghe, W.A.J.P.; Senevirathne, Mahinda; Oh, Myung-Cheol

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, a suitable drying method was developed for citrus press cakes (CPCs), which are produced as a by-product in citrus juice plants, and the protective effect of methanol extract of CPCs prepared by far-infrared radiation (FIR) drying against H2O2-induced DNA damage was evaluated versus that of freeze-dried CPCs. Methanol extract of FIR-dried CPCs exhibited comparatively good ROS scavenging activity versus the freeze-dried CPCs at the concentration of 100 µg/mL. The extract strongly enhanced the cell viability against H2O2-induced oxidative damage in Vero cells. Lipid peroxidation inhibitory activity of the extract from FIR-dried CPCs was comparable to that of the extract from freeze-dried CPCs. This sample also exhibited good protective effects against H2O2-mediated cell apoptosis as demonstrated by decreased apoptotic body formation in the nuclear staining with Hoechst 33342. In the comet assay, the CPC extracts exhibited strong inhibitory effects against H2O2-mediated DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, this study demonstrated that FIR drying effectively preserves CPC as a functionally important natural antioxidant source and the FIR drying can be adapted for drying CPCs and is more economical for massive production than freeze drying. PMID:22125675

  5. Protective effect of methanol extract from citrus press cakes prepared by far-infrared radiation drying on H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidative damage in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, W A J P; Senevirathne, Mahinda; Oh, Myung-Cheol; Jeon, You-Jin

    2011-10-01

    In the present study, a suitable drying method was developed for citrus press cakes (CPCs), which are produced as a by-product in citrus juice plants, and the protective effect of methanol extract of CPCs prepared by far-infrared radiation (FIR) drying against H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage was evaluated versus that of freeze-dried CPCs. Methanol extract of FIR-dried CPCs exhibited comparatively good ROS scavenging activity versus the freeze-dried CPCs at the concentration of 100 µg/mL. The extract strongly enhanced the cell viability against H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative damage in Vero cells. Lipid peroxidation inhibitory activity of the extract from FIR-dried CPCs was comparable to that of the extract from freeze-dried CPCs. This sample also exhibited good protective effects against H(2)O(2)-mediated cell apoptosis as demonstrated by decreased apoptotic body formation in the nuclear staining with Hoechst 33342. In the comet assay, the CPC extracts exhibited strong inhibitory effects against H(2)O(2)-mediated DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, this study demonstrated that FIR drying effectively preserves CPC as a functionally important natural antioxidant source and the FIR drying can be adapted for drying CPCs and is more economical for massive production than freeze drying.

  6. Dominant roles of the polybasic proline motif and copper in the PrP23-89-mediated stress protection response.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Cathryn L; Drew, Simon C; Boland, Martin P; Masters, Colin L; Barnham, Kevin J; Lawson, Victoria A; Collins, Steven J

    2009-05-15

    Beta-cleavage of the neurodegenerative disease-associated prion protein (PrP) protects cells from death induced by oxidative insults. The beta-cleavage event produces two fragments, designated N2 and C2. We investigated the role of the N2 fragment (residues 23-89) in cellular stress response, determining mechanisms involved and regions important for this reaction. The N2 fragment differentially modulated the reactive oxygen species (ROS) response induced by serum deprivation, with amelioration when copper bound. Amino acid residues 23-50 alone mediated a ROS reduction response. PrP23-50 ROS reduction was not due to copper binding or direct antioxidant activity, but was instead mediated through proteoglycan binding partners localised in or interacting with cholesterol-rich membrane domains. Furthermore, mutational analyses of both PrP23-50 and N2 showed that their protective capacity requires the sterically constraining double proline motif within the N-terminal polybasic region. Our findings show that N2 is a biologically active fragment that is able to modulate stress-induced intracellular ROS through interaction of its structurally defined N-terminal polybasic region with cell-surface proteoglycans. PMID:19383722

  7. Human Amnion-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Protect Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells against Oxidative Stress-Mediated Dysfunction via ERK1/2 MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuli; Ma, Junchi; Du, Yifei; Miao, Jing; Chen, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that bone is especially sensitive to oxidative stress, causing bone loss in the elderly. Previous studies indicated that human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HAMSCs), obtained from human amniotic membranes, exerted osteoprotective effects in vivo. However, the potential of HAMSCs as seed cells against oxidative stress-mediated dysfunction is unknown. In this study, we systemically investigated their antioxidative and osteogenic effects in vitro. Here, we demonstrated that HAMSCs signi cantly promoted the proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of H2O2-induced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs), and down-regulated the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Further, our results suggest that activation of the ERK1/2 MAPK signal transduction pathway is essential for both HAMSCs-mediated osteogenic and protective effects against oxidative stress-induced dysfunction in HBMSCs. U0126, a highly selective inhibitor of extracellular ERK1/2 MAPK signaling, significantly suppressed the antioxidative and osteogenic effects in HAMSCs. In conclusion, by modulating HBMSCs, HAMSCs show a strong potential in treating oxidative stress- mediated bone deficiency. PMID:26743906

  8. Protective role of amantadine in mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress mediated by hepatitis C virus protein expression.

    PubMed

    Quarato, Giovanni; Scrima, Rosella; Ripoli, Maria; Agriesti, Francesca; Moradpour, Darius; Capitanio, Nazzareno; Piccoli, Claudia

    2014-06-15

    Amantadine is an antiviral and antiparkinsonian drug that has been evaluated in combination therapies against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Controversial results have been reported concerning its efficacy, and its mechanism of action remains unclear. Data obtained in vitro suggested a role of amantadine in inhibiting HCV p7-mediated cation conductance. In keeping with the fact that mitochondria are responsible to ionic fluxes and that HCV infection impairs mitochondrial function, we investigated a potential role of amantadine in modulating mitochondrial function. Using a well-characterized inducible cell line expressing the full-length HCV polyprotein, we found that amantadine not only prevented but also rescued HCV protein-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Specifically, amantadine corrected (i) overload of mitochondrial Ca²⁺; (ii) inhibition of respiratory chain activity and oxidative phosphorylation; (iii) reduction of membrane potential; and (iv) overproduction of reactive oxygen species. The effects of amantadine were observed within 15 min following drug administration and confirmed in Huh-7.5 cells transfected with an infectious HCV genome. These effects were also observed in cells expressing subgenomic HCV constructs, indicating that they are not mediated or only in part mediated by p7. Single organelle analyzes carried out on isolated mouse liver mitochondria demonstrated that amantadine induces hyperpolarization of the membrane potential. Moreover, amantadine treatment increased the calcium threshold required to trigger mitochondrial permeability transition opening. In conclusion, these results support a role of amantadine in preserving cellular bioenergetics and redox homeostasis in HCV-infected cells and unveil an effect of the drug which might be exploited for a broader therapeutic utilization.

  9. Vaccination with a purified blood-stage malaria antigen in mice: correlation of protection with T cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Playfair, J H; De Souza, J B; Freeman, R R; Holder, A A

    1985-01-01

    A purified 230,000 mol wt protein antigen from the lethal mouse malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii YM which had previously been shown to be highly effective as a vaccine, was tested for its ability to stimulate specific helper T cells and T cells responsible for delayed hypersensitivity. Strong stimulation was found in both assays, but larger doses were required for delayed hypersensitivity, correlating well with the requirements for protection. It is suggested that T stimulation may be a requirement for effective protection by purified antigens in malaria. PMID:2933196

  10. Novel polymer materials for protecting crew and structural elements of orbital station against microorganisms attack throughout long-term operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyev, Yu.; Rudenko, A.; Robota, L.; Koval, E.; Savelyeva, O.; Markovskaya, L.; Veselov, V.

    2009-01-01

    Novel polyurethanes, polyamidourethanes and polyurethane foams of stable to biocorrosion were synthesized. The polymers possess fungicidal/fungistatic and bactericidal/bacteriostatic activity. After the biological tests with using of mold fungi and yeasts, polymers totally keep their main exploitation characteristics: for most of polymers coefficients of strength and elasticity keeping are equal of 100%. Most of them possess the fungicidal properties of zero balls, according to the State Standard. Life-firmness investigation of the most aggressive extremophiles: mold fungi Penicillium and Aspergillus on the polymer surfaces showed that for some samples it made up from 3 to 10 days. Some polymers possess both anti-micotic and anti-bacterial action. Based on investigation results a special technological scheme of assured human protection against microorganisms attack in specific condition of his existence are to be elaborated.

  11. Dynamic finite element simulation of the gunshot injury to the human forehead protected by polyvinyl alcohol sponge.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Alireza; Razaghi, Reza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu

    2016-04-01

    Although there are some traditional models of the gunshot wounds, there is still a need for more modeling analyses due to the difficulties related to the gunshot wounds to the forehead region of the human skull. In this study, the degree of damage as a consequence of penetrating head injuries due to gunshot wounds was determined using a preliminary finite element (FE) model of the human skull. In addition, the role of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge, which can be used as an alternative to reinforce the kinetic energy absorption capacity of bulletproof vest and helmet materials, to minimize the amount of skull injury due to penetrating processes was investigated through the FE model. Digital computed tomography along with magnetic resonance imaging data of the human head were employed to launch a three-dimensional (3D) FE model of the skull. Two geometrical shapes of projectiles (steel ball and bullet) were simulated for penetrating with an initial impact velocity of 734 m/s using nonlinear dynamic modeling code, namely LS-DYNA. The role of the damaged/distorted elements were removed during computation when the stress or strain reached their thresholds. The stress distributions in various parts of the forehead and sponge after injury were also computed. The results revealed the same amount of stress for both the steel ball and bullet after hitting the skull. The modeling results also indicated the time that steel ball takes to penetrate into the skull is lower than that of the bullet. In addition, more than 21% of the steel ball's kinetic energy was absorbed by the PVA sponge and, subsequently, injury sternness of the forehead was considerably minimized. The findings advise the application of the PVA sponge as a substitute strengthening material to be able to diminish the energy of impact as well as the load transmitted to the object. PMID:26886822

  12. Rhein protects pancreatic β-cells from dynamin-related protein-1-mediated mitochondrial fission and cell apoptosis under hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Zhaohong; Zhang, Yujing; Zhang, Mingchao; Zhu, Xiaodong; Fan, Yun; Shi, Shaolin; Zen, Ke; Liu, Zhihong

    2013-11-01

    Rhein, an anthraquinone compound isolated from rhubarb, has been shown to improve glucose metabolism disorders in diabetic mice. The mechanism underlying the protective effect of rhein, however, remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that rhein can protect the pancreatic β-cells against hyperglycemia-induced cell apoptosis through stabilizing mitochondrial morphology. Oral administration of rhein for 8 or 16 weeks in db/db mice significantly reduced fasting blood glucose (FBG) level and improved glucose tolerance. Cell apoptosis assay using both pancreatic sections and cultured pancreatic β-cells indicated that rhein strongly inhibited β-cell apoptosis. Morphological study showed that rhein was mainly localized at β-cell mitochondria and rhein could preserve mitochondrial ultrastructure by abolishing hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) expression. Western blot and functional analysis confirmed that rhein protected the pancreatic β-cells against hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis via suppressing mitochondrial Drp1 level. Finally, mechanistic study further suggested that decreased Drp1 level by rhein might be due to its effect on reducing cellular reactive oxygen species. Taken together, our study demonstrates for the first time that rhein can serve as a novel therapeutic agent for hyperglycemia treatment and rhein protects pancreatic β-cells from apoptosis by blocking the hyperglycemia-induced Drp1 expression. PMID:23919963

  13. TRF2-RAP1 is required to protect telomeres from engaging in homologous recombination-mediated deletions and fusions.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rekha; Chen, Yong; Lei, Ming; Chang, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    Repressor/activator protein 1 (RAP1) is a highly conserved telomere-interacting protein. Yeast Rap1 protects telomeres from non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), plays important roles in telomere length control and is involved in transcriptional gene regulation. However, a role for mammalian RAP1 in telomere end protection remains controversial. Here we present evidence that mammalian RAP1 is essential to protect telomere from homology directed repair (HDR) of telomeres. RAP1 cooperates with the basic domain of TRF2 (TRF2(B)) to repress PARP1 and SLX4 localization to telomeres. Without RAP1 and TRF2(B), PARP1 and SLX4 HR factors promote rapid telomere resection, resulting in catastrophic telomere loss and the generation of telomere-free chromosome fusions in both mouse and human cells. The RAP1 Myb domain is required to repress both telomere loss and formation of telomere-free fusions. Our results highlight the importance of the RAP1-TRF2 heterodimer in protecting telomeres from inappropriate processing by the HDR pathway. PMID:26941064

  14. SIRT Is Required for EDP-Mediated Protective Responses toward Hypoxia–Reoxygenation Injury in Cardiac Cells

    PubMed Central

    Samokhvalov, Victor; Jamieson, Kristi L.; Fedotov, Ilia; Endo, Tomoko; Seubert, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia–reoxygenation (H/R) injury is known to cause extensive injury to cardiac myocardium promoting development of cardiac dysfunction. Despite the vast number of studies dedicated to studying H/R injury, the molecular mechanisms behind it are multiple, complex, and remain very poorly understood, which makes development of novel pharmacological agents challenging. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) is an n - 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid obtained from dietary sources, which produces numerous effects including regulation of cell survival and death mechanisms. The beneficial effects of DHA toward the cardiovascular system are well documented but the relative role of DHA or one of its more potent metabolites is unresolved. Emerging evidence indicates that cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenase metabolites of DHA, epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), have more potent biological activity than DHA in cardiac cells. In this study we examined whether EDPs protect HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R injury. Our observations demonstrate that treatment with 19,20-EDP protected HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R damage through a mechanism(s) protecting and enhancing mitochondrial quality. EDP treatment increased the relative rates of mitobiogenesis and mitochondrial respiration in control and H/R exposed cardiac cells. The observed EDP protective response toward H/R injury involved SIRT1-dependent pathways. PMID:27242531

  15. Liver-Enriched Gene 1, a Glycosylated Secretory Protein, Binds to FGFR and Mediates an Anti-stress Pathway to Protect Liver Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunxia; Liu, Feng; Cui, Zongbin; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals and birds, teleost fish undergo external embryogenesis, and therefore their embryos are constantly challenged by stresses from their living environment. These stresses, when becoming too harsh, will cause arrest of cell proliferation, abnormal cell death or senescence. Such organisms have to evolve a sophisticated anti-stress mechanism to protect the process of embryogenesis/organogenesis. However, very few signaling molecule(s) mediating such activity have been identified. liver-enriched gene 1 (leg1) is an uncharacterized gene that encodes a novel secretory protein containing a single domain DUF781 (domain of unknown function 781) that is well conserved in vertebrates. In the zebrafish genome, there are two copies of leg1, namely leg1a and leg1b. leg1a and leg1b are closely linked on chromosome 20 and share high homology, but are differentially expressed. In this report, we generated two leg1a mutant alleles using the TALEN technique, then characterized liver development in the mutants. We show that a leg1a mutant exhibits a stress-dependent small liver phenotype that can be prevented by chemicals blocking the production of reactive oxygen species. Further studies reveal that Leg1a binds to FGFR3 and mediates a novel anti-stress pathway to protect liver development through enhancing Erk activity. More importantly, we show that the binding of Leg1a to FGFR relies on the glycosylation at the 70th asparagine (Asn70 or N70), and mutating the Asn70 to Ala70 compromised Leg1’s function in liver development. Therefore, Leg1 plays a unique role in protecting liver development under different stress conditions by serving as a secreted signaling molecule/modulator. PMID:26901320

  16. CD38 Deficiency Protects the Heart from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Activating SIRT1/FOXOs-Mediated Antioxidative Stress Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Hong, Xuan; Zhao, Ning; Xiao, Yun-Fei; Wang, Ling-Fang; Qian, Yi-Song; Deng, Ke-Yu; Ji, Guangju; Fu, Mingui

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury induces irreversible oxidative stress damage to the cardiac muscle. We previously observed that CD38 deficiency remarkably protects mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from oxidative stress-induced injury. However, whether CD38 deficiency protects from I/R injury in the heart is not explored. Here, we showed that the hearts of CD38 deficient mice or wild type mice supplied with exogenous NAD were significantly protected from ischemia/reperfusion injury, seen as reduction of the myocardial infarct sizes when the mice were subjected to 30 min ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Consistently, the protection of CD38 deficiency on hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury was confirmed with a CD38 knockdown H9c2 stable cell line. Furthermore, we observed that knockdown of CD38 remarkably inhibited ROS generation and intracellular Ca2+ overloading induced by H/R in H9c2 cells. The FOXO1 and FOXO3 expressions were significantly elevated by H/R injury in CD38 knockdown cells compared with normal H9c2 cells. The cell immunofluorescence assay showed that FOXO1 nuclear translocation was significantly increased in CD38 knockdown H9c2 cells. In addition, we demonstrated that the increase of FOXO1 nuclear translocation was associated with the increased expressions of antioxidant catalase and SOD2 and the attenuated expression of the ROS generation enzyme NOX4. In conclusion, our results provide new evidence that CD38 deficiency protects the heart from I/R injury through activating SIRT1/FOXOs-mediated antioxidative stress pathway. PMID:27547294

  17. CD38 Deficiency Protects the Heart from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Activating SIRT1/FOXOs-Mediated Antioxidative Stress Pathway.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Hong, Xuan; Zhao, Ning; Xiao, Yun-Fei; Wang, Ling-Fang; Tang, Ling; Jiang, Kai; Qian, Yi-Song; Deng, Ke-Yu; Ji, Guangju; Fu, Mingui; Xin, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury induces irreversible oxidative stress damage to the cardiac muscle. We previously observed that CD38 deficiency remarkably protects mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from oxidative stress-induced injury. However, whether CD38 deficiency protects from I/R injury in the heart is not explored. Here, we showed that the hearts of CD38 deficient mice or wild type mice supplied with exogenous NAD were significantly protected from ischemia/reperfusion injury, seen as reduction of the myocardial infarct sizes when the mice were subjected to 30 min ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Consistently, the protection of CD38 deficiency on hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury was confirmed with a CD38 knockdown H9c2 stable cell line. Furthermore, we observed that knockdown of CD38 remarkably inhibited ROS generation and intracellular Ca(2+) overloading induced by H/R in H9c2 cells. The FOXO1 and FOXO3 expressions were significantly elevated by H/R injury in CD38 knockdown cells compared with normal H9c2 cells. The cell immunofluorescence assay showed that FOXO1 nuclear translocation was significantly increased in CD38 knockdown H9c2 cells. In addition, we demonstrated that the increase of FOXO1 nuclear translocation was associated with the increased expressions of antioxidant catalase and SOD2 and the attenuated expression of the ROS generation enzyme NOX4. In conclusion, our results provide new evidence that CD38 deficiency protects the heart from I/R injury through activating SIRT1/FOXOs-mediated antioxidative stress pathway. PMID:27547294

  18. Protective vaccination with promastigote surface antigen 2 from Leishmania major is mediated by a TH1 type of immune response.

    PubMed

    Handman, E; Symons, F M; Baldwin, T M; Curtis, J M; Scheerlinck, J P

    1995-11-01

    Leishmania major promastigote surface antigen-2 complex (PSA-2) comprises a family of three similar but distinct polypeptides. The three PSA-2 polypeptides were purified from cultured promastigotes by a combination of detergent phase separation and monoclonal antibody affinity chromatography. Intraperitoneal vaccination of C3H/He mice with PSA-2 with Corynebacterium parvum as an adjuvant resulted in complete protection from lesion development after challenge infection with virulent L. major. Significant protection was also obtained in the genetically susceptible BALB/cH-2k and BALB/c mice. One of the PSA-2 genes was cloned and expressed in both Escherichia coli and Leishmania mexicana promastigotes. Vaccination with the recombinant PSA-2 purified from E. coli did not confer protection, in contrast to the L. mexicana-derived recombinant PSA-2, which provided excellent protection. CD4+ T cells isolated from the spleens of vaccinated mice produced large amounts of gamma interferon but no detectable interleukin 4 upon stimulation with PSA-2 in vitro. Limiting dilution analysis showed a marked increase in the precursor frequency of PSA-2-specific gamma interferon-secreting CD4+ T cells. No substantial change in precursor frequency was observed for interleukin 4-secreting T cells in the vaccinated mice. A CD4+ PSA-2 specific T-cell line generated from splenocytes of a vaccinated mouse produces a cytokine pattern consistent with a TH1 phenotype. Intravenous injection of this line into naive mice reduced significantly the parasite burden upon challenge infection. Taken together, the data suggest that vaccination with PSA-2 induces a TH1 type of immune response which protects mice from L. major infection. Moreover, a single recombinant PSA-2 polypeptide derived from a genomic clone can also vaccinate, provided that the structural form of the antigen is near native. PMID:7591056

  19. Novel mechanism of cardiac protection by valsartan: synergetic roles of TGF-β1 and HIF-1α in Ang II-mediated fibrosis after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xizhong; Wei, Hongchao; Wang, Dacheng

    2015-08-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 is a known factor in angiotensin II (Ang II)-mediated cardiac fibrosis after myocardial infarction (MI). Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (Hif-1α) was recently demonstrated to involve in the tissue fibrosis and influenced by Ang II. However, whether Hif-1α contributed to the Ang II-mediated cardiac fibrosis after MI, and whether interaction or synergetic roles between Hif-1α and TGF-β pathways existed in the process was unclear. In vitro, cardiac cells were incubated under hypoxia or Ang II to mimic ischaemia. In vivo, valsartan was intravenously injected into Sprague-Dawley rats with MI daily for 1 week; saline and hydralazine (another anti-hypertensive agent like valsartan) was used as control. The fibrosis-related proteins were detected by Western blotting. Cardiac structure and function were assessed with multimodality methods. We demonstrated in vitro that hypoxia would induce the up-regulation of Ang II, TGF-β/Smad and Hif-1α, which further induced collagen accumulation. By blocking with valsartan, a blocker of Ang II type I (AT1) receptor, we confirmed that the up-regulation of TGF-β/Smad and Hif-1α was through the Ang II-mediated pathway. By administering TGF-β or dimethyloxalylglycine, we determined that both TGF-β/Smad and Hif-1α contributed to Ang II-mediated collagen accumulation and a synergetic effect between them was observed. Consistent with in vitro results, valsartan significantly attenuated the expression of TGF-β/Smad, Hif-1α and fibrosis-related protein in rats after MI. Heart function, infarcted size, wall thickness as well as myocardial vascularization of ischaemic hearts were also significantly improved by valsartan compared with saline and hydralazine. Our study may provide novel insights into the mechanisms of Ang II-induced cardiac fibrosis as well as into the cardiac protection of valsartan.

  20. Differential roles of p38-MAPK and JNKs in mediating early protection or apoptosis in the hyperthermic perfused amphibian heart.

    PubMed

    Gaitanaki, Catherine; Mastri, Michalis; Aggeli, Ioanna-Katerina S; Beis, Isidoros

    2008-08-01

    In the present study the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) by hyperthermia was investigated in the isolated perfused Rana ridibunda heart. Hyperthermia (42 degrees C) was found to profoundly stimulate p38-MAPK phosphorylation within 0.5 h, with maximal values being attained at 1 h [4.503(+/-0.577)-fold relative to control, P<0.01]. JNKs were also activated under these conditions in a sustained manner for at least 4 h [2.641(+/-0.217)-fold relative to control, P<0.01]. Regarding their substrates, heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) was maximally phosphorylated at 1 h [2.261(+/-0.327)-fold relative to control, P<0.01] and c-Jun at a later phase [3 h: 5.367(+/-0.081)-fold relative to control, P<0.001]. Hyperthermia-induced p38-MAPK activation was found to be dependent on the Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1) and was also suppressed by catalase (Cat) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), implicating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS were also implicated in the activation of JNKs by hyperthermia, with the Na+/K+-ATPase acting as a mediator of this effect at an early stage and the NHE1 getting involved at a later time point. Finally, JNKs were found to be the principal mediators of the apoptosis induced under hyperthermic conditions, as their inhibition abolished poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage after 4 h at 42 degrees C. Overall, to our knowledge, this study highlights for the first time the variable mediators implicated in the transduction of the hyperthermic signal in the isolated perfused heart of an ectotherm and deciphers a potential salutary effect of p38-MAPK as well as the fundamental role of JNKs in the induced apoptosis.

  1. Moringa oleifera Lam. seed extract prevents fat diet induced oxidative stress in mice and protects liver cell-nuclei from hydroxyl radical mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Das, Nilanjan; Ganguli, Debdutta; Dey, Sanjit

    2015-12-01

    High fat diet (HFD) prompts metabolic pattern inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mitochondria thereby triggering multitude of chronic disorders in human. Antioxidants from plant sources may be an imperative remedy against this disorder. However, it requires scientific validation. In this study, we explored if (i) Moringa oleifera seed extract (MoSE) can neutralize ROS generated in HFD fed mice; (ii) protect cell-nuclei damage developed by Fenton reaction in vitro. Swiss mice were fed with HFD to develop oxidative stress model (HFD group). Other groups were control, seed extract alone treated, and MoSE simultaneously (HS) treated. Treatment period was of 15 days. Antioxidant enzymes with tissue nitrite content (TNC) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were estimated from liver homogenate. HS group showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH) activity, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) compared to only HFD fed group. Further, TNC and LPO decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in HS group compared to HFD fed group. MoSE also protected hepatocytes nuclei from the hydroxyl radicals generated by Fenton reaction. MoSE was found to be polyphenol rich with potent reducing power, free radicals and hydroxyl radicals scavenging activity. Thus, MoSE exhibited robust antioxidant prospective to neutralize ROS developed in HFD fed mice and also protected the nuclei damage from hydroxyl radicals. Hence, it can be used as herbal medication against HFD induced ROS mediated disorders.

  2. Identification of ypqP as a New Bacillus subtilis biofilm determinant that mediates the protection of Staphylococcus aureus against antimicrobial agents in mixed-species communities.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Vizuete, Pilar; Le Coq, Dominique; Bridier, Arnaud; Herry, Jean-Marie; Aymerich, Stéphane; Briandet, Romain

    2015-01-01

    In most habitats, microbial life is organized in biofilms, three-dimensional edifices sustained by extracellular polymeric substances that enable bacteria to resist harsh and changing environments. Under multispecies conditions, bacteria can benefit from the polymers produced by other species ("public goods"), thus improving their survival under toxic conditions. A recent study showed that a Bacillus subtilis hospital isolate (NDmed) was able to protect Staphylococcus aureus from biocide action in multispecies biofilms. In this work, we identified ypqP, a gene whose product is required in NDmed for thick-biofilm formation on submerged surfaces and for resistance to two biocides widely used in hospitals. NDmed and S. aureus formed mixed biofilms, and both their spatial arrangement and pathogen protection were mediated by YpqP. Functional ypqP is present in other natural B. subtilis biofilm-forming isolates. However, the gene is disrupted by the SPβ prophage in the weak submerged-biofilm-forming strains NCIB3610 and 168, which are both less resistant than NDmed to the biocides tested. Furthermore, in a 168 laboratory strain cured of the SPβ prophage, the reestablishment of a functional ypqP gene led to increased thickness and resistance to biocides of the associated biofilms. We therefore propose that YpqP is a new and important determinant of B. subtilis surface biofilm architecture, protection against exposure to toxic compounds, and social behavior in bacterial communities. PMID:25326298

  3. Parasite-Mediated Upregulation of NK Cell-Derived Gamma Interferon Protects against Severe Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Influenza Virus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Kevin B.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Knoll, Laura J.

    2011-01-01

    Outbreaks of influenza A viruses are associated with significant human morbidity worldwide. Given the increasing resistance to the available influenza drugs, new therapies for the treatment of influenza virus infection are needed. An alternative approach is to identify products that enhance a protective immune response. In these studies, we demonstrate that infecting mice with the Th1-inducing parasite Toxoplasma gondii prior to highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza virus infection led to decreased lung viral titers and enhanced survival. A noninfectious fraction of T. gondii soluble antigens (STAg) elicited an immune response similar to that elicited by live parasites, and administration of STAg 2 days after H5N1 influenza virus infection enhanced survival, lowered viral titers, and reduced clinical disease. STAg administration protected H5N1 virus-infected mice lacking lymphocytes, suggesting that while the adaptive immune response was not required for enhanced survival, it was necessary for STAg-mediated viral clearance. Mechanistically, we found that administration of STAg led to increased production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) from natural killer (NK) cells, which were both necessary and sufficient for survival. Further, administration of exogenous IFN-γ alone enhanced survival from H5N1 influenza virus infection, although not to the same level as STAg treatment. These studies demonstrate that a noninfectious T. gondii extract enhances the protective immune response against severe H5N1 influenza virus infections even when a single dose is administered 2 days postinfection. PMID:21734055

  4. DJ-1 plays an important role in caffeic acid-mediated protection of the gastrointestinal mucosa against ketoprofen-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Jhang, Jhih-Jia; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2014-10-01

    Ketoprofen is widely used to alleviate pain and inflammation in clinical medicine; however, this drug may cause oxidative stress and lead to gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers. We previously reported that nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays a crucial role in protecting cells against reactive oxygen species, and it facilitates the prevention of ketoprofen-induced GI mucosal ulcers. Recent reports suggested that Nrf2 becomes unstable in the absence of DJ-1/PARK7, attenuating the activity of Nrf2-regulated downstream antioxidant enzymes. Thus, increasing Nrf2 translocation by DJ-1 may represent a novel means for GI protection. In vitro, caffeic acid increases the nuclear/cytosolic Nrf2 ratio and the mRNA expression of the downstream antioxidant enzymes, ϒ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and heme oxygenase-1, by activating the JNK/p38 pathway in Int-407 cells. Moreover, knockdown of DJ-1 also reversed caffeic acid-induced nuclear Nrf2 protein expression in a JNK/p38-dependent manner. Our results also indicated that treatment of Sprague-Dawley rats with caffeic acid prior to the administration of ketoprofen inhibited oxidative damage and reversed the inhibitory effects of ketoprofen on the antioxidant system and DJ-1 protein expression in the GI mucosa. Our observations suggest that DJ-1 plays an important role in caffeic acid-mediated protection against ketoprofen-induced oxidative damage in the GI mucosa.

  5. Moringa oleifera Lam. seed extract prevents fat diet induced oxidative stress in mice and protects liver cell-nuclei from hydroxyl radical mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Das, Nilanjan; Ganguli, Debdutta; Dey, Sanjit

    2015-12-01

    High fat diet (HFD) prompts metabolic pattern inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mitochondria thereby triggering multitude of chronic disorders in human. Antioxidants from plant sources may be an imperative remedy against this disorder. However, it requires scientific validation. In this study, we explored if (i) Moringa oleifera seed extract (MoSE) can neutralize ROS generated in HFD fed mice; (ii) protect cell-nuclei damage developed by Fenton reaction in vitro. Swiss mice were fed with HFD to develop oxidative stress model (HFD group). Other groups were control, seed extract alone treated, and MoSE simultaneously (HS) treated. Treatment period was of 15 days. Antioxidant enzymes with tissue nitrite content (TNC) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were estimated from liver homogenate. HS group showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH) activity, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) compared to only HFD fed group. Further, TNC and LPO decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in HS group compared to HFD fed group. MoSE also protected hepatocytes nuclei from the hydroxyl radicals generated by Fenton reaction. MoSE was found to be polyphenol rich with potent reducing power, free radicals and hydroxyl radicals scavenging activity. Thus, MoSE exhibited robust antioxidant prospective to neutralize ROS developed in HFD fed mice and also protected the nuclei damage from hydroxyl radicals. Hence, it can be used as herbal medication against HFD induced ROS mediated disorders. PMID:26742324

  6. Identification of ypqP as a New Bacillus subtilis Biofilm Determinant That Mediates the Protection of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobial Agents in Mixed-Species Communities

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Vizuete, Pilar; Le Coq, Dominique; Bridier, Arnaud; Herry, Jean-Marie; Aymerich, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    In most habitats, microbial life is organized in biofilms, three-dimensional edifices sustained by extracellular polymeric substances that enable bacteria to resist harsh and changing environments. Under multispecies conditions, bacteria can benefit from the polymers produced by other species (“public goods”), thus improving their survival under toxic conditions. A recent study showed that a Bacillus subtilis hospital isolate (NDmed) was able to protect Staphylococcus aureus from biocide action in multispecies biofilms. In this work, we identified ypqP, a gene whose product is required in NDmed for thick-biofilm formation on submerged surfaces and for resistance to two biocides widely used in hospitals. NDmed and S. aureus formed mixed biofilms, and both their spatial arrangement and pathogen protection were mediated by YpqP. Functional ypqP is present in other natural B. subtilis biofilm-forming isolates. However, the gene is disrupted by the SPβ prophage in the weak submerged-biofilm-forming strains NCIB3610 and 168, which are both less resistant than NDmed to the biocides tested. Furthermore, in a 168 laboratory strain cured of the SPβ prophage, the reestablishment of a functional ypqP gene led to increased thickness and resistance to biocides of the associated biofilms. We therefore propose that YpqP is a new and important determinant of B. subtilis surface biofilm architecture, protection against exposure to toxic compounds, and social behavior in bacterial communities. PMID:25326298

  7. Protective Effect of Electroacupuncture on Neural Myelin Sheaths is Mediated via Promotion of Oligodendrocyte Proliferation and Inhibition of Oligodendrocyte Death After Compressed Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Siqin; Tang, Chenglin; Sun, Shanquan; Cao, Wenfu; Qi, Wei; Xu, Jin; Huang, Juan; Lu, Weitian; Liu, Qian; Gong, Biao; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been used worldwide to treat demyelinating diseases, but its therapeutic mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, a custom-designed model of compressed spinal cord injury (CSCI) was used to induce demyelination. Zusanli (ST36) and Taixi (KI3) acupoints of adult rats were stimulated by EA to demonstrate its protective effect. At 14 days after EA, both locomotor skills and ultrastructural features of myelin sheath were significantly improved. Phenotypes of proliferating cells were identified by double immunolabeling of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine with antibodies to cell markers: NG2 [oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) marker], 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) (oligodendrocyte marker), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (astrocyte marker). EA enhanced the proliferation of OPCs and CNPase, as well as the differentiation of OPCs by promoting Olig2 (the basic helix-loop-helix protein) and attenuating Id2 (the inhibitor of DNA binding 2). EA could also improve myelin basic protein (MBP) and protect existing oligodendrocytes from apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-12 (a representative of endoplasmic reticulum stress) and cytochrome c (an apoptotic factor and hallmark of mitochondria). Therefore, our results indicate that the protective effect of EA on neural myelin sheaths is mediated via promotion of oligodendrocyte proliferation and inhibition of oligodendrocyte death after CSCI.

  8. Arabidopsis miR171-targeted scarecrow-like proteins bind to GT cis-elements and mediate gibberellin-regulated chlorophyll biosynthesis under light conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhaoxue; Hu, Xupeng; Cai, Wenjuan; Huang, Weihua; Zhou, Xin; Luo, Qian; Yang, Hongquan; Wang, Jiawei; Huang, Jirong

    2014-08-01

    An extraordinarily precise regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. However, our knowledge on the complex regulatory mechanisms of chlorophyll biosynthesis is very limited. Previous studies have demonstrated that miR171-targeted scarecrow-like proteins (SCL6/22/27) negatively regulate chlorophyll biosynthesis via an unknown mechanism. Here we showed that SCLs inhibit the expression of the key gene encoding protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) in light-grown plants, but have no significant effect on protochlorophyllide biosynthesis in etiolated seedlings. Histochemical analysis of β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in transgenic plants expressing pSCL27::rSCL27-GUS revealed that SCL27-GUS accumulates at high levels and suppresses chlorophyll biosynthesis at the leaf basal proliferation region during leaf development. Transient gene expression assays showed that the promoter activity of PORC is indeed regulated by SCL27. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative PCR assays showed that SCL27 binds to the promoter region of PORC in vivo. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that SCL27 is directly interacted with G(A/G)(A/T)AA(A/T)GT cis-elements of the PORC promoter. Furthermore, genetic analysis showed that gibberellin (GA)-regulated chlorophyll biosynthesis is mediated, at least in part, by SCLs. We demonstrated that SCL27 interacts with DELLA proteins in vitro and in vivo by yeast-two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation analysis and found that their interaction reduces the binding activity of SCL27 to the PORC promoter. Additionally, we showed that SCL27 activates MIR171 gene expression, forming a feedback regulatory loop. Taken together, our data suggest that the miR171-SCL module is critical for mediating GA-DELLA signaling in the coordinate regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis and leaf growth in light.

  9. Emodin-mediated protection from acute myocardial infarction via inhibition of inflammation and apoptosis in local ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanxia; Tu, Xin; Lin, Guosheng; Xia, Hao; Huang, Hao; Wan, Jing; Cheng, Zhide; Liu, Mengyuan; Chen, Gao; Zhang, Haimou; Fu, Jinrong; Liu, Qian; Liu, Dong-Xu

    2007-10-13

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is associated with inflammation and apoptosis. Emodin plays an anti-inflammatory role in several inflammatory diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated that emodin protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, its mechanism underlying its effects remains unknown. In a murine model of AMI, based on ligation of the left coronary artery, administration of emodin reduced myocardial infarct size (MIS) in a dose-dependent manner. Emodin significantly suppressed TNF-alpha expression and NF-kappaB activation in the local myocardial infarction area. Treatment with emodin inhibited myocardial cell apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-3 activation. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that emodin protects against myocardial cell injury via suppression of local inflammation and apoptosis.

  10. CD4+ T cells mediate the protective effect of the recombinant Asp f3-based anti-aspergillosis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Arevalo, Diana; Bagramyan, Karine; Hong, Teresa B; Ito, James I; Kalkum, Markus

    2011-06-01

    The mortality and morbidity caused by invasive aspergillosis present a major obstacle to the successful treatment of blood cancers with hematopoietic cell transplants. Patients who receive hematopoietic cell transplants are usually immunosuppressed for extended periods, and infection with the ubiquitous mold Aspergillus fumigatus is responsible for most cases of aspergillosis. Previously, we demonstrated that vaccination with recombinant forms of the A. fumigatus protein Asp f3 protected cortisone acetate-immunosuppressed mice from experimentally induced pulmonary aspergillosis. Here, we investigated the vaccine's protective mechanism and evaluated in particular the roles of antibodies and T cells. After vaccination, Asp f3-specific preinfection IgG titers did not significantly differ between surviving and nonsurviving mice, and passive transfer of anti-Asp f3 antibodies did not protect immunosuppressed recipients from aspergillosis. We experimentally confirmed Asp f3's predicted peroxisomal localization in A. fumigatus hyphae. We found that fungal Asp f3 is inaccessible to antibodies, unless both cell walls and membranes have been permeabilized. Antibody-induced depletion of CD4+ T cells reduced the survival of recombinant Asp f3 (rAsp f3)-vaccinated mice to nonimmune levels, and transplantation of purified CD4+ T cells from rAsp f3-vaccinated mice into nonimmunized recipients transferred antifungal protection. In addition, residues 60 to 79 and 75 to 94 of Asp f3 contain epitopes that induce proliferation of T cells from vaccinated survivors. Vaccine-primed CD4+ T cells are not expected to clear the fungal pathogen directly; however, they may locally activate immunosuppressed phagocytes that elicit the antifungal effect.

  11. Sperm fucosyltransferase-5 mediates spermatozoa-oviductal epithelial cell interaction to protect human spermatozoa from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Venus Wenxin; Lee, Cheuk-Lun; Lee, Yin-Lau; Lam, Kevin K W; Ko, Jennifer K Y; Yeung, William S B; Ho, Pak-Chung; Chiu, Philip C N

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major cause of sperm dysfunction. Excessive ROS generation reduces fertilization and enhances DNA damage of spermatozoa. Interaction between spermatozoa and oviductal epithelial cells improves the fertilizing ability of and reduces chromatin damage in spermatozoa. Our previous data showed that oviductal epithelial cell membrane proteins interact with the human spermatozoa and protect them from ROS-induced reduction in sperm motility, membrane integrity and DNA integrity. Sperm fucosyltransferase-5 (sFUT5) is a membrane carbohydrate-binding protein on human spermatozoa. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that sFUT5 is involved in human spermatozoa-oviduct interaction and the beneficial effects of such interaction on the fertilizing ability of human spermatozoa. Anti-sFUT5 antibody-treated spermatozoa had reduced binding to oviductal membrane proteins. It is consistent with the result that affinity-purified sFUT5 is bound to the epithelial lining of human oviduct and to the immortalized human oviductal epithelial cell line, OE-E6/E7. Pretreatment of spermatozoa with anti-sFUT5 antibody and oviductal membrane proteins with sFUT5 suppressed the protective action of oviductal membrane proteins against ROS/cryopreservation-induced oxidative damage in spermatozoa. Asialofetuin, a reported sFUT5 substrate, can partly mimic the protective effect of oviductal epithelial cell membrane proteins on sperm motility, membrane and DNA integrity. The results enhance our understanding on the protective mechanism of oviduct on sperm functions.

  12. Passive immunotherapy for anthrax toxin mediated by an adenovirus expressing an anti-protective antigen single-chain antibody.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Boyer, Julie L; Tan, Yadi; Alipui, D Olivier; Hackett, Neil R; Crystal, Ronald G

    2005-02-01

    In the 2001 U.S. bioterror attacks, 33,000 individuals required postexposure prophylaxis, 18 subjects contracted anthrax (11 inhalation, 7 cutaneous), and despite optimal medical therapy, 5 deaths resulted. Rapid protection against anthrax is required in a bioterrorism scenario; this study describes an in vivo gene transfer-based therapy that uses a human adenovirus (Ad)-based vector (AdalphaPAscAb) encoding a single-chain antibody directed against protective antigen (PA), a critical component of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Following AdalphaPAscAb administration to mice, anti-PA single-chain antibody and anti-PA neutralizing activity were detected in serum over a 2-week period. Substantial survival advantage from anthrax lethal toxin was conferred by AdalphaPAscAb following administration from 1 to 14 days prior to toxin challenge, compared to no survival associated with an Ad vector expressing a control single-chain antibody. Passive immunotherapy with an Ad-based vector may be a rapid, convenient approach for protecting a susceptible population against anthrax, including use as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy.

  13. Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a Live Vaccine Vehicle for the Induction of Protective Anti-Viral Cell-Mediated Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hao; Slifka, Mark K.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Jensen, Eric R.; Ahmed, Rafi; Miller, Jeff F.

    1995-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive bacterium that is able to enter host cells, escape from the endocytic vesicle, multiply within the cytoplasm, and spread directly from cell to cell without encountering the extracellular milieu. The ability of LM to gain access to the host cell cytosol allows proteins secreted by the bacterium to efficiently enter the pathway for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen processing and presentation. We have established a genetic system for expression and secretion of foreign antigens by recombinant strains, based on stable site-specific integration of expression cassettes into the LM genome. The ability of LM recombinants to induce protective immunity against a heterologous pathogen was demonstrated with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). LM strains expressing the entire LCMV nucleoprotein or an H-2L^d-restricted nucleoprotein epitope (aa 118-126) were constructed. Immunization of mice with LM vaccine strains conferred protection against challenge with virulent strains of LCMV that otherwise establish chronic infection in naive adult mice. In vivo depletion of CD8^+ T cells from vaccinated mice abrogated their ability to clear viral infection, showing that protective anti-viral immunity was due to CD8^+ T cells.

  14. DNA Microarray Highlights Nrf2-Mediated Neuron Protection Targeted by Wasabi-Derived Isothiocyanates in IMR-32 Cells.

    PubMed

    Trio, Phoebe Zapanta; Fujisaki, Satoru; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Hisanaga, Ayami; Sakao, Kozue; Hou, De-Xing

    2016-01-01

    6-(Methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MSITC), 6-(methylthio)hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MTITC), and 4-(methylsulfinyl)butyl isothiocyanate (4-MSITC) are isothiocyanate (ITC) bioactive compounds from Japanese Wasabi. Previous in vivo studies highlighted the neuroprotective potential of ITCs since ITCs enhance the production of antioxidant-related enzymes. Thus, in this present study, a genome-wide DNA microarray analysis was designed to profile gene expression changes in a neuron cell line, IMR-32, stimulated by these ITCs. Among these ITCs, 6-MSITC caused the expression changes of most genes (263), of which 100 genes were upregulated and 163 genes were downregulated. Gene categorization showed that most of the differentially expressed genes are involved in oxidative stress response, and pathway analysis further revealed that Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress pathway is the top of the ITC-modulated signaling pathway. Finally, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting confirmed the gene expression and protein products of the major targets by ITCs. Taken together, Wasabi-derived ITCs might target the Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress pathway to exert neuroprotective effects. PMID:27547033

  15. Normalizing Microbiota-Induced Retinoic Acid Deficiency Stimulates Protective CD8(+) T Cell-Mediated Immunity in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Nupur; Yuan, Robert; Prestwood, Tyler R; Penny, Hweixian Leong; DiMaio, Michael A; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E; Krois, Charles R; Kenkel, Justin A; Pham, Tho D; Carmi, Yaron; Tolentino, Lorna; Choi, Okmi; Hulett, Reyna; Wang, Jinshan; Winer, Daniel A; Napoli, Joseph L; Engleman, Edgar G

    2016-09-20

    Although all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is a key regulator of intestinal immunity, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. We found that mice with colitis-associated CRC had a marked deficiency in colonic atRA due to alterations in atRA metabolism mediated by microbiota-induced intestinal inflammation. Human ulcerative colitis (UC), UC-associated CRC, and sporadic CRC specimens have similar alterations in atRA metabolic enzymes, consistent with reduced colonic atRA. Inhibition of atRA signaling promoted tumorigenesis, whereas atRA supplementation reduced tumor burden. The benefit of atRA treatment was mediated by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, which were activated due to MHCI upregulation on tumor cells. Consistent with these findings, increased colonic expression of the atRA-catabolizing enzyme, CYP26A1, correlated with reduced frequencies of tumoral cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and with worse disease prognosis in human CRC. These results reveal a mechanism by which microbiota drive colon carcinogenesis and highlight atRA metabolism as a therapeutic target for CRC.

  16. DNA Microarray Highlights Nrf2-Mediated Neuron Protection Targeted by Wasabi-Derived Isothiocyanates in IMR-32 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trio, Phoebe Zapanta; Fujisaki, Satoru; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Hisanaga, Ayami; Sakao, Kozue; Hou, De-Xing

    2016-01-01

    6-(Methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MSITC), 6-(methylthio)hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MTITC), and 4-(methylsulfinyl)butyl isothiocyanate (4-MSITC) are isothiocyanate (ITC) bioactive compounds from Japanese Wasabi. Previous in vivo studies highlighted the neuroprotective potential of ITCs since ITCs enhance the production of antioxidant-related enzymes. Thus, in this present study, a genome-wide DNA microarray analysis was designed to profile gene expression changes in a neuron cell line, IMR-32, stimulated by these ITCs. Among these ITCs, 6-MSITC caused the expression changes of most genes (263), of which 100 genes were upregulated and 163 genes were downregulated. Gene categorization showed that most of the differentially expressed genes are involved in oxidative stress response, and pathway analysis further revealed that Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress pathway is the top of the ITC-modulated signaling pathway. Finally, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting confirmed the gene expression and protein products of the major targets by ITCs. Taken together, Wasabi-derived ITCs might target the Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress pathway to exert neuroprotective effects. PMID:27547033

  17. Rapid nontranscriptional activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates increased cerebral blood flow and stroke protection by corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Limbourg, Florian P.; Huang, Zhihong; Plumier, Jean-Christophe; Simoncini, Tommaso; Fujioka, Masayuki; Tuckermann, Jan; Schütz, Günther; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Liao, James K.

    2002-01-01

    Many cellular responses to corticosteroids involve the transcriptional modulation of target genes by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). A rapid, non-nuclear effect of GR was found to mediate neuroprotection. High-dose corticosteroids (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally), given within 2 hours of transient cerebral ischemia, acutely increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, augmented regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) by 40% to 50%, and reduced cerebral infarct size by 32%. These neuroprotective effects of corticosteroids were abolished by the GR antagonist RU486 and by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and were absent in eNOS–/– mice. To determine the mechanism by which GR activated eNOS, we measured the effect of corticosteroids on PI3K and the protein kinase Akt. In a ligand-dependent manner, GR activated PI3K and Akt in vitro and in vivo caused NO-dependent vasodilation, which was blocked by cotreatment with RU486 or the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 but not by transcriptional inhibitors. Indeed, a mutant GR, which cannot dimerize and bind to DNA, still activated PI3K and Akt in response to corticosteroids. These findings indicate that non-nuclear GR rapidly activates eNOS through the PI3K/Akt pathway and suggest that this mechanism mediates the acute neuroprotective effects of corticosteroids through augmentation of CBF. PMID:12464678

  18. Normalizing Microbiota-Induced Retinoic Acid Deficiency Stimulates Protective CD8(+) T Cell-Mediated Immunity in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Nupur; Yuan, Robert; Prestwood, Tyler R; Penny, Hweixian Leong; DiMaio, Michael A; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E; Krois, Charles R; Kenkel, Justin A; Pham, Tho D; Carmi, Yaron; Tolentino, Lorna; Choi, Okmi; Hulett, Reyna; Wang, Jinshan; Winer, Daniel A; Napoli, Joseph L; Engleman, Edgar G

    2016-09-20

    Although all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is a key regulator of intestinal immunity, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. We found that mice with colitis-associated CRC had a marked deficiency in colonic atRA due to alterations in atRA metabolism mediated by microbiota-induced intestinal inflammation. Human ulcerative colitis (UC), UC-associated CRC, and sporadic CRC specimens have similar alterations in atRA metabolic enzymes, consistent with reduced colonic atRA. Inhibition of atRA signaling promoted tumorigenesis, whereas atRA supplementation reduced tumor burden. The benefit of atRA treatment was mediated by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, which were activated due to MHCI upregulation on tumor cells. Consistent with these findings, increased colonic expression of the atRA-catabolizing enzyme, CYP26A1, correlated with reduced frequencies of tumoral cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and with worse disease prognosis in human CRC. These results reveal a mechanism by which microbiota drive colon carcinogenesis and highlight atRA metabolism as a therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27590114

  19. Regulation of Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2 Expression by Adrenoceptors and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein-Potential Crosstalk Between Sterol and Glycerophospholipid Mediators.

    PubMed

    Chew, Wee-Siong; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) is an 85-kDa enzyme that releases docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from glycerophospholipids. DHA can be metabolized to resolvins and neuroprotectins that have anti-inflammatory properties and effects on neural plasticity. Recent studies show an important role of prefrontal cortical iPLA2 in hippocampo-prefrontal cortical LTP and antidepressant-like effect of the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NRI) antidepressant, maprotiline. In this study, we elucidated the cellular mechanisms through which stimulation of adrenergic receptors could lead to increased iPLA2 expression. Treatment of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with maprotiline, another tricyclic antidepressant with noradrenaline reuptake inhibiting properties, nortriptyline, and the adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine, resulted in increased iPLA2β mRNA expression. This increase was blocked by inhibitors to alpha-1 adrenergic receptor, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP). Maprotiline and phenylephrine induced binding of SREBP-2 to sterol regulatory element (SRE) region on the iPLA2 promoter, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Together, results indicate that stimulation of adrenoreceptors causes increased iPLA2 expression via MAP kinase/ERK 1/2 and SREBP, and suggest a possible mechanism for effect of CNS noradrenaline on neural plasticity and crosstalk between sterol and glycerophospholipid mediators, that may play a role in physiological or pathophysiological processes in the brain and other organs.

  20. Development and evaluation of a finite element model of the THOR for occupant protection of spaceflight crewmembers.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Jacob B; Somers, Jeffrey T; Wells, Jessica A; Perry, Chris E; Untaroiu, Costin D

    2015-09-01

    New vehicles are currently being developed to transport humans to space. During the landing phases, crewmembers may be exposed to spinal and frontal loading. To reduce the risk of injuries during these common impact scenarios, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing new safety standards for spaceflight. The Test Device for Human Occupant Restraint (THOR) advanced multi-directional anthropomorphic test device (ATD), with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration modification kit, has been chosen to evaluate occupant spacecraft safety because of its improved biofidelity. NASA tested the THOR ATD at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) in various impact configurations, including frontal and spinal loading. A computational finite element model (FEM) of the THOR to match these latest modifications was developed in LS-DYNA software. The main goal of this study was to calibrate and validate the THOR FEM for use in future spacecraft safety studies. An optimization-based method was developed to calibrate the material models of the lumbar joints and pelvic flesh. Compression test data were used to calibrate the quasi-static material properties of the pelvic flesh, while whole body THOR ATD kinematic and kinetic responses under spinal and frontal loading conditions were used for dynamic calibration. The performance of the calibrated THOR FEM was evaluated by simulating separate THOR ATD tests with different crash pulses along both spinal and frontal directions. The model response was compared with test data by calculating its correlation score using the CORrelation and Analysis rating system. The biofidelity of the THOR FEM was then evaluated against tests recorded on human volunteers under 3 different frontal and spinal impact pulses. The calibrated THOR FEM responded with high similarity to the THOR ATD in all validation tests. The THOR FEM showed good biofidelity relative to human-volunteer data under spinal loading, but limited

  1. Th1-mediated immunity against Helicobacter pylori can compensate for lack of Th17 cells and can protect mice in the absence of immunization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hua; Nedrud, John G; Blanchard, Thomas G; Zagorski, Brandon M; Li, Guanghui; Shiu, Jessica; Xu, Jinghua; Czinn, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection can be significantly reduced by immunization in mice. Th17 cells play an essential role in the protective immune response. Th1 immunity has also been demonstrated to play a role in the protective immune response and can compensate in the absence of IL-17. To further address the potential of Th1 immunity, we investigated the efficacy of immunization in mice deficient in IL-23p19, a cytokine that promotes Th17 cell development. We also examined the course of Helicobacter infection in unimmunized mice treated with Th1 promoting cytokine IL-12. C57BL/6, IL-12 p35 KO, and IL-23 p19 KO mice were immunized and challenged with H. pylori. Protective immunity was evaluated by CFU determination and QPCR on gastric biopsies. Gastric and splenic IL-17 and IFNγ levels were determined by PCR or by ELISA. Balb/c mice were infected with H. felis and treated with IL-12 therapy and the resulting gastric bacterial load and inflammatory response were assessed by histologic evaluation. Vaccine induced reductions in bacterial load that were comparable to wild type mice were observed in both IL-12 p35 and IL-23 p19 KO mice. In the absence of IL-23 p19, IL-17 levels remained low but IFNγ levels increased significantly in both immunized challenged and unimmunized/challenged mice. Additionally, treatment of H. felis-infected Balb/c mice with IL-12 resulted in increased gastric inflammation and the eradication of bacteria in most mice. These data suggest that Th1 immunity can compensate for the lack of IL-23 mediated Th17 responses, and that protective Th1 immunity can be induced in the absence of immunization through cytokine therapy of the infected host.

  2. Attitudinal Ambivalence as a Protective Factor Against Junk Food Advertisements: A Moderated Mediation Model of Behavioral Intention.

    PubMed

    Ran, Weina; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the role of attitudinal ambivalence in moderating the effects of junk food advertisements on behavioral intentions by tapping different facets of this construct-felt ambivalence, potential ambivalence, and affective-cognitive ambivalence. Results based on an online survey of college students indicate that attention to junk food advertisements has an indirect positive effect on intentions to eat junk food through its positive effect on attitudes toward junk food. A moderated mediation model reveals that this indirect effect of junk food advertisements is weakened as respondents' levels of felt ambivalence increase. This moderating role is not observed for the measures of potential ambivalence and affective-cognitive ambivalence. Implications are discussed for health interventions.

  3. Critical role of fatty acid metabolism in ILC2-mediated barrier protection during malnutrition and helminth infection.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Christoph; Harrison, Oliver J; Schmitt, Vanessa; Pelletier, Martin; Spencer, Sean P; Urban, Joseph F; Ploch, Michelle; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Siegel, Richard M; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2016-07-25

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) play an important role in many immune processes, including control of infections, inflammation, and tissue repair. To date, little is known about the metabolism of ILC and whether these cells can metabolically adapt in response to environmental signals. Here we show that type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), important mediators of barrier immunity, predominantly depend on fatty acid (FA) metabolism during helminth infection. Further, in situations where an essential nutrient, such as vitamin A, is limited, ILC2 sustain their function and selectively maintain interleukin 13 (IL-13) production via increased acquisition and utilization of FA. Together, these results reveal that ILC2 preferentially use FAs to maintain their function in the context of helminth infection or malnutrition and propose that enhanced FA usage and FA-dependent IL-13 production by ILC2 could represent a host adaptation to maintain barrier immunity under dietary restriction. PMID:27432938

  4. Critical role of fatty acid metabolism in ILC2-mediated barrier protection during malnutrition and helminth infection.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Christoph; Harrison, Oliver J; Schmitt, Vanessa; Pelletier, Martin; Spencer, Sean P; Urban, Joseph F; Ploch, Michelle; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Siegel, Richard M; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2016-07-25

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) play an important role in many immune processes, including control of infections, inflammation, and tissue repair. To date, little is known about the metabolism of ILC and whether these cells can metabolically adapt in response to environmental signals. Here we show that type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), important mediators of barrier immunity, predominantly depend on fatty acid (FA) metabolism during helminth infection. Further, in situations where an essential nutrient, such as vitamin A, is limited, ILC2 sustain their function and selectively maintain interleukin 13 (IL-13) production via increased acquisition and utilization of FA. Together, these results reveal that ILC2 preferentially use FAs to maintain their function in the context of helminth infection or malnutrition and propose that enhanced FA usage and FA-dependent IL-13 production by ILC2 could represent a host adaptation to maintain barrier immunity under dietary restriction.

  5. Plasmin(ogen) acquisition by group A Streptococcus protects against C3b-mediated neutrophil killing.

    PubMed

    Ly, Diane; Taylor, Jude M; Tsatsaronis, James A; Monteleone, Mercedes M; Skora, Amanda S; Donald, Cortny A; Maddocks, Tracy; Nizet, Victor; West, Nicholas P; Ranson, Marie; Walker, Mark J; McArthur, Jason D; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2014-01-01

    The globally significant human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) sequesters the host protease plasmin to the cell surface during invasive disease initiation. Recent evidence has shown that localized plasmin activity prevents opsonization of several bacterial species by key components of the innate immune system in vitro. Here we demonstrate that plasmin at the GAS cell surface resulted in degradation of complement factor C3b, and that plasminogen acquisition is associated with a decrease in C3b opsonization and neutrophil-mediated killing in vitro. Furthermore, the ability to acquire cell surface plasmin(ogen) correlates directly with a decrease in C3b opsonization, neutrophil phagocytosis, and increased bacterial survival in a humanized plasminogen mouse model of infection. These findings demonstrate that localized plasmin(ogen) plays an important role in facilitating GAS escape from the host innate immune response and increases bacterial virulence in the early stages of infection.

  6. HRD1-Mediated IGF-1R Ubiquitination Contributes to Renal Protection of Resveratrol in db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Caifeng; Xu, Weifeng; Huang, Yujie; Li, Min; Shen, Yachen; You, Hui; Liang, Xiubin

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have provided evidence to demonstrate the beneficial renal effects of resveratrol (RESV) due to its antioxidant character and its capacity for activation of surtuin 1. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective role of RESV against kidney injury are still incompletely understood. The present study used Lepr db/db (db/db) and Lepr db/m (db/m) mice as models to evaluate the effect of RESV on diabetic nephropathy (DN). RESV reduced proteinuria and attenuated the progress of renal fibrosis in db/db mice. Treatment with RESV markedly attenuated the diabetes-induced changes in renal superoxide dismutase copper/zinc, superoxide dismutase manganese, catalase, and malonydialdehyde as well as the renal expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 4 (NOX4), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and E-cadherin in db/db mice. The kidney expression of the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) was increased in db/db mice, but the expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl reductase degradation (HRD1), a ubiquitin E3 ligase, was significantly decreased in the DN model. RESV treatment dramatically decreased IGF-1R and increased HRD1 expressions, consistent with data obtained with HKC-8 cells. HRD1 physically interacted with IGF-1R in HKC-8 cells and liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) data supported the concept that IGF-1R is one of the HRD1 substrates. HRD1 promoted the IGF-1R ubiquitination for degradation in HKC-8 cells, and the down-regulation of HRD1 reversed the protective effects of RESV in HKC-8 cells. In summary, we have demonstrated that RESV reduces proteinuria and attenuates the progression of renal fibrosis in db/db mice. These protective effects of RESV on DN were associated with the up-regulation of HRD1, induced by RESV, and the promotion of IGF-1R ubiquitination and degradation.

  7. Heme oxygenase-1-mediated autophagy protects against pulmonary endothelial cell death and development of emphysema in cadmium-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Surolia, Ranu; Karki, Suman; Kim, Hyunki; Yu, Zhihong; Kulkarni, Tejaswini; Mirov, Sergey B; Carter, A Brent; Rowe, Steven M; Matalon, Sadis; Thannickal, Victor J; Agarwal, Anupam; Antony, Veena B

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary exposure to cadmium, a major component of cigarette smoke, has a dramatic impact on lung function and the development of emphysema. Cigarette smoke exposure induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a cytoprotective enzyme. In this study, we employed a truncated mouse model of emphysema by intratracheal instillation of cadmium (CdCl2) solution (0.025% per 1 mg/kg body wt) in HO-1(+/+), HO-1(-/-), and overexpressing humanized HO-1 bacterial artificial chromosome (hHO-1BAC) mice. We evaluated the role of HO-1 in cadmium-induced emphysema in mice by analyzing histopathology, micro-computed tomography scans, and lung function tests. CdCl2-exposed HO-1(-/-) mice exhibited more severe emphysema compared with HO-1(+/+) or hHO-1BAC mice. Loss of pulmonary endothelial cells (PECs) from the alveolar capillary membrane is recognized to be a target in emphysema. PECs from HO-1(+/+), HO-1(-/-), and hHO-1BAC were employed to define the underlying molecular mechanism for the protection from emphysema by HO-1. Electron microscopy, expression of autophagic markers (microtubule-associated protein 1B-light chain 3 II, autophagy protein 5, and Beclin1) and apoptotic marker (cleaved caspase 3) suggested induction of autophagy and apoptosis in PECs after CdCl2 treatment. CdCl2-treated HO-1(-/-) PECs exhibited downregulation of autophagic markers and significantly increased cleaved caspase 3 expression and activity (∼4-fold higher). Moreover, hHO-1BAC PECs demonstrated upregulated autophagy and absence of cleaved caspase 3 expression or activity. Pretreatment of HO-1(+/+) PECs with rapamycin induced autophagy and resulted in reduced cell death upon cadmium treatment. Induction of autophagy following CdCl2 treatment was found to be protective from apoptotic cell death. HO-1 induced protective autophagy in PECs and mitigated cadmium-induced emphysema.

  8. Heme oxygenase-1-mediated autophagy protects against pulmonary endothelial cell death and development of emphysema in cadmium-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Surolia, Ranu; Karki, Suman; Kim, Hyunki; Yu, Zhihong; Kulkarni, Tejaswini; Mirov, Sergey B.; Carter, A. Brent; Rowe, Steven M.; Matalon, Sadis; Thannickal, Victor J.; Agarwal, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to cadmium, a major component of cigarette smoke, has a dramatic impact on lung function and the development of emphysema. Cigarette smoke exposure induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a cytoprotective enzyme. In this study, we employed a truncated mouse model of emphysema by intratracheal instillation of cadmium (CdCl2) solution (0.025% per 1 mg/kg body wt) in HO-1+/+, HO-1−/−, and overexpressing humanized HO-1 bacterial artificial chromosome (hHO-1BAC) mice. We evaluated the role of HO-1 in cadmium-induced emphysema in mice by analyzing histopathology, micro-computed tomography scans, and lung function tests. CdCl2-exposed HO-1−/− mice exhibited more severe emphysema compared with HO-1+/+ or hHO-1BAC mice. Loss of pulmonary endothelial cells (PECs) from the alveolar capillary membrane is recognized to be a target in emphysema. PECs from HO-1+/+, HO-1−/−, and hHO-1BAC were employed to define the underlying molecular mechanism for the protection from emphysema by HO-1. Electron microscopy, expression of autophagic markers (microtubule-associated protein 1B-light chain 3 II, autophagy protein 5, and Beclin1) and apoptotic marker (cleaved caspase 3) suggested induction of autophagy and apoptosis in PECs after CdCl2 treatment. CdCl2-treated HO-1−/− PECs exhibited downregulation of autophagic markers and significantly increased cleaved caspase 3 expression and activity (∼4-fold higher). Moreover, hHO-1BAC PECs demonstrated upregulated autophagy and absence of cleaved caspase 3 expression or activity. Pretreatment of HO-1+/+ PECs with rapamycin induced autophagy and resulted in reduced cell death upon cadmium treatment. Induction of autophagy following CdCl2 treatment was found to be protective from apoptotic cell death. HO-1 induced protective autophagy in PECs and mitigated cadmium-induced emphysema. PMID:26071551

  9. Resveratrol protects PC12 cells against OGD/ R-induced apoptosis via the mitochondrial-mediated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Zhu, Xiangyang; Chen, Miao; Ge, Qinmin; Shen, Yong; Pan, Shuming

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective potential of resveratrol against oxygen glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R)-induced apoptotic damages in well-differentiated PC12 cells and the underlying mechanisms. Cells were incubated under normal condition or OGD/R in the presence or absence of 10 μM resveratrol. Cell viability was determined with methyl-thiazolyl-tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Apoptotic ratio was determined with Hoechst 33342 staining and Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), the mitochondrial superoxide, the malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). The intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) was estimated by Fluo-3/AM. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was evaluated by 5,5′,6,6′-tetrachloro-1,1,3,3′-tetraethyl-benzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) and rhodamine 123 (Rh123). The opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) was determined by the Calcein/Co2+-quenching technique. The protein levels of cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved caspase-3 were detected by western blot analysis. The results showed that 10 μM resveratrol attenuated OGD/R-induced cell viability loss and cell apoptosis, which was associated with the decreases in the MDA content and the increases in the SOD and CAT activities. Furthermore, the accumulation of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial superoxide, disturbance of [Ca2+]i homeostasis, reduction of MMP, opening of MPTP, and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c observed in OGD/R-injured cells, which indicated a switch on the mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathway, were all reversed by resveratrol. These results suggest that resveratrol administration may play a neuroprotective role via modulating the mitochondrial-mediated signaling pathway in OGD/R-induced PC12 cell injury. PMID:26960953

  10. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c mediates increase of postprandial stearic acid, a potential target for improving insulin resistance, in hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xia; Liu, Liyan; Na, Lixin; Lu, Huimin; Li, Songtao; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2013-02-01

    Elevated serum free fatty acids (FFAs) levels play an important role in the development of insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes. We investigated the dynamic changes and the underlying regulatory mechanism of postprandial FFA profile in hyperlipidemia (HLP) and their relation with insulin sensitivity in both humans and mice. We found that serum stearic acid (SA) is the only fatty acid that is increased dramatically in the postprandial state. The elevation of SA is due to increased insulin-stimulated de novo synthesis mediated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c)/acetyl-CoA carboxylase/fatty acid synthase/elongation of long-chain fatty acid family member 6 (ELOVL6) and the elongation of palmitic acid (PA) catalyzed by ELOVL6. Downregulation of SREBP-1c or ELOVL6 by small interfering RNA can reduce SA synthesis in liver and serum SA level, followed by amelioration of IR in HLP mice. However, inhibition of SREBP-1c is more effective in improving IR than suppression of ELOVL6, which resulted in accumulation of PA. In summary, increased postprandial SA is caused by the insulin-stimulated SREBP-1c pathway and elongation of PA in HLP. Reduction of postprandial SA is a good candidate for improving IR, and SREBP-1c is potentially a better target to prevent IR and diabetes by decreasing SA.

  11. A critical review on fungi mediated plant responses with special emphasis to Piriformospora indica on improved production and protection of crops.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohammad Wahid; Trivedi, Dipesh Kumar; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-09-01

    The beneficial fungi are potentially useful in agriculture sector to avail several services to crop plants such as water status, nutrient enrichment, stress tolerance, protection, weed control and bio-control. Natural agro-ecosystem relies on fungi because of it takes part in soil organic matter decomposition, nutrient acquisition, organic matter recycling, nutrient recycling, antagonism against plant pests, and crop management. The crucial role of fungi in normalizing the toxic effects of phenols, HCN and ROS by β-CAS, ACC demainase and antioxidant enzymes in plants is well documented. Fungi also play a part in various physiological processes such as water uptake, stomatal movement, mineral uptake, photosynthesis and biosynthesis of lignan, auxins and ethylene to improve growth and enhance plant fitness to cope heat, cold, salinity, drought and heavy metal stress. Here, we highlighted the ethylene- and cyclophilin A (CypA)-mediated response of Piriformospora indica for sustainable crop production under adverse environmental conditions.

  12. Korean Red Ginseng Saponin Fraction Downregulates Proinflammatory Mediators in LPS Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells and Protects Mice against Endotoxic Shock.

    PubMed

    Yayeh, Taddessee; Jung, Kun-Ho; Jeong, Hye Yoon; Park, Ji-Hoon; Song, Yong-Bum; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kang, Heun-Soo; Cho, Jae Youl; Oh, Jae-Wook; Kim, Sang-Keun; Rhee, Man Hee

    2012-07-01

    Korean red ginseng has shown therapeutic effects for a number of disease conditions. However, little is known about the antiinflammatory effect of Korean red ginseng saponin fraction (RGSF) in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, in this study, we showed that RGSF containing 20(S)-protopanaxadiol type saponins inhibited nitric oxide production and attenuated the release of tumor necrotic factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, granulocyte monocyte colony stimulating factor (GMCSF), and macrophage chemo-attractant protein-1 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, RGSF down-regulated the mRNA expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxyginase-2, IL-1β, TNF-α, GMCSF, and IL-6. Furthermore, RGSF reduced the level of TNF-α in the serum and protected mice against LPS mediated endotoxic shock. In conclusion, these results indicated that ginsenosides from RGSF and their metabolites could be potential sources of therapeutic agents against inflammation.

  13. Effects of thirty elements on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dermience, Michael; Lognay, Georges; Mathieu, Françoise; Goyens, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    The human skeleton, made of 206 bones, plays vital roles including supporting the body, protecting organs, enabling movement, and storing minerals. Bones are made of organic structures, intimately connected with an inorganic matrix produced by bone cells. Many elements are ubiquitous in our environment, and many impact bone metabolism. Most elements have antagonistic actions depending on concentration. Indeed, some elements are essential, others are deleterious, and many can be both. Several pathways mediate effects of element deficiencies or excesses on bone metabolism. This paper aims to identify all elements that impact bone health and explore the mechanisms by which they act. To date, this is the first time that the effects of thirty minerals on bone metabolism have been summarized. PMID:26302917

  14. Effects of thirty elements on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dermience, Michael; Lognay, Georges; Mathieu, Françoise; Goyens, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    The human skeleton, made of 206 bones, plays vital roles including supporting the body, protecting organs, enabling movement, and storing minerals. Bones are made of organic structures, intimately connected with an inorganic matrix produced by bone cells. Many elements are ubiquitous in our environment, and many impact bone metabolism. Most elements have antagonistic actions depending on concentration. Indeed, some elements are essential, others are deleterious, and many can be both. Several pathways mediate effects of element deficiencies or excesses on bone metabolism. This paper aims to identify all elements that impact bone health and explore the mechanisms by which they act. To date, this is the first time that the effects of thirty minerals on bone metabolism have been summarized.

  15. Wuzhi tablet (Schisandra Sphenanthera extract) protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation and regulation of NRF2-ARE and p53/p21 pathways.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaomei; Jiang, Yiming; Wang, Ying; Tan, Huasen; Zeng, Hang; Wang, Yongtao; Chen, Pan; Qu, Aijuan; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2014-12-01

    Schisandra sphenanthera is widely used as a tonic and restorative in many countries to enhance the function of liver and other organs. Wuzhi tablet (WZ) is a preparation of an ethanol extract of Schisandra sphenanthera. Our previous study demonstrated that WZ exerted a protective effect toward acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of this protection remain unclear. This study aimed to determine what molecular pathways contributed to the hepatoprotective effects of WZ against APAP toxicity. Administration of WZ 3 days before APAP treatment significantly attenuated APAP hepatotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner and reduced APAP-induced JNK activation. Treatment with WZ resulted in potent inhibition of CYP2E1, CYP3A11, and CYP1A2 activities and then caused significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine-reduced glutathione. The expression of NRF2 was increased after APAP and/or WZ treatment, whereas KEAP1 levels were decreased. The protein expression of NRF2 target genes including Gclc, Gclm, Ho-1, and Nqo1 was significantly increased by WZ treatment. Furthermore, APAP increased the levels of p53 and its downstream gene p21 to trigger cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, whereas WZ pretreatment could inhibit p53/p21 signaling to induce cell proliferation-associated proteins including cyclin D1, CDK4, PCNA, and ALR to promote hepatocyte proliferation. This study demonstrated that WZ prevented APAP-induced liver injury by inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated APAP bioactivation, activation of the NRF2-antioxidant response element pathway to induce detoxification and antioxidation, and regulation of the p53, p21, cyclin D1, CDK4, PCNA, and ALR to facilitate liver regeneration after APAP-induced liver injury.

  16. S-adenosyl-L-methionine protection of acetaminophen mediated oxidative stress and identification of hepatic 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, James Mike; Kuhlman, Christopher; Terneus, Marcus V.; Labenski, Matthew T.; Lamyaithong, Andre Benja; Ball, John G.; Lau, Serrine S.; Valentovic, Monica A.

    2014-12-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is protected by S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) treatment 1 hour (h) after APAP in C57/Bl6 mice. This study examined protein carbonylation as well as mitochondrial and cytosolic protein adduction by 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) using mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Additional studies investigated the leakage of mitochondrial proteins and 4-HNE adduction of these proteins. Male C57/Bl6 mice (n = 5/group) were divided into the following groups and treated as indicated: Veh (15 ml/kg water, ip), SAMe (1.25 mmol/kg, ip), APAP (250 mg/kg), and SAMe given 1 h after APAP (S + A). APAP toxicity was confirmed by an increase (p < 0.05) in plasma ALT (U/l) and liver weight/10 g body weight relative to the Veh, SAMe and S + A groups 4 h following APAP treatment. SAMe administered 1 h post-APAP partially corrected APAP hepatotoxicity as ALT and liver weight/10 g body weights were lower in the S + A group compared the APAP group. APAP induced leakage of the mitochondrial protein, carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS-1) into the cytosol and which was reduced in the S + A group. SAMe further reduced the extent of APAP mediated 4-HNE adduction of CPS-1. MS analysis of hepatic and mitochondrial subcellular fractions identified proteins from APAP treated mice. Site specific 4-HNE adducts were identified on mitochondrial proteins sarcosine dehydrogenase and carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS-1). In summary, APAP is associated with 4-HNE adduction of proteins as identified by MS analysis and that CPS-1 leakage was greater in APAP treated mice. SAMe reduced the extent of 4-HNE adduction of proteins as well as leakage of CPS-1. - Highlights: • Acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity protected by S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) • 4-Hydroxynonenal adducted to sarcosine dehydrogenase • 4-Hydroxynonenal adducted to carbamoyl phosphate synthetase-1 • SAMe reduced APAP mediated CPS-1 mitochondrial leakage.

  17. One compound of saponins from Disocorea zingiberensis protected against experimental acute pancreatitis by preventing mitochondria-mediated necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Wen, Li; Shen, Yan; Shi, Na; Xing, Zhihua; Xia, Qing; Niu, Hai; Huang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a painful inflammatory disorder of the exocrine pancreas, ranking as the most common gastrointestinal reasons for hospitalization with no specific therapy currently. Diosgenyl saponins extracted from natural products and diosgenin or its derivatives have been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects in various diseases. However, the therapeutic effects of diosgenyl saponins from Dioscorea zingiberensis C. H. Wright in AP have not yet been determined. Five compounds were extracted and screened for taurocholate-induced necrosis in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Particularly, 26-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-3β, 22α, 26-trihydroxy-25(R)-furosta-5-en-3-O-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 4)]-β-d-glucopyranoside (compound 1) exhibited the best protective effects with no toxicity observed. Next, we showed compound 1 concentration-dependently inhibited necrotic cell death pathway activation and 2.5 mM compound 1 also prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, adenosine triphosphate production, and reactive oxygen species generation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Finally, we showed compound 1 protected against three clinically representative murine models of AP and significantly improved pancreatitis-associated acute lung injury. These data provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that one compound of diosgenyl saponins can be potential treatment for AP. This study suggests natural saponins may serve as fruitful sources for exploring/identifying potential therapies for inflammatory diseases. PMID:27779235

  18. Protective Effects of Soluble Collagen during Ultraviolet-A Crosslinking on Enzyme-Mediated Corneal Ectatic Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaokun; Huang, Yong; Jastaneiah, Sabah; Majumdar, Shoumyo; Kang, Jin U.; Yiu, Samuel C.; Stark, Walter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen crosslinking is a relatively new treatment for structural disorders of corneal ectasia, such as keratoconus. However, there is a lack of animal models of keratoconus, which has been an obstacle for carefully analyzing the mechanisms of crosslinking and evaluating new therapies. In this study, we treated rabbit eyes with collagenase and chondroitinase enzymes to generate ex vivo corneal ectatic models that simulate the structural disorder of keratoconus. The models were then used to evaluate the protective effect of soluble collagen in the UVA crosslinking system. After enzyme treatment, the eyes were exposed to riboflavin/UVA crosslinking with and without soluble type I collagen. Corneal morphology, collagen ultrastructure, and thermal stability were evaluated before and after crosslinking. Enzyme treatments resulted in corneal curvature changes, collagen ultrastructural damage, decreased swelling resistance and thermal stability, which are similar to what is observed in keratoconus eyes. UVA crosslinking restored swelling resistance and thermal stability, but ultrastructural damage were found in the crosslinked ectatic corneas. Adding soluble collagen during crosslinking provided ultrastructural protection and further enhanced the swelling resistance. Therefore, UVA crosslinking on the ectatic model mimicked typical clinical treatment for keratoconus, suggesting that this model replicates aspects of human keratoconus and could be used for investigating experimental therapies and treatments prior to translation. PMID:26325407

  19. Platelet protective efficacy of 3,4,5 trisubstituted isoxazole analogue by inhibiting ROS-mediated apoptosis and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, Swamy; Rajeev, Narasimhamurthy; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K; Sharath Kumar, Kothanahally S; Paul, Manoj; Hegde, Mahesh; Basappa; Sadashiva, Marilinganadoddi P; Girish, Kesturu S; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S

    2016-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a major hematological concern in oxidative stress-associated pathologies and chronic clinical disorders, where premature platelet destruction severely affects the normal functioning of thrombosis and hemostasis. In addition, frequent exposure of platelets to chemical entities and therapeutic drugs immensely contributes in the development of thrombocytopenia leading to huge platelet loss, which might be fatal sometimes. Till date, there are only few platelet protective molecules known to combat thrombocytopenia. Hence, small molecule therapeutics are extremely in need to relieve the burden on limited treatment strategies of thrombocytopenia. In this study, we have synthesized a series of novel 3,4,5 trisubstituted isoxazole derivatives, among which compound 4a [4-methoxy-N'-(5-methyl-3-phenylisoxazole-4-carbonyl) benzenesulfonohydrazide] was found to significantly ameliorate the oxidative stress-induced platelet apoptosis by restoring various apoptotic markers such as ROS content, cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, eIF2-α phosphorylation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, caspase activation, PS externalization, and cytotoxicity markers. Additionally, compound 4a dose dependently inhibits collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Hence, compound 4a can be considered as a prospective molecule in the treatment regime of platelet activation and apoptosis and other clinical conditions of thrombocytopenia. Further studies might ensure the use of compound 4a as a supplementary therapeutic agent to treat, thrombosis and CVD-associated complications. Over all, the study reveals a platelet protective efficacy of novel isoxazole derivative 4a with a potential to combat oxidative stress-induced platelet apoptosis.

  20. Protective effect of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury mediated by claudin-4 in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yueliang; Cai, Wenwei; Zhou, Shengang; Xu, Liming; Jiang, Chengxing

    2016-01-01

    Our study aims to investigate the effects of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) as well as the underlying mechanism. In our study, Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: control group; ALI group; ALI+MSCs group and ALI+MSCs claudin-4 siRNA group. MRC-5 and BEAS-2B cell lines were used for in vitro assay. Flow cytometry, western blot, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, CCK-8 assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were involved to measure the pathological changes in lung tissues. Results showed that in vivo MSCs administration significantly attenuated pulmonary edema (wet/dry ratio), inflammation cytokines levels (TGF-α), pathological alternations and cell apoptosis which were mediated by claudin-4 in LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats. In vitro experiment showed that hypoxia could induce the expression of claudin-4 in MSCs, and MSCs treatment showed significantly enhanced cell viability (by CCK-8 assay) and reduced cell apoptosis. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that BM-MSCs can protect against LPS-induced ALI in vivo and in vitro, at least partly mediated by claudin-4. PMID:27725857

  1. Tim-3 protects decidual stromal cells from toll-like receptor-mediated apoptosis and inflammatory reactions and promotes Th2 bias at the maternal-fetal interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, SongCun; Cao, ChunMei; Piao, HaiLan; Li, YanHong; Tao, Yu; Zhang, XiaoMing; Zhang, Di; Sun, Chan; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Yan; Yuan, MinMin; Li, DaJin; Du, MeiRong

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important in mediating immune responses against various pathogens during pregnancy. However, uncontrolled TLR-triggered inflammation will endanger normal pregnancy, resulting in pregnancy loss. Therefore, maintenance of a moderate inflammatory response is crucial for successful pregnancy under conditions of infection. Here, we demonstrated significantly lowered expression of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) in miscarried decidual stromal cells (DSCs), indicating that Tim-3 might play important roles in maintaining successful pregnancies. Activation of TLR signaling induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and apoptosis of DSCs, which was accompanied by up-regulated Tim-3 expression. Tim-3, in turn, protected DSCs from TLR-mediated apoptosis in an ERK1/2 pathway-dependent manner. In addition, Tim-3 inhibited TLR signaling-induced inflammatory cytokine production by DSCs through suppressing NF-κB activation. Tim-3 increased production of T helper 2 (Th2)-type cytokines by DSCs and reversed the inhibitory effect of LPS on Th2 cytokine generation by up-regulation of interferon regulatory factor 4 expression. Tim-3 blockade abolished the effect of Tim-3 on the inflammatory response to LPS stimulation. Thus, Tim-3 signaling could represent a "self-control" mechanism in TLR-triggered inflammation during pregnancy. These findings identify Tim-3 as a key regulator of DSCs and suggest its potential as a target for the treatment of spontaneous abortion.

  2. Pathways from childhood maltreatment to emerging adulthood: investigating trauma-mediated substance use and dating violence outcomes among child protective services-involved youth.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Breanne; Goldstein, Abby L; Wekerle, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal survey data were used to examine the relationship between two types of childhood maltreatment, abuse/neglect and exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV), and two outcomes, substance use and dating violence, within the past year. Participants were youth (N = 158, aged 16-19 at Time 3) involved with child protective services (CPS). A parallel multiple mediator model was used to test the hypothesis that trauma symptoms would mediate the relationship between both types of maltreatment and dating violence, marijuana, and alcohol use outcomes. Although both types of maltreatment were not directly associated with dating violence and substance use outcomes, the indirect effects of anxiety, anger, and dissociation on the relationship between maltreatment and substance use/dating violence were significant. Direct effects of both types of maltreatment on past year use of dating violence + alcohol use and dating violence + marijuana use were not significant, but results demonstrated a significant indirect effect for anger on the relationship between exposure to IPV and past year dating violence + marijuana use. No other indirect effects were significant. Findings highlight the negative effects of exposure to IPV and have implications for the development of prevention programming for youth transitioning out of CPS.

  3. Fisetin, a tetra hydroxy flavone recuperates antioxidant status and protects hepatocellular ultrastructure from hyperglycemia mediated oxidative stress in streptozotocin induced experimental diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Prasath, Gopalan Sriram; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai

    2013-09-01

    Oxidative stress is a biological entity quoted as accountable for several pathological conditions including diabetes mellitus. Chronic hyperglycemia in diabetes is associated with oxidative stress mediated tissue damage. The present study is aimed to explore the role of fisetin, in ameliorating hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative damage to liver in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. In addition to the levels of blood glucose, plasma insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, the extent of oxidative stress was assessed by hepatic lipid peroxides and hydroperoxides. The levels of reduced glutathione and the activities of enzymatic antioxidants were determined in the liver tissues. The activities of serum aminotransferases and alkaline phosphatase were assayed. A portion of liver was processed for histological and ultrastructural studies. Oral administration of fisetin (10 mg/kg b. w.) to diabetic rats decreased the levels of blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin and increased the plasma insulin level. A reduction in lipid peroxides and hydroperoxides were observed. The diminished activities of antioxidant enzymes and reduced glutathione in diabetic rats were improved upon fisetin administration. Thus, the results of the present study indicate that fisetin treatment protects the hepatocytes by improving the antioxidant competence in hepatic tissues of diabetic rats which is further evidenced from histological and ultra structural observations.

  4. Microbial sphingomyelinase induces RhoA-mediated reorganization of the apical brush border membrane and is protective against invasion.

    PubMed

    Saslowsky, David E; Thiagarajah, Jay R; McCormick, Beth A; Lee, Jean C; Lencer, Wayne I

    2016-04-01

    The apical brush border membrane (BBM) of intestinal epithelial cells forms a highly structured and dynamic environmental interface that serves to regulate cellular physiology and block invasion by intestinal microbes and their products. How the BBM dynamically responds to pathogenic and commensal bacterial signals can define intestinal homeostasis and immune function. We previously found that in model intestinal epithelium, the conversion of apical membrane sphingomyelin to ceramide by exogenous bacterial sphingomyelinase (SMase) protected against the endocytosis and toxicity of cholera toxin. Here we elucidate a mechanism of action by showing that SMase induces a dramatic, reversible, RhoA-dependent alteration of the apical cortical F-actin network. Accumulation of apical membrane ceramide is necessary and sufficient to induce the actin phenotype, and this coincides with altered membrane structure and augmented innate immune function as evidenced by resistance to invasion by Salmonella. PMID:26864627

  5. Microbial sphingomyelinase induces RhoA-mediated reorganization of the apical brush border membrane and is protective against invasion

    PubMed Central

    Saslowsky, David E.; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; McCormick, Beth A.; Lee, Jean C.; Lencer, Wayne I.

    2016-01-01

    The apical brush border membrane (BBM) of intestinal epithelial cells forms a highly structured and dynamic environmental interface that serves to regulate cellular physiology and block invasion by intestinal microbes and their products. How the BBM dynamically responds to pathogenic and commensal bacterial signals can define intestinal homeostasis and immune function. We previously found that in model intestinal epithelium, the conversion of apical membrane sphingomyelin to ceramide by exogenous bacterial sphingomyelinase (SMase) protected against the endocytosis and toxicity of cholera toxin. Here we elucidate a mechanism of action by showing that SMase induces a dramatic, reversible, RhoA-dependent alteration of the apical cortical F-actin network. Accumulation of apical membrane ceramide is necessary and sufficient to induce the actin phenotype, and this coincides with altered membrane structure and augmented innate immune function as evidenced by resistance to invasion by Salmonella. PMID:26864627

  6. DNA Vaccine that Targets Hemagglutinin to MHC Class II Molecules Rapidly Induces Antibody-Mediated Protection against Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Mjaaland, Siri; Roux, Kenneth H.; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik

    2013-01-01

    New influenza A viruses with pandemic potential periodically emerge due to viral genomic reassortment. In the face of pandemic threats, production of conventional egg-based vaccines is time consuming and of limited capacity. We have developed in this study a novel DNA vaccine in which viral hemagglutinin (HA) is bivalently targeted to MHC class II (MHC II) molecules on APCs. Following DNA vaccination, transfected cells secreted vaccine proteins that bound MHC II on APCs and initiated adaptive immune responses. A single DNA immunization induced within 8 d protective levels of strain-specific Abs and also cross-reactive T cells. During the Mexican flu pandemic, a targeted DNA vaccine (HA from A/California/07/2009) was generated within 3 wk after the HA sequences were published online. These results suggest that MHC II–targeted DNA vaccines could play a role in situations of pandemic threats. The vaccine principle should be extendable to other infectious diseases. PMID:23956431

  7. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC) Protect Islet Transplants via B7-H1 Mediated Enhancement of T Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hong-Shiue; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Charles, Ronald; Wang, Lianfu; Wagner, Timothy; Fung, John J.; Qian, Shiguang; L, Lina Lu

    2011-01-01

    Background Side effects of lifetime immunosuppression for cell transplants often outweigh the benefits, therefore, induction of transplant tolerance is needed. We have shown that cotransplantation with myeoid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) effectively protect islet allografts from rejection without requirement of immunosuppression. This study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Methods MDSC were generated by addition of hepatic stellate cells (HpSC) from various stain mice into dendritic cell (DC) culture. The quality of MDSC was monitored by phenotype and function analyses. MDSC mixed with islet allografts were transplanted into diabetic recipients. T cell response was analyzed following transplant by flow and histochemical analyses, and compared to islet alone and islet/DC transplant groups. B7-H1 knockout mice were used to determine the role of B7-H1 on MDSC in regulation of T cell response. Results Cotransplantation with MDSC (not DC) effectively protected islet allografts without requirement of immunosuppression. This is associated with attenuation of CD8 T cells in the grafts and marked expansion of T regulatory (Treg) cells, which contributed to MDSC-induced T cell hyporesponsiveness. Antigen-specific Treg cells were prone to accumulate in lymphoid organs close to the grafts. Both in vitro and in vivo data demonstrated that B7-H1 was absolutely required for MDSC to exert immune regulatory activity and induction of Treg cells. Conclusion The described approach holds great clinical application potential, and may overcome the limitation of requiring chronic administration of immunosuppression in cell transplants. Understanding the underlying mechanisms will facilitate the development of this novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:22179405

  8. Protective effect of DNA-mediated immunization with liposome-encapsulated GRA4 against infection of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Lu, Shao-Hong; Tong, Qun-Bo; Lou, Di; Shi, Dong-Yan; Jia, Bing-Bing; Huang, Guo-Ping; Wang, Jin-Fu

    2009-07-01

    The dense granule protein 4 (GRA4) is a granular protein from Toxoplasma gondii, and is a candidate for vaccination against this parasite. In this study, the plasmid pcDNA3.1-GRA4 (pGRA4), encoding for the GRA4 antigen, was incorporated by the dehydration-rehydration method into liposomes composed of 16 mmol/L egg phosphatidylcholine (PC), 8 mmol/L dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), and 4 mmol/L 1,2-diodeoyl-3-(trimethylammonium) propane (DOTAP). C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly three times with liposome-encapsulated pGRA4 to determine whether DNA immunization could elicit a protective immune response to T. gondii. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of sera from immunized mice showed that liposome-encapsulated pGRA4 generated high levels of IgG antibodies to GRA4. Production of primary interferon (IFN)-gamma and interleukin (IL)-2 in GRA4-stimulated splenocytes from vaccinated mice suggested a modulated Th1-type response. 72.7% of C57BL/6 mice immunized with liposome-encapsulated pGRA4 survived the challenge with 80 tissue cysts of ME49 strain, whereas C57BL/6 mice immunized with pGRA4 had only a survival rate of 54.5%. When immunized BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally challenged with 10(3) tachyzoites of the highly virulent RH strain, the survival time of mice immunized with liposome-encapsulated pGRA4 was markedly longer than that of other groups. Our observations show that liposome-encapsulated pGRA4 enhanced the protective effect against infection of T. gondii. PMID:19585669

  9. Inhibition of caspase-8 activity promotes protective Th1- and Th2-mediated immunity to Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Manfro, Wânia F; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L; Filardy, Alessandra Almeida; Vellozo, Natália S; Guillermo, Landi V C; Silva, Elisabeth M; Siegel, Richard M; Dosreis, George A; Lopes, Marcela F

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how apoptosis pathways mediated by death receptors and caspase-8 affect cytokine responses and immunity to Leishmania major parasites. Splenic CD4 T cells undergo activation-induced apoptosis, and blockade of FasL-Fas interaction increased IFN-γ and IL-4 cytokine responses to L. major antigens. To block death receptor-induced death, we used mice expressing a T cell-restricted transgene for vFLIP. Inhibition of caspase-8 activation in vFLIP mice enhanced Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses to L. major infection, even in the Th1-prone B6 background. We also observed increased NO production by splenocytes from vFLIP mice upon T cell activation. Despite an exacerbated Th2 response, vFLIP mice controlled better L. major infection, with reduced lesions and lower parasite loads compared with WT mice. Moreover, injection of anti-IL-4 mAb in infected vFLIP mice disrupted control of parasite infection. Therefore, blockade of caspase-8 activity in T cells improves immunity to L. major infection by promoting increased Th1 and Th2 responses.

  10. Inhibition of caspase-8 activity promotes protective Th1- and Th2-mediated immunity to Leishmania major infection

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Manfro, Wânia F.; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L.; Filardy, Alessandra Almeida; Vellozo, Natália S.; Guillermo, Landi V. C.; Silva, Elisabeth M.; Siegel, Richard M.; DosReis, George A.; Lopes, Marcela F.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how apoptosis pathways mediated by death receptors and caspase-8 affect cytokine responses and immunity to Leishmania major parasites. Splenic CD4 T cells undergo activation-induced apoptosis, and blockade of FasL-Fas interaction increased IFN-γ and IL-4 cytokine responses to L. major antigens. To block death receptor-induced death, we used mice expressing a T cell-restricted transgene for vFLIP. Inhibition of caspase-8 activation in vFLIP mice enhanced Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses to L. major infection, even in the Th1-prone B6 background. We also observed increased NO production by splenocytes from vFLIP mice upon T cell activation. Despite an exacerbated Th2 response, vFLIP mice controlled better L. major infection, with reduced lesions and lower parasite loads compared with WT mice. Moreover, injection of anti-IL-4 mAb in infected vFLIP mice disrupted control of parasite infection. Therefore, blockade of caspase-8 activity in T cells improves immunity to L. major infection by promoting increased Th1 and Th2 responses. PMID:24072877

  11. Chronic Calcium Channel Inhibitor Verapamil Antagonizes TNF-α-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction and Protects Against Inflammatory Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhan; Li, Zhong; Meng, Qingjuan; Zhang, Pei; Yan, Pengcheng; Zhang, Zhenbiao; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Jingrui; Zhai, Yujia; Liu, Yaoge; Wang, Xiaokai; Li, Weiwei; Zhao, Yunpeng

    2016-10-01

    It is well established that the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays a dominant role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Calcium channel is recently reported to be closely associated with various inflammatory diseases. However, whether chronic calcium channel blocker verapamil plays a role in RA still remains unknown. To investigate the role of verapamil in antagonizing TNF-α-mediated inflammation reaction and the underlying mechanisms, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) cells were cultured with stimulation of TNF-α, in the presence or absence of verapamil. Inflammation-associated cytokines, including IL-1, IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS-2), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), were assessed, and verapamil suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice models were established, and arthritis progression was evaluated by clinical and histological signs of arthritis. Treatment of verapamil attenuated inflammation as well as joint destruction in arthritis models. In addition, activity of NF-kB signaling pathway was determined both in vitro and in mice arthritis models, and verapamil inhibited TNF-α-induced activation of NF-kB signaling both in vitro and in mice models. Collectively, chronic calcium channel blocker verapamil may shed light on treatment of inflammatory arthritis and provide a potential therapeutic instrument for RA in the future. PMID:27438468

  12. Mutant versions of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) can protect HIF1α from SART1-mediated degradation in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez-Navadijo, Á; Fuertes-Yebra, E; Acosta-Iborra, B; Balsa, E; Elorza, A; Aragonés, J; Landazuri, M O

    2016-02-01

    Inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor drives the development of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) through hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Although ccRCC cells exhibit constitutive normoxic HIF signaling, the potential role of hypoxia in this setting is not fully understood. We show here that the ccRCC cell lines RCC4 and RCC10, which express mutant